Island Sun News Sanibel Captiva

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NEWSPAPER
VOL. 22, NO. 31
SANIBEL
& CAPTIVA
ISLANDS,
FLORIDA
Sanibel
& Captiva
Islands
JANUARY SUNRISE/SUNSET: 23 7:17 • 6:03 24 7:16 • 6:04 25 7:16 • 6:05 26 7:16 • 6:06 27 7:16 • 6:06
Comedy At
Strauss Explores
Theater’s Role,
Relationships
P
eggy has redecorated the living
room and her husband, Roger,
can’t stand it. Peggy’s usually
exquisite taste was overcome by a
mysterious lapse that caused her to
redo her living room as if it were a
stage set – everything faces one wall,
the fourth wall, which she’s left bare,
and which faces the audience.
In The Fourth Wall, his tribute to
the theater, playwright AR Gurney
comically explores the relationship of
theater with its audiences and the connections it makes through that fourth
wall, the invisible partition at the front
of the stage through which the audience sees the action on the stage and
the actors look to imaginary scenes.
Showtimes are 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays
to Saturdays through February 21,
with twilight matinee performances at
4 p.m. on Sundays, February 8 and 15. Tickets are $42 for adults and $5 for students
and children, and are available at the Strauss Theater Box Office, 472-6862, or online
at www.bigarts.org.
Gurney expertly uses the stage to explore, quite comically, theater’s place in the
world today. Each character who enters the contemporary, upper class living room
begins to behave as if they were acting in a play, or even a musical when occasionally
someone feels the urge to sing a Cole Porter tune. Roger calls on friends to try to end
the theatrics, but Peggy sets out to break the fourth wall in order to connect with her
feelings. Laughs, loves, and more tunes ensue as characters and audience alike respond
to the fourth wall in front of them.
Starring: Nancy Antonio (Peggy), Eric Cover (Roger), Julie Arensman (Julia), and
David Morrissey, Jr. (Floyd). Directed by Bobby Logue.
For more information, call 472-6862 or email [email protected]
The Fourth Wall is sponsored by Congress Jewelers and the Island Sun; the Strauss
Theater’s 2014–2015 season is sponsored by The Sanibel Captiva Trust Company.
Three Candidates Qualify
For Council Election
by Jeff Lysiak
O
ne incumbent and two newcomers have qualified to run for the pair of city
council seats up for election on March 3.
Long-time council member Jim Jennings, along with Sanibel residents
Chauncey P. Goss and Frances J. Slane, submitted their candidate qualifying paperwork
before the noon deadline on January 16.
The lone incumbent seeking re-election, Jennings serves as the council liaison of the
Contractors Review Board, the Vegetation Committee and the Employee Dependent
Scholarship Committee. He is also the voting delegate of the National League of Cities.
He was first elected to council in 2003.
Goss, the managing partner and founder of Goss Practical Solutions, has a master’s
JANUARY 23, 2015
28 7:15 • 6:07 29 7:15 • 6:08
Soprano Emalie Savoy To Debut
New Work Written By Her Father
A
lready able to touch audiences personally with the lyrical beauty of
her voice, soprano Emalie Savoy
will add a special personal touch to her
upcoming performance at BIG ARTS. Her
song recital will not only include classical and contemporary selections, but this
appearance will also include the premiere
of a song written just for her.
The concert takes place Sunday, January
25 at 3:30 p.m. in Schein Performance
Hall at BIG ARTS. Tickets are $32 for
general seating; students and children will
be admitted free. Tickets are available at
the Marks Box Office, 900 Dunlop Road,
by phone at 395-0900 or online at www.
bigarts.org/classic2.
On the program at Schein Hall will be
the debut performance of An Iliad for
Emalie. written by Savoy’s father, Thomas
Emalie Savoy
Savoy, a composer and organist, and his
friend and frequent collaborator, Bertrand T.
Fay. The piece sets Fay’s poem of the same name in the classic musical form of a passacaglia. Fay based the poem on a chorus from Euripides’ Hecuba.
“It is always a singular opportunity to set an original text,” said Thomas Savoy,
“More so when it is dedicated to one’s daughter. It is a piece of intense expression, purposely written for Emalie’s vocal beauty, insight, and sensitivity.”
The program will also feature works by Strauss, Barber, Poulenc and Bizet, plus
selections from Broadway and the American Songbook.
Hailed as “a fresh young voice of great promise” (Musical America), Emalie Savoy
is becoming widely recognized for the unique interpretive depth she brings to her
performances. She has performed to great acclaim in both operatic and concert repertoire, making her Metropolitan Opera debut during the 2011–12 season in Leoš
Janácek’s The Makropulos Case and returning to the Met in Verdi’s Rigoletto in
2013, which was broadcast as part of the Live in HD series. In recognition of her
outstanding artistic achievement and potential, she was a recipient of a 2013 Leonore
Annenberg Fellowship as well as the 2012 Hildegard Behrens Foundation Young Artist
Humanitarian Award. She is a graduate of The Metropolitan Opera’s Lindemann Young
Artist Development Program and holds bachelor and master of music degrees in vocal
continued on page 3
degree in public policy from Georgetown University and a BA from Rollins College. He
previously worked for the President’s Office of Management and Budget. In 2012, he
ran unsuccessfully for the United States House of Representatives.
Slane, who currently serves as the accounts payable/cashiering supervisor for the
city’s finance department, supports several island organizations (FISH, SCCF and
the United Way) through volunteerism. She attended Macalester College in St. Paul,
Minnesota and earned an MBA from the University of Minnesota – Carlson School of
Management.
Vice Mayor Doug Congress did not seek re-election to the council. His term of office
will officially end on March 9.
Sanibel’s general election will take place on Tuesday, March 3. Polls will be open
from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. in the city’s three precincts:
• Precinct 16 – Island Civic Center, 2407 Library Way
• Precinct 117 – Sanibel Community Church, 1740 Periwinkle Way
• Precinct 118 – Sanibel Congregational United Church of Christ, 2050 Periwinkle
Way.
2
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ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
From page 1
Soprano Emalie
Savoy Debut
performance from The Juilliard School,
with additional studies at the International
Meistersinger Akademie in Neumarkt,
Germany.
For more information, call 395-0900
or email [email protected]
Emalie Savoy’s performance at BIG
ARTS is part of the Classical Afternoons
Series, sponsored by Deborah and John
La Gorce.
American
Legion Post 123
O
n Sunday, January 25, American
Legion Post 123 will offer barbecued ribs and chicken from 1 to
8 p.m.
Every Monday, the 8-Ball Pool League
plays at 5 p.m. Stop in to cheer on your
team.
Liver and onions will be served all day
on Wednesdays.
Texas Hold’em is played Thursdays
from 7 to 10 p.m. and Saturdays from
4:30 to 10 p.m. Players are welcome
and must be members.
Every Friday, a six-ounce ribeye steak
sandwich is available all day. There are
daily specials as well as the popular halfpound burgers. Food is served from 11
a.m. to 8 p.m. The public is welcome.
On Super Bowl Sunday, February 1,
there will be a buffet and live music with
Robby Hutto.
The Ladies Auxiliary willmeet Tuesday,
February 3 at 6 p.m. Ladies Auxilliary
cookbooks are available for a $15 donation.
If you have an American flag that
needs to be retired, drop it off at Post
123 at your convenience.
Hours are Monday through Saturday
from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday from
noon to 9 p.m.
American Legion Post 123 is located
at mile marker 3 on Sanibel-Captiva
Road. For more information, call 4729979.
Skin Screening
At Rec Center
Arts & Crafts Fair
Saturday, February 7
9am - 2pm
3
What’s Happening At
The House In 2015
SCA Events
Fun Fest 2015
Handcrafted items by 40 vendors
• Shell designs
• Jewelry
• Paintings
• Books
• Photography
• Fabric Art • Pottery
• Glasswork • Tropical Plants
Center 4 Life
Palm Ridge Road & Library Way, Sanibel FL
Jan. 25 10-4 pm
Town Festival
Gertrude Bell Performance
Feb 5 Noon Luncheon
$30/Members; $40/Guests
CLASSES/PROGRAMS
Complimentary Shell Crafting
Lesson: Monday begins 10 am - Noon
Crafts on Sale Mon.-Friday until 3 p.m.
Advanced iPad/iPhone
Jan 29 9:30 am
$35 Members/$40 Guests
Sissi Paint Party
Jan 26 7 pm
$40 members, $45 guests
Sanctioned Duplicate Bridge
Beginning January
Tues. & Thurs. 1 pm
Optimize Your Health
Feb. 11 4 pm
Identity Theft
Jan. 30 10 am FREE
Paint Your Pet
Jan. 29 3:30 pm -6:30 pm
$65/Members; $70 Guests
Yoga
Monday and Thursday
8:30 am
H
arris Dermatology will be offering
complimentary skin cancer screening at the Sanibel Recreation
Center on Friday, January 23 from 8 to
11 a.m. Screenings are quick and easy.
The exam is a non-invasive, visual
inspection of exposed areas of the body
that will be done after a brief medical
history is completed. No appointment or
registration necessary; walk-ins are welcome.
The recreation center is located at
3880 Sanibel-Captiva Road. Call 4720345 for more information.
Telephone: (239) 472-2155
[email protected]
www.sanibelcommunityhouse.net
2173 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel, FL 33957
“To enrich community spirit through educational,
cultural and social gatherings in our
historic Community House.”
The SCA is a 501c 3 Organization.
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4
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Women Recall Sanibel’s Past: Ferries,
Hurricanes And Forming A City
Sarita Van Vleck
Betty Anholt
The second Historical Women of
Sanibel Panel, sponsored by Debi Almeida of
Event sponsor Debi Almeida talks about how the idea of hosting a historical women
panel got started
photos by Jeff Lysiak
by Jeff Lysiak
A
capacity crowd gathered at The Community House last Friday afternoon as
three ladies – Eleanor Kinzie, Betty Anholt and Sarita Van Vleck – shared
some of the most compelling stories from the island’s past from the perspective of long-time Sanibelians.
Sanibel Blue Financial, brought together Kinzie, Anholt and Van Vleck in an informal
presentation with a question-and-answer period following each lady’s turn with the
microphone.
“I wanted to model our luncheon after the Grande Dames Tea they hold in Fort
Myers every year,” said Almeida. “The first one we held (in 2013) was very successful, so we decided to open this one to the men, too. Everybody’s interested in history,
especially here on Sanibel.”
Kinzie, along with her daughter, Betty Ann, shared several interesting tales from
her 94 years of living in Southwest Florida. Included were stories about the 1926 and
1928 hurricanes; her father’s ferry business of bringing automobiles from Fort Myers
to Sanibel; swimming from the dock at Dinkins Bayou; and how life changed dramatically after the causeway was constructed in 1963.
“I remember the first ferry started at 8 a.m.,” said Kinzie, sitting in a rocking chair
in the North Room of The Community House. “The last ferry left Sanibel at 5 p.m…
and you’d better not be late for it!”
Kinzie also recalled one particularly strong hurricane, when one of her family’s
ferry boats had run aground during a trip back to Fort Myers from Sanibel. “Captain
Andrews told the crew ‘Keep the boilers running at full, so when the tide comes in,
we’ll be ready to go.’ And that’s exactly what they did,” she added.
After the Sanibel Causeway opened on May 26, 1963, most of the ferry boats that
had been owned by the Kinzie family were sold and relocated to the Great Lakes
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ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Nicole McHale thanks attendees for supporting the Sanibel Community Association
region, where several of them are still in service today.
Anholt, a well-known historian and author who works at the Sanibel Public Library,
told the near-capacity crowd of a six-week red tide event which occurred off the island
in 1971, during which thousands of fish, manatees and dolphins perished. Lee County
managed the post-event cleanup by sending several bulldozers and backhoes to the
island, digging large troughs along the beach, filling the dead fish and debris into those
holes, and then covering them up with sand.
Van Vleck, a longtime resident of
Captiva, talked about conservation efforts
during the years leading up to Sanibel’s
incorporation as a city in 1974. One of
the first members of the Sanibel Planning
Board, she discussed her background in
creating quick sketches of birds she used to
see along the island’s beaches.
“At one point, I had more than 1,000
of them saved, but (Hurricane) Charley
wiped out all but about 100 of them,” said
Van Vleck. “It was kind of a clean sweep…
but that’s life living on an island.”
She talked about her involvement in
helping stop development on Sanibel during the late 1960s, when real estate investors had planned on constructing homes
and high-rises for more than 30,000
people.
“There was a flood of instruments of
destruction heading this way, which was
really upsetting to me,” Van Vleck added.
“Luckily, the city pulled together and we
were able to stop that.”
Eleanor Kinzie, right, and her daughter,
All proceeds from the January 16
Betty Ann
luncheon will be donated to the Sanibel
Community Association.
Current Events
Group Hears
Economic
Forecasts
M
ore than 125 men and women
met at BIG ARTS on Sanibel
on Monday, January 12, to
hear some prominent local economists
describe a difficult and evolving economy in 2014 and its impact on what is
expected to be a stronger and yet still
unpredictable 2015.
Every Monday morning for 30 years,
Current Events has featured two hours
of lively, well-informed, civil discussions
concerning topics of interest in the news
on state, national and international levels.
Each session is led by a different moderator. After presenting a scenario of the
event, a question is asked and anyone in
the audience may give a short answer.
On Monday, the group took a temporary departure from this format. Current
Events’ chairman, Malcolm Martini, a for-
mer economist and environmental planner, arranged for the group to hear some
economic forecasts for 2015. Three local
economists shared their projections: Larry
Davidson, professor emeritus of Business
Economics Public Policy at Indiana
University; Harvey Padewer, former president of Duke Energy; and Richard Pyle,
president, Sanibel Captiva Trust Co.
Each provided an overview of recent
economic developments and took challenging questions from the audience.
Padewer explained the complex factors impacting the recent changes in the
price of a barrel of oil, including variables
like the quality of the oil and new technology. He expects the price of oil to stay at
approximately current levels through next
year and perhaps as long as three years.
“There’s always something to worry
about when you study the economy,” said
Davidson, alluding to rising inequality and
a growing national debt, “But, we look
pretty good compared to the rest of the
world.”
He is optimistic about the economy
for 2015 and projected growth at about
coninued on page 47
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ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
COTI Celebrates 40 Years
Of Helping Keep Sanibel Sanibel
From left, Jim Beauchamp, Mick Denham, Gail and Bill Bachman
Past and current presidents of the Committee Of The Islands, from left, Larry Schopp, Tom
Gilhooley, Barbara Joy Cooley, Mike Gillespie, Jim Beauchamp, Wayne Ponader and
John Harries
photos by Jeff Lysiak
by Jeff Lysiak
M
ore than 300 residents gathered at The Community House last Wednesday
evening the mark the 40th anniversary of the Committee Of The Islands,
celebrating its continued commitment to “keeping Sanibel Sanibel” and honoring one of the founding members of the organization.
“COTI has a unique role on Sanibel as group of residents, property owners and
seasonal visitors and nature’s inhabitants to advocate for and promote the Sanibel
Vision and Sanibel Plan,” said Jim Beauchamp, president. “We are working hard to
ensure the next 40 years is as special as the last 40 years that we pass our gift on to
future generations.”
According to Beauchamp, the all-volunteer organization boasts a special ability – as
a civic advocate – to “ensure effective government, protect the nature’s inhabits, maintain the small town harmonious community and home values.”
In the past year, COTI’s membership has grown by more than 40 percent, with
over 950 islanders playing an active role.
Barbara Joy Cooley, a past president of the group, took time to honor 103-yearold Milena Eskew, one of three citizens who helped incorporate the organization in
1975. In addition to being a founding board member, secretary and first female presi-
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Ed and Lynn Ridlehoover, John Pryor, Tom Cooley, Larry Schopp and Barbara Joy Cooley
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Children’s Crafts
Art Supplies
Shell Crafts
Gifts
Find us on
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Chauncey Goss with Beverly and Bernie Lubetkin
dent, Eskew served on Sanibel’s planning board.
“Before COTI existed, she was on the board of Sanibel Tomorrow, the group that
worked so hard to incorporate Sanibel as a city in 1974,” Cooley explained. “She
worked tirelessly for several other important Sanibel organizations, too, and we are so
honored to have her here this evening to celebrate COTI’s 40th anniversary.”
In addition to hot and cold hors d’oeuvres prepared by Leslie Adams Catering,
there was an assortment of beverages and a cake specially decorated for the celebration by Bailey’s General Store. Guests mingled, shared stories and danced to music
provided by Gene Federico.
“Let’s also recognize the many special people that created the community of
Sanibel, before the city, over the last 100-plus years. These citizens paved the way for
formation of our city and the creation of a truly unique place to live, work, play and
visit,” added Beauchamp. “Let’s all work together to keep Sanibel special for the next
40 years!”
COTI’s annual meeting will be held at The Community House on Friday, March
13 beginning at 9:30 a.m. All are welcome to attend. For additional information, visit
www.coti.org.
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
TRUST
Current COTI president Jim Beauchamp
One of COTI’s founders Milena Eskew with
Mick Denham
Karen Storjohann and Alex Werner
Dr. Bruce Neill and Erick Lindblad
Mary Ann and Tom Gilhooley
Barbara Joy Cooley welcomed the crowd
to the celebration
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ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Justice Department Appointee
Speaks About Police Relations
Attendees at the Democratic Club meeting
Democratic club co-chairs Allison Ward and Dave Waks with speaker Ellen Scrivner, center
D
r. Ellen Scrivner held the capacity crowd spellbound at the Thursday, January
l5 meeting of the Democratic Club of the Islands as she shared her personal experience of chairing the first high stakes meeting between Attorney
General Janet Reno and police commissioners during the Clinton Administration.
This was the beginning of the COPS PROGRAM, which put l00,000 cops on
the street and worked to change the concept of “bully warrior” cops to police as
“guardians of the community.”
Great progress was made during those years as the Department of Justice funded
extensive training programs for police throughout the country, which strengthened
community/police relations. Policing was seen as a “social contract” to earn the community’s trust. Scrivner initiated and participated in a new philosophy of “procedural
justice” which involved trust building and de-escalation of conflict.
When the administration changed, Attorney General Ashcroft moved the COPS
Ikki Matsumoto
Prints & Posters
PROGRAM funding to Homeland Security and support for many local police programs dried up. The most dramatic change in policing occurred with the passage of
1033, which made military equipment and tanks available to local police departments
across the country with the condition that the equipment be used within a year, or lose
it. Thus began the “militarization” of local police departments. Scrivner returned to the
Department of Justice as deputy director under President Obama from 2009 to 2012
and was appointed to the Harvard Executive Session of Policing and Public Safety and
the DOJ team to assess civil rights issues in police departments.
The recent shootings of African Americans in Ferguson, New York City and
Cleveland have reignited the distrust between communities and their police. Scrivner
holds out hope that President Obama’s recently commissioned Presidential Task Force
will reduce excess militarization and the warrior cop mentality, and slowly begin to
rebuild trust where cops and the communities they serve see themselves as guardians.
Sanibel-Captiva Republican Caucus
T
he Sanibel-Captiva Republican Caucus will conduct their next meeting on
Saturday, January 24 beginning at 10 a.m. at the Sanibel Public Library,
770 Dunlop Road. Mike Scott, Sheriff of Lee County, will be speaking to
the caucus. Republicans and other interested citizens are invited to come out and
hear Sheriff Scott speak. Afterwards, enjoy coffee and cookies with your peers.
Admission is free.
Overeaters
Anonymous
T
wo Sanibel residents are starting
an Overeaters Anonymous meeting for anyone who has a problem
with food. Overeaters Anonymous (OA)
is a 12-step program that addresses all
kinds of food issues including bulimia,
anorexia, binge-eating, food restricting,
compulsive eating and compulsive food
behaviors.
Until a meeting place is secured, meetings will be held in a private home on the
island. For more information about the
meeting or about OA, call 781-799-9957
and ask for Margie.
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Tarpon Bay Road
Sanibel • 395-1350
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Chadwick’s Square
Captiva • 472-7633
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Sanibel • 313-0535
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ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
George Schumann To Speak About
Frank Lloyd Wright’s Unity Temple
Frank Lloyd Wright’s Unity Temple in Oak Park, Illinois
A
mong Frank Lloyd Wright’s early career milestones is the 1908 Unity Temple
in Oak Park, Illinois. This unique structure was the first church to be built of
monolithic concrete since the Roman era. It is located on Lake Street in Oak
Park, Illinois, about 10 miles due west from Chicago on the same road that thousands of pioneers used to travel West in their Conestoga wagons in the mid-19th
Century.
George Schumann, who has extensive background in this topic, will speak about
Lloyd Wright’s creation when Unitarian Universalists of the Islands meet on Sunday,
9
February 1, at 4: p.m. in Fellowship Hall
at the Sanibel Congregational Church of
Christ, 2050 Periwinkle Way. The public
is welcome to attend. Note the earlier
starting time to eliminate conflict with the
Super Bowl game.
Schumann grew up in Oak Park and
pursued an early interest in architecture at
Yale through Vincent Scully’s course on
the history of architecture that prominently
featured Frank Lloyd Wright homes from
Schumann’s childhood neighborhood.
Back home in Oak Park, Schumann
became intimately involved in the preservation and public access to Wright’s
home and studio and the landmark Unity
Temple. He was an active member of
the Chicago Architecture Foundation, the George Schumann
Unity Temple Restoration Foundation, the
Society of Architectural Historians, as well
as a board member of the Bienenstock Library in High Point, North Carolina, the
country’s largest furniture library. The skills he had acquired as a senior executive of
Sears Corporation were of great benefit in nurturing the objectives of these groups.
He shares his active architectural interest with his wife of 25 years, Dawn Follett
Schumann, who is the founding president of the Frank Lloyd Wright Home & Studio
Foundation.
Wright had left Madison, Wisconsin in 1887 to start his architectural career in
Chicago and initially settled and established his reputation in Oak Park. The original
Unity Church in Oak Park had burned down in 1905. Given Wright’s growing reputation and Unitarian family background, coupled with the strong backing he enjoyed
from Charles E. Roberts, a Wright client, engineer, inventor, and church board member, Wright not only received the commission to design the church but also its furniture
and stained glass windows. The site’s elongated shape and constrained urban setting
presented a unique challenge. What resulted is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
“Because of its consolidation of aesthetic intent and structure through use of a
single material, reinforced concrete, Unity Temple is considered by many architects to
be the first modern building in the world” (Wikipedia).
All are welcome. Lively discussion, fellowship and refreshments will follow the service.
10
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Highlights Of
CHR’s Volunteer
Luncheon
photos by Jeff Lysiak
Several volunteers were honored at the inaugural Community Housing & Resources Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon, held on January 14
at The Community House
Richard Johnson, board president
CHR board members, from left, Rich McDonnell, Ray Pavelka, George Campean, Richard Johnson, Tim Garmager, Dorothy Donaldson and
Dr. Phillip Marks
CHR staff members, from left, Kenny Shearer, Helen Jedel, Patti Bohm, Kelly Collini, Bonnie McCurry and Dan Whicker
Kelly Collini, executive director
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ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
11
Looking Back:
Alligator Huntin’ Featured
In Yearbook, 1923-24
Allison Schulz, new CHR resident
Dee Caldwell, CHR resident
The History Gallery, developed by the Captiva Island Historical Society, tells the unique
and diverse history of Captiva. Interpretive panels and touch screen access to historic
photos are featured; sure to pique one’s interest. The History Gallery is accessed through
the Captiva Memorial Library located on Chapin Lane on Captiva. Open during Captiva
Library hours. This week’s image is a group of photos from the Snyder School for Boys
yearbook, The Breaker, 1923-24
photo archives of the Captiva Island Historical Society
Pioneer Family Member Talks To
Sold-Out Crowd At Historical Village
Crystal Pomrenke, CHR resident
City Of Sanibel Vegetation Committee
Reduce Fertilizer
Use On Your
Property
vegetation committee Sunshine mimosa
T
he City of Sanibel Vegetation
Committee is offering guided
native vegetation and landscaping
tours of city hall grounds, planted solely
with native plants. The next tour of city
hall grounds is on Wednesday, January
24. The tour begins at 10 a.m.
Walk the grounds for ideas on planting
native vegetation that requires no fertilizer. See how you can plant a garden that
reseeds itself with very little maintenance,
is good for the environment and will
attract birds and butterflies.
Vegetation committee members will
provide valuable information on proper
Bailey’s Catering provided a delicious meal
for CHR’s Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon
planting and care of native vegetation.
The City of Sanibel encourages planting
of vegetation that is indigenous to the
area as it requires very little maintenance,
no fertilizer, and no supplemental irrigation.
Registration is not required. Attendees
meet at the main entrance to Sanibel
City Hall, 800 Dunlop Road, in front of
the main staircase. For more information, regarding the guided native vegetation tour, contact the Natural Resources
Department at 472-3700.
The City of Sanibel is a walkable and
bikeable community and features one of
the most extensive shared use paths in
the state of Florida. Attendees to these
special events are encouraged to “enjoy
our good nature, bicycle to these events
and stay Fit-4-Life.”
The Natural Resources Department
section of the city’s website, www.
mysanibel.com, offers information
and photos of native plants, a listing
of licensed contractors, Sanibel’s vegetation standards and codes, and the
Environmental Reference Handbook
prepared by the city’s vegetation committee. The vegetation committee also
offers free native plant tours of the
grounds at city hall at 10 a.m. on the
second Wednesday and fourth Saturday
of the month from November to April.
For more information, contact the
Sanibel Natural Resources Department
at 472-3700.
T
y Symroski, grandson of Ross and Daisy Mayer, spoke to a sold-out crowd
last week in the first of four Twilight Talks scheduled at the Sanibel Historical
Village this season. The Mayer family built Shore Haven and Morning Glories
(the Sears kit homes now in the village), as well as the Caretakers’ Cottage, also in
the village and scheduled to open soon.
Symroski worked in the Sanibel Planning Department from 1977 to 1980, cocompiling the city’s ecozones map. He was involved in nearly every project during the
city’s formative years after the adoption of The Sanibel Plan. He recounted his early
years on Sanibel before the causeway.
“You think of bridges as bringing people together, but in effect, the causeway has
really changed the island,” Symroski said. “At that time, if you worked on the island,
you basically had to live on the island. There were only about 400 or 500 people at
that time. Now people can live off the island and come here to work, and it’s really
changed our community. I don’t think people anticipated that at the time.”
Symroski also described how dark the island was at night.
“Sometimes you’d have nights with an incredible amount of stars overhead and you
could really see the Milky Way,” he said. “And then you’d have a full-moon night and
you could virtually read a book out there, it was so bright from that full moon. Then it
would be overcast without a full moon and it would be completely black; you could not
see your hand in front of your face. That would make for a scary run between houses
– if you hit the house, you knew you were in the right place.”
It was a quieter island, too.
“Sanibel was really a very quiet place, Symroski said. “We didn’t have a lot of
power boats -- there were a few, but none like I saw the other day with about a 900
horsepower engine. We didn’t have yard work going on, so it was really much quieter
on Sanibel.”
The next Twilight Talk at the village is February 12 at 7 p.m. in Shore Haven, the
village’s new welcome center (and Symroski’s grandparents’ house). Mike Billheimer,
long-time islander, former planning commission member, and owner of the Lighthouse
Café, will be the speaker. Tickets are $5 each; call museum manager Emilie Alfino at
472-4648. Tickets must be paid for and picked up in advance.
The historical village is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesdays through
Saturdays. It is located at 950 Dunlop Road (next to BIG ARTS). Admission is $10 for
adults 18 and older and free for members and those under 18.
Docent-guided tours are available at 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. at no extra charge,
based upon docent availability. There is handicap access to all buildings. Admission for
entrance only to the Museum Store is free.
For information, call 472-4648 during business hours or visit www.sanibelmuseum.
org.
Read us online at IslandSunNews.com
12
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Churches/ Temples
ANNUNCIATION GREEK
ORTHODOX CHURCH:
8210 Cypress Lake Drive, Fort Myers
Reverend Dr. Elias Bouboutsis. Orthros
Service Sunday 9 a.m. Divine Liturgy
Sunday 10 a.m. Fellowship Programs,
Greek School, Sunday School, Bible Study
www.orthodox-faith.com, 481-2099
BAT YAM-TEMPLE OF THE ISLANDS:
The Reform Congregation of Bat Yam
Temple of the Islands meets for Friday
night services at 8 p.m. in the Fellowship
Hall of the Sanibel Congregational United
Church of Christ, 2050 Periwinkle Way.
Rabbi Myra Soifer. For information call
President Martin Pokedoff at 239-395-2544.
CAPTIVA CHAPEL BY THE SEA:
The Reverend George E. Morris
Services every Sunday 11 a.m. through
April 26, 2015. 11580 Chapin Lane on
Captiva. 472-1646.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST:
2950 West Gulf Dr., Sunday 10:30 a.m.;
Sunday School 10:30 a.m., Wednesday
evening meeting 7:30 p.m.; Reading room
open, Monday, Wednesday and Friday 10
a.m. to 12 p.m. (November through March),
Friday 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. (summer hours).
472-8684.
NEW SANIBEL BAPTIST CHURCH
Join us for worship Sunday mornings
9 a.m. Bible Study and 10 a.m. Worship
Service at The Community House,
2173 Periwinkle Way. 239-671-5502.
SANIBEL COMMUNITY CHURCH
1740 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel, 472-2684
Dr. Daryl Donovan, Senior Pastor
Sunday Worship Hours:
8 a.m. Traditional in historic Chapel. 9 a.m.
Contemporary and 11 a.m. Traditional in main
Sanctuary. 10:15 a.m. Courtyard Fellowship.
9 and 11 a.m. Bible classes. Childcare available at all services.
SANIBEL CONGREGATIONAL
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST:
2050 Periwinkle Way 472-0497
The Reverend Dr. John H. Danner, Sr.
Pastor. The Reverend Deborah Kunkel,
Associate Pastor. 7:45 a.m. Chapel, 9 and
11 a.m. Full Service with Sunday school
and nursery care provided. Elevator access.
ST. ISABEL CATHOLIC CHURCH:
3559 San-Cap Rd., 472-2763
Pastor Reverend Christopher Senk,
Saturday Vigil Mass 5 p.m., Sunday Mass
8:30 and 10:30 a.m., Daily Mass Wed.
Thurs. Fri. 8:30 a.m. Communion Service
Mon. and Tues. 8:30 a.m. Holy Days call.
ST. MICHAEL & ALL ANGELS
EPISCOPAL CHURCH:
2304 Periwinkle Way. Reverend Dr. Ellen
Sloan, Rector. Saturday Eucharist 5 p.m.,
Sunday Eucharist 8 and 10:30 a.m.,
Sunday School 10:30 a.m., Tuesday
Morning Prayer 9 a.m.,
Wednesday Healing Eucharist 9 a.m.,
Wednesday Evening Service – 6 p.m.
(Followed by Potluck Supper on the 1st
Wednesday) For more information call 4722173 or visit www.saintmichaels-sanibel.org
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALISTS
OF THE ISLANDS:
Meets on the first Sunday of each month
from December through April at the Sanibel
Congregational Church, 2050 Periwinkle
Way at 5 p.m. A pot luck is held at a member’s home on the third Sunday of each
month. For more information call 433-4901
or email [email protected]
Read us online at
IslandSunNews.com
Tahitian Gardens
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2496 Palm Ridge Road
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Cafe’s open 7:30
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OBITUARY
SUE CAROL FRANCIS
ue Carol Francis was born October
7, 1933, near Smyrna, Tennessee,
and grew up in that region,
attending schools in Old Jefferson and
Smyrna before graduating high school
in Smyrna in 1951. Sue then matriculated to the University of Tennessee,
pursuing dual interests in writing and
art. After completing her master’s
degree at UT, she became a teacher in
Salisbury, North Carolina, where she
met and married William (“Bill”) Gwynn.
They moved to Kansas for his job at
Fort Hays State University and Sue
continued to teach and to produce art.
Their next adventure took them to Fort
Collins, Colorado in the early 1970s,
where Sue turned her gregarious personality and engaging energies to real
estate, managing successful businesses
S
over three decades, including The
Gwynn Company, which focused on
buyers seeking older homes and other
unique properties. Known as the “Jazzy
Lady of Real Estate,” Sue maintained
her interests in real estate, property
management, travel, politics, art, education and music, well into retirement.
She also split her time between Fort
Collins and Sanibel, eagerly visiting
many friends and family members on
the long drives between her two states
of residence.
Sue fell in love with Unitarian
Universalism (UU) in college and from
then on was a lifelong proponent of
UU and other liberal causes, including
the League of Women Voters, and she
was a board member of the Ethos West
Chamber Orchestra, based in Northern
Colorado. Sue particularly loved sharing
jazz, classical, and operatic music with her
many friends and acquaintances.
In Knoxville, she was an activist in the
movement for racial integration.
After suffering sudden heart attack
symptoms starting December 21, 2014,
Sue died unexpectedly on Christmas
night, December 25, 2014, in hospital
in Fort Myers, where she was awaiting triple-bypass surgery. She leaves a
brother, James (whom she called Toby);
sister, Sarah; and niece, Cheryl; and their
families; long-time employee Kevin Cline
and his family; and many other beloved
friends in the Smyrna, Salisbury, Fort
Hays, Fort Collins, and Sanibel areas,
and across the nation.
A memorial service honoring the life
and mourning the death of Sue Francis
will be held by the Unitarian Universalists
of the Islands at 7 p.m. on Sunday,
February 8, in the Fellowship Hall of
Sanibel Congregational United Church
of Christ, 2050 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel.
Additional services to be announced in
Fort Collins and Smyrna.
Credit Rebuilding League
Workshop
Of Women
ISH of Sanibel-Captiva, working with Voters Meeting
Cheryl McConahy, manager of Fifth
F
Third Bank, is offering a complimentary workshop for those who wish to
build or rebuild their credit. The workshop
will be held at the FISH Walk-In Center,
located at 1630 Periwinkle Way, from 6
to 8 p.m on Tuesday, January 27.
Those in attendance will learn how to
deal with debt-related issues and begin
rebuilding or correcting their credit report.
The workshop will cover the following:
Debt collection issues, reducing debt,
bankruptcy as an option, Fair Credit
Reporting Act, how to get your free credit
report. Chapter 7 vs. Chapter 13 bankruptcy and foreclosure.
McConahy, who deals with credit issues
every day, will be available to speak oneon-one about participant’s particular credit
issues.
For additional information or to RSVP,
contact Christine Swiersz or Jessi Zeigler of
FISH, 472-4775.
W
hat you need to know about
human trafficking here and
now in Southwest Florida will
be presented at the Wednesday, January
28 meeting of the League of Women
Voters - Sanibel, scheduled to take place
at the Sundial Beach Resort.
Nola Theiss, former Sanibel mayor
and published author in the field of
human trafficking, will present the topic
during the program. Members of the
public are welcome to attend.
Theiss earned her MPA from Florida
Gulf Coast University and is listed in
Who’s Who in American Women.
Guests may make a reservation for
the LWV luncheon and program by
emailing Ellen O’Neill at [email protected]
yahoo.com or by calling 395-1019.
Payment of $25 per person will be
accepted at the door. Registration begins
at 11:30 a.m.
Our email address is [email protected]
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
OBITUARY
New Series At
Community
Church
B
eginning February 15, Sanibel
Community Church will be offering the powerful new video series
by Rick Warren of Saddleback Church
entitled, What On Earth Am I Here
For? The study delves into some of life’s
deepest questions, including “what is
the purpose of life?” Based on Warren’s
all-time best-seller, now published in 85
languages, The Purpose Driven Life,
this new series is more challenging and
penetrating for participants.
“SEÑORA” NISLA PARELIA TOLP
eloved mother, grandmother,
teacher and friend to many, Nisla
Parelia Tolp. 89, of Sanibel Island
and Fort Myers, passed away with her
loving family by her side on January 20,
2015.
Nisla was born on April 12, 1925
in Chiriqui, Panama to her late parents
Mercedes Moreno and Juan De Dios
Aizparua. She was the first Spanish
teacher at The Canterbury School where
she taught for 25 years. She was also
an avid volunteer teacher at The Sanibel
School.
Nisla was preceded in death by her
husband Arthur Tolp, Sr., and is survived
by her daughter W. Toby Tolp (Steve
Harrell), her sons Arthur Tolp, Jr. and
Karl (Donna) Tolp; her grandchildren,
Kasey (Brendan) Albright, Arthur Tolp,
III, Robert (Tonya) Tolp, Ryan Tolp,
and Brandon Tolp; and her sister Evyla
Aizparua of Panama.
A memorial service will be celebrated
at 11 a.m. on Saturday, January 24,
at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, 2635
Cleveland Avenue, Fort Myers.
In lieu of flowers, the family asks that
you instead consider a donation in Nisla’s
memory to The Canterbury School or
The Sanibel School.
What On Earth Am I Here For? will
be offered for six weeks on Sundays
at 10:45 a.m. in the historic chapel,
facilitated by Joel Goodman. Muffins and
coffee will be available. Bible classes for
children are available at that time as well.
On Wednesdays, beginning on
February 18, Pastor Daryl Donovan will
facilitate the course. A light dinner will be
served at 5:3 p.m., with the video and
discussion. The Wednesday course will
also be held in the historic chapel.
This series is free and all are welcome
to attend. No need to pre-register. Dr.
Warren’s Book will be available, but is not
required for the course.
Sanibel Community Church is a nondenomination evangelical congregation
Send your
editorial copy to:
[email protected]
B
Physical Therapy, Massage Therapy & Pilates
Phone # 239-395-5858
Administrative Offices
& Classrooms
Phone # 239-472-9700
Showroom Hours 8:30am-4:30pm Monday-Friday
Phone # 239-472-9473
Sanibel
Treasures &
Consignment
Rene’s
Jewelry
472-5544
9am-5pm 7 days a week
Phone #: 239-472-HOME
Showroom Hours: 8am-5pm
Monday-Friday
Phone # 239-472-1101
Hours: 10-6 Monday – Saturday
12-5 Sunday
Phone: 239-910-7333
Open Daily 7am
(Summer hours vary)
239-395-1919
13
located at 1740 Periwinkle Way. For
more information visit www.sanibelchurch.com or call 472-2684.
Showroom Hours: 8am-5pm
Monday-Friday
Phone # 239-472-1101
Conveniently located on Periwinkle Way across from Sanibel Community Park
14
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
The Community House
Janina Birtolo
A free program on identity theft is scheduled for January 30
how to protect your identity and how to
recover from identity theft if it happens to
you. There will also be a short tour-style
presentation of the Lee County Sheriff’s
Office Corrections Bureau, giving an
unseen look at the world of corrections
and corrections facilities.
The event is provided free of charge
as a public service.
Paint Your Pet partiicipants
Paint Your Pet
imperial era. A privileged British woman
who fell in love with the Middle East,
Bell accomplished many things and was
deemed invaluable to the empire due to
her contacts and extensive experience in
the region. Pre-paid reservations are $30
for members and $40 for guests. A light
meal is included after the performance: a
grilled chicken Caesar salad and raspberry cheesecake. Register by calling The
Community House or register online at
www.sanibelcommunityhouse.net on the
“donate here” page.
Glassware Painting
Beading Classes
H
ave a furry family member you’d
love to immortalize on canvas?
Join art instructor Jenny M. Licht
on Thursday, January 29 from 3:30 to
6:30 p.m. and create a painting of your
pet based on any photo you may have.
No experience is necessary. The photo
you submit with your registration will be
used to provide a sketched primer/design
on your canvas. All other materials are
provided, including canvas, brushes, palette, easel, paint and samples. Students
can paint multiple pets on the same
canvas, but must pay an additional fee for
the extra sketching. Instruction is provided and there are no skill barriers. The
class fee is $65 for members and $70 for
guests. Register by calling The Community House. Cancellation fees apply; full
refunds are available if cancelled within
48 hours of class. Minimum number of
students required.
Crime Prevention Seminar
G
erald J. McNulty of the Lee
County Sheriff’s Office will present
a crime prevention program on
Identity Theft on Friday, January 30 at
10 a.m. with specific focus on determining your own risk. He will also detail local
instances of identity theft, how to recognize social engineering and other methods of obtaining your personal information without your knowledge or consent,
Weave necklace with scallop shell
R
esidents and
visitors are
invited to
learn the intricate
art of beading with
shells and other
treasures of the
sea with instructor
Anita Gober. All
supplies and tools
are included in the Spiral rope bracelet
with shell charms
price of the class.
If you wear reading
glasses, you should bring them. Classes
are kept small for personalized, one-onone instruction. There is a minimum of
three people and a maximum of 10 for
these projects. Planned projects include:
February 4 – Jingle bracelet
February 18 – Peyote stitch around a
sea biscuit
The per class price is $35 for members and $40 for guests. Advanced
classes will be scheduled ad hoc for $50
for three hours for members.
Historical Performance
E
njoy history? Acting? See awardwinning actress and writer Janina
Birtolo perform her one-woman
play, Ghosts of the Desert, on Thursday, February 5, from 12 to 1:30 p.m.
Ghosts of the Desert is the story of
Gertrude Bell, a famous writer and all
around skilled woman who was influential
in both Jordan and Iraq during the British
Handpainted glassware
A
rt instructor Jenny M. Licht will
teach glassware painting on Tuesday, February 10 from 3:30 to
6:30 p.m. This is an opportunity to create unique designs on four pieces of glass
stemware. No experience is necessary
and students have a choice of painting
flamingos, palm trees, flip flops, tropical fish, abstract shapes, flowers, animal
prints, seahorses, fall designs, Halloween
or your own design. Bring your own
washed glassware. Glassware paint is
permanent and hand washing is recommended. The class requires a $45 prepaid registration for members and $50
for guests. Included with registration are
glassware paints, use of brushes, rubbing
alcohol, cotton balls and paint cloths.
Register by calling 472-2155. Cancellation fees apply, full refunds are available
if cancelled within 48 hours of class, no
refunds for cancellations can be made
within 24 hours of class. Class cancellation is at the discretion of the art instructor or Community House staff. Minimum
number of students required.
Shell Crafters at work
Shell Club Needs Shells
V
isitors who attend the Sanibel Shell
Show love the little bags of shells
that they receive when they enter
the show. They are a “thank you for your
donation” gift from the Sanibel-Captiva
Shell Club. These gift bags are 4” x 4”
and are typically filled with about six or
eight appropriately-sized shells.
The club always needs shells to fill
these bags. If you are cleaning out your
garage or want to downsize your shell
collection, consider donating some of
your shells to the Shell Club. Donated
shells should be no larger than a fullgrown Florida fighting conch. Ideally,
each bag will be filled with shells around
the size of an adult apple murex and
might include banded tulips, olives, moon
snails, nutmegs, or others of that size.
The shells do not have to be from the
local area. Any shells of the right size
make the bagging process go smoothly
and quickly. The shells should be cleaned,
with barnacles removed and the sand
shaken out, since the club does not have
a way to clean them at the “bagging
parties” in the lower level of The BaileyMatthews National Shell Museum.
Shells larger than a full-grown Florida
fighting conch can be donated to the shell
museum for use in educational programs,
or to the Sanibel Community Association “shell-sorters” for sale at the Shell
Festival. Very small shells, such as kitten
paws and coquinas, get lost in the bags,
but they can be used as craft shells.
The 78th annual Sanibel Shell Festival
will be held March 5 through 7 on The
Community House grounds.
Contact Linda Edinburg at 395-9426
or Irene Longley at 283-7417 to arrange
for either pick-up or delivery of your shell
donation for the Shell Club.
The Community House is located
at 2173 Periwinkle Way. For more
information, visit www.sanibelcommunityhouse.net or call 472-2155.
Share your community
news with us.
Call 395-1213
Fax: 395-2299
or email
[email protected]
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Garden Club Auction A Success
A painting goes up for auction
Shell Islands Garden Club’s Going, Going, Gone auction brought out the bidders for a
successful fundraiser
A
n exciting day of fundraising was had by all at the annual Shell Islands
Garden Club live and silent auction on January 13 at The Community
House on Sanibel.
The auctioneer was Tommy Williams, who has been a wonderful friend to the
Garden Club over the years, assisted by father and son Jack and Jay Nitz. Their team
efforts guaranteed a successful day of fundraising which will provide assistance to various local community organizations.
Auction co-chairs were Maggie Butcher and Jeannine Brinkerhoff, and volunteers
included Connie Walters and many other helpers.
The Shell Islands Garden Club is very grateful to all of the generous donations made
by club members as well as the the following local businesses and community members: Bennett’s Fresh Roast, RS Walsh landscaping, Traders Store & Cafe, Rosie’s
Cafe and Grill, Captiva Cruises, Suncatchers Dream, Sue Ritchie at Forever Green
Ace Hardware, Judy Hicks Bromeliads and Sanibel artist Peter Zell.
Attendees check out the auction items
NEW ARRIVALS THIS WEEK
AT
WATSON MACRAE GALLERY
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OPENING RECEPTION TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3RD 5-7PM
Featuring Amazing Works in Clay, Paper, Fiber, Porcelain, Wood and Steel.
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A wonderful range of choices to admire,
acquire or give as a gift.
PAINTINGS • SCULPTURE • CERAMICS • GLASS • JEWELRY
A Sanctuary of Art in The Village Shops
2340 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel 239-472-3386
Monday – Saturday 10:30 To 5:00
WatsonMacRaeGallery.com
15
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Breakfast Night At LOGOS
Come explore our natural world
Moving Water South! — Conservation Forum on Jan. 27
Lu
cie
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shede north
The time is now to press state and Federal leaders to Move Water South
out of Lake Okeechobee! Join SCCF and the Everglades Foundation
on January 27 at 7 p.m. to learn about
the next steps to protect our estuary as
part of Everglades restoration. Program
details at sccf.org. Tuesday, January 27.
Sanibel Community House, 2173 Periwinkle Way. Refreshments at 6:30 p.m. Free.
Move Water South!
St.
16
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Okeechobee
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and
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Sanibel
Birding at Lighthouse Beach — January 28
Meet your SCCF guide at the Sanibel Fishing Pier at Lighthouse Park for
a walk on the beach and through the woods. Wednesday, January 28 at 8
a.m. Free to all but you must pay to park.
The Alien Invasion — January 28
Over 500 fish and wildlife species, 1,180 plant species and who knows how
many insects that are not native now live and multiply in Florida. Learn
about Sanibel’s “Alien Invasion.” Wednesday, January 28 at 10 a.m. $5 Adults
Hurricanes! — January 28
Hurricane Charley roared in from the south, skirted the coast and made
landfall over North Captiva Island on August 13, 2004. Storms in 1873,
1910, 1945, and others re-sculpted the islands and shaped wildlife, vegetation and human existence here. Wednesday, January 28 at 2 p.m. $5 Adults
My Favorite Island Insects — January 27
Living with insects can be a challenge but because our islands are subtropical we have some great ones! Learn about the moth that pollinates
the ghost orchid, a caterpillar that is a coral snake mimic and migrating
dragonflies. Tuesday, January 27 at 10 a.m. $5 Adults
Burke White and Cindy Sitton
L
ogos kids celebrated Breakfast Night on Wednesday, January 14, at Sanibel
Community Church by showing up in their pajamas and slippers.
The family time game was pizza delivery. Quick delivery was Jackie ChavezSantana’s style, while Burke White was the cool delivery man under the watchful eye
of the dinner dean, Cindy Sitton. This midweek program is for families with children
age three years through 5th grade.
Islanders Supporting Local Kids
Kemp’s Ridley Sea Turtles & Red Tide — January 30
Jeff Schmid of the Conservancy of Southwest Florida has satellite
tagged Kemp’s Ridleys, documenting their seasonal migrations in local
waters. Learn about the riddles of the Ridleys and why red tide events
affect them so detrimentally. Friday, January 30 at 10 a.m. $5 Adults
Weeds and Seeds — January 26
Visit different locations on Sanibel on walks that last for two hours,
guided by a leader with a plant list. For info, please call Candice Etheridge at 395-9498. Monday, January 12 at 9 a.m. Free. Meet at SCCF.
Wildflowers & Pollinators in Native Landscapes — Jan. 29
Learn about “La Florida’s” local native wildflowers (about 1,500 species!) and
their pollinators. Pollinators include the domesticated honey bee but also
many native insects. Learn about our island’s third generation beekeeper and
why native pollinators matter. Thursday, January 29 at 10 a.m. $5 Adults
EXPLORE OUR NATURE CENTER, TRAILS AND OBSERVATION TOWER
Butterfly House – Guided tour Tuesdays 10 a.m.; also self-guided.
Nature Center – live turtles, snakes, touch tank, videos. $5 adults
Guided Trail Walks – Tues-Fri, 11 a.m. 4 miles of trails to explore $5 adults
Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation
3333 Sanibel-Captiva Road (one mile west of Tarpon Bay Road)
Nature Center: Open Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Native Plant Nursery: Open Mon-Fri 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., Sat 10 - 3
(239) 472-2329
www.sccf.org
O
n Monday, January 26 from 5 to 8 p.m., Sanibel and Captiva islanders will
support the Gladiolus Learning and Development Center while on a sunset
dinner cruise with dancing aboard Captiva Cruises’ Lady Chadwick. DJ Jeff
Key will spin dance tunes and Catering by Leslie Adams will twirl taste buds with
her twist on malt shop cuisine. There will be exclusive Captiva live auction items up
for bid. Cost for the evening is $150 per person. Contact executive [email protected] or call 481-2100.
Gladiolus Learning and Development Center (formerly Brightest Horizons) is a
501(c)3 organization located in the Harlem Heights neighborhood of south Fort Myers
devoted to providing quality early education to the children of low income working
families in order to give them a brighter future.
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
17
Carson Lecture: Environmental
Education In Turbulent Times
T
he Center for
Environmental
and
Sustainability
Education’s 2015
Rachel Carson
Distinguished Lecture
will take place
Friday, January 30,
at St. Michael and
All Angels Church,
Sanibel, at 7 p.m.
Entitled,
Environmental
Education in Turbulent
Times: Perspectives from Rachel Carson’s Hawk Mountain and Wangari
Maathai’s Karura Forest, it will feature environmental educators and authors
David W. Orr and Peter Blaze Corcoran. The lecture has grown out of Orr and
Corcoran’s collaboration on a new book, which will investigate the educational
implications of addressing climate change.
Corcoran said “We will draw on the inspiration of Rachel Carson and Wangari
Maathai as we re-imagine environmental education in a world of climate change.”
Immediately following the lecture, guests will be invited to join lecturers Orr and
Corcoran in the fellowship hall for a light reception. The lecture is free and open to
the public.
A sunset reception for patron level donors who contribute $1,000 and up, will
be held on Saturday, January 31, at the beachfront home of hosts Mallory and
Peter Haffenreffer. Couples who, together, contribute $1,000 will be invited to the
sunset gathering. The patron reception will include catering by Leslie Adams and
music by harpist Leslie Gregory.
The Center for Environmental and Sustainability Education is an academic center located at Florida Gulf Coast University. The Center works toward realizing the
dream of a sustainable and peaceful future for Earth through scholarship, education, and action. For more information call 590-7025, visit www.fgcu.edu/cese/ or
email [email protected]
Chris Lechowicz and Charles LeBuff
Audubon Presents Lecture
On Amphibians And Reptiles
T
he Sanibel-Captiva Audubon Society will host a lecture by two researchers and
authors: Charles LeBuff, Sanibel icon and retired sea turtle biologist and Chris
Lechowicz, herpetologist and director of SCCF Wildlife Habitat Management.
The lecture will be held at The Community House on Thursday, January 29 at 7:30
p.m. Entitled Adventures with Island Amphibians (frogs, toads and salamanders)
and Reptiles (snakes, lizards and turtles), the lecture is based on their book The
Amphibians and Reptiles of Sanibel and Captiva Islands, Florida: A Natural
History. The book is a new approach to the natural history of the islands
continued on page 36
18
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Satisfaction
Of Working
Out A Pattern
by Capt. Matt
Mitchell
F
abulous winter
weather and
great fishing
action just go hand
in hand. So far so
good this winter
– without any prolonged cold periods,
we are still shiner
fishing for catch and
release snook and big trout. This really
makes a pleasant change from recent
winters when by January, all our fishing
had long since changed over to slow bottom bouncing live shrimp for sheepshead
and rat redfish or popping corks for trout.
Fishing with lots of my regular winter
clients this time of year, they have simply
never been here at the right time to experience the excitement of shiner fishing the
mangroves.
Catching shiners has remained relatively easy as our water temperature stays
in the 60’s. With lots of shiners loaded up
in the boats livewell, basically no matter
what the tide is doing, I’m going to catch
quality fish. It might take a few stops to
find where the fish are from day to day
and on different phases of the tide, but
once you find there location, the fish
come out of the woodwork to attack the
shiners. If you’re looking for a great visual
explosive bite, shiner fishing just cannot
be beat.
Most of my days this week was spent
in the way back mangrove creeks. The
smaller and deeper the creek system, the
better the action was during the cooler
low tide mornings. One real plus of these
narrow creek systems is that even during
periods of slow moving tide, the current
will still move in here when you simply
cannot find moving water anywhere else.
Look for the fish to be in the deepest
sections of these creeks during the lowest phases of the tide, then they slowly
spread out more as the water level slowly
comes back up. Some of the best fishing
in these creeks can be found on the lowest periods of the tide when it’s all about
locating the deepest sections with good
Send Us Your Fish Tales
T
he Island Sun would like to hear from anglers about their catches.
Send us details including tackle, bait and weather conditions, date of catch,
species and weight, and include photographs with identification. Drop them
at the Island Sun, 1640 Periwinkle Way, Suite 2, Sanibel, or email to
[email protected]; or call 395-1213.
CLEAR YOUR GEAR
It Catches More Than Fish
Untangle tackle
from vegetation and
discard it responsibly
Joe Gardner from Sea Isle, New Jersey with one of many snook caught and released while
fishing with Capt. Matt Mitchell this week
tide flow. With miles and miles of mangrove creek systems in Pine Island Sound,
the possibilities are almost endless.
After years of fishing many of our
mangrove creek systems, I’m still finding new productive areas to fish. One
of the most rewarding parts of fishing is
locating that new spot or shoreline that
has many of the same things that make
another spot so productive. Often when
out fishing, it’s very easy to fall into the
rut of fishing the same places over and
over and basically wearing them out.
Finding a hot new spot is refreshing and
always feels good to add to your mental
inventory. Learning what to look for and
the reason the fish are there is all part of
fitting another piece into the puzzle.
BOAT
RENTALS
Fishing • Cabbage Key
Dolphin Watching
Captains Available
472-5800
Jensen’s Marina
Captiva Island
1
I’m often asked by clients what I’m
looking for when I pull up in one particular creek or shoreline when many areas
we fish look very much alike. The first
thing I’m looking for is moving current
– this can either be wind or tide. When
you find both the wind and tide moving
in the same direction, it increases the
speed of the water and you’re generally
onto something. Then I’m looking for
life, which can be bait, mullet or birds.
Combining all these things and fish will
be there.
I got onto one such shallow water big
trout pattern this week and then searched
out and located other nearby creeks that
had the almost exact same set up. The
key was to find a deep narrow mangrove
channel with fast current that blew up
onto a very shallow, sandy exposed clear
water flat area. Big trout would simply
stage up all week long on these drastic
depth transitions and ambush the shiners as the current pushed them into the
shallow water. Working out a pattern and
catching these feeding fish in many of
these like places is much more satisfying
than just randomly catching a fish
Capt. Matt Mitchell has been fishing
local waters since he moved to Sanibel
in 1980. He now lives in St. James
City and works as a back country fishing guide. If you have comments or
questions, email [email protected]
com.
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ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
CROW Case Of The Week:
Eastern
Screech Owl
by Patricia Molloy
O
n December
18, an Eastern
screech owl
(Megascops asio) was
admitted to CROW
after surviving an
unknown traumatic
incident. The patient,
#14-3339, was given
a thorough exam
upon arrival at the
wildlife clinic.
“He came in with head trauma. His left
eye is really deflated, has a little air bubble
in it and he’s got bleeding in it,” explained
Dr. Jennifer Riley, DVM intern. “He’s pretty
bright considering. I can’t really see any
of the structures in the back of the eye, so
we’re just going to keep him a little longer
and see if it gets any better.”
A strong pain reliever was administered
to make the owl more comfortable along
with a anti-inflammatory drug to help reduce
the swelling in its eye.
If you hear a haunting trill in the dark of
the night, that spooky sound may have been
emitted by an owl that is only nine inches
tall. Small amongst its kind, the Eastern
screech owl has a 20-inch wingspan and
weighs a mere six ounces. These nocturnal
avians are found wherever one finds trees:
they can hide virtually unnoticed in the cavi-
ties of trunks, in broad daylight, thanks to
their camouflaged plumage.
Feared by some cultures and loved by
others, owls have had a prominent role
in folklore from around the world. With
nicknames such as Whickering Owls and
Death Owls, they have been associated with
witchcraft, medicine, birth and death. These
superstitious beliefs were borne of their nocturnal habits; the spooky sounds they make;
their large, intense eyes; and their ability to
fly silently.
In ancient Greek mythology, owls were
seen in a more positive light: they were considered to be protectors and even accompanied soldiers into battle. If an owl flew over
a Greek army, it was considered a sign of
impending victory. In native American folklore, owls represented wisdom and were said
to have powers of prophecy.
Despite the mixed reception, one thing is
certain: owls are magnificent creatures that
deserve our respect and our protection.
With regard to the Eastern screech owl
currently at CROW, it has shown significant
signs of improvement. According to Dr.
Heather Barron, hospital director, “The owl
seems to be healing very well although it
still needs some time indoors for treatment.
As long as everything continues to improve,
it should be moved to one of our outdoor
enclosures soon.”
CROW (Clinic for the Rehabilitation of
Wildlife, Inc.) is a non-profit wildlife hospital providing veterinary care for native
and migratory wildlife from our local area.
The hospital accepts patients seven days a
week from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mail donations
to PO Box 150, Sanibel, FL 33957. Call
472-3644 or visit: www.crowclinic.org.
Gramma Dot’s
The Eastern screech owl, patient #14-3339, suffered head trauma that caused its
left eye to deflate and an air bubble to form. Here it perches in the clinic’s ICU.
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19
20
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Solar Power Pioneer To
Lecture At ‘Ding’ Darling
N
eville Williams has been on the
leading edge of the solar power
revolution for decades and knows
from firsthand experience how power
from the sun can transform lives and
communities for the better. He will present two programs titled A Solar Odyssey,
based on his book Sun Power: How
Energy from the Sun is Changing
Lives around the World, Empowering
America, and Saving the Planet, beginning at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Friday,
January 30 in the free “Ding” Darling
Visitor & Education Center on Sanibel
Island.
For more than 20 years, solar energy
pioneer Williams has traveled the globe,
bringing the reality of solar-generated electricity to struggling communities throughout
Asia, Africa, India and the developing
world.
“If millions of poor families in the Third
World can get their electricity from the sun, Neville Williams
why can’t Americans -- who are concerned
with their rising power bills, dependence on foreign oil, and their carbon footprint -- do
the same?” asks Williams, who develops solar farms in New Mexico and today lives in
Naples.
Following his presentations, Williams will sign copies of his book, which are available for purchase in the Refuge Nature Store, all proceeds of which benefit refuge conservation and education programs.
Admission is free to the lectures, which are sponsored by The Sanibel Captiva Trust
Company and “Ding” Darling Wildlife Society-Friends of the Refuge (DDWS), as part
of the 14-week Friday Lecture Series.
Future events are listed below; all lectures include two presentations at 10 a.m. and
1 p.m.
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6520-C Pine Avenue
Sanibel, FL 33957
1036 Periwinkle Way
Sanibel, FL 33957
239-472-5353
239-472-6939
Lazy Flamingo 3, Inc. Lazy Flamingo 4, Inc.
16501 Stringfellow Rd
Bokeelia, FL 33922
12951 McGregor Blvd.
Ft. Myers, FL 33919
239-283-5959
239-476-9000
As usual, Wildlife Drive is closed
on Friday, but visitors are welcome
to enjoy the free Visitor & Education
Center and the recreational opportunities at Tarpon Bay Explorers, the refuge’s official concessionaire located at
its Tarpon Bay Recreation Area.
For more information on the lecture
series, call 239-472-1100 ext. 241
or visit www.dingdarlingsociety.org/
lectures.
Upcoming “Ding” Darling
Lecture Series Events
(*Book-signings will follow all starred
presentations)
*February 6 – Author Jeff
Klinkenberg, Alligator in B Flat
*February 13 – Authors Don and
Lillian Stokes, Beautiful Birds of Sanibel
*February 20 – No lecture (volunteer
luncheon)
*February 27 – Author Gary
Monroe, The Highwaymen
March 6 – Sarah Adams, Memories
of My Grandfather, Ansel Adams
*March 13 – Author Frederick
“Fritz” Davis, Banned: A History
of Pesticides and the Science of
Toxicology
*March 20 – Author Marie Read, Into the Nest: Intimate Views of the Courting,
Parenting, and Family Lives of Birds
*March 27 – Peggy MacDonald, Marjorie Harris Carr: Defender of Florida
Environment
April 3 – Jeremy Conrad, Sea Turtles
April 10 – Jerry Lorenz, The Beauty & Science of Roseate Spoonbills
To support DDWS and the refuge with a tax-deductible gift, visit www.dingdarlingsociety.org or contact Birgie Miller at 292-0566, 472-1100 ext. 4 or [email protected]
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
21
ISLAND FARE
Dine Your Way Around Sanibel And Captiva With Anne Mitchell
For more information, check out our advertisers in this week's Island Sun
THE DUNES RESTAURANT
RESTAURANTS
The Dunes Golf & Tennis Club is open to the
public and serves lunch daily from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Chef specials include an assortment of salads, wraps
and sandwiches, soup buffet Monday through Friday,
and the popular the Shrimp Po’ Boy.
Featured monthly events include Trivia Night,
Corks & Canvas, Comedy Night, dinner, dancing and
live entertainment, and bridge. There is a Friday a la
carte dinner menu with featured selections each week
such as fish fry, prime rib, seafood and pasta nights.
Take in the sunset views while sipping on your favorite drink. Happy hour is every day from 3 to 6 p.m.
The variety of dining options on Sanibel and
Captiva just keeps getting better. For their size, the
islands offer an extensive culinary array – all making
the most of the area’s fresh and abundant seafood
and local produce. You’ll find everything from burgers
to barbecue, bistro style, Italian, Mexican, American,
classic deli fare, organic, vegan, gluten-free, café food
and Caribbean.
In this column, each week you will be able to stay
updated on our local dining establishments and what
they’re offering and get the scoop on the island dining
scene, whether it’s fine or casual, take-out or frozen
desserts.
GEORGE & WENDY'S
SEAFOOD GRILLE
AMONG THE FLOWERS CAFE
George & Wendy’s Seafood Grille features live
music Fridays and Saturdays and Karaoke on Thursdays. Specials include barbecued ribs on Monday
for $18, prime rib on Tuesdays for $18, crab legs
on Wednesdays for $18, steak lovers special on Thursdays for $18 and Friday night fish fry for $15.
There is a live jazz brunch buffet on Sunday from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Happy hour is from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. The full bar
has an extensive wine list, 20 beers on tap, local,
domestic and craft beer, mojitos, martinis and tropical
favorites.
Football food and drink specials are available in
the bar area only during all NFL and Saturday college
games. There are free Jello shots with each Chicago
or Buffalo touchdown.
Hours are 11 a.m. to midnight seven days a week.
Among the Flowers Cafe features local and
organic vegetarian/vegan fare. Some of the featured
items are fresh pressed juices and smoothies, fresh
organic coffee and an espresso drink bar, fresh housemade nut milks, raw protein gems and chocolates,
organic egg sandwiches and salads, Queenie’s local
ice cream, local beers and organic/sustainably farmed
wines, gluten free bakery with custom layered cakes
and complete party catering. You’ll also find original art
with uplifting messages as well as salt lamps, sage
wands, handmade jewelry, T-shirts and gift-baskets.
Open 7 days a week for breakfast, lunch and early
dinner until 6 p.m. Call-ahead for to-go orders, or sit
outside under a covered deck.
BAILEY’S GENERAL STORE
Bailey’s General Store has a full deli, bakery, daily
lunch specials, take out and catering for cook-outs,
picnics and parties. This is the oldest supermarket on
the islands, established long before a causeway linked
Sanibel to the mainland.
The bakery has freshly made donuts, scones
and breads. The deli offers a variety of hot foods
for breakfast, lunch and dinner, as well as catering
services for special events. Services include shopping
for your groceries and delivering them to your home
or vacation destination. If you are on a gluten-free diet,
pick up the extensive list of gluten-free products near
the entrance to the supermarket.
The Coffee Bar at Bailey’s serves espresso based
drinks, hot chocolate, smoothies and specialty coffees.
BENNETT’S FRESH ROAST
Bennett’s Fresh Roast at 1020 Periwinkle Way
prides itself on its fresh-from-scratch doughnuts made
daily and being the only Southwest Florida doughnut
shop offering fresh roasted coffee from the finest
beans. They also offer fresh desserts including praline
bread pudding and lemon bars, packaged whole bean
or ground coffees, breakfast muffins, oatmeal, breakfast sandwiches, strata (a layered baked breakfast
dish) and a large variety of Harney & Sons Fine Teas.
Lunch offerings including paninis, soups, sandwiches,
signature salads and Bennett’s Chicken & Donut,
Donut Dog and a Lobster Roll are available Monday
through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
BLUE GIRAFFE
Blue Giraffe serves breakfast, lunch and dinner
from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. This restaurant offers casual
island dining seven days a week from a menu featuring fresh local seafood, chowders, salads and steaks.
Besides dessert choices, you can get hand-dipped
Edy’s Grand Ice Cream.
Dine outside on the boardwalk or inside at handpainted tables decorated by a local artist, or sit at the
full liquor bar for a mixed drink, glass of wine or cold
beer.
GRAMMA DOT’S
Natalia Molinary at Over Easy Cafe
CIP’S PLACE
Cip’s Place is named for the late Jimmy Cipriani, a
longtime islander and owner of the property on which
the restaurant sits. Jimmy always made time for a
good conversation, good company and great food. In
Jimmy’s memory, Cip’s styles itself as a local watering
hole. A mural that takes up an entire wall shows lots of
islanders through the ages – including Cip – and if you
don’t recognize them all, ask to see the “key.”
Food choices range from “comfort” to culinary with
some Caribbean and island favorites as well. And do
try the home-made potato chips, the fried buttermilk
chicken with sage gravy and the snapper tacos.
Choose between the outdoor garden patio or front
porch. Indoor seating and full bar are also available.
Hours are 11:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. daily with happy
hour from 4 to 6 p.m.
CHIP’S SANIBEL STEAKHOUSE
Chip’s Sanibel Steakhouse has many great
options for locals and tourists alike. It is open seven
nights a week with daily happy hour from 5 to 6 p.m.,
featuring two-for-one drinks and $4.95 appetizers.
For early diners, there’s a three-course prix fixe menu
for $35 including a cocktail. In addition to an updated
wine list, seasonal house-infused liquors such as
strawberry-jalapeño tequila, blood orange vodka and
cucumber gin are available.
The menu features steaks and seafood, including
a six-ounce filet mignon topped with jumbo lump
crabmeat finished with Hollandaise and served with
of asparagus and choice of potato; Parmesan-crusted
seabass served with mushroom risotto and finished
with a creamy dill sauce. Save room for dessert
though, because whether you are a chocolate lover
or Key lime pie fan, Chip’s has something for every
sweet tooth.
CROW'S NEST
AT ‘TWEEN WATERS INN
The Crow’s Nest at ‘Tween Waters Inn is a more
casual place than its sister the Old Captiva House. It’s
home to the famed Captiva Crab Races on Mondays
and Thursdays and is a popular venue for live entertainment on Fridays and Saturdays.
There is a nightly happy hour.
DOC FORD'S RUM BAR & GRILLE
Doc Ford’s Rum Bar & Grille is named for the Doc
Ford character in local author Randy Wayne White’s
best-selling mystery novels.
In addition to its Sanibel restaurant, Doc Ford’s
has a Captiva location in Chadwick’s Square.
It’s a well known gathering place and tropical
theme sports bar with indoor and outdoor patio seating. The combined menu offers all the lunch and dinner items from 11 a.m. until closing. It includes cedar
plank salmon topped with a mango chipotle glaze or
a marinated grilled chicken sandwich. The fish tacos
are an island favorite and there’s a well provisioned
raw bar. Tropical drinks are a specialty, notably the
signature rum drink, Island Mojito.
Gramma Dot’s, the only dockside dining on
Sanibel, offers a lunch and dinner menu seven days
a week from “Sanibel’s only Seaside Saloon” where
you can leisurely dine at the Sanibel Marina in view of
luxury yachts and modest fishing boats and watch the
comings and goings of seagoing folk and fishermen.
The menu features a full line of “only fresh” seafood,
salads, sandwiches and more. Appropriate dress is
required.
If you’re arriving by boat, check in with dockmaster
for a lunch slip, monitor VHF 16. You can tie up for
a night or two at the available dockage if you wish.
Gramma Dot’s is open daily at 11:30 a.m. For dinner,
arrive before 8 p.m.
GREAT WHITE GRILL
The Great White Grill is a sports bar featuring 29
beers on tap and a good wine list. It’s home of The
Steel Curtain Pizza. There’s free pizza delivery too.
The Great White carries the TV Baseball package
and the NFL package for sports enthusiasts and has
arcade games for kids of all ages.
The regular menu includes hand-cast fresh dough
pizza, wings, fries, chicken fingers, salads, gyros,
sandwiches and burgers. Check out the Pittsburgh
Salad, which consists of grilled chicken, French fries,
cheddar cheese, cucumbers, tomatoes and onions on
a bed of lettuce.
GREEN FLASH
The Green Flash has marvelous waterfront
views of Captiva’s bayside and Pine Island Sound.
The Green Flash was built on the site of the historic
Timmy’s Nook, opened in 1950. Fittingly, seafood
dominates the menu, although other options are
offered as well. The Green Flash is easily navigable
by boat and is located southwest of Marker 38 on the
Intracoastal Waterway.
Hours are daily from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. for
lunch and 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. for dinner.
continued on page 22
22
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
From page 21
Island Fare
GREENHOUSE GRILL
The Greenhouse Grill has happy hour daily that
includes $2 off house wine, $1 off draft beer and half
price special of the day appetizer from 4 to 6 p.m.
There are vegan and gluten free options available.
Fresh, local, seasonal ingredients are used to flavor
steaks, seafood, pasta, salads and burgers. The
signature Bouillabaisse is a seafood lover’s delight
with fresh shrimp, mussels, clams, scallops, grouper
and calamari. Homemade lemonade and green tea
with pomegranate are a favorite among guests. Grand
finales include Chocolate Fondant, Tiramisu, Crème
Brule, Cannoli and other delectables. Pet-friendly patio
seating available.
The Greenhouse Grill is open daily from 10:30
a.m. to 9 p.m. Reservations are appreciated and carry
out orders are welcome.
IL TESORO
Il Tesoro serves authentic Italian food “with the
taste and feel of a Tuscan holiday,” according to owner
Chef AJ Black. He infuses flavors from the old world
to the new world of cooking using only fresh seasonal
ingredients to bring his dishes to life. Daily specials
focus on pairing authentic meals with a bold array of
fine Italian wines.
Il Tesoro (The Treasure) serves dinner seven
nights a week from 5 to 10 p.m.
MATZALUNA ITALIAN KITCHEN
In the mood for pizza? Matzaluna Italian Kitchen
has a wood-fired oven to bake authentic pizzas,
including gluten-free ones. That’s in addition to a big
selection including over 20 combinations of pasta dinners from $11.95 (including soup or salad and fresh
baked bread), affordable veal, tender chicken, choice
steaks and seafood (Italian style) in a casual marketlike setting. Gluten-free pizza is also available.
Matzaluna has craft beers on tap. On Wine
Wednesdays, every bottle priced $25 and over will be
discounted by $8 all evening. Hours are 4:30 to 9:30
p.m. daily and happy hour is from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.
MUCKY DUCK
The Mucky Duck may well be the most famous
restaurant on Captiva due to its longevity and quirky
name. Then there’s the fabulous sunsets. Patrons
gladly wait on the beach for tables. This place draws
crowds – sipping cocktails and beverages until they
can take their seats. Reservations are not accepted.
The Duck is open for lunch and dinner, serving
fresh seafood, pub-style food, sandwiches, steaks and
other items.
OLD CAPTIVA HOUSE
AT ‘TWEEN WATERS INN
The Island Cow is a family favorite with its colorful
indoor and outdoor seating and live entertainment.
“Come as our guests… leave as our friends!” is the
motto. The Cow serves breakfast, lunch and dinner
featuring fresh local seafood and meats and has an
extensive children’s menu. Starbucks coffee is also on
the menu.
Breakfast is served between 7 and 11 a.m. Hours
are 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Old Captiva House at ‘Tween Waters Inn, Captiva,
offers romantic sunset dining in an historic setting
with live piano music. Executive Chef Jason Miller
prepares New Florida island favorites, tropical seafoods, classic meats and daily fresh-baked breads and
pastries, served with an extensive selection of wines,
liquors and coffees.
First built as a one-room school for children of
Captiva’s pioneer settlers, the Old Captiva House
still reflects much of its original charm – from white
French doors to hardwood floors to the Gulf of Mexico
sunset that streams through the western windows.
Its collection of famed cartoonist JN “Ding” Darling’s
1930s whimsical vacation illustrations has led to its
designation as a landmark in Southwest Florida.
JACARANDA
OVER EASY CAFÉ
The Jacaranda Restaurant & Patio Lounge is a
Sanibel mainstay, with a reputation for fine seafood
and steaks. Dinner is served year-round Monday
through Sunday. You can eat inside or outside on the
pretty patio with its fairy lights and tropical vegetation.
During The Jac’s Summer Break, Monday through
Thursday, choose an appetizer, entree and dessert
from the featured menu for just $30. Wine specials
are also offered, along with the featured drink, The
Jacaranda Sangria.
The Jac Bar has live music six nights and is the
unofficial HQ for Sanibel’s social scene. The patio
lounge menu includes a selection of “happy apps” for
$5.95 and half price drinks during happy hour, 5 to 7
p.m. There is also a raw bar.
Over Easy Café is a pet-friendly place with
indoor and outdoor dining for breakfast and lunch.
The covered patio is a popular spot. Choose from 22
different Eggs Benedict, scramblers and omelettes, 11
pancakes and French toast choices, 15 egg specialties and wraps, eight salads and 26 sandwiches
and burgers, plus baked goods. Beer and wine is
available.
Breakfast is served all day. Hours are 7 a.m. to
3 p.m.
ISLAND COW
JERRY’S RESTAURANT AND DELI
Jerry’s Restaurant and Deli in Jerry’s Market is
the next best thing to dining in a tropical garden. This
family-style restaurant has large windows to view the
lush garden with caged tropical birds that are favorites
with visitors and residents. Daily specials are offered in
the spacious restaurant and you can order a sandwich
or hot food from the deli or help yourself at the wellstocked salad bar to take out.
The restaurant is open for breakfast, lunch and
dinner from 6 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
LAZY FLAMINGO
The Lazy Flamingo is a famed island hang-out with
two Sanibel locations: one at 1036 Periwinkle Way, the
other – the original – at 6520 Pine Avenue, near Blind
Pass. “If our seafood were any fresher, we would be
serving it under water!” is the Flamingo’s motto. And
that includes, shrimp, grouper, oysters, conch fritters
and chowder as well as chicken.
The Flamingo Bread and the Caesar Salad are
signature items. Pull up a stool to the rustic bar or take
a high or low table. The interior feels like the inside of
an old pirate ship with its portholes and hewn wood
surfaces. The atmosphere is definitely casual and beer
is available by the bottle, on draft or by the pitcher.
PECKING ORDER
The Pecking Order, features tender, juicy, broasted
fried chicken and the fixins. The chicken is marinated
and seasoned, and the high-pressure deep-frying
system produces a crispy coating and holds in the
juices without allowing the fat to penetrate.
Homemade sides include slow-cooked collard
greens, sweet and spicy baked beans, cheesy shell
mac, rice and beans, cole slaw, red mashed and
gravy, fried pickles and veggie chili. Try the Black Betty,
a warm, dark chocolate cupcake filled with liquid
dark chocolate, sprinkled with sea salt flakes and
confectioners sugar.
Take out and outdoor dining available. .
POCOLOCO
Need a pick-me-up? Looking for some downtime?
Either way, your best bet is PocoLoco on the tropical
courtyard at Jerry's Center. Indoors or out you will
savor gourmet coffee, tea, signature sandwiches,
pastries, or a cone of the region's most popular ice
cream, Love Boat. PocoLoco is the Sanibel source for
this ice cream and always features a couple dozen delicious favors. Stop by, sit in the sunshine and chatter
with six cheerful parrots for a unique and memorable
experience.
RC OTTER'S, CANTINA CAPTIVA,
SUNSHINE SEAFOOD, KEYLIME
BISTRO AND CAPTIVA PIZZA,
YOGURT & GIFTS
Five Captiva eateries under the same ownership
– RC Otter's, Cantina Captiva, Sunshine Seafood,
Keylime Bistro and Captiva Pizza, Yogurt & Gifts –
offer a fun and casual dining experience with a tropical
flair reminiscent of Key West.
RC Otter's and Keylime Bistro have live music
outdoors most of the day. Cantina Captiva serves
Mexican food. Sunshine Seafood Cafe Wine Bar
specializes in fine dining with a very respectable wine
list. You have your choice of dining inside or outdoors.
ROSIE’S CAFÉ & GRILL
Rosie's repertoire includes crab cakes, grouper
and shrimp entrees and steaks with all the trimmings,
Southwestern dishes such as burritos and fajitas, soup
and sandwich combos, and salads. Among the most
popular items is Rosie’s Famous Cheese Steak made
from shaved rib eye, grilled mushrooms, onions and
green peppers, Ultimate Cuban and Classic Reuben,
home-made muffins and cinnamon rolls and Key lime
pie, root beer floats and banana splits. A children’s
menu and carry-out are also available and outdoor
seating is available.
Breakfast is served from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. and
happy hour is from 3 to 6 p.m. seven days a week
with two-for-one draft beer and wine and a menu that
starts at $4.50 for items such as nachos with cheese
and salsa and $5.50 wings and chicken tenders. The
ice cream bar has 20+ flavors of locally made Royal
Scoop ice cream.
SANDBAR
Currently serving happy hour from 4 to 5:30 p.m.
every day in the lounge only, and dinner from 5 to 9
p.m. Since opening in 2013, The Sandbar has become
known for its fresh seafood and choice cuts of beef
and pork.
SANIBEL BEAN
The Sanibel Bean coffee shop is java central on
Sanibel Island. With its indoor and outdoor seating
and free wi-fi, it’s a popular venue for laptop-toting
coffee lovers to relax and check their inboxes, have
breakfast or lunch or recharge the batteries in the
afternoon.
Besides a big selection of coffee from around the
globe and a variety of coffee drinks, The Bean has
tea and other beverages and a variety of hearty sandwiches, pastries and muffins, plus other light fare.
SANIBEL DELI & COFFEE FACTORY
Sanibel Deli & Coffee Factory offers a gluten free
menu in addition to regular choices, along with pizza
and wings, Boar’s Head meats, frozen yogurt and
ice cream. There is indoor seating as well as outdoor
tables shaded with umbrellas, and free wi-fi.
SANIBEL FISH HOUSE
Find out why Sanibel Fish House is such a great
addition to the list of Sanibel restaurants. We offer
a wide range of fresh seafood as well as our great
alternative choices at reasonable prices.
Come and see us in our delightful tropical island
setting. Open 11 to 10 daily with excellent lunch and
dinner specials. Don’t miss the best happy hour on
the island 11 to 6 daily and all day on Saturdays and
Sundays in The Lounge! The Lounge opens 11 to 10
Sunday through Thursday and until 1 a.m. on Fridays
and Saturdays.
SANIBEL GRILL
The Sanibel Grill has 19 big screen TVs with satellite TV tuned to every televised sporting event. The
Grill shares a kitchen with The Timbers, serving the
same fresh seafood, along with burgers, sandwiches,
pizzas and salads. Crunchy Grouper and Crunchy
Shrimp are signature dishes.
SANIBEL SPROUT
The Sanibel Sprout is the island’s only vegan cafe
and organic juice bar. There is comfortable seating for
friends to socialize and taste Chef Nikki’s extended
menu of plant-based gourmet cuisine. The soups –
lentil, Vietnamese Pho, etc. – are popular year-round,
as are vegan lasagna, Mexican taco salad, kale salad
with avocado chipotle dressing and numerous desserts. The extended menu is posted on the Sprout’s
Facebook page.
The organic juice bar is popular with locals and
visitors of all ages. Kids love the Strawberry Kiss or the
Chocolate Bliss Smoothie, whereas adults favor the
Coffee Sproutaccino or the green Emerald Mermaid
Smoothie. Those are just a few of the juice bar favorites from an extensive menu.
The Sprout is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner
8.30 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday.
SUNDIAL BEACH RESORT & SPA
The Sea Breeze Café at Sundial Beach Resort &
Spa is open 7 days a week, from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.,
serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Dine indoors or
al fresco, overlooking the gulf. Choose from classic tavern fare, fresh seafood, innovative entrees, salads and
sandwiches. There is a daily happy hour from 4 to 6
p.m. with drink specials and bar menu. Every Monday
is Margarita Monday with $5 margaritas from 4 to 10
p.m., a taco bar from 4 to 6 p.m., and live island-style
entertainment from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Turtle’s Pool & Beach Bar serves imported and
domestic beer, wine and tropical drinks in a casual
outdoor island setting just steps from the gulf. A full
menu is available at the poolside dining patio from
11 a.m. to 7 p.m., including seafood, award-winning
burgers and fresh salads. Happy hour is 3 to 5 p.m.
every day.
Create your own custom pizza or grab a quick
snack at Slice of Paradice, Sundial’s newest poolside
dining option, featuring slices, specialty and custom
pizzas, grab and go salads, hot dogs and hand
scooped ice cream, including Sundial’s signature
flavor, Island Delight. Open daily from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
All restaurants and bars are open to the public.
TIMBERS RESTAURANT
& FISH MARKET
The Timbers Restaurant & Fish Market and the
adjoining Sanibel Grill are mainstays of the island dining scene, boasting 35 years of fresh fish on Sanibel
Island. The restaurant offers 13 dinners for $15
daily before 5:30 p.m. plus a large selection of local
seafood such as grilled shrimp, fried grouper, oysters,
clams and crab cakes.
Besides specializing in fresh local seafood, the
restaurant has a seafood market that opens at 11 a.m.
(except Sunday, when it’s 2 p.m.)
TRADITIONS ON THE BEACH
Traditions on the Beach is one of the few Sanibel
restaurants with beachfront dining. Located in the
historic Island Inn, the recently updated restaurant
sits on 10 acres with gulf views, perfect for watching
the sunset over the water while you dine. The menu
features Italian and Mediterranean cuisine prepared
by Chef Aziz and his team. Traditions’ dishes are made
with fresh ingredients, from seafood and meats, to
produce from local vendors. On the menu you will find
the classics and specialties including Moroccan lamb,
roast duck, lobster and veal. Pasta, grilled items and
a raw bar are also available. In addition to the regular
menu, specials are offered daily. There’s an attractive
bar and lounge area that also serves food and an
extensive wine and cocktail list. Dining begins at 5 p.m.
and continues until late. Reservations are suggested.
ZEBRA TREATS
This bold and bright cafe/store offers a variety of
frozen yogurt flavors – try the caramel sea salt pretzel
– with more than 50 toppings such as strawberries,
blueberries, chopped candy and sprinkles. Other offerings include milk shakes, smoothies and frappes.
Zebra has indoor and outdoor seating.
The store recently added frozen yogurt to go, by
the pint and quart.
continued on page 23
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Island Fare
M
LIVE ON THE ISLANDS
The Crow’s Nest at ’Tween Waters Inn will have
a crab show on Thursday and Monday, live entertainment with Stolen Fruit on Friday and Saturday; Taylor
Stokes on Sunday and Tuesday; and Bobby Blakely
on Wednesday.
George & Wendy’s Seafood Grille has live
music Friday with Jeff Lyons on acoustic guitar and
vocals; Saturday is John Allender Band playing rock,
plus half-price drinks for the ladies from 9 p.m. to
midnight; Sunday is Buckeye Ken; Monday is Megan
Rose on piano and vocals; Wednesday Jeff Lyons.
On Sunday, there is a live jazz brunch buffet from 10
a.m.to 1 p.m. plus Hospitality Night with happy hour
pricing from 8 p.m. to close. Tuesday is open mic
night from 8 to 11 p.m. Karaoke is Thursday from 9
p.m. to midnight.
The Jacaranda has live entertainment on Friday
and Saturday with Cruzan Vibes, playing reggae and
dance, beginning at 8:30 p.m. Sunday is Jamaica
Dave & Co., playing reggae and dance, beginning
at 8 p.m. Weekdays, music is from 8 to 11 p.m. On
Monday, it’s Renata, playing jazz, funk and contemporary; Wednesday is Tish, playing contemporary,
top 40s and dance; Thursday is Eric Malibu, playing
contemporary, reggae and dance.
The Mucky Duck on Andy Rosse Lane, Captiva
features music by Gary Earle on Thursday and
Friday; Gene Federico plays on Saturday; Gary Earle
plays Sunday; Mark Dupuy plays on Monday; Perry
atzaluna Italian restaurant, Sanibel’s home for wood-fired pizza
and local craft beer will host a
Tap Takeover from Sarasota’s Big Top
Brewing Company.
On Tuesday. January 27, from 5:30
to 7:30 p.m., sample selections will
include Circus City IPA and Intercoastal
Amber Ale.There will be special pricing
on drafts and sample paddles. Appetizers
will be offered.
Visit www.matzaluna.net,, www.
bigtopbrewing.com or call 472-1998 for
more information.
Cruzan Vibes plays reggae and dance on Friday and Saturday at The Jacaranda
English plays on Tuesday; and Gene Federico plays
on Wednesday.
Sea Breeze Café at Sundial Beach Resort
& Spa features Margarita Monday from 4 to 8:30
p.m. every Monday with $5 margaritas, taco bar for
$12.95 and island style entertainment. Happy hour is
daily from 5 to 7 p.m. with drink specials.
Traditions on the Beach at the Island Inn has
live music Friday and Saturday with Joe McCormick
and Marvilla Marzan, playing jazz, Latin, pop, R&B
and contemporary dance. Joe McCormick plays on
New Exhibit Opens At
Watson MacRae Gallery
Pitchers created by artist Mark Knott
C
23
Tap Takeover
At Matzaluna’s
From page 22
ontemporary Florida, recent work by artists Hollis Jeffcoat, Rainer Lagemann,
Mira Lehr and Sang Roberson, will be exhibited at the Watson MacRae Gallery,
2340 Periwinkle Way, with an opening reception on Tuesday, February 3 from
5 to 7 p.m. The gallery will also host an Artist Talk by Jeffcoat on Thursday, February
26 beginning at 4 p.m.
“I wondered how to write about the four artists in this exhibit – the high level of
quality, uniqueness and sophistication of their work and their commitment to their art,
Wednesday. Joe McCormick and Marvilla Marzan
play on Thursday.
The Island Cow on Periwinkle Way has live entertainment on Friday with Gene Federico; Saturday,
Jay Helt; and Sunday, Dan Confrey.
RC Otter’s on Andy Rosse Lane, Captiva, has
live music daily with dining inside and out.
Restaurant owners/managers, please email or
fax any changes to your entertainment schedule to
[email protected] or 395-2299.
To advertise in the
Island Sun
Call 395-1213
longevity and accomplishments – without using superlatives or flowery language,” said
gallery owner Maureen Watson. “Then I realized the common thread: museum exhibits
and collections, which in the art industry says it all.”
Watson first saw Lehr’s mixed media sculpture at an exhibition at the Naples Museum last year, and was transfixed. Lehr, who studied with Robert Motherwell in New
York City and was selected by futurist Buckminster Fuller as a member of a yearlong
project he headed, continues with that experimental vein in her work.
Watson discovered Lagemann’s unique gravity-defying steel figures at the international exhibit at the Republic of Georgia National Museum. A resident of Miami, Lagemann has amassed a large international following as well as acquisitions by numerous
museums.
At that same exhibit, Jeffcoat showed her mesmerizing Portal series, the genesis for
the work in this exhibit. This was followed by participation in two additional museum
exhibitions this year. Jeffcoat, a third generation abstract expressionist, studied with
the major painters/teachers of that movement and carries on the tradition of great oil
painters, pushing it in a contemporary direction.
Another museum find by Watson was the sophisticated terra cotta boxes of Roberson during her solo exhibit at Brevard Museum of Art. Roberson’s burnished and
banded boxes are in corporate and museum collections across the country.
“One thing I can say is that the work in this exhibit is truly museum quality,” added
Watson.
For more information, visit watsonmacraegallery.com or call 472-3386.
24
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Ra n k e d S a n i b e l ’ s
#
1
Shopping Destination
by the Lee County Convention and Visitors Bureau
6KRS'LQH5HOD[
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gifts | artisan crafts
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home
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Shop in Store
239.472-4600
Shop Online
islandpursuit.com
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Indulge in Color and Fun!
SANIBEL’S AWARD
ARD WINNING C ASUAL RESTAURANT
DINE INSIDE OR OUT
ON OUR TROPICAL DECK
Upscale Women’s
Casual Clothing,
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2 x Winner
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Best of the Islands
Breakfast
Lunch . Dinner
Island Dining
NOW WITH FULL LIQUOR BAR
JOIN US FOR OUR HAPPY HOUR 4-6PM
(239) 472-4206
Appetizers f rom $4 - Drinks from $3
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239 472 2525
Authentic
“Atocha” treasure.
239 . 472 . 8111
We Carry Tribal • Cheryl Nash
Nic & Zoe • Lisette Pants
• Andrea Lieu
Naot & Onex Sandals
We Also Carry Sanibel Perfume
Telephone: 239.472.8444
www.peachrepublic.com
Casual Clothing and Shoes
mybluegiraffe.com
Come in and pick out your original,
certified“Piece of Eight” and enjoy the pride
of wearing a genuine piece of history.
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26 Unique Stores In A Tropical Setting • 2075 Periwinkle Way • Shop Mon - Sat 10-8 Sun 12-6 • Dine Mon - Sun 10-9
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Follow us o
on
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26
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Taco-Stuffed Bell Peppers
3 large bell peppers
(your favorite color),
halved lengthwise,
seeds removed
1 pound lean ground beef
1 cup onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 tomatoes, diced
1 package taco meat seasoning
for 1 pound of ground beef
Sea salt and fresh ground
pepper, to taste
12 ounces Colby jack cheese
(or your favorite), shredded
1 cup tortilla chips, crushed
Salsa and sour cream for garnish
1 teaspoon olive oil
Preheat a large sauté pan over
medium-high heat.
Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
Add olive oil to preheated sauté
pan.
Add chopped onion to pan and
cook until translucent.
Add garlic and ground beef to the
cooking onions.
Brown ground beef and drain any
excess fat.
Add the taco seasoning mix and
diced tomatoes; stir ingredients to
combine.
Remove from heat and let cool
slightly.
Add about 4 ounces of the
cheese to the beef mixture and stir
to combine.
Evenly stuff each pepper half with
the beef mixture.
Top each stuffed pepper with the
rest of the cheese.
Place stuffed peppers on a cookie
sheet and bake in preheated oven
for 15 to 20 minutes.
Remove stuffed peppers from
oven and evenly top them with the
crushed tortilla chips.
Place the peppers back in the
oven for another 5 minutes or until
tortilla chip topping is golden brown
and filling mixture and cheese are
bubbly.
Remove stuffed peppers from
oven and let cool slightly.
Serve warm with salsa and sour
cream.
Taco-Stuffed Bell Peppers
BEST TAKE-OUT
ON THE
ISLANDS
FULL DELI, BAKERY
DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS
COLD BEVERAGES
The Only Dockside Dining on Sanibel
Located at the Sanibel Marina
Specializing in Local Seafood
We also feature Petite & 10 oz. Filet Mignons
Call us for your cookout, picnic
and party needs. We’ll take care of you!
Corner of Periwinkle Way & Tarpon Bay Road
472-8138
Dining Awards: 6 years running
472-1516
Sanibel Deli & Coffee
F A C T O R Y
Get in line.
Your neighborhood chicken joint is now open. Featuring Chicken & Waffles.
Tender, juicy, roasted fried chicken. Comfort Food all the fixins. Take-out, outdoor dining
PIZZA & WINGS
Call Open every day, 11am to 9pm
CALL AHEAD 472-2555
239.Grab.Legs
IL TESORO RISTORANTE
F I N E
I T A L I A N C U I S I N E
Open 7 days a week
751 Tarpon Bay Road • 239.395.4022
Fresh fish, meat, and pasta dishes, rated best wine list
on the island, famous coconut tiramisu
Menu at: www.iltesoro.net
www.facebook.com/iltesorosanibel
The Sanibel Sprout
2463 Periwinkle Way
in the Bailey‛s Center
Vegan Cafe and Juice Bar
V
Open 8:30 am to 7 pm
Monday through Saturday
239-472-4499
www.sanibelsprout.com
Monday - Saturday
11am - 9pm
Sunday
12pm - 7pm
Gourmet vegan cuisine
100% organic and non-GMO
Catering and special orders welcome
Sanibel‛s original fresh juice and smoothie bar
Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner
Follow Us On facebook:
The Sanibel Sprout
Pizza
Subs
Drinks
Across from
CVS in
Palm Ridge Place
BOARS HEAD MEAT!
FROZEN YOGURT &
ICE CREAM
~ OPEN ~ Mon. 7am-3pm
Tues. Wed. & Thurs. 7am-8pm
Fri & Sat. 7am-9pm
Sun. - Seasonal
Among The Flowers
Italian espresso • fresh juice bar & smoothies • ice cream
• pizza • sandwiches • salads • GLUTEN FREE Pizza
• handmade local art and gifts
Call Ahead Orders 239-312-4085
website for menu
www.loveamongtheflowers.com
Restaurant & Deli
Daily Lunch Specials • Salad Bar • Take-Out
or Eat In • Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner
Open Daily 6 a.m. - 10 p.m.
CALL FOR
DAILY SPECIALS
472-9300
Get The Word Out
About Your Take-Out!
~Advertise Here~
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
27
Plant Smart
Coral Bean
by Gerri Reaves
C
Tr
oral bean (Erythrina
herbacea) is a native
shrub with brilliant
spikes of flowers and ornamental trifoliate leaves.
Also called cardinal spear,
coral spear and Cherokeebean, its wild habitat
includes hammocks, thickets
and pine woods.
In South Florida, this
native of the bean family
might be a shrub or a tree.
As a tree, it can be 20 feet
tall or more but is usually
much shorter. It might be as
wide as tall or take a sprawling form.
The irregular branches
have recurved spines.
Flowers appear in spring
or summer and the bean
Coral bean’s spikes of brilliant red or coral flowers attract
hummingbirds and butterflies
pods in fall. Spikes of
curved coral or scarlet tubutoid in shape, with the center one being
lar flowers appear at the branch ends,
the largest.
often when the plant is leafless.
The brown pods are constricted (i.e.,
The upright pyramidal spikes are four
look pinched between the seeds) and
to eight inches long, and each flattened
about six inches long. They split open,
flower is about two inches long. They
revealing bright red kidney-shaped seeds
attract hummingbirds and butterflies.
with black stripes.
The compound leaves – among the
Those seeds, as well as the leaves, are
most attractive of Florida natives – are up
poisonous to people and animals. Their
to nine inches long. They are made up of many uses include poisoning rats, paralyzthree thin shallow-lobed leaflets, each del- ing fish, and making ornamental beads.
o
pi
c al
The trifoliate leaves with deltoid-shaped leaflets are a distinguishing mark of this Florida
native
photos by Gerri Reaves
This adaptable plant prefers moist
well-drained sandy soil with some organic
content but will survive in nutrient-poor
soil too. It has a moderate growth rate
and is salt tolerant and highly drought
tolerant.
Plant it in full to partial shade.
Propagate coral bean with the seeds.
Sources: A Gardener’s Guide to
Florida’s Native Plants by Rufino
Osorio, The Shrubs and Woody Vines
of Florida by Gil Nelson, Native Florida
Plants by Robert G. Haehle and Joan
Brookwell, Wild Plants for Survival in
South Florida by Julia F. Morton, www.
floridata.com, edis.ifas.ufl.edu, regionalconservation.org and wildflowers.jdcc.edu.
Plant Smart explores the diverse
flora of South Florida.
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28
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
An Inside Look At Wildlife Recovery
Barn owl chicks
photos courtesy of CROW
Baby bunnies
T
he CROW Picture Show presents informative anecdotes about the native
and migratory wildlife species brought to the Clinic for the Rehabilitation of
Wildlife (CROW), along with photos of patients admitted to the facility.
In 2014, CROW’s wildlife hospital cared for 3,410 sick, injured, or orphaned animals. Of the 200 different species, 57 percent were birds, with 37 percent mammals
and six percent reptiles.
CROW is not permitted to display its patients publicly, so this hour-long presentation offers the next best thing: numerous candid snapshots of current and past
patients, with commentary by Claudia Burns, a veteran clinic volunteer.
The next CROW Picture Show is on Friday January 30 at 11 a.m. in CROW’s Visitor Education Center at 3883 Sanibel-Captiva Road, across from The Sanibel School.
Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for teens, free for members and children 12 or under.
The entry fee also includes access to the Visitor Education Center, which exhibits
CROW’s efforts to save wildlife through care, education and collaboration.
For more information, call 472-3644, ext. 228. To learn more about CROW, visit
www.crowclinic.org.
Serving Breakfast
‘til 3:00 everyday!
For pets
and the people
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• Collars, Harnesses & Leads
• Great Pet Toys
• Pet Beds & Carriers
• Breed Specific Items
• Cat Stuff Too!
Specializing in all Natural
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630 Tarpon Bay Road
Sanibel, FL 33957
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fax 239.395-1458
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630 Tarpon Bay Road
Sanibel, FL 33957
239.395.1464
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ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Shell Of The Week
Lineate
Dove Snail
by José H. Leal,
PhD, The BaileyMatthews National
Shell Museum
Science Director &
Curator
T
he lineate
dove snail,
Suturoglypta
iontha (Ravenel,
1861) is a small
gastropod that
measures about 9 mm (about a third of
an inch). A member of the marine dove
snail family Columbellidae, this species
is found in sea grass beds and mud flats
around the barrier islands of Southwest
Florida. Lineate dove snails are variable
in their color pattern, ranging from having fine lines to large spots of mahogany-, light- or yellowish-brown color.
Small dove snails are known to feed
on carrion (they are micro-scavengers)
and on the thin film of microorganisms
that grow on sea grass blades. The live
specimen (in the two images on the
right) was collected by museum marine
The lineate dove snail Suturoglypta iontha (Ravenel, 1861), shell on left and live animal
on right
biologist Rebecca Mensch (under a
Special Activities License granted by the
Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Commission) on Sanibel and photographed by me. Learn more about this
species at http://shellmuseum.org/
shells/shelldetails.cfm?id=97.
Shell Museum Events
Daily Live Tank Demonstration at
11:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. – Get a closer
look at live mollusks (the shell-makers)
with a staff member or docent. Sights
may include a fighting conch using its
01/30/15
foot for locomotion, watching a lightning
whelk slam its trap door shut for protection, or witnessing mollusks zip across the
tank via jet propulsion.
Mondays at 2 p.m. – Staff favorites
may include: Carolyn’s Collection (A presentation of gem-quality shells) or Giant
and Colossal Squids (An expert’s insights
about these mysterious creatures.)
Tuesdays at 2 p.m. – What is a
Mollusk? A marine biologist offers a fun
and informative introduction to mollusks
found throughout the world.
29
Wednesdays at 2 p.m. – Mollusk
Matinées: Scientific lectures by guest
speakers on most Wednesdays, ranging
from historical changes in waterways to
learning about cephalopods. January
28: Manatee Mugshots; Snapshots for
Conservation. February 4: Cindy Bear’s
How Shells Reveal a Stunning Past.
Thursdays at 2 p.m. – Shell ID: Get
mysterious finds identified by an expert.
Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays at 2
p.m. – Tank University: A presentation
and hands-on experience at the live mollusk observation tank. Learn about the
mollusks that make the shells. Limited to
20 guests, first-come/first-served, recommended ages 10 and up.
Daily Island Inn Morning Beach Walks:
Join our marine biologist for a beach
walk near Island Inn on Sanibel. Walks
depart daily from the Island Inn lobby at
9 a.m. The cost is $10, and parking at
Island Inn is free for beach walk participants. Space is limited so book online
at www.shellmuseum.org/events or call
395-2233 to make a reservation. All
beach walk participants will receive halfoff shell museum admission.
The Bailey-Matthews National Shell
Museum is at 3075 Sanibel-Captiva
Road. Phone 239-395-2233 or visit
www.shellmuseum.org.
30
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Welcome to Jerry’s of Sanibel
ARTS & CRAFTS
AR
Fax 239
F
239.472-1658
4 2 16 8
Hours:
9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 7 days
Toll Free 866.746.6574 • 239.472-6776
To
NANNY’S CHILDREN’S SHOPPE
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Hello Shoppers of Sanibel,
When you shop Jerry’s of Sanibel you’ll
experience much more than just quality
grocery shopping and dining at Jerry’s
Restaurant.
From H20 Outfitters to Sanibel Surf
Shop’s flagship store to Sanybel’s Finest
and more, there are just enough shops at
Jerry’s to turn an ordinary day into an
extraordinary day.
Before shopping at Jerry’s Foods, you
can enjoy the wonderful courtyard to
relax with family and friends; it’s a little
piece of paradise teeming with colorful
exotic birds!
Stop by and say hello!
Regards,
Jerry’s of Sanibel
1700 Periwinkle Way,
Sanibel Island, FL 33957
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
31
game day
favorites!
Thur., 1.22.2015 - Wed., 1.28.2015
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32
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
‘Ding’ Darling Party Features
Puffins, Live And Silent Auctions
Bid on a six-day birding camp to Hog Island, Maine
photo by Stephen W. Kress
L
ive auction items at “Ding” Darling’s 2015 Trailgate Party: Dinner & Puffins in
Maine, which will be held at The Community House on February 17, include an
original puffin decoy carved by master sculptor Jim Sprankle and an all-inclusive
six-day puffin camp excursion to Maine for two people including a special social gettogether with Audubon puffin activist Dr. Stephen W. Kress.
Kress will also speak at the Trailgate Party about his role in founding the Project Puffin
in 1973 to restore Maine’s historic but decimated puffin population.
“To keep with the Maine theme, we are taking Trailgate indoors this year and serving
culinary specialties from Maine,” said Birgie Miller, executive director of “Ding” Darling
Wildlife Society-Friends of the Refuge (DDWS), host of the third annual Trailgate Party.
“We thank Doc Ford’s for supplying the lobster rolls, and our wonderful island restaurant
partners for all the side dishes.”
In addition to authentic Maine lobster rolls, the menu will include shrimp, crab cakes,
salad, ice cream and other offerings.
Sprankle has carved a number of puffin decoys during his career, and taught students
at Cornell Lab of Ornithology how to carve puffins, some of which were used in Kress’
research. One of his original puffins resides
in the “Ding” Darling Visitor & Education
Center’s Decoy Exhibit, which holds 47
decoys that Sprankle has carved and donors
have sponsored. At this year’s Trailgate,
DDWS will auction off another decoy
sponsorship for 2015’s common moorhen
decoy.
The six-day puffin camp on birding hot
spot Hog Island, Maine will include a $250
air flight voucher, puffin sightings, a guest
A puffin decoy similar to this one currently
lecture by Kress, ground transportation, field on display at the refuge will be auctioned
tours, housing and all meals.
Silent auction items include a hand-painted bicycle, framed limited edition photographs
of puffins and other birds, spring league baseball game tickets, handmade art, restaurant
packages, a scale model of Ernest Hemingway’s famous Pilar fishing boat, and other
items created specifically for the event. All proceeds benefit education and conservation
projects at JN “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge on Sanibel.
“Seating is limited, and we once again anticipate a sold-out crowd,” said event committee member and DDWS president Doris Hardy. “We encourage people to contact us
if they would like to receive an invitation.”
Attendance is by reservation only. Tickets are $100 each and include the lecture, a
seafood feast from local restaurants, live entertainment and auctions. To register, visit
tinyurl.com/trailgate or call 292-0566.
The following individuals and businesses are making Trailgate possible with their sponsorship:
Champion Sponsors – Mark and Gretchen Banks, Peter and Paula Bentinck-Smith,
Wayne and Linda Boyd, Doc Ford’s Rum Bar & Grille, John and Kathy McCabe, Sanibel
Catering/Bailey’s General Store.
Protector Level – Mike and Terry Baldwin, Jay and Cindy Brown, Cip’s Place,
Amanda Cross, Bob and Darlene Duvin, George & Wendy’s Seafood Grill, The
Jacaranda, Queenie’s Homemade Ice Cream, Royal Shell Realtor Sarah Ashton and Jim
Metzler, Shaker Investments, Traders Café & Store, Don and Ann-Marie Wildman.
Defender Level – Big Red Q Quickprint, Tim and Suzanne Devitt, Melissa and Tom
Gauntlett, Half-crackerphoto.com, John Grey Painting, Suncatcher’s Dream.
To support DDWS and the refuge with a tax-deductible gift, visit www.dingdarlingsociety.org or contact Birgie Miller at 292-0566 or email [email protected]
New York City
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EARLY BIRD DINING 5-6PM
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Come join us for a taste of Italy.
Receive one complimentary glass from our selected featured Italian wines
and a sample of our famous homemade Antipasto with a purchase of two entrees.
Cannot be combined with any other offer, discount, or voucher. No online reservations, call in reservations accepted.
18% gratuity will be added to full amount before discount. Valid through the month of January, 2015.
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8$ meatball appetizers
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“Fresh ingredients, simplicity, love...
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www.iltesoro.net • 239-395-4022
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
CROW Takes Canadian
Wildlife Haven Under Its Wing
Representatives from The Wildlife Haven Rehabilitation Centre in Canada visited CROW
T
he Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife (CROW), spent a week mentoring Canadian representatives from The Wildlife Haven Rehabilitation Centre,
located in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
The Wildlife Haven Rehabilitation Centre is in the middle of a capital campaign to
build a $2.5-million state-of-the-art hospital and education center similar to CROW’s.
“The board of directors for the organization has the vision to recognize that our
33
patient load and public awareness will increase substantially with this project. So why
not visit a wildlife rehabilitation center that is larger and run efficiently, to gain insight
into our future,” said Judy Robertson, vice president of the board for the Wildlife
Haven. “We wanted to learn every aspect of how CROW operates, so that we can
begin to put some of their successful practices into place now, before we open our
new facility. The hope is that we will be better prepared for the expected increase in
patients and expenses.”
The Canadian representatives spent a week with CROW staff learning all aspects of
the organization. They spent a considerable amount of time with Dr. Heather Barron
to learn about her perspective on wildlife medicine and its future.
“She took the time to explain the many aspects of what CROW does and how
it does it, which really gave us a good look at why CROW is so successful,” said
Robertson.
In addition, they received advice on rehabilitation enclosures from Randy Rainbolt,
facilities manager. JoEllen Urasky, volunteer and student coordinator, provided them
with some much-needed advice on managing volunteers. James Robinson, development director, explained what should be in place, going forward, as far as fund-raising,
membership, and direct mailings are concerned. Linda Estep, executive director,
offered some advice on what type of individual would be an asset on a board. Lastly,
Gareth Johnson, hospital manager, provided Wildlife Haven’s hospital coordinator,
some help with a wildlife app that they will be using to input patient data.
“We were so impressed with the wonderful people who work at CROW,” added
Robertson. “Everyone was more than willing to share their knowledge and expertise
with us and gave us brochures, posters, forms and even swatches of fabric. This mountain of information will help guide us going forward in our challenge of building the
best wildlife hospital possible and an exemplary education center. We cannot thank
everyone enough for taking the time to talk to us, show us around and explain what
works for CROW.”
Visit www.crowclinic.org for more information.
Our email address is [email protected]
34
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Master Gardener
Lecture February 5
T
he 70th Master Gardener Lecture
will be held on Thursday, February
5 at 10 a.m. at the Sanibel Public
Library. The guest speaker will be Jenny
Evans, manager of the Sanibel-Captiva
Conservation Foundation Native Plant
Nursery.
The PowerPoint presentation, featuring digital photos, will also include an
update on the progress of the Bailey
Tract restoration, featuring the newlyfinished littoral pond, new pathways
and special emphasis on the planned
botanical garden and the move of SCCF’s
Native Plant Nursery to the Bailey Tract,
adjacent to Periwinkle Way.
The SCCF Native Plant Nursery was
established over 37 years ago and was
the first native plant nursery founded
in the United States. The nursery has
esxtablished a wide range of sources for
plants native to Southwest Florida, which
are replenished continuously. The nursery also propagates many native plants
onsite. As a member of SCCF, you are
entitled to a free evaluation of your property and a 10 percent discount on your
nursery plant material. Delivery of large
specimens or large orders of mulch is also
available.
Evans is an articulate and knowledgeable professional who combines a strong
background with a wealth of practical
knowledge of Sanibel’s climate and ecology. Questions will be welcomed from the
audience.
The lecture is free and open to the
public, but seating is limited. The Sanibel
Public Library is located at 770 Dunlop
Road.
Fish Caught
Shell Found
Shell Museum Fundraiser
Michael Blied
T
M
he Bailey-Matthews National Shell Museum will
conduct their annual Under The Sea fundraiser
on Sunday, January 25 beginning at 5:30 p.m.
at The Sanctuary Golf Club, 2801 Wulfert Road on
Sanibel.
The event, which will be themed a 1960’s beach
party, includes dinner by The Sanctuary’s master chef,
live music and huge live and silent auctions.
Tickets are $135 per person and help raise funds for
the museum’s educational programs.
The principal sponsor of Under The Sea is the
Sanibel-Captiva Trust Company.
ichael Blied, visiting from
Kalamazoo, Michigan, found
a junonia along the beach
near West Gulf Drive while shelling on
January 15. Blied, who was staying
at West Wind Inn, called his shell find,
“another lucky scoop.”
Lance Fredrick
L
ance Fredrick, visiting from
Kentucky, caught a 26-inch redfish
on a recent Sea Reed Charter fishing trip.
Our email address is
[email protected]
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
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35
36
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Work To Boost Caloosahatchee
Water Storage Is Approved
W
ith funding support from the Florida Legislature, the South Florida Water
Management District Governing Board on January 15 approved a contract
to begin early construction on the site of a future Everglades restoration
reservoir near the Caloosahatchee River. The work will provide critical water storage in the Caloosahatchee basin and help to protect the downstream estuary.
“This work allows us to deliver some of the key benefits of the Caloosahatchee
River (C-43) West Basin Storage Reservoir before it is fully funded and constructed,”
said water district board chairman, Daniel O’Keefe. “Every step we take to increase
water storage means increased benefits to the river and estuary – and to the residents
who depend on this vital ecosystem.”
The C-43 reservoir project, a component of the Comprehensive Everglades
Restoration Plan, was authorized last year by Congress in the Water Resources and
Reform Development Act of 2014. It will one day hold approximately 170,000 acrefeet of water to be used during dry periods to help maintain a desirable minimum flow
of fresh water to the Caloosahatchee Estuary. During the rainy season, the reservoir
will store excess stormwater and regulatory releases from Lake Okeechobee, helping
to prevent excessive fresh water flows to the estuary.
Since 2012, the water district put the reservoir property to use with emergency
water storage of summertime rainfall. Temporary pumps and levee improvements
helped to capture approximately 4.2 billion gallons of water that otherwise would have
flowed to the river.
Following this effort, engineers determined that early construction work on key features at the C-43 reservoir site could create up to 5,000 acre-feet of semi-permanent
storage for the region, or the equivalent of 2,500 Olympic-sized swimming pools.
Eventually, this storage site will be integrated into the full-scale reservoir project.
The contract award is the first of three construction contracts that will be issued
using an $18 million investment from the Florida Legislature to complete significant
work on the project.
The first step, an approximately $2 million contract with Mitchell & Stark
Construction Co., Inc., includes:
• Demolishing existing features such as buried pipes, culverts and above-ground
facilities at the storage site, a 3,500-acre impoundment approximately 15,000 feet
long and 100 feet wide;
• Construction of a berm, approximately three miles long, to provide the northern
boundary for the impoundment. The height of the berm will range between three and
eight feet and provide a maximum storage depth of four feet.
For more information on projects to protect and improve the Caloosahatchee River
and estuary, visit www.sfwmd.gov/caloosahatchee:
From page 17
Amphibians And Reptiles Lecture
and is a 50-year comprehensive study of the amphibians and reptiles of Sanibel and
Captiva. LeBuff and Lechowicz will have a surprise guest as they share their decades
of experience with local cold-blooded neighbors.
LeBuff lived on Sanibel for 46 years and retired after a 32-year career as a wildlife technician with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at JN “Ding” Darling National
Wildlife Refuge in 1990. In 1968, as an avocation, he formed a loggerhead sea turtle
conservation organization known as Caretta Research. By the mid ‘70s, this organization included all loggerhead nesting beaches along the Florida gulf coast. Today’s
successful sea turtle conservation efforts in the region evolved from LeBuff’s pioneering work. Along with his passion for turtles and snakes, he is also a historian and has
written several books on the history of Sanibel, the history of “Ding” Darling Wildlife
Refuge and The Calusan, a historical novel which accurately depicts the culture of
Southwest Florida’s extinct Native Americans.
Lechowicz grew up on the southwest side of Chicago and was fascinated with all
things slimy and scaly. As member of the Chicago Herpetological Society, he has been
mentored by numerous members and visiting scientists. He graduated from Southern
Illinois University and Carbondale and Florida Gulf Coast University with degrees in
zoology, computer science and environmental science before joining SCCF in 2002.
This is the fourth of eight Sanibel-Captiva Audubon lectures to be held in this year
on Thursday evenings at The Community House. All are welcome to attend. Doors
open at 6:30 p.m. Parking is available at The Community House and across the street
in the Herb Strauss Theater parking area. A $5 donation is appreciated with proceeds
after costs being used to promote conservation on Sanibel and in Florida. For more
information, call Elaine Jacobson at 395-1878 or visit www.san-capaudubon.org.
Read us online at IslandSunNews.com
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W
CIGARS • GIFT ITEMS
One of the Best Selections
of Domestic and Imported
Wines on the West Coast
Best Liquor Selection
on the Islands
Special Orders
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Walk-in Humidor
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Smirnoff Vodka 1.75 ltr.
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Dewar’s Scotch 750 ml.
Reg. $24.99 SALE $21.99
Crown Royal 750 ml. SALE $24.99
Grey Goose Vodka 750 ml.
SALE $32.99
Tanqueray Gin 750 ml. SALE $20.99
J. Lohr Cabernet 750 ml. Reg. $17.99
SALE $14.99
Santa Margherita Pinot Grigio 750 ml.
SALE $22.99
Kendall Jackson Chardonnay 750 ml.
SALE $13.99
Masciarelli Montepulciano 750 ml.
$9.99
A to Z Pinot Noir 750 ml. SALE $18.99
No need to leave the island... it's all right here!
Bailey's Shopping Center (just right of the hardware store)
Corner of Periwinkle and Tarpon Bay • 472-1682
Mon.-Sat. 9 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sun. noon - 7 p.m.
Pileated woodpecker
photo by Same Ayers
T
he next Sanibel-Captiva
Audubon bird walk will be
on Saturday, January 24 at
the Pond Apple Trail. Meet in the
Matzaluna restaurant parking lot
nearest Periwinkle Way at 8 a.m.
These bird walks are open to the public and all levels of experience. A $2
donation is appreciated
Call Hugh Verry at 395-3798 for
further details.
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Sponsors Needed For Sanibel
Sea School Octifest Celebration
Students inspecting a horse conch
S
anibel Sea School is all about love for the ocean, so on Saturday, March 28,
the organization will once again pitch a big top tent on the causeway to celebrate its connection to the ocean planet. The 9th annual Octifest will raise
money to support Sanibel Sea School’s mission to improve the ocean, one person
at a time. Guests will be treated to sunset views, a local and sustainable dinner,
music with friends, and some surprises throughout the evening. All proceeds will
help subsidize programs, purchase teaching supplies, and fund scholarships for
underprivileged students to attend Sanibel Sea School, making it possible for more
kids from more places to participate in marine science and summer camp programs.
There will be no live auction this year. The party will be a seaside celebration.
Advance sponsorships are requested to make sure Sanibel Sea School has plenty of
nets, buckets and surfboards to go around this year.
To learn more about Sanibel Sea School, a 501(c)3 non-profit dedicated to a world
in which all people value, understand, and care for the ocean, visit www.sanibelseaschool.org. For event information, to become a sponsor, or to purchase tickets to
Octifest, visit www.octifest.org or call 427-8585.
Dr. Bruce Neill of the Sanibel Sea School
discussing sealife with a student
Seining in the gulf produces some great
finds
Read us online at IslandSunNews.com
37
38
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Libraries Receiving Fewer
Tax Forms From The IRS
T
he IRS has cut back a tax-season staple at local libraries – the paper instructions some taxpayers use to make sure they’re filing their returns properly.
The instructions contain tables that list an individual’s tax bracket status and
tax liability that aren’t on the forms themselves.
In a January 9 email sent to libraries, the IRS Tax Forms Outlet Program
(TFOP) Administrator wrote, “IRS appropriations were significantly cut in the 2015
Omnibus Appropriations bill recently passed by Congress. Unfortunately this puts us
in a position where we have very few options. We want to honor our commitment
to you […] but we cannot deliver nearly what we have in the past.”
The TFOP communication stated copies of the 1040, 1040A and 1040EZ
forms will be sent to local libraries. There is no word on when any of the IRS forms
will arrive. Libraries will also be mailed one reference copy of Publication 17,
“Your Federal Income Tax.” Publication 17 is typically more than 200 pages long
and addresses nearly all of the common questions and situations that individual taxpayers face.
Taxpayers will be able to access Publication 17 online in English and Spanish
from irs.gov/Pub17 and, it will also be available as a free e-Pub for downloading
from IRS.gov for viewing on most e-Readers and other mobile devices.
The IRS TFOP stated it will provide libraries limited copies of Publication
4604, Use the Web for IRS Tax Products & Information, and Publication 1132,
Reproducible Copies of Federal Tax Forms and Instructions. IRS materials may also
be ordered by phone by calling 1-800-829-3676.
“The decision to reduce the number of tax products available to our TFOP partners was not made lightly. We realize this decision is not ideal and we understand it
may impact you and your customers,” the advisory noted. David Tucker, spokesman
for the IRS, said the agency has more tax-filing resources available online than ever
before, including printable and downloadable paper forms and instruction sheets.
Tucker said those making less than $60,000 a year can use commercial software
for free to electronically file their tax returns. He said filing online leads to much
greater accuracy and reduced liability for taxpayers.
Library patrons can print out IRS forms at the library; Sanibel Public Library’s
fee is 10 cents a page. Call the reference desk at 472-2483 for more information
about tax forms.
Free tax help for those who make less than $57,000 a year is available through
the local United Way’s VITA program. You can call the United Way by dialing 2-1-1
or 433-3900 to schedule an appointment to have IRS-certified volunteers prepare
your taxes and ensure you get the largest refund for which you qualify. More information is also available at UnitedWayLee.org.
For more information about the Sanibel Public Library, call 472-2483 or visit
www.sanlib.org.
To advertise in the Island Sun call 395-1213
Portraits In Print
by Jane Vos Hogg
Beyond Brave
I
n a room filled
with people discussing a book, I
heard one woman
say back in the
1950s, living in a
small Tennessee
town, she’d started
a local chapter
of the NAACP.
I turned to see who she was and, still
standing, saw a stocky, dark-haired
white woman. Later I learned her name:
Sue Francis. Obviously this person
blends thoughts with action.
For more than a dozen years this
born and bred Southerner has split her
time between Sanibel and Colorado; up
north, a hard-working successful realtor
and hereabouts enjoying a wide variety of
simple pleasures. Described as absolutely
brilliant, one friend found it fascinating
how Sue could engage endlessly in any
topic up for discussion: politics, music,
literature, social concerns, art… it didn’t
matter. Her knowledge was extensive.
Radio, television, newspapers, magazines,
the Internet. College educated, she continued to cover all bases.
People… she was a people person.
In a supermarket she’d talk to everyone,
shelf-stackers, floor cleaners, the baggers,
those in the check-out line, all part of her
delectable stew. She savored the ingredients.
After a concert, while others in the
audience talked with each other, she’d
rush backstage and talk to players,
strings, wind, percussionists, those who
made the sound intrigued her. Her own
enthusiasms were heard loud and clear.
One Barbara B. Mann Performing Arts
Hall regular said if you heard a shrill
whistle or a shouted who-ha, you could
be sure Sue was standing up at her seat
delivering delight. Silent at a symphony,
not necessarily. Jazz and opera were also
high on her agenda so you’d see her
there too, listening, humming parts to
herself, perhaps marking time with her
whole body.
Her concerns merged with her commitments, said a fellow congregant of the
Universalist Unitarians. Sue was driving
her car home from the group’s monthly
potluck dinner, ferrying three other diners. A stroke? No one knows for sure
what happened but suddenly the car
sped up, swerved off the highway and
tore into a dense tree-ed area. It came to
a sharp stop inches away from a giant
gumbo limbo tree. Barely touching both
sides were leafy branches of other trees,
any one of which could have wrecked
the vehicle, said the police who arrived at
the site. Passengers, panicked but unhurt,
and Sue unconscious, but somehow steering safely.
EMS took charge. For two days it was
ER involvement and finally begrudging
discharge with her promise to schedule
immediate carotid artery treatment. Back
home in Periwinkle Park she was her
usual take-charge self. A nearby friend
brought dinner over saying, “You have to
eat.” Sue sat up, but then feeling tired,
delayed it. “I’m fine. Just let me rest a
while.” Talkative as ever she remembered
all the hospital staff she’d met; knew
names, origins, children if any. Suddenly,
fine became not fine at all. EMS returned
and she was rushed back to the hospital.
Apparently a heart attack. Within two
days she was dead.
Gone, but not forgotten. Her
Unitarian Universalist Church memorial
service is scheduled for Sunday, February
8 at 7 p.m.
Her Colorado handyman for the past
36 years, “I’ll borrow the money but I
have to see her again. She may be dead
but not to me.”
He’ll be here, along with a few other
dear friends from far away, because to
know Sue Francis is to love her.
Our email address is
[email protected]
Featuring Original Paintings
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ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
39
You Can’t Resist: New
Art Exhibits Open At BIG ARTS
Circe by Deborah Butler
Flower Market by Peter Zell
P
eople and what tempts them are featured in two new art exhibits now showing at BIG ARTS.
People and Places in the Founders Gallery features pieces by Sanibel-based
artist Peter Zell. Temptation in Phillips Gallery is a juried, themed exhibit in which artists submitted their interpretations of what tempts us – food, entertainment, beauty,
money, even art itself.
The shows run through February 28 and admission is free. Founders Gallery is
open 9 a.m. to –4 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.
Phillips Gallery is open 1 to 4 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Both galleries are locat-
Tango Two by Holly Maiz
ed at the BIG ARTS Center, 900 Dunlop Road, Sanibel.
The more than 20 new oil paintings by Peter Zell include cityscapes, figurative studies and landscapes. Zell, who describes his style as “traditional with some abstraction,”
enjoys painting scenes from everyday life, particularly those with urban and artistic
settings, sometimes featuring musicians and other entertainments. Color, form, and
light are important elements in each painting as he attempts to preserve moments that
capture everyday human experiences.
Zell is a past-president of the Sanibel Captiva Art League and is currently the
regional chairperson for the Florida Artists Group. He has won many awards since
moving to Florida from California nine years ago and has shown his work in several
galleries and museums, including the Butler Institute of Art in Youngstown, Ohio.
Love, food and travel are just some of the subjects selected by the 33 artists in the
temptation-themed show. More than 50 works include paintings, sculptures and collages, all of which speak to temptation – some whimsically, some abstractly, all artistically.
The show was juried by Diane Schmidt, a signature member of American
Watercolor Society, National Watercolor Society, The Watercolor Honor Society,
Rocky Mountain Watermedia Society and 12 others. She is also an elected member of
the Petticoat Painters of Sarasota.
The first prize was awarded to Holly Maiz for her etching/mixed-media piece entitled
continued on page 44
40
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Award-Winning String
Quartet To Perform At BIG ARTS
Hailed for its “gripping intensity” and “suspenseful and virtuoso playing” (San
Francisco Classical Voice), the Amphion String Quartet is a winner of the 2011
Concert Artists Guild Victor Elmaleh Competition. The quartet joined the roster of the
Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center’s CMS Two Program in fall 2013. Through
LCCMS, the ensemble made its Alice Tully Hall debut in March 2014.
The quartet consists of violinists Katie Hyun and David Southorn, violist Wei-Yang
Andy Lin, and cellist Mihai Marica. Each maintains a stellar individual career while continuing to perform at the highest levels together.
Their program at BIG ARTS is scheduled to include Franz Joseph Haydn’s String
Quartet in C Major, Op. 33, No. 3, often referred to as The Bird because of the
birdlike notes repeated throughout; Leoš Janácek’s String Quartet No. 2, “ntimate
Letters; and Edvard Grieg’s String Quartet in G minor, Op. 27.
For more information, call 395-0900 or email [email protected]
Amphion String Quartet’s performance at BIG ARTS is sponsored by Penny
Wilkinson, Ken Nees and the Family of Joe Boscov.
Poet’s Corner
We invite
submissions
from local poets.
Anyone interested may submit
their work via
email to [email protected]
comcast.net.
Each week, individual work will
be showcased.
selected by Tanya Hochschild
Amphion String Quartet
photo by Janette Beckman
W
Life is revealed in solitary lines.
Later, into the far future,
when the world floods
and property is measured in liters,
lizards will lose their feathered feet,
their second bladder,
and grow to crocodile greatness;
chameleons will move into the woods
and turn green.
A Drop Of Fog
by Tanya Hochschild
hen four up-and-coming musicians were brought together to play at Yale
School of Music in 2009, they had no idea of the awards and accolades
that would follow. But the overwhelmingly positive audience response
to their performance inspired them to pursue a career together. Since then, the
Amphion String Quartet has continued to thrill audiences throughout the world with
their focus, intensity, and virtuosity.
Southwest Florida audiences can hear them on Thursday, January 22, at 7:30 p.m.
at Schein Performance Hall at BIG ARTS on Sanibel. Tickets are $42 for general
seating and $47 for reserved loge seats; students and children will be admitted free of
charge. Tickets are available at the Marks Box Office, 900 Dunlop Road, by phone at
395-0900 or online at www.bigarts.org/classic2.
In this waterless place
speckled skinks sparkle,
chameleons burn black,
sidewinders scroll,
lizards leave tracks in the sand,
the bushman’s newspaper.
In the Namib Desert
a mute beetle lies upside-down,
one drop of fog rolls from
its bleached spoonback
to its cupmouth, open on the sand.
Between its silence and my words,
I cannot describe
what keeps it alive
except flow of life.
S H O U L D N ’ T E V E R Y DAY B E T H I S G O O D ?
15951 CAPTIVA DRIVE • 239.472.5161 • TWEEN-WATERS.COM
WHETHER YOU LOOK
WEST OR LOOK DOWN,
OUR VIEWS ARE
EQUALLY SPECTACULAR.
Just up the road awaits a true, must-do destination: the Captiva House,
where America’s most romantic sunset meets Captiva’s top-rated dining
in a charming, historic, Gulf-front location complete with live piano.
Come, feast your eyes and your appetite.
Reservations 239.472.5161 X421
Today, survival depends on a drop of
fog.
Tanya Hochschild is member of a
Sanibel Writers Group, has participated
in Artpoems and Writer’s Reads on the
island, and had two books published.
Read us online at
IslandSunNews.com
Duplicate Bridge
O
n January 13, there were eight
tables in play at The Community
House. The duplicate bridge winners were:
North/South
1. Sara Berendt and Linda Coons
2. Clara and Terry Terrana
3. (tie) Jan Buffo and Jane Witte
3. (tie) Sue Danford and Linda Drasnin
East/West
1. Kenneth Appel and Albert Simon
2. Susan Freund and Nancy Traylor
3. Karen and Geoffrey Moss
On Thursday, January 15, there were
five tables in play. The winners were:
1. Helen and Jim McCartney
2. Jim Rawcliffe and Clark
Wackerman
3. Geoffrey Moss and George
Willoughby
4. Kenneth Appel and Albert Simon.
There are two weekly ACBLsanctioned games January through April.
The Community House is located at
2173 Periwinkle Way on Sanibel Island.
For further information, contact Susan
Willoughby at 281-3258.
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
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42
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Captiva Art Show Opening
Artist Marion Hall stands next to her water color of a pair of ibises at water’s edge
Artist Eleanor Dominek poses in front of her oil painting, which couples the motherboard
of a computer with paintings of birds to explore the interrelationship between technology
and nature
Artist Pat Levinson shows off a ceramic
sculpture she crafted
Artist Yola Downey not only paints scenes
locally, but also uses photographs to help
her render paintings from other locales
Artist Marion Hall at the show with Rita McLain and Kathy Taylor, president of the Sanibel Art
League
T
he gallery at the
Captiva Civic
Association was packed
for the opening reception
of the Captiva Electic Art
Show, which opened a twoweek run on Friday night,
January 15.
Kathleen C. Taylor, who
heads the Sanibel-Captiva Art
League, said four top artists
were selected from among
the best of the league’s artists
to showcase different styles,
mediums and subject matter.
She said Sue Sherlock, art
committee chair of the CCA,
chose the artists and was
Mark Rosenbaum, Ken Johnson and Lorin Buckner share
instrumental in putting the
their views of the art they have seen at the opening
show together.
reception of the Captiva Eclectic art show.
“These are artists who
have won lots of prizes over the years,” she said. “They have won all of the national
recognition you can think of.”
Taylor said the artists had strong praise for the remodeled art gallery and meeting room, which was part of a nearly $1.5 million remodeling and renovation of the
Captiva Community Association building.
“This is a beautiful gallery,” she remarked. “And it has virtually no size limit, so
these artists can put some of their biggest works on display.”
Art work in the show varied from the almost abstract oil paintings of Eleanor
Sue Sherlock, art committee chair, who put the show together, speaks with Phil Urion, a
board member and widower of the late Captiva artist Stella Farwell
Dominek, who often likes to combine technology with nature to show the interrelationship between the two, to the more traditional paintings of Yola Downey, often whimsical sculptures by Pat Levinson, and realistic – sometimes impressionistic – watercolors
by Marion Hall.
Although most of the artists have had other careers, they all said art has been virtually a lifelong love affair that they can now pursue full time.
Hall, was a physical therapist who worked with brain-damaged patients; she vacations and teaches on Upper Captiva Island. Dominek was a college administrator in
Michigan, who moved to Sanibel in 2000. Downey, a native of Poland and a chemist,
now lives on a bayou on Sanibel. Levinson came to Captiva about 27 years ago, but
still manages a horse boarding business in New York.
The show will be open without charge to the public on Wednesdays and Fridays
from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. through January 30. It is the second major show of the year
in the new gallery.
On February 5 to 26 the association will host the Sanibel-Captiva Art League’s
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
ANNUAL BENEFIT
43
Tickets:
ckets: $95
Have Strings, Will Swing!
The Aaron Weinstein Trio
with
w special guest, Bucky Pizzarelli
The four electric artists whose works are on display at the Captiva Civic Association gallery: Pat Levinson, Eleanor Dominek, Marion Hall and Yola Downey
7:30 pm, Saturday, January 31
Schein Performance Hall
THEATER
The Fourth Wall
by A.R. Gurney
“It's whimsical meditation
on the theatre!"
—Chicago Sun-Times
Herb Strauss Theater
7:30 pm, Tues.–Sat. Jan. 23– Feb. 21
4 pm, Sunday, Jan. 25, Feb. 8 & 15
Adult Reserved: $42 | Student/Child:
ild: $5
A sizeable crowd fills the remodeled art gallery at the Captiva Civic Association to view
the opening reception of the Captiva Eclectic Art Show
CLASSICAL
Emalie Savoy
3:30 pm, Sunday, January 25
Schein Performance Hall
General: $32 | Student/Child: Free
Emalie
Savoy
GALLERY EXHIBITS
FREE Admission!
January 14 – February 28
Artists Reception: 5:30 pm, Friday, January 23
John and Marjorie Wilson check painting
titles and prices with Maria Mohr
Temptation
Paintings by Peter Zell
Founders Gallery
Mon.–Fri. 9am–4pm
Juried Exhibit
Phillips Gallery
Mon.–Sat. 1–4pm
A painting draws appreciative smiles from
Janice and Alan Adams
American City by Peter Zell
FILM
Monday Night Film Series
Island Art, a juried exhibition of more
than 60 new pieces.
In addition, the art league also has a
show of many of its artists’ works opening February 2 at the Sanibel Library,
and its March 15 annual Clothesline Sale
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on March 15 at
The Community House on Sanibel.
The art league, with nearly 130 members, was created to promote appreciation of the arts. It is celebrating its 50th
anniversary.
Read us online at
IslandSunNews.com
People and Places
Schein Performance Hall
7 pm, Mondays | Tickets: $8
January 26
February 2
Bicycling With Molière
Ida
See a full listing of this season’s programs at
www. BIGARTS. org
Artist Pat Levinson and her husband Richard
share some laughs with guests at the preview of her work on the opening night of the
art show
CLASSICAL | DANCE | FAMILY & ENTERTAINMENT | VISUAL ARTS | THEATER | FILM | FORUM
JAZZ/POP/CONTEMPORARY | COMMUNITY CREATIONS | WORKSHOPS | WINTER ACADEMY
239-395-0900 • 900 Dunlop Road, Sanibel, FL 33957• BIGARTS.org
44
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
You’ve Heard Of 3-D Printing, Now
See One In Action At Sanibel Library
Demo elephant made by Southwest Florida Library Network’s 3-D printer
B
eginning on Tuesday, January 27, Sanibel Public Library will be demonstrating 3-D printing with a printer on loan from the Southwest Florida Library
Network (SWFLN).
Southwest Florida Library Network staff run their 3-D printer
As its name suggests, a 3-D printer makes a three-dimensional object using additive
processes in which successive layers of material (commonly plastic) are laid down under
computer control.
SWFLN is a cooperative of Southwest Florida libraries who work together to help
area libraries deliver better, faster service by sharing materials, providing education and
technical support. With the onset of the digital revolution, across the U.S. the library
community has assumed a leading role in the effort to help people of all ages build
the skills they need to thrive in a high-tech world. 3-D printing expands the frontier of
the ongoing digital transformation of our society and library professionals are helping
people and communities take advantage of this development.
“I am excited to say we will be the first library to begin SWFLN’s 3-D printer
pilot program,” said Joanne Wessels, Sanibel Public Library’s technology manager.
“Beginning January 27th, for a week or so, the 3-D printers will be setup in our
Technology Area where library patrons can see the printer in action, and learn about
3-D printing. We’ll run presentations showing the functionality of items created with
3-D printers within the medical, industrial and educational fields today.”
There is no registration required to see the demo, visitors and residents are welcome to stop by Sanibel Public Library to learn about this innovative technology. 3-D
printing demos will run through Tuesday, February 3.
“This month’s 3-D printing presentation is opportunity to learn about 3-D printing
at Sanibel Library,” said Margaret Mohundro, library director. “Hopefully in the future,
we will be able to provide the service where library patrons can print the 3-D objects
they have designed.”
Sanibel Public Library is located at 700 Dunlop Road on Sanibel. For more information, call 472-2483 or visit www.sanlib.org.
From page 39
Art Exhibits
Open At BIG ARTS
Tango Two; other winners include Eliza Brewster, Tempting Fate; Marcy Calkins,
What’s Inside; Francesco Gillia, Nudo di Uomo; and Deborah Butler, Circe: A Tale
of Seduction.
BIG ARTS will hold a reception on January 23 at 5:30 p.m. in Phillips Gallery to
honor all the artists and present the Temptation prizes. Both galleries will be open during the reception and artists will be on hand to discuss their pieces.
The exhibits and the artists’ reception are free and open to the public.
For more information, call 395-0900 or email [email protected]
Founders Gallery’s 2014-15 season is sponsored by Deborah and John La Gorce;
June Rosner and Russ Bilgore are patron season sponsors of Phillips Gallery.
Our email address is [email protected]
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Sanibel Resident Wins Second
In Digital Lee Logo Competition
S
arah Adler, a sophomore in the Pre-IB
program at Fort Myers
High School, won second
place in the Digital Lee
Logo Competition. The
contest kicks off the start
of the Digital Lee Awards,
which is a design and technology competition for
students throughout Lee
County. The program is in
its fifth year and showcases
the talents of students in
all areas of design including graphic design, web
design, animation and multi
-media. Her logo design was
chosen from a field of 91
entries which were selected
by county design teachers
as the best work of their
students.
Adler’s popular and
admired teacher, Eric
Riemenschneider, is a former resident of Sanibel and
Sarah Adler of Sanibel with teacher Eric Riemenschneider
teaches digital design at Fort
Myers High School. An
accomplished artist and Ringling College of Art and Design alumnus, Riemenschneider
is a 2012 Golden Apple Award winner.
Academy Award Contender’s Series
Birdman
by Stan Gembicki
O
n
Wednesday,
January 28
at noon, the Island
Cinema will show
the fourth movie
in this year’s BIG
ARTS Academy
Awards Contenders
Film Series. A discussion will follow
the movie.,
Tickets are available at the Island
Cinema.
Other movies in the series will be
announced prior to the weekly showing.
Birdman or The Unexpected Virtue
of Ignorance is a black comedy that tells
the story of an actor (Michael Keaton) –
famous for portraying an iconic superhero – as he struggles to mount a Broadway
play. In the days leading up to opening
night, he battles his ego and attempts to
recover his family, his career and himself.
Lindsay Duncan, Zach Galifianakis, and
Edward Norton co-star in this film from
Biutiful director Alejandro González
45
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and Now Dinners
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Nightly Specials:
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Save room for our Fabulous Dessert Selections!
Iñárritu.
Birdman received nine Academy
Award nominations including best picture,
best director, best actor, best supporting
actor and best supporting actress.
The film is 1 hour and 59 minutes in
length.
Share your community news with us.
Call 395-1213, Fax: 395-2299
or email [email protected]
For Reservations Call
(239) 472-0303
Visit our online store
www.LighthouseCafe.com
Share yours comments, photos
or stories on our Facebook page.
www.facebook.com/lighthousecafeofsanibel
46
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Book Review
Monday Night Movie
Wild Asparagus
Bicycling
With Moliere
by Di Saggau
S
anibel author Bob Maxeiner is quite
a storyteller. In his latest book, Wild
Asparagus, he has included 19 of
his favorite stories – ones that could well
become yours. A few were published
some years ago and grew further, but
most are first-timers to the published
page. Nearly all of the stories reflect his
grievance with current society: too much
violence. Our real world daily force-feeds
us on malice and disaster. Not so in Wild
Asparagus. There is conflict and problems in the stories, but most are goodhearted tales dealing with real stresses
in decent people, alive and under trial
and with what can happen when other
people care. He means them to be goodhearted, all but one.
I enjoyed every story in his book. One
of my favorites is The Quiet Man, dealing
with a fishing trip on a Minnesota lake
with a school teacher and his annoying
brother-in-law. The start up of his Evinrude
motor and the call of a loon bring back
wonderful memories of my childhood at
our summer home in Minnesota. You’ll
love his cell phone revenge.
Once A Marine tells a fascinating tale
about an ex-Marine looking for Sarge, a
man he fought with in Korea. Sarge is a
bitter man who was treated unfairly by the
VA pogues. “Pogues are what the leathernecks call those invisible people way back
out of the action, sitting safe and snug
in offices somewhere, making decisions
about your life.” The ending will grab you.
by Di Saggau
T
Wild Asparagus is not only the title,
but a chapter in the book dealing with a
millionaire ex-whiz kid who tangles with
real barbed wire, loses his pants, but wins
back his wife. All the result of him searching for wild asparagus.
Ellen is a charming story about two
girls with the same name who are as different as night and day. The last three
sentences pack a wallop in this one.
Maxeiner’s characters are as real as
any you have read about. He has a real
gift for creating personalities that stay with
you. His dialogue is enjoyably crisp and
gets right to the heart of the matter. As
he says, most of the stories sing of the
human heart. All but one, and that one –
The Simple Truth – touches upon a murder that catches the nose of a suspicious
detective. It’s a compelling tale.
Wild Asparagus by SR Maxeiner, Jr.
makes for delightful reading. It’s available
at local book stores and also on Amazon.
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he BIG ARTS
movie for
Monday,
January 26 is
Bicycling With
Moliere, a French
comedy about two
actors rekindling an
old friendship. It’s
a witty contemporary deconstruction
of Moliere’s 17th-century comedy The
Misanthrope. Two actors of opposite
temperaments discuss a possible collaboration on a new production of the
play. Serge Tanneur (Fabrice Luchini)
is the older of the two actors. Gauthier
Valence (Lambert Wilson) is a handsome
actor of late middle age who plays a
surgeon on a popular nighttime soap
opera. He visits Serge to propose the
revival.
A scene from that tacky soap, for
which Valence is highly paid, suggests
that the two come not only from different show business worlds, but also from
different planets. One of the treats in the
film is the series of rehearsals, which are
great fun because of the language itself
and the passion with which the actors
throw themselves into the work. They
also have amusing arguments over such
issues as how precise their elocution
should be and whether cellphones need
to be on or off during the process.
The two do not spend all their time
rehearsing. They also make the acquaintance of a blithe young actress Zoe,
and a local Italian woman, Francesca.
Competition ensues between the two
when Francesca enters the picture. She
is going through a divorce and is bitter
in her own way, as Serge is in his. Early
in the film, she announces that they’re
all going to die, their flesh will go flabby,
they’ll rot in the grave and everything will
end up as dust.
Many of the actors’ dialogues take
place as they bicycle side by side on the
picturesque Ile de Re, an island off the
west coast of France. As much rivals as
friends, the two men can’t agree on anything, especially who should play the lead
character Alceste or the supporting role
of Philinte. They end up flipping a coin
each time they start to rehearse.
The film is directed by Philippe Le
Guay, who also did The Women On
The 6th Floor. He directs in a polished,
straightforward manner that favors the
performances over everything else. The
photography on its multiple island settings is terrific as it brings Moliere’s classic text into the stormy or sun-drenched
landscapes of the present. Bicyling With
Moliere runs 105 minutes.
Next up on February 2 is Ida, a hauntingly beautiful film about two women, an
orphan raised in a convent and a chainsmoking, hard-drinking judge. I’ll have
more on that in next week’s Island Sun.
Admission to BIG ARTS Monday
Night Film Series is $8 and all screenings
begin at 7 p.m. in Schein Performance
Hall. Each film is followed by a complimentary reception and discussion in
Phillips Gallery. Series Sponsors: Bank
of the Islands, Stan and Visnja Gembicki,
John R. Wood Properties, Penny
Wilkinson. Series Supporters: Sanibel
Taxi, Jerry’s Foods of Sanibel.
BIG ARTS is located at 900 Dunlop
Road on Sanibel. Tickets are available at
the door or by calling 395-0900.
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Programs At
Sanibel Public Library
S
anibel Public
Library will
be hosting local author
W.C. Highfield
for a book signing
and discussion of
Sanibel’s Secret
Bank, at 10 a.m.
Thursday, January
29. Published in
November 2014,
the book’s premise
is there is a secret
bank located on
Sanibel – a powerful dealer in international finances.
“The Bank,” as
it is called, is led
by a ruthless and
evil group that
eliminates anyone viewed as a
threat to its quest
for world financial
domination. Residents of the island have no idea it exists,
since it is camouflaged in the J. N. “Ding” Darling Wildlife
Refuge. The main character leads a close-knit band of young
employees as they set about to avenge the wrongdoings of
The Bank.
With Sanibel’s Secret Bank, Highfield continues his practice
of placing his novels in Florida locales. His first book, In Sun
Down Far, takes place on a fictitious version of Fort Myers
Beach. His second
novel, Streets, is
set in Key West. All
three books have differing themes where
the author explores
the diverse and complex range of human
behavior.
Author and historian Albert Axell will
speak at the Library
at 2 p.m. Thursday,
January 29 about his
research on Russia
women who have
contributed to past
war efforts. Axell
has written 15 nonfiction books including three on Japan.
Formerly stationed
in Moscow, Axell, in
his book, Russia’s
Heroes: 1941-45,
has collected tales
of wartime heroics
by patriots defending the Motherland. His lecture, titled Russian
Women at War, includes his 1990s interviews with a highly
literate young woman who fought with a female guerrilla unit
combating the Germans, who flew risky starlight raids in open
cockpit biplanes. Axell also interviewed more than 30 of Stalin’s
frontline generals, as well as many Russian pilots, and a female
sniper who killed more than 300 enemy troops.
A complete list of programs is available on the library’s website. Residents as well as non-residents are invited, and there is
no additional cost to participate.
The Sanibel Public Library is located at 770 Dunlop Road,
Sanibel. For more online at www.sanlib.org.
Current
Events Group
3.25 percent for this year.
In response to a question, Richard
Pyle noted that people are living longer
today with the surviving spouse living to
an average age of 92. He suggested that
people in their 70s and 80s can afford
to be more aggressive with their investments. He indicated that interest rates are
low and data suggests they will remain
low; unemployment dropped from 6.7
percent to 5.6 percent; low inflation and
low gas prices portend a good financial
year.
Current events are held Mondays from
10 to noon. in the BIG ARTs complex
on Dunlop Road, Sanibel. The public is
invited. There is a $3 charge.
Send your
editorial copy to:
[email protected]
Pilates, Dance, Yoga and more...
Come see our beautiful space designed especially for your Dance,
Pilates and Yoga experience. We Welcome all levels and look forward
to seeing you soon! Located at Sanibel Health Club.
www.sanibeldance.com
www.sanibelpilatesyoga.com
January 5 - 31st, 2015 Calendar
*CLASSES WILL START ON MONDAY, JANUARY 5th
*Sanibel Health Club membership is not required to attend these classes.
Monday
# (484) 459-3971
975 Rabbit Road Sanibel, Fl 33957
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
8:45-9:45 am 10:00-11:00 am 8:30-9:45 am 10:00-11:00 am 8:30-9:30 am
Pilates Mat
Foundation
Gentle Stretch
Pilates Mat
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11:30-12:30 am
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Power Yoga 10:00-11:00 am Power Yoga
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10:00-11:00 am
Pilates Mat
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11:30-12:30 pm 12:45-1:45 pm 4:30-5:30 pm 12:45-1:45 pm
Yoga
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Restorative Adult Ballet & Cardio Barre
(All Levels)
Yoga
Contemporary
Yoga
(All Levels)
6:30-7:45 pm
Candlelight Yoga
~ Special Events and Workshop Details available online.
~ Private & semi-private instruction available, see individual teacher.
~ Pilates Reformer Classes (private & semi-private) available daily, see Debbie.
~ Class cards are available
~ Walk ins welcomed or register for classes online at www.sanibelpilatesyoga.com
~ Classes subject to change. Please refer to the appropriate website for more info.
47
From page 5
Saturday
Special
Events
Saturdays
Jan 17th
Noon-6:00 pm
Wellness day
Jan 31st
11:00-1:00 pm
Renew &
Rejuvenate in
the New Year!
48
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Sanibel Island
Ft. Myers Beach
Captiva Island
Visit Us Online @ www.DocFords.com
Live Music & Happy Hour Available - Details online!
TheBeachedWhale.com
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SECTION
NEWSPAPER
Sanibel & Captiva Islands
VOL. 22, NO. 31
SANIBEL & CAPTIVA ISLANDS, FLORIDA
The Sanctuary Golf Challenge
T
he Sanctuary Golf Club, as host and
underwriting sponsor of the 13th
annual Sanctuary Community Golf
Challenge on January 24, has announced
Jim and Patty Sprankle of Sanibel as honorary chairpersons.
“Jim and Patty Sprankle are longtime
island residents with a rich history of community involvement. Jim is viewed as an
island treasure, being a nationally renowned
bird carver, duck decoy collector, and
owner of perhaps the largest collection
of autographed baseballs in the country,”
said Al Hanser, president of the Charitable
Foundation of the Islands.
“His enormous generosity in creating
and donating his bird carvings to many
of the islands’ charitable organizations is
Patty and Jim Sparnkle
second to none. Jim “Birdman” Sprankle
served five terms as president of the JN
“Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge and helped build them to the nationally recognized organization that they are today,” Hanser added.
“Patty is also an accomplished artist who has been creating magnificent pieces of
hand-painted porcelain for many years. She served on the Sanibel Planning Commission
for years and has been active in many local organizations. We are, indeed, fortunate to
have Jim and Patty Sprankle here on Sanibel and Captiva and to honor them as this
year’s honorary chairpersons,” said Hanser.
Sponsorship opportunities range from the $7,500 Diamond Partnership, which
includes additional rounds of golf, lunch and dinner at The Sanctuary Golf Club, to a
$250 Hole Partnership. All proceeds go directly to the Charitable Foundation of the
Islands, which in turn distributes the funds to assist island nonprofit organizations, individual island residents and workers who have experienced hardships such as medical and
continued on page 22B
Tickets For Zonta Six Chances Raffle
T
he Zonta Club of Sanibel-Captiva is selling tickets for its Six Chances at The
Unique annual raffle featuring six great prizes.
The raffle contributes to the club’s annual fundraiser, A Peek At The Unique
house tour, to be held Saturday, March 14 to benefit the Zonta Foundation of
Southwest Florida.
Raffle tickets are $10 each and available from any Zonta Club member. They will
also be available outside Bailey’s General Store during the three weekends leading up to
the Peek and at The Sanibel Farmers Market February 15 and March 7.
Prizes are chosen at the time of purchase with the drawing being held the day of
the event. Participants do not have to present to win one of the following six exclusive
prizes:
• One-of-a-kind, 3-D art construction – value $2,500. Artist and Fort Myers resident
Michael St. Amand, whose work is exhibited locally, nationally and internationally,
donated a mixed media piece dubbed Cash Cow;
• A 3-night, vacation package in tropical Mexico – value $2,200. This all-inclusive
package is good for two people who can choose from any Fiesta Americana Grand
Meeting property in Cancun, Cabo San Lucas or Puerto Vallarta. This prize is valid until
December 20, 2015, excludes some holidays, and is subject to availability. Airfare not
included.
• A 3-night Sanibel Getaway – value $1,000. This vacation stay for two people at
Gulf Breeze Cottages, one of Sanibel’s most historic and unique resorts, is good until
December 15, 2015, excludes some holidays and is subject to availability. Resort owner
and Zontian Sandy Hutchings donated this prize.
JANUARY 23, 2015
Find Your Forever Best Friend
At Pet Palooza On Sanibel
G
ulf Coast Humane Society (GCHS),
a non-kill shelter, returns to the
islands with more of their furry
friends who are ready to be your best
friend for life. Pet Palooza will take place
Saturday February 7 at Tahitian Gardens,
1975 Periwinkle Way, from 10 a.m. to 1
p.m.
A donation for GCHS is requested. Visit
www.gulfcoasthumanesociety.org to review
their current needs.
“This year, we are expanding the
event by adding an audience participation
activity as well as bringing in more pet
experts and resources for islanders,” said
Tahitian Gardens marketing director Barb
Harrington. “Islanders have adopted several
of the Pet Palooza pups over the years and
we hope to continue this trend in 2015.”
The Pets du Soleil photographer will be
returning to take pet portraits for attendees.
Because it is close to Valentine’s Day and
Easter is right around the corner, photos
will have a spring theme. GCHS Valentines Duchess
will be sold for $1 during the event to support the shelter.
Cheeburger Cheeburger will be giving a portion of the sale of its Pounder Burger to
GCHS, so attendees are encouraged to have lunch during the event.
Cedar Chest Fine Jewelry is planning another special offer with details to come.
Is your dog a good listener? Maybe he or she will be the winner of the “audience participation” portion conducted by a professional dog trainer.
In attendance will be veterinarians, groomers, a pet sitter and obedience trainers.
• Island shopping spree – value $920. The spree includes the following merchants:
Eileen Fisher, The Cedar Chest, Peach Republic, Why Knot, CJ’s Boutique, Her Sports
Closet, Sanibel Day Spa, Whims and Tribeca Salon Sanibel. This prize has been included in Zonta’s raffle each year due to its overwhelming popularity.
• Scenic Sanibel By Air and Sea – value $580. This package for two people includes
an airplane ride over Sanibel and Captiva and a tour via kayak of Captiva’s picturesque
Roosevelt Channel. The plane ride was donated by pilot John MacLennen and is subject
to availability. The kayaking tour, donated by Brian Houston of Adventure Sea Kayak
Wildlife Tours, is valid until December 31, 2015 with reservations required.
• A Sealife by Congress Jewelry Set – value $515. This sterling silver, bracelet
and earrings set is from Congress Jeweler’s collection inspired by the beautiful shells
and diverse sea life found on the beaches and in the waters of Sanibel and Captiva.
Congress was one of the original donors to give to Zonta’s first raffle in 2004.
Organizers expect the 14th annual Peek, which features some of the most distinctive
and normally inaccessible homes on the island, to sell out as it has done in years past.
Tickets are $85. For ticket inquiries, email [email protected]
The Zonta Foundation of Southwest Florida, the club’s 501(c)3 fundraising arm,
offers more ways to give with the option of donating online at www.zontasancap.com.
Contributions are tax-deductible and will be recognized in this year’s Peek program if
made prior to February 20.
The event smashed records again last year raising over $100,000, most of which
is distributed in the form of grants each January to local organizations that work to
improve the lives of women and girls. Nearly $80,000 will be distributed to local service
partners with $22,000 going to Zonta International later this year for global initiatives
that focus on health, education and reducing violence against women.
For more information about Zonta, visit www.zontasancap.com.
2B
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Rotary
Happenings
submitted by Shirley Jewell
O
h, to be young
and foolish.
Think about
this: you’re in your
mid-20s, you’re
a couple living in
Rhode Island, you
want to travel, you
don’t have much money; so the logical thing to do is buy a boat, quit your
jobs, sell everything, and within a few
months cast off from the dock for parts
unknown. Did I mention the fact, that
this was a 27-foot sailboat, and that this
couple had never been in a boat before,
definitely had never sailed before buying the boat, and really only had a very
basic idea about what direction they
were headed – due south.
Scott and Gretchen McPhee set out
on what was to become the adventure
of a lifetime. This first boat, rechristened
Shadowfax, from the fictional trilogy
Lord of the Rings by J. R. Tolkien, was
Gandalf the Wizard’s horse and would
always get him out of trouble.
McPhee now lives here on Sanibel
and spoke to the Rotary Club, not really
about this first voyage on Shadowfax
because that was just the beginning of
Scott and Gretchen’s adventures at sea.
But we do have to start at the beginning, the sail to Captiva took them five
Scott McPhee
months and definitely was a true learning experience. Weather at sea can be
quite different, unpredictable and violent
at times; add to that sea conditions and
you’re in for some more than interesting and sometimes scary times at sea.
Nevertheless, this first adventure didn’t
cure the lust for adventure, in fact just the
opposite. They were pretty convinced
that they could handle anything except
the financial resources needed for future
sailing adventures. They settled down
for a while, nine years, on Sanibel, both
working jobs on the islands. They had a
good life, had pretty good jobs, bought a
house, had a dog, two cars, many friends,
but they wanted a vacation. A week
wasn’t enough, a month wasn’t enough,
how about another adventure at sea, a
long one? How about sailing around the
world? They went about selling off everything they had, found a good home for
their dog, and went looking for just the
right boat at the right price. This took a
while but while waiting they were gearing
up and reading up on what it was like
to sail around the world. If something
could go wrong, it will go wrong; bring
your world-sailing charts, have the best
mechanical equipment aboard that your
can afford, bring books on how to repair
everything, definitely be prepared for
medical emergencies, read every book
you can that has been written about sailing around the world and pretty much
be self-sustaining while out at sea. Study
books on learning the sextant, get a
ham radio operator’s license and learn
advance navigation. Weather is both
your best friend and worst enemy on a
sailboat.
They found their boat, a 46-foot
ketch (Call2-46) which they renamed
Shadowfax. Checked the mechanicals
and navigation systems, pulled her out
of the water for inspection, cleaned her
up and stocked the boat with necessities
of life and maybe just a few other things.
Called up their friend Dave from Rhode
Island, who had traveled with them on
their journey to Florida, and déjà vu, off
they went. Be prepared for long-days at
sea, unexpected storms, the breakdown
of almost every piece of machinery on
board, pirates and thieves, and having the
worst and best times of your life.
Dave has many stories to tell, many
of them about the people they met along
the way, a sub-culture devoted to this
lifestyle, people from all over the world,
and lasting lifelong friends. This journey
lasted just under five years. They sailed
31,786 nautical miles. Sailed the oceans,
journeyed through large shipping canals,
explored tropical waters and traveled
throughout the world visiting many places
people have only read about. Their final
journey on the Shadowfax brought them
back to Captiva You can read their story
in Life at Five Knots. Check the shelves
at the Sanibel Library.
The Sanibel-Captiva Rotary Club
meets at 7 a.m. every Friday at The
Dunes Golf and Tennis Club, 949 Sand
Castle Road. If you have any questions
regarding Rotary, e-mail President Scot
Congress at [email protected]
Barrier Island
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SANIBEL ISLES
BEACHVIEW COUNTRY CLUB ESTATES
PELICANS ROOST
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Florida: Bonita Springs/Estero,
Captiva Island, Fort Myers/Cape Coral,
Naples/Marco Island, Ocala, Sanibel Island
North Carolina: Cashiers/Lake Glenville,
Highlands, Sapphire/Lake Toxaway
NEW PRICE
3B
4B
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
STOREWIDE SAVINGS
SAVE
UP TO
40
% OFF
Trust Company Hosts First Women’s
Series Program Of The Season
Throughout the Store!
Huge Inventory of Name
Brand Designer Furniture
for Your Home
Ginny Fleming (trust company board member and WOW founder), Robin Cook, Janet
Strickland (estate planning attorney on Sanibel), and Cheryl Giattini (trust company
board member)
T
The Island’s
Headquarters
Take an
% EXTRA
10 OFF
the lowest price on any
lamp or accessory
Must use this coupon. Expires 1/31/15
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Plus...
Summer Classics
Braxton Culler • Stanley
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Henredon • Hooker
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Rugs • Mattress sets
And many more!
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Island Interiors
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Distinctly
*These sale items and pricing are only available at our Sanibel location
he Sanibel Captiva Trust Company hosted its first WOW presentation of the
season this week with 50 local women in attendance.
Entitled Leaving a Legacy, the event featured speakers Attorney Janet M.
Strickland and Cheryl Giattini, board member of The Sanibel Captiva Trust Company.
Strickland spoke about estate planning, trust structures and charitable trusts and
Giattini reviewed how to select charities, utilize online research nonprofit rating tools,
and work with family and local foundations.
The WOW Women’s Series is intended to empower women to be better informed
and prepared to handle their lives independently and dynamically. WOW (Women.
Opportunity. Wealth.) will include two additional sessions:
Tuesday, February 3 – You’re In Charge Now - Make Your Nest Egg Last (Investing
Strategies) with speaker Timothy P. Vick, senior vice president and senior portfolio
manager of The Naples Trust Company.
Wednesday, March 11 – Strategies To Protect Your Assets (Identity Theft &
Insurance, Home, Liability, Etc.) with speakers Gerald J. McNulty from the Lee County
Sheriff’s Office West District and Kim Kovacs from Heidrick & Company Insurance.
If you are interested in attending, contact Frances Steger at The Sanibel Captiva
Trust Company at 472-8300 or email [email protected] All events begin at
9:30 a.m. at The Sanctuary and seating is limited.
Our email address is [email protected]
We recommend Tax
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Businesses and individuals pay the
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1648 Perwinkle Way, Suite D Sanibel
A CPA spends years preparing for
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ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Island Seniors At
The Center 4 Life
M
eet your friends and make some
new ones at the Center 4 Life.
Browse through the following
activities, then stop by to sign up.
Arts & Crafts Fair – Saturday,
February 7, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. This
annual event features a variety of handcrafted items by area artists, as well as
new books by local authors. More than
40 vendors will be on site. Take advantage of this opportunity to buy some
unique pottery, shell designs, paintings,
fabric art, jewelry, glasswork, books, tropical plants, photography, wreaths, canned
goods and other items. Refreshments will
also be for sale.
Page Turners with Ann Rodman
– If you would like to be on the Page
Turners list, email [email protected]
or contact the Center 4 Life.
The book to be discussed on
Wednesday, February 11 at 2:30 p.m.
is The Goldfinch by Donna Tart. The
discussion will be facilitated by Carol
Awender.
iPad & iPhone Classes Now
Available – Tuesdays and Thursdays with
instructor Ronda Seifer Walis on the following dates:
iPad – Beginners: February 17 and 19
iPhone – Basics: February 24 and 26
iPad – Intermediate: January 27 and
29
Understanding iPhoto: February 10
and 12
A session includes a Tuesday and
Thursday from 9 to 11 a.m. on the dates
indicated.
Cost is $60 per session for members
and $90 per session for non-members.
Class size limited to four. You must provide your own device.
AARP Safe Driving Classes –
Thursdays, January 22 and 29 from 1 to
4 p.m. Cost is $20 with a $5 discount for
AARP members. You will be eligible for a
discount on your auto insurance but you
must attend both classes. The next session
will be held March 19 and 26. Register by
calling Ed VanderHey at 239-292-4012.
You need not be a member of the Island
Seniors to attend.
Powerful Tools for Caregivers–
Classes are offered on Tuesdays, January
20 to February 24, from 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Lisa Armstrong with Comfort Keepers
will provide an educational program
designed to help family caregivers take
care of themselves while caring for a relative or friend. You will benefit from this
class whether you are helping a parent,
spouse, friend, someone who lives at
home, in a nursing home or across the
country. Class meets once a week for six
weeks. It is recommend that you attend all
classes but not required. Class size is limited and advance registration is required.
Class #2: Tuesday, January 27 –
Identifying and Reducing Personal Stress
Class #3: Tuesday, February 3 –
Communicating Feelings in Challenging
Situations
Coping with Life Series – Featuring
guest speakers on various topics at the
Center 4 Life.
Friday, January 23 at 1:30 p.m. –
Bike Safely on Sanibel’s Shared Use
Paths and Roadways with Sanibel Bicycle
Club representatives and Lt. William
Dalton, Sanibel Police Department.
Sanibel Bicycle Club members will present bike safety information for Sanibel’s
shared use paths and roadways. There
will be time for Q&A. As a bikeable and
walkable community, Sanibel actively
promotes and encourages biking to community events. So pedal on over and join
in for this informative presentation.
Friday, January 30 at 1:30 p.m. –
How Do You Know When It’s Time To
Move To Assisted Living? with McKenzie
Millis, assisted living healthcare marketing specialist for Shell Point Retirement
Community. This presentation will provide you with a better understanding of
what the differences are between independent living, assisted living and skilled
nursing care. Whether you are considering assisted living for yourself or someone
you love, this presentation will help you
to identify the signs for when you should
consider making a move to assisted living.
Games
Bridge – Monday and Wednesday at 1
p.m. Cost is $2.50 for members and $5
for non-members. Prizes will be awarded.
Mahjongg – Thursday at 1 p.m. Cost
is $2.50 for members and $5 for nonmembers. Prizes are awarded.
Mahjongg Refresher Class –
Friday, January 23 from 9:30 a.m. to
12:30 p.m. If it’s been awhile since you
5B
have played Mahjongg and you would
like to brush up on your skills, this class is
for you. All supplies are provided. Cost is
$5 for members, $10 for non-members.
Register at the center.
Tuesday and Thursday Kayaking
Now Available – January 22, 27 and
29 (weather permitting) at 8:30 a.m.
There is space for 16 people on eight
two-person kayaks and limited space for
those who own their own kayaks. Island
Seniors will provide kayaks, paddles and
life jackets. Bring water, a small snack,
sun lotion, bug spray, sunglasses, towel,
hat and change of clothing. Cost is $5
for members and $10 for non-members.
Advance registration is required.
Fitness Classes
Classes are available and all ages are
welcome. Cost is $3.75 for members and
$6.75 for non-members. Annual membership is $20. Sanibel Recreation Center
members must show their membership
card to attend.
Happy Hour Fitness – Monday,
Wednesday and Friday at 8 a.m. This
class keeps your brain fit and your heart,
lungs and muscles strong with a combination of aerobics and muscle conditioning
exercises and balance. Hand weights,
stretch cords and your body weight will
be used. Class begins with a joke and
ends with a positive thought for the
day. Athletic footwear required. Silvia
Villanueva is the instructor.
Essential Total Fitness – Monday,
Wednesday and Friday at 9:30 and 11
a.m. Cardio, muscle strengthening and
continued on page 7B
6B
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Do Taxpayers Benefit From Recent
Investments Of $130 Million In
Spring Training Facilities?
by Ed Frank
I
n just a few weeks, a large entourage of players, coaches
and team officials will descend upon the facilities of JetBlue
Park and the newly-renamed CenturyLink Sports Complex,
the Lee County spring training homes of the Boston Red Sox
and the Minnesota Twins, respectively.
In the past three years, nearly $130 million has been spent
to build JetBlue Park and dramatically expand and improve the
CenturyLink facility that includes Hammond Stadium.
As the work nears completion on the $48.5 million upgrade
of the Twins complex – ribbon-cutting is scheduled for February
22 – we often hear questions and remarks relative to the large
taxpayer investments in these two state-of-the-art facilities.
“Why should taxpayers be saddled with such costs when the Red Sox and Twins
SPORTS QUIZ
1. Detroit pitcher Max Scherzer set a major-league record for most starts to begin a career without a
complete game. How many was it?
2. Who was the manager of the Houston Astros the first time the franchise won more than 90 games
in a season?
3. Name the only Iowa football player to win the Heisman Trophy?
4. In 2014, the East and West squads in the NBA All-Star Game combined to score a record 318
points. What had been the previous mark?
5. The Calgary Flames tied an NHL record in the 2013-14 season for most games decided by one
goal in a season (49). Who are the Flames tied with?
6. How many times has Canada’s women’s team won the Olympic gold medal in curling?
7. In 2014, Kevin Streelman set a record by recording birdies on the final seven holes to win a PGA
Tour event. Who had the mark of six straight?
ANSWERS
1. It was 178 games. 2. Bill Virdon led the Astros to a 93-70 mark in 1980. 3. Quarterback Nile Kinnick, in 1939. 4. It was 303 points, in 1987. 5. The Florida Panthers, in the 2010-11 season. 6. Twice
-- 1998 and 2014. 7. Mike Souchak, in the 1956 St. Paul Open.
Hortoons
franchises are worthy hundreds of millions of dollars?”
“What are the public benefits from spring training?”
“Wouldn’t we be better off if these millions of dollars had been spent on improving
local education, law enforcement and the myriad of other local problems?”
And the questions go on and on.
Yes, these are legitimate questions, but study after study on the economic impact of
spring training both locally and in the state of Florida has shown conclusively that the
payback is huge and it continues to grow.
We know that the large majority of fans watching spring training baseball are outof-state visitors who flock here each year spending thousands of dollars in hotels, restaurants, and for purchases and entertainment.
The Florida Sports Foundation recently reported that last year’s spring training
attendance grew four percent over the previous year with four teams – the Red Sox,
Detroit, Pittsburgh and Washington – setting new attendance records.
The 15 Major League teams that train in the Sunshine State have attracted
23,464,074 fans in the last 14 years and Lee County is the only locale with two
teams. That averages about 1.5 million fans per team over that span of time.
In 2014, the Red Sox drew 147,669 fans, an average of 9,845 per game for their
15-game home schedule. The Twins drew 107,806 for 14 games, a figure that would
have been much larger without two rainouts. This averaged 7,700 per game with a
Hammond Stadium record set last March 22 when 9,298 fans watched the Twins and
New York Yankees.
A study commissioned by the Florida Sports Foundation a few years ago reported
that the annual economic impact of spring training is $753 million, with more than
half of those dollars spent by out-of-state visitors.
Taxpayer dollars spent on professional sports will continue to raise questions, but
there is little doubt that here in Lee County we reap the benefits of spring training.
Just ask any owner of a restaurant or hotel.
27th Ace Group Classic February 13 to 15
The 27th annual Ace Group Classic – one of the longest running and most successful golf tournaments on the Champions Tour – will return to Twin Eagles Golf Club in
Naples February 13 to 15.
Kirk Triplett will return to defend his title, a dramatic one-stroke victory last year
when he sank a six-foot par putt on the final hole to claim the $240,000 winner’s
share of the $1.6 million tournament purse.
His victory marked the 15th time in the 27-year history of the event when the winning margin was decided by either a playoff or one stroke.
The field for this popular 50-and-older tournament will be announced in the next
few weeks, but two of the early entrants are Hal Sutton and Fred Funk. Funk has won
nine Champions Tour events to go with his eight wins on the regular PGA tour.
Sutton won 14 PGA tournaments and is a former Ryder Cup Captain.
Free Balance
Screening Offered
U
nintentional falls are the leading cause of death due to injury
among Florida residents ages 65
years and older and the fourth leading
cause of death due to injury overall.
Attend a free balance screening to find
out about your fall risk and what you can
do to get help to improve your balance
and minimize your risk of falling.
Lee Memorial Health System will host
a balance screening on Tuesday, February
3 from 10 a.m. to noon at Riverwalk
Sports Medicine & Rehabilitation, 8350
Riverwalk Park Blvd., Suite 3 in Fort
Myers.
A balance screening participant will
complete a questionnaire prior to going
through balance testing stations manned
by licensed physical therapists. A summary of test results and findings will be
reviewed during an “exit interview” with a
licensed physical therapist.
Space is limited. Make your reservations by calling 343-8850.
Read us online at
IslandSunNews.com
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Sanibel 8-Ball Pool League
SANIBEL 8-BALL POOL LEAGUE 2014-15
Standings through January 19
Standing
Team Name
Won
Lost
First
Bunt’s Ball Busters
166
74
Second
Sandycappers
132
108
Third
Sanibel Café
126
114
Fourth
Fresh Legion Crew
122
118
Fifth
Island Lifers
93
147
Sixth
Legion Motley Crew
81
159
January 19 Results
Bunt’s Ball Busters
13
Legion Motley Crew
3
Island Lifers
11
Fresh Legion Crew
5
Sandycappers
10
Sanibel Café
6
M.S.T.
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1619 Periwinkle Way, Suite 102, Sanibel Island, FL 33957
Sandycappers
Seniors At
Stretch Lead In
Center 4 Life
training with hand weights,
Race For Second flexibility
stretch cords, chairs and stability balls.
I
n the battle for second place in the
league standings, Sandycappers put
together a 10-6 win over Sanibel
Café and moved six games ahead of
the Café guys. The teams meet only
one more time before season end on
March 16. Jack Dalton, John Bates and
Kevin Pottorf posted 3-1 records for the
Sandycappers while Joe Mason went 3-1
for Sanibel Café.
Island Lifers came to life with a
resounding 11-5 pounding of Fresh Legion
Crew. Jack Cunningham and Kip Buntrock
went undefeated for the Lifers. They were
backed up by 3-1 efforts from Kelly Greten
and Carmen Senese. Jimbo Gaubatz had
three of the losing team’s five points.
Bob Buntrock and Noah Smith racked
up 4-0 wins over Chip Gelpi and Larry
Hancock to pace Bunt’s Ball Busters to
a 13-3 victory over Legion Motley Crew.
The Ball Busters are now 34 games in
front but will need them all, since two of
their top players will be returning north
this week and a third is unable to shoot
on the team’s remaining late night dates
due to a need for more sleep on Monday
nights.
The big match this week is Bunt’s
Ball Busters versus Sandycappers. The
first game starts at 5 p.m. Drop by the
American Legion to watch the contest.
Athletic footwear required. Mahnaz
Bassiri is the instructor.
Power Hour Fitness – Tuesday
and Thursday at 8 a.m. Hand weights,
stretch cords, stability balls and mats are
used. Improve core strength and balance. Athletic footwear required. Mahnaz
Bassiri is the instructor.
Gentle Yoga – Tuesday and Thursday
at 9:30 a.m. Stretch, tone and strengthen
while improving flexibility, proper alignment and circulation. Mats are used to
meet the needs of varying experience
levels. Bring a towel. Kim Kouril is the
instructor.
Chair Yoga – Tuesday and Thursday
at 11 a.m. Similar to Gentle Yoga but all
poses are done in a chair. Kim Kouril is
the instructor.
For more information on programs or
to join Island Seniors, call 472-5743 or
stop by the Center 4 Life, 2401 Library
Way on Sanibel.
Our email address is
[email protected]
CALL FOR
APPOINTMENT
JANUARY 25 • 10AM-4PM
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1990 SUNRISE CIRCLE
• Direct Access Pool Home
• Fantastic 3 Bed / 3.5 Bath
• Large Dock with 10,000 lb. Boat Lift
• Offered at $1,290,000
Melissa Rice
CCIM Broker Associate
239-398-0404
7B
From page 5B
OPEN HOUSE
• Sanibel Estate Home
• Over 9200 total sq ft
• 4 BD/3.5 Bath on 1.3+ Acre
• Offered at $1,295,000
Ken Colter
239-851-1357
John Naumann & Associates • 1149 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel, FL 33957
Bob Berning
239-699-9597
8B
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Sanibel Island Golf Club
Member-Member Tournament
Staff professional Gene Taylor, Jerry Mader and Fred St. Pierre
Roger Cogswell, Fred Zimmer and staff professional Gene Taylor
submitted by Jack Tukey
O
n Saturday, January 17, the Sanibel Island Golf Club men played a MemberMember tournament. Names were drawn out of a hat to choose partners.
The men played a one best net ball game with 90 percent handicaps applied
to determine final scores.
The winners were Fred Zimmer and Roger Cogswell with a score of 59. Cogswell
birdied the first hole and shot his lowest score of this season. Zimmer had a net one
on the 7th hole and sunk a 35-foot putt on the 12th hole. Cogswell contributed many
of the low scores for a 26 on the front and said Zimmer came alive on the back “like a
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rocket that finally ignited.”
There was a tie score of 61 for second and third place. A scorecard playoff was
necessary to award places. The back nine scores were used and all nine scores were
even, and the last six holes on the back were also even and, finally, there was a difference of one stroke on the last three holes. Second place went to Jerry Mader and Fred
St. Pierre. They might have been in first place but Mader hit a wrong ball that had just
been put into play and ended up a few inches from the hole. When the mistake was
discovered, he had to go back and re-hit his ball, which landed on the green several
feet from the cup and he had a net five instead of a potential four. The two-stroke
penalty plus the extra putt was a three-stroke difference. But they had only two bogies
and thus a very good round.
Tony Baldino and Mike Zembko were awarded third place. They each contributed
to their final score of 61 with an almost even number of net best balls. The matches
were all fairly even, with the next five teams scoring 62s.
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Quotes Sought For Softball Umpires
T
he City of Sanibel is seeking quotes for softball umpire services for fiscal year
2015 (October 1, 2014 through September 30, 2015). Umpires must be
available in the evening to officiate adult softball games at the Sanibel Ball
Field Complex, located at 3840 Sanibel-Captiva Road. Umpires will be paid $55
per game. Selected softball umpires must submit to and pass a criminal background
check.
Requirements are as follows:
• Copy of current ASA certification(s)
• A minimum of three references
For more information or to submit a quote, contact the City of Sanibel Recreation
Department, Attn: Andrea Miller, Recreation Director, 3880 Sanibel-Captiva Road,
Sanibel, FL 33957 or email [email protected]
Batting Practice With The Twins
I
n partnership with the Minnesota Twins and Shoeless Joes Sports Café, the
Crowne Plaza at the Bell Tower Shops in Fort Myers will be sponsoring the 4th
annual Batting Practice With The Twins.
Batting Practice With The Twins invites 25 lucky fans to be on the field during
batting practice before every home game during this year’s spring training season.
Interested fans must have a ticket to the present day’s game and be at Hammond
Stadium prior to the game by 10 a.m.
Tickets are $40 per person for each game and are available by calling the Boys &
Girls Clubs at 334-1886 or by arriving three hours prior to the first pitch on game day
and purchasing at the stadium.
All proceeds from the practice events will go directly to the Boys & Girls Club of
Lee County. Last year’s events raised more than $7,000 for the Boys & Girls Clubs.
“This is the ultimate experience for any baseball fan,” said Jim Larkin, general
manager of the Crowne Plaza Hotel in Fort Myers. “Fans can take advantage of
excellent photo opportunities and be close enough to hear their favorite player’s conversations. It’s a great event for friends and family and also a unique way to entertain
important clients or reward your best employees.”
For more information or to purchase tickets, contact the Boys & Girls Clubs at
334-1886.
S L
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9B
10B
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Paint The Ice Night At Everblades
Red Sox Chef To Create Menu For
Annual Evening With The Red Sox
T
Paint the Ice Night
F
photo by Al Larson Photography
riday, January 30 is Paint the Ice Night at the Everblades. Game time is 7
p.m. versus the Greenville Road Warriors at Germain Arena in Estero. Tickets
are $18.25 forall ages and can be purchased at the Sanibel Recreation Center
by Wednesday, January 28.
Kids and kids at heart are invited to stick around after the game and head down to
ice level, where they will be able to paint their own designs onto the ice. This results
in a special canvas that will set a colorful scene as the Everblades play the following
night. For more information, call the Sanibel Recreation Center at 472-0345 or visit
www.mysanibel.com.
he Boston Red Sox corporate executive chef Ron Abell will leave Fenway
Park and head to Southwest Florida as he leads the Aramark team in creating
and preparing a new menu for this year’s 10th annual Evening with the Red
Sox dinner and auction event.
Chef Abell served under Lydia Shire at Biba, Lucient Robert and Pierre Jamet at
Maison Robert and as executive chef at the famed Icarus in Boston’s fashionable South
End. A graduate of Johnson and Wales University and Blue Hills High School for the
Culinary Arts, Abell is constantly challenging and expanding his culinary skills. He is
an active member of the Chef’s Collaborative, a national network of food professionals
who promote sustainable cuisine by celebrating the joys of local, seasonal and artisanal
cooking.
“We’re very excited to have a taste of Fenway at this year’s event, as Chef Abell
shares his Fenway flavor and skills with Fort Myers,” said Jim Larkin, co-chairperson
for the event and board member of the Boys and Girls Clubs of Lee County.
Benefiting the Boys & Girls Clubs of Lee County, the annual Evening with the Red
Sox will be held at JetBlue Park at Fenway South, located at 11500 Fenway South
Drive in Fort Myers. The evening will begin at 5:30 p.m. and include a cocktail reception with hors d’oeuvres, beer and wine, silent and live auctions, dinner and autograph
signings from Red Sox players. Last year’s event included autograph signings by Craig
Breslow, Mike Carp and Will Middlebrooks.
Presenting sponsors for this year’s event are Allstate Insurance and Ted Todd
Insurance. Additional sponsorships and tables are still available from $1,250 to
$10,000. Donations for auction items are also being accepted. For more information
or to become a sponsor, contact Shannon Lane at 334-1886 or [email protected]
Individual tickets for the event are $200 per person.
Funds raised during the event provide more than 30,000 hours of service to more
than 420 young people in our community who are a part of the Boys & Girls Clubs of
Lee County. Last year, more than 1,300 youth demonstrated academic success, character and leadership and healthy lifestyles from the agency’s programs.
For more information or to register for the event, contact Shannon Lane at 3341886 or [email protected]
To advertise in the Island Sun call 395-1213
SANIBEL SEAVIEW
Direct Gulf front luxury PENTHOUSE residence in small east end complex
offering pool and tennis. Four bedroom, Four bath plus loft/den.
Spectacular views. Spacious living area with cathedral ceilings, huge
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Just Reduced $1,999,999.00
1019 Periwinkle Way
Sanibel Island, FL 33957
Jim Artale
Broker Associate
Wendy Artale-Amerman
Sales Associate
Phone 239-209-1665
Phone 239-292-4176
e-mail [email protected]
e-mail [email protected]
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
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S a n i b e l Re a l E s t at e . n e t
1019 Periwinkle Way
Sanibel Island, FL 33957
11B
12B
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Will Power
Another Reason To Update Your
Legal Documents To Florida Law
by Craig R. Hersch, Florida Bar Board Certified
Wills, Trusts & Estates Attorney; CPA
T
he Illinois Department of Revenue (IDR) recently attempted
to tax a trust that had been moved from Illinois to Texas
after the grantor’s death. The trustees of the trust had to
expend considerable sums fighting off the IDR. This is a lesson
that those who have moved to Florida but have not updated their
trusts should consider.
Illinois trusts are subject to a five percent income tax and a 1.5
percent personal property tax. A non-resident trust is subject to the
tax to the extent that the income is generated in Illinois or apportioned to Illinois. Resident
trusts, on the other hand, are taxed on all income, regardless of the source. With respect
to a trust, if the grantor was a resident of Illinois, at her death it is still considered an
Illinois trust, even if none of the trustees or beneficiaries has a nexus to Illinois.
In Linn v. Illinois Department of Revenue, the case involved a trust established in 1961
by A.N. Pritzker, an Illinois resident. The trust was initially administered by Illinois trustees pursuant to Illinois law. In 2002, pursuant to powers vested in the trustee in the trust
instrument, the trustee distributed the trust property to a new trust (the “Texas Trust”).
Although the Texas Trust generally provided for administration under Texas law, certain
provisions of the trust instrument continued to be interpreted under Illinois law. The Texas
Trust was subsequently modified by a Texas court to eliminate all references to Illinois
law, and the trustee filed the Texas Trust’s 2006 Illinois tax return on a nonresident basis.
At that time no non-contingent trust beneficiary resided in Illinois, no trust office holder
resided in Illinois, no trust assets were outside Illinois and Illinois law was not referenced in
the trust instrument.
The IDR determined that the trust was a resident trust and that, as such, the trust
should continue to be subject to Illinois income tax. The trustee countered that the imposition of Illinois tax under these circumstances was unconstitutional as a violation of the due
process clause and the commerce clause. The court sided with the trustee based on due
process grounds (not reaching the commerce clause arguments), and recited the following
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requirements for a statute to sustain a due process challenge: 1. a minimum connection
must exist between the state and the person, property, or transaction it seeks to tax, and
2. the income attributed to the state for tax purposes must be rationally related to values
with the taxing state.
The IDR argued that significant connections with Illinois existed, maintaining that the
trust owed its very existence to Illinois and listing numerous legal benefits Illinois provides
to the trustees and beneficiaries. The court disagreed with the testamentary trust cases the
IDR relied on, finding that an inter vivos (revocable during life) trust’s connections with a
state are more attenuated than in the case of a testamentary (after death) trust.
Further, the court found that the Texas Trust wasn’t created under Illinois law, but
rather by a power granted to the trustees under the original trust instrument. The court
proceeded to dismiss the trust’s historical connections to Illinois and focused on contemporaneous connections finding that “what happened historically with the trust in Illinois
courts and under Illinois law has no bearing on the 2006 tax year.” For 2006, the court
concluded that the trust received the benefits and protections of Texas law, not Illinois law.
Imagine if the trustees had never decanted the original Illinois trust into a Texas trust.
Then Texas law would not have applied and it is likely that Illinois taxes would still have
been imposed. Texas, like Florida, has no state income tax. The fact that the trustees were
able to move the trust from a state that taxes trust income (Illinois) to a state that does not
(Texas) resulted in significant savings for the trust beneficiaries.
This is an important lesson for those that have moved their residences to Florida but
have not updated their wills and trusts to Florida law. Chances are, the former home state
taxes income, and if the laws of that state are broad reaching (as many are) then taxes
may be assessed.
©2015 Craig R. Hersch. Learn more at www.sbshlaw.com.
Estate Expert
To Visit Jeweler
C
ongress Jewelers will host a
buying estate event on Friday,
February 6 and Saturday,
February 7 in the store located in
Periwinkle Place Shopping Center. The
buying event will also feature many
estate jewelry items for purchase. Last
year, Congress Jewelers held a similar
event and gave individuals an opportunity to not only sell their antique and
estate items, but also watches, colored
stone jewelry, diamonds, platinum
and gold. The appraiser may also be
willing to buy unusual artwork, sculpture, bronzes and silver flatware. All
transactions are strickly confidential.
Appointments can be made by calling
472-4177.
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
School Smart
by Shelley M.
Greggs, NCSP
D
ear
Shelley,
I have a
9-year-old disabled
child who receives
transportation services to and from
school as part of his
individualized education program (IEP).
We are moving to a different state soon
and I am worried that my son will not be
eligible for transportation. What are the
rules about transportation?
Mary Beth F., Fort Myers
Mary Beth,
Transportation is considered a related
service on an IEP and transportation
issues vary greatly depending on the
child’s unique needs. “The law defines
transportation as “travel to and from
school and between schools; travel in and
around school buildings; and specialized
equipment such as special or adapted
buses, lifts and ramps, if required to provide special transportation for a child with
a disability” 34 CFR §300.34(c)(16). The
school must provide related services as
per the Individuals with Disabilities Act
(IDEA) and as such the school must provide the special education services, and
as determined the IEP team the related
services of speech therapy, occupational
therapy, physical therapy, rehabilitation
counseling, transportation and supplementary aides and services that the
child needs to receive a free appropriate public education and receive benefit
from his special education program 34
CFR §300.34(a). Wrightslaw: Special
Education Law, 2nd edition.
Transportation can be complicated and
you are smart to do your research now
on this issue. Check your new state’s special education regulations, and the local
school district policy regarding transportation. To learn about special education in
your new state, you will need to contact
the State Department of Education and
its Special Education Division. To find
the new state’s website and information,
visit the National Association of State
Directors of Special Education (NASDSE)
at http://nasdse.org/MeettheDirectors/
tabid/60/Default.aspx.
In regard to moving to a new state
with an IEP, The Center for Parent
Information and Resources says, “When
you move to a different state a different
agency becomes responsible for educating your child. That new agency must
provide FAPE to your child, including
services comparable to those described
in the IEP from the previous state, until
– and this is the new agency’s option – it
conducts a full and individual evaluation
of your child to determine if he or she is
an eligible child with a disability in that
state. The agency may decide that an
evaluation isn’t needed, in which case it
is not required to conduct one. Should
the agency decide to evaluate your child,
it will need your permission as parents.
If your child is found eligible for special
education services in the new state, a new
IEP will need to be developed according
to local policies.”
Remember that the IEP team determines the need for transportation by
answering this question, “Is transportation required for the child to benefit from
special education and related services?” If
the answer is yes, than transportation is
provided.
Make sure that when the new IEP is
written for your son that all the specifics
about transportation be included in the
IEP such as specific circumstances under
which transportation is to be provided
(normal school hours, off-campus educational components, early or after-school
instruction), the type of vehicle to be used
in transportation, any specific equipment
used in conjunction with the vehicle (any
specialized or adaptive equipment), the
nature and extent of the transportation
(where the child is picked-up/droppedoff), personnel needed to assist in transportation (aides, monitors, health care
personnel) and any transportation goals
and objectives if transportation has an
independent purpose beyond access to
education.
Shelley Greggs is adjunct faculty at
Florida SouthWestern State College,
where she teaches psychology and
education courses. She is also a nationally certified school psychologist and
consultant for School Consultation
Services, a private educational consulting company. Questions for publication
may be addressed to [email protected]
com. Not all questions submitted can
be addressed through this publication.
Next Motor Club
Event February 7
T
he sixth San Cap Motor Club
event will be help on Saturday,
February 7 in the parking lot of
Periwinkle Place shopping center on
Sanibel.
Last month more than 35 antique,
classic, muscle and sport models filled
the front of the shopping center while
several hundred spectators took pictures,
chatted with owners and spent a relaxing
Saturday morning.
“The event is a great way to start off
the weekend and visit with other car owners and spectators. The community has
really embraced the idea of sharing their
vehicles with one another in a non-stress
environment,” said Mike Stone, one of
the organizers. “We look forward to even
more participants this month, he added.
For more information on the club,
contact Scot Congress at 472-4177 or
[email protected] or Mike Stone at
322-0044 or [email protected]
13B
14B
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
CAPTIVA
16151 Captiva Drive
Stephanie Bissett
Web ID 214064054
239.850.9555
$7,000,000
LET US MANAGE
YOUR PROPERTY
2984 Wulfert Road
Jane Reader Weaver
Web ID 214067662
CAPTIVA
SANIBEL
CAPTIVA
239.850.9555
$2,200,000
568 Lighthouse Way
Wil Rivait
239.464.8108
Web ID 201328791
$1,995,000
11514 Wightman Lane
Jim Branyon
239.565.3233
Web ID 214040103
$1,985,589
239.292.3707
$10,800,000
SANIBEL
CAPE CORAL
1213 Periwinkle Way
George Kohlbrenner 239.565.8805
Web ID 214057872
$875,000
1519 SW 53rd Terrace
Stephanie Bissett
239.292.3707
Web ID 214047615
$799,000
16910 Captiva Drive
Jane Reader Weaver
Web ID 214043066
CAPTIVA
239.292.3707
$10,800,000
SANIBEL
CAPTIVA
15172/174 Wiles Drive West
Jane Reader Weaver
Web ID 214068122
CAPTIVA
Captiva Drive
Stephanie Bissett
Web ID 214064065
239.850.9555
$4,735,000
SANIBEL
239.233.9277
$659,000
561 Lighthouse Way
Wil Rivait
Web ID 201327528
239.292.3707
$4,100,000
239.464.8108
$1,895,000
Mastique #PH02
Robert Pecoraro
Web ID 214022383
FORT MYERS
239.281.4179
$625,000
16585 Captiva Drive
Jim Branyon
Web ID 214040636
239.565.3233
$2,799,585
CAPTIVA
SANIBEL
239.233.9277
$1,599,000
857 Birdie View Point
Kara Cuscaden
239.470.1516
Web ID 214060706
$995,000
SANIBEL
FORT MYERS
Sanibel Arms West #M8
Kara Cuscaden
239.470.1516
Web ID 214065048
$479,900
15549 Laguna Hills Drive
Augustina Holtz
914.648.8888
Web ID 214061600
$472,000
SANIBEL
1228 Anhinga Lane
Brooke Brownyard
Web ID 214045593
CAPTIVA
3411 West Gulf Drive
Jane Reader Weaver 239.850.9555
Web ID 213506506
$3,740,000
SANIBEL
FORT MYERS
14961 David Drive
Robert Pecoraro
Web ID 214052951
11530 Paige Court
Stephanie Bissett
Web ID 214064002
15B
43 Oster Court
Jim Branyon
Web ID 214040091
239.565.3233
$784,900
Now offering rentals
on Sanibel and
Captiva Islands!
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FORT MYERS
SANIBEL
FORT MYERS BEACH
8675 Southwind Bay Circle
Augustina Holtz
914.648.8888
Web ID 214062210
$454,500
5723 Baltusrol Court
Stephanie Bissett
239.292.3707
Web ID 214064070
$399,000
Island Reef Club #103
Stephanie Bissett
239.292.3707
Web ID 214029215
$380,000
GULF HARBOUR YACHT & CC
Bellavista #32E
Maxwell Thompson
Web ID 214068409
239.989.3855
$374,800
FORT MYERS
1345 Stadler Drive
Maxwell Thompson
Web ID 214060913
239.989.3855
$289,900
SANIBEL
FORT MYERS
12858 Timber Ridge Drive
Maxwell Thompson
239.989.3855
Web ID 215002522
$239,900
5406 Osprey Court
Brooke Brownyard
Web ID 214068065
Over 16,400 associates | Approximately 730 offices | 56 countries and territories worldwide | 24 locations
Sotheby’s International Realty® and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Each office is independently owned and operated. Equal Housing Opportunity. Property information herein is derived from various sources including but not limited to county records and the multiple listing service, and may include approximations. All information is deemed accurate.
premiersothebysrealty.com
SANIBEL | 239.472.2735
2341 Palm Ridge Road
Sanibel, Florida 33957
CAPTIVA | 239.395.5847
11508 Andy Rosse Lane
Captiva, Florida 33924
239.281.4179
$779,000
16B
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Superior Interiors
Why Work
With A Pro?
by Marcia Feeney
I
nterior designers
enjoy helping
our clients create
the perfect look
for them and their
lifestyle. Whether
its one room or
one window that
you’re interested in
redecorating, we
like to help you do
Meta G Roth, MS
Fitness Practitioner
Owner
Personal Trainer
Pilates
Strength Training
TRS
Nutritional Counselor
Yoga
239-410-1342
695 Tarpon Bay
(The Promenade)
Sanibel Island, FL 33957
[email protected]
sanibelfitnessbymeta.com
it right the first time.
If you’re like most of the clients we
work with, you want a beautiful custom
designed look, but truly don’t know how
to make that vision a reality. You might
not be sure of what goes where or with
what.
Or, perhaps you might be able to
begin your new design project by building
on what you already have, rather than
throwing everything out and starting from
scratch. You might even fear that if you
call a professional decorator, your home
will end up featuring that decorator’s
taste, not yours. And last, but certainly
not least, you might not be even be sure
you can afford the services of a professional decorator.
Well fear not. Let a professional,
knowledgeable and friendly decorator put
your decorating concerns to rest. From
design concept to completion, we’ll help
save you valuable time and money by
guiding your decision-making process
through myriad functional and decorative
ideas.
The list of benefits available to you
when you choose to work with a professional decorator goes on and on. The
bottom line, however, is that a professionally trained interior decorator can
not only make your ideas work better,
but they know to make your decorating
dreams a reality. Maybe it’s time for you
to consider calling in the professionals.
Marcia Feeney is an interior designer
on Sanibel/Captiva Islands. She can be
reached at [email protected]
Got A Problem?
Dr. Connie Is In
by Constance
Clancy
Q: My sister’s
husband undermines her success
and controls her.
She makes excuses
for him and I just
cannot stand to see
this happen to her.
Should I stay out
of it?
A: While it is difficult to see what your
sister is going through, she may resent
it if you confront her and most likely
she will deny her husband’s behavior.
What you can do is let her know what
a wonderful person she is and how she
deserves to be treated (as we all do) with
dignity and respect and she has every
right to speak her truth. Her husband is
treating her this way because he can and
she is obviously allowing it to continue. Is
your sister afraid he will leave her if she
stands up to him? Somehow he has managed to control and manipulate her to the
point where she feels inadequate.
Rather than criticizing her husband,
perhaps you could talk with her about
how she is feeling overall with her life.
She may begin to open up and you can
begin to have her look at her situation
and see if she is willing to settle for this or
at least see if she will talk with someone.
She needs to realize that she should not
invest more in a relationship than she can
afford to use.
Constance Clancy-Fisher, EdD is
a licensed mental health therapist,
hypnotherapist, author and holistic
stress management instructor. She can
be reached at [email protected]
gmail.com.
Our email address is
[email protected]
One Builder Serving Sanibel & Captiva for over 35 years
• Custom Residential Construction
• Remodeling Projects
• Design Team with Construction Drawings
• Plans Through Completion of Project
25 Years Experience
Phone: (239)489.0442
Email: [email protected] • www.gregweglarz.com
State Certified General Contractor License # CGC A05420
Top 10 Real Estate Sales
Development
City
Year Built
Square Footage
Listing Price
Selling Price
Days On Market
Marcello
Naples
2007
5,011
$2,495,000
$2,320,000
365
Oakbrook
Bonita Springs
2005
4,679
$1,899,000
$1,776,000
260
Ridge
Bonita Springs
1996
3,400
$1,239,000
$1,200,000
45
Verona Lago
Miromar Lakes
2004
3,628
$1,199,000
$1,090,000
34
Imperial Shores
Bonita Springs
2005
2,820
$1,150,000
$1,000,000
62
Tidewater Island
Fort Myers
2005
3,868
$950,000
$900,000
89
Grande Estates
Estero
2007
3,122
$909,000
$879,000
23
Edgewater
Fort Myers
1996
3,033
$835,000
$835,000
0
Trevi
Fort Myers
2007
3,620
$925,000
$825,000
189
Water Shadows Unrecorded Subdivison
Sanibel
1977
2,142
$865,000
$790,000
116
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Hersch And Hill To Present
Estate Planning Workshops
17B
De-ionized Water Leaves your
Windows Spotless!
De-ionized
Window Cleaning
Craig Hersch and Michael Hill
A
ttorneys Craig R. Hersch and Michael B. Hill of Sheppard, Brett, Stewart,
Hersch, Kinsey & Hill, PA will present two informative Florida estate planning workshops on February 4 and 5 at 2 p.m. to provide answers to many
estate planning questions on wills, trusts and other documents. The Wednesday,
February 4 workshop will be held at The Community House, 2173 Periwinkle Way
on Sanibel. The identical workshop will also be held on Thursday, February 5 at
Temple Beth El, located at 16225 Winkler Road in Fort Myers. All attendees will
receive their informative Florida Estate Planning Guide and DVD.
New and partial-year residents will learn about Florida homestead laws, if their will
and trust documents from up north are valid in Florida, the advantages of declaring
Florida residency, how to avoid probate, and why changes in the laws make it necessary for everyone to have older estate planning documents updated. Attendees are
invited to bring a copy of their current estate planning documents and arrive a half
hour early to receive a confidential, complimentary review and written analysis following the presentation.
Reservations can be made by calling 425-9379 or online at www.sbshlaw.com/
seminars.shtml.
Realtors Conduct Awards Banquet
• Interior & Exterior
• Clean Windows, Doors,
Frames & Screens
• Eco Friendly
• Locally Owned & Operated
• Residential & Commercial
• Satisfaction Guaranteed
• Additional Services
Available:
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$25
OFF*
$250 min
Cleaning
* Pressure Washing (roofs excluded)
* Video Inspections
* Maintenance Programs * Annual Contracts
Keep Your View Crystal Clear!
T
he Sanibel & Captiva Islands Association of Realtors, Inc. held its Installation
and Awards Banquet at Sundial Beach Resort & Spa on January 10.
During the event, 2015 Florida Realtors President Andrew Barbar and 2015
National Association of Realtors Regional V.P. Dean Asher installed the 2015 Board
of Directors:
Officers
President, Eric Pfeifer, Pfeifer Realty Group
President-elect, Lori Pierot, VIP Realty Group, Inc.
Treasurer, Joel Goodman, VIP Realty Group, Inc.
Secretary Martha Smith, VIP Realty Group, Inc.
Directors
Mary Lou Bailey, VIP Realty Group, Inc.
Dustyn Corace, RE/MAX of the Islands
Deborah Smith, VIP Realty Group, Inc.
Shane Spring, VIP Realty Group, Inc.
Toby Tolp, John Naumann & Associates
This event also gives the association the opportunity to honor those individuals who
deserve special recognition for their outstanding achievements and service to the organization and to the community in 2014. The recipients of these awards include:
Administrative Support Award – Jessica Elliott, VIP Realty Group, Inc.
Community Service Award – Shane Spring, VIP Realty Group, Inc.
Affiliate Business Partner of the Year – Nanci Berlin, Barrier Island Title
President’s Award – Chris Heidrick, Heidrick & Company Insurance
Realtor of the Year – David Schuldenfrei, VIP Realty Group, Inc.
In addition, 23 realtors received Honor Society Awards in recognition of their
community service activities and professionalism through education, participation and
service.
Call Today for a Free Estimate
239-313-7930
Licensed & Insured
* Residential customers only. Some Restrictions may apply
18B
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
deaRPharmacist
Reduce
Inflammation
Naturally
by Suzy Cohen, RPh
D
ear
Pharmacist:
Have
you ever had a sore
throat, been stung
by a bee, or twisted
your ankle? Do you
have arthritis, back
pain or headaches?
Whenever you are in
pain, even post-surgical pain, your body makes compounds
in response to the injury which cause temporary redness, heat, swelling, and pain.
Then naturally produced enzymes in your
body eat up these inflammatory compounds, and that is when you notice the
swelling goes down, the pain is relieved
and the redness or stiffness recedes.
One second ago, an enzyme in your
body called superoxide dismutase (SOD)
just chased out a cancer-causing toxin that
your cell accidentally spawned. You make
all sorts of enzymes, and what’s cool is
that you can also buy certain enzymes as
a dietary supplement, including SOD.
Lactose is an enzyme that chews up
milk sugars, helping some people to tolerate milk. Bromelain, derived from pineapples, helps with allergies and helps people
post-surgically. It might even reduce
scarring if taken soon enough. People
who take acid blockers could benefit from
papain, an enzyme derived from papaya
fruit that works nicely with your stomach’s
pH range.
Proteolytic enzymes, another type of
enzyme, chew up proteins and help with
digestion. I think they’re great for chronic
pain syndromes. They help dissolve fibrin
deposits which helps bruising. As a teenager (way back in the 1980s) we played
a game called Pac Man. Remember?
(please tell me you remember). This
popular arcade game included a Pac-Man
which traveled a maze and gobbled up
ghosts. I was a monster at Pac-Man in my
heyday! Proteolytic enzymes work in the
same way, they just gobble up debris, as
opposed to ghosts.
With less debris, there is improved
circulation. That means more oxygen and
healing nutrients to the site of injury. As
a pharmacist, I recommend you reach
for proteolytic enzymes before you take
NSAIDs such as acetaminophen, naproxen or ibuprofen. Why? Because they are
temporary and they have side-effects. It’s
the equivalent of applying a bandage, and
while most of you fare well, the unlucky
few experience diarrhea, nausea, headaches, dizziness, bleeding ulcers or, heaven forbid, kidney damage. Besides, if you
mask your pain with medicine, but continue to operate as normal, you increase
your risk of permanent damage.
A German paper studied proteolytic
enzymes in 100 athletes. The results were
shocking. More than 75 percent said the
enzyme treatment was favorable and no
side effects were reported. So incredible
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Make an appointment today!
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Caring Medical and
Rehabilitation Services
9738 Commerce Center Ct.,
Fort Myers, FL 33908
Marion A. Hauser, MS, RD
Ross A. Hauser, MD
CEO of Caring Medical
& Rehabilitation Services
Board Certified in Physical
Medicine & Rehabilitation
were the results that the German government sent millions of enzyme capsules to
the Olympics to help their athletes heal
quicker.
Enzymes are a necessity to life, just
like oxygen, food, clean water and shelter.
(Some may argue that chocolate should
be included as well).
For chronic pain syndromes, as
Doctor and Dietitian
back of the head, neck pain, a cracking
or grinding sensation in the neck and
desire to pop or crack the neck. When
combined with dizziness, vertigo (spinning feeling), imbalance, tinnitus and
migraines, the condition is known as
Barre-Lieou Syndrome. An easy way to
document a neck cause for dizziness is
to wear a soft cervical collar for three
to seven days (including sleeping) and
not turn the neck. If the dizziness is significantly relieved (or any of the above
symptoms), then you can be assured
that the neck is the cause of the symptom. Neck instability is best treated with
Prolotherapy, a natural regenerative injection therapy that tightens the ligaments to
stabilize the neck.
Another common cause of dizziness is
neuropathy, typically from elevated blood
sugars. Checking your glycosylated hemoglobin levels will help diagnose this condition. Ideal HbgA1C levels are 5.2 percent
or below. Elevated levels reveal that blood
sugars were spiking above normal. This
can cause damage to nerves leading to
dizziness. The treatment is weight loss,
exercise and a diet with less sugar and
simple carbohydrate and more complex
carbohydrates, vegetables and protein.
Interestingly enough, the most common cause of dizziness is related to medication use. Dizziness is a potential side
effect for nearly all mediations. If a new
medication and dizziness began at about
the same time, the prescribing physician
should be notified. Improper dosing may
also lead to dizziness, particularly related
to blood pressure meds.
This information is not intended
to treat, cure or diagnose your condition. Caring Medical and Rehabilitation
Services has two locations: one in Oak
Park, Illinois, and one in Fort Myers.
It was established in 1991 by Ross
Hauser, MD, and Marion Hauser, MS,
RD. They can be reached at [email protected]
Natural Cures
For Dizziness
by Ross Hauser, MD
and Marion Hauser, MS, RD
A
nywhere from 10 to 30 percent
of the population may experience
dizziness or a feeling of lightheadedness or imbalance. While the
cause cannot always be identified, here
are five simple ways to diagnose and
cure dizziness.
Perhaps the simplest cause of dizziness is low blood sugar or hypoglycemia.
If dizziness occurs when you have not
eaten for a few hours, this is most likely
the cause. A glucose-insulin tolerance lab
test could confirm this diagnosis. This
test involves ingesting a sugar drink, with
subsequent blood insulin and sugar level
checks over a period of three hours.
The treatment for hypoglycemia is eating small frequent meals high in protein,
reduced in sugar or simple carbohydrates.
Another common cause of dizziness
in Southwest Florida is overheating and
dehydration. The treatment, of course, is
to drink cold drinks and cool the body by
sitting in the shade versus the direct sunlight, especially during the heat of the day.
A lessor known cause of dizziness is
neck or cervical instability. Neck instability often presents with headaches in the
Foundation
Lauded
T
he Lee Memorial Health System
Foundation was recently recognized as a High Performer by the
Association for Healthcare Philanthropy
(AHP), the authority on health care
philanthropy standards and leadership.
The foundation was chosen for its efforts
as a top performing development organization supporting a nonprofit health
system.
“This is a first for the foundation and
we are very proud to be among the top
health care fundraising organizations,”
said Sharon A. MacDonald, chief foundation officer for Lee Memorial Health
System. “We are beyond thankful for
our many donors and the community’s
unwavering support for health care; and
we are truly blessed to have such a strong,
dedicated team that worked hard to
cotinueed on page ????
achieve such an extraordinary accomplishment.”
Participating foundations complete an
annual survey, providing performance
information including revenues, expenses
and other fundraising details. The AHP
identifies participants that have shown
high efficiency and effectiveness as they
relate to bottom-line returns and studies
the characteristics and strategies of these
high performance organizations.
AHP recognizes high performance
based on net production returns in the
top 75th percentile. Membership in this
group can change dramatically from year
to year and is quite an achievement. For
fiscal year 2013, being a high performer
means those participating organizations
raised more than $10 million in net production returns.
For more information on the foundation or opportunities to give, visit: www.
leememorial.org/foundation/. For a complete list of AHP High Performers, visit
www.ahp.org/highperformers.
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Mom And Me
by Lizzie and Pryce
L
izzie and Pryce answer your questions and give advice about aging
concerns from a two-generational
perspective. A mother and daughter
team, Lizzie is a retired RN and health
educator, and Pryce is a licensed psychotherapist in private practice who specializes in the care of elders and people with
chronic illnesses.
Dear Mom & Me,
I am a single woman; a retired career
educator. My career was foremost so
I never married, but I now realize how
much I have missed.
After I retired, I was thrilled to be able
to stay in my home and enjoy the many
pleasures. But I now realize that this cannot go on too much longer and I must
make a change, as I am completely on
my own with no family.
I have interviewed many complexes
and have one very basic problem: I am
terrified that I will not have the financial
resources to see me to the end, and then
I will be out on the street. What do I do
then?
Ada
Dear Ada,
In today’s economy, many singles
and married people are having the same
problem as you. Nobody knows for sure
what is ahead.
I would suggest that you get all of the
information you can about your financial
position and seek the counsel of an experienced, older financial advisor; maybe
she/he will have the answer for you.
So far as what you have “missed,”
many married women envy you. They
would have loved having a career and all
of the glamour in your life rather than a
life of domesticity.
Lizzie
Dear Ada,
What’s to regret? What did you miss?
You made a life for yourself as a single
professional. You can make a life for
yourself as a retired single professional.
Being married is not a requirement to
participate in social activities and networking. Many single women (divorced
or widowed) are enjoying rich social lives.
The key is you need to take an active
role in creating your social connections
through church, senior centers, local
parks and recreation programming.
Pryce
Lizzie and Pryce’s email address is
[email protected]
Eden Energy Medicine
Change Your
Eating Patterns
by Karen L.
Semmelman,
Certified EEM,
JD, AAML (03-12)
C
an’t stop
munching on
potato chips?
Are they carefully
tucked away in a tin
in the cupboard so
you won’t be tempted, but you sneak in
and eat them anyway (and sometimes four and five times
in a row)? Food cravings satisfy emotional
needs by calming stress and reducing anxiety. But the cravings kick into high gear
when we’re stressed or anxious. By eating
carbohydrates, we boost the levels of the
hormone serotonin, which has a calming
effect... thus eating more. So, how do
you stop this incessant habit loop?
We know Triple Warmer controls our
energy habits, so we need to shift the internal energetic fields to create a new internal
atmosphere that supports new ways of
thinking and feeling. This tool enables, with
your deep intention, the shifting of deeply
embedded energetic habit fields.
1. Set your intention before you begin
– “I feel empowered to say no to potato
chips”
19B
2. While standing, place arms in front
of you while bending elbows slightly. Make
fists with inside of wrists facing upward.
3. Take a deep breath while swinging
arms behind you and over the head.
4. Reach up as high as possible while
turning fisted hands facing each other.
Throw your arms down the front of body
as you bend over, releasing the breath and
fists while emitting a sound that feels right
for you. Repeat three times. On the last
repeat, bend slowly and with controlled
intention release.
5. Stand up and breathe deeply while
stating your intention (Step 1 above).
6. Zip-up this affirmation by placing
both hands at pubic bone, inhale while
stating the affirmation and moving hands
slowly up the front of body to the lower lip.
Repeat three times. (This acts much like
hypnosis by tracing the central meridian.)
7. Hook-up by placing middle finger of
one hand in navel and middle finger other
hand between eyebrows while pulling both
fingers in and upward for 15 seconds on
deep inhale and stating your affirmation.
Welcome to your newly-created energetic habit field.
Have fun with your energy! Next week’s
topic is Hugging Increases Your Love
Hormone.
If you have a question, email Karen
Semmelman at [email protected]
gmail.com. Learn more at www.semmelmanenergy.com. EEM does not diagnose
or cure illness, but working with subtle
energies of the body has been shown to
help many conditions.
20B
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
My Stars ★ ★ ★ ★
FOR WEEK OF JANUARY 26, 2015
ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Some
unsettling facts about a past situation
could come to light. And while you’d love
to deal with it immediately, it’s best to get
more information to support your case.
TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A
straightforward approach to a baffling
situation is best. Don’t allow yourself to
be drawn into an already messy mass of
tangles and lies. Deal with it and move on.
GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Don’t be
discouraged or deterred by a colleague’s
negative opinion about your ideas. It
could actually prove to be helpful when
you get around to finalizing your plan.
CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Ignore
that sudden attack of “modesty,” and step
up to claim the credit you’ve so rightly
earned. Remember: A lot of people are
proud of you and want to share in your
achievement.
LEO (July 23 to August 22) A financial
“deal” that seems to be just right for
you Leos and Leonas could be grounded
more in gossamer than substance. Get an
expert’s advice to help you check it out.
VIRGO (August 23 to September 22)
Don’t ignore that suddenly cool or even
rude attitude from someone close to you.
Asking for an explanation could reveal a
misunderstanding you were completely
unaware of.
LIBRA (September 23 to October 22)
Unless you have sound knowledge, and
not just an opinion, it’s best not to step
into a family dispute involving a legal
matter, regardless of whom you support.
Leave that to the lawyers.
SCORPIO (October 23 to November
21) An awkward situation presents the
usually socially savvy Scorpian with a
problem. But a courteous and considerate
TREE & LAWN CARE
approach soon helps clear the air and ease
communication.
SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to
December 21) A calmer, less-tense atmosphere prevails through much of the week,
allowing you to restore your energy levels
before tackling a new challenge coming
up by week’s end.
CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Your approach to helping with
a friend or family member’s problem
could boomerang unless you take time to
explain your method and how and why it
(usually!) works.
AQUARIUS (January 20 to February
18) Someone who gave you a lot of grief
might ask for a chance for the two of you
to make a fresh start. You need to weigh
the sincerity of the request carefully
before giving your answer.
PISCES (February 19 to March 20)
Too much fantasizing about an upcoming
decision could affect your judgment. Better to make your choices based on what
you know now rather than on what you
might learn later.
BORN THIS WEEK: You have a way
of seeing the best in people and helping
them live up to their potential.
THIS WEEK IN HISTORY
● On Feb. 21, 1885, the Washington
Monument, built in honor of America’s
revolutionary hero and first president,
is dedicated in Washington, D.C. The
555-foot-high marble obelisk was the
tallest structure in the world when completed, and it remains today, by District of
Columbia law, the tallest building in the
nation’s capital.
● On Feb. 20, 1902, the famous Western photographer Ansel Adams is born in
San Francisco. Adams’ dramatic black and
white images of Yosemite and the West
are some of the most widely recognized
and admired photographs of the 20th
century. Adams was dedicated to the use
of “straight” images free from darkroom
trickery.
● On Feb. 18, 1929, The Academy
of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
announces the winners of the first Academy Awards: The first award recipients’
names were printed on the back page of
the academy’s newsletter.
● On Feb. 19, 1942, President Franklin
Roosevelt signs Executive Order 9066,
initiating a controversial World War II
policy with lasting consequences for Japanese Americans. The document ordered
the removal of resident enemy aliens from
parts of the West vaguely identified as
military areas and into detention camps.
● On Feb. 23, 1954, a group of children
from Arsenal Elementary School in Pittsburgh receive the first injections of the
new polio vaccine developed by Dr. Jonas
Salk. After mass inoculations began in
1954, everyone marveled at the high success rate -- some 60 percent to 70 percent
● On Feb. 17, 1972, the 15,007,034th
Volkswagen Beetle comes off the assembly line, breaking a world car production
record held for more than four decades by
the Ford Motor Company’s iconic Model
T, which was in production from 1908 and
1927. The history of the VW Beetle dates
back to 1930s Germany.
● On Feb. 22, 1980, in one of the most
dramatic upsets in Olympic history, the
underdog U.S. hockey team, made up
of college players, defeats the four-time
defending gold-medal winning Soviet
team at the XIII Olympic Winter Games
in Lake Placid, N.Y.
STRANGE BUT TRUE
● It was writer and cartoonist James
Thurber who made the following sage
observation: “Humor is emotional chaos
remembered in tranquility.”
● You might not be familiar with the
National Chicken Council, but it’s making
predictions about you nonetheless. If you
ate wings while watching the Super Bowl,
you contributed to the 1.25 billion wings
that the council’s 2014 Wing Report projected to be consumed during that event.
● Those who study such things say that
if you happen to find lint in your belly
button, it’s more likely to be blue than any
other color.
● The name of the state of Alabama
comes from the Choctaw word “albah,”
which means “plant-cutters.”
● Accident or not? At an evening event
in 1989, a bottle of wine once owned by
Thomas Jefferson was up for sale. The
asking price? $500,000. It seems nobody
was willing to pony up the cash, and at
the end of the night there was no sale.
At that point, a waiter (inadvertently?)
dropped the bottle, destroying the unprofitable item. The bottle was insured, however, and the merchant did end up with
$250,000.
● The White House was not designed
by an American. It was Irish architect
James Hoban who won the competition to
create the architectural plans for the home
of the political leader of the United States.
● Before he became president, George
H.W. Bush was, for a time, the youngest
aviator in the history of the U.S. Navy,
getting his wings just three days before he
turned 19.
THOUGHT FOR THE DAY
“When I am working on a problem,
I never think about beauty. I only think
about how to solve the problem. But when
I have finished, if the solution is not beautiful, I know it is wrong.” -- Buckminster
Fuller
PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY
AIRPORT SHUTTLE TAXI SERVICE
* Jesus Hernandez *
Island Chiropractic Center
“Palmer Graduate”
LANDSCAPING &
TREE SERVICE
Dr. Sudeep Chawla
Chiropractic Physician
482-7350
2400 Palm Ridge Rd.
Sanibel Island, FL 33957
239-472-2244
[email protected]om
www.chirosanibel.com
“We Service All your Landscape Needs “
FULL Landscaping SERVICES
• Tree TRIMMING AND REMOVAL
• Stump Grinding
SANIBEL INVASIVE VEGETATION
REMOVAL
MONTHLY MAINTENANCE SERVICES
FREE Landscape Consultation
and LANDSCAPE Designs
• LANDSCAPE REFURBISHING
• MULCHING • RIP RAP
• GRAVEL DRIVEWAYS • CUSTOM PAVERS
NOW OFFERING IRRIGATION WET CHECK
licensed • insured • bonded
Over 20 years serving San-Cap & Ft. Myers
www.jesuslawncare.com • [email protected]
CHIROPRACTIC SERVICES
COMPUTER SERVICES
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
CGC1517615
A BBB Accredited
Business with an +A Rating
New Construction
& Remodels
239-593-1998
www.dbrowngc.com
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
21B
answer on page 23B
FIND AT LEAST SIX DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PANELS
SUDOKU
To play Sudoku:
Complete the grid so
that every row, column
and every 3x3 box
contains the numbers
1 through 9 (the same
number cannot appear
more than once in a
row, column or 3x3 box.)
There is no guessing
and no math involved,
just logic.
PROFESSIONAL
DIRECTORY
answer on page 23B
CONSTRUCTION
POOL
OO S
SERVICE
C
LAWN MAINTENANCE
Island Condo
Maintenance,
Inc.
Since 1974
RP0031826
SI-12240
COMPLETE POOL SERVICE
SANIBEL AND CAPTIVA ISLANDS
RESIDENTS OF SANIBEL
Specialists In:
• Pool Service and Repairs
For Residential-Commercial
Complete Line Of:
• Chemicals-Pumps-Motors-Filters
• Pool Supplies and Parts
Installation Of:
• Pool Heaters, Blankets
& Roller Systems
MILLS BROTHERS BUILDING CONTRACTORS
• Custom Home Building|Remodels
• Design Service Available • Sanibel Owned & Operated
Office Phone & Fax
239-472-6711
Joseph Mills Lic. #CBC058789
William Mills Lic. #CBC058788
GENERAL CONTRACTOR
Joe Wirth General Contractor
Joe Wirth
Certified General Contractor
472-4505
239-339-7988
1205 PERIWINKLE WAY, SANIBEL FL 33957
EMAIL: [email protected]
ARTISTIC INTERIORS INC.
When Its’ Wirth Having It Done Right!
7:00 AM - 4:00 PM MON-FRI
8:00 AM - NOON SATURDAYS
Fax: 472-8813
DESIGN AND REMODELING
www.joewirthconstruction.com
Licensed & Insured cgc 1521967
“WE DON’T JUST DO REMODELING, WE CREATE ARTWORK”
CALL CHRIS BORING @
DESIGNING AND REMODELING-
239-989-6122
BORINGDESIGNSO6
@EMBARQMAIL.COM
Lic#RG291 103860, SI 16371
FROM CONCEPT TO COMPLETION
QUALITY REMODELING AND
SERVICE
22B
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
From page 1
NOW HERE’S A TIP
● If you store nail polish in the fridge, it will
dry more quickly and last longer.
● “In cold winter months, keep your robe
(and slippers or whatever else) under the
covers with you when you sleep. Pull it next
to or over you a few minutes before you get
up. It’ll be toasty and will help make the
transition into the cold a little less harsh.” -G.G. in New York
Sanctuary
Golf Challenge
financial emergencies.
“Patty and I are honored to be honorary co-chairs this year for The Sanctuary
Community Golf Challenge. Our challenge to everyone is to donate, contribute, or participate and in turn, we can be
the highest donating year on record. As
proven by the increased amount raised
each year, it has grown into a meaningful
fundraiser for the many recipients in need
on Sanibel and Captiva. The Sanctuary
Golf Club and the members are very
generous in providing the club and course
for the day. Thank you to everyone. Your
ongoing generosity of over $1 million
donated through the years demonstrates
the caring nature of the citizens of Captiva and Sanibel and The Sanctuary Golf
Club,” said Jim Sprankle.
The tournament begins at 10:30 a.m.
with a brunch, followed by a 12:30 p.m.
shotgun start. Afterward, golfers meet
at the clubhouse for drinks and hors
d’oeuvres, an awards presentation and
the ever-popular helicopter drop.
For more information, contact Brett
Kist at 472-6223 or [email protected]
net.
PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY
NEW HOMES, REMODELING & ADDITIONS
COSMETICS
CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING
904 Lindgren Blvd.
Sanibel Island, FL 33957
Ph: 239-395-0978 / 317-509-6014
[email protected]
Products: www.marykay.com/mbutcher
CALL ME FOR
GIFTS GALORE!
MAGGIE BUTCHER
INTERIOR DESIGN
Career information available
Gift ideas available
COMPUTERS
• New Homes
• Consulting
P.O. Box 143
Sanibel Island, FL
Ph (239) 472-8446
DeCorteFour.com
Sanibel Design Center
Custom Home Builders, Inc.
We do it all from repairing a door to adding a 2nd Floor
New Construction Too
P. O. Box 922 • Sanibel, FL 33957 • Fax (239) 472-8449
2330 Palm Ridge Road • Sanibel, FL 33957
(239) 395-2525 • Fax (239) 395-2373
Toll Free: 1-866-395-2525 • [email protected]
PRESSURE WASHING
PAINTING
Residential & Commercial Painting
PARAMOUNT DECORATOR
& UPHOLSTERY
since 1974
Complete line of quality upholstery work by European Craftsman
We work with the finest imported silk, satin, damask, brocades, velvets,
hand-loomed crewel, embroidered tapestries from Italy, Belgium & India.
Antique Furniture Restoration
We also do boat cushions & down feather cushions
472-8086 • 735 Donax Street, Sanibel Island
CONTRACTOR
G
Interlocking Pavers
Mediterranean Stone
Residential - Commercial
Driveways - Pool Decks - Patios - Condos
Gigi Design Group
Since 2001, A Southwest Florida Paver Contractor
Lic.# S3-12238
Schedule free estimates or
visit our new show room
www.gigicompanies.com
239-541-7282
Ron DeCorte
#CBC058483
DeCorte Four
Verticals • Mini Blinds • Draperies • Wallpaper • Furniture
Ceramic • Wood • Appliances • Interior Painting • Custom Cabinets
Upholstery • Kitchen & Bath Remodeling
CONTRACTOR
Phone: 239-472-2601
Fax: 239-472-6506
CUSTOM HOME BUILDER
Pam Ruth
V.P. Interior Design
(Cell) 239-850-4128
UPHOLSTERY
A Friendly Personalized Service From
Owner-Operator Steven Cservenyak
• Remodeling
• Contracting
Remodeling & Aluminum
by
Curtis Allen Designs.com
Bathrooms • Kitchens • Room Additions
• Lanai Enclosures • Storm Shutters •
Screen Rooms • Carports • Windows •
Garages • Floors • Doors & More
$500. OFF w/ad
239-470-1637
COLOR SCHEMES
on request from
Sanibel Home Furnishings
- Power Washing
- Wallpaper Hanging
- Faux Finishing
- Free Estimates
- Interior & Exterior
- Dependable
- Reliable
- Licensed & Insured
Lic #S3-11944
395-3928 Cell: 841-4302
With your contract
a donation to your
favorite charity will be made.
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
23B
PUZZLE ANSWERS
SUDOKU
SUPER CROSSWORD
KING CROSSWORD
PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY
TREE & LAWN CARE
MAGIC MAZE
SCRAMBLERS
FISHING CHARTER
Light Tackle Sport Fishing
Tarpon
p • Snook • Redfish & More
CAPT. MATT
MATT MI
MITCHELL
TCHELL
239-896-6789
Complete Landscaping Services
• Tree Service and Pepper Clearing
• Lawn Care • Landscape Trimming & Pruning
• Fertilization • Weed Maintenance • Mulch Applications
• Property Clean up
Sanibel Family Owned & Operated
Licensed & Insured / www.enviromow.com
BRICK PAVERS
USCG
Licensed
& Insured
C: (239) 340-8651
www.captmattmitchell.com
email: [email protected]
POOL SERVICE & REPAIR
TRAVEL AGENCY
Deep-End
Pool Service
25 years experience
License # CPC1457386
Leigh Klein - Owner
Sanibel, FL
239.472.3171
Lee County Lic. # IP06-00664
Sanibel Lic. # S3-14729
239-560-1199
[email protected]
GLASS
Insured
Licensed
# S2-11975
Stevens & Sons Glass
Replacement Impact Windows & Sliding Doors,
Mirrors, Tub & Shower Enclosures, Store Fronts,
Porch Enclosures, French Doors, Plate Glass
Specialists in impact condo complex replacement
2416 Palm Ridge Road
Sanibel Island, FL 33957
Phone: (239) 472-0032
Fax: (239) 472-0680
239-699-6279
• Islands Premier Pool Service
• Professional Weekly Service
• Fast Expert Equipment
Repair and Replacement
• Specializing in Rental Properties
also Complete Pool and Deck remodeling,
Repair and Installation of all brands of
Pool Heaters including
Gulfstream, Aquacal and Aquatherm.
24/7 emergency repair service.
Free estimates for weekly service and repairs!
[email protected]
www.AllWaysTravelThe World.com
AUTO DETAILING
Affiliate of
Frosch Travel
24B
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
★ ★ ★ CLASSIFIEDS ★ CLASSIFIEDS ★ ★ ★
REAL ESTATE
REAL ESTATE
REAL ESTATE
ANNUAL RENTAL
BUILD YOUR ISLAND
DREAM HOME ON
SANIBEL ISLAND
1986 PARK MODEL
FOR SALE BY OWNER
2BR, 1½ Bath, Trailer.
All New Appliances. New AC/Heat. Pool.
10 Min’s. From Sanibel. $25,000.
239-896-6385.
High Point Place
$20,000 below Recent Appraisal
Call for details 239-334-0956
No Realtors, please.
ANNUAL RENTALS
☼NS 1/16 CC 1/30
☼NS 1/16 CC 1/23
CENTRAL LOCATION
Close to shopping, banks, bike path. This
UF updated Apt. offers 2 bedrooms/1 bath,
screened porch, Ground level. Includes
most utilities and yard care.
Quiet location. Gorgeous. A must see!
COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE
Please call for details
BIRDIE VIEW DRIVE
Desirable Beachview lot
overlooking the golf course
Convenient to everything!
RUE ROYALE
Listen to the waves from your
Chateaux Sur Mer property.
Just steps to the beach access.
BLUE CRAB COURT-UNDER CONTRACT
Overlook Dinkins Bayou and
enjoy the dolphin and manatees.
Homesite has a dock in place.
Give me a call today!
Sarah Ashton, Broker Associate
FOR SALE BY OWNER
$699,000
3 Bedroom 2 Bath renovated ranch (08)
East Rocks. Pool w newer lanai,
granite and stone counter tops, tile floors.
call 732-778-8367 for info.
☼NS 9/26 CCTFN
472-6747
Gulf Beach Properties, Inc.
OFFICE/WAREHOUSE
/FLEX SPACE
Pine Ridge and Kelly.
Closest to Islands and Beaches
2,000 sq. ft. to 8,000 sq. 4 units available.
14 ft clear all air. 12 and 14 ft overhead
doors. 3 phase power. Broadband access.
Can be rented partially furnished.
$1,250 to $ 2,500 modified gross.
239-822-8915
Paul H. Zimmerman, Broker
Serving The Islands Rental Needs Since 1975
☼RS 1/23 BM TFN
Putting owners and
tenants together
Call Ryan Block
www.remax-oftheislands.com
239-472-2311
☼RS 1/23 BM TFN
VACATION RENTAL
Looking for
a Home in
McGregor
Woods ?
RICHARD J. GARCIA, GRI, BROKER
239-472-5147
garciaonsanibel.com
Offering Personal, Private, and
Professional Real Estate Services on
Sanibel and Captiva Islands.
30 Year Resident of Sanibel.
Licensed in Florida, New York,
Pennsylvania and New Jersey.
FREE REAL ESTATE TOURS
ISABELLA RASI
(239) 246-4716
Email
[email protected]
Newly remodeled vacation cottage.
2 bedrm 1 bath
Walk to beach, East End
Bright, Clean, Adorable
non-smoking/ no pets
Call Bob 410-913-2234 or
[email protected]
☼RS 1/16 CC TFN
OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE
2 units available for rent in the popular
Sanibel Square property. 1 unit will have
998sq. inside – the other unit will have
840sq. (Formally Molnar Electric). Great
place for your private office or business.
Please call Judy @ 239-851-4073
Island Vacations
ANNUAL/SEASONAL RENTAL
Of Sanibel & Captiva
Million $ Views Await You!
• Cottages • Condos • Homes •
Miles of Beaches & Bike Paths
239-472-7277
☼NS 11/21 CC 3/6
☼RS 3/21 NC TFN
SCARNATO LAWN SERVICE
Lawn Service, Shrubs and Tree Trimming
Weeding, Installation of Plants, Trees and
Mulch (one month free service available)
Joe Scarnato (239) 849-6163
[email protected]
☼RS 1/25 BM TFN
SANIBEL COTTAGE
FOR RENT
Annual or Seasonal 3BR/2B Island cottage
for rent. Private mid-island location,dead
end street. Walk to all conveniences &
easy bike ride to bay/gulf beaches. Fully
furnished incl w/d. Annual $1,800 mo.+ util.
Seasonal $1,300 per wk/$4,000 mo.
Best deal on Sanibel! 773-507-8095.
☼NS 1/9 CC TFN
FREE VACATION
RENTAL ADVERTISING!
Over 300 rentals
to choose from!
☼NS 9/5 CC TFN
HOME/CONDO WATCH
CONCIERGE SERVICES
Dorado Property Management
❋ Island Resident ❋ Licensed & Insured
❋ 24/7 ❋ www.doradoproperty.com
ANNUAL RENTAL WANTED
Call Lisa or Bruce at 239-472-8875
☼RS 3/21 CC TFN
TURN YOUR PHONE
INTO GOLD
PHONEWORKS.ORG
24 K GOLD
24 K ROSE GOLD
PLATINUM
DIAMONDS
PHONEWORKS.ORG
☼NS 1/23 NC 1/23
ANNUAL RENTAL WANTED
Annual Sanibel/Captiva Rental by
Single, Mature, Honest, Clean and
very handy Gentleman... house/condo/
apartment or caretaker situation.
Excellent References! Call 239-233-1388
LIGHTHOUSE REALTY
1101 Periwinkle Way #105
Sanibel, FL 33957
Retired Police Captain
Lives on Sanibel
Will Check Your Home Weekly
Very Reasonable Rates
(239) 728-1971
☼NS 1/23 CC 1/23
☼NS 1/23 CC 1/23
Every Wednesday 10AM
Departs from 2300 McGregor Blvd. one
block north of the Edison Ford Winter
Estates. FREE Subway lunch included.
Call to register (239) 939-1145.
SANIBEL HOME WATCH
COMMERCIAL RENTAL
☼RS 1/4 BM TFN
C M
F Y
P
T
CAREGIVER
Experienced and compassionate Caregiver
that fits your needs. Background check and
references available. Ph: 239-994-4975 or
email: [email protected]
☼RS 1/4 BM TFN
AVAILABLE APRIL 2015
1-888-451-7277
☼RS 9/26 CC TFN
☼NS 1/23 CC TFN
RE/MAX OF THE ISLANDS
239-691-4915
GARCIA REAL ESTATE
AND CONSULTING
UPHOLSTERY
On Island Free Estimates.
Over 15 Years Experience.
Offering Professional Upholstery Services,
Custom Art and Hand Painted Furniture.
[email protected] or 918-740-4972.
☼NS 1/23 CC 1/23
☼NS 1/16 CC 1/23
☼RS 12/26 CC 2/27
SERVICES OFFERED
Paul J. Morris, Broker
VACATION RENTALS
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT & SALES
359 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel Island
239-579-0511
TURN YOUR SMARTPHONE
INTO GOLD
GOLDBRAINS.ORG
24 K
24 K ROSE GOLD
PLATINUM
DIAMONDS
GOLDBRAINS.ORG.
☼NS 1/23 NC 1/23
☼RS 1/4 CC TFN
★ ★ ★ C L A S S I F I E D D E A D L I N E F R I DAY
AT
NOON ★ ★ ★
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
25B
★ ★ ★ CLASSIFIEDS ★ CLASSIFIEDS ★ ★ ★
SERVICES OFFERED
HELP WANTED
MOBILE DOG GROOMING
CASHIERS/BAGGERS
Self-Contained Trailer
Up to 40 Lbs.,
Total Grooming, Package,
Please call.
239-313-7140.
Jerry’s Foods is looking for
Cashiers/Baggers night time hours
3 to 10 Sunday through Saturday
29 hrs a week.
We are also looking for Servers
in the Restaurant various hours
7 days a week.
If interested contact
Tami or Mark (239) 472-9300.
☼RS 1/16 CC 2/6
AFFORDABLE HOME CARE
Private Duty & Personal Assistant
Flexible shifts from 4hrs, Live Ins & 24hrs
Bath Visits,Alzheimer’s Care,Bedridden
Stroke, Parkinson’s, Traveling Companion
Licensed and Insured. 239-444-6914
☼NS 11/28 CC TFN
SIMPLY ELEGANT CLEANING
“Voted Best Of Islands”
Specializing in home - offices - condo’s commercial. Call for Free Estimates.
395-1122, Owned & Operated by
20 year Island Residents.
☼NS 1/2 CC 2/6
ROGER NODRUFF ELECTRIC
Lic# EC12002788.
Call Roger 239-707-7203.
Aqualink - Motor Controls.
Office & Store Maint.
☼RS 6/7 CC TFN
HELLE’S CLEANING SERVICES
Residential Cleaning to Satisfaction
Sanibel & Captiva • 239-565-0471
Sanibel Lic. #11412 Lee Co. Lic. #051047
☼NS 1/4 PC TFN
☼NS 1/23 CC 1/23
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
VEHICLE FOR SALE
PART-TIME FULL-CHARGE
BOOKKEEPER/ACCOUNTANT
GREETER/
FEE COLLECTOR
POLARIS GEM
ELECTRIC CAR
Sanibel CPA firm seeks a full-charge
bookkeeper/accountant. Prior CPA firm
experience and Associates/ Bachelors
Degree preferred. Expert in QuickBooks.
Responsibilities include Payroll, General
Ledger, Accounts Payable, Receivables,
Financial Statements, MS Word, Excel,
and Prior Experience Mandatory.
Resumes can be emailed to Linda at
[email protected]
☼NS 1/23 BM 1/30
Tarpon Bay Explorers has an opening
for part-time associates to work in the
Ding Darling National Wildlife Refuge
greeting and collecting entrance fees
for Wildlife Drive. Must enjoy customer
service and helping visitors. Must also
be able to operate a basic cash register.
Please email resume to
[email protected]
or stop in at 900 Tarpon Bay Rd
to fill out an application.
☼NS 1/23 CC 2/6
BILLY’S EMPIRE
Looking for happy, competent folks
to add to our excellent staff.
Fort Myers & Sanibel - Bike Shop,
Bike Rentals,& Warehouse positions.
FT/PT, benefits and rideshare.
*Rental/Sales Staff
*Cashiers
*Mechanics Scooter & Bicycle
*Delivery Drivers
*Segway Tour Guide
info 239-472-4919
[email protected]
☼NS 1/16 CC 1/23
GIFT SHOP MGR. /
ADMINISTRATIVE ASST.
The Clinic for the Rehabilitation of Wildlife
(CROW) on Sanibel is seeking a full-time
experienced retail manager to run our
gift shop, and also provide administrative
support to our Development Director.
Excellent organizational and people skills,
office and computer experience required.
Competitive pay and benefits offered.
Email resume to Linda Estep, Executive
Director at [email protected] or mail to
PO Box 150, Sanibel FL 33957.
No phone calls.
KAYAK LAUNCH ATTENDANT
Tarpon Bay Explorers has an opening for
a kayak/canoe launch and maintenance
associate to work at the Tarpon Bay
Recreation Center in The Ding Darling
National Wildlife Refuge. Must enjoy
customer service and working in a team.
Shift hours are 7:30am-6pm and open
7 days a week so at least one weekend
day will be required for full time. Part time
also available. Please email resume to
[email protected] or visit 900 Tarpon Bay
Rd to fill out application.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
☼NS 11/1 NC TFN
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
The Bailey-Matthews National Shell
Museum needs Education and Great Hall
volunteers. No experience necessary, will
train. Please contact Melanie at
(239) 395-2233 ext 11.
FUNDRAISERS NEEDED
FOR CHARITY THAT
HELPS VETERANS
BOATS - CANOES - KAYAKS
Reps greet patrons OUTSIDE of Grocery/
Department Stores and Special Events.
Travel involved. Car and license required!
Comp/mileage... Part-time, Seniors
Welcomed! 866.212.5592 Email resume’
to: [email protected]
BOAT FOR SALE!
14’ SYLVAN SEA SNAPPER
☼NS 1/23 CC 2/13
☼NS 7/11 NC TFN
15HP, 4-Stroke with less than 25 hours.
Excellent for back bay fishing, island
hopping. 5’ beam. Sturdy, light hull (230
lbs.) Electric Motor included. New Bimini
top, newly refurbished trailer.
$3,500.
Call 239-691-7660.
☼NS 11/21 CC TFN
HELP WANTED
VOLUNTEER/
JOB OPPORTUNITIES
PAID volunteer opportunities to seniors,
age 55 and over, to tutor/mentor children
in elementary schools & after-school
programs. Offering a stipend, mileage
reimbursement, annual physical, holiday,
vacation, and sick pay – all tax exempt.
Providing struggling school children a
chance to succeed in school, and offering
opportunities that will last a lifetime.
Call Joan at The Dr. Piper Center at
239-332-5346.
☼NS 1/17 NC TFN
VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY
The Sunshine Ambassador Program
is a new and exciting volunteer opportunity
offered at the Golisano Children’s Hospital
of Southwest Florida located within
HealthPark Medical Center. The Sunshine
Ambassadors will greet, assist and be a
positive first point of contact for patients,
families and visitors entering the hospital.
The Ambassadors also make a difference
to families by providing educational
and healthful resources to assist in
GRANDparenting for GRANDchildren.
We are currently seeking
year-round volunteers to work
one 4-hour shift Monday through Friday
from 8:00 am to 12:00 pm
or 12:00pm to 4:00 pm.
If you would be interested in learning more
about this wonderful new opportunity,
please contact Lisa Ellinwood, Volunteer
Resources Coordinator at 239-343-5062
at the Golisano Children’s Hospital.
SEASONAL
TRANSPORTATION
VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED
DR. PIPER’S
FAITH IN ACTION PROGRAM
Senior Volunteers needed to transport
the elderly who need a ride to the Doctor,
Dentist, pharmacy, dialysis or grocery
shopping. Volunteers drive clients only
when it fits in with their schedules,
and are located in same ZIP code.
The reward is in knowing you helped
someone remain independent.
Make a difference in your community and
put your time and talents to use.
Call Leslie Jander at
239-332-5346
at The Dr. Piper Center
for Social Services, Inc.
☼NS 11/21 NC TFN
☼NS 1/16 CC 1/23
WANTED TO BUY
CASH PAID FOR
MILITARY ITEMS
Cash Paid For Old Military Items.
Medals, Swords, Uniforms,
helmets, old guns, awards & more.
Local Toll Free 1-866-440-3280
☼RS 12/5 CC 2/27
CAUTION
☼NS 1/23 CC 2/6
☼NS 1/2 CC 1/23
Volunteers needed for light general
maintenance. Call (CHR) Community
Housing & Resources, Inc. 472-1189.
6 SEATER
GREAT FOR GETTING AROUND,
RUNS GREAT $8,000.
239-472-1234
GARAGE •
MOVING • YARD
SALES
ANNUAL ALBATROSS ROAD
MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE
Fri. Jan. 23 – 8am to 1pm
Sat. Jan. 24 – 8am to 3pm
Sun. Jan. 25 – 8am to 3pm
Repeat Performance
Fri. Jan. 30 – 8am to 1pm
Sat. Jan. 31 – 8am to 3pm
Sun. Feb. 1 – 8am to 3pm
1399 Albatross Road, Sanibel
☼NS 1/23 CC 1/23
DOCKAGE
Hourly, Daily, Weekly
and Monthly.
Captiva Island 472-5800
☼RS 1/4 NC TFN
TO PLACE A
CLASSIFIED
LOG ONTO:
LARGE DUAL FAMILY
DESIGNER MOVING SALE
Help clean out our attics!
Interior Designer and mother need to rid
themselves of extra items for a move to a
new beach house. Come get unique items
for your home. Child items, decorative
items, lighting, furniture, wicker,
china, vintage jewelry, etc...
429 Lake Murex Circle, Sanibel
Saturday January 31st from 8-12.
First come first serve! No early birds
please for our neighbors peace.
☼NS 1/23 CC 1/30
IslandSunNews.com
☼NS 2/8 NC TFN
★ ★ ★ C L A S S I F I E D D E A D L I N E F R I DAY
CLICK ON
PLACE CLASSIFIED
AT
NOON ★ ★ ★
26B
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Pets Of The Week
M
y name is Sophie and I am a sixyear-old spayed female Lab mix,
brown brindle in color. I’m not
sure why I ended up in an animal shelter.
My history will always be a mystery. I’m
a sweet, playful girl and love any activities
that involve a ball. I’m a dog that loves
people so if you don’t already have a dog,
I’d love to be your one and only. Adoption
fee: $45 (regularly $75) during Paw Stars
Adoption Promotion
My name is Montana and I am a sixmonth-old neutered male, black domestic
short hair cat.I have a beautiful sleek black
coat and I’m perky, playful and entertaining. I get along great with my fellow
felines here at the shelter and would make
an addition to your family. Adoption fee:
$10 (regularly $50) during Paw Stars
Adoption Promotion
For information about this week’s
Sophie ID# 600680
pets, call 533-7387 (LEE-PETS) or log
on to Animal Services’ website at www.
LeeLostPets.com. When calling, refer
to the animal’s ID number. The website
updates every hour so you will be able
to see if these or any other pets are still
available.
The shelter is open for adoptions
from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday
through Saturday. The shelter is located
at 5600 Banner Drive, Fort Myers, next
to the Lee County Sheriff’s Office, off
Six Mile Cypress Parkway.
All adoptions include spay/neuter
surgery, age-appropriate vaccinations,
rabies vaccination and county license if
three months or older, flea treatment,
worming, heartworm test for dogs six
months and over, feline AIDS and
leukemia test for cats, training DVD,
10-day health guarantee, and a bag of
Science Diet pet food.
Montana ID# 604947
PAWS
T
his is Jack. He is an exceptionally sweet
boy. Unfortunately, his family has not been
located and, in addition, he tested positive
for Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV). This
disease is found in about four percent of cats. It
is contagious to other cats, but not easily passed
along. It is not contagious to humans or other
animals. PAWS has adopted out two FIV positive
cats in the past year to households with other
cats. Otherwise, Jack appears to be in very good
health and hopefully will live a long and happy
life. He has his shots and a microchip. It is
important to let Jack’s veterinarian know that he
is an FIV positive cat. If he needs to be seen for
any ailments or conditions, this information may
be helpful in determining medications to be used
in treatment. While all PAWS cats are adopted
as indoor cats only, it’s especially important that
Jack remain inside.
Please give Jack a forever home... he is truly
a fabulous kitty! Call PAM at PAWS of Sanibel at
472-4823 to adopt Jack.
Read us online at
IslandSunNews.com
Jack
NEWSPAPER
Sanibel & Captiva Islands
CALLING CARD 239-395-1213
Emergency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 911
Sanibel Police . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-3111
Lee County Sheriff’s Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 477-1200
On Call Captiva Deputy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 477-1000
Fire Department - Sanibel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-5525
Fire Department - Captiva . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-9494
Florida Marine Patrol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332-6966
Florida Highway Patrol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278-7100
Poison Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-800-282-3171
Chamber of Commerce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-1080
City of Sanibel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-4135
Administrative Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-3700
Building Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-4555
Community Housing and Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-1189
Planning Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-4136
Library - Sanibel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-2483
Library - Captiva . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239-533-4890
Post Office - Sanibel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-1573
Post Office - Sanibel (toll free) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-275-8777
Post Office - Captiva . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-1674
Sanibel Community Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-2155
Center 4 Life - Senior Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-5743
ARTS
Arcade Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 332-4488
Art League Of Fort Myers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275-3970
BIG ARTS - Barrier Island Group for the Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 395-0900
Broadway Palm Dinner Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278-4422
Fort Myers Symphonic Mastersingers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288-2535
Gulf Coast Symphony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-6197
Lee County Alliance for the Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 939-2787
Naples Philharmonic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 597-1111
The Herb Strauss Schoolhouse Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-6862
Sanibel Music Festival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .336-7999
Sanibel-Captiva Art League . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-4258
SW Florida Symphony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 418-0996
CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS
ABWA - American Business Women’s Assoc. . . . . . . 565-7872 or 433-7798
American Legion Post 123 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-9979
Angel Flight SE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-877-4AN-ANGEL
Audubon Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-3744
Sanibel Bike Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .sanibelbicycleclub.org
Community Foundation of Sanibel-Captiva . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274-5900
CROW - Clinic For The Rehabilitation of Wildlife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-3644
FISH of Sanibel - Friends in Service Here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-0404
Sanibel Island Fishing Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-8994
Horticultural Society of the Islands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-6940
Horticulture and Tea Society of Sanibel and Captiva . . . . . . . . . . 472-8334
Kiwanis Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 677-7299
League of Women Voters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [email protected]
Lions Club, Tom Rothman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 395-3248
Master Gardeners of the Islands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-6940
Newcomers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-9332
Notre Dame Club of Southwest Florida . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 768-0417
Optimist Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-0836
PAWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-4823
Rotary Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-7257 or 472-0141
Sanibel Beautification Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 470-2866
Sanibel-Captiva Orchid Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-6940
Sanibel-Captiva Power Squadron . . . . . . www.usps.org/localusps/sancap
Sanibel-Captiva Republican Caucus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 395-1202
Sanibel-Captiva Shell Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 395-1770
Sanibel Youth Soccer. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . www.sanibelsoccer.org . . 395-2040
MOAA - Military Officers Assc. of America, Alex MacKenzie . . . . 395-9232
United Way of Lee County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 433-2000
United Way 211 Helpline 24 hour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 or 433-3900
Zonta Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 728-1971
ISLAND ATTRACTIONS
Bailey-Matthews Shell Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 395-2233
JN “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-1100
Sanibel Historical Museum & Village . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 472-4648
SCCF Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .472-2329
To be listed in calling card email your information to:
[email protected]
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
27B
BEACH CHAIR PASTIME
answers on page 23B
28B
ISLAND SUN - JANUARY 23, 2015
Beach-Front at Sanibel Surfside #123
Remodeled 2 bedrm with white kitchen, cottage-style
décor, & weekly rental income. $874,000
Sandalfoot #5C1 Gulf-Front Walkout
Income-producing 2 bedroom earning more than
$60K/year in on-site rental program. $699,000
Top Floor Sundial Beach Resort #R401
Updated 2 bedroom with den, stack washer/dryer,
covered parking, storeroom & more. $849,000
Gulf-View at Sand Pointe #122
2nd floor 2 bedroom with new open kitchen, updated
baths, plus views of beach & sunsets. $749,000
3rd Floor at Loggerhead Cay #353
Spanish Cay #A7 Across Street to Beach
East-end convenient 2 bedroom grossing ~$40K/year Fully equipped 2nd floor ~950-sq. ft. condo in rental
with view down courtyard to gulf. $499,000
program; community pool & riverside docks. $249,900
Somerset at The Reef #B101 on the Gulf
Nearly 2,400 sq. ft. of beachside living with exquisite
yet comfortable furnishings. $2,200,000
5743 Baltusrol Court in The Sanctuary
Easy 1-level living Augusta Greens 3- or 4-bedroom
pool home. Lot next door available too. $1,450,000
Canal-Front Lot at 837 Limpet Drive
Overlooking intersecting canals in Shell Harbor, this
half+ acre parcel will hold a large pool home. $749,000
Boaters’ Delights Mariner Pointe #332 & #811
Both expanded 2 bedrooms at Sanibel’s peninsula
condo with boat docks. $499,900 & $499,000
9477 Peaceful Drive in Gumbo Limbo
3 bedroom plus den on wide lot, backs to
conservation land, updated kitchen/bath. $499,000
744 Martha’s Lane in Sanibel Place aka Foley
Elevated 2 bedroom plus den on large cul-de-sac lot in
small community with shared pool & tennis. $479,000
2242 Periwinkle Way, #3
472-HOME (4663)
888-603-0603
5307 Umbrella Pool Road in Sanibel Bayous
Near-beach cul-de-sac lot ~1/2-acre, short walk to
Clam Bayou & Bowman’s Beach. $379,000
Susan Andrews
Realtor®
Broker/Owner
David Anderson
Realtor®
Closing Coordinator
Elise Carnes
Notary & Listing
Coordinator
Call now for FREE Sanibel & Captiva inventory lists with sales history: condos, homes & lots
Lisa Murty
Realtor®
Sales Associate