Officials: 33-year-old woman died in car vs. train accident

MONDAY
January 19, 2015
129th Year, No. 204
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
Independent and locally
owned since 1887
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
75 Cents
Press
THE SHERIDAN
ON THE WEB: www.thesheridanpress.com
PHOTOS, VIDEO AND BREAKING
NEWS UPDATES
Lady Generals top
Western Wyoming.
Sports, B1
Officials: 33-year-old woman died in car vs. train accident
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Local law enforcement said Monday
morning that witnesses reported the woman who died
Friday in a collision with a train in Sheridan County had
pulled in front of the train.
Kevin Sessions with the Sheridan County Coroner’s
office confirmed that Michelle Clemens, 33, of Sheridan
was killed when her car was hit by two Burlington
Northern Santa Fe locomotives just north of Sheridan.
Sessions said Clemens died of blunt force trauma, but that
the manner of death has not yet been determined.
Matt Jones, the BNSF director of public affairs for
Wyoming and Montana said the locomotives had been
returning to Sheridan from the area of Parkman Hill
where they had been assisting a train up the hill. He said
the locomotives collided with the vehicle near Kleenburn
Road, causing minimal damage to the locomotives, but
killing Clemens.
Sheridan County Sheriff ’s Office officials said that
Clemens was sitting at the crossing and drove into the
tracks when the locomotives approached. Toxicology
results are pending. Clemens had been arrested Jan. 11 for
driving under the influence.
Clemens was the only person in the car at the time of
the crash.
The investigation into the crash is ongoing.
Is your
New Year’s
resolution
fading?
Press earns
11 awards
at state
convention
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Wellness festival
organizers seek to
keep you motivated
BY HANNAH SHEELY
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Remember
that New Year’s resolution
you made 19 days ago? That
one about living a more hearthealthy lifestyle for your kids,
eating better or taking more
time to recharge emotionally?
While the temptations to
ease up — or even give up —
may be setting in about now,
don’t.
When the couch looks more
inviting than a nature walk
with your kids, say this to
yourself: Go with the Goat!
Achieve your Peak!
When that second helping of
dessert is calling your name,
repeat the mantra: Go with
the Goat! Achieve your Peak!
Don’t know what it means
to, “Go with the Goat”? Keep
reading.
SEE FESTIVAL, PAGE 6
Woolsey Wellness
Festival
— The keynote address with Tony
Horton is at 7 p.m. Friday at the Early
Auditorium. Tickets are $20.
— The community workout with
Horton is from 9-10 a.m. Saturday at
the Sheridan College Golden Dome. It
is free and open to all.
— Wellness workshops, booths
and activities will be held from
10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Whitney
Atrium in the Edward A. Whitney
Academic Center at Sheridan College.
Sessions will include: Diet and nutrition with Kentz Willis of the University
of Wyoming Extension Office at 10:30
a.m.; music therapy with Michele
Folster of Western Skies Music Therapy
at 11:30 a.m.; Mindfulness with Dr.
Khahn Tran of Piedmont Psychological
Practice at 12:30 p.m.; and beginning
birders with Dr. Julie Rieder of Science
Kids at 1:30 p.m.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
People mingle in the halls and on the stairs of the Wyoming Capitol building Friday. Legislators are expected to tackle the issue of Medicaid expansion this week.
Legislative committee takes up Medicaid expansion
CHEYENNE (AP) — The
Wyoming Legislature this week
will start what promise to be
contentious hearings about
whether to expand the federal
Medicaid program in the state.
Meanwhile, the Legislature’s
Joint Appropriations Committee
this week will continue budget
meetings as lawmakers work to
review new revenue figures that
predict a decline in the face of
sagging energy markets.
The Senate Labor, Health and
Social Services Committee has
set a hearing for Monday morning to listen to comments from
the public about the Medicaid
expansion issue. The committee
Scan with your
smartphone for
latest weather,
news and sports
is not set to vote on the bill.
Pressure is mounting in
Wyoming to accept federal
money to expand Medicaid. The
expansion, aimed at offering
health insurance to an estimated
17,600 adults who make up to 138
percent of the federal poverty
level, is a critical element of the
federal Affordable Care Act. It’s
also an element Wyoming has
resisted for years.
Wyoming Health Department
Director Tom Forslund has said
expanding the Medicaid program would save the state money
by getting people off other programs. The state’s Medicaid program would likely need an infu-
sion of nearly $80 million in
state general funds in coming
years without the expansion,
while expanding the program
promises the state nearly $50
million in savings, Forslund
said.
Gov. Matt Mead, a Republican
elected last fall to his second
term, had joined other states
early in his first term in an ultimately unsuccessful federal legal
challenge to the Affordable Care
Act. Over the last year, however,
Mead increasingly has come
around to the idea of expanding
Medicaid.
The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
307.672.2431
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
SEE EXPANSION, PAGE 2
Today’s edition is published for:
Marisa Root
of Sheridan
CHEYENNE — The Sheridan
Press staff earned 10 awards at
the Wyoming Press Association
convention held over the weekend in Cheyenne.
The awards covered advertising, design, editorial content and
the company’s Destination
Sheridan magazines.
In editorial content categories,
Sheridan Press education and
features reporter Alisa Brantz
earned a first-place award in specialty or beat reporting for a
three-part series on
suicide. Government
and outdoors
reporter Hannah
Sheely earned a second-place award in
news-feature writing
for an article on the
anniversary of the
Brantz
Cloud Peak
Wilderness.
The entire editorial
staff earned a second-place award in
the special sections
category for the indepth project completed in 2013 on the
Affordable Care Act. Sheely
The Destination
Sheridan magazines earned the
Press staff a first-place award for
plus business advertising idea and a page
layout featuring the
floor plan and photos
of the new Sheridan
College Thorne-Rider
Campus Center
Cates
earned the Press
team a first-place
award for use of graphic elements.
In advertising,
designer Nicole
Scofield earned a second-place award for
use of color in an
Easter ad, an honorable mention for a
small ad featuring
Scofield
McDonald’s and an
honorable mention
for a merchandise ad featuring
Farmers COOP.
Press graphic
designer Jon Cates
earned a first-place
award for an ad featuring WyoVision and
a second-place award
for best-designed ad,
Sheely
which featured
Wyoming Audiology.
Photographer Justin Sheely
also took home an honorable
mention in the portraits category.
PEOPLE
PAGE SIX
ALMANAC
3 SPORTS
4 COMICS
5 CLASSIFIEDS
B1
B4
B5
A2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
EXPANSION: Also examining CREG report
FROM 1
“The fact is, many of us don’t like the ACA, including me,” Mead said Wednesday in his state of the
state address. “But here’s another fact: Our federal
tax dollars pay for ACA. Wyoming federal tax dollars
help pay for the ACA. Do we choose to have that support, that Wyoming money, return to Colorado, to
California, or to Wyoming? I say Wyoming.”
The Wyoming Department of Health proposed an
expansion plan going into this legislative session
that didn’t include the health savings plan component.
The Wyoming Hospital Association also has been a
vocal proponent of expansion, saying hospitals subsidize hundreds of millions of dollars in uncompensated care each year — much of which could be covered by the federal program.
The Wyoming Business Alliance issued a position
paper this month concluding the state needs to support Medicaid expansion. “Ignoring the economic
reality and hardship of some 17,600 citizens does not
advantage Wyoming today, or for the future,” it stated.
The chief architect of Legislature’s repeated rejection of Medicaid expansion in the past few years has
been Sen. Charles Scott, R-Casper. He’s chairman of
the Senate Labor, Health and Social Services
Committee holding Monday’s hearing.
In December, Scott’s committee and its House
counterpart voted to amend the Medicaid expansion
bill drafted by Mead’s administration to insert the
Obama to
honor King
legacy
health savings account language. It’s still uncertain
whether federal officials would accept that requirement and still provide money for the program.
Rep. Elaine Harvey, R-Big Horn, chairman of the
House Labor, Health and Social Services Committee,
said Friday that she believes the savings account
proposal would make the program more similar to
how people pay for insurance on the open market.
“We’re trying to teach management of medical dollars,” she said.
Harvey also said she believes the committee bill
would have a better chance of getting through the
Legislature than the version proposed by the Health
Department. She said the committee still doesn’t
have estimates yet of how much it would cost to
administer the savings account program.
In other action, top lawmakers said they expect
legislators will take time this week to absorb new
revenue projections that were released on Friday.
The state’s Consensus Revenue Estimating Group on
Friday announced that it was reducing its general
revenue estimates for the current two-year fiscal
cycle by about $220 million as a result of falling energy prices. The state’s school system is in line for
additional losses.
Senate President Phil Nicholas, R-Laramie, and
House Speaker Kermit Brown, R-Laramie, said
Friday that lawmakers will call for a longer-term fiscal profile to assess where the state stands.
Nicholas said he expects the Legislature’s Joint
Appropriations Committee this week will finish its
hearings on the state’s supplemental budget.
WASHINGTON (AP) — President
Barack Obama is honoring the birth of
Martin Luther King Jr. by participating in a community service project.
The White House says the president
and his wife, Michelle, will help with a
project at the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Greater Washington.
The organization helps youngsters
develop the skills they need to become
responsible adults.
In a proclamation issued last week
Obama says the U.S. has made “undeniable progress” since King agitated for
justice and equality for all. But Obama
says securing the gains requires “constant vigilance, not complacency.” He
called on everyone to stand together for
good jobs, fair wages, safe neighborhoods and quality education.
MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 2015
WYOMING BRIEFS |
Wyoming seeks to
archive Vietnam
veterans experiences
CASPER (AP) — Vietnam
War veterans in Wyoming are
being asked to share their
story in a state-wide historical
documentation project.
The Wyoming Veterans
Commission says the project
will take recorded histories
from Wyoming’s veterans and
archive them at the Wyoming
Veterans Memorial Museum.
Museum director John Goss
says it is seeking stories from
all branches of service.
It wants to hear from men
and women, clerks, infantrymen, nurses, pilots, sailors,
inductees, enlistees, officers
and civilians who served in
Vietnam in another overseas
location or remained in the
United States.
The documentation will coincide with the state’s Vietnam
Veterans Reunion, which will
be held June 4-7 in Casper. A
similar project was also completed for Wyoming World War
II veterans in 2011.
Miyamoto new state
Ag Department
director
CHEYENNE (AP) — The
Wyoming Department of
Agriculture has a new director.
Gov. Matt Mead has appoint-
ed Doug Miyamoto to lead the
agency, starting March 15.
Miyamoto currently serves
as the director and chief executive officer of the Wyoming
Livestock Board.
He graduated from Rawlins
High School and attended the
University of Wyoming, earning a bachelor’s degree in
Rangeland Ecology and
Watershed Management. He
later earned a master’s degree
in Rangeland Ecology from
UW.
In 2011, Miyamoto was
appointed deputy director of
the Wyoming Department of
Agriculture.
Enzi to work on
comprehensive tax
reform
CHEYENNE (AP) — U.S.
Sen. Mike Enzi will co-chair a
working group focusing on
reforms to individual income
taxes.
The Wyoming Republican’s
group is one of five separate
groups formed by the Senate
Finance Committee to spur
comprehensive tax reform
efforts in the 114th Congress.
Officials say the groups will
analyze current tax law and
examine policy trade-offs and
available reform options within the group’s designated topic
areas.
Focus areas include: individual income tax, business
income tax and community
development and infrastructure.
Advocates say
death penalty
should be
abolished
CHEYENNE (AP) — In
most capital murder cases,
jurors in Wyoming prefer
life imprisonment instead of
imposing the death penalty,
a veteran Cheyenne defense
attorney said during a program advocating abolishment of the death penalty.
“We’ve had two people executed in the last 40 years in
Wyoming,” attorney David
Serelson said, despite many
cases where the state sought
the death penalty.
“There is not one person
in Wyoming on death row
right now,” Serelson said.
“We have evolved as a society. Our laws need to reflect
that.”
Serelson was one of four
panelists who spoke
Saturday about abolishing
the death penalty during a
program sponsored by the
Wyoming Association of
Churches and the Catholic
Diocese of Cheyenne.
The program called attention to the death penalty in
Wyoming and to House Bill
97, a new bill in the state
Legislature that aims to
abolish it.
The Wyoming Tribune
Eagle reports that the bill
proposes that the maximum
penalty for first-degree murder would be life in prison
or life in prison without
parole.
Gov. Matt Mead, a former
state and federal prosecutor,
has said he believes
Wyoming should keep the
death penalty.
In addition to Serelson,
other people on the panel
were Rick Martinez, deputy
director of Legal Aid of
Wyoming; Father Carl
Gallinger of St. Joseph’s
Catholic Church in
Cheyenne; and Aaron Lyttle,
a Cheyenne lawyer who
fought for the freedom of
Andrew Johnson, a man
wrongfully imprisoned for
23 years. Johnson recently
was exonerated as a result
of DNA testing.
Lyttle said he worries
about people who are convicted for crimes they did
not do.
“We know that people are
wrongfully convicted and
that it happens more than
traditionally assumed,” he
said.
PEOPLE
MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Senior Center to host yoga
Tickets now available for Civic Theatre Guild play
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan
Civic Theatre Guild will present
“Vanya and Sonia and Masha and
Spike” several times over the next
couple weeks at the Carriage
House Theater.
The show will be performed this
Friday through Sunday, Jan. 29Jan. 31 and Feb. 6-8.
Thursday, Friday and Saturday
shows will begin at 7:30 p.m., and
Sunday matinees will begin at 2
p.m.
In the production, Vanya and
his adopted sister Sonia live a
quiet life in the Pennsylvania
farmhouse where they grew up,
but their peace is disturbed when
their movie star sister Masha
returns unannounced with her
twenty-something boy toy, Spike.
A weekend of rivalry, regret and
raucousness begins.
FROM STAFF REPORTS
The play is rated PG.
Tickets are $15 for adults and
$12 for seniors, students and military. Tickets are available through
the WYO Theater box office,
wyotheater.com or at the Carriage
House Theater one hour before
curtain.
For additional information, call
672-8886.
The Carriage House Theater is
located at 410 Delphi Ave.
SHERIDAN — A gentle yoga
balance class will be offered
Wednesday from 10:30-11:30
a.m. at the Sheridan Senior
Center.
Cindy Baker will lead the
class set to begin and end with
mindful meditation and is
designed to increase strength,
balance, flexibility and to help
people be more conscious of
how they breathe.
Standing or sitting in chairs,
participants can adapt movements to their abilities.
The class is open to the public at the price of $1, which
serves as a donation to the
Sheridan Senior Center.
For additional information,
contact the center at 672-2240.
The Sheridan Senior Center
is located at 211 Smith St.
‘The Wild Bunch’
scheduled next for Classic
Western Film Series
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The next installment of the Classic
Western Film Series at the WYO Theater will feature
“The Wild Bunch.”
The series is hosted by the WYO Theater at 2 p.m.
each Sunday in January.
A local host will offer commentary on the movie.
Free popcorn will be available, as well as entries for
prize drawings.
Tickets cost $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and $6 for
students, and may be purchased online at
wyotheater.com or by calling the WYO Theater Box
Office.
The event is sponsored by Craig and Judy Johnson,
Sheridan Realty Associates, Best Out West and Open
Range Bar and Grill at the Sheridan Inn.
For additional information, contact the WYO Theater
at 672-9084.
The theater is located at 42 N. Main St.
Get your Press on the Web at
www.thesheridanpress.com
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Learning teatime etiquette
Jean Edmundson visits with other fellow fans during the second annual Downton Abbey Tea Party on
Wednesday evening at the Sheridan County Fulmer Public Library. The tea party was held in celebration of
the fifth season of the PBS Masterpiece show “Downton Abbey.” Judy Fuller and Tessa Dalton gave presentations on the history of tea and proper teatime etiquette.
(ISSN 1074-682X)
Published Daily except Sunday
and six legal holidays.
©COPYRIGHT 2014 by
SHERIDAN NEWSPAPERS, INC.
307-672-2431
144 Grinnell Ave.
P.O. Box 2006
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
Periodicals Postage Paid in
Sheridan, Wyoming.
Publication #0493-920
Sheridan’s ‘We the People’ team to
practice for state competition Wed.
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The 2015
“We the People” team from
Sheridan High School has
qualified for the state competition this year. The
group won state in 2014 and
went on to compete at the
national level.
This year’s state competition is set for Jan. 26 in
Laramie.
In order to prepare, the
team will conduct a dress
rehearsal from 5-8 p.m.
Wednesday in the district
court courtroom, located on
the second floor of the
Sheridan County
Courthouse.
The team will practice
answers to any questions
thrown their way about the
U.S. and Wyoming
Constitutions, their history
and the documents’ application to present-day situa-
Crews to clean up oil spilled
from eastern Montana pipeline
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Crews were working to clean
up crude oil that spilled in and near the Yellowstone River
in eastern Montana while Bridger Pipeline officials tried
to determine what caused the breach.
Bridger has said the break in the 12-inch steel pipe happened Saturday morning about 9 miles upstream from
Glendive. Bridger spokesman Bill Salvin said Monday that
the company is confident that no more than 1,200 barrels
— or 50,000 gallons — of oil spilled during the hour-long
breach. It is not clear how much oil is in the river. Some of
it is trapped under ice.
Salvin says oil has been seen in the river in spots 15 and
25 miles downstream from Glendive.
The Casper, Wyoming-based company is testing the water
for any contamination. The pipeline remains shut down.
tions.
For additional information, contact Tyson Emborg
at 672-2495 ext. 3228.
The Sheridan County
Courthouse is located at 224
S. Main St.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
1 Mo.
3 Mos.
6 Mos.
1 Yr.
City
Carrier
$12.75
$35.25
$67.50
$126.00
Motor
Route
$14.75
$41.25
$79.50
$150.00
ONLINE RATES
2 Mos.
4 Mos.
6 Mos.
1 Yr.
$15.00
$28.00
$39.00
$69.00
County
Mail
$16.25
$45.75
$88.50
$168.00
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to The Sheridan Press,
P.O. Box 2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
EXECUTIVE STAFF
Stephen Woody
Publisher
Kristen Czaban
Managing Editor
Phillip Ashley
Marketing Director
Becky Martini
Mark Blumenshine
A3
Office Manager
Production Manager
A4
PAGE SIX
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 2015
TODAY IN HISTORY |
10 things to
know today
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Your daily look at latebreaking news, upcoming
events and the stories that
will be talked about
Monday:
1. WHAT OBAMA PLANS TO
PITCH DURING STATE OF
UNION
The president will roll
out plans for tax hikes on
the wealthiest Americans
in his annual address
Tuesday.
2. WHO MARCHES IN
ALABAMA TO HONOR MLK
Actors from the biopic
‘Selma’ and hundreds of
others retrace the steps of
activists who braved tear
gas and police dogs in the
1965 fight for voting rights.
3. HOW MANY TURN OUT
FOR POPE’S FINAL DAY IN
PHILIPPINES
A record 6 million people
pour into Manila’s rainsoaked streets and its
biggest park for the pontiff ’s last Mass of his Asia
trip.
4. TOURISM IN FRANCE
DROPS FOLLOWING
TERROR ATTACK
Just over a week after a
deadly attack, fewer
tourists are seen at the
Eiffel tower and other
major sites.
5. POLICE FIND 2 TEEN
SUSPECTS IN SOUTHERN
CRIME SPREE
Two teenage sweethearts
suspected in a crime spree
are taken into custody in
Florida. One appears in
court Monday morning.
6. WHY N. KOREA
DEFECTOR IS BACK IN
SPOTLIGHT
Shin Dong-Hyuk, who
told the world about his
childhood in a North
Korean prison camp and
became the face of international efforts to hold the
country accountable for
human rights abuses, has
changed key parts of his
life story, his biographer
says.
7. FREEZING RAIN CAUSES
MAYHEM IN NORTHEAST
Icy highways lead to
wrecks in Pennsylvania,
Connecticut and New
Hampshire that kill at least
five people.
8. CLINTON ADVISERS
OFFER ECONOMIC
ROADMAP
As Hillary Rodham
Clinton weighs a 2016
White House run, her allies
prepare a plan to raise
wages for millions of workers and close the gap
between rich and poor.
9. WITH PLUNGING OIL
PRICES, ALASKA FACES
BUDGET CUTS
The drop in crude prices
leaves a shortfall in Alaska,
which relies heavily on oil
revenues.
10. IMPROBABLE OT WIN
SENDS SEAHAWKS TO
SUPER BOWL
The Seattle Seahawks
become the first defending
champions to make the
Super Bowl in 10 years,
stunning the Green Bay
Packers. The Seahawks will
play the AFC champion
New England Patriots, who
routed Indianapolis 45-7.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Prepping for ‘Mary Poppins’
From left, Sarah Campbell, director Marva Craft, Spencer Longhurst and Adam Berry practice a jog-step during a blocking and
choreography session for “Mary Poppins” on Wednesday at the Sheridan High School auditorium.
LOCAL BRIEF |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Republican Women seeking
applicants for scholarship
SHERIDAN — The Republican Women of
Sheridan County organization is now seeking applicants for its college scholarship program.
One $1,000 scholarship will be awarded to a registered female Republican in Sheridan County who is
planning to attend a junior college, college, univer-
sity or vocational trade school.
Those interested in applying can find additional
information at
www.sheridanrepublicanwomen.com/Scholarship_
Program.html.
Contact with a RWSC member must be made at
least one month before submitting an application.
Any questions concerning the process should be
directed to Jacque Harrod at [email protected]
or 673-0730.
The deadline to apply is April 1.
The recipient will be announced May 31.
TUESDAY EVENTS |
• 11 a.m., Health insurance enrollment presentation, Conference Room B, Sheridan Memorial Hospital,
1401 W. Fifth St.
• 1-3 p.m., Social Media 101 class, Sheridan Senior Center, 211 Smith St.
• 4 p.m., Opening reception for “Composite Practices,” Martinsen Gallery, Edward A. Whitney Academic
Center, Sheridan College, 3059 Coffeen Ave.
• 6 p.m., Health insurance enrollment presentation, Conference Room B, Sheridan Memorial Hospital,
1401 W. Fifth St.
• 7 p.m., Gala Concert — Wyoming All-State Music Conference, Sheridan High School gymnasium, 1056
Long Drive, $5 for adults, $4 for students
TIPPED OVER |
Tony Verna, inventor of instant TV
replay, dies at 81
PALM DESERT, Calif. (AP) — Tony Verna, a television director and producer who invented instant
replay for live sports games 51 years ago, has died.
He was 81.
Verna died Sunday at his Palm Desert home after
battling acute lymphoblastic leukemia, his daughter Tracy Soiseth said.
CBS used instant replay for the first time in the
Dec. 7, 1963 Army-Navy football game in
Philadelphia, after Verna developed a method to cue
the tape to pinpoint the play he wants to immediately air again. He said he was looking for a way to fill
those boring gaps between plays during a football
telecast.
The concept was so new that when Army quarterback Rollie Stichweh scored a touchdown, announcer Lindsey Nelson had to warn viewers: “This is not
live! Ladies and gentlemen, Army did not score
again!”
Instant replay quickly became a staple of sports
broadcasting, and Verna’s innovation gave fans a
new way to look at the game.
“Not many things you can do in life where you
can change the way things were happening before,”
Verna told the Associated Press in 2008.
Verna would go on to produce or direct five Super
Bowls, the Olympics, the Kentucky Derby and even
“Live Aid.”
His lasting legacy, though, is pulling back the curtain on sports and revealing what really goes on.
Verna is survived by his wife of 45 years, Carol,
daughters Tracy Soiseth and Jenny Axelrod, son
Eric Verna and three grandchildren.
Peter Wallenberg, patriarch of
Swedish business empire, dies
STOCKHOLM (AP) — Peter Wallenberg, the former head of a Swedish financial dynasty sometimes
compared to the Rockefellers, has died. He was 88.
Wallenberg died Monday at his home on the
island of Varmdo, outside Stockholm, the family
foundation said in a statement. The cause of death
wasn’t released.
From 1982 to 1997 Wallenberg was chairman of
Investor AB, the holding company through which
the family controls large stakes in major Swedish
companies. He also served on the board of wireless
equipment maker Ericsson, appliance maker
Electrolux, engineering firm Atlas Copco and other
Swedish companies.
Internationally, the Wallenberg family’s best
known member is World War II hero Raoul
Wallenberg, who is credited for saving at least
20,000 Jews while serving as a Swedish diplomat in
Nazi-occupied Hungary. But the family has been a
prominent force in the Swedish business world
since the 19th century, when Peter’s great grandfather founded what is today called the SEB bank.
Peter Wallenberg was born in Stockholm in 1926
to Marcus Wallenberg and his Scottish wife
Dorothy. As a child, he attended boarding school in
Sweden and spent the summers, alongside older
brother Marc and sister Ann-Marie, with his mother’s family in Britain.
He has often described his childhood, under a
strict and domineering father, as a tough period in
his life.
“I was cheeky compared with my brother,”
Wallenberg said in a 2006 interview with daily
Dagens Industri. “My father didn’t like that.”
He wasn’t groomed to become the family patriarch, but stepped into the role of heir after Marc
committed suicide in 1971. When their father died
in 1982, Peter took over as chairman of Investor. His
eldest son Jacob is now chairman.
In 1993, Peter Wallenberg was the target of a
foiled kidnapping plot as police arrested four wouldbe abductors outside the gates of his estate on
Varmdo.
Wallenberg married and divorced three times. He
is survived by his two sons, Jacob and Peter Jr., and
daughter Andrea. Funeral arrangements weren’t
immediately announced.
Today’s Highlight in
History:
On Jan. 19, 1915,
Germany carried out its
first air raid on Britain
during World War I as a
pair of Zeppelins dropped
bombs onto Great
Yarmouth and King’s Lynn
in England.
On this date:
In 1807, Confederate
Gen. Robert E. Lee was
born in Westmoreland
County, Virginia.
In 1853, Giuseppe Verdi’s
opera “Il Trovatore” premiered in Rome.
In 1861, Georgia became
the fifth state to secede
from the Union.
In 1937, millionaire
Howard Hughes set a
transcontinental air record
by flying his monoplane
from Los Angeles to
Newark, New Jersey, in 7
hours, 28 minutes and 25
seconds.
In 1942, during World
War II, Japan invaded
Burma (Myanmar).
In 1944, the federal government relinquished control of the nation’s railroads to their owners following settlement of a
wage dispute.
In 1955, a presidential
news conference was filmed
for television and newsreels
for the first time, with the
permission of President
Dwight D. Eisenhower.
In 1966, Indira Gandhi
was elected prime minister
of India.
In 1970, President
Richard M. Nixon nominated G. Harrold Carswell to
the Supreme Court; however, the nomination was
defeated because of controversy over Carswell’s past
racial views.
In 1977, in one of his last
acts of office, President
Gerald R. Ford pardoned
Iva Toguri D’Aquino, an
American convicted of
treason for making
wartime broadcasts for
Japan.
In 1981, the United States
and Iran signed an accord
paving the way for the
release of 52 Americans
held hostage for more than
14 months.
In 1992, German government and Jewish officials
dedicated a Holocaust
memorial at the villa on the
outskirts of Berlin where
the notorious Wannsee
Conference had taken place.
Ten years ago:
Previewing his second
inauguration, President
George W. Bush pledged to
seek unity in a nation
divided by political differences, saying, “I am eager
and ready for the work
ahead.” Condoleezza Rice
won strong but not unanimous endorsement as secretary of state from the
Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, which voted 162 to recommend her confirmation. The American
Cancer Society reported
that cancer had passed
heart disease as the top
killer of Americans age 85
and younger.
Five years ago: In a
major upset, Republican
Scott Brown captured the
U.S. Senate seat held by liberal champion Edward
Kennedy for nearly half a
century as he defeated
Democrat Martha Coakley
in a special election.
One year ago: An
Islamic militant group in
Russia’s North Caucasus
claimed responsibility for
recent twin bombings in
the southern city of
Volgograd and posted a
video threatening to strike
at the 2014 Winter Olympics
in Sochi.
Thought for Today:
“Life is a foreign language;
all men mispronounce it.”
— Christopher Darlington
Morley, American journalist (1890-1957).
ALMANAC
MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A5
REPORTS |
SHERIDAN
FIRE- RESCUE
Friday
• Rocky Mountain
Ambulance assist, 400
block North Jefferson
Street, 10:11 a.m.
• RMA assist, 2300 block
Shirley Cove, 1 p.m.
• RMA assist, 2300 block
North Main Street, 4:50
p.m.
Saturday
• Activated fire alarm,
3000 block Coffeen Avenue,
3:23 p.m.
• RMA assist, 1100 block
North Sheridan Avenue,
3:59 p.m.
Sunday
• Activated fire alarm,
400 block North Jefferson
Street, 11:03 p.m.
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
AMBULANCE
Friday
• Medical, 400 block
North Jefferson Street,
10:10 a.m.
• Medical, 2300 block
Shirley Cove, 12:55 p.m.
• Trauma, intersection of
Third and Gould streets,
2:36 p.m.
• Medical, 2300 block
North Main Street, 4:49
p.m.
• Trauma, Highway 345,
5:08 p.m.
• Medical, 900 block West
Brundage Lane, 8:37 p.m.
Saturday
• Medical, 1800 block Big
Horn Avenue, 6:40 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block
West Fifth Street, 8:54 a.m.
• Trauma, 1700 block
Park Side Court, 9:19 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block
West Fifth Street, 10:55
a.m.
• Trauma, 1000 block Big
Goose Road, 11:56 a.m.
• Trauma, 900 block East
Fifth Avenue, 11:59 a.m.
• Medical, 1800 block
Holloway Avenue, 1:15 p.m.
• Trauma, 100 block
South Connor Street, 1:56
p.m.
• Trauma, 1000 block
South Sheridan Avenue,
3:57 p.m.
• Medical, 2000 block
South Sheridan Avenue,
8:36 p.m.
• Trauma, 1800 block Big
Horn Avenue, 8:53 p.m.
• Trauma, Interstate 90,
11:58 p.m.
Sunday
• Medical, 1500 block
Sugarland Drive, 12:16 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block
West Fifth Street, 2:47 a.m.
• Trauma, 600 block
North Main Street, 4:15
a.m.
• Medical, 100 block West
13th Street, 1:13 p.m.
• Medical, 400 block
Second Avenue, 5:16 p.m.
SHERIDAN
MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL
Friday
• Admissions — Kati M.
Mitchell, Ranchester;
Clayton William Mitchell,
Ranchester
• Dismissals — Mary J.
White, Buffalo; Joe D.
Harrod, Sheridan
Saturday
• No admissions reported.
• Dismissals — Sharon C.
Foster, Sheridan; Kati M.
Mitchell, Ranchester;
Clayton William Mitchell,
Ranchester
Sunday
• No admissions or dismissals reported.
SHERIDAN POLICE
DEPARTMENT
Information in the police
reports is taken from the
SPD website.
Friday
• Welfare check, North
Main Street, 9:19 a.m.
• Careless driver, Coffeen
Avenue, 10:47 a.m.
• Accident, North Main
Street, 11:36 a.m.
• Reckless driver, West
Fifth Street, 12:21 p.m.
• Drug activity, Lewis
Street, 12:54 p.m.
• Suspicious circumstance, West 11th Street,
2:09 p.m.
• Snow removal, Warren
Avenue, 2:46 p.m.
• Threats (cold),
Cheyenne Street, 3:45 p.m.
• Dog at large, Frackleton
Street, 3:54 p.m.
• Hit and run, East Third
Street, 4:20 p.m.
• Trespass (cold),
Mydland Road, 5:35 p.m.
• Animal injured, Lewis
Street, 7:01 p.m.
• Warrant service, North
Main Street, 8:56 p.m.
• Barking dog, East
Seventh Street, 9:28 p.m.
• Harassment, Marion
Street, 10:01 p.m.
• Accident, East Seventh
Street, 10:16 p.m.
• Suspicious circumstance, Coffeen Avenue,
10:59 p.m.
Saturday
• Bar check, North Main
Street, 12:29 a.m.
• Bar check, North Main
Street, 12:30 a.m.
• Bar check, North Main
Street, 12:34 a.m.
• DUI, East 13th Street,
12:58 a.m.
• DUI, 12th Street, 2:07
a.m.
• DUI, North Main Street,
2:15 a.m.
• Found property, North
Main Street, 4:14 a.m.
• Warrant service, South
Sheridan Avenue, 9:04 a.m.
• Dog at large, Val Vista
Street, 10:23 a.m.
• Illegal parking, Fourth
Street, 10:25 a.m.
• Hit and run, South
Sheridan Avenue, 10:28
a.m.
• Warrant service, Avoca
Avenue, 11:11 a.m.
• Alarm, Sugarland
Drive, 11:16 a.m.
• Warrant service, Fourth
Avenue East, 2:59 p.m.
• Suicidal subject, North
Sheridan Avenue, 3:54 p.m.
• Dog bite, West Fifth
Street, 4:05 p.m.
• Drug activity, Coffeen
Avenue, 4:07 p.m.
• Malicious destruction,
Mydland Road, 4:55 p.m.
• Warrant service, West
TUESDAY
SHERIDAN COUNTY
SHERIFF’S OFFICE
Friday-Sunday
• No reports available at
press time due to the holiday.
ARRESTS
Names of individuals
arrested for domestic violence or sexual assault will
not be released until those
individuals have appeared
in court.
Friday-Sunday
• No reports available at
press time due to the holiday.
23
THURSDAY
WEDNESDAY
Cloudy with
snow showers
Partly sunny
33
28
10
Almanac
Temperature
High/low .........................................................50/23
Normal high/low ............................................36/12
Record high .............................................56 in 2013
Record low ............................................. -30 in 1963
Precipitation (in inches)
Sunday............................................................ 0.00"
Month to date................................................. 0.42"
Normal month to date .................................... 0.31"
Year to date .................................................... 0.42"
Normal year to date ....................................... 0.31"
Mostly sunny
and not as cold
10
39
20
38
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
2p
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
Olive “Luoma” Stout
Here are the
results of
Saturday’s
Powerball
lottery drawing:
Winning numbers:
15-16-23-27-36;
Powerball 9
Powerplay 2X
Estimated jackpot:
$208,000,000
The Sun
Rise
Set
Today
Tuesday
Wednesday
7:40 a.m.
7:39 a.m.
7:38 a.m.
4:58 p.m.
4:59 p.m.
5:01 p.m.
The Moon
Rise
Set
Today
Tuesday
Wednesday
6:32 a.m.
7:21 a.m.
8:05 a.m.
4:32 p.m.
5:44 p.m.
6:59 p.m.
New
First
Full
Cody
21/30
Shown is Tuesday's weather.
Temperatures are tonight's lows
and Tuesday's highs.
Jan 26
Feb 3
SHERIDAN
23/33
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2015
Gillette
21/34
Wright
19/31
Kaycee
19/32
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
38/30/s
30/22/s
43/26/s
34/19/s
32/15/s
38/28/pc
36/17/s
16/3/s
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Tue.
Hi/Lo/W
27/11/pc
32/15/sf
28/14/pc
27/9/pc
30/15/pc
37/13/pc
29/14/sf
22/-11/c
Charter the
Sheridan Trolley!
Regional Cities
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
31/22/pc
26/12/s
30/17/s
25/9/s
28/9/s
31/19/s
29/10/s
12/-10/s
Shown are
Tuesday's noon
positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
Buffalo
20/31
Worland
9/24
Tue.
Hi/Lo/W
36/15/sf
31/7/sf
35/16/pc
30/8/pc
30/13/pc
34/18/sf
33/13/pc
23/-8/c
Jason J. Gausvik, 32, of Sheridan, passed away on Friday,
January 16, 2015, at the Sheridan Memorial Hospital.
Services are pending at this time.
Online condolences may
be
written
at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
Clearmont
23/33
Story
20/29
Last
Feb 11
Jason J. Gausvik
Ranchester
23/32
Thermopolis
17/30
Jan 20
Michelle Ann Clemens, 33, of Sheridan, passed away on
Friday, January 16, 2015, at the Sheridan Memorial Hospital.
Online condolences may
be
written
at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
National Weather for Tuesday, January 20
Big Horn
12/26
Basin
12/26
Michelle Ann Clemens
Smoothies
Hardin
20/33
Parkman
22/31
Dayton
22/32
Lovell
15/28
Olive “Luoma” Stout, 97, of Sheridan, passed away on
Saturday, January 17, 2015, at the Green House Living of
Sheridan.
Online condolences may
be
written
at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
Broadus
23/35
21
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
DEATH NOTICES |
Partly sunny
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
24 hours through noon Sunday ...................... 0.00"
Majority Floor Leader Rep. Rosie Berger, R-Sheridan, attends the 63rd Wyoming Legislature's general session in the House Chamber at the Wyoming State Capitol in Cheyenne on Friday morning.
FRIDAY
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through Sunday
Jotting down notes
JAIL
Today
• No report available at
press time due to the holiday.
Billings
24/36
Considerable
clouds and
breezy
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Regional Weather
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
TONIGHT
Fifth Street, 4:02 p.m.
• Dog bite, West Burkitt
Street, 5:14 p.m.
• Illegal parking, North
Main Street, 5:18 p.m.
• DUI, North Main Street,
5:37 p.m.
• Drugs (other), East
Fifth Street, 5:41 p.m.
• DUI, North Main Street,
6:03 p.m.
• Shoplifting, North Main
Street, 8:12 p.m.
• Barking dog, Papago
Drive, 9:05 p.m.
• Motorist assist, North
Sheridan Avenue, 9:22 p.m.
• Bar check, North Main
Street, 10:47 p.m.
• Bar check, North Main
Street, 11:06 p.m.
• Suspicious vehicle,
West 14th Street, 11:47 p.m.
• Wyoming Highway
Patrol assist, Interstate 90,
11:52 p.m.
Sunday
• Bar check, Sugarland
Drive, 12:41 a.m.
• DUI, South Sheridan
Avenue, 2:24 a.m.
• Agency assist, North
Main Street, 4:02 a.m.
• Warrant service, North
Main Street, 4:24 p.m.
• Dog at large, Yellowtail
Drive, 7:48 a.m.
• Burglar alarm, West
Loucks Street, 9:15 a.m.
• Abandoned vehicle,
Victoria Street, 10:44 a.m.
• Driving under suspension, East Brundage Lane,
11:30 a.m.
• Abandoned vehicle,
Exeter Avenue, 1:19 p.m.
• Snow removal, West
Ninth Street, 1:43 p.m.
• Snow removal, Burton
Street, 2:28 p.m.
• Driving under suspension, North Sheridan
Avenue, 2:45 p.m.
• Careless driver, Coffeen
Avenue, 2:56 p.m.
• DUI, East Third Street,
4:14 p.m.
• Hit and run, Coffeen
Avenue, 5:07 p.m.
• Suicidal subject, North
Main Street, 5:25 p.m.
• Suspicious person,
North Main Street, 5:35
p.m.
• Traffic complaint,
North Main Street, 8:11
p.m.
• Harassment, Ridgeway
Avenue, 8:44 p.m.
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
23/3/pc
28/11/s
23/9/s
22/6/s
27/14/s
32/9/s
26/14/s
16/-7/s
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
31/16/s
39/24/pc
28/18/s
26/14/s
33/22/s
39/21/s
40/27/pc
22/0/s
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Add a touch of nostalgia to your event!
Just $110 an hour (2 hour minimum) gets you and
30 of your friends and family to your destination.
Call 672-2485 to reserve your trolley today!
A6
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 2015
WDE clarifies rules regarding
epinephrine pens in schools
BY ALISA BRANTZ
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Though some local
school districts have reported that new
legislation requires all Wyoming schools
to carry Stock Epinephrine AutoInjectors — commonly called EpiPens
after one brand of the auto-injector on
the market — Wyoming Department of
Education officials say that is a misconception of the bill.
Clarification of the new guidelines for
use of stock epinephrine as defined in
statute was provided by the WDE in
December stating that a district school
board may elect to adopt and implement
a policy where it would acquire, maintain and dispense the medication, but the
action is optional.
Stock Epinephrine is injectable medications used for the treatment of previously undiagnosed severe life-threatening allergies that schools and districts
buy and keep on-site for emergency use.
EpiPens treat anaphylaxis, which is a
rare but serious form of allergy that usually develops suddenly and requires
rapid management to prevent shock and
possible fatality. Auto-Injectors contain a
single dose of epinephrine, which are
injected into the outer thigh.
Opponents of having the treatment
administered by a school official often
site the side effects and potential risk of
misuse as concerns.
The Food Allergy Research and
Education organization works as advocates for the use of stock epinephrine in
schools.
According to FARE, every state in the
country with the exception of New
Hampshire has school epinephrine legislation, with only two states’ guidelines
still pending.
Several states require schools to stock
epinephrine, including Nebraska.
In Wyoming, the guidelines are specifically for previously undiagnosed conditions as parents have the obligation to
provide epinephrine for a child who has
been diagnosed with a condition requiring the need.
Under the statute, a district board can
obtain the stock epinephrine without
prescriptions, granted they adhere to
specific conditions.
Each participating district must implement and maintain a plan for the management of students with life-threatening allergies.
The plan, which must be in place
before the epinephrine is made available
to students, must be available on the district’s website or other practicable
means as determined by the school
board.
Personnel identified as responsible for
the management and administration of
the epinephrine must undergo training.
Under the guidelines, a district decision covers all schools in the district, and
each school must maintain a list of
employees who have been assigned and
trained to administer the auto-injector.
Schools must also keep a record of
each incident that involves a life-threatening allergy or the administration of
epinephrine.
The guidelines were developed in consultation with the Department of Health
and a steering committee comprised of
nursing experts, educators, advisors and
input from various school nurses
statewide.
Schools and school personnel trained
to administer stock epinephrine autoinjectors will not be held liable for damages or injuries resulting from the
administration, overseeing or allowing
self-administration or a failure to administer the auto-injector.
Get your Press on the Web at
www.thesheridanpress.com
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
One, two, step
Pruden Koltiska holds Tyra Relaford as they practice a lift during a blocking and choreography session for
“Mary Poppins” on Wednesday at the Sheridan High School auditorium.
FESTIVAL: Will be held at the WYO, SC
Films featured in the Woolsey Film Festival
The Woolsey Film Festival will be at 7 p.m. Saturday at the
WYO Theater. Tickets are $10, available at the WYO Theater
box office, Java Moon or online at wellnesscouncilsc.org.
Selections include:
• “Fungiphilia Rising” by Bozeman, Montana, filmmaker
Madison McClintock, a film that sets out to beat down the
stigma surrounding fungi and educate about how fungus
can be used.
• “Red wine, Alcohol and Nutrition” by Sheridan filmmaker
Georgia Boley, a film that explores the health effects of red
wine.
• “Miami, NM” by Cheyenne filmmaker Cole Smith, a western film about a ranch family struggling to maintain its
rural lifestyle.
• “Land of No Use” by Bozeman, Montana, filmmaker Henry
Worobec, a film about what makes wilderness areas special.
• “Absaroka, Sins” by California filmmaker Patrick Mignano,
a western film shot in Wyoming with a strong mental
health message at the end.
Saturday. That’s right, Sheridanites can get
pumped with the man who has been helpGo with the Goat is the slogan for the
ing people get ripped as a renowned fitness
upcoming Woolsey Wellness and Film
trainer for more than 25 years.
Festival hosted by the Wellness Council of
Organizers also added a film festival to
Sheridan County. It is a cheer to keep purthe weekend lineup, hoping that the
suing your peak physical, emotional, social, Woolsey Wellness and Film Festival will
spiritual, financial, intellectual, environbecome an annual event that will bring in
mental and occupational wellness.
people from around the region for educaGo with the goat. Reach your goal —
tion, inspiration and all-out fun.
again and again as you figure out how to
The festival is being sponsored by the
maintain an all-around healthy lifestyle for Wyoming Film Office and will serve as a
the long term at the Woolsey Wellness and
kick off to the commission’s upcoming film
Film Festival on Friday and Saturday.
festival in the spring. It will feature films
The festival is named after Mount
shot in Wyoming or Montana, a 50/50 raffle,
Woolsey, that gnarly, pointy peak next to
door prizes and more.
Black Tooth Mountain. In its second year
Graslie said more than 250 films were
now, the festival will be a time for commuentered into the festival, about 20 qualified
nity members to learn about all eight
for its parameters — films had to have a
aspects of health in a variety of workshops wellness aspect and be shot in Wyoming or
and interactive booths, a community work- Montana — and five were chosen to hit the
out and a keynote address with P90X fitscreen at the WYO Theater on Saturday,
ness program creator Tony Horton and,
including one by Sheridan resident Georgia
yes, even a film festival.
Boley.
“Our first festival last year was pretty
Festival goers will be able to vote on their
successful for us, we had a lot of attenfavorite film and ultimately choose the windants, so this year we just wanted to up our ner of the festival via SMS with their cell
game and try to reach even more people,”
phone.
Wellness Council Executive Director Paul
Yes, 19 days into January it is tempting to
Graslie said.
ease up on those New Year’s resolutions, so
Festival organizers booked Tony Horton
mark your calendar for this weekend. Get
— who was on his way to Jackson to go ski- pumped up with Tony Horton, work out
ing and decided to make a stop in Sheridan with Tony Horton, learn about all eight
on his way — to give a keynote address on
aspects of wellness and check out the first
Friday and lead a community workout on
annual Woolsey Film Festival, to boot.
FROM 1
MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 2015
Deep ball
helps Broncs
drain Natrona
SPORTS
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B1
All the right adjustments
BY MIKE DUNN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Natrona County’s 6foot-9, 300-pound center Pete Bergman,
is a defensive presence manning the
paint. You can’t go through him and you
certainly can’t go over him.
But you can go around him.
So, the Sheridan Broncs basketball
team (6-4) took what they could get in
Saturday’s contest with the Mustangs
(4-6), and it certainly paid off.
Impeccable outside shooting from the
Broncs kept Natrona County from doing
any damage in the 57-45 win for the
hosting Sheridan basketball team.
The Broncs were perfect from behind
the arc in the first half, shooting a staggering 6-for-6 from 3-point land before
the break, and Mustangs couldn’t keep
up out of the gate.
Field goal shooting wasn’t too shabby
either. Sheridan knocked down 53 percent of their field goals in the first half
led by senior Dylan Daniels.
After the first quarter, the Mustangs
never came within five points of the
lights-out Sheridan Broncs.
The only thing that kept the Mustangs
from warming up the bus early was
Sheridan turnovers. The Broncs turned
the ball over several times underneath
the basket and limited their field goal
attempts.
But when the offense failed, defense
came to the rescue.
The Mustangs were restricted to six
points from the field in the first half,
but 89 percent free-throw shooting kept
Natrona within striking distance.
At the end of the first half, the Broncs
had a dominating 27-14 lead.
But Sheridan began the third quarter
playing not to lose instead of playing to
win.
The hot-handed Broncs went cold —
missing three out of four from behind
the arch and shooting 3-of-11 from the
field. Natrona took advantage of the flat
Bronc offense and scored five unanswered points at the beginning of the
half.
After managing only 14 points in the
first half, the Mustangs more than doubled their score with 16 points in the
third quarter and made it a 37-30 game
going into the final quarter of regulation.
But the Broncs were not about to fold.
Sheridan senior Kris Clark was
relentless against Bergman and the
Natrona County defense inside the
paint. The 6-foot-1 post racked up a
handful of second-chance baskets off
offensive rebounds to extend the
Sheridan lead.
When Natrona County began to foul at
the end of the game, Sheridan shot a
clutch 5-for-7 at the line to propel them
to a victory.
The Broncs are diving into conference
play this weekend, playing Cheyenne
South (7-4) Bison. The Bison will be
heading into Sheridan Friday on a fourgame winning streak.
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Katie Kuhn draws a double team during the first half of Sheridan College's 70-52 victory over Western Wyoming Saturday at the Bruce Hoffman
Golden Dome.
Lady
Generals take
down
Western Wyo.
BY MIKE PRUDEN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — After a sluggish start left the Sheridan
College Lady Generals basketball team with their backs
against the wall Friday, the SC
coaches made some adjustments Saturday to bounce back
and beat Western Wyoming 7052.
Casper College had no problem breaking down the
Sheridan press Friday night,
leaving the Lady Generals
chasing the ball as Casper
dropped in basket after basket.
That forced Frank McCarthy
and his staff to pull back the
press against Western, allowing his players to get setup and
play sound defense.
The 50 percent field-goal
shooting from Casper on
Friday turned into 26 percent
shooting for Western on
Saturday, and no Western players scored in double figures.
“Against Casper, they really
opened it up against our pressure and got good looks,”
McCarthy said. “Today, we got
out of our press a little bit —
— the fatigue factor — and we
thought we could lock them up
on defense, too.”
As it often does, the defense
led to offense for Sheridan.
The Lady Generals really made
it a point of emphasis to work
the ball inside.
SEE INSIDE, PAGE B3
Defense propels Sheridan College Generals
past Western Wyoming, 73-66
BY MIKE PRUDEN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Terrell Butler tries to find a teammate as he runs through a Western Wyoming defender Saturday at
the Bruce Hoffman Golden Dome. Butler led the Generals with eight assists in their 73-66 win.
SHERIDAN — Western Wyoming shot 22
more field goals than Sheridan College and
outrebounded them by nine, but Sheridan
relied on their defense to pull out the 73-66
win Saturday at the Bruce Hoffman Golden
Dome.
SC coach Matt Hammer knew that his
Sheridan Generals team would have to pick
up their intensity if they were going to win
games in Region IX, and that’s exactly what
it took for Sheridan to come away with two
big wins this weekend.
After playing one of their best all-around
games of the season in a dominating win
over Casper College Friday, the Generals
carried that momentum into Saturday’s
matchup.
Despite the rebounding struggles — 20 of
Western’s 38 rebounds came on the offensive end — and the lopsided shot attempts,
Sheridan was able to stay solid on defense
to keep those shot attempts from finding
the bottom of the net.
Coming into Saturday’s matchup,
Western was shooting close to 50 percent
per game, and almost 40 percent from 3point range. But Saturday, they shot just 38
percent from the field and an abysmal 2-of21 (.095) from behind the arc.
“I thought we did a great job of the guys
guarding shooters,” Hammer said, “working hard, working through screens and
chasing the guy off the shot when he got a
catch.”
With the game tied at halftime, Sheridan
got a much-needed spark off the bench
from freshman guard Terrell Butler.
The Generals only average 20.6 assists a
game for the season, with no player with
more than four per game.
SEE ASSISTS, PAGE B3
B2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 2015
LOCAL SPORTS BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
Lady Broncs
top Natrona County
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan Lady
Broncs wrapped up this weekend’s
basketball games with a close, 41-35,
victory Saturday over the Natrona
County Fillies.
With a 37-35 lead in the final seconds of regulation, the Lady Broncs
were able to ward off the defending
state champions after making four
free throw shots. Robbi Ryan once
again led the Lady Broncs with 11
points.
“It was a tough battle, but we will
take the W,” head coach Jessica
Pickett said.
The win brings the Lady Broncs
winning streak to seven.
Sheridan will have a week off
before taking on their next opponent. They’ll open up 4A East conference play at home against the
Cheyenne South Lady Bison (5-7) on
Friday.
SHS wrestling finishes
sixth in Miles City
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan
wrestling team put in some long
hours on the road this weekend traveling more than 200 miles to Miles
City, Montana.
The Broncs made the trip well
worth their time.
Sheridan finished sixth out of 26
teams at the 57th annual Cowboy
Invite with 137.5 team points.
The Broncs squared off against
schools from North Dakota,
Montana, Nebraska and Wyoming at
the tournament.
Sheridan brought home two firstplace performances on the shoulders of Tory Music (285) and last
week’s Sheridan Press Athlete of
the Week winner Kerry Powers
(195).
Tongue River Boys
fall in weekend matchups
DAYTON — The rough road continues for Robert Griffin’s basketball squad in Tongue River after losing to a pair of 2A Northwest teams
this weekend.
The Eagles (2-12) dropped a 68-31
game to Greybull Friday night and a
44-59 loss in Basin to the Riverside
Rebels on Saturday.
The Eagles are searching for their
second win of 2015. Their last win
came in a 53-39 come-from-behind
victory against Southeast (Yoder) on
Jan. 8.
Tongue River could have an opportunity to begin 2A Northeastern
Conference play with a win this
Friday as they host the 4-9
Moorcroft Wolves.
Tongue River girls
split in weekend games
DAYTON — The Tongue River
Lady Eagles basketball team split
the weekend in their final week of
non-conference play.
The Lady Eagles lost another
heartbreaker in a 41-42 loss at
Greybull on Friday, but were able to
bounce back with a formidable 56-18
victory against the Riverside (Basin)
Lady Rebels on Saturday.
A 8-5 record for the Lady Eagles
probably doesn’t indicate how well
this team has been playing. In their
last three losses, the Lady Eagles
were defeated by an average of 3
points. Two of those losses were
decided in overtime.
The Lady Eagles look forward to
opening up conference action as
they take on the winless Moorcroft
Lady Wolves. The struggling Lady
Wolves are averaging slightly more
than 15 points per game in their 14
games this season.
Big Horn boys
dismantle at Greybull
BIG HORN — After two weekends
in a row playing three games or
more, Big Horn’s fatigue finally
caused their team to dismantle.
The 5-9 Rams were crushed 74-29
at Greybull on Saturday night after
the Buffaloes racked up 40 points in
the first half.
“We just came out with not a lot of
energy,” Rams head coach Ryan
Alley said.
Collin Powers led the Rams with
seven points.
The Rams are going to have an
opportunity to rest up until Friday.
Beginning the 2A Northeast conference with the Wright Panthers (210), Alley hopes his team will begin
to be more focused on the court.
Lady Rams
defeat Greybull
BIG HORN — The Big Horn girls
basketball team (10-4) capped off the
weekend with a 56-38 rout over the
Greybull Lady Buffaloes.
“The game went really well,” Lady
Rams head coach Justin Kidneigh
said. “Greybull pressed from start to
finish, but our girls maintained
their composure.”
Kidneigh said his team made some
quality defensive adjustments and
took away the Lady Buffaloes inside
shots.
Brett Stephens, typically the Lady
Buffaloes leading scorer, was held to
nine points against the tenacious
Lady Rams defense.
Thanks to quality transition
offense, Big Horn was led by Abby
Buckingham with a whopping 17
points.
The Lady Rams begin conference
play in Wright on Friday against the
Lady Panthers (8-5).
SHS swimming
takes ninth in Cheyenne
SHERIDAN — The Bronc swimmers finished near the end of the
pack on Saturday at the Cheyenne
Invite.
Sheridan took ninth out of 13
teams in the meet, mainly consisting of Wyoming high schools and
area teams.
The top-finishers for the Broncs
were Presley Felker and Jacob
Eckard, who took third and fourth,
respectively, in the 100-yard butterfly.
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A composed jump stop
Big Horn's Ashton Koltiska jump stops during the Lady Rams' matchup with Rocky Mountain Friday at Big Horn High
School.
Bomar sets school record
at first indoor meet of season
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Three
Sheridan County high schools
traveled to Spearfish, South
Dakota, Friday for the first
indoor track meet of the season, and Sheridan High
School took the reigns as the
team to beat, at least in the
county.
Although team scores were
not kept at this meet,
Sheridan had a solid showing
from a number of athletes.
Sophomore Peyton Bomar set
the tone for the Broncs, setting a new school record in
the triple jump at 34-feet, 6inches, which was the top
score at the meet. She also finished first in the girls long
jump with a distance of 16feet, 5.25-inches.
“She had a tremendous meet
and made a statement of how
she is going to compete this
season,” head coach Art
Baures said of Bomar’s performance. “We will be relying
on her this season, and she is
leading by example.”
Bomar’s teammate, Xiomara
Robinson, also had a solid
first meet, finishing first in
the 3200-meter run with a time
of 12:14.89, shaving 45 seconds
off of her personal best.
The Sheridan boys didn’t
have any first-place finishers
this weekend, but Matt
Scarlett was the closest with a
second-place finish in the 800meter run with a time of
2:03.90. Scarlett also finished
fifth in the 1600 with a time of
4:38.25.
“It was also a good opportunity for our inexperienced
athletes to get in a meet, and
many of them had never competed in an indoor meet previously,” Baures said. “It’s
always good to get the first
meet under our belt, and now
we will be able to set realistic
goals for the next meet and
the rest of the season.”
Big Horn and Tongue River
are two new indoor track programs trying to catch up to
Sheridan, but they both had
some solid performers on
Friday as well.
Christian Mayer was
the top dog for the Rams,
running a 7.34 in the 60meter dash, good enough
for a fifth-place finish.
Garrett Allen finished
sixth in the shot put,
throwing 44-feet, 9-inches.
Sarah Bacon led the
way for Tongue River
with her fifth-place finish
in the girls shot put with
a distance of 29-feet, 9.5inches, and Micaiah
Huff ’s time of 9.54 was
enough for a sixth-place finish
in the boys 60-meter hurdles.
Here are the other top finishers from the weekend:
Girls
60-meter dash
4. Gabby Edeen (SHS) 8.30
200-meter dash
7. Gabby Edeen (SHS)
28.32
60-meter hurdles
5. Peyton Bomar (SHS)
10.52
6. Madesta Shepard (SHS)
10.97
Girls triple jump
8. Madesta Shepard (SHS)
27’ 7.75”
Girls long jump
9. McKenzie Greenelsh
(BHHS) 14’ 3.5”
4x400-meter relay
5. Peyton Bomar, Gracie
Edeen, Amanda Buckler,
Gabby Edeen (SHS) 4:38.40
Boys
800-meter run
5. Rion Szatkowski (SHS)
2:12.90
Boys high jump
5. Cameron Craft (SHS) 5’
10”
5. Rion Szatkowski (SHS)
5’ 10”
Boys long jump
7. Dayton Bruney (SHS)
19’ 7”
4x400-meter run
3. Brian Kjerstad, Zack
Petersburg, Rion
Szatkowski, Matt Scarlett
(SHS) 3:48.04
MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
SCOREBOARD |
NBA |
National Basketball Association
By The Associated Press
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Toronto
26
14
.650
—
Brooklyn
17
24
.415
9½
Boston
13
25
.342
12
Philadelphia
8
32
.200
18
New York
5
36
.122
21½
Southeast Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Atlanta
33
8
.805
—
Washington
28
13
.683
5
Miami
18
22
.450
14½
Charlotte
16
25
.390
17
Orlando
15
29
.341
19½
Central Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Chicago
27
15
.643
—
Milwaukee
21
19
.525
5
Cleveland
21
20
.512
5½
16
25
.390
10½
Detroit
Indiana
15
27
.357
12
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Memphis
29
11
.725
—
Dallas
28
13
.683
1½
28
13
.683
1½
Houston
San Antonio
26
16
.619
4
New Orleans 20
20
.500
9
Northwest Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Portland
30
11
.732
—
Oklahoma City 20
20
.500
9½
Denver
18
22
.450
11½
Utah
14
27
.341
16
Minnesota
7
32
.179
22
Pacific Division
W
L
Pct
GB
Golden State 32
6
.842
—
L.A. Clippers 27
14
.659
6½
Phoenix
24
18
.571
10
Sacramento
16
24
.400
17
L.A. Lakers
12
29
.293
21½
___
Sunday’s Games
New Orleans 95, Toronto 93
Oklahoma City 127, Orlando 99
San Antonio 89, Utah 69
Monday’s Games
Philadelphia at Washington, 2 p.m.
Minnesota at Charlotte, 2 p.m.
Detroit at Atlanta, 2:30 p.m.
Boston at L.A. Clippers, 3:30 p.m.
Denver at Golden State, 4 p.m.
Dallas at Memphis, 5 p.m.
Indiana at Houston, 5:30 p.m.
New Orleans at New York, 5:30 p.m.
Chicago at Cleveland, 7:30 p.m.
Toronto at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Portland, 10 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Tuesday’s Games
Oklahoma City at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
San Antonio at Denver, 9 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
New York at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Miami at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Utah at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Orlando at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Toronto at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Dallas at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Washington, 8 p.m.
Portland at Phoenix, 9 p.m.
Brooklyn at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Houston at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
NCAAM |
This Week's Top 25 Fared
The Associated Press
1. Kentucky (17-0) beat Missouri 86-37; beat
Alabama 70-48.
2. Virginia (17-0) beat Clemson 65-42; beat Boston
College 66-51.
3. Gonzaga (18-1) beat Pepperdine 78-76; beat
Loyola Marymount 72-55.
4. Duke (15-2) lost to Miami 90-74; beat No. 6
Louisville 63-52.
5. Villanova (17-1) beat Xavier 88-75; beat
Pennsylvania 62-47.
6. Louisville (15-3) beat Virginia Tech 78-63; lost to
No. 4 Duke 63-52.
7. Wisconsin (16-2) beat Nebraska 70-55.
8. Utah (14-3) beat Arizona State 76-59; lost to No.
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Driving to the basket
Sheridan College's Tamara Brine drives toward the basket Saturday at the
Bruce Hoffman Golden Dome.
10 Arizona 69-51.
9. Kansas (14-3) beat No. 24 Oklahoma State 6757; lost to No. 11 Iowa State 86-81.
10. Arizona (16-2) beat Colorado 68-54; beat No. 8
Utah 69-51.
11. Iowa State (13-3) lost to No. 22 Baylor 74-73;
beat No. 9 Kansas 86-81.
12. Notre Dame (17-2) beat Georgia Tech 62-59;
beat Miami 75-70.
13. Wichita State (16-2) beat Southern Illinois 6755; beat Evansville 61-41.
14. Maryland (17-2) beat Rutgers 73-69; beat
Michigan State 75-59.
15. North Carolina (14-4) beat N.C. State 81-79;
beat Virginia Tech. 68-53.
16. West Virginia (15-3) beat No. 18 Oklahoma 8669; lost to No. 20 Texas 77-50.
17. VCU (15-3) beat Rhode Island 65-60; beat
Duquesne 70-64.
18. Oklahoma (12-5) lost to No. 16 West Virginia 8669; beat No. 24 Oklahoma State 82-65.
19. Arkansas (13-4) lost to Tennessee 74-69; lost to
Mississippi 96-82.
20. Texas (13-4) beat No. 16 West Virginia 77-50.
21. Seton Hall (13-4) lost to Butler 79-75, OT.
22. Baylor (13-4) beat No. 11 Iowa State 74-73; lost
to Kansas State 63-61.
23. Northern Iowa (16-2) beat Bradley 63-52; beat
Missouri State 60-46.
24. Oklahoma State (12-5) lost to No. 9 Kansas 6757; lost to No. 18 Oklahoma 82-65.
25. Wyoming (16-3) lost to San Diego State 60-52;
beat Fresno State 70-65, 3OT.
NCAAW |
This Week's Women's Top 25 Fared
The Associated Press
1. South Carolina (17-0) beat Missouri 60-49.
2. UConn (16-1) beat Temple 92-58; beat South
Florida 92-50.
3. Baylor (16-1) beat Iowa State 79-47; beat Kansas
71-63.
4. Louisville (17-1) beat N.C. State 65-58; beat
Virginia 67-55.
4. Texas (14-2) lost to Oklahoma 70-59; beat Texas
Tech 55-44.
6. Tennessee (15-2) beat Auburn 54-42.
7. Notre Dame (16-2) beat No. 12 North Carolina
89-79.
8. Maryland (15-2) beat No. 24 Rutgers 71-59; beat
Illinois 74-54.
9. Oregon State (15-1) beat Washington State 7370.
10. Kentucky (15-4) beat Florida 62-56; lost to LSU
84-79.
11. Texas A&M (16-3) beat Mississippi 58-49.
12. North Carolina (16-3) lost to No. 7 Notre Dame
89-79; beat Clemson 78-56.
13. Stanford (13-4) beat Arizona 77-47.
14. Arizona State (16-1) beat California 67-52.
15. Mississippi State (19-2) lost to LSU 71-69, 2OT;
beat Alabama 66-50.
16. Duke (13-5) beat Virginia Tech 65-40; beat
Miami 68-53.
17. Nebraska (13-3) beat Penn State 73-45.
18. Georgia (16-3) lost to Mississippi 55-52; beat
Vanderbilt 64-53.
19. Princeton (17-0) did not play.
20. Florida State (17-2) beat Pittsburgh 58-43; beat
Virginia Tech 59-44.
21. Oklahoma State (12-4) beat Kansas State 6947; lost to West Virginia 61-49.
22. Iowa (14-3) beat Northwestern 81-68; beat
Michigan State 52-50.
23. Minnesota (16-2) beat Ohio State 76-72; beat
Indiana 65-61.
24. Rutgers (13-5) lost to No. 8 Maryland 71-59;
beat Wisconsin 73-63.
25. Syracuse (13-5) beat Wake Forest 73-62; beat
Boston College 64-46.
NHL |
National Hockey League
By The Associated Press
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP
W
Tampa Bay
47
29
Detroit
46
26
Montreal
44
28
Boston
46
24
Florida
43
20
Toronto
46
22
Ottawa
44
18
Buffalo
47
14
Metropolitan Division
GP
W
N.Y. Islanders 45
30
Pittsburgh
44
26
L
14
11
13
16
13
21
18
30
OT
4
9
3
6
10
3
8
3
Pts
62
61
59
54
50
47
44
31
L
14
12
OT Pts
1 61
6 58
N.Y. Rangers 43
26
13
Washington
45
24
13
Philadelphia
46
18
21
Columbus
43
19
21
New Jersey
46
16
22
Carolina
45
15
25
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP
W
L
Nashville
44
30
10
St. Louis
45
28
13
Chicago
45
28
15
Winnipeg
47
25
14
Dallas
45
21
17
Colorado
46
19
17
Minnesota
44
20
19
Pacific Division
GP
W
L
Anaheim
46
30
10
San Jose
46
24
16
Vancouver
43
25
15
Calgary
45
24
18
Los Angeles 45
20
14
Arizona
45
16
24
Edmonton
46
11
26
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
loss.
Sunday’s Games
Winnipeg 4, Arizona 3, SO
N.Y. Rangers 5, Pittsburgh 2
Dallas 6, Chicago 3
Detroit 6, Buffalo 4
Monday’s Games
Philadelphia at N.Y. Islanders, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Toronto, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Colorado at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Calgary at Los Angeles, 10:30 p.m.
New Jersey at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Tuesday’s Games
Ottawa at N.Y. Rangers, 7 p.m.
Edmonton at Washington, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Vancouver at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Arizona at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Boston at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Toronto at Ottawa, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Pittsburgh, 8 p.m.
Columbus at Winnipeg, 9 p.m.
Boston at Colorado, 10 p.m.
Calgary at Anaheim, 10 p.m.
Los Angeles at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
4
8
7
3
8
5
56
56
43
41
40
35
OT
4
4
2
8
7
10
5
Pts
64
60
58
58
49
48
45
OT Pts
6 66
6 54
3 53
3 51
11 51
5 37
9 31
for overtime
TENNIS |
AHL |
American Hockey League
By The Associated Press
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP
Manchester
41
Portland
41
Worcester
39
Providence
41
St. John’s
42
East Division
GP
Hershey
39
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton41
Lehigh Valley
38
Binghamton
39
Norfolk
40
Northeast Division
GP
Springfield
41
Syracuse
40
Hartford
39
Albany
40
Bridgeport
40
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP
Rockford
41
Milwaukee
39
Chicago
39
Grand Rapids
38
Lake Erie
38
North Division
GP
Utica
38
Adirondack
41
Hamilton
41
Toronto
39
Rochester
41
West Division
GP
Oklahoma City
41
San Antonio
38
22
13
3
Texas
39
16
14
9
Charlotte
40
15
20
4
Iowa
40
15
23
1
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win, one point
for an overtime or shootout loss.
Sunday’s Games
Worcester 4, Manchester 3
Bridgeport 2, Syracuse 1
Providence 5, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 4
Binghamton 6, Springfield 3
Iowa 4, Lake Erie 3, OT
Rochester 8, Oklahoma City 7, SO
Hershey 5, Lehigh Valley 2
Monday’s Games
Chicago at Rockford, 2 p.m.
Tuesday’s Games
Texas at San Antonio, 8 p.m.
Wednesday’s Games
Chicago at Grand Rapids, 7 p.m.
Worcester at Portland, 7 p.m.
Providence at Hartford, 7 p.m.
St. John’s at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton, 7:05 p.m.
Hershey at Lehigh Valley, 7:05 p.m.
Charlotte at Norfolk, 7:15 p.m.
Bridgeport at Albany, 7:30 p.m.
Utica at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
W
26
22
20
19
17
L OL
10
3
16
3
14
3
16
5
19
5
W
21
20
19
17
15
L OL
13
4
17
1
14
4
18
3
21
2
W
26
24
22
18
19
L OL
11
4
11
5
12
3
14
3
16
4
W
23
22
19
19
16
L OL
12
4
12
2
15
4
15
3
16
3
W
24
22
18
17
17
L OL
9
5
15
3
17
6
16
6
23
1
W
27
L OL
9
2
Australian Open Seeds Fared
The Associated Press
Monday
At Melbourne Park
Melbourne, Australia
Men
First Round
Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Yen-hsun Lu,
Taiwan, 6-4, 6-2, 7-5.
Rafael Nadal (3), Spain, def. Mikhail Youzhny,
Russia, 6-3, 6-2, 6-2.
Andy Murray (6), Britain, def. Yuki Bhambri, India, 63, 6-4, 7-6 (3).
Tomas Berdych (7), Czech Republic, def. Alejandro
Falla, Colombia, 6-3, 7-6 (1), 6-3.
Grigor Dimitrov (10), Bulgaria, def. Dustin Brown,
Germany, 6-2, 6-3, 6-2.
Ernests Gulbis (11), Latvia, lost to Thanasi
Kokkinakis, Australia, 5-7, 6-0, 1-6, 7-6 (2), 8-6.
Kevin Anderson (14), South Africa, def. Diego
Schwartzman, Argentina, 7-6 (5), 7-5, 5-7, 6-4.
Tommy Robredo (15), Spain, lost to Edouard
Roger-Vasselin, France, 2-3, retired.
David Goffin (20), Belgium, def. Michael Russell,
United States, 6-3, 6-3, 5-7, 6-0.
Philipp Kohlschreiber (22), Germany, def. PaulHenri Mathieu, France, 6-2, 6-2, 6-1.
Ivo Karlovic (23), Croatia, def. Ruben Bemelmans,
Belgium, 6-2, 6-2, 6-4.
Richard Gasquet (24), France, def. Carlos Berlocq,
Argentina, 6-1, 6-3, 6-1.
Leonardo Mayer (26), Argentina, def. John Millman,
Australia, 6-3, 6-3, 6-2.
Lukas Rosol (28), Czech Republic, def. Kenny de
Schepper, France, 4-6, 6-2, 6-7 (4), 6-3, 6-4.
Jeremy Chardy (29), France, def. Borna Coric,
Croatia, 3-6, 6-4, 7-5, 6-4.
Martin Klizan (32), Slovakia, def. Tatsuma Ito,
Japan, 7-6 (6), 6-2, 6-4.
Women
First Round
Maria Sharapova (2), Russia, def. Petra Martic,
Croatia, 6-4, 6-1.
Simona Halep (3), Romania, def. Karin Knapp, Italy,
6-3, 6-2.
Ana Ivanovic (5), Serbia, lost to Lucie Hradecka,
Czech Republic, 1-6, 6-3, 6-2.
Eugenie Bouchard (7), Canada, def. Anna-Lena
Friedsam, Germany, 6-2, 6-4.
Angelique Kerber (9), Germany, lost to IrinaCamelia Begu, Romania, 6-4, 0-6, 6-1.
Ekaterina Makarova (10), Russia, def. An-Sophie
Mestach, Belgium, 6-2, 6-2.
Sara Errani (14), Italy, def. Grace Min, United
States, 6-1, 6-0.
Lucie Safarova (16), Czech Republic, lost to
Yaroslava Shvedova, Kazakhstan, 6-4, 2-6, 8-6.
Carla Suarez Navarro (17), Spain, lost to Carina
Witthoeft, Germany, 6-3, 6-1.
Peng Shuai (21), China, def. Tatjana Maria,
Germany, 6-4, 7-5.
Karolina Pliskova (22), Czech Republic, def.
Evgeniya Rodina, Russia, 7-5, 6-1.
Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova (23), Russia, lost to
Yanina Wickmayer, Belgium, 4-6, 6-3, 6-3.
Svetlana Kuznetsova (27), Russia, lost to Caroline
Garcia, France, 6-4, 6-2.
Sabine Lisicki (28), Germany, lost to Kristina
Mladenovic, France, 4-6, 6-4, 6-2.
Zarina Diyas (31), Kazakhstan, def. Urszula
Radwanska, Poland, 3-6, 6-4, 6-2.
Belinda Bencic (32), Switzerland, lost to Julia
Goerges, Germany, 6-2, 6-1.
NFL investigating whether Patriots used deflated footballs
(AP) The NFL is investigating
whether the New England
Patriots deflated footballs that
were used in their AFC championship game victory over the
Indianapolis Colts.
"We are looking into it," league
spokesman Brian McCarthy
wrote in an email to The
Associated Press on Monday. "We
do not have anything further to
add at this point."
The inquiry was first reported
by the website for WTHR-TV in
Indiana, citing an unnamed
source.
The Patriots have come under
scrutiny with regards to NFL
rules in the past, most infamously
when they were punished for
videotaping sideline signals used
by the New York Jets during a
2007 game. Coach Bill Belichick
was fined $500,000, and the team
was docked $250,000 and stripped
of its 2008 first-round draft pick.
According to the NFL rule book,
INSIDE: Hanson leads charge with 25
FROM B1
Whether it be driving hard to the basket
or feeding the post, Sheridan didn’t settle
for tough outside jump shots.
Despite making just 11 of their 35 field
goals in the first half, all 11 of them came
from inside the paint.
Tiana Hanson, who has made a living
under the basket all season for Sheridan,
barely had time to get established on the
block before one of her teammates was
passing her the ball.
She went only 3-of-10 in the half, but she
was getting the ball and forcing the
defense to collapse.
The shots weren’t falling, but the fouls
were coming. She got to the line eight
times in the first half, and the nation’s
leader in free-throw attempts knocked
down seven of them.
“We needed to start better,” McCarthy
said of the offensive adjustments.
“Against Casper, we got down 41-21, and
by the time you battle back, you’re
exhausted. We wanted to establish that
inside game first, and then it will open up
from the outside.”
Sheridan College is a team that shoots
18 3-pointers a game, but against Western
Wyoming, they fired off only eight.
To go along with Hanson’s post play,
McCarthy was also pleased to see his
wing players attack the basket rather than
settle for jump shots.
Tamara Brine, whose field-goal percentage has fluctuated throughout the season,
got back to her early season ways of driving to the basket, resulting in 15 points
and five trips to the free-throw line.
“I really liked her competitiveness,”
McCarthy said of Brine’s aggressive
offense. “Her two-foot jump stops in the
lane really got some key baskets at key
times.”
To go along with Brine’s 15, Hanson led
all scorers with 25 points and had 14
rebounds. Zuzana Talackova chipped in 14
and Sam Moodie scored eight off the
bench.
The win puts Sheridan at 2-2 in the conference before heading to Gillette for a
tough road matchup tomorrow. Tipoff is
set for 5:30 p.m.
home teams are responsible for
furnishing playable balls at all
time. Each team brings 12 primary balls, while home teams are
required to also bring 12 backup
balls. Once the referee makes sure
the footballs are properly inflated,
they're delivered to ball attendants provided by the home team.
The league's game operations
manual notes: "If any individual
alters the footballs, or if a nonapproved ball is used in the game,
the person responsible and, if
appropriate, the head coach or
other club personnel will be subject to discipline, including but
not limited to, a fine of $25,000."
ASSISTS: Butler dishes eight off bench
FROM B1
In a contest where offensive struggles
were the name of the game, Butler dished
out eight assists and had just two
turnovers.
“A lot of times, freshmen kind of have a
tendency when they’re playing in big
games like this, they get in the paint and
they panic a little bit,” Hammer said of
Butler’s solid night. “Terrell didn’t. He
played pretty composed tonight. That’s
going to be big down the stretch, that
perimeter depth, quality depth.”
While Butler’s dimes were crucial for
the Sheridan offense, their rebounding
woes, especially late in the game, kept the
score close for the entire 40 minutes.
But the man of the weekend, Jamir
Andrews, extended the lead just enough
to force Western to foul down the stretch.
Although Andrews wasn’t able to match
his 32-point outburst from the night
before, he still had the hot hand Saturday,
at least long enough to make the play of
the game.
With Western keeping the score close,
Andrews got fouled on a 3-pointer from
the right wing and made the shot.
After that, Western was forced to foul,
which was both a gift and a curse for the
Generals.
Hammer’s squad struggles from the line
but made some big ones at the end of the
game Saturday. Bennie Lufile went 0-for-5
from the charity stripe, but Kyi Thomas
went 4-for-4 — all in the final minutes of
the game — to give Sheridan their third
conference win of the season.
Pablo Rivas led Sheridan with 19 points,
and Andrews, Butler and Thomas all had
11 apiece.
The Generals travel to face Gillette, one
of the conference-favorites, tomorrow, so
Hammer knows how important the two
wins were this weekend.
“I tip my hat to our guys,” Hammer
said. “They played their butts off both
games this weekend, and they put themselves in a good position. We’ll try to continue that defensive intensity in practice
that we’ve been working on all this week
and then go down there and go to battle
with Gillette.”
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 2015
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
Back in 1982 Billy Joel
wrote: "Two men out and
three men on/ Nowhere to
look but inside/ Where we all
respond to PRESSURE."
That's how it can feel when
you're sitting in the doctor's
office waiting for a blood
pressure test. For many,
when the doc takes their BP,
it soars, and it turns out that
has serious consequences.
The U.S. Preventive
Services Task Force says that
between 15 percent and 30
percent of people who are
told they have high blood
pressure after an in-office
"cuff on arm" test do NOT
experience hypertension in
their day-to-day life. As a
result, people are given
unnecessary medication!
(And many more who really
have it don't get tested or
treated!)
The best way to diagnose
high BP, says the USPSTF, is
to follow up an in-office test
with an ambulatory monitor
that you wear for 24 to 48
hours. Every 30 minutes, it
assesses your BP -- even
while you're sleeping. Then, a
reliable diagnosis can be
made.
You want to know (and get
treated) if your BP is elevated. High BP causes strokes,
heart attack, cognitive
decline and kidney disease.
Even if you have mild only
hypertension (140 to 159/90 to
99 mmHg) and no overt cardiovascular disease, taking
antihypertensive drugs
reduces your risk by more
than 80 percent; you also can
get your BP down with
healthy lifestyle changes.
Sometimes it's best to do
both.
So like Billy Joel said, "You
have to learn to pace yourself
... You're just like everybody
else -- pressure."
Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of
"The Dr. Oz Show," and Mike
Roizen, M.D. is Chief
Wellness Officer and Chair of
Wellness Institute at
Cleveland Clinic. To live your
healthiest, tune into "The Dr.
Oz Show" or visit www.sharecare.com.
DEAR ABBY
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
DEAR ABBY: I am dating a
man, "Richard," who is significantly older -- 17 years, actually. I'm in my mid-20s. I have
no problem with it, as I have
always been attracted to men
who are older and have their
lives together.
My parents are cool with it,
but I know they have their
reservations. Richard is not a
sugar daddy; I don't love him
for his money. I have my own
success. I don't have "daddy
issues," as my father is an
amazing person who has
raised me and my siblings
well. My parents are still
together and are great role
models.
My friends can't find anything in common with
Richard when we all hang
out. It seems everyone
around us is giving us grief -including his parents. I
understand the concern, but
how can I convince everyone
that I'm happy and willing to
take this relationship wherever it goes? -- AGE IS JUST
A NUMBER
DEAR AGE: The way to do
that is simply to BE happy
and take the relationship one
step at a time. While you're
doing that, accept that relationships with this kind of
age disparity are not without
challenges. The friends you
have now may never be comfortable around Richard, and
you may have to make new
ones closer to his age. Also,
the women may look askance
at you for being so young.
These things can be overcome. What bothers me about
this scenario is that this
man's parents are weighing
in. By now one would think
they would have accepted
that their son is an adult and
capable of making his own
decisions about the women in
his life.
DEAR ABBY: A good friend
and I are having a disagreement. My 17-year-old son has
a 16-year-old girlfriend. I
know they are sexually
active.
I spoke to my son and asked
if she's on the pill. He said
her mom refuses to put her
on the pill. I gave my son $10,
had a long talk about
unwanted pregnancy, and
told him to buy a box of condoms every few weeks and
bring me the receipt so I
know the money is being
spent on condoms.
My problem is, my friend
disagrees with me about
what I did. She accused me of
encouraging them. If I had a
daughter, I'd buy the pill for
her, so why not pay for condoms for my son? Who is
right and who is wrong here?
-- MISSOURI MOM
DEAR MISSOURI MOM:
The girl's mother may think
that by not providing her sexually active daughter with
birth control, she is discouraging her from having sex.
Clearly that hasn't happened.
Of course you are right to
make sure your son doesn't
impregnate his girlfriend.
Neither one of them is ready
for the financial and emotional responsibility of a
child.
Something I'm unclear
about is why your friend is
trying to guilt you out of it,
when she should be minding
her own business. Please tell
her I said so.
DEAR READERS: Today
we remember the Rev. Martin
Luther King Jr., who was
martyred in the cause of
civil rights in 1968. His words
ring as true today as when he
first spoke them: "Darkness
cannot drive out darkness;
only light can do that. Hate
cannot drive out hate; only
love can do that."
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Contact Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
Abby shares more than 100
of her favorite recipes in two
booklets: "Abby's Favorite
Recipes" and "More Favorite
Recipes by Dear Abby." Send
your name and mailing
address, plus check or money
order for $14 (U.S. funds) to:
Dear Abby, Cookbooklet Set,
P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris,
IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and
handling are included in the
price.)
MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Seahawks stun Packers
with late rally for 28-22 win in OT
SEATTLE (AP) — After the chaos
subsided, Earl Thomas sat in his
locker quietly searching for a description.
For a change, the normally chatty
Seattle Seahawks’ All-Pro safety had
little to say.
“It’s hard to describe what just happened. We were down with 3 minutes
left and look what happened. I’m clueless right now,” Thomas said. “I don’t
know if I’m drained. I’m grateful.”
By the time Jermaine Kearse caught
a 35-yard touchdown from Russell Wilson 3:19 into overtime to give the Seahawks a 28-22 win over Green Bay and
a second straight NFC championship
Sunday, Seattle was spent.
The Seahawks were down 16-0 at
halftime. They trailed 19-7 with 3:52
remaining. They watched Wilson
throw four interceptions for the first
time in his career. They needed two
touchdowns and an onside kick recovery in the final 130 seconds just to
reach overtime.
The noisiest venue in the NFL was
left on mute for most of the afternoon.
All that made the eruption after
Kearse’s TD catch even more meaningful for a team that felt they were
counted out a number of times
through the season.
“As a true competitor, you can’t
have any doubt. You can’t lack any
confidence, because if you go out
there, you’re already beat if you lack
that confidence and that belief in
yourself and your teammates,” Seattle
wide receiver Doug Baldwin said. “So,
never any doubt. And when it got
down to 5 minutes and we were still
down by 12 points, we believed that we
were going to find a way to pull it out.
And obviously we did that.”
Seattle (14-4) already bucked history
becoming the first defending champion since January 2006 to win a playoff game when the Seahawks beat
Carolina in the divisional round.
Thanks to the improbable comeback,
Seattle is the first defending champion
in a decade with a chance at repeating.
Waiting for them in Arizona: the last
team to pull off back-to-back titles, the
New England Patriots.
For 56 minutes, it appeared Green
Bay and Aaron Rodgers were destined
for the Super Bowl. The Packers bullied the line of scrimmage on both
sides of the ball and took advantage of
unusual mistakes by Wilson. The 16-0
lead at halftime could have been
closer to 30-0 if not for a series of goalline stands by the Seahawks’ defense.
Even still, Green Bay took possession up by 12 with 5:04 left.
“We have lots to evaluate but the
way we lost when we were sitting
there with two scores late in the game
with the ball you expect to put that
thing away,” Rodgers said.
Seattle had been ineffective all day
until Wilson finally put a drive together with passes to Baldwin and
B5
Luck, Colts fall,
again, to Patriots 45-7
FOXBOROUGH, Mass.
(AP) — Andrew Luck
made no excuses after
his worst game as a pro
came in the biggest game
of his young career.
“My play was not up to
par for where it needs to
be to give you a chance
to beat a quality team
like them,” Luck said
after the New England
Patriots ended the Indianapolis Colts’ season
with a 45-7 victory in the
AFC championship Sunday.
Playing in steady rain
from the start, the dometeam Colts (13-6) never
got on track a week after
upsetting Peyton Manning and the Denver
Broncos on the road.
Luck completed just 12 of
33 passes for 126 yards,
no touchdowns and two
interceptions. His passer
rating was a career-low
23.0. A few of Luck’s
passes were dropped
early in the game and the
slick conditions certainly made it tougher to
throw the ball and catch
it. But Luck wouldn’t
blame the weather.
“I don’t think it had a
Marshawn Lynch — initially ruled a
touchdown but called back because he
stepped out of bounds. Wilson finished
with a 1-yard scoring run to cut the
lead to 19-14 with 2:09 left.
The onside kick went high to Packers tight end Brandon Bostick, but he
couldn’t gather it, and Seattle’s Chris
Matthews recovered at the 50. Lynch
sped and powered his way to a 24-yard
TD run. On the 2-point conversion,
Wilson — about to be sacked — threw
a desperate pass hauled in by Luke
Willson to make it 22-19 with 1:25 remaining.
Rodgers, limping on an injured calf,
calmly led the Packers (13-5) downfield to set up Mason Crosby’s fifth
field goal, a 48-yarder with 14 seconds
to go to force overtime.
Then Wilson and Kearse struck,
with Kearse — the target on all four of
Wilson’s interceptions — beating Tramon Williams on the winning pass.
Kearse has also caught the winning
score in last year’s conference title
win over San Francisco. Instead of a
postgame television moment like last
year with Richard Sherman shouting,
Wilson was in tears.
“I’m usually pretty calm. But I just
think that going through that game
and going through the ups and the
downs of the game, a lot of downs,
more so than normal, that’s for sure,”
Wilson said. “But just staying the
course and continuing to believe in
the guys I have around me.”
negative effect on anything,” he said.
Losing to the Patriots
(14-4) is nothing new for
Luck or the Colts.
The two-time Pro Bowl
quarterback is 0-4
against Tom Brady, Bill
Belichick and New England in three seasons. He
has six TDs and 10 interceptions in those four
losses.
Overall, the Colts are 14 against the Patriots in
the playoffs since 2003.
“It was a great run,”
Colts owner Jim Irsay
said. “We all believed we
had a chance to run the
table, but it was a great
season and we improved.”
The Colts have advanced one game further
in each of Luck’s three
seasons. They lost in the
first round in 2012 and in
the divisional round to
the Patriots last year.
While Luck struggled,
the defense couldn’t stop
Brady or LeGarrette
Blunt. It contributed to
the second-most lopsided
AFC championship victory ever and third-most
overall.
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
TO PLACE YOUR AD
Fax: (307) 672-7950
DEADLINES
RATES & POLICIES
Deadline
Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 days . . . . . . . .6 days . . . . . . . . . . . .26 days
Monday ........................................................................Friday 2:30 PM
2 lines (minimum) . . . . . . .$10.75 . . . . . . .$16.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$40.00
Tuesday.................................................................... Monday 2:30 PM
Each additional line . . . . . .$4.75 . . . . . . . . $7.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17.50
Email : [email protected]
Wednesday ............................................................Tuesday 2:30 PM
Visit : 144 Grinnell Street, Downtown Sheridan
Thursday........................................................... Wednesday 2:30 PM
Mail : P.O. Box 2006, Sheridan, WY, 82801
Friday...................................................................... Thursday 2:30 PM
Include name, address, phone, dates to run and payment
Saturday ...................................................................... Friday 2:30 PM
We reserve the right to reject, edit or reclassify any advertisement accepted by us for publication. When placing an ad in person or on the phone, we will read all ads back to you for
your approval. If we fail to do so, please tell us at that time. If you find an error in your
classified ad, please call us before 9 a.m. to have it corrected for the next day’s paper. The
Press cannot be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Claims cannot be considered unless made within three days of the date of publication. No allowances can be
made when errors do not materially affect the value of the advertisement.
Phone: (307) 672-2431 Fax: (307) 672-7950
Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm
Run Day
All classified ads run for free at www.thesheridanpress.com!
All classified ads running in Monday’s Press also run in the weekly PressPlus at no additional charge!
Guns
SPRINGFIELD
LOADED M1A.
307-672-6233.
Firewood
USED WOOD
BURNING BLAZE
KING stove with stove
pipe. $250. 674-7575.
Real Estate
SUNSET TERRACE.
2003 3 BR/2 Ba home.
Carport. C/A. 24' wide.
Open floor plan. Nice
cond. $65,000. Owner/
Broker. 970-468-0404.
For Lease
BUSINESS, OFFICE or
RETAIL SPACE
54 South Main:
GROUND LEVEL –
2750 sq. ft. Clean ready
to move in, includes
kitchen space and large
manager’s office.
$1,850.00 plus utilities
per month.
UPPER LEVEL –
2 office suite, each
office approximately
15’x20’, quiet with large
windows. $425.00 with
utilities included.
Contact:
(307) 672-7491
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
CLEAN 1BR
Ranchester 4Plex no
smk util incl $610+dep
672-8641
LGE, IMMACULATE
4 BR/3 Ba. in Big Horn.
Carport, storage, RV
Parking. W/D hooks.
W/S/G & lawn care
provided. $1500/mo.
No smoking/pets.
307-751-7718.
LGE 2 BR/1 Ba in Big
Horn. W/S/G provided.
W/D Hookups.
$750/mo. 1 pet w/
approval.
307-751-7718.
LG 4 BR, 2 Ba home on
5 acres, 3 car garage,
horse pasture and
barns available.
$1100/month + dep.
751-2105.
NICE CLEAN 2 BR,
quiet neighborhood,
ldry. hkps, sm storage
unit. $625/mo + $500
dep.
1 yr. lease. 751-2445.
2 BR + office. 1 Ba
Offstreet parking. All
utilities pd. No smoking.
$750/mo.
307-751-5815.
2 BDRM apt. W/D
laundry
rm.
No
smoking/pets. $700/ mo
includes utilities. 1 yr.
lease req'd. 1st mo rent
+ dep. Call 674-8071.
3BR/2.5 BA Condo.
$1300/mo + Util. 2 car
garage. 220 W.
Loucks. Central A/C.
1500 SF. Avail 2/1.
751-4061.
2 BR 1 ba., remodeled,
W/D hks., fncd. yrd.
quiet, No smk/pets.
Avail 2/1. 673-5429
eves.
Houses, Furnished for
Rent
EXECUTIVE HOMES
at The Powder Horn
for Rent,
furnished; from
$1800/mo; utils incl;
thru May only. Contact
Judy at Powder Horn
Realty, 674-9545.
Mobile Homes for Rent
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
IMMEDIATE
OPENINGS Housekeeping.
Experience
preferred. Top
wages. Apply in
person at Motel 6 &
Hampton Inn.
Now Hiring
RETIRED PERSON, 14 hrs./day, 3 days/wk.
P/T. $11-$13/hr. Buggy
Bath, Call 674-6888.
BOY SCOUTS of
AMERICA seeking
EXECUTIVE
DIRECTOR to cover
Sheridan & Buffalo.
Duties include
fundraising,
recruitment, and
volunteer support.
Part-time, flexible
hours. Excellent
communication and
sales skills preferred,
no background in BSA
required.
Contact Tucker at
307-234-7329.
2 BR 1 Ba., $575/mo. +
dep., includes lot rent.
751-2105.
2 BR. $700/mo.
CHAPS
EQUINE
Woodland Park.
Assisted Therapy is
763-8631.
looking for a PT Barn
Mobile Hm. Space for
Manager. Candidate will
Rent
have experience caring
RV SPACE, Big Horn. for horses, ability to
By day, month or year. manage and supervise
674-7718.
volunteers, aptitude for
BUILDINGS
facility maintenance and
Storage Space
FOR LEASE
upkeep. Contact us at
CIELO STORAGE
[email protected]
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rail Road Land
752-3904
Rent
& Cattle Co.
TAKING
DOWNER ADDITION
Has Shop Space,
3BR/1BA. LRG fenced
APPLICATIONS
STORAGE 674-1792
Warehouse Space,
yard. W/D hooks. $950
FOR:
Retail Space,
INTERSTATE
+ util, lease & deposit.
Journeyman
Office Space and
STORAGE. Multiple
Pet negotiable.
Electrician to Work
much more
Sizes avail. No
307-631-6024
for lease!
for a Good Solid
deposit req'd.
3 BR, 2 Ba. $1000/mo +
Company. Bring
752-6111.
util. $1000 dep. No
673-5555
resume to 1851 N.
smoking/no pets. Avail
Main St. 674-9710
CALL BAYHORSE
mid-Feb. Call 674-7155.
STORAGE 1005 4th
CNA
CLASSES
Furnished Apts for Rent 2 BEDROOM 1 bath
Ave. E. 752-9114.
beginning
in
March.
Call
single family home: 1
1 BR. No smk/pets.
E L D O R A D O Sheridan Manor & 674bedroom,
1
bath
unit,
$650 + elec. Coin-Op
STORAGE Helping you 4416 & ask for Donna.
optional shop/garage.
W/D. 307-674-5838.
conquer space. 3856
Close to downtown.
NOW TAKING
Coffeen. 672-7297.
ROCKTRIM. $600 / mo. 307-751-5649
applications for Line
Wi-Fi/Cable. 752-8783.
cooks, Servers w/
3 BR. 1 Ba. Fenced yd.
experience. Morning &
WKLY
FR
$210. Dogs
allowed.
eve. shifts avail.
Monthly
fr
$630. $1100/mo + util. Avail.
Apply in person,
Americas Best Value 2/1. Ref's, app. & dep. www.thesheridanpress.com
1373 Coffeen Ave.
Inn. 672-9757.
req'd. 752-3057.
Go online today!
• Maintenance
• Overnight
Maintenance
• Bartenders
• Hostess
These Animals are Available
at the Dog & Cat Shelter
84 East Ridge Road
Dogs
*Wage DOE
Apply in person at the Front Desk.
Cats
1809 SUGARLAND DRIVE
SHERIDAN, WY
LOOKING FOR AN
EMPLOYEE who
loves
providing
EXCELLENT
customer service at
busy doctor’s office.
Full time. M-F 9-6;
Saturdays 8 – noon.
Starting at $11/hr.
Send reply to box 219,
c/o The Sheridan
Press, PO Box 2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801
“Jackie”, 5 yr. old, SF, brown & white, Shepherd/Siberian Husky mix
“Colton”, 2 yr. old, NM, black, Labr mix
“Sawyer”, 2 yr. old, SF, black & brown, Hound mix
“Brut”, 2 yr. old, NM, black & brown, Presa Canario
“Pork”, 4 yr. old, NM, Black & Brown, Boxer/Terrier Mix
“Roxy”, 3 yr. old, SF, Gray, Weimaraner mix
“Jojo”, 2 yr. old, SF, black, Retriever/Heeler mix
“Harry”, 3 yr. old, NM, black & white Australian Cattle Dog
“Bethany”, 1 yr. old, SF, black, Lab mix
“Bobert”, 7 yr. old, NM, gray & brown, tabby, DSH
“Stubby J”, 8 yr. old, NM, gray & white, bobtail, DLH
“Juan”, 2 yr. old, NM, gray tabby, DSH
“Matilda”, 2 1/2 yr. old, SF, black & white, DSH
“Patsy”, 4 yr. old, SF, black & orange, Calico manx
“Sabrina”, 10 yr. old, SF, cream, Siamese mix
“Serena”, 7 yr. old, SF, black, DSH
“Chelsey””, 1 yr. old, SF, orange & black Calico mix
“Sharon”, 1 yr. old, SF, orange & black Calico mix
DSH = domestic short hair DMH = domestic medium hair DLH = domestic long hair
NM = neutered male • SF= spayed female
We have 50 cats and 3 kittens and 13 dogs up for adoption!!
Come up and see what we have for you!
Please bring your aluminum cans either to our Can Hut just inside the Shelter
gates or to our can trailer at Scotty’s Skate Castle. Recycling proceeds are
used to care for the animals.Thanks for your support.
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 2015
Help Wanted
Help Wanted
TEMPORARY NIGHT
SECURITY, Wyo. Girls
School (WGS),
Sheridan; Class Code
SOYS03-02268,
Target Hiring Range:
$2184-$2730/mo.
General Description:
This position is
temporary/time-limited
which is not currently
benefitted; anticipate 812 weeks, however,
should it be filled for 6
months or longer, it will
become benefitted.
Provide overnight
security for residents,
staff, property, buildings
& dormitories at WGS,
an institution for
adjudicated female
youth. For more info or
to apply online go to:
http://www.wyoming.
gov/loc/06012011_1/
Pages/default.aspx or
submit a State of Wyo.
Employment App. to the
HR Division, Emerson
Building, 2001 Capitol
Ave., Cheyenne, WY
82002-0060, Phone:
(307)777-7188, Fax:
(307)777-6562, along
w/ transcripts of any
relevant course work.
The State of Wyo. is an
Equal Opportunity
Employer & actively
supports the ADA &
reasonably
accommodates
qualified applicants w/
disabilities.
FT DRIVER needed for
fun local office. GREAT
BENEFITS OFFERED!
Please send cover
letter & resume to Box
221, c/o The Sheridan
Press,
PO Box 2006,
Sheridan, WY 82801.
SHERIDAN MANOR
is now hiring CNA's.
Call Donna at 307674-4416. Also hiring
RN's & LPN's.
Call Brenda at
307-674-4416.
PICKLES
NON SEQUITUR
Hints from Heloise
Heloise
Dear Readers:
Here is this week's
SOUND OFF, about
store checkout
lanes:
"My Sound Off is
when I'm in line to
check out at the store and a
new line opens up, and the
cashier doesn't ask for the next
in line. So people just walking
up who haven't been waiting as
long get checked out before
you. I think that is rude!" -- J.I.
in Ohio
It may be rude or it may be
just an oversight. It would be
nice if those people just walking up let someone from another line in first. I do try to be
fair and say, "You were here
first" or "You have been waiting longer." Also, when someone behind me has only a few
items and I have a basketful, I
offer to let that person go first.
What are a few minutes in your
life to be nice to someone? -Heloise
FAST FACTS
Dear Readers: Here are some
hints for plastic utensils:
* Use as plant markers.
* Make maracas out of
spoons, dried beans and tape.
* Use for camping and picnics.
* Use knives as coffee stirrers.
-- Heloise
GROUT CLEANER
Dear Heloise: I remember you
gave a hint about cleaning
grout in the bathroom. The
grout in our guest bathroom is
looking dingy, and I would love
some help. -- Yvette in Florida
Here is the hint to use, and
the best part is you most likely
have everything in your house.
You only need three ingredients: borax, baking soda and
hot water. Mix 1/2 cup of borax
with 1 cup of baking soda in a
large bowl. Then add about 1/2
cup of hot water to the powder
so that it makes a thick paste,
sort of like paint. Apply it to
the grout using an old toothbrush, and scrub a little. Now,
for about an hour, go do something else and let the potion
work. Rinse the area and scrub
a little more, if needed. Baking
soda is one of my all-time favorite household products. I
love it so much I have devoted
an entire pamphlet to all the
things it can do. Want a copy?
Send $5 and a long, self-addressed, stamped (70 cents) envelope to: Heloise/Baking Soda,
P.O. Box 795001, San Antonio,
TX 78279-5001. Have a fiberglass
shower you need to clean? Use
baking soda on a damp sponge
for scrubbing action and a
sparkling shower. -- Heloise
LUGGING LAUNDRY
Dear Heloise: My washer
stopped working, and I had to
use a public laundry facility. I
scooped several loads' worth of
detergent into a plastic bag and
took that rather than the whole
heavy box of detergent. -Kenny S. in Oklahoma City
PET HAIR BEGONE
Dear Heloise: I place bath
towels on sofas, chairs and beds
to protect upholstery from pet
hair. Before I wash them, I put
them in the dryer for a short
time. It removes most of the fur
before washing. -- Kay in Mission Viejo, Calif.
Bridge
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): It's easy to be too eager
to please. A casual flirtation
could distract you from
business or cause you to
drop the ball elsewhere. Remain within the bounds of
propriety with the opposite
sex.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Your day could be like coffee; it wakes you up but is
just the same old grind. It
might seem that romantic
partners are preoccupied.
Mind your own business as
relationships quickly return to normal.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): What you see is what
you get. A hint of realism
may make you worry that a
shiny new bauble cost more
than it should have, or that
the microscopic scratch on
the car creates an eyesore.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Today's New Moon might
coincide with a time when
you have proof that a stalemate has been overcome.
An agreement can result in
some extra spending money
or a chance to compromise.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Be competent and show others you know how to do
your job. The higher the
stakes, the harder you must
try to succeed. Don't let a
passing whim or lack of sincerity place you in a bad
light.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Be careful not to confuse excellence with perfection.
NOW HIRING
housekeepers.
Apply at
Candlewood Suites
1709 Sugarland
Drive.
Help Wanted,
Professional
CASPER ELECTRIC
is seeking licensed
JOURNEYMAN
ELECTRICIANS.
Competitive
compensation and
benefits. Call
(307)237-3003 or visit
casperelectric.biz
LOCAL NON-PROFIT
is seeking an Executive
Director.
Candidate
must be experienced in
fundraising,
grant
writing,
personnel
budget
management,
development, financial
marketing
oversight,
and promotion and
horse handling and
care. If you are self
motivated and ready to
make a difference for
our community please
contact
us
at:
[email protected]
Phillip Alder
THE OBVIOUS LINE
IS THE WRONG
CHOICE
Carolyn Wells, an author and poet who died
in 1942, said, "A blunder
at the right moment is
better than cleverness at
the wrong time."
That seems debatable -a blunder is still a blunder. It is true, though,
that finding a clever
play on the wrong deal is
pointless.
In this deal, how
should South plan the
play in seven hearts
after West leads a spade?
In the auction, North
used two doses of Roman
Key-Card Blackwood to
learn that his partner
had three key-cards
(three aces or, as here,
two aces and the trump
king) and the diamond
king. North bid seven
hearts, expecting partner to win one spade, six
hearts (the normal
length of
South's suit for
his overcall),
three diamonds, two
clubs and one
club ruff in the
North hand.
South, with only a fivecard suit, saw the same
tricks and a 13th with a
second club ruff in the
dummy. So, he won the
first trick with dummy's
spade ace, drew two
rounds of trumps,
cashed dummy's club
king, and played another
club. However, East
ruffed in to defeat the
contract.
That was unlucky, to
be sure, but there was a
more clever line. Do you
see it?
When dummy's
trumps are powerful,
think "dummy reversal."
After winning the first
trick, South should have
ruffed a spade in his
hand, played a trump to
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GAL: Dancer
and actress Kherington
Payne was born in Whittier,
Calif., today in 1990.This
birthday gal first made herself known to TV viewers as
a contestant on "So You
Think You Can Dance" in
2008. She would go on to appear on episodes of "Vegas,"
"True Blood" and "CSI." On
the big screen, Payne's' film
resume includes "Sins of
Our Youth," "No Strings Attached" and "Fame."
ARIES (March 21-April
19): Curl up in your cocoon.
There isn't a time to be a social butterfly when your
creative genius is energized. You may struggle to
find the time and the energy
to work in noisy places.
BARTENDER.
FLEXIBLE Schedule.
Apply at Sutton's
Tavern, 1402 N. Main
St., Sheridan, WY
dummy, ruffed another
spade high, returned to
dummy with a heart,
ruffed the last spade, led
a diamond or club to
dummy, drawn East's
third trump and claimed
13 tricks: one spade, four
hearts, three diamonds,
two clubs and those
three spade ruffs.
Jeraldine Saunders
Nothing is ever absolutely
perfect, but by concentrating you can do an excellent
job.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Efficiency and top quality workmanship could be
in demand. Every carpenter
needs a hammer just as a
farmer needs a plow. Having the proper tools make
all the difference to the results.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Today's New Moon
might mark the start of a
new phase in your daily
routines. You might make a
private vow to be more accurate, organized and reliable.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Today's New Moon may
remind you to keep your
worries and concerns to
yourself. Financial problems can be overcome if you
don't overspend or try to
outdo your peers.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): A New Moon in your
sign may mean it's time to
take charge and take the
right kind of action. Free
yourself of obligations by
paying off the credit card or
following through on a worthy goal.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Pretending to be brave
is just as good as the real
thing. People will admire
you for refusing to bail out
in the face of difficulties.
Look for lasting values instead of instant gratifica-
tion.
IF JANUARY 20 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: You can get far
through sheer will power
and ambition between now
and April. Your social activities might be the center of
attention during the next
two to three weeks, but fulfilling your obligations and
being seen as a responsible
person will always be at the
back of your mind. For the
best results, wait until August to make major changes
or commitments. In August,
your judgment will be better than usual and you're
more likely to make wise
choices.
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Thayer
Shafer
Councilor
307-673-4118
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
Kelly Gooch
Councilor
307-752-7137
COUNTY
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom
Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Mike
Nickel
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob
Rolston
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed proposals will be received by the City of
Sheridan, Wyoming, at the office of the City Clerk until
2:00 PM Mountain Daylight Savings Time, February
4,2015, for furnishing the following equipment:
ONE(1)Automatic Closed Baling Press for Recycling, in
accordance with specifications and bid documents on
file at the City Service Center, 1148 KROE Lane, Sheridan
Wyoming 82801.
The bids will then be opened and read aloud at the
Council Chambers on 3rd floor of City Hall.
All bids shall be submitted in a sealed and clearly
marked envelope as per the bid item. Delivery dates
listed in Bid Documents.
Proposals shall be addressed to:
Attn: Scott Badley, Clerk
City of Sheridan
55 Grinnell Plaza
Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
The City of Sheridan reserves the right to reject any and
all bids and to waive all informalities or minor defects in
the bids, to accept or reject any qualified or conditional
bid, and to accept any item or combination of items in
bid.
Preference shall be given to responsible
Wyoming bidders as defined by Wyoming Statutes,
1990, Section 16-6-102 in the amount of five percent
(5%) higher than responsible non-resident bidders.
CITY OF SHERIDAN
_/s/ Nicholas Bateson ,
Nicholas Bateson, Public Works Director
Publish: January 19, February 2, 2015.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed proposals will be received by the City of
Sheridan, Wyoming, at the office of the City Clerk until
2:00 PM Mountain Daylight Savings Time, February 4,
2015 for furnishing the following equipment:
ONE(1)Rear Load Refuse Truck, in accordance with
specifications and bid documents on file at the City
Service Center, 1148 KROE Lane, Sheridan Wyoming
82801.
At a meeting on the above date and promptly
thereafter, all written proposals that have been duly
received will be opened and publicly read.
All proposals must be submitted in sealed opaque
envelopes and clearly marked as per item bid.
Delivery dates listed in Bid Documents.
The City of Sheridan reserves the right to reject any and
all bids and to waive all informalities or minor defects in
the bids, to accept or reject any qualified or conditional
bid, and to accept any item or combination of items in
bid.
Preference shall be given to responsible Wyoming
bidders as defined by Wyoming Statutes, 1990, Section
16-6-102 in the amount
of five percent (5%) higher than responsible nonresident bidders.
CITY OF SHERIDAN
/s/ Nicholas Bateson
Public Works Director
Publish: January 19, February 2, 2015
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest in
property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Sealed proposals will be received by the City of
Sheridan, Wyoming, at the office of the City Clerk until
2:00 PM Mountain Daylight Savings Time, February
4,2015, for furnishing the following equipment: ONE(1)
1/2TON 4WD EXTENDED CAB PICKUP WITH SHORT
BOX, ONE (1) 3/4TON 4WD CREW CAB (4 DOOR)
SHORT BOX AND ONE (1) 1TON 4WD WITH FLAT BED ,
in accordance with specifications and bid documents on
file at the City Service Center, 1148 KROE Lane, Sheridan
Wyoming 82801.
At a meeting on the above date and promptly
thereafter, all written proposals that have been duly
received will be opened and publicly read.
All proposals must be submitted in sealed opaque
envelopes and clearly marked as per item bid.
Delivery dates listed in Bid Documents.
The City of Sheridan reserves the right to reject any and
all bids and to waive all informalities or minor defects in
the bids, to accept or reject any qualified or conditional
bid, and to accept any item or combination of items in
bid.
Preference shall be given to responsible
Wyoming bidders as defined by Wyoming Statutes,
1990, Section 16-6-102 in the amount of five percent
(5%) higher than responsible non-resident bidders.
CITY OF SHERIDAN
/s/ Nicholas Bateson ,
Nicholas Bateson, Public Works Director
Publish: January 18, February 2, 2015.
Your Right
To Know
and be informed of
government legal
proceedings is
embodied in public
notices. This
newspaper urges
every
citizen to read and
study these
notices.
We strongly advise
those seeking
further information
to exercise their
right of access to
public records and
public meetings.
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in the
event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is not
supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
The Sheridan Press publishes Legal
Notices under the following schedule:
If we receive the Legal Notice by:
Monday Noon –
It will be published in
Thursday’s paper.
Tuesday Noon –
It will be published in
Friday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Saturday’s paper.
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Monday’s paper.
Thursday Noon –
It will be published in
Tuesday’s paper.
Friday Noon –
It will be published in
Wednesday’s paper.
• Complete information, descriptions and billing information are required with
each legal notice. A PDF is required if there are any signatures, with a Word
Document attached.
• Failure to include this information WILL cause delay in publication. All legal
notices must be paid in full before an "AFFIDAVIT OF PUBLICATION" will be
issued.
• Please contact The Sheridan Press legal advertising department at 672-2431 if
you have questions.
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
STATE
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
O U TD O O R S
TO M
M C I N TY R E i
s a noveli
st w hose book,‘
T he
S now Leopard’
s Tale,
’w as publi
shed i
n S eptem ber
by B angtai
lP ress.He i
s also a contri
buti
ng edi
tor to
Mark
Jennings
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-461-0697
John
Patton
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-672-2776
S ports A fi
eld and Fi
eld and S tream m agazi
nes.Hi
s
Every T hursday,The S herid a n P res s publi
shes i
ts O utdoors page as
a com pli
m ent to i
ts sports secti
on.I
ni
t,you’
llfi
nd fi
rst-hand hunti
ng
and fi
shi
ng experi
ences by tw o ofthe m ost accom pli
shed
book,‘
S hooters B i
ble G ui
de to O pti
cs’w as
outdoorsm en i
n our area – G ordon R ose and Tom M cI
ntyre.T hese
publi
shed by S kyhorse P ubli
shi
ng.Follow Tom on
di
sti
ngui
shed w ri
ters reach deeply i
nto subject m atter that affects
Tw i
tter @ m ci
ntyrehunts.
de audi
ence i
n S heri
dan C ounty and beyond.
and i
nterests a w i
To m M cI ntyre
Too,there are new s releases from the W yom i
ng G am e and Fi
sh
Departm ent,new s that every localhunter and fi
sherm an can use.
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
GO R D O N R O S E i
s an attorney w ho w orks as a
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-461-4297
307-278-6030
com m erci
alfly ti
er and operates the S heri
dan W YO
Heali
ng W aters,w hi
ch i
s part ofa non-profi
t
organi
zati
on w hi
ch teaches di
sabled m i
li
tary
veterans fly fi
shi
ng,fly tyi
ng and fly rod bui
ldi
ng as
part ofthei
r therapy.
G o rd o n R o s e
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
B7
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that it is
working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause by
carrying out their partnership with the people’s right to know through public
notices. By offering an independent and archived record of public notices,
newspapers foster a more trusting relationship between government and its
citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
have done so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established,
trustworthy and neutral source that ably transfers information between
government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and are
presented in the most efficient and effective means possible.
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
You are hereby notified that a Petition has
been filed on behalf of Nancy Josephine (Julia)Pilch in
the District Court in and for Sheridan County, Wyoming,
Civil Action No. CV2015-8, the object and prayer of
which is to change the name of the above-named
person from Nancy Josephine (Julia) Pilch to Nancy
Josephine Mikkelson.
Any objection must be filed in the District
Court, 224 S. Main, Suite B-11, Sheridan, Wyoming 82801
in writing, on or before March 11, 2015 or the prayer of
the Petitioner shall be granted.
DATED this 13 day of January, 2015.
By: /s/ Nickie Arney
Deputy Clerk
Publish: January 19, 26, February 2, 9, 2015.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Content matters.
144 G ri
nnell•Sheri
dan,W Y •672-2431
B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, JANUARY 19, 2015