Nursing Annual Report 2011 - 2012 Right Care. Right Now. Right Here.

Nursing Annual Report 2011 - 2012
Right Care. Right Now. Right Here.
It’s my pleasure to be able to
share with you our first nursing annual
report. This report shines a light on
the essential work of our nurses at The
Children’s Medical Center of
Dayton. This report highlights
the depth – and breadth – of
the professional practice of
nursing exemplified each
and every day for our
region’s children.
C. Renae Phillips,
MSN, RN, NEA-BC, FACHE,
Vice President for Patient Care
Services and Chief Nurse Executive
1
Transformational Leadership
Strategic planning, advocacy and influence,
visibility, accessibility and communication
Our nurses at Dayton Children’s reflect the organization’s
commitment to be the first choice for children’s health by
providing high-quality care for the children and families we
serve. In this annual report, you’ll learn that professional
nursing care at Dayton Children’s is driven by our mission to
improve the health status of all children.
You will witness how professional nursing at Dayton Children’s
is practiced. Our professional practice model is built on
Synergy, which matches nurse competencies and patient
needs. Our nursing philosophy is designed to provide familycentered care that aligns with our SPIRIT standards and our
culture of safety to produce the best patient outcomes.
You will also see how we use evidence-based practice and
collaborate with other children’s hospitals to improve safety
and advance the quality of care.
This past year, we continued our journey toward Magnet
designation. Awarded by the American Nurses Credentialing
Center (ANCC), Magnet designation is given to those
organizations that demonstrate high-quality patient care,
nursing excellence and innovation. It’s the gold standard for
nursing practice! We plan to submit our documentation to
ANCC in February 2013. Our documents will showcase our
strong interdisciplinary relationships and excellence in nursing
care. Should we be successful in having our documents
accepted, we will have a site visit in the fall of 2013.
Inside
Nursing Services
Vision and Mission
3
Transformational
Leadership
4
Structural
Empowerment
7
Exemplary
Professional
Practice
13
New Knowledge,
Innovation and
Improvements
17
Moving forward, nursing at Dayton Children’s will be guided
by our first-ever nursing services strategic plan. This plan
outlines our strategies for assuring excellence in nursing care
and alignment with Dayton Children’s strategic plan.
I am proud to work side by side with our nursing staff
each day to provide the right care, right now, right here
at Dayton Children’s.
Transformational Leadership
On the cover:
Ottelee Waite,
MSN, RN,
CRNA, nurse
anesthetist,
surgical
services
2
Nursing services vision
Dayton Children’s is the first choice for pediatric
health care for patients, families, practitioners
and professional nurses.
Nursing services mission
To advocate for the health and well-being of children
through excellent, highly reliable, evidence-based
nursing care that places the family at the center and is
strengthened through service, education and research.
3
Linda
Hollen,
MS, RN,
FNP-BC,
provides the
right care,
right now,
right here in
the surgical
services
department
at Dayton
Children’s.
Nursing initiates a strategic plan
Last year, Nursing Leadership began the process of developing
its first strategic plan, setting the course for nursing at Dayton
Children’s. Four strategies were identified that align with the
strategic focus of the hospital’s 2015 strategic plan.
“As nurses at
Dayton Children’s,
our mission is to advocate
for the health and well-
Strategic Plan 2015
being of children. The
new strategic plan
Strategic
Focus
Dayton
Children’s
Nursing
Services
requires us to serve as
Assertiveness
Take a more
assertive market
stance
Serve as nurse
leaders in pediatric
health care
deliver cost-effective
Adapt to changing
payer mix and
reimbursement
Deliver cost
effective care
for the children
we serve
resources at the right time,
Access
Drive revenue
growth through
improved patient
access to specialty
care
Ensure the right
resources are
available to deliver
the right care
Quality/Safety
Become a
“high-reliability”
organization
Become a
“high-reliability”
organization
Cost Effectiveness
pediatric leaders,
care and have the right
in a safe environment.”
Renae Phillips, MSN, RN,
NEA-BC, FACHE, Vice President for Patient
Care Services and Chief
Nurse Executive
Transformational Leadership
4
Sandy
Bartosik,
MS, RN,
CCRC,
2012 Nursing
Excellence
award
winner,
educating a
pulmonary
patient and
his mother
on keeping
accurate
records.
The Joint Commission
In 2012, Dayton Children’s successfully
completed an unannounced survey by The Joint
Commission. Surveyors identified the daily safety
briefing as a very strong asset to the care of our
patients. The patient callback system in the
emergency department was also identified as a
“best practice,” and the surveyors encouraged
us to share it with others. Success with The Joint
Commission survey is always a testament to
quality care and a collaborative environment
among all disciplines.
5
Trauma nurse leader program:
Equipping nurses to be leaders
Dayton Children’s began its trauma nurse leader program in 2011.
This program is designed to develop nurse leaders who direct the
care of critically-ill children.
A number of emergency staff nurses have completed the oneyear trauma nurse leader internship, providing them with the
opportunity to develop leadership skills. Over the course of
their internship, they not only assume a leadership role in the
trauma room, but assume responsibility for evaluating process
improvements, making recommendations for change and
evaluating the results of these changes in practice. This group has
become a respected and valuable asset at Dayton Children’s.
The Soin Pediatric
Emergency and
Trauma Center
had a record-high
parent satisfaction
with 91.5!
Pictured left to
right, front row:
Brandon Carr,
RN; Cesar “JR”
Panganiban, BSN,
RN; Janet Ellis, RN.
Back row: Steven
Lewis, RN; Karen
McConnell, RN,
CPEN; Michele
Nadolsky, BSN, RN,
CPEN. Trauma nurse
leaders in training
and not pictured
include Daniel
Lantis, RN; Lindsey
Terrace, BSN, RN,
and Brittany
Pritchard, RN.
Transformational Leadership
6
Jennifer
Ayers,
BSN, RN,
2012 Nursing
Excellence
award
winner and
Daisy Award
winner,
treats the
sickest
neonates
in Dayton
Children’s
Regional
Level IIIB
Newborn
Intensive
Care Unit.
Recognizing nurses
Dayton Children’s has numerous awards and
recognition programs to honor nurses for their
vital contributions to patient care.
7
Structural Empowerment
Professional development, teaching,
community involvement, nursing recognition
2012 Nursing Excellence award winners
The excellence award categories are based on the
Synergy Professional Practice Model.
The Daisy
Award
The DAISY Award recognizes
nurses for their extraordinary
acts of compassion with
patients and families.
August 2011
Nancy Callaham, BSN, RN
Developmental Pediatrics
Advocacy/Moral Agency
Amanda Hofmann, RN
Emergency Department
Caring Practices
Elizabeth Lee, RN
Three West
Clinical Judgment Alice Rivera, RN
Surgical Services
November 2011
Cynthia Dixon, MSN, RN, CPN
Almost Home Unit
February 2012
Erica Yanney, BSN, RN
Almost Home Unit
June 2012
Jennifer Ayers, BSN, RN
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
Clinical Inquiry
Sandy Bartosik,
MS, RN, CCRC
Pulmonary Clinic
Collaboration
Molly Depoorter, RN
Surgical Services
Facilitator of Learning Cheryl Coffey, BSN, RN
Hematology/Oncology Clinic
Outstanding New Employee
Jennifer Ayers, BSN, RN
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
Outstanding New Graduate
Kristen Morey, BSN, RN
Intermediate Care Unit/
Pediatric Intensive Care Unit
Response to Diversity
Amy Kosanovich, BSN, RN
Three East
August 2012
Kari Roberts, BSN, RN
Hematology/Oncology Unit
Systems Thinking Alysia Brazel, BSN, RN
Emergency Department
Structural Empowerment
8
IMPACTS
program
recipients fall
2011 class
The IMPACTS (Improving
My Professional
Advancement Career
Through Synergy) program
is Dayton Children’s
clinical advancement
ladder. Nurses complete
certain requirements in
order to advance. This
recognition program is for
successful contributions as
direct care providers.
Level III
Glenda Davis, BSN, RNC
Intermediate Care Unit
JoAnn Davis, MS, RN, CPNP-AC, CCRN
Pediatric Intensive Care Unit
Mari Jo Rosenbauer, MS, RNC, CPNP-PC, IBCLC,
nurse and lactation consultant in the NICU.
Cameos of Caring winner
9
Level II
Sylvia Cain, BSN, RN, SANE-P
Emergency Department
April Denlinger, BSN, RN, CPEN, SANE-P
Emergency Department
Sarah Farley, BSN, RN
Intermediate Care Unit
Rebecca Hendricks, BSN, RN
Intermediate Care Unit
Heather Holfinger, BSN, RN
Medical Imaging
Lisa Kinsman, MS, RN, CPNP-PC
House Float
Carol Murray, MS, RN, CPN, CPNP-AC
Intermediate Care Unit
Lindsay Tucholski, BSN, RN
Intermediate Care Unit
Karen Turner, RNC-NIC
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
Cameos of Caring is a special awards program
sponsored by the Wright State University’s
College of Nursing and Health. All local hospitals
participate. This award is a prestigious honor
for recipients.
Mari Jo Rosenbauer, MS, RNC, CPNP-PC, IBCLC
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
Mari Jo Rosenbauer, pictured above, has been with
Dayton Children’s for 26 years. For more than a
decade, she has served as a lactation consultant.
Her position is critical to ensuring premature
and critically-ill neonates receive the benefits
of breast milk from their mother or our
milk donor program.
Nursing partners with
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base
Dayton Children’s nursing division is proud to assist Wright-Patterson Air Force Base
with its combat readiness program. This program provides the opportunity for WrightPatterson nurses who are preparing for deployment to gain valuable experience in the care
of critically-injured children. In 2012, Dayton Children’s developed the Partners in Practice
program with Wright-Patterson to enable its nurses to refresh their pediatric clinical
skills. Working together with our community partners helps strengthen the skills of the
professional nursing staff of both organizations.
Preparing the next generation
for tomorrow’s patients
Each year, Dayton Children’s hosts approximately 900 nursing
students from undergraduate to doctoral students. Students come
from across the state, gaining valuable clinical experience in
pediatrics. Students are placed in inpatient units, ambulatory
clinics, surgery and the emergency department.
Students come from the following Ohio universities and colleges:
Renae Phillips,
MSN, RN, NEA-BC,
FACHE, discusses the
future of nursing to
a group of potential
caregivers during
Nurse Camp.
4 Akron University
4 Cedarville University
4 Clark State University
4 Edison College
4 Kettering College of Medical Arts
4 Miami University
4 Ohio Northern University
4 The Ohio State University
4 Sinclair Community College
4 The University of Cincinnati
4 Wright State University
Structural Empowerment
10
Vital Statistics*
13%
Master’s
Degree
50%
BSN/Bachelor’s
Degree
37%
Diploma/Associate
Degree
633
Total nurses: APNs, RNs and LPNs
(63% of nurses have a bachelor’s
degree or higher)
125
Nurses certified in their specialty
75
NRP certified
(Neonatal resuscitation program)
117
TNCC certified
(Trauma nurse core course)
345
PALS certified
(Pediatric Advanced Life Support)
“Every nurse has the
2012 Nursing Satisfaction**
<40
low satisfaction
opportunity to have a
40-60
60+
moderate satisfaction
Job enjoyment
high satisfaction
59.53
Children’s. I believe this
RN-RN interactions
Autonomy
directly correlates to
our outstanding nursing
satisfaction scores.”
— Renae Phillips,
53.80
MSN, RN, NEA-BC,
60.19
71.77
Professional status
Professional development
73.55
65.42
RN-MD interactions
Decision-making
and their practice of
nursing at Dayton
54.61
Task
voice in patient care
FACHE
65.53
Nursing management
58.16
Nursing administration
57.68
*Vital Statistics as of November 2012
**NDNQI (National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators), Nursing Satisfaction Survey
11
Evidence-based practice/outcomes,
council leaders:
Carol Murray, MS, RN, CPN, CPNP-AC
Cindy Brown, MS, RN, CNS
Jennifer York, BSN, RN, cares for a patient in the general pediatric unit.
Shared Governance leads to
high satisfaction — for nurses
and patients
Shared Governance provides nurses at every level within the
organization an opportunity to be part of the decisionmaking about nursing through partnership, participation,
ownership, authority and accountability.
These councils promote the feeling that individual nurses
have a personal stake in the organization and patient care,
which increases employee satisfaction, improves the quality
of health care and leads to greater patient satisfaction. Each
of the Shared Governance councils are chaired by a staff
nurse and co-led with a nurse leader mentor.
Patient/family support, council leaders:
Cynthia Dixon, MSN, RN, CPN
Holly Lane, MS, RN, NEA-BC
Clinical operations, council leaders:
Cheri Skiles, BSN, RN
Jennifer Morris, BSN, RNC-NIC
Quality, council leaders:
Terrie Koss, BSN, RN
Cindy Burger, MS, RN
Governance, council leaders:
Alysia Brazel, BSN, RN
Susan Powell, MS, MBA, RN
Nursing Leadership:
The final step of our shared governance
model is Nursing Leadership. Nursing
Leadership is a decision-making council
that provides oversight and strategic
direction for professional nursing practice
at Dayton Children’s.
Structural Empowerment
12
Aligning nurse competencies to patient needs
Dayton Children’s professional practice model is called Synergy. The
nursing professional practice model competencies include: advocacy/
moral agency, caring practice, collaboration, systems thinking, response to
diversity, facilitation of learning, clinical inquiry and clinical judgment.
By utilizing nurses’ competencies matched with patients’ needs, we enhance
patient outcomes. To visually represent the model, Nursing Leadership
created a graphic – the flower pot – which shows how the model is based on
the foundation of the hospital’s mission and vision, and represents growth,
rooted in a culture of safety and SPIRIT standards, encircled in familycentered care.
13
Exemplary Professional Practice
Ethics, patient safety and
quality infrastructure
Keeping kids safe
The OCHSPS initiative for Dayton Children’s is co-led by
Hila Collins, MS, RN, CPNP-AC, CIC, and James Ebert, MD.
Dayton Children’s initiatives in safety
Leadership training: Four nurse super trainers assisted in
rolling out training to 200 staff in leadership positions.
Nursing quality indicators are
continually monitored. Our
outcomes are exceptional as
compared to all hospitals
nationwide.
Central Line Bloodstream Infections
4.0
3.5
3.0
2.5 National Average
2.0
1.5
1.0
0.5
0
July June
2011
Training on behavioral expectations: Specific techniques
were taught to all employees to demonstrate behavioral
expectations, including hand-off techniques.
Ventilator Associated Pneumonia
Daily safety briefing: A team of employees, including
seven registered nurses attend a 15-minute daily safety
briefing to review events in the last 24 hours and discuss
the next 24 hours in an effort to minimize risk of harm
to patients, employees and visitors.
Rate per 1,000 Ventilator Days
Error prevention training: A team of registered nurses
taught prevention techniques to more than 1,800
employees, physicians and volunteers.
Our key nursing
quality indicators
Rate per 1,000 CVL Days
Dayton Children’s is a part of Ohio Children’s Hospitals’
Solutions for Patient Safety (OCHSPS), a statewide learning
network that is the first of its kind in the nation. OCHSPS is
committed to making Ohio’s children’s hospitals the safest in
the country. The goal is for all Ohio children’s hospitals to
reduce serious harm by 95 percent by 2015.
5.0
4.5
National Average
4.0
3.5
3.0
2.5
2.0
1.5
1.0
0.5
0
July June
2011
JulyJune
2012
JulyJune
2012
Exemplary Professional Practice
14
Staffing for today and tomorrow
Nurse leaders work together to trend data to formulate a staffing plan. This
helps ensure we have the right staff, at the right time, delivering the right
care to our patients. The plan uses projected patient volumes, nursing
standards and our staff’s competencies. The staffing committee is formed
based on the principles of House Bill 346.
The staffing committee makes recommendations to the chief nurse
executive as part of the budget planning process. Participation in the
staffing plan gives nurses the opportunity to be influential in driving
strategies for more effective patient care.
2012 staffing committee staff nurse members
4 Betsy Medaugh, BSN, RN, General Pediatrics
4 Meghan Moore, BSN, RN, CPN, General Pediatrics
4 Patty Ducharme, RN, Newborn Intensive Care Unit
4 Alyssa Teegardin, RN, Almost Home Unit 4 Connie Cunningham, BSN, RN, Surgical Services
4 Erica Yanney, BSN, RN, Almost Home Unit
4 Michele Nadolsky, BSN, RN, CPEN, Emergency Department
4 Cheri Skiles, BSN, RN, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit
4 Molly Renaud, BSN, RN, House Float
4 Lindsay Tucholski, BSN, RN, Intermediate Care Unit
2012 staffing committee management members
4 Renae Phillips, MSN, RN, NEA-BC, FACHE,
Vice President For Patient Care Services, Chief Nurse Executive
4 Joan Lakes, BSN, RN, Operations Coordinator, Surgical Services
4 Holly Lane, MS, RN, NEA-BC, Director, General Pediatrics
4 Tami Wiggins, MSA, RN, NE-BC, Administrative Manager,
Pediatric Intensive Care and Intermediate Care Units
4 Karen Beekman, BSN, RNC-NIC, Resource Nurse,
Newborn Intensive Care Unit
4 Christie Banford, BSN, RN, Administrative Manager,
Almost Home and Hematology/Oncology Units
4 Susan Powell, MS, MBA, RN, Director of Nursing Excellence
4 Andrea Zimmer, BSN, RN, CPEN, Resource Manager,
Nursing Administration
4 Leslie Grooms, MS, SPHR, CEBS, Director of Human Resources
15
Rounding for optimal outcomes
The comprehensive family-centered rounding
teams include physicians, pediatric nurse
practitioners, staff nurses, residents, specialists,
medical students and family members with the
goal of including the family in the decisionmaking process. Family-centered rounds have
been successful in our newborn intensive care,
intermediate care and pediatric intensive care
units, as well as the hematology/oncology unit.
In the fall of 2011, this model was implemented
on our general inpatient floors, three east and
three west.
The new rounding process in general pediatrics enhances the
partnership of the family, nurses, physicians and other care team
members. Including parents in the rounding process is more than
just a courtesy — parents provide an important voice in their child’s
care. With all inpatient units now fully participating in family-centered
rounds, we’ve seen improvements in patient satisfaction scores across
key questions relating to communication and family involvement.
Nurses in general
pediatrics assist
physicians,
residents and
medical students
with family-centered
rounds. Top left:
Emily Krumm, BSN,
RN. Top right: Ann
Marie Schmersal,
MS, RN, CPNP-AC.
Raw Score
General Pediatrics Family-Centered Rounds
92
90
88
86
84
82
80
Comparison of scores three east and three west from 2011 and 2012
Doctors
Nurses inform Doctors inform concern
for
using clear
using clear
questions/
language
language
worries
2011
86
86.9
88.5
2012
88.7
89
90.9
Prior to
implementing
family-centered
rounds in 2011
Staff include Respect for
you in deci- your knowl- Staff worked Care given at
sions regard- edge
of child well together this hospital
ing treatment
84.5
85.4
87.2
87.9
89.2
87.7
86.9
90.7
Post implementation of
family-centered
rounds 2012
Exemplary Professional Practice
16
Erin Black,
BSN, RN,
CPEN, is an
emergency
department
nurse who
participates
in the awardwinning,
postdischarge
outreach
program.
Recognition for the emergency
department post-discharge
outreach program
The Dayton Children’s Emergency Outreach Nurse Program won first
place in “Patient-Centered Care” at the First Annual National Nursing
Patient Safety Awards Program at Georgetown University Hospital,
Washington, D.C. in the summer of 2011. Through this program,
outreach nurses call patients perceived to be at high risk, such as
patients who left without being seen, patients who may not follow
discharge instructions or patients who have a positive lab finding
after discharge.
A post-discharge phone call allows a registered nurse to reinforce
discharge instructions, answer questions, arrange for follow-up
appointments for testing or identify if a patient needs to return to the
emergency department. Last year, more than 16,000 calls were made
through the outreach program.
17
New Knowledge, Innovation
and Improvements
Nursing innovation, research,
evidence-based practices
Evidence-based practice and research
leads to improved care
At Dayton Children’s, nurses use research to provide evidence-based care
that promotes quality health outcomes for patients and families. Examples
of nurse-led research studies that were published this fiscal year include:
4 Effectiveness of oral sucrose for pain management in infants during
immunizations. Published by Cindy Brown, MSN, RN, CNS, in
Pain Management Nursing, this study
examined the effects of oral sucrose
Implementing the right
as an analgesic agent during routine
immunizations in infants at 2, 4 and 6
technology for patient safety
months of age.
A nurse-led committee implemented Alaris® System
4 A multicenter prospective analysis of
smart pumps in March 2012. The Alaris pumps
pediatric trauma activation criteria
improve safety by preventing medication errors.
routinely used in addition to the six
The smart pump provides an alert if the nurse enters
criteria of the American College of
the incorrect medication name, dosage or infusion
Surgeons. Published by Lisa Schwing,
rate information. The nurse then has the opportunity
RN, in Journal of Acute Care Surgeons,
to make a correction to avoid a potential safety event.
this study evaluated the American
Cathy Gill, BS, RN, co-chair of the Clinical Value
College of Surgeons six criteria (ACSAnalysis Committee (CVAC), led a multidisciplinary
6) routinely used for top-tier pediatric
team, which reviewed and provided input on the
trauma team activation and 21 other
choice of pumps for patients.
criteria to evaluate overtriage and
undertriage rates.
4 Predictors of failure of high-flow,
high-humidity nasal cannula therapy
in infants with viral bronchiolitis.
Cheri Skiles, BSN, RN, along with two
other Dayton Children’s clinicians,
published the findings of a three-year
research study in Pediatric Critical
Care Medicine. The study evaluated
what patient variables are most likely
to respond to noninvasive, positivepressure ventilation in patients with
viral bronchiolitis.
Julie Kelley, MS, RN, and Tynisha Edmondson, PCA,
assisting a patient with an Alaris pump.
New Knowledge, Innovation
and Improvements
18
Pictured left
to right:
Kara
Nurrenbrock,
MS, MBA,
RN-BC,
and Karen
Beekman,
BSN, RNCNIC, received
first place
in “Quality”
at OONE’s
annual meeting
and poster
presentation
for new process
improvements
that improve the
health outcomes
of our tiniest
patients.
Surgical services and NICU recognized
for quality
Dayton Children’s received first place in the “Quality” category out
of 60 entries from around the state at the Ohio Organization of Nurse
Executives (OONE) annual meeting last fall.
The Regional Level IIIB Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) and surgical
services staff were recognized for improving the process of children in
the NICU having surgery. These changes improve safety, reduce the risk
of errors and better utilize the valuable time of staff.
This initiative was developed by:
4 Rhonda Beane, MSN, RN, Director of Surgical Services
4 Cindy Burger, MS, RN, Director of Critical Care,
Emergency and Trauma Services
4 Carol Wise, MS, RN-BC, CPHQ, Director of Quality
4 Kara Nurrenbrock, MS, MBA, RN-BC,
Administrative Manager, Surgery
4 Karen Beekman, BSN, RNC-NIC, NICU Resource Nurse
4 Lisa Jasin, MS, RNC-NIC, NNP-BC, Neonatal Nurse Practitioner
19
Publications, posters and presentations
Posters
4 Society of Pediatrics Nursing
Convention
April 2012, Houston, TX
Effect of parent education and engagement
related to the initiation of a pediatric
response team call.
Cindy Brown, MSN, RN, CNS, and
JoAnn Davis, MS, RN, CPNP-AC, CCRN
4 Ohio Organization of Nurse Executives
November 2012, Columbus, OH
Effect of parent education and engagement
related to the initiation of a pediatric
response team call.
Cindy Brown, MSN, RN, CNS, and
JoAnn Davis, MS, RN, CPNP-AC, CCRN
4 Emergency Nurses Association
General Conference
September 13-15, 2012, San Diego, CA
Developing an efficient and effective
triage process in a pediatric
emergency department.
Pam Bucaro, MS, RN, PCNS-BC,
CPNP-PC, CPEN;
Erin Black, BSN, RN, CPEN;
Elaine Markland, BSN, RN, CPEN;
Karen McConnell, RN, CPEN;
Carol Swigart, BSN, RN, CPEN
4 Pediatric Hospital Medicine Conference
July 2012, Cincinnati, OH
Apparent life-threatening event, seriously?
Ann Marie Schmersal, MS, RN, CPNP-AC,
and Ranjana Sinha, MD
4 Wright State University
Submitted April 2012, Dayton, OH
A U.S.-based study on nurses’ perceptions
of family nursing practice.
Renae Phillips, MSN, RN, NEA-BC,
FACHE, Vice President for Patient Care
Services, Chief Nurse Executive;
Rosemary Eustace, PhD, CFLE,
PHCNS-BC, RN, Assistant Professor,
Wright State University;
Donna Miles-Curry, PhD, RN, Professor,
Wright State University;
Bobbe Ann Gray, PhD, RNC-OB,
CNS-BC, Associate Professor,
Wright State University
Presentations
4 The Children’s Medical Center of Dayton
November 30, 2011, Dayton, OH
Cystic fibrosis screening
for the newborn.
Leora Langdon, MS,
As a teaching
RN, CPNP-PC
4 The Children’s Medical
Center of Dayton
June 20, 2012,
Dayton, OH
Assessment of the
emergent pediatric
patient.
Pam Bucaro, MS, RN,
PCNS-BC, CPNP-PC,
CPEN
4 The Children’s Medical
Center of Dayton
January 18, 2012,
Dayton, OH
Error prevention training.
Hila L. Collins, MS, RN,
CPNP-AC, CIC
hospital, Dayton
Children’s works
closely with area
universities, not
only to train future
nurses, but also to
advance pediatric
care through
research and
written scholarship,
including
journal articles
and abstract
publications.
New Knowledge, Innovation
and Improvements
20
Pictured left
to right:
Hila L. Collins,
MS, RN, CPNPAC, CIC, and
James Ebert,
MD, presenting
about the
impact of a
high-reliability
organization
using a daily
safety brief.
4 The Children’s Medical Center
of Dayton
February 28, 2012, Dayton, OH
The impact of a high-reliability
organization using a daily safety brief.
Hila L. Collins, MS, RN, CPNP-AC, CIC
4 Associate of Women’s Health,
Obstetrics and Neonatal Nurses,
Columbus Chapter
August 2012, Columbus, OH
In-utero methadone exposure.
Lisa Jasin, MS, RNC-NIC, NNP-BC
4 Cedarville University
June 21, 2012, Cedarville, OH
Infectious disease in the pediatric
population.
Hila L. Collins, MS, RN, CPNP-AC, CIC
4 National Association of
Neonatal Nurses
November 2012, Palm Springs, CA
In-utero substance exposure:
What’s a neonatal nurse to do?
Lisa Jasin, MS, RNC-NIC, NNP-BC
4 The Children’s Medical Center
of Dayton
June 27, 2012, Dayton, OH
Skin and soft tissue case study.
Hila L. Collins, MS, RN, CPNP-AC, CIC
4 Associate of Women’s Health,
Obstetrics and Neonatal Nurses,
Dayton Chapter
March 2012, Dayton, OH
In-utero methadone exposure.
Lisa Jasin, MS, RNC-NIC, NNP-BC
21
4 The Children’s Medical Center
of Dayton
April 2012, Dayton, OH
Chronic pain management in
children and adolescents.
Cindy Brown, MSN, RN, CNS
4 The Children’s Medical Center
of Dayton
June 2012, Dayton, OH
Chronic pain management in
children and adolescents.
Cindy Brown, MSN, RN, CNS, and
Daniel Lacey, MD, PhD
4 Dayton Area Graduate Medical
Education Council
March 2012, Dayton, OH
Acute pain management in children
and adolescents.
Cindy Brown, MSN, RN, CNS
4 Life Connection of Ohio
April 2012, Dayton, OH
Supporting staff through the process
of organ donation.
Cindy Brown, MSN, RN, CNS
Publications
4 Brown, C., Curry, D., Wrona, S. (2012)
Effectiveness of oral sucrose for
pain management in infants during
immunizations. Pain Management
Nursing. 22( 3), September 2012
4 Collins, H. (2012)
Pertussis, Pediatric Clips, The Children’s
Medical Center of Dayton, January 2012
4 Smith, S., and Hoersting, A. (2012)
Positional plagiocephaly, Pediatric Clips,
The Children’s Medical Center of Dayton,
May 2012
4 Riedel, A. (2012)
Tricyclic overdose, Pediatric Clips,
The Children’s Medical Center of Dayton,
September 2012
4 Hollen, L. (2012)
What – No operation for appendicitis?
Pediatric Clips, The Children’s Medical
Center of Dayton, March 2012.
4 Bucaro, P. (2012)
Case study on rabies. Pediatric Clips,
The Children’s Medical Center of Dayton,
June 2012.
Nurse leaders who serve on local and national
professional organizations
4 Karen Beekman, BSN, RNC-NIC
March of Dimes Miami Valley Chapter,
Committee Chair
4 Cathy Gill, BS, RN
- Ohio Organization of Nurse Executives (OONE), Committee Chair
- Dayton Organization of Ohio Nurse Executives, Board
4 Angela Hoersting, MS, RN, CPNP-AC/PC
The National Association of Pediatric Nurse
Practitioners (NAPNAP), Board
4 Susan Kern, MSN, RNC-NIC, NNP-BC
Infant, Child and Adolescent Nutrition,
Editorial Board
4 Renae Phillips, MSN, RN, NEA-BC, FACHE
- Ohio Organization of Nurse Executives (OONE), President
- Ohio Action Coalition, Member
- American Organization of Nurse Executives, President
4 Abigail Riedel, MS, RN, CNP-AC/PC
A Special Wish Foundation, Inc. —
Dayton Chapter, Board
4 Stephanie Smith, MS, RN, CPNP
The National Association of Pediatric Nurse
Practitioners (NAPNAP), Committee Chair
4 Carol Wise, MS, RN-BC, CPHQ
- Ohio Association for Healthcare Quality (OAHQ), Board Member
- Ohio Patient Safety Institute Education Committee, Chair
- Ohio Patient Safety Institute (OPSI), Chair
New Knowledge, Innovation
and Improvements
22
Nonprofit Organization
U.S. Postage Paid
Permit Number 323
Dayton, Ohio
One Children’s Plaza
Dayton, Ohio 45404-1815
Our Nursing Leadership
Renae Phillips, MSN, RN, NEA-BC, FACHE Vice President for Patient Care Services and Chief Nurse Executive
Rhonda Beane, MSN, RN
Karen Braun, MHA, FACHE
Director of Surgical Services
Cindy Brown, MSN, RN, CNS
Cindy Burger, MS, RN
Director of Ambulatory Services
Clinical Nurse Specialist for Hospital Operations
Director of Critical Care Services, Emergency and Trauma Services
Julie Deschenes, MS, RN, CPHQ
Director of Nursing Informatics
Leslie Grooms, MS, SPHR, CEBS
Director of Human Resources
Holly Lane, MS, RN, NEA-BC Director of General Pediatrics
Susan Powell, MS, MBA, RN Director of Nursing Excellence
Carol Wise, MS, RN-BC, CPHQ Director of Quality, Patient Safety and Corporate Education
© 2013 The Children’s Medical Center of Dayton.
All Rights Reserved.
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