TAKE IT TO NEW HEIGHTS

Townsend escapees recaptured in Sevier. 5A
LADY VOLS MAKE
CHARITY CASE
Free-throw line costly
for Landers’ Georgia. 1B
MC grad takes study
of Chile into class. 10A
YOUR LIFE. YOUR TIMES. SINCE 1883
January 26, 2015
MONDAY
Maryville, TN
thedailytimes.com
Farmers’ Market still growing
$1.00
Storm has
‘historic’
potential
BY VERENA DOBNIK
The Associated Press
JOY KIMBROUGH | THE DAILY TIMES
IN THIS FILE PHOTO, Michelle Greenway weeds her garden as she prepares for another year at Maryville Farmers’ Market.
Ten original vendors still with Maryville market
BY MIKE GIBSON
[email protected]
Maryville Farmers’ Market marked its 10-yearanniversary Sunday with
an afternoon of education, celebration, and — of
course — a buffet spread
of tasty treats, many of
which came courtesy of
local farmers.
The market’s annual
meeting was held at the
city’s municipal center and
Maryville Farmers’ Market Board President Jamie
Reed played hostess, calling 2014 “one of the biggest
years ever” for the market,
and setting expectations
higher for 2015.
Reed said the local farmers’ market organization
came together a decade
ago through the efforts
of Blackberry Farm’s
Sam Beall and a handful
of other local producers.
The first Farmers’ Market
event hosted about 15 vendors, give or take.
That number has grown
to a high of 44 vendors in
2014, with that number
running the gamut of farms
and farm products — beef
growers and poultry farmers and herb gardeners,
tree and flower growers
and vendors of vegetables
of every sort.
Reed said there are 10
original vendors who are
still with the market, having persevered since its
inaugural season, and all
10 of those vendors were
represented Sunday afternoon.
The Farmers’ Market
holds court between April
and November: 9 a.m. to
noon on Saturdays, at
Founders’ Square in downtown Maryville; and 3:30
p.m to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, at New Providence
Presbyterian Church on
West Broadway.
But that only tells part of
the story.
“We’ve been growing,”
Reed said. “We’re really
trying to promote outside
of that Saturday morning
‘box.’”
More recently, the Farmers’ Market has added
events on the second
and fourth Tuesdays of
the month, July through
September, at Vanderbilt
Mortgage and Finance
Inc. Market organizers
have also added a host
of new promotions and
special events, such as a
SEE MARKET, 5A
NEW YORK — A “potentially historic” storm
could dump 2 to 3 feet
of snow from northern
New Jersey to southern
Maine starting Monday,
crippling a region that has
largely been spared so far
this winter, the National
Weather Service said.
A blizzard warning was
issued for a 250-mile
stretch of the Northeast,
including New York and
Boston, and the National Weather Service said
the massive storm would
bring heavy snow, powerful winds and widespread
coastal flooding starting
today and through Tuesday.
“This could be a storm
the likes of which we have
never seen before,” New
York City Mayor Bill de
Blasio said at a news conference Sunday.
De Blasio held up a
piece of paper showing
the city’s top 10 snowstorms and said this one
could land at the top of a
list that goes back to 1872,
including the 26.9 inches
that fell in 2006. “Don’t
underestimate this storm.
Prepare for the worst,” he
said as he urged residents
to plan to leave work early
today.
Boston is expected to get
18 to 24 inches of snow,
with up to 3 feet west of
the city, and Philadelphia
could see 14 to 18 inches, the weather service
said.
“We do anticipate very
heavy snowfall totals,”
said Bob Oravec, lead
forecaster with the weather service in College Park,
Md. “In addition to heavy
snow, with blizzard warnings, there’s a big threat
of high, damaging winds,
and that will be increasing Monday into Tuesday.
A lot of blowing, drifting
and such.”
Wind gusts of 75 mph
or more are possible for
coastal areas of Massachusetts, and up to 50 mph
further inland, Oravec
said.
Airlines prepared to
shut down operations
along the East Coast,
leading to the expected cancellation of more
than 1,400 flights scheduled for today, according
to the flight tracking site
FlightAware.
A weekend storm that
had brought snow and
slush to the Northeast —
the first real snow of the
season for many areas —
was just a warm-up.
“Looks like our luck is
SEE STORM, 5A
‘Death-qualified’ juror search slows marathon, theater cases
BY DENISE LAVOIE
AP Legal Affairs Writer
BOSTON — One prospective
juror was brutally frank when
asked whether he could consider
a sentence of life in prison for
the man accused of bombing the
Boston Marathon.
“I would sentence him to death,”
he said, then added: “I can’t imagine any evidence that would
change how I feel about what
happened.”
Another prospective juror said
James
Holmes
Dzhokhar
Tsarnaev
Accused of killing 12 people and
injuring 70 others in a suburban
Denver movie theater in 2012.
Charged with setting off
two bombs that killed three
people and injured more
than 260 in 2013.
he couldn’t even consider the
death penalty, telling the court,
“I just can’t kill another person.”
The two men are on opposite
sides of the capital punishment
debate, but both are unlikely to
make it on the jury for the trial of
Blount Records . . . . 4A
Bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7B
Classified . . . . . . . . . 6B
Comics . . . . . . . . . . . . 8B
Crossword . . . . . . . . . 9B
Daily Calendar. . . . .11A
Dear Abby . . . . . . . . 12A
Deaths . . . . . . . . . . . . 4A
Dzhokhar Tsarnaev: to be seated
for a death penalty case a juror
must be willing — but not eager
— to hand down a sentence of
either life or death.
The process of finding “death
qualified” jurors has slowed down
Horoscope . . . . . . . . 9B
Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10A
Lottery . . . . . . . . . . . . 2A
Money & Markets . 7A
Nation & World. . . . 8A
Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . 6A
Sports. . . . . . . . . . . . . .1B
Sudoku . . . . . . . . . . . . 9B
jury selection in federal case
against Tsarnaev, who is charged
with setting off two bombs that
killed three people and injured
more than 260 during the 2013
marathon.
It is expected to do the same
in the state trial of James Holmes, the man accused of killing
12 people and injuring 70 others
in a suburban Denver movie theater in 2012.
The process is designed to weed
out jurors who have strong feelings for or against the death pen-
Slight chance
of rain
High 41 | Low 25
9B
alty. A 1985 ruling from the U.S.
Supreme Court said a juror can
lawfully be excused if his views
on the death penalty are so strong
that they would prevent or substantially impair his ability to
follow the law.
But death penalty opponents
have long said the process is fundamentally unfair. They argue
that death-qualified juries do
not represent a true cross-section of the community and are
SEE DEATH, 5A
Get The Daily Times sent to your
email box every day with a digital
subscription at TheDailyTimes.com.
SUPER BOWL PARTY SPECIAL
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Alcoa, TN 37701 Next To Lenny’s
ALL DOMESTIC
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10.99
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Offer good through 1/30/2015
2A | BLOUNT COUNTY
THE DAILY TIMES
www.thedailytimes.com
Taking precautions
can help keep pets
safe from house fires
[email protected]
On a dark December
evening, a fire in Fairview
Heights Subdivision drove
a local woman out of her
home and claimed the
lives of her five beloved
dogs.
That same weekend,
a fire in a Jeania Lane
mobile home killed
another pet — though
Blount County firefighters were able to save two
other dogs trapped in the
home. And on Jan. 9, a
blaze in an outbuilding
on Mentor Road killed a
horse that had been stabled there.
It happens all too often
— an accidental f ire
ignites in a home, and
furry family members are
caught up in the wake of
destruction. It’s not an
easy problem to solve,
since animals are often
alone and unattended
when fires begin. And
sometimes, even when
owners are present, an
animal’s instincts may run
counter to the best practices of fire safety.
“There’s usually two
things (pets) will do in a
fire,” says Blount County
Fire Captain Jerry Phillips. “They’ll run and hide,
or they’ll try to get out.
We’ve been inside homes
where we opened doors,
and the animals about ran
over us, trying to get out
of the home. And then
sometimes we find them
hidden behind beds or
couches. A lot of times,
that’s when the smoke
gets them.”
Statistics show that pets
sometimes cause fires
themselves — to the tune
of 1,000 fires a year that
are allegedly pet-related.
But according to Blount
County Fire Chief Doug
McClanahan, the best
way to protect your pets
in the event of a fire is to
make sure your home is
adequately fire-safe in the
first place.
PUBLIC MEETING
Blount County
BLOUNT MEMORIAL
HOSPITAL BOARD OF
DIRECTORS will meet
in the hospital board
room at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. Committees of the
board of directors will
also meet in the board
room Tuesday as follows: Finance and Audit
Committee at noon,
and a combined meet-
PET SAFETY TIPS
™;dgbjaViZa household
fire/disaster plan, and
make your pets a part
of it.
™9ZiZgb^cZa family
member who will be
responsible for each
pet, in the event of
crisis.
™@cdlwhere your pets
like to hide, as this may
be the first place they
seek out.
™<Zia “Pet Alert” sticker
at a pet store or shelter
and post it on a front
door or window to let
emergency workers
know how many pets
are in the home.
™DcXZyou have your fire
plan in place, take a few
run-throughs. Practice
makes perfect.
™@ZZeyoung pets, such
as puppies, away from
fire hazards when you
are away from home.
™@ZZecollars on, keep
leashes at the ready,
in case you or rescue
workers have to get the
animals out in a hurry.
Keep pets in rooms near
entrances while you are
away, whenever possible.
™9dcÈiallow pets
around open flames or
heated cooking appliances. Consider removing stove knobs, or protecting them with covers, before leaving the
house.
™>ckZhiin flameless
candles.
SOURCES: American Red
Cross, pet product manufacturer Bil-Jac, American
Kennel Club
“Make sure you have
working smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms,” he said. “Keep
your fireplaces clean.
Keep heaters away from
combustible materials.
And don’t leave candles
or stoves on when you
leave home.”
ing of the Institutional
Planning and Human
Resources Committees
at 1:30 p.m.
THIS WEEK IN HISTORY
From The Daily Times
on Jan. 23, 1990: Dr.
James B. McLaren of
Louisville, professor of
animal science at the
University of Tennessee,
retired after a 40-year
career with the university.
Blount psychic ‘reads’ on cable show
BY KELVIN RAY BOYD
Daily Times Correspondent
For centuries people have gone to
seers to seek out answers regarding the past, present and future.
In modern society, the seers are
referred to as psychics, and people
still go to them to find answers.
However, some individuals want
psychics to have all the answers.
The TLC show “My Strange
Addiction” has returned for a sixth
season with an episode entitled,
“Addicted to Psychics/Addicted
to Body Casting.” Michelle Leigh,
a Blount County psychic, appears
in the show, performing a psychic
reading for a woman who cannot
make a decision without psychic
advice.
“A person should not go to a psychic for answers to everything,”
Leigh said. “You should go to a psychic to get information in order
to make a certain decision or for
a second opinion on something.
Going to a psychic should not be
done frequently. I would suggest
three times a year at the most,
unless there is a new situation that
arises which needs clarity.”
Leigh, 63, was born in Maryville.
She moved to California when she
was 5, and returned to Tennessee
to live in Knoxville 12 years ago.
She runs a business called Mystical
Entertainment at Green Acres Flea
Market in Louisville.
“At my business I offer Tarot
card/palm/aura/psychic readings,”
she said. “I have been there for
over three years and I really enjoy
it.”
Leigh said some people will not
accept the answer given to a question. “Some people ask the same
question they asked two weeks
ago, and there has not been enough
time for anything to change,” she
said. “The answer is usually the
same — most things do not change
overnight.”
Valentine’s Day, which is less
than a month away, is one of the
busier days of the year for Leigh.
“I get a lot of couples for Valentine’s Day,” Leigh said. “With the
psychic reading we examine what
works for the couple, and look at
areas that need improving. After
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
MICHELLE LEIGH, A PSYCHIC at Green Acres Flea Market in Louisville, performs a psychic
reading on the TLC cable TV show, “My Strange Addiction.”
THE DETAILS
“My Strange Addiction —
Addicted to Psychics/Addicted
to Body Casting” can be seen
7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 28, on
TLC.
that we try to see if anything can
be improved.”
Leigh said that with couples it is
usually the woman’s idea to see a
psychic. In fact, most of her customers are women.
“I think women are more willing
to ask for help,” Leigh said. “Men
seem to be reluctant to ask for
help. It appears to be attached with
a (social stereotype) of how men
and women should behave. That is
slowly changing; I have given readings to more men as the years have
gone by.”
Lobbyists spend record $725,000 on lawmakers
The Associated Press
KNOXVILLE — Records
from the Tennessee Ethics
Commission show organizations lobbying the state
Legislature spent a record
$725,000 on 96 “wining and
dining” events for lawmakers last year.
A Knoxville newspaper
reports that the 2014 spending — precisely $724,982
— compares to $650,873 in
spending a year earlier and
$565,318 in 2012.
Under a law enacted in
2006 during a special legislative session on governmental ethics, lobbyists and
their employers are generally prohibited from making
gifts to legislators.
But there are exceptions,
including events to which
all members of the Legislature are invited.
In those cases, the amount
spent could not exceed $50
per person in 2006, although
there is a cost-of-living
adjustment for each legislative session. For the 109th
General Assembly, which
begins this year, the limit is
$59 per person, up about $1
from the previous session.
The law also requires lobbyist employers to notify
the Ethics Commission of
a planned event in advance
and to provide a copy of
the invitation sent, then to
report afterward the amount
spent on the event.
In 2006, when the law
took effect on July 1, only
six events were reported to
the commission, and total
spending listed on the commission website was just
$5,774. Most events come
while the legislators are in
session.
Last year, the most expensive event in total cost listed
on reports was a Christmas
party held by the Ingram
Group, a Nashville public relations and lobbying
firm founded by political operative and lobbyist Tom Ingram. The party cost $40,627, or $43.41
per person, according to
the group’s report. Most of
the guests were not legislators, although all lawmakers were invited.
Maryville, Madisonville and Knoxville Chiropractic Clinics
XXXESCBDLDPN
Cash 3 Evening
2-7-1, Lucky Sum: 10
(two, seven, one; Lucky Sum:
ten)
Mega Millions
Estimated jackpot:
$25 million
High$ Octane Tattoo
$
50 value for 25
THE DAILY TIMES
Blount County’s only daily newspaper,
serving our readers
since 1883.
Your Life. Your Times.
Vol. 71 No. 301
On a per-capita basis, the
costliest event was hosted
by Insurors of Tennessee
and member insurance companies. The $19,918 total cost
was reported as amounting
to $50 per person.
The least expensive 2014
event listed was $77.50 spent
by the Tennessee Apartment
Association, or 57 cents per
person, while holding a “day
on the hill” event.
Dick Williams, a veteran lobbyist for Common
Cause in Tennessee who
was involved in drafting the
2006 law, said it’s not surprising that the spending
on such events is increasing
because they’re beneficial
to lobbyists and the hosting
organizations.
Need a Back Doctor?
TENNESSEE
LOTTERY
NUMBERS
Cash 4 Evening
5-4-5-5, Lucky Sum: 19
(five, four, five, five; Lucky
Sum: nineteen)
Grieving individuals sometimes
go to a psychic to communicate
with departed loved ones. “My
favorite thing about being a psychic is bringing peace to people
that are hurting because they lost
someone,” Leigh said. “Communicating (with the other side) is a
great gift because people walk out
feeling better — they were able to
talk to someone they loved. They
leave with a sense of closure.”
Leigh feels good about her appearance on “My Secret Addiction.”
“I am excited about it,” she said.
“The show will help me reach out
to a broader audience.”
Does the psychic have a secret
addiction?
“I really don’t drink or do anything like that,” Leigh said. “The
closest thing to an addiction I have
is probably watching too much
television.”
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t1BJOJO+PJOUTBOE&YUSFNJUJFT
Dr. Woodrow W. Gwinn, Jr.
Owner & Director of Clinics
Doctor of Chiropractic
50029213TDT
BY MIKE GIBSON
Monday, January 26, 2015
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Monday, January 26, 2015
THE DAILY TIMES
www.thedailytimes.com
| 3A
4A | BLOUNT COUNTY
THE DAILY TIMES
www.thedailytimes.com
Schools to compete in April Foolies
BLOUNT RECORDS
COURT RECORDS
Charged with driving under
the influence of an
intoxicant:
Blount County
Donald Murrel Lane, 36,
Honeysuckle, Maryville, also
charged with two counts of
drug possession, Schedule II
and Schedule IV
™
™
violating an order of protection
RECORDS POLICY
Information contained in
Blount Records is compiled from official public
records available for
inspection at city/county
governmental and public
safety offices, as well as
the various judicial offices. Births are provided by
area hospitals.
ARRESTS
™
™
Derek Dale Carpenter,
37, Old Niles Ferry Road,
Greenback, also charged
Maryville
Maria Lidia-Tervel Pinto,
Maryville, reported at 12:51
p.m. Jan. 24 that her husband had an argument with
another man, and that later
after the argument, the couple
discovered that all four tires
had been slashed on their
vehicle. Damage estimated at
$400.
™
with felony evading arrest, a
felony violation of probation,
a misdemeanor violation of
probation, and five charges of
failure to appear in court
Cindy Floydene Cutshaw,
59, Dotson Memorial Road,
Maryville, also charged with
strolling magician, a photo booth, local
comedian Ben Young and a dessert bar
provided by Maryville High School’s Cafe
LaReve.
Sandra Elder, one of the founders of
Cafe LaReve who helps run the establishment, explained that the “student-driven
organization” was
staffed entirely
by Maryville students, some of
whom also attend
The Gate.
Elder looks forwa r d t o C a f e
L a Reve’s f i rs t
involvement with April Foolies, as well
as the first opportunity for the student
employees to leave campus and “experience what it’s like to cater,” away from
their normal setting.
For Nicole Wicker, the prevention and
fundraising coordinator for New Hope,
the talent show represents more than a
collection of skits, but rather a chance
to make lasting impacts on the children
she deals with daily.
“Without the community supporting us
in this way by coming out, we can’t meet
the needs of the child victims that we see
on a yearly basis,” said Wicker.
The April Foolies talent show will take
place 7 p.m. Saturday, March 28, at the
Clayton Center for the Arts. All proceeds
will be divided equally between The
Gate and New Hope Blount County Children’s Advocacy Center to help benefit
individuals with special needs and child
victims of abuse respectively.
BY TANNER HANCOCK
Daily Times Correspondent
VANDALISM
Victoria Lynn Vargo, 47, Kelly
Circle, Louisville
Arrested for contempt of
court:
Monday, January 26, 2015
™
Kyrie Briana Dunn, Maryville,
reported at 12:19 a.m. Jan. 25
that she went to a friend’s
residence, and that upon leaving, she discovered that two of
her tires had been punctured.
Damage estimated at $200.
The April Foolies charity talent show
is set to deliver its annual dose of entertainment on March 28, complete with a
few major changes.
The talent show, which benefits nonprofit organizations New Hope-Blount
County Children’s Advocacy Center and
The Gate, this year consists of local high
schools competing for donations in order
to claim the prize of first place.
Michael Trost, co-chair of April Foolies and an employee at The Gate, views
the new structure of the talent show as
a much-needed change.
“The consensus was that it was getting a little stale,” Trost explained of the
event’s old format, which once included
an array of local comedians and personalities. “(We) wanted to change it up a
little bit, make it a little more family
friendly.”
Maryville High School, Heritage High
School, Alcoa High School, William Blount
High School and the Clayton Bradley
STEM Academy will each have representing students performing for first
place. Trost hopes the school rivalries,
usually manifested on the field, may help
to raise the funds necessary to keep The
Gate open and benefiting special needs
individuals.
Headlining acts include the Backseat
Delilahs and Sarah Pirkle, with special
needs choir The Gatecrashers returning
this year. A reception will be held before
the show at 6 p.m. and will include a
FUNERAL NOTICES
ELIZABETH BOURNE
CHRIS BARSTAD, TULLAHOMA NEWS | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
IN THIS RECENT PHOTO, Tullahoma native Tyronn Hamilton (left) talks with percussionist/producer
Pino Squillace at the Creative Caffeine Music Studio in Nashville.
Tullahoma’s Hamilton
keeps the music real
The Tullahoma News
NASHVILLE — On a
cold and rainy Monday
in Nashville, creativity is
keeping everyone warm
and dry at the Creative
Caffeine Music Studio,
located in the heart of
Music City.
Tullahoma native and
musician Tyronn Hamilton sits across from
Nashville music industry
veteran Pino Squillace
discussing the importance of “keeping the
music real” while supporting local artists in
the area.
Squillace is one of the
original MuzikMafia
members and a wellknown and respected
percussionist/producer who has supported
musical diversity since
his arrival on the Nashville music scene in the
early 1990s. He is also
well known for founding Cafi Milano, a music
venue that attracted wellknown acts such as Chet
Atkins, Johnny Cash,
Branford Marsalis and
more.
“Pino is the real deal
and one of a kind, “said
Hamilton.
After playing a few
tracks from an artist that
Squillace is producing,
Hamilton takes a break
from his studio work to
sit down with The Tullahoma News and discuss
his musical work both in
Nashville and across the
country.
HIS DESTINY
It would seem that
Hamilton was almost
destined to become a
musician — growing up
in Tullahoma in a house
full of musicians that
included his parents Walter and Donna Hamilton
and his 10 siblings.
“What I can remember
of my whole indoctrination, if you will, as a
musician began when I
was 3 or 4 years old,” said
Hamilton.
FAMILY’S ROLE
“All of my older siblings
sang or played something. I can remember
seeing my brothers play
the drums. At some point
I got to sit in their laps
and hold the sticks.”
He explained that he
began to be able to keep
time and would work the
top part of the drum kit
while his brothers helped
him play the bottom,
which he could not yet
reach.
“They would also sit
me in their laps when we
performed at church. By
the time I was five years
old, I was able to reach
the pedals and from
there I knew that playing
drums was what I wanted
to do,” he added.
Hamilton said that his
love of drums continued
through high school, but
also during that time he
was introduced to the
piano during a family jam
session.
“One of my brothers had come in to visit
from California,” he said.
“The great thing about
my brothers coming to
visit was that the house
turned in to one big jam
session that could last all
night with breaks being
taken to show one brother how to play a certain
instrument or chord.”
He explained that dur-
OBITUARY POLICY
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and online editions.
For anyone who does not wish to purchase a funeral notice,
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containing basic information such as survivors and funeral
arrangements.
All information is verified through the funeral home handling
arrangements.
For more information, call 981-1166.
ing that weekend jam
session, he was introduced to the piano.
“One brother was
showing another brother
how to play something
on the piano. I knew the
chord so I went over to
help. They showed me a
few things and I went on
my way and left them to
what they were doing. I
really didn’t think much
of it at the time, but it
was definitely the beginning of something.”
Hamilton then said he
took the chords that his
brothers had taught him
and began to frequently
play more and more.
Fast forward to a year
later and Hamilton was
teaching himself how to
hear music via the piano
while also writing music
that he was then playing
on the piano.
“I began a relationship
with the piano that is
still growing to this day.
My whole perception of
music changed because
of playing the piano,” he
said.
FATHER SAW TALENT
Hamilton credits his
dad, Walter C. Hamilton,
with helping him to recognize the importance of
his musical talents.
“My father was an envisionist and knew there
was always potential in
us that would take us
places and he was instrumental in helping me to
see that for myself,” he
said. “He told each of us
to not take our talent for
granted and make sure to
use our gifts. The biggest
thing I got from my dad
is to not sit on our talent,
but to be progressive and
keep moving forward.”
Quinn, Julie Lemons, Cooper and James Hodges;
great-grandchildren, Dalton and Hannah Iiams, Bailey Quinn, Cooper Hodges,
Jr., Ethan Hodges, Tanner
and Ashton Lands, and
Heidi Hammontree; also
several nieces and nephews. Funeral services
will be held at 6 p.m. on
Monday, Jan. 26, 2015, in
the Smith West Chapel
with Rev. Greg Long officiating. The family will
receive friends starting at
4 p.m. until service time.
Arrangements by Smith
Funeral & Cremation Service, Maryville, 983-1000,
www.SmithFuneraland
Cremation.com.
CHERYL FAYE BURKHART
Cheryl Faye Burkhart of
Townsend, Tenn., departed
this life in the waiting arms
of our Heavenly Father on
Jan. 25, 2015. Cheryl was a
devoted wife and mother who loved the Smoky
Mountains. Cheryl hiked
many miles with her husband Billy, and family and
friends. Preceded in death
by her parents, Virgil and
Helen Ballinger; brother, Rev. Charles Vaughn
Ballinger; and grandson,
Dax Corey Burkhart; also,
Aussie Cat, Max. Survived
by her husband, Billy Burkhart; son, Billy Joe Burkhart; three grandchildren,
Brayden, Nolan and Gracie Lee; special friend and
daughter-inl a w, M a r y
Pat Burkhart; brothers, Wayne,
Johnny and
wife Janie,
Mike and Lee
Ballinger; sisters, Marion
Banks and Rita Ballinger;
special family, Jane Ballinger, Willa Dean Ballinger; several special nieces, nephews and special
friends, Ronnie and Jeanne
Hepperly, Melanie, Pam,
Patsy, and L.J., Della, and
E.T. Stamey. The family
would like to express their
thanks for the care given
by the staff and doctors of
U.T. Hospice. A celebra-
tion of Cheryl’s life will be
held at 7 p.m. on Tuesday,
Jan. 27, 2015, in the Smith
Trinity Chapel with Rev.
Ronnie Hepperly and Rev.
Pacer Hepperly officiating.
In lieu of flowers, please
make contributions to the
R.I.O. Revolution Church
Building Fund. The family will receive friends
from 5 until 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 27, 2015, at Smith
Funeral & Cremation Service, Maryville, 983-1000,
www.SmithFuneraland
Cremation.com.
BETTY LOU DOTSON
Betty Lou Dotson, age 84,
widow of Thomas Dotson,
Jr., of Maryville, passed
away 10:10 p.m. Saturday,
Jan. 24, 2015, at her home.
Member of Church of
God of Union Assembly.
Survivors: daughters &
sons-in-law, Charlotte &
James Henderson, Cathy
& Audie Schrimsher, Violet & Doug Dailey, all of
Maryville, Della & Raymond Miles, Etowah; sons,
Thomas Douglas Dotson,
Maryville, Roger Dotson,
Greenback; grandchildren, Julie, Brian, Justin,
Brent & Brittany; greatgrandchildren, Lauren,
Nathan, Sarah & Rachel;
several other family &
friends. Preceded in death
by mother, Ruby Breeden
Norton, father, Lester Burrell, sister, Margaret Murr.
Funeral: 3 p.m. Tuesday,
Biereley-Hale Chapel,
Rev. David Simmons &
Rev. Jesse Edwards officiating. Interment: Pine
Grove Cemetery, Greenback. Family will receive
friends 12-3 p.m. Tuesday
at Biereley-Hale Funeral
Home, Madisonville.
DONALD K. PRICE
Donald K. Price, age 84,
of Maryville, died Friday,
Jan. 23, 2015, at the family home. Funeral services
will be at 2 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 29, 2015, in Danville, W.Va., handled by
Handley Funeral Home.
MILLER FUNERAL
HOME
“The Business That Service Built”
Friends may call at their
convenience from 9 a.m.
until 7 p.m., and the family
will receive friends from
5 p.m. until 7 p.m. Monday, Jan. 26, 2015, at Smith
Funeral & Cremation Service, Maryville, 983-1000,
www.SmithFuneraland
Cremation.com.
e are proud to be a part
of this community.
W
DISTINCTIVE F U N E R A L S E R V I C E S
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For Dedication and Experience Rely On
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30027217TDT
BY KALI BOLLE
Elizabeth Bourne, age 98,
beloved mother, grandmother and friend, passed
away after an illness on the
night of Jan. 23. She was a
teacher of both elementary and Sunday school, a
dedicated Christian and
member of Pleasant Grove
Baptist Church. She is survived by her sister, Dorothy Bennet; grandchildren Kenneth Iiams, Becky
BLOUNT COUNTY | 5A
THE DAILY TIMES
Monday, January 26, 2015
www.thedailytimes.com
East Tenn. representatives discuss agendas with journalists
BY TANNER HANCOCK
Daily Times Correspondent
KNOXVILLE — Health
care, the economy and
abortion were just a few
of the issues discussed Saturday during the East Tennessee Society of Professional Journalists’ annual
legislative preview luncheon.
Blount County state Reps.
Bob Ramsey and Art Swann
were among the attending
politicians who weighed in
on Gov. Bill Haslam’s controversial Insure Tennessee health care expansion
program.
Swann voiced concerns
about the costs of cover-
ing more than 200,000
currently uninsured Tennesseans, a key aspect of
Haslam’s health care proposal. Swann noted that
the 2005 cuts to TennCare
under then Gov. Phil Bredesen were some of the most
difficult times the state had
to endure, and that every
measure should be taken
to avoid a similar occurrence.
“I would hate to see us go
through this routine again
just because we don’t have
the money,” Swann said,
making note of Tennessee’s
lack of an income tax and
his opposition to imposing
one. “We’ve got to figure
out a better way of dealing with the population. ...
I’m not sure yet that this
(Insure Tennessee) is the
right answer, but I’m very
open minded.”
The General Assembly
will meet Feb. 2 in a special session convened by
Haslam to consider his
Insure Tennessee health
care coverage plan.
Townsend escapee, 18,
caught in Sevier County
From Staff Reports
Sevier County authorities
recaptured two escaped jail
inmates over the weekend,
including an 18-year-old
Townsend resident.
A chief deputy from
Sevier County Sheriff ’s
Office confirmed Sunday
that both David L. Way,
44, of Cosby, and Dustin
Skaggs, Old Highway 73,
Townsend were taken back
into custody by deputies
from SCSO.
Skaggs was arrested
around 11 p.m. Saturday, he
said, while Way was taken
at 12:45 p.m. Sunday.
Dustin
Skaggs
David
Way
Details are still scarce
about how the two men
made their escape, how
they were recaptured, or
even concerning how long
each man had been in prison, or what charges they
were facing. Sevier County
officials said they would
make a formal release this
morning.
The two men were discovered missing Friday
evening. According to
reports, corrections officers at Sevier County Jail
Annex realized they were
missing during a check at
11:41 p.m. Jan. 23.
After a search failed to
turn up the two wayward
inmates, Sevier County
officials issued a press
release on the escape Saturday around 3:30 p.m. Sevier
County Sheriff Ron Seals
said at the time that both
men should be considered
dangerous.
MARKET: 2015 officers, events announced
FROM 1A
Bike Rodeo (set for May 2
this year), and the seasonending Holly Day Market
(Nov. 14).
Also on tap for the coming
year is a “Bike to the Market” program, whereby bike
riders will receive a special
phone app, which they can
use to log miles traveling to
market events. At the end of
the season, the bikers who
have logged the most miles
will receive prizes.
Reed said market organizers are also looking forward to participating once
again in the city’s Summer
on Broadway music-andbarbecue street festival in
June. “It was a big hit last
year,” Reed said. “It was
just like the old days, with
our vendors out on the
streets.”
After presentations from
a pair of special guests —
University of Tennessee
Offering a more lighthearted mood to the luncheon,
Ramsey said of Maryville
politics, “I tell everyone
that I got the smart side of
the county and Art got the
pretty side.”
Regarding legislation,
Ramsey described two
bills he hopes to pass, one
of which deals with developmental disabilities waivers for state programs and
services allowing for consideration of a caregiver’s
age. The other bill would
allow for a 12-month funding of teacher insurance
within the Better Education Program, rather than
the current 10 months.
Ramsey believes it will be
difficult to pass these bills,
given that “money (within
the state) is going to be in
short supply this year.”
Attendees also discussed
potential abortion legislation in light of the passing of Amendment 1 to the
Tennessee Constitution last
November.
Rep. Bill Dunn, of Fountain City, stressed that women contemplating abortion
need to be consulted on all
possible alternatives.
“You are paying to take
the life of that child,” Dunn
said of abortion procedures,
which he perceives as being
inherently different from
routine medical procedures. “There is a distinc-
DEATH: Process could skew capital cases
FROM 1A
less likely to be sympathetic to the defense.
“You end up with a jury
with less women, less
blacks, less Democrats
... you end up with a jury
that is skewed in ways that
make it probably more conservative, more accepting
of prosecution arguments,
of state authority,” said
Richard Dieter, executive
director of the Death Penalty Information Center, a
nonprofit organization that
opposes executions.
The Capital Jury Project, a consortium of university researchers, interviewed about 1,200 jurors
in 353 capital trials in 14
states beginning in the
early 1990s. The group’s
research has shown that
death penalty juries are
more likely to convict and
that jurors often make up
their minds about what
punishment to hand down
long before they’re supposed to, said William
Bowers, director of the
project.
After reaching a verdict,
a trial enters the penalty
phase, when prosecutors
present evidence of aggravating factors, such as the
brutality of the crime, to
argue in favor of the death
penalty while defense
attorneys present mitigating factors, such as abuse
as a child, to argue against
it. Juries are then supposed
to weigh those factors
when deciding whether a
defendant should get life
or death.
“The principal finding
is that half of the jurors
said they knew what the
punishment should be
before the penalty stage
of the trial and another
one-quarter of them said
they were pretty sure,”
Bowers said. “The thing
they don’t recognize or
seem to have overlooked
is that they are not supposed to decide what the
punishment is until they
hear the evidence in the
second phase.”
Death penalty opponents have argued that
to get around this kind of
about to run out,” said
John Paulsen as he gassed
up his SUV in New Jersey. “I can’t complain too
much since we’ve had a
pretty mild winter, but I
don’t know if I’m ready
for a foot or so of snow
all at once.”
The storm system driving out of the Midwest
brought several inches of
snow to Ohio on Sunday
and was expected to ultimately spread from the
nation’s capital to Maine
for a “crippling and potentially historic blizzard,” the
National Weather Service
said.
The Washington area
expected only a coating
or a bit more, with steadily increasing amounts as
the storm plods its way
north.
At New York’s Penn Station, Cicero Goncalves
was waiting for a train to
Vermont, where he’s going
snowboarding, because he
expected the flight he had
hoped to take would be
canceled.
But the 34-year-old flight
attendant from Queens —
pre-judgment, separate
juries should be chosen to
hear evidence in the guilt
phase and the punishment
phase. But that idea has
not gained traction.
Another finding of the
research was that death
penalty opponents are
also more willing to consider an insanity defense,
something that will come
into play in the case of
Holmes, whose attorneys
don’t dispute opened fire
during a midnight showing of “The Dark Knight
Rises” but argue he was
in the grips of a psychotic
episode. He has pleaded
not guilty by reason of
insanity.
Holmes’ lawyers, citing
data from the Capital Jury
Project, argued that his
jury should not be deathqualified, but Judge Carlos A. Samour Jr. rejected
their challenge, saying he
is bound by rulings by the
U.S. Supreme Court and
the Colorado Supreme
Court holding that deathqualification is constitutional.
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JOY KIMBROUGH | THE DAILY TIMES
JAMIE REED (LEFT) HANDS OUT a 10-year vendor award to Sherri
Lile of Liles Acres for being part of the Maryville Farmers’ Market
for the entirety of the market’s existence.
Food Safety Specialist Dr.
Faith Critzer, and UT Agricultural Extension Educator for Blount County
Chris Sneed — the Farmers’ Market rolled out new
officers for 2015. Jim Brown
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who was dressed in a fulllength bear costume —
counted himself and his
travel partner as lucky.
“We’ll get there before it
snows, and we’re coming back when the storm
is over, on Thursday,” he
said.
Preparations large and
small were in effect elsewhere in New York. A Manhattan Home Depot store
sold about twice as many
shovels over the weekend
as it normally does, and
transit officials hoping
to keep the subways running smoothly planned to
use modified subway cars
loaded with de-icing fluid
to spray the third rail that
powers trains.
Farther north, snow plow
driver Al Laplant expected
to be out clearing roads of
Simsbury, Conn., this week,
just as he has for more than
two decades. But even for
a plow driver, the snow is
no cakewalk.
“It’s kind of exhilarating,” he said. “But at the
same time, I’ve been doing
it for 27 years, so I’m kind
of tired of it myself.”
The Super Bowl-bound
New England Patriots also
expected to be out — as in
out of town — by the time
the storm arrives in Boston.
The team plans to leave
Logan Airport at 12:30 p.m.
today for Phoenix, where
the temperature will reach
the high 60s.
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will take over as president
of the Board of Directors,
along with Vice President
Phil Reed. Secretary for
2015 is Kate Caldwell, and
treasurer is Karen Carver.
' 2 0$*($%8
STORM: ‘Crippling blizzard’ heads n\orth
FROM 1A
tion between removing a
gallbladder and taking a
human life, so I think that
distinction itself means we
could look at this issue a bit
differently.”
Dunn also voiced his
opposition to the statefunded pre-K program,
for which the state Legislature annually sets
aside $87 million. Citing a
study from group outside
the state, Dunn claimed
that of the children who
attended the state’s pre-K
program “there’s no difference, except in a couple of
areas where the pre-K kids
do worse,” compared with
children who do not attend
the program.
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ON THE WEB: Editorials, letters and other
opinions, archived for your review.
www.thedailytmes.com/opinion
Scan this QR code to go to the Web page.
6A
THE DAILY TIMES
MONDAY, JANUARY 26, 2015
OUR VOICE
Blount homeless count
finds high number
of children at risk
W
hen it comes to counting the homeless, an inquiring
mind might ask: How do you do that?
Good question. The truth is there’s more than one
way. Basically, you check where the homeless tend to go.
The upside is that folks in Blount County dedicated to the
task are getting better at it.
The annual Point-In-Time Count was held Thursday. It is
required in order for communities to receive federal grant
money from U.S. Department
of Housing and Urban Development.
United Way leads the effort
in Blount County, in partnership with Maryville College
student volunteers who are
taking a January Term course
called Action to Advocacy –
Hunger and Homelessness.
This year’s Blount County
count revealed a depressingly high number of homeless
families. That translates to children in crisis.
The first Point-In-Time Count, conducted in 2011, found
only 70 homeless men, women and children in Blount
County. That obviously was a severe undercount.
This year’s count documented 303 homeless people in
Blount. Likely an undercount, too, but much closer to reality.
Of the total, 164 were in family units. Here’s the gut punch.
The homeless under age 18 numbered 74.
Compare that to the Tennessee homeless numbers for
2014. Across the state last year, according to HUD, there
were 9,415 homeless. Of those, 1,390 were children. That’s
14.8 percent kids.
Again — to hammer the point home — the Blount count
this year found 303 homeless people including 74 children.
That’s 24.4 percent kids.
Why is the percentage of homeless children so much higher in Blount County than in the state as a whole?
Could it be that large cities with shelters tend to draw
more homeless individuals? Are singles and couples more
transient because they don’t have children that tie them to
an area — because of schools for example?
Maybe. But local folks involved in helping the homeless
hear stories of families drawn to Blount County in hopes of
finding jobs that didn’t materialize.
On the plus side, this year’s count found a large number of
people in shelters, transitional housing and being cared for
in hotels. That means local programs are more effective at
getting homeless people out of cars and makeshift shelters.
As the process has become more refined over five years,
counters have become more successful at learning the reasons people find themselves without a home. This year, 29
said mental illness was the cause; 13 blamed a physical illness; 38 revealed a substance abuse problem; 26 suffered
domestic violence incidents.
That kind of information is critical because homelessness
itself is not the crux of the problem. It’s a symptom.
Eliminate the cause — eliminate the effect. That’s the
simple math of homelessness.
The Blount count this
year found 303
homeless people
including 74 children.
OTHER VOICES
State of health crisis
W
e smoke too much. We weigh too much. We don’t
get enough exercise. That, in a nutshell, is a sobering description of the health of most Tennesseans.
Our health rankings among the states stink: 45th in overall
health, 46th in tobacco use, 47th for obesity and 49th for
physical activity.
“Forty-five is not just a number,” Tennessee’s Department
of Health commissioner said. “If we don’t change, it’s our
future.”
These statistics aren’t just something to tut-tut about. Poor
health costs us money, lots of money, in hospital care, doctors’ bills and other areas.
Our crisis stems not from some unknown virus for which
we have no cure, but from everyday lifestyle choices that we
make.
The main problem is that the cure for Tennessee’s health
problems is for people to change their style of living.
That’s one of the hardest things in the world to do. But we
must.
Paris Post-Intelligencer
TODAY’S BIBLE VERSE
SUBMITTED BY JUDY DENTON, FRIENDSVILLE
Humble yourselves therefore under the mighty hand of God,
that he may exalt you in due time.
I Peter 5:6
THE DAILY TIMES
Blount County’s only daily newspaper, serving our readers since 1883
Published by Blount County Publishers LLC
Gregg K. Jones
President
Carl Esposito
Publisher
Frank Trexler
Managing Editor
Richard Dodson
News Editor
Dean Stone
Editor
Melanie Tucker
LifeTimes Editor
Robert Norris
City Editor
Larry Aldridge
Executive Editor
Marcus Fitzsimmons
Sports Editor
Daryl Sullivan
Photo Editor
Republicans take over, sort of
W
ith the Republicans now totally in charge
of Congress, they have the chance to make
good on their promise that things are
going to change on Capitol Hill. But their opening moves suggest more of the same old same
old.
The new House’s first legislative volley was
that golden oldie, abortion. It passed a bill, by
249-179, certain to be vetoed, banning use of federal funds for abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. It was brought up only after about two
dozen Republican female members obliged the
leadership to withdraw an even stronger antiabortion measure.
A sticking point in the tougher version was a
stipulation that for an exception to be granted
in a case of rape, the victim would have had to
report the attack to law-enforcement authorities.
The rebellious women argued that this condition
would only invite fiercer opposition from abortion-rights groups in the 2016 political campaign.
But tilting at windmills never ended with the
departure of Don Quixote.
One despairing Republican, Rep. Charles Dent
of Pennsylvania, summed up his House colleagues’ opening behavior by citing a failed
effort to oust House Speaker John Boehner, and
then immediately pivoting to other lost causes.
“Week one we had a speaker election that
didn’t go the way that a lot of us wanted it to.”
Dent lamented. “Week two, we were debating
deporting children, and again not a conversation
a lot of us wanted to have then. And week three,
we’re now debating rape and abortion, again an
issue that most of us didn’t campaign on ... or
really wanted to engage on at this time. And I
just can’t wait for week four.”
One could only wonder whether one of the
chief organizational scolds in American politics,
the anti-abortion March for Life, was doing its
thing before the Supreme Court building across
Capitol Plaza had anything to do with the timing.
In any event, the ripple of dissent from a couple of dozen House Republicans had to be disturbing to Boehner and Co. hoping for a new
day after the midterm congressional elections
that strengthened their hands. It came only two
days after President Obama’s State of the Union
address, in which, beyond the usual talk about
compromise, he served notice he was poised to
use his veto pen on any such ideological litmus
test legislation.
The Republican majority in the House rose
slightly as a result of the November midterms,
and the latest abortion argument brought some
moderate voices to the surface that should lighten Boehner’s old task of
warding off the influence of
the tea party and other conservative members.
Meanwhile, over in the
Senate, the new Republican majority spent some
of its time rejecting two
amendments to the GOPbacked Keystone pipeline construction bill that
would have affirmed that
climate change is real and
has been negatively affected by human behavior. This
is another issue on which
many Republicans continue
to reject the wide scientific consensus. Obama
has also promised to veto the bill if it reaches his
desk.
As for Obama’s own priority of immigration
reform, he invited a congressional alternative to
his controversial executive order, but he is still
waiting for the Republican response, at least in
English.
Rep. Carlos Curbelo of Florida, commenting
in Spanish on the president’s State of the Union
address, said only that Republicans wanted
Obama “to collaborate with us to get it done,”
apparently meaning through congressional
action. Freshman Sen. Joni Ernst of Iowa, in her
rebuttal (in her native tongue) to the president’s
speech, did not mention the subject.
All this suggests that, for political purposes,
the new GOP majority prefers first to recycle
old proposals certain to be vetoed before getting
down to any serious discussions on the areas of
possible compromise both sides insist are available. How long this dance will go on before getting down to business is anybody’s guess, as
time’s now a-wasting for lame duck Obama.
JULES
WITCOVER
JULES WITCOVER’S email address: [email protected]
cast.net
YOUR VOICE
Letters to the Editor reflect the opinions of the writers and are not necessarily those of The Daily Times.
Resident defends
bulk rubbish pickup
Dear Editor:
In the Jan. 8 edition of The
Daily Times, I read an article
written by reporter, Iva Butler,
a long-time employee, in regard
to a Ms. Leslie Marvin who “is
on a mission to clean up what
she feels is an unsightly trail
of bulk rubbish in Maryville
neighborhoods.”
The article lists Ms. Marvin as having resided at 1102
Forest Ave. for seven years. I
myself could be considered, by
some, as a long-time resident of
Blount, Alcoa and Maryville for
a combined total of 38 years.
If Ms. Marvin has resided at
her current residence for seven
years, I would like to ask the
following question. Where was
Ms. Marvin when our nation’s
economy tanked around 2007?
An economic nightmare with
trickle-down effects, which our
beloved city/county were not
immune.
Has Ms. Marvin been somewhat blind for the last sevenplus years, witnessing some
of her neighbors having their
grown children return to live
with them due to lost employment or housing? Thus there
would be an increase not only
of bulk rubbish, but of garbage
pickup within the city limits.
Some household members are
working two or more jobs to
put food on the table for their
family or make rent or mortgage payments, just to make
ends meet.
Others may work out of town/
state or are long-haul truckers
who may only have an opportunity to place bulk rubbish
curbside when at home to do
so. Does Ms. Marvin expect
the elderly who live alone to
adhere to a three-day rule?
Elderly individuals rely either
on a family member or neighbor to place their bulk rubbish
curbside for them, when they
can.
Further the article lists Ms.
Marvin as stating, “I’m hoping things can change.” “How
much money do we spend?” “Is
it really a service?” Quite frankly, Ms. Marvin, it is. The county
is not blessed with tax dollars
used to pick up bulk rubbish
outside the city limits.
My husband and I resided
along Sevierville Road for seven years. I can truly state that
Maryville city employees did
and do a fantastic job in picking up bulk rubbish, leaves and
garbage.
Respectfully,
Mrs. Anna Walker
107 Regal Tower
Maryville, TN 37804
VOICE YOUR OPINIONS
Letters to the editor are welcome. All letters must
be signed and include your address and a telephone
number where the writer may be reached. Those longer than 300 words normally will not be considered for
publication. Address letters: Editor, The Daily Times,
307 E. Harper Ave., Maryville, Tenn., 37804.
Letters may be submitted via email to
[email protected] with verification included.
In addition, a signed copy of the email must be forwarded to the above postal address.
We do not accept letters via fax or by comments
posted to our websites or Facebook page.
MONEY | 7A
THE DAILY TIMES
Monday, January 26, 2015
www.thedailytimes.com
From train to plane
Travelers like
plan for rail
link to NY’s
LaGuardia
BY FRANK ELTMAN
The Associated Press
NEW YORK — Tom Fiore knows
what it’s like to sit in a taxi for as long
as two agonizing hours, over bridges
or through a tunnel, to travel a mere
eight miles from midtown Manhattan
to LaGuardia Airport in Queens.
The salesman who makes that
trek about twice a month is among
legions of travelers applauding what
they see as a long overdue proposal
from New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo:
build a rail link connecting the city
to LaGuardia.
“This is a very difficult place to get
to,” Fiore said as he typed on a laptop
while waiting for his flight. “I think it
would save a measure of time.”
LaGuardia is one of just a few airports in major American cities not
served by some sort of rail service.
Neighboring John F. Kennedy and
Newark have it, and projects are currently underway at Washington Dulles, Los Angeles and Denver.
$450M PROPOSED
Cuomo’s $450 million proposal,
made this past week on the eve of
his State of the State address, follows
his announcement last year for a $3.6
billion renovation of the decrepit
LaGuardia — famously dubbed by
Vice President Joe Biden as a “thirdworld” facility.
The plan calls for an elevated AirTrain that would connect the airport,
located along Flushing Bay, with a
busy transit hub 1.5 miles away.
The hub, with access to the city’s
subway and commuter railroads, is
near Citi Field, home of baseball’s
Mets, and the Billie Jean King Nation-
8jbk_\=ffc
Reasonable
Expectations
Q
A
What kind of long-term return
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the S&P 500 has averaged 7.7
percent, and over the past 30, it’s
closer to 9 percent. (For the “real”
return, subtract the rate of inflation,
which has historically averaged
around 3 percent annually.)
Those returns reflect investments
in the overall stock market, not in
various individual stocks. Each
individual company might end up
trouncing or underperforming the
market. You can hope to beat the
market’s average return by carefully selecting individual stocks or
mutual funds — or just settle for the
market’s return, via an index fund.
***
What does “pro forma” mean?
— B.E., Shallowater, Texas
The term “pro forma” on a
financial statement means
that you’re looking at some “what
if” numbers. Imagine that PepsiCo
merged with Boeing last May. At
the end of the merged company’s
fiscal year in December, you might
see some pro forma financial statements in the PepsiCo-Boeing
annual report. These would
show you the state of the firm
over the year as if it had been a
combined company all year long.
Pro forma results can be useful.
If you were researching PepsiCoBoeing, it wouldn’t be too meaningful to contrast a pre-merger
period’s results with post-merger
results. By examining combined
results, you can get a clearer idea
of the company’s financial health.
Sometimes, though, companies
have taken pro forma statements
too far, showing positive earnings results that they would have
had if various bad things hadn’t
happened.
Q
A
Got a question for the Fool? Send it in
— see Write to Us
KATHY WILLENS | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A NO. 7 SUBWAY TRAIN arrives at the Mets-Willets point station (left) as another leaves
the station on Wednesday in New York.
al Tennis Center, home of the U.S.
Open.
“You can’t get to LaGuardia by train.
That really is inexcusable and that
is going to change,” Cuomo said in
announcing the plan.
Because the 1.5-mile project would
be built mostly along the Grand Central Parkway and not in residential
neighborhoods, Cuomo does not
expect much local opposition. The
project would be managed by the
Port Authority of New York and New
Jersey, which runs the area’s major
airports, with coordination with the
Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which operates subway, bus and
commuter railroads.
A start date for construction has
not been set, and the Legislature
must sign off on the project.
Cuomo said it would be financed
through a combination of existing
state funds, Port Authority funds,
and a share of the $5 billion generated from settlements of alleged
bank misconduct. Aides say it could
be completed within five years once
work begins.
A 2014 Port Authority survey found
that 75 percent of those traveling
to LaGuardia from Manhattan took
either taxis or private town cars. Only
about 7 percent used bus service.
Approximately six million people
used the Kennedy AirTrain out of 50.4
million passengers in 2013. At Newark
Liberty Airport, 2.3 million people
used the AirTrain, out of a total of
35 million passengers, according to
Port Authority statistics.
WHERE WILL THE
MONEY COME FROM?
Nicole Gelinas, a senior fellow at
the Manhattan Institute, a conservative think tank, questioned how the
project would be financed.
She said the MTA, which is included in the plans, already has commitments to complete a Manhattan
subway project and a new rail line
bringing the Long Island Rail Road
to Grand Central Terminal.
That’s in addition to the Port
Authority’s LaGuardia renovation,
which includes a complete reconstruction of the facility’s Central
Terminal Building. Some preliminary work, including the demolition of two old hangars and parking
garage improvements, have already
started.
“We don’t have money to start yet
another infrastructure project when
we have not figured out how to pay
for what we are already doing,” Gelinas said. “I suppose it’s better than
nothing, but it’s not a great aspiration.”
BRIEFS
Company seeks
rights to names
of iconic lodges
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. —
To those who know and
love the Grand Canyon,
the names of its historic
lodges are synonymous
with the national park
itself.
Phantom Ranch,
Bright Angel Lodge,
El Tovar — all bring
to mind a place coveted worldwide for its
sweeping views, river
rapids and history told
though layers of geology.
But the fate of those
names is up for debate
after a longtime Grand
Canyon concessionaire
applied to trademark
them.
Approval of its bid
would mean Xanterra
Parks & Resorts could
charge future concessionaires to use roughly
20 names of the park’s
most popular properties. It also could walk
away with those names,
leaving the iconic lodges and other facilities to
adopt new identities.
The National Park Service is weighing how
to respond with the
U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on the matter, which a spokesman
described as relatively
uncharted territory.
US gas prices fall,
but expected to rise
CAMARILLO, Calif.
— The average price of
a regular gallon of gas
dropped 13 cents in the
past two weeks to $2.07,
but it could soon rise.
Industry analyst Trilby
Lundberg said Sunday
that the lowest prices
in more than five years
are likely to increase
because of rising wholesale prices.
Lundberg says ris-
ing costs of crude oil
the past 10 days should
eventually be seen at
the pump.
San Francisco continued to have the highestpriced gas in the Lower
48 states at $2.54 a gallon. Albuquerque, N.M.,
remained lowest at $1.73
a gallon.
Lundberg says prices
at the pump are $1.24
lower than this time last
year.
The average price in
California was $2.43 a
gallon.
The average national
price for midgrade gas
is $2.31. For premium,
it’s $2.47.
Romanians protest
loans repayments
BUCHAREST, Romania — Hundreds of people have protested in
Romania against high
repayments for Swiss
franc loans, blaming
the banks for offering
deceptively cheap loans
and calling on the government to regulate
hard currency loans.
“The bank tricked us!”
yelled up to 1,000 demonstrators gathered in a
downtown square. “You
have the power, we have
the pain!” read one banner.
About 75,000 Romanians have loans in
Swiss francs, taking
them out during the
economic boom of the
mid-2000s, because
they had a lower interest rate.
They have been hit by
a strong franc and even
more so after the Swiss
National Bank abolished
its currency ceiling this
month causing the franc
to increase by 40 percent against the euro.
Lawmakers are discussing implementing
rules to protect people
who take out hard currency loans.
The Motley Fool
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© 2015 THE MOTLEY FOOL/DIST. BY UNIVERSAL UCLICK 1/22
8A | NATION&WORLD
THE DAILY TIMES
www.thedailytimes.com
Hostage death video stuns Japan
BY YURI KAGEYAMA
The Associated Press
TOKYO — From the
prime minister to ordinary people, Japanese were
shocked Sunday at a video
purportedly showing one
of two Japanese hostages of
the extremist Islamic State
group had been killed.
With attention focused
on efforts to save the
other hostage, some also
criticized Prime Minister
Shinzo Abe’s drive for a
more assertive Japan as
responsible for the hostage crisis.
A somber Abe appeared
on public broadcaster NHK
early Sunday demanding the militants release
47-year-old journalist Kenji
Goto unharmed. He said the
video was likely authentic, although he added that
the government was still
reviewing it. He offered
condolences to the family
and friends of Haruna Yukawa, a 42-year-old adventurer taken hostage in Syria
last year.
KOJI SASAHARA | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
ANTI-PRIME MINISTER SHINZO ABE PROTESTERS rally Sunday with
signs and a banner reading: “Prime Minister Abe, save the life of
Kenji Goto!” in front of Abe’s official residence in Tokyo.
Abe declined to comment
on the message in the video,
which demanded a prisoner exchange for Goto. He
said only that the government was still working on
the situation and reiterated
that Japan condemns terrorism.
“I am left speechless,” he
said. “We strongly and totally criticize such acts.”
Yukawa’s father, Shoichi,
told reporters he hoped
“deep in his heart” that the
news of his son’s killing was
not true.
President Barack Obama
said the U.S. stands “shoulder to shoulder” with Japan
and called for the immediate
release of Goto.
The United Nations
Security Council issued a
statement that “deplored
the apparent murder” of
Yukawa, declaring that the
Islamic State group “must
be defeated and that the
intolerance, violence and
hatred it espouses must be
stamped out.”
The Associated Press
could not verify the contents of the video message, which was removed
from websites soon after
it appeared and varied
greatly from previous videos released by the Islamic State group, which now
holds a third of both Syria
and Iraq.
Criticism of Abe has
touched on his push for an
expanded role for Japan’s
troops — one that has
remained strictly confined
to self-defense under the
pacifist constitution written after the nation’s defeat
in World War II.
About 100 protesters,
some of them holding placards that read, “I’m Kenji”
and “Free Goto,” demonstrated late Sunday in front
of the prime minister’s residence, demanding Abe save
Goto.
Demonstrator Kenji Kunitomi, 66, blamed Abe as
bringing the hostage crisis
on himself.
Radical left-wing party wins big in Greece
The Associated Press
ATHENS, Greece — A radical leftwing party vowing to end Greece’s
painful austerity program won a historic victory in Sunday’s parliamentary elections, setting the stage for a
showdown with the country’s international creditors that could shake
the eurozone.
Alexis Tsipras, leader of the communist-rooted Syriza party, immediately promised to end the “five
years of humiliation and pain” that
Greece has endured since an international bailout saved it from bankruptcy in 2010.
With 80 percent of polling stations
counted, Syriza had 36 percent versus
28 percent for Prime Minister Antonis Samaras’ conservatives.
It remained to be seen whether
Syriza had enough seats to govern
outright or would have to seek support from other parties. That might
not become clear until this morning or even later, when all the votes
are counted.
If Tsipras, 40, can put together a government, he will be Greece’s youngest prime minister in 150 years.
The prospect of an anti-bailout government coming to power in Greece
has sent jitters through the financial
world, reviving fears of a Greek bankruptcy that could reverberate across
the eurozone.
“The sovereign Greek people today
have given a clear, strong, indisputable mandate. Greece has turned a
page. Greece is leaving behind the
destructive austerity, fear and author-
Know
about
HPV.
itarianism. It is leaving behind five
years of humiliation and pain,” Tsipras told a crowd of rapturous flagwaving supporters.
He won on promises to demand
debt forgiveness and renegotiate the
terms of Greece’s $270 billion bailout, which has kept the debt-ridden
country afloat since mid-2010.
To qualify for the cash, Greece has
had to impose deep and bitterly resented cuts in public spending, wages and
pensions, along with public sector layoffs and repeated tax increases.
Tsipras pronounced the troika and
its regular debt inspections “a thing
of the past.”
“The verdict of the Greek people
ends, beyond any doubt, the vicious
circle of austerity in our country,”
he said.
Monday, January 26, 2015
BRIEFS
Senators say more
special ops troops
needed in Mideast
WASHINGTON —
Two influential senators are calling on President Barack Obama to
send more U.S. special
ops forces to hotspots
around the Middle East.
The suggestion by
Republican John McCain
and Democrat Dianne
Feinstein is a direct challenge to the president,
who has said he doesn’t
want to increase the
U.S. military presence in
Yemen despite the deteriorating security condition in that country.
McCain — a Republican who heads the
Senate Armed Services
Committee — and Feinstein tell CBS’ “Face
the Nation” that special operations forces in
particular may be necessary to blunt Iranian
influence in various
spots in the region.
UK reviewing hoax
call to Cameron
LONDON — British
officials are reviewing
security measures Sunday after a hoax caller
pretending to be the
director of the government’s eavesdropping
agency managed to get
through to Prime Min-
ister David Cameron on
the phone.
Cameron ended the
call when it became
clear the call, purportedly from GCHQ director
Robert Hannigan, was
a hoax, Downing Street
said. No sensitive information was disclosed.
Officials said a separate hoax call was
made earlier Sunday to
GCHQ , resulting in the
disclosure of a cellphone
number for Hannigan.
Marines identified in
deadly copter crash
TWENTYNINE
PALMS, Calif. — Two
Marine Corps officers
killed when their helicopter crashed during
a training exercise in
the Southern California desert were remembered Sunday as talented
pilots.
Capt. Elizabeth Kealey
and 1st Lt. Adam Satterfield died from injuries
in the crash Friday at
the Twentynine Palms
Marine base.
Kealey, 32, of Indiana,
Pa., was commissioned
in 2005 and had earned
several awards and
medals.
Satterfield, 25, of Oldham, Ky., was commissioned in 2011 and supported training operations in Southern California.
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can prevent cervical cancer, and is most effective when administered before a
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appointment with a Blount Memorial gynecologist (women) or family medicine
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examines them under a microscope.
Today’s ThinPrep Pap tests are extremely
accurate. Previous Pap smears could
evaluate roughly 100,000 cells, but current
ones can examine about 400,000 cells.
Young women should get their first Pap test
between ages 16 and 18 — earlier if they
are sexually active — and continue those
each year.
Hospital
www.blountmemorial.org
9A
Monday, January 26, 2015
Surgical services at Parkwest
Whether your surgery is elective or required, Parkwest has a wide variety of specialties to meet your needs.
“It is a pleasure to work with welltrained, caring staff in the Parkwest operating suites,” Tracy Pesut, MD, Parkwest
orthopedic surgeon, said. “The staff takes
extra steps to make sure our patients receive
excellent care and have the best outcomes
possible.”
The following surgical service lines are
available at Parkwest.
Cardiovascular Surgery: Parkwest
is home to a state-of-the-art hybrid operating room for patients who are having issues
with their hearts and lungs. In addition to
offering traditional open heart procedures,
the combination of up-to-date, innovative
technology and Parkwest’s experienced
heart team allows high-risk patients the
opportunity to have Transcatheter Aortic
Valve Replacement (TAVR) instead of open
heart surgery. Thoracic aortic aneurysm
repairs and endovascular abdominal aneurysm repairs can also be performed, which
allow for better blood flow to the extremities. Open advanced cardiovascular procedures include aortic root replacement, ascending aortic aneurysm repair and aortic
arch repair.
Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT): When
a patient has ear, nose or throat problems
that are not resolved by lesser invasive alternatives, ENT surgery may be necessary.
Parkwest physicians perform ENT surgeries
for both children and adults, including ton-
may benefit from Parkwest’s elite orthopedics program, which ranks among the highest orthopedic volume generators in the
state. The orthopedic surgeons at Parkwest
perform more than 1,800 total joint replacements each year. Parkwest is home to
The Retreat, a total joint replacement center, which provides physical therapy immediately following a short surgical recovery
period. Physical therapists work with patients to practice how to climb stairs, get in
a car and move comfortably again. Orthopedic surgeries that are common at Parkwest
include replacements, a wide variety of podiatry procedures, fracture repair and knee
arthroscopy.
Plastic Surgery: Parkwest also offers
reconstructive or elective plastic surgeries.
Urology: For patients with issues of the
urinary tract, Parkwest’s urology service
sillectomy, ear and sinus surgery, and bal- and robotic surgery using the DaVinci Ro- line offers a wide variety of treatments for
bot. Gynecological surgeries include hys- issues including kidney stones, bladder tuloon sinuplasty.
General Surgery: To reduce recovery terectomies, diagnostic laparoscopies and mors and bladder repair.
time and level of pain, Parkwest offers mini- vaginal repair.
To prepare for surgery, every patient
Neurosurgery: Parkwest’s dedicat- is scheduled for a Pre-Admission Testing
mally invasive laparoscopic surgeries for
general surgeries including hernia repairs, ed team works with four neurosurgeons (PAT) appointment (see below). Patients
gallbladder removal and hiatal hernia re- trained on the BrainLab system for spinal and families are encouraged to ask any
pair. Patients are able to return to normal and cranial surgeries. The BrainLab system questions and voice concerns at this time.
routines sooner and with less pain. Other is especially useful in precisely pinpointing
“Our priority is patient care and providgeneral surgeries include appendix remov- the location of a tumor during brain bi- ing the best possible outcomes for every
opsies, which allows physicians to obtain procedure, every time,” Deena McStay, RN,
al, colon surgeries and breast surgeries.
Gynecology: For women who are expe- more accurate tissue samples. The system surgery nurse manager, said.
riencing pain in their reproductive organs also reduces radiation exposure, shortens
or bladder incontinence, Parkwest provides operating time and is minimally invasive.
For more information about surgical
Orthopedics: Patients experiencing services at Parkwest, call 865-374-PARK
gynecological and oncology services, including minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery joint pain, foot problems or chronic issues or visit www.TreatedWell.com.
Surgical
patient
spotlight:
Audrey
Pre-Admission Testing:
Before you come in for surgery, you will make an appointment
for Pre-Admission Testing (PAT) in order to expedite your registration and complete necessary preparation for surgery. At your
PAT appointment, Parkwest staff members will
discuss your medical history, allergies and medications, and will complete
a pre-anesthesia consultation. Other necessary preoperative diagnostic studies, such as X-rays and
blood work, will be done
at this appointment.
An important component of PAT is education
about and preparation for
surgery. Parkwest aims to
reduce anxiety associated
with having surgery by
giving patients the opportunity to voice their concerns and ask questions.
Staff members work with
pre-operative patients to
explain exactly what will happen on the day of surgery and make
sure that all medical information is on file and correct.
“Our focus on pre-testing is directly tied to patient safety
and successful surgeries,” Dawn Cunningham, RN, ambulatory
staging manager, said. “We want patients who choose Parkwest
to know everything they want to about their surgeries and have
positive experiences.”
While PAT involves many questions and numerous confirmations of identity, this thorough process significantly decreases
chances of patient misidentification or surgical error. PAT has
also proven to reveal previously undiagnosed conditions that are
identified through lab work. By discovering these issues before
the day of surgery, Parkwest staff can provide safer care and better outcomes.
When Audrey
W. started to
have pain in her
lower abdomen,
she rushed to
the Emergency
Department
at Parkwest. A
computed
tomography (CT)
scan
revealed
thickening
in
her colon and
issues with her
uterus.
“I
hadn’t
been to a gynecologist in four
years,” she said.
“My friend recommended Susan
Schwarz, MD, at Parkwest, so I
made an appointment.”
Dr. Schwarz initially advised
Audrey to take a wait-and-see approach based on her symptoms.
She completed an ultrasound to
establish a base line from which
she could watch for future changes.
“A couple of days after the ultrasound, Dr. Schwarz called me and
explained that I had fibroids in the
muscle of my uterus,” Audrey said.
“She explained everything about it
in great detail.”
Fibroids are benign solid masses and can cause severe pain and
heavy bleeding during periods. “If
left untreated, fibroids can continue to grow and cause significant
pain,” Dr. Schwarz said.
For Audrey, who was not planning to have more children, having a hysterectomy was the best
way to be free from the pain.
a screen in the
Surgery Waiting
area that lists
each patient’s
whereabouts using a unique ID.
“My family
was taken care
of while they
were waiting,”
she said. “The
volunteers were
so friendly and
the environment
was so nice. The
craft table gave
my 67-year-old
mother something to do
“There are many different types while she waited, which was good
of hysterectomies. They all have for her. Between that, the valet
a special place for a special prob- parking and how good the caflem,” Dr. Schwarz explained. eteria food is, I would recommend
“Each woman should sit down Parkwest to everyone I know. I
with her doctor and figure out the had a great experience from start
best individualized approach to to finish.”
Audrey’s hysterectomy resultget her back on her feet as quickly
ed in the removal of her uterus
as possible.”
Surgery was scheduled for Dec. and fallopian tubes and was
10, 2014. Audrey had an appoint- completed laparoscopically, so
ment on Dec. 4 to complete her she only has three small scars on
Pre-Admission Testing (PAT). her abdomen. Her pain has been
“They asked me a ton of ques- eliminated. “Dr. Schwarz even
tions, which made me feel good shared before and after pictures
about the safety of the hospital,” of my uterus, ovaries and surAudrey said. “They warned me rounding organs,” Audrey said.
they’d ask my name and date of “That helped me understand how
birth a lot, which I totally under- incredibly important it was to
have this procedure.
stood.”
“The medical staff at Parkwest
On the day of the surgery, Audrey’s husband and mother accom- made my family and me feel very
panied her to Parkwest. They were cared for and welcome. It all felt
given a pager that works across the so organized, and I felt like I was
hospital’s campus and were able in such a safe and clean environto monitor Audrey’s progress on ment.”
0808-1289
CRITICISM OF EGYPTIAN GOVERNMENT RENEWED AFTER WOMAN’S DEATH. 12A
MONDAY, JANUARY 26, 2015
THE DAILY TIMES
10A
New exhibit
now open
at McClung
Museum
From Staff Reports
PHOTOS COURTESY OF MARYVILLE COLLEGE
LIBBY HESS, A MARYVILLE COLLEGE graduate, talks about her Senior Study of Chile with her adviseer, Dr. Geoff Mitchell. Hess is a now a Spanish teacher
in Loudon County.
Magic, family, femininity
Maryville grad takes Senior Study work into classroom
BY CHLOE KENNEDY
Assistant Director of Communications,
Maryville College
When Libby Hess was
studying abroad in Chile, she
was struck by the general
hesitance of Chileans to discuss the recent military dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet,
whose regime began with a
violent coup that overthrew
the democratically elected
Marxist President Salvadore
Allende in 1973.
For 17 years, the military
dictatorship altered the
social, economic and political institutions of Chile —
including literature produced
during the Pinochet era.
“Although many intellectuals with Socialist leanings
were forced into exile, a great
number of texts written by
Chilean nationals found subversive ways to criticize the
Pinochet dictatorship and
celebrate the Chilean culture,” said Hess, who is from
Maryville. “I began looking at
literature published by Chileans living in exile and found
the amazing novel ‘La casa
de los espíritus’ by Isabel
Allende, which explores the
deep connections between
magic, family and femininity
in an unnamed Latin American country.”
EXPLORING LITERATURE
Hess decided to further
explore the topic in her
Senior Study at Maryville
College, titled “Magical History: Exploring the Chilean
Dictatorship through La casa
de los espíritus.”
“‘La casa de los espíritus,’
through the inherently Latin
American genre of magical
realism, follows the journey,
which spans four generations
of women, from reliance
on magic to escape social
and political constraints to
full political awareness and
activism,” Hess wrote in her
Senior Study.
A Spanish with teacher
licensure major, she also
wrote a nontraditional chapter for her Senior Study,
which includes a resource
website for high school
teachers who want to use the
novel in a Spanish IV/V classroom.
“It includes lesson plans
and activities based on the
An innovative new exhibition featuring work by 28 contemporary artists who produced original prints based
on objects from the permanent collections of the University of Tennessee McClung
Museum of Natural History
and Culture is now open.
By pairing selected objects
with their related prints,
“Drawn from the McClung
Museum” examines how art,
science and culture are perceived and interpreted in
museums.
The exhibition will run
through May 24.
The 58 objects and prints on
view explore how museums
collect and the ways in which
these collections might be
interpreted.
Highlights of “Drawn”
include Mark Dion’s “Phantoms of Lost Museums” — a
mock cabinet of curiosities
pondering the broad spectrum of objects that have ended up in the McClung’s collections; Lynne Allen’s “Bishop’s Cope/Ghost Shirt,” which
highlights the shared spiritual
power of Native American
and Western sacred dress;
Mark Bovey’s investigation of
the horrifying consequences
of war as evidenced by the
scars on a Civil War-era canteen in “… as we would walk
over and over …”; Sydney A.
Cross’ use of a fossilized mastodon jaw to warn of the dire
situation of the modern-day
African elephant in “Extinction”; and UT Art Professor
Beauvais Lyons’ documentation of an imagined 19th century pottery studio that could
have manufactured a pitcher
in the museum’s collections in
“Goatman Pottery.”
The McClung Museum is
located at 1327 Circle Park
Drive. Museum admission is
free, and the museum’s hours
are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday
to Saturday and 1 to 5 p.m. on
Sundays.
For more information about
the McClung Museum and its
collections and exhibits, visit
mcclungmuseum.utk.edu.
BRIEFS
MARYVILLE COLLEGE’S DR. GEOFF MITCHELL and former student Libby Hess. Hess has taken what she learned of
the culture in Chile into the classroom as a Spanish teacher. Mitchell served as her adviser.
‘I learned
about a
beautiful
genre
of literature that
is uniquely Latin
American called
magical realism,
which incorporates
fantastical elements
into the plot of the
story as if they were
normal, everyday
occurrences ...’
Libby Hess
Maryville College graduate
novel,” she said. “Through a
careful study of this novel,
high school Spanish students
can connect the influence
that a country’s history and
politics has on its literature.”
Hess said the most challenging aspect of the Senior
Study was finding authentic
sources about the dictatorship, since few Chileans discuss or write about the topic.
Through her Senior Study,
she learned about a genre of
literature with which she was
unfamiliar: magical realism.
“I learned about a beautiful genre of literature that
is uniquely Latin American
called magical realism, which
incorporates fantastical elements into the plot of the
story as if they were normal, everyday occurrences
— it makes for a gorgeous,
thought-provoking storyline,”
Hess said. “I highly recommend ‘La casa de los espíritus,’ or ‘The House of the
Spirits.’ It’s OK to read the
English translation!”
Her adviser, Dr. Geoff
Mitchell, said his student’s
Senior Study was one of the
most innovative projects he
has seen in recent years.
“She combined language
teaching pedagogy with
detailed lesson plans, technology, and an interesting literary text in order to engage
future students in language
and culture,” said Mitchell,
associate professor of Spanish at Maryville College.
Hess, who completed her
student teaching in the fall,
now teaches Spanish at
Greenback School in Loudon
County.
TAKING IT TO
THE CLASSROOM
She said she thinks her
Senior Study will help her in
her career because it “reinforced my love for incorporating ‘real’ Spanish in the
classroom.”
“Many students of Spanish are never exposed to the
great literature and cultures
from the Spanish speaking
world,” she said. “I hope to
be able to use the knowledge
gained from my thesis as well
as my website in the classroom.”
Her adviser agreed.
“Although she was concerned that she may not have
the opportunity to use her
lessons in the classroom, I
pointed out that her creativity and technological expertise would enable her to
adapt and modify her project
to suit the students and the
level,” Mitchell said.
Entries sought for Arts
in the Airport exhibition
The Arts & Cultural Alliance
of Greater Knoxville and the
Metropolitan Knoxville Airport Authority announce a call
for entries for the next Arts in
the Airport, a juried exhibition
developed to allow regional
artists to compete and display
work in the airport.
About 40-45 fine art works
encompassing all styles and
genres will comprise the exhibition from April 16-Oct. 7.
The deadline for entries is
March 8. The call for entries is
open to all artists 18 and older
residing in the 33 counties of
East Tennessee. Each artist
may submit up to five entries.
Apply online or download an
application at www.knoxville
alliance.com/airport _entry.
html. Prizes include $1,000 in
cash awards. Entry fee is $30.
AARP Driver Safety Course
to be presented in Alcoa
AARP Driver Safety Course
will be presented from 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. on Feb. 12 at East Tennessee Medical Group, located at
266 Joule St. in Alcoa.
Francis Gross will be the
instructor. To register or for more
information, contact Jim Norton
at 233-3442.
LIFE | 11A
THE DAILY TIMES
Monday, January 26, 2015
www.thedailytimes.com
From Blount Memorial Hospital
Y
ou may not realize it,
but chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, is the third
leading cause of death in
the United States behind
cancer and heart disease.
This group of lung diseases affects more than
24 million Americans
and particularly is common in the Southeastern
portion of the country.
While there are a variety
of causes, there also are
many different types of
treatment for COPD, one
of which is designed to
help patients with a common health problem —
sleep apnea.
Typically, sleep apnea
patients find themselves
using a CPAP system
to help them breathe
at night. But, Dr. Jaber
Hassan with the Blount
Memorial Sleep Health
Center says a similar
device is making advances
with patients whose respiratory failure is a result
of COPD. “People with
severe COPD still can live
long, decent lives, providing that their health care is
maximized,” Hassan said.
“Still, they’re prone to lifethreatening flare-ups that
often can require hospitalization and mechanical
ventilation to help them
recover. Recently, though,
advances in non-invasive
ventilatory support using
BPAP or BiPAP systems
have shown a significant
decrease in a patient’s
chances of needing to be
placed on an invasive lifesaving ventilator. BPAP
or BiPAP systems use a
mask to deliver air pressure, rather than requiring a tube to be placed
in the trachea. It’s very
similar to a CPAP system, and has saved many
lives, shortened hospital
stays, reduced the costs
incurred with using a ventilator, and has helped
prevent the overall deterioration of quality of life,”
he explained.
“BPAP systems help
rest the breathing muscles of patients at night.
These muscles usually
are overworked to the
point of exhaustion, causing shortness of breath
and the retention of carbon dioxide in the lungs.
With the right patient,
use of a BPAP machine
at night can improve carbon dioxide and oxygen
levels during the day on
a chronic basis. Much
of the evidence for the
BPAP’s effectiveness
was speculative until a
study released this fall
in The Lancet journal
found that patients with
severe COPD and high
carbon dioxide levels
had a remarkable drop
in mortality rates and an
improved overall quality
of life,” he explained.
For more information,
call the Sleep Health Center at 980-5120.
DAILY CALENDAR
PLAYTIME
PACIFIC LUTHERAN WIND
ENSEMBLE AT THE
UNIVERSITY TENNESSEE: The
Pacific Lutheran University
Wind Ensemble is made
up of the some of the best
performers of wind and
percussion instruments at
Pacific Lutheran, and it’s
recognized as one of the
finest groups of its kind in
the Northwest. Following
the philosophy of a player
pool, adopting flexible
instrumentation according
to the composer’s intention, the full ensemble of
approximately 50 players
is soloistic and technically stunning performing
chamber music, selected
transcriptions, concerti and
original full ensemble repertoire spanning five centuries. The Wind Ensemble
is committed to championing new music and has
performed numerous world
premiers each year. The ensemble performs regularly
at the university, but next
week the group will travel
to Tennessee to perform.
Their performance — a joint
one with the University of
Tennessee Wind Ensemble
— takes place at 8 tonight
at the James R. Cox Auditorium in the Alumni Memorial Building, 1408 Middle
Drive on the UT campus in
Knoxville. It’s free to attend.
CLUBS,
ORGANIZATIONS
MARYVILLE-ALCOA ROTARY CLUB:
Will meet at 7 a.m. Tuesday
at Blount County Public
Library.
TENNESSEE NETWORKING TEAM:
Meets from 8 to 9:30 a.m.
each Wednesday at Blount
County Habitat for Humanity, 1017 Hampshire Drive in
Maryville. For more information , call Karen at 228-0290
or Kathy at 257-0013.
BLOUNT BUSINESS
PROFESSIONALS: Meets at
11:30 a.m. each Tuesday at
Courtyard Grill, 3749 Alcoa
Highway.
MARYVILLE BUSINESS NETWORK
INTERNATIONAL: A business referral organization
whose primary purpose is
to increase a small business
customer base, meets at
7 a.m. each Wednesday at
Green Meadow Country Club.
MARYVILLE KIWANIS CLUB:
Meets at noon each Tuesday
at Green Meadow Country
Club. Guests are welcome.
For more information, visit
www.maryvillekiwanis.org.
MUSIC, DANCING
ALNWICK COMMUNITY CENTER
KARAOKE: Karaoke is held at
6:30 p.m. on Thursdays and
Saturdays at $5 per person.
Concessions are available.
SQUARE DANCING: The Wagonwheeler Western Square
Dance Club dances 7 to
9:30 p.m. each Tuesday at
Springbrook Gym in Alcoa. For
information call Betty Bowers
at 805-8291.
SELF HELP,
SUPPORT GROUPS
EDITOR’S NOTE: For a listing of
Alcoholics Anonymous, AlAnon and Al-Ateen meetings,
please see this section every
Wednesday.
WEIGHT WATCHERS: Meetings are
held at 10:30 a.m. and 5 p.m.
on Tuesdays, at 9:30 a.m.
on Thursdays and at 8 and
9:30 a.m. on Saturdays at
Maryville Church of Christ, 611
Sherwood Drive in Maryville.
Weigh-ins are 30 minutes
prior to meeting times. Everyone welcome.
WEIGHT WATCHERS: Will meet
each Monday at Eusebia
Presbyterian Church, 1701
Burnett Station Road in
Maryville. Weigh-ins at 5:45
p.m. followed by meeting at
6:30 p.m.
ALATEEN ANONYMITY GROUP:
Meets from 4-5 p.m. every
Tuesday in Room 210, Lakeway Academy, Jett Street. For
information call 681-3337.
TOPS NO. TN 390, EAST ALCOA:
Meets each Tuesday at East
Alcoa Baptist Church. Weighin at 9:30 a.m. Program at
10:15 a.m. For information,
call 379-8329 or 984-0569.
TOPS NO. TN 404: Meets every
Tuesday at Chilhowee View
Community Center. Weigh-in
at 6 p.m. Program at 6:30
p.m. For information, call
983-9182.
TOPS NO. TN 0334, MARYVILLE:
Meets each Thursday at
Monte Vista Baptist Church.
Weigh-in at 5:30 p.m. Program at 6:30 p.m. For more
information, call 216-0285 or
209-5803.
CHRISTIAN SUPPORT GROUP FOR
PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH
SPECIAL NEEDS: Meets from
6:30-8 p.m. Wednesdays at
Fairview United Methodist
Church, 2508 Old Niles Ferry
Road. For information and to
RSVP child care needs, call
983-2080.
Feed children’s imagination
Author Budayr presents multicultural book day
BY MELANIE TUCKER
[email protected]
She loves to read and
she loves to write and she
encourages others, especially children, to do the
same.
Maryville’s Valerie
Budayr, a children’s book
author and blogger, started Multicultural Children’s Book Day last year
to raise awareness for
the children’s books that
celebrate diversity. In its
first year, there were 70
bloggers who participated and offered reviews of
multicultural books that
are out there for children
ages preschool through
high school. It all takes
place next Tuesday, Jan.
27 on the website multi
culturalchildrensbookday.
com. Parents and teachers will find a diversity
book list and resource
guide there as well.
The online virtual event
is definitely catching on,
Budayr said. She has partnered with Mia Wenjen
from Pragmatic Mom to
create this national event.
It was something that was
definitely needed, this
mom and author said.
Twenty years ago, there
really weren’t any books
that featured multicultural families. Today, the
population of this coun-
CELEBRATE THE DAY
To participate in Multicultural Children’s Book Day, go to
the website at www.multiculturalchildrensbookday.com
on Tuesday, Jan. 27. Bloggers will provide reviews of over
100 children’s books. Join a Twitter Party that same day,
from 9 to 10 p.m. using hashtag #ReadYourWorld.
VALERIE BUDAYR
try is changing and many
diverse backgrounds are
represented.
“In the United States,
37 percent of the population is of a multicultural
nature,” Budayr said. “But
only 10 percent of all children’s books published
are written from that perspective.”
If children do not relate
to the characters in the
book, many times they
don’t have an interest
in reading it, she said.
“They are inspired to
read about people like
them.”
This year, Budayr and
Wenjen have 17 sponsors where there were
just four last year. Both
of these women also blog
about children’ books.
Wenjen lives in Chi-
cago. Budayr moved to
Maryville 18 years ago.
Her husband is Dr. Mahdi Budayr.
The goal besides raising awareness about the
books that are available
is to also get more of
these books into classrooms and libraries.
To do that, Multicultural Children’s Book Day
as partnered with First
Book to offer a virtual
book drive that will help
donate children’s books
through their channels
next week.
MCCBD has teamed
up with the Children’s
Book Council as well to
highlight multicultur-
al/diverse authors and
illustrators.
On Jan. 27 along with
the blog tour, there will
be a Twitter Party hosting big book package
giveaways from sponsors and authors as well
as other book donations
given by several publishers. The Twitter Party
will be open from 9 to
10 p.m. using hashtag
#ReadYourWorld.
Budayr is a best-selling children’s author of
“The Fox Diaries.” She
is passionate about making children’s books
come alive and has her
own website, Jump into a
Book.
Recovery is living our way into thinking right
T
here are a lot of clichés in the rooms of
recovery.
I’ve talked about it
before, but it bears
repeating for the same
reason those clichés are
repeated so much —
addicts are a stubborn,
hard-headed lot with
selective memories. In
my addiction and in early
recovery, I heard what
I wanted to hear and
ignored what I didn’t.
The clichés may seem
trite, but the fact is,
they’re true and they
work. And they’re repeated often for the same
reason our readings are
repeated at the start
of every single meeting — because we need
to hear them, over and
over again. We need to be
reminded of what keeps
us clean, so that in times
of crisis, we can draw on
those readings and those
clichés to help us stay
clean.
I received a call last
week from a mother concerned about her son
who’s in treatment. He
seems to be doing well
there, but she’s concerned because his counselors are recommending
he enter a halfway house
after he completes his 28
days, and he doesn’t want
to go. It got me thinking
of something I heard early on that stuck with me
— we can’t think our way
into living right; we have
to live our way into thinking right.
No matter how much I
thought I could control
my using or make decisions that were best for
me, my addiction ran
the show. Even after a
JUST FOR
TODAY
STEVE
WILDSMITH
period of some abstinence, my addiction
would fool me into thinking that everything was
going to be OK, that I had
a handle on it all and that
I could rush back into living life the way I wanted
to live it.
No matter how much
I wanted to do the next
right thing, no matter
how much I thought I
knew about staying clean,
no matter how much I
thought I wanted to stay
clean, I couldn’t do it
on my own. I couldn’t
trust the thoughts that
went through my head,
because those thoughts
often sprang from my
addiction, which only
wanted to keep me high
and miserable.
When I first came to
recovery, I thought I
could do it my own way.
I thought the cliché that
“alcohol is a drug” didn’t
really apply to me and
that I could therefore
drink a little bit and be
OK. I thought that getting a sponsor and getting absolutely honest
wouldn’t work for me
because no one could
possibly understand what
I was going through.
How wrong I was. And
the more I tried to think
my way into acting and
living right, the more lost
I became.
It wasn’t until someone
with much more clean
time than I told me to
stop thinking so much
and just do what I needed
to do that I started looking at my thoughts and
actions and the disparity
between the two.
By thinking I had a
handle on my addiction,
I was fooling myself. By
acting like I was powerless and that my life was
unmanageable and doing
what those in recovery
suggested to remedy
those things, I had a shot
at getting better.
In other words, I had to
just do it. I had to go to
meetings, get a sponsor,
get honest, work some
Steps, get involved in service work, do all of the
things that those in recovery suggested. I couldn’t
sit back and think I had
everything figured out; I
had to take action.
Basically, I had to ignore
the fact that my mind
wanted to scoff at the
process of recovery. I had
to be willing to take suggestions and ask for help,
even though my ego hated to do so. I had to follow those suggestions,
regardless of how stupid
and useless I thought
they were, because those
who had gone before me
in the recovery process
assured me that those
suggestions would work.
They were right.
The more action I took,
the more my broken
way of thinking began to
mend, and the clearer it
became that I didn’t know
anything about staying
clean and living life. The
more suggestions I followed, the more I saw
just how screwed up my
thinking really was.
In other words, by
doing what was suggested, I came to believe
in the process of recovery because it was working for me. And the more
I came to believe, the
more willing I was to follow suggestions. And the
more suggestions I took,
the more my thinking fell
into line with the process
of recovery.
They say you can never be too dumb to get
the process of recovery,
but you sure can be too
smart. I was one of those
“smart” ones — I thought
I knew too much, and it
almost killed me. But by
acting my way into right
thinking, my life turned
around, and for that, I’m
grateful.
STEVE WILDSMITH is a recovering addict and the Weekend editor for The Daily
Times. Contact him at
[email protected]
or at 981-1144.
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THE DAILY TIMES
www.thedailytimes.com
Monday, January 26, 2015
Cuba pushes concessions as part of better ties
BY MICHAEL WEISSENSTEIN
AND ANNE-MARIE GARCIA
The Associated Press
HAVANA — The start
of talks on repairing 50
years of broken relations
appears to have left President Raul Castro’s government focused on winning
additional concessions
without giving in to U.S.
demands for greater freedoms, despite the seeming
benefits that warmer ties
could have for the country’s struggling economy.
Following the highestlevel open talks in three
decades between the two
nations, Cuban officials
remained firm in rejecting significant reforms
pushed by the United
States as part of President
Barack Obama’s surprise
move to re-establish ties
and rebuild economic relations with the Communistled country.
“One can’t think that in
order to improve and normalize relations with the
U.S., Cuba has to give up
the principles it believes
in,” Cuba’s top diplomat for
U.S. affairs, Josefina Vidal,
told The Associated Press
after the end of the talks.
“Changes in Cuba aren’t
negotiable.”
It’s not clear if Cuba’s
tough stance is part of normal negotiation tactics or
a hardened position that
could prevent the talks
from moving forward.
The Obama administration has dedicated significant political capital to rapprochement, but closer ties
with the economic giant
to the north also could
have major importance for
Cuba, which saw growth
slow sharply in 2014.
In a wide-ranging interview, Vidal said that before
deciding whether to allow
greater economic ties with
the U.S., Cuba was seeking more answers about
Obama’s dramatic move
to loosen the half-century
trade embargo.
Measures put into effect
this month range from permitting large-scale sales
of telecommunications
equipment to allowing U.S.
banks to open accounts in
Cuba, but Vidal said officials on the island want to
know if Cuba can buy such
gear on credit and whether
it is now free to use dollars
for transactions around
the world, not just those
newly permitted with U.S.
institutions. Until now, at
least, U.S. law and policy
has banned most foreign
dealings with Cuba.
“I could make an endless
list of questions and this is
going to require a series of
clarifications in order to
really know where we are
and what possibilities are
going to open up,” Vidal
said.
Obama also launched a
review of Cuba’s inclusion on the U.S. list of state
sponsors of terrorism and
Vidal said “it will be difficult to conceive of the
reestablishment of relations” while Cuba remains
on that list, which imposes
financial and other restrictions.
Shoeless dad wants
slippers inside his
daughters’ homes
HEBA KHAMAS | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
EGYPTIANS CARRY THE COFFIN of Shaimaa el-Sabagh, a 32-year-old mother who was shot Saturday in downtown Cairo while taking
part in a gathering commemorating the nearly 900 protesters killed in the revolution.
Egypt’s government again under fire
BY SARAH EL DEEB
The Associated Press
CAIRO — Images of a mortally
wounded protester, blood running
down her face and hair as she was
lifted from the pavement by a comrade, have touched off powerful criticism of Egypt’s government on the
anniversary of a revolution initially
sparked by police brutality.
The photos and videos show a
heavily armed police unit, with
some members masked, shooting
at a small, peaceful protest Saturday near Cairo’s Tahrir Square in
which 32-year-old Shaimaa el-Sabbagh took part.
A labor rights activist with a history of involvement in protests that
predated the country’s 2011 revolution, el-Sabbagh was also a poet and
mother of a 5-year-old boy.
She had traveled to Cairo from her
home in Alexandria to attend the
demonstration to demand police
and officials be held accountable for
protesters killed since the uprising
four years ago that forced autocrat
Hosni Mubarak from power.
She was killed by what authorities said was a blast of birdshot that
pierced her heart and lungs from
close range.
“I won’t listen to anyone who undermines my resolve,” she wrote on her
Facebook page Saturday before tak-
ing part in the protest, saying she
wouldn’t pay attention to those who
think there is no point in protesting
anymore.
Mahienour el-Masry, an activist and friend of el-Sabbagh’s,
described her as a firm believer in
change who used to take her son
along with her.
“She really had her heart in it,” elMasry said.
Her death renewed criticism of
police use of force and the government’s insistence that its crackdown
is reserved for terrorists and violent
protesters.
A new page has already appeared
on Facebook in her memory — a
reminder of a similar page honoring Khaled Said, a young Alexandria man beaten to death by police
agents in 2010. That page drew millions of followers and became one
of the main engines for organizing
the 2011 anti-Mubarak uprising in
Tahrir Square.
A cartoonist, Makhlouf, drew a cartoon dedicated to el-Sabbagh showing a flower confronting the barrel
of a gun.
“People were very sympathetic
when they learned” of el-Sabbagh’s
death, said El-Masry, el-Sabbagh’s
friend. She added: “When they kill a
woman with flowers among about 30
protesters, it is clear that the regime
... is only protecting itself.”
El-Sabbagh’s funeral Sunday in
Alexandria drew hundreds, many
chanting, “Down with military rule”
— a slogan President Abdel Fattah
el-Sissi, the former military chief
elected to office in May, has said he
will no longer tolerate. After her
burial, mourners likened el-Sissi to
Mubarak, chanting, “Down with elSissi Mubarak.”
“Her only crime is that she went
to lay a wreath of flowers on the
memorial of the martyrs in Tahrir. She then joined them,” Medhat
al-Zahed, the acting head of the
Popular Alliance Party, of which elSabbagh was a member, told reporters. He directly accused the police
of killing her.
Security officials have sought to
distance themselves from her death,
saying that they only used tear gas
against the protest and that violent
elements infiltrate rallies to “drive
a wedge” between the people and
the police.
During scattered small protests on
Sunday, at least 13 protesters were
killed in clashes in which police said
they were attacked.
The Popular Alliance Party was
one of the supporters of the military’s overthrow of Islamist President Mohammed Morsi in 2013. Ever
since, a security crackdown on Islamists has left hundreds killed and
thousands in jail.
Suspect falls through ceiling, lands near police
The Associated Press
HOUSTON — Authorities
say a man’s plans to break
into a Houston store fell
through, after he crashed
through the ceiling and
landed in front of police.
Houston police say the
man climbed a tree and
onto the roof of a Family
Dollar store early Sunday
morning, then managed to
break a hole in the roof and
enter the building.
But after making his way
into the store, the man fell
through the ceiling just as
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DEAR
ABBY
of his numerous family
members have offered to
teach him. But his nonchalant attitude toward
learning has made
everyone give up.
We know his parents
aren’t happy transporting him back and forth,
and we think they need
to push him toward
more independence.
We worry about what
will happen as his parents are getting older,
and none of us plan on
assuming the responsibility of transporting
him. Any suggestions? —
CONCERNED AUNT IN FLORIDA
DEAR CONCERNED AUNT:
How do you know the
parents aren’t happy
about transporting him?
Have they said it? If so,
the next time they vent,
tell them you’re concerned about their son
and why. He may have
additional problems
that you are unaware
of. He may simply be a
late bloomer or have no
incentive to be independent because his parents
are happy with him snug
in their nest.
However, if this is the
elephant in the room
that no one — including
the parents — wants to
acknowledge, keep mum
because if you don’t, you
will be resented for it.
DEAR ABBY is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known
as Jeanne Phillips. Contact
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Abby.com or P.O. Box 69440,
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DEAR ABBY: We have
a couple of daughters
who have told us we
must take off our shoes
if we visit them (and
our beautiful grandchildren). Although I’m not
sure of their reasons
for this, I do know for
sure that we have never
tracked any kind of dirt
into their house when
we visited. In fact, our
shoes are always clean.
I have very sensitive
feet. I cannot even walk
outside barefoot. On top
of that, my feet get cold
if they aren’t covered. I
have always worn house
slippers at home if I
didn’t have shoes on.
In a discussion with
my wife, I suggested that
their request was both
inconsiderate and disrespectful. I also said they
should provide alternatives to shoes for visitors
if they expect guests
to remove their shoes.
What is the proper etiquette in a situation like
this? — COLD FEET IN IOWA
DEAR COLD FEET: A person does not have to
track “dirt” into a house
to carry germs on the
soles of one’s shoes. If
guests have walked on
a sidewalk or driveway
where someone has
walked a dog or spat,
then I can see why a parent might want shoes
removed if children play
on the floor.
Good manners in a
case like this would be
to cheerfully cooperate
with your hosts and, if
slippers are not provided, to bring a pair over
that you can leave for the
next time you visit. It’s
a small price to pay for
spending time with your
beautiful grandchildren.
DEAR ABBY: We have a
27-year-old nephew who
lives at home with his
parents. He is a good
guy, but he doesn’t drive.
He has no physical or
mental impairments that
we are aware of, and all
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NOT ‘MEAN GIRLS’
Tennis pros talk about
friendship and
competition. 4B
JACKSON MAKES VERBAL COMMITMENT. 2B
COLLEGE BASKETBALL 3B | COMICS 8B | PUZZLES 9B
MONDAY, JANUARY 26, 2015
THE DAILY TIMES
1B
True Millenial: Coach K gets 1,000th
TOP 25 MEN
BY MIKE FITZPATRICK
AP Sports Writer
No. 5 DUKE 77, St. John’s 68
SETH WENIG | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DUKE HEAD COACH MIKE KRZYZEWSKI gestures during Sunday’s 77-68 win over
St. John’s in New York.
One flu over, the
residue’s a mess
NEW YORK — Coach 1K. How
grand.
Mike Krzyzewski earned his
1,000th career win Sunday, making him the first NCAA Division
I men’s coach to reach the milestone, when No. 5 Duke surged
past St. John’s in the second half
for a 77-68 victory at Madison
Square Garden.
Tyus Jones scored 22 points
and the Blue Devils (17-2) went
on an 18-2 run down the stretch
to put Krzyzewski in four figures
on his first try.
Jahlil Okafor had 17 points
and 10 rebounds, combining
with Jones and Quinn Cook (17
points) to fuel the decisive spurt
after Duke trailed by 10 with 8:15
remaining. That’s when the Blue
Devils finally began to look like a
Krzyzewski-coached team, picking up their defense and hustling
to loose balls as he urged them
on from one knee in front of the
bench. Duke outworked the Red
Storm on the glass and held them
without a field goal for 6 pivotal
minutes.
When the final horn sounded,
Duke players engulfed Krzyzewski, and he received a bear hug
from assistant Jeff Capel. Players were given T-shirts that read
“1,000 Wins And Kounting.”
“We were so gritty in the last
10 minutes,” Krzyzewski said. “It
was tough to get involved with
1,000. I was just trying to survive
this game, which is how you get
to 1,000.”
A public address announcement offered congratulations to
Krzyzewski from St. John’s, and
Duke fans at a packed Garden
chanted his name and held aloft
“K” signs.
“I’m in it right now. I wasn’t in
it until now,” he said. “You know,
to see the happiness of my players makes it good. We have to
keep it in perspective. It makes us
17-2 and we’ve got to go to Notre
Dame on Wednesday, but for this
moment, for basketball, for the
game and for this program, we’ll
SEE COACH, 5B
Making a charity case
M
aryville College’s
basketball teams
begin making up
games missed due to the
flu tonight traveling to
Fayetteville, N.C., for a
visit to Methodist University.
Jack Nicholson may
not be stealing the team
bus to take the Scots
fishing, but it’s nonetheless, the start of one
cuckoo of a road swing.
For the men, this is a
no-doubt-about-it must
road win. The Scots
knocked off the Covenant men by a dozen Saturday, but are
still looking for some
answers on consistent
defensive intensity and
adapting to how teams
are gimmicking up
junk defenses designed
to use extra bodies to
either deny, slow, mug,
frustrate or otherwise
defend Jaumonee Byrd
in the paint.
Methodist (6-10, 2-4)
is probably MC’s best
opportunity to bloodhound the search for
the confident swagger
that was misplaced at
the end of last season.
Maybe it’s locked up
in the basement of the
Cooper Athletic Center or was accidentally
CHECK
MARC’S
MARCUS
FITZSIMMONS
walled up in the Anderson Hall renovation in a
case of The Tell-Tale Mo
Jo. Whatever the reason,
since the quarterfinal
upset in the USA South
tournament Maryville’s
winning mindset has
been a Loch Ness Monster spotted only in blurry flashes.
Tonight starts a stretch
of five consecutive road
games as MC plays the
role of conscientious
student making up all
the work missed while
they were forced to stay
home with plague. Missing their scheduled N.C.
Reel on Jan. 9 and 10 for
SEE FLU , 5B
PATRICK MURPHY-RACEY | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TENNESSEE COACH HOLLY WARLICK pounds the floor in Sunday’s 59-51 win over No. 22 Georgia in Thompson-Boling Arena.
Lady Vols best Lambert’s Georgia at free-throw line
BY STEVE MEGARGEE
Jones continues
search for new OC
BY GRANT RAMEY
[email protected]
In a radio interview with
FootballScoop.com’s Scott
Roussel, Butch Jones on
Sunday shed some light
on what he continues to
look for while searching
for a new offensive coordinator.
As it has been from the
beginning, the emphasis
from Tennessee’s head
football coach has been
the term ‘fit.’
“Everything is about
fit,” Jones told Roussel,
appearing on an ESPN
Radio affiliate in Baton
Rouge, La. “The outside
world wants to look at
résumé, who’s the hottest thing going.
“There’s some great
offensive coordinators
out there, but for us everything is about a fit within
our staff.”
That would address, at
least in part, the name
that comes up more than
any other since the search
started on Thursday: Mike
DeBord.
‘Everything is
about fit.’
Butch Jones
UT head football coach
DeBord, currently an
administrator overseeing Michigan’s Olympic
teams, has been out of
football since 2012. He
last coached tight ends
with the Chicago Bears
after a two-year stint with
the Seattle Seahawks. He
was a head coach at Central Michigan — where he
inherited Jones as an assistant and promoted him to
offensive coordinator —
and worked two different
stints at Michigan, including roles as offensive coordinator and recruiting
coordinator. DeBord, 58,
has coached offensive line,
tight ends, quarterbacks
and wide receivers in a
coaching career that dates
back to 1982.
SEE SEARCH, 5B
AP Sports Writer
KNOXVILLE — On a
day when both teams
had all kinds of trouble
scoring from anywhere
else, No. 5 Tennessee
survived by feasting
from the free-throw
line.
The fifth-ranked Lady
Vols made their first 20
free throws Sunday and
TOP 25 WOMEN
No. 5 LADY VOLS 59
No. 22 Georgia 51
finished 20 of 21 from
the line in a 59-51 victory over No. 22 Georgia.
Had Isabelle Harrison
not misfired on Tennessee’s final free throw
with 46 seconds remaining, the Lady Vols would
have set a Southeastern
Conference single-game
record for most free
throws made without a
single miss.
“If we don’t hit big
free throws, we don’t
win the game,” Tennessee coach Holly Warlick
said.
Jordan Reynolds
scored a career-high 15
points as Tennessee (173, 7-0 SEC) maintained
its perfect home record
inflicting a loss that
could prove costly for
Georgia (17-4, 5-3).
TENNESSEE’S ALEXA MIDDLETON (SECOND FROM LEFT) loses the ball trying to get through Georgia’s Marjorie Butler (24) and Halle Washington (23) Sunday in Knoxville.
Georgia guard/forward Shacobia Barbee
was injured with less
than three minutes left
in the first half, later
went to the locker room
on crutches and didn’t
return to the game.
There was no immediate word on the severity
of the junior’s injury. If
Barbee misses a significant length of time, it
would create some tremendous pressure for
the Georgia’s roster. She
entered the day as the
Lady Bulldogs’ top scorer, 12 ppg, and secondleading rebounder, with
seven per contest.
“She’s one of our main
leaders,” said Mackenzie Engram, who led
Georgia Sunday with
14 points. “I think some
of us are going to have
to step up, some young
ones are going to have
to step up and become
the leaders that she (has
been).”
The free-throw disparity made the difference
in a game of spurts that
featured extended scoring droughts by each
team.
While Tennessee was
20-of-21 from the line,
Georgia was 3-of-7. Harrison’s three-point play
with 5:51 left put Tennessee ahead for good
and started a 12-1 run.
“Both teams probably
SEE LADY VOLS, 3B
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YOUR SPORTS. YOUR TIMES.
2B
THE DAILY TIMES
ON THE SCHEDULE
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
5 p.m. — Maryville at Methodist
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m. — Maryville at Methodist
ON THE AIR
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m................ Syracuse at North CarolinaeSPNN
7 p.m................ Delaware St. at North Carolina Central ............ESPNU
9 p.m. .............. Texas at Iowa St. ......................................................ESPN
9 p.m. .............. Prairie View A&M at Arkansas-Pine Bluff ........ESPNU
TENNIS
3 a.m. .............. Australian Open, quarterfinal..............................ESPN2
9 p.m. .............. Australian Open quarterfinals .............................ESPN2
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
7 p.m................ Texas A&M at South Carolina ..............................ESPN2
25 YEARS AGO FROM TIMES HISTORY
From the Jan. 26, 1990 edition of The Daily Times: The William Blount girls’ basketball team defeated Clinton, 87-76, in
1990. WB’s Leah Onks scored 42 points, breaking the school’s
single-game scoring record previously held by Rose Ballard
with 35.
New York
8
Southeast Division
W
L
Pct
GB
NFL
Atlanta
Washington
Miami
Charlotte
Orlando
Central Division
37
30
20
19
15
8
15
24
26
32
.822
.667
.455
.422
.319
—
7
161⁄2
18
23
W
L
Pct
GB
Chicago
Cleveland
Milwaukee
Detroit
Indiana
29
25
22
17
16
17
20
22
28
30
.630
.556
.500
.378
.348
—
31⁄2
6
111⁄2
13
GLANTZ-CULVER LINE
FAVORITE ....... OPEN .. TODAY .O/U ..UNDERDOG
New England .... +3 ........1 ...... (48).......Seattle
NCAA BASKETBALL
FAVORITE .................. LINE ................ UNDERDOG
at North Carolina ..... 11½ ...................Syracuse
Cleveland St. ................ 1..................at Oakland
at Detroit .......................5 ...................Wright St.
at Valparaiso .............14½............... Milwaukee
at Iowa St. ...................3½ .........................Texas
NBA
FAVORITE ..............LINE.... O/U ..........UNDERDOG
Sacramento ............. 4 ... (204) ...at New York
Portland ................5½ ... (194) .....at Brooklyn
at Oklahoma City .. 17 ... (207½) ..Minnesota
at Memphis .........10½ ... (208½) ...... Orlando
at New Orleans ......14 ... (191½) Philadelphia
at Utah .......................7 ... (197½) ......... Boston
at L.A. Clippers... 12½ ... (214½) ..........Denver
BASKETBALL
NCAA MEN’S SCORES
EAST
Albany (NY) 69, UMBC 55
Dominican (NY) 76, Georgian Court 70
Duke 77, St. John’s 68
Louisville 80, Pittsburgh 68
Maine 70, Hartford 61
Marist 73, Fairfield 67
NYU 85, Chicago 68
Post (Conn.) 68, Holy Family 65
Rhode Island 53, St. Bonaventure 48
Sciences (Pa.) 81, Caldwell 73
St. Peter’s 69, Siena 55
Stony Brook 61, Binghamton 54
UConn 66, South Florida 53
Vermont 61, Mass.-Lowell 50
W. New England 69, New England 63
Wilmington (Del.) 78, Nyack 72
SOUTH
Belmont 63, Tennessee St. 55
Boston College 64, Georgia Tech 62
Cincinnati 56, UCF 46
NJIT 72, South Alabama 55
Notre Dame 81, NC State 78, OT
Virginia 50, Virginia Tech 47
NCAA WOMEN’S SCORES
EAST
Albany (NY) 82, Hartford 58
Chicago 87, NYU 73
Dominican (NY) 67, Georgian Court 65
Drexel 61, Delaware 56
Iona 80, Canisius 62
Lehigh 65, Lafayette 60
Maine 56, UMBC 42
Mass.-Lowell 72, Vermont 63
New England 54, W. New England 50
Nyack 82, Wilmington (Del.) 75
Penn St. 76, Northwestern 75
Rutgers 66, Minnesota 61
Sciences (Pa.) 81, Caldwell 62
Seton Hall 99, Georgetown 85, OT
Syracuse 66, NC State 49
Villanova 81, St. John’s 69
SOUTH
Duke 74, North Carolina 67, OT
Florida 72, Arkansas 58
Florida St. 110, Wake Forest 80
Georgia Tech 68, Virginia 62
James Madison 73, Coll. of Charleston 53
Louisville 68, Miami 55
South Florida 64, Tulane 45
Tennessee 59, Georgia 51
Vanderbilt 55, Alabama 52
NBA
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
Toronto
Brooklyn
Boston
Philadelphia
W
L
Pct
GB
29
18
15
8
15
26
27
36
.659
.409
.357
.182
—
11
13
21
37
.178
211⁄2
ODDS
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Pct
GB
12
14
15
17
21
.721
.682
.667
.630
.523
—
11⁄2
2
31⁄2
81⁄2
W
L
Pct
GB
32
22
18
16
7
13
22
26
28
36
.711
.500
.409
.364
.163
—
91⁄2
131⁄2
151⁄2
24
Memphis
31
Houston
30
Dallas
30
San Antonio
29
New Orleans
23
Northwest Division
Portland
Oklahoma City
Denver
Utah
Minnesota
Pacific Division
Golden State
L.A. Clippers
Phoenix
Sacramento
L.A. Lakers
W
L
Pct
GB
36
30
26
16
12
6
14
20
27
32
.857
.682
.565
.372
.273
—
7
12
201⁄2
25
Saturday
Charlotte 76, New York 71
Milwaukee 101, Detroit 86
Memphis 101, Philadelphia 83
Utah 108, Brooklyn 73
Portland 103, Washington 96
Sunday
Miami 96, Chicago 84
Cleveland 108, Oklahoma City 98
L.A. Clippers 120, Phoenix 100
New Orleans 109, Dallas 106
Atlanta 112, Minnesota 100
Indiana 106, Orlando 99
San Antonio 101, Milwaukee 95
Toronto 114, Detroit 110
Golden State 114, Boston 111
Washington 117, Denver 115, OT
Houston at L.A. Lakers, late
Today
Portland at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Sacramento at New York, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Minnesota at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Orlando at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Boston at Utah, 9 p.m.
Denver at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Tuesday
Toronto at Indiana, 7 p.m.
Milwaukee at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Memphis at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Chicago at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Washington at L.A. Lakers, 10:30 p.m.
GOLF
HUMANA CHALLENGE
PAR SCORES
Sunday
p-PGA West, Arnold Palmer Private Course:
6,950; par 72
n-PGA West, Jack Nicklaus Private Course:
6,924; par 72
q-La Quinta Country Club: 7,060; par 72
La Quinta, Calif.
Purse: $5.7 million
Final
Bill Haas (500), $1,026,000
67p-63q-69n-67 — 266 -22
Charley Hoffman (167), $342,000
71q-63n-69p-64 — 267 -21
Brendan Steele (167), $342,000
67q-68n-68p-64 — 267 -21
Sung Joon Park (167), $342,000
68n-67p-67q-65 — 267 -21
Steve Wheatcroft (167), $342,000
65p-67q-68n-67 — 267 -21
Matt Kuchar (167), $342,000
65q-64n-71p-67 — 267 -21
Webb Simpson (85), $177,650
70p-66q-68n-64 — 268 -20
Boo Weekley (85), $177,650
70p-66q-67n-65 — 268 -20
Justin Thomas (85), $177,650
68q-63n-68p-69 — 268 -20
Colt Knost (68), $136,800
71p-67q-68n-63 — 269 -19
Francesco Molinari (68), $136,800
64p-71q-67n-67 — 269 -19
Ryan Palmer (68), $136,800
71q-61n-68p-69 — 269 -19
Erik Compton (68), $136,800
66p-66q-67n-70 — 269 -19
Nick Watney (57), $108,300
67q-64n-71p-68 — 270 -18
Shawn Stefani (54), $91,200
75p-66q-63n-67 — 271 -17
Lucas Glover (54), $91,200
68n-69p-66q-68 — 271 -17
Martin Laird (54), $91,200
68n-66p-68q-69 — 271 -17
Alex Cejka (54), $91,200
68q-64n-70p-69 — 271 -17
Michael Putnam (54), $91,200
63n-67p-69q-72 — 271 -17
Mark Hubbard (50), $66,405
69p-69q-67n-67 — 272 -16
James Hahn (50), $66,405
67q-67n-73p-65 — 272 -16
John Peterson (50), $66,405
64n-70p-69q-69 — 272 -16
Scott Pinckney (50), $66,405
64q-67n-69p-72 — 272 -16
Phil Mickelson (45), $46,170
71q-66n-68p-68 — 273 -15
David Lingmerth (45), $46,170
68p-72q-65n-68 — 273 -15
David Toms (45), $46,170
68q-71n-65p-69 — 273 -15
Brian Davis (45), $46,170
67n-69p-68q-69 — 273 -15
Rory Sabbatini (45), $46,170
71p-68q-63n-71 — 273 -15
Patrick Reed (45), $46,170
65q-70n-67p-71 — 273 -15
Mark Wilson (36), $31,091
64n-73p-69q-68 — 274 -14
Jason Bohn (36), $31,091
67n-72p-66q-69 — 274 -14
Pat Perez (36), $31,091
66q-68n-70p-70 — 274 -14
Scott Piercy (36), $31,091
69q-70n-67p-68 — 274 -14
George McNeill (36), $31,091
68q-68n-68p-70 — 274 -14
Graham DeLaet (36), $31,091
68n-70p-66q-70 — 274 -14
John Huh (36), $31,091
69n-68p-70q-67 — 274 -14
Harris English (36), $31,091
67n-68p-69q-70 — 274 -14
Cameron Tringale (36), $31,091
69q-70n-68p-67 — 274 -14
Jeff Overton (36), $31,091
68p-73q-66n-67 — 274 -14
Fabian Gomez (36), $31,091
69q-68n-71p-66 — 274 -14
Kevin Streelman (27), $19,950
71q-69n-66p-69 — 275 -13
Brendon de Jonge (27), $19,950
69p-65q-71n-70 — 275 -13
Chad Collins (27), $19,950
68p-72q-67n-68 — 275 -13
Matt Jones (27), $19,950
76n-67p-64q-68 — 275 -13
Billy Horschel (27), $19,950
71q-67n-65p-72 — 275 -13
Bill Lunde (27), $19,950
72p-69q-67n-67 — 275 -13
Sean O’Hair (27), $19,950
68q-67n-73p-67 — 275 -13
Billy Hurley III (20), $14,036
68q-69n-68p-71 — 276 -12
J.J. Henry (20), $14,036
67n-67p-72q-70 — 276 -12
Kevin Na (20), $14,036
69p-68q-69n-70 — 276 -12
Keegan Bradley (20), $14,036
68q-70n-69p-69 — 276 -12
Jason Kokrak (20), $14,036
65n-68p-70q-73 — 276 -12
Troy Merritt (20), $14,036
71p-69q-68n-68 — 276 -12
Blayne Barber (20), $14,036
69n-72p-67q-68 — 276 -12
Adam Hadwin (20), $14,036
72q-70n-66p-68 — 276 -12
Patrick Rodgers (0), $12,882
70q-67n-69p-71 — 277 -11
Chris Kirk (14), $12,882
70p-68q-69n-70 — 277 -11
Charles Howell III (14), $12,882
67q-68n-72p-70 — 277 -11
Tony Finau (10), $12,426
71q-65n-68p-74 — 278 -10
Martin Flores (10), $12,426
68p-65q-71n-74 — 278 -10
Steven Alker (10), $12,426
68n-66p-69q-75 — 278 -10
Gonzalo Fdez-Castano (10), $12,426
69p-72q-66n-71 — 278 -10
Retief Goosen (10), $12,426
68p-70q-69n-71 — 278 -10
Scott Stallings (5), $11,856
68q-67n-71p-73 — 279 -9
Danny Lee (5), $11,856
68q-69n-70p-72 — 279 -9
Alex Prugh (5), $11,856
70p-70q-67n-72 — 279 -9
Brice Garnett (5), $11,856
69n-69p-70q-71 — 279 -9
D.J. Trahan (5), $11,856
68p-71q-69n-71 — 279 -9
MONDAY, JANUARY 26, 2015
Heath Slocum (1), $11,400
66n-72p-68q-74 — 280 -8
Scott Verplank (1), $11,400
70q-65n-72p-73 — 280 -8
Nicholas Thompson (1), $11,400
72p-67q-69n-72 — 280 -8
Robert Garrigus (1), $11,172
71n-69p-68q-74 — 282 -6
MITSUBISHI ELECTRIC
CHAMPIONSHIP
Scores
Sunday
At Hualalai Golf Course
Kaupulehu-Kona, Hawaii
Purse: $1.8 million
Yardage: 7,107; Par 72
Final
Miguel A. Jimenez (309), $309,000
69-64-66 —
199
Mark O’Meara (187), $187,000
69-67-64 —
200
Fred Couples (133), $133,000
72-64-66 —
202
Rocco Mediate (112), $111,500
66-67-70 —
203
Olin Browne (77), $76,750
68-67-69 —
204
Bernhard Langer (77), $76,750
72-65-67 —
204
Colin Montgomerie (77), $76,750
70-66-68 —
204
Wes Short, Jr. (77), $76,750
68-70-66 —
204
Bart Bryant (54), $53,500
68-69-69 —
206
Corey Pavin (54), $53,500
67-72-67 —
206
Loren Roberts (0), $42,750
75-68-64 —
207
Kirk Triplett (0), $42,750
73-65-69 —
207
Scott Dunlap (0), $35,219
69-70-69 —
208
David Frost (0), $35,219
71-69-68 —
208
Tom Lehman (0), $35,219
73-65-70 —
208
Kenny Perry (0), $35,219
69-69-70 —
208
Michael Allen (0), $27,125
73-68-68 —
209
Roger Chapman (0), $27,125
70-73-66 —
209
Paul Goydos (0), $27,125
68-71-70 —
209
John Riegger (0), $27,125
74-67-68 —
209
Russ Cochran (0), $20,625
69-73-68 —
210
John Cook (0), $20,625
68-74-68 —
210
Tom Pernice Jr. (0), $20,625
70-71-69 —
210
Esteban Toledo (0), $20,625
68-69-73 —
210
Tom Watson (0), $20,625
68-74-68 —
210
Mark Wiebe (0), $20,625
69-69-72 —
210
Fred Funk (0), $17,125
74-67-70 —
211
Jay Haas (0), $15,750
69-72-71
—
212
Peter Jacobsen (0), $15,750
74-71-67
—
212
Davis Love III (0), $14,750
70-69-74 —
213
Jeff Maggert (0), $14,750
71-72-70
—
213
Joe Daley (0), $13,750
73-71-70
—
214
Nick Price (0), $13,750
72-72-70 —
214
Brad Faxon (0), $13,000
71-74-70
—
215
Craig Stadler (0), $12,500
70-69-77 —
216
Jeff Sluman (0), $12,000
72-72-74
—
218
Hale Irwin (0), $11,250
73-74-74 —
221
Curtis Strange (0), $11,250
74-71-76
—
221
Kohki Idoki (0), $10,750
77-71-77
—
225
Ben Crenshaw (0), $10,500
85-85-85 —
255
CHRIS CARLSON | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FORMER PRESIDENT BILL CLINTON (RIGHT) HANDS BILL HAAS the
trophy after Haas won the Humana Challenge Sunday in La
Quinta, Calif.
Haas pulls away
to win Humana
BY JOHN NICHOLSON
AP Sports Writer
HOCKEY
SPHL
Knoxville
Peoria
Louisiana
Columbus
Pensacola
RiverKings
Fayetteville
Huntsville
GP W L OL
Pts
GF GA
33
33
33
31
31
34
30
31
42
41
40
38
38
36
32
15
101100
98 87
104105
88 87
103 79
90 94
81 86
69 96
20
19
18
19
17
17
13
5
11
11
11
12
10
15
11
21
2
3
4
0
4
2
6
5
NOTE: Two points are awarded for a win,
one point for an overtime or shootout loss.
Overtime or shootout losses are only denoted in the OL column, not the loss column.
Friday’s Games
Knoxville 4, Columbus 1
Peoria 4, Mississippi RiverKings 1
Louisiana 4, Huntsville 2
Saturday
Mississippi RiverKings 4, Peoria 2
Fayetteville 4, Pensacola 3
Columbus 5, Knoxville 2
Louisiana 2, Huntsville 1
Tuesday
Columbus at Mississippi RiverKings, 11:35
a.m.
Thursday
Fayetteville at Knoxville, 8:35 p.m.
Peoria at Louisiana, 8:05 p.m.
LA QUINTA, Calif. — Bill
Haas pulled ahead with a
20-foot birdie putt on the
par-4 16th and parred the
final two holes for a onestroke victory Sunday in
the Humana Challenge.
Haas closed with a
5-under 67 for his sixth
PGA Tour title and first
since the 2013 AT&T
National. He won the 2010
event at PGA West for his
first tour victory.
Haas was making his first
start since November. He
took the long break to rest
his left wrist, fractured in
April when he fell down
stairs at Hilton Head.
Part of a six-man tie for
the lead after a par save on
the par-3 15th, Haas got to
22 under with the birdie
putt on 16 on the Arnold
Palmer Private Course.
Haas two-putted for par
from 20 feet on the par-5
18th after pulling off an
awkward layup with his
ball perched on the front
lip of a right-side fairway
bunker.
His father, Jay, won the
1998 tournament. Haas’
great uncle, 85-year-old
Bob Goalby, watched the
final holes. Goalby won
the 1968 Masters.
Matt Kuchar, Charley
Hoffman, Brendan Steele,
Steve Wheatcroft and Sung
Joon Park tied for second.
Hoffman and Steele shot
64, and Park had a 65, and
Kuchar and Wheatcroft
shot 67.
Kuchar had a two-stroke
lead with four holes to
play Saturday, but bogeyed
three of the last four holes
in the third round to fall a
stroke back.
Haas eagled the par-5
sixth for a share of the lead,
setting up his 15-foot putt
with a 260-yard, 5-wood
from the dormant left
rough with the ball below
his feet.
The 32-year-old former Wake Forest player
birdied the par-4 eighth,
punching a low, spinning
wedge from 70 yards to 8
feet, and got to 21 under
with a 7-foot birdie putt
on the par-5 11th.
He made a key par save
on the 131-yard 15th to keep
a share of the lead. Shortsided in the left bunker, he
blasted to 6 feet.
Haas broke out of the tie
on 16, and then missed a
10-foot birdie try on the
par-3 17th with a bighorn
sheep grazing nearby at
the foot of the Santa Rosa
Mountains.
On the par-5 18th, with
water running the length
of the hole on the left, his
drive stopped on the top
edge off the right-side
bunker. Standing in the
bunker with the ball in the
dormant grass at nearly
waist level, he choked up
on an 8-iron and slashed
80 yards down the fairway.
That left him 170 yards to
the green and he hit safely
to the middle.
Justin Thomas, Webb
Simpson and Boo Weekley tied for seventh, two
strokes back.
Thomas, playing alongside Haas and two-time
heart transplant recipient Erik Compton in the
final group, dropped out
of the lead on 16 with a
double bogey after hitting
his approach from a bunker into the All-American
Canal. The 21-year-old former Alabama player birdied 18 for a 69.
Simpson finished with a
64, and Weekley shot 65.
Compton had a 70 to tie
for 10th, three strokes back
at 19 under.
Phil Mickelson shot his
second straight 68 to tie
for 24th at 15 under in his
first start since the Ryder
Cup in September.
DIVOTS: Colt Knost had
a 63 — the best round of
the day — to finish in the
tie for 10th at 19 under. He
was in the first group off
the 10th tee and played his
final nine holes behind
Haas’ group. ... Patrick
Reed, the winner last year,
shot a 71 to join Mickelson
in the group at 15 under. He
started the year in Hawaii
with a playoff victory in
the Tournament of Champions.
Jackson gives verbal commitment to play football at Stanford
BY JOHN BRICE
AND GRANT RAMEY
Dylan
Jackson
[email protected]
There’s was just something about
Stanford University that Dylan
Jackson couldn’t shake. So much
so that Sunday night, the threetime state champion Maryville
defensive end and three-star prospect committed to play college
football for the Cardinal.
“I made a list in the car on the
way back (from visiting Georgia Tech), pros and cons of each
school,” Jackson said. “Looking
at it, I knew in my heart Stanford
was the right pick for me.
“(I) kept an open mind, but Stanford was in the back of my mind
the entire time. It was a great decision for me.”
Jackson, listed as the No. 16 over-
The Maryville defensive end
is listed at the No. 16 overall
prep prospect in the state.
all prep prospect in the state and
the 31st best strongside defensive
end in the nation according to
Rivals.com, was previously committed to Tennessee. Aside from
offers from Alabama, Northwestern and Vanderbilt, the closing
stretch of his recruitment included hard sales from LSU and Georgia Tech.
“Coming to the big decision at
the end was a big deal for me,”
Jackson said. “It’s been stressful
for me throughout the process but
it was huge for me and my fam-
ily. Took a big load off my shoulders. Excited to begin the next
chapter.”
That next chapter started with a
phone call to Stanford head coach
David Shaw.
“I called Coach Shaw and let
him know I’m ready to become a
Stanford Cardinal,” Jackson said.
“It was a good moment. He said
he’s very excited to get me out
there and join this class, this big
family.”
Jackson said his dad, John, and
his mom, Maureen, were in the
car with him during the pros-andcons decision process. And selling
mom on a school over 2,400 miles
from Maryville wasn’t easy.
“We all knew that Stanford was
a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity,” Jackson said. “Mom understands the distance, it’s hard for
her, but she realizes this is best
for me and our future as the Jackson family.”
Jackson was accompanied on
the visit to Stanford by his dad
and his grandfather, Fred, who
he called Sunday night to deliver
the news.
Stanford sold the lengthy, athletic Jackson — who’s listed at
6-foot-5, 243 pounds — on playing
defensive end in the Cardinal’s
3-4 scheme.
“They liked how I can cover the
edge, tall, lanky guy who can keep
edge and containment and get
good pass rush and help stop the
run,” Jackson said.
The academic tradition of the
University sold itself.
“I took the ACT course a couple
of times and then last time I went
in with an open mind, and I got the
score I needed,” Jackson said. “All
the hard work finally paid off.
“It definitely meant a lot. It’s not
a four-year decision but a 40-year
(decision). It will impact my life,
the career I’m going to have and
maybe even who I’m going to marry someday. Impact me the rest
of my life.”
As of Sunday night, the whole
decision and process still felt
somewhat surreal.
“A little bit, it all kind of feels like
a dream,” Jackson said. “Especially
the way we won state — congrats
again to T.D. Blackmon. All of us
seniors, we couldn’t go out in a
better way. But winning a state
championship, as coach (George)
Quarles says, ‘don’t let this be
best thing you do.’ It’s time for
us to go out and make the most
of our lives.”
SPORTS | 3B
THE DAILY TIMES
Monday, January 26, 2015
www.thedailytimes.com
Duke
needs OT
to knock
off UNC
AROUND THE SOUTHEASTERN CONFERENCE
No. 14 KENTUCKY 83, MISSOURI 69: Jennifer O’Neill
scored 19 points to pace a balanced attack and No. 14 Kentucky outlasted Missouri.
Kentucky led 43-40 at the break but Missouri responded
and went up 50-48 with 14:07 left. The Wildcats scored the
next 11 points, including a 3-pointer by Bria Goss, and Missouri never got closer than six points the rest of the way.
FLORIDA 72, ARKANSAS 58: Florida hit 13-of-13 free throw
attempts in the final 1:42 and earned a much-needed win
the Stephen C. O’Connell Center in Gainesville. The win
snapped UF’s four-game losing streak and brought the
Gators back to .500 overall (10-10, 2-5) this season.
Carlie Needles and January Miller each scored 16 points for
the Gators, while redshirt senior Kayla Lewis recorded 10
points, six rebounds and two steals.
AP TOP 25 — HOW THEY FARED
GARY LANDERS | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CINCINNATI GUARD MAKENZIE CANN (5) drives the ball against
Connecticut forward Morgan Tuck (3) Sunday in Cincinnati.
No. 2 CONNECTICUT 96, CINCINNATI 31: Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis scored 12 of her 19 points in the first half, missing
only one shot all game, and No. 2 Connecticut rolled to its
17th straight victory.
The Huskies (18-1, 8-0 American Athletic) haven’t lost since
falling at Stanford 88-86 in overtime on Nov. 17. UConn’s
seven wins in January have come by 36, 38, 59, 34, 42, 55
and 65 points.
Mosqueda-Lewis went 7 of 8 from the field, playing only 16
minutes. Breanna Stewart also had 19 points in 16 minutes.
Connecticut went to its bench midway through the first
half of a game that was lopsided from the start.
No. 4 LOUISVILLE 68, MIAMI 55: Myisha Hines-Allen
scored a career-high 23 points, making 10 of her 11 shots,
to help Louisville rally to beat Miami. Louisville (18-2, 6-1
Atlantic Coast Conference) held Miami to a single field goal
in the first 10 1/2 minutes of the second half and built a
56-39 with 5:38 to play. The Cardinals trailed by 13 in the
first half, falling behind early for the second straight game,
but withstood a late charge to atone for Thursday’s loss at
Florida State.
No. 7 MARYLAND 84, INDIANA 74: Lexie Brown scored 21
points and Brionna Jones added 10 and 14 rebounds to help
Maryland remain unbeaten in Big Ten play with a win over
Indiana.
Maryland (17-2, 8-0 Big Ten) has won 11 straight since falling
to Notre Dame on Dec. 3.
IOWA STATE 58, No. 8 TEXAS 57: Nikki Moody scored 14
points, including two free throws with 17. 5 seconds left, to
help Iowa State upset Texas.
Texas guard Brooke McCarty then missed a jump shot with
two seconds left.
No. 9 OREGON STATE 67, NO. 13 ARIZONA STATE 54:
Jamie Weisner scored 21 points to help Oregon State beat
Arizona State to take over sole possession of first place in
the Pac-12. Oregon State (18-1, 8-0 Pac-12) used a 14-0 run
early in the second half to pull away from Arizona State
(18-2, 7-1) to win its eighth in a row and end the Sun Devils’
14-game winning streak, one short of the school record.
AP Basketball Writer
PATRICK MURPHY-RACEY | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TENNESSEE COACH HOLLY WARLICK reacts to Sunday’s win against Georgia in Knoxville.
LADY VOLS: Georgia goes on early 14-3 run
FROM 1B
did what they wanted
to do defensively for
the most part,” Georgia
coach and Blount County
native Andy Landers said.
“I thought Tennessee
defended well and made
it hard for us to score.
I thought we defended
well and made it hard
for them to score except,
when they scored, we
took unnecessary risk and
ended up fouling them
and putting them at the
free-throw line so much
that it affected the game
big-time.
“I’m really upset with
the way that we fouled.
We didn’t affect anything.
They have five, six threepoint baskets. They hit
the shot. We couldn’t have
fouled them very hard.
We’re out of position and
we’re fouling someone for
no reason whatsoever.”
Georgia went on a 14-3
run to grab a 22-14 lead
late in the first half. Tennessee responded with
14 straight points and led
30-25 at halftime. Georgia
started the second half
on a 10-0 run to go ahead
35-30, but Tennessee
scored the next 12 points.
Tennessee missed its
first 12 shots of the second half before Cierra
Burdick’s putback with
11:52 remaining. Georgia
later went scoreless for
a stretch of 6 minutes, 45
seconds.
TIP-INS: Georgia —
Although the Lady Vols
lead the all-time series
46-15 or 47-15, depending
on which school’s doing
the accounting (Tennessee counts a 1969 victory that isn’t included
in Georgia’s records),
Georgia’s 15 wins are tied
for the second-most of
any team over Tennessee.
Maryville College also
has 15 wins over Tennessee, and Louisiana Tech
leads with 17.
Tennessee — The Lady
Vols beat Georgia for the
seventh straight time and
the 15th time in their last
16 meetings. Georgia’s
only win in that stretch
WOMEN’S TOP 25
No. 15 DUKE 74,
No. 12 N. Carolina 67, OT
GEORGIA COACH ANDY LANDERS reacts to a call that went Tennessee’s way Sunday in Knoxville.
SEC WOMEN
Team
S Carolina
Tennessee
Miss State
Kentucky
Texas A&M
Georgia
Ole Miss
LSU
Vanderbilt
Florida
Arkansas
Missouri
Alabama
Auburn
SEC
6-0
7-0
5-2
5-2
4-2
5-3
4-3
4-3
3-4
2-5
1-6
1-6
1-6
0-6
ALL
18-0
17-3
20-2
16-4
16-4
17-4
14-6
10-9
12-8
10-10
11-8
11-9
12-10
9-10
Sunday
Florida 72, Arkansas 58
Vanderbilt 55, Alabama 52
Tennessee 59, Georgia 51
Kentucky 83, Missouri 69
Today
7 p.m. TexasA&M at SCarolina
9 p.m. Miss St at Auburn
Thursday
7 p.m. Alabama at SCarolina
7 p.m. Missouri at Florida
7 p.m. Tennessee at Kentucky
8 p.m. Auburn at Arkansas
8 p.m. Vandy at Miss St
8 p.m. Ole Miss at LSU
was a 53-50 decision in
Athens on Jan. 21, 2010.
TESTING DEPTH: Georgia
lost Barbee late in the
first half and had other
key players battling foul
trouble. Tennessee’s two
leading scorers — Ariel
Massengale and Harrison
— were both held score-
less for the first 28 minutes. That forced both
teams to rely on unusual contributors as each
team’s bench recorded 25
points.
“Our bench kept us in
the game the first half,”
Warlick said. “We keep
preaching to them your
time is coming. It’s coming. Today, the time
(came). They stepped up
and did some big things.”
NEXT UP: Georgia travels
to No. 14 Kentucky on Feb.
1. Tennessee visits Kentucky on Thursday.
NO. 5 TENNESSEE 59, NO. 22 GEORGIA 51
GEORGIA (17-4): Griffin 3-13 0-0 8, Hempe
0-2 0-0 0, Donald 5-7 1-3 12, Butler 3-6 0-0 6,
Ford 0-7 0-1 0, Roberts 2-5 1-2 6, Barbee 1-5
1-1 3, Washington 1-3 0-0 2, Engram 6-9 0-0
14. Totals 21-57 3-7 51.
TENNESSEE (17-3): Reynolds 5-12 5-5 15,
Burdick 2-5 0-0 4, Graves 2-5 0-0 4, Carter
1-4 0-0 2, Harrison 2-6 5-6 9, Moore 0-0 0-0
0, Massengale 3-15 2-2 10, Dunbar 1-1 0-0 3,
Nared 1-1 5-5 7, Middleton 1-4 3-3 5. Totals
18-53 20-21 59.
Halftime: Tennessee 30-25. 3-Point Goals—
Georgia 6-24 (Engram 2-4, Griffin 2-9,
Donald 1-1, Roberts 1-3, Barbee 0-2, Butler
0-2, Ford 0-3), Tennessee 3-17 (Massengale
2-12, Dunbar 1-1, Reynolds 0-2, Carter 0-2).
Fouled Out: Engram. Rebounds: Georgia 29
(Butler, Donald 5),Tennessee 45 (Harrison
9). Assists: Georgia 14 (Butler 6), Tennessee
6 (Graves, Harrison, Massengale, Middleton,
Moore, Reynolds 1). Total Fouls: Georgia 23,
Tennessee 13. ATT: 13,428.
E. Michigan player killed in crash
Passenger in junior player’s car also dies
The Associated Press
MEL EVANS | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
RUTGERS HEAD COACH C. VIVIAN STRINGER (RIGHT) and her
assistant coach Chelsea Newton (left) react to play Sunday
in Piscataway, N.J.
No. 25 RUTGERS 66, No. 21 MINNESOTA 61: Tyler Scaife
scored a season-high 28 points, on 12-of-21 shooting, to
lead Rutgers past Minnesota. After Betnijah Laney missed
the front end of a one-and-one, Minnesota’s Mikayla Bailey
hit a 3 on the other end to pull within 64-61 with 16 seconds left. But Briyona Canty hit a streaking Kahleah Copper
with a full-court pass for a layup to seal the win.
Scaife scored 13 during a 25-2 run that gave Rutgers (14-5,
5-3 Big 10) its biggest lead, 25-5, midway through the first
half. Amanda Zahui B. led Minnesota (16-4, 5-3) back into
the game, scoring 20 of her career-high 36 before halftime
and pulling the Golden Gophers within six, 37-31, at the
break.
No. 23 SYRACUSE 66, N.C. STATE 49: Alexis Peterson
scored 27 points and Syracuse exploded in the second half
to beat North Carolina State. The Orange outscored the
Wolfpack 40-20 after intermission. N.C. State (12-8, 3-4
ACC) led 29-26 at the break and added three more on
Dominique Wilson’s 3-pointer on the first possession when
play resumed.
YPSILANTI TOWNSHIP, Mich. — An Eastern Michigan University
women’s basketball player
and another student were
killed early Sunday when
their car crossed the center line of a road and hit an
oncoming vehicle, authorities say.
The collision happened
about 1 a.m. in Ypsilanti Township, west of the
school’s Ypsilanti campus,
the Washtenaw County
sheriff’s department said
in a statement.
Shannise Heady, a 21-yearold junior forward for the
Eagles, was driving when
her car veered into the
vehicle of a 22-year-old
driver, who was taken to
a hospital with non-life
threatening injuries, the
sheriff’s department said.
Heady, of Hazel Crest,
Illinois, and her 23-year-old
passenger, Jordan Hopkins,
CHAPEL HILL, N.C.
— Duke’s Elizabeth Williams again saved her best
for North Carolina.
The senior scored a
career-high 33 points
to help the 15th-ranked
Blue Devils beat the 12thranked Tar Heels 74-67 in
overtime Sunday.
A year after setting
a career high with 28
points against UNC,
an Eastern Michigan senior
from Dexter, died.
The circumstances of the
crash remain under investigation, the sheriff’s department said.
“This is a tragic loss,” said
Eastern Michigan University President Susan Martin.
“Our thoughts and prayers
are with Jordan’s and Shannise’s families and friends
at this difficult time.”
Heady transferred to the
Eastern Michigan in January 2013 from Seton Hall
University, in northern
New Jersey. She appeared
in 22 games for the Eagles
last season, averaging 5
points in 14.4 minutes. In
17 games this season, she
was averaging 23.2 minutes
and 7.9 points.
“Obviously this is one of
our toughest days as a program ... as we mourn the
loss of Shannise,” coach
Tory Verdi said in a statement. “We are truly devastated. ... Shannise was
Williams finished with
the most points ever by a
Duke player in the fierce
rivalry. With Williams
going 14-for-25 from the
field, the Blue Devils (146, 5-2 Atlantic Coast Conference) snapped a fivegame road losing streak
— their longest in two
decades.
“When you come to
Duke, you love to play
Carolina,” Williams said.
“I think for me it was nice
to get the ball inside and
just try to be a beast in
there.”
Duke coach Joanne P.
McCallie said Williams
was “in attack mode and
really getting after it.”
She certainly carried the
load, scoring 15 of her
team’s 28 first-half points
and half her team’s 62
points in regulation.
She also had 10 rebounds
and four blocks, one coming on Latifah Coleman’s
layup on the final play of
regulation.
“We couldn’t do anything with her,” UNC
coach Sylvia Hatchell said. “She always
plays really well against
us. And she did that
tonight.”
Williams scored in the
post to start overtime,
then found Rebecca
Greenwell for a 3-pointer
off an offensive rebound
as part of an 8-0 run that
put Duke in control.
Greenwell, a redshirt
freshman, finished with
14 points and a seasonbest 14 rebounds.
Allisha Gray scored 20
points for the Tar Heels
(17-4, 4-3), who shot 30
percent and went 5-for30 from 3-point range.
That included a first-half
run of 15 straight misses
and a 5-for-25 performance over the final 12
minutes of regulation
and overtime.
“If we just had knocked
down a couple more 3s,
then we’d be happy right
now,” Hatchell said.
It marked the f irst
meeting with neither
team in the top 10 since
March 2000, according
to STATS.
UP NEXT: Duke hosts
Pittsburgh on Thursday.
UNC hosts Boston College on Feb. 1.
MICE
MUNCHING?
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
THIS PHOTO provided by Eastern Michigan University shows
Shannise Heady.
not only an inspiration to
all of us, but she brought
energy and liveliness to
our team.”
Mid-American Conference Commissioner Jon A.
Steinbrecher said he “was
shocked and saddened to
learn of this tragic event.”
The university said it
would make counseling
available to those who
seek it.
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VANDERBILT 55, ALABAMA 52: After seeing a 16-point
first-half advantage turn into a two-point deficit near the
midway mark of the second half, the Commodores came
up with a series of huge plays in the final eight minutes to
earn their first SEC road win of the season.
Vanderbilt freshman Paris Kea hit two free throws with 10
seconds left to give the Commodores (12-8, 3-4) a theepoint lead, and Alabama (12-10, 1-6) missed a potential
tying 3-pointer at the buzzer.
BY AARON BEARD
4B | SPORTS
THE DAILY TIMES
www.thedailytimes.com
Monday, January 26, 2015
FRIENDLY RIVALRIES
JOHN RAOUX | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SCOTT DIXON DRIVES the Ford DP to Victory Lane with co-drivers (from left)Kyle Larson, Tony Kanaan, Jamie McMurray and
car owner Chip Ganassi after winning Sunday’s IMSA 24 hour
auto race at Daytona International Speedway in Daytona
Beach, Fla.
Ganassi ‘star car’
takes Rolex 24
BY JENNA FRYER
AP Auto Racing Writer
DAYTONA BEACH,
Fla. — Scott Dixon drove
a gritty and lengthy final
leg Sunday, leading the
“star car” to Chip Ganassi
Racing’s record-breaking
sixth victory in the Rolex
24 at Daytona.
The three-time IndyCar champion relieved
Kyle Larson, NASCAR’s
reigning rookie of the year,
with 3 hours, 32 minutes
remaining in the twiceround-the-clock endurance race. Dixon was
tasked with conserving
fuel and making no mistakes in pursuit of the
Rolex watch.
The Iceman delivered,
and made it look easy,
too.
He totaled more than
seven hours behind the
wheel of the Target/Ford
EcoBoost Riley Prototype,
and had teammates Larson, Daytona 500 winner
Jamie McMurray and Indianapolis 500 winner Tony
Kanaan watching with little worry as he closed out
the victory.
“We had such a good
group of guys driving, an
awesome team,” McMurray said. “It’s about Scott
Dixon to me. It’s really
hard to appreciate the talent that guys have from
other series until you race
with them, and it’s crazy
the pace that Scott is able
to have in the car. It’s so
much fun to sit up there
and watch it.”
The win gave team owners Ganassi and Felix
Sabates their sixth win in
12 Rolex attempts — most
in the 53-year history of
the race.
It was the second win
for Dixon, who was part
of the 2006 victory with
Casey Mears and Dan
Wheldon.
“I don’t know what to
say, man,” the New Zealander said. “The whole
last part of that race is so
horrible because you think
something’s going to break
or you’re going to go off in
a corner or something. I’m
just stoked for the whole
team.”
It was the first Rolex win
for McMurray, Kanaan and
Larson, who felt he was
so underwhelming in his
debut last season that he
let his team down and never wanted to return to the
sports car race. Instead, he
drove his own impressive
‘It’s crazy how
much a year can
do. I hated this
race last year. I
was terrible.’
MIKE GROLL | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
CAROLINE WOZNIACKI (LEFT) TALKS with Serena Williams, of the U.S., after Williams won the championship match of the 2014 U.S.
Open Sept. 7 in New York.
Women tennis pros talk friendship, competition
BY JOCELYN GECKER
The Associated Press
Kyle Larson
Rolex 24 driver
three-plus hour stint in
the middle of the night,
then put together a brief
but error-free run Sunday morning to get the
team into the time window to turn the car over
to Dixon.
“It’s crazy how much a
year can do. I hated this
race last year. I was terrible,” Larson said.
McMurray joined AJ
Foyt and Mario Andretti as the only drivers to
win the Daytona 500 and
the Rolex, while Kanaan
joined a limited list of
drivers to win both Indy
and the 24 Hours.
“It’s awesome, man. I
love watches,” Kanaan
said. “I always bought
them, so I’ve finally got
one for free today.”
After the race, Ganassi stressed he does not
endorse the “star car”
nickname.
“I don’t know who named
it, but I don’t approve of
that name,” he said of
the all-star driver lineup.
“That’s like any other car
on our team.”
Ganassi and team manager Mike Hull have
always insisted they can
draw the eight Rolex drivers’ names from a hat to
set their two lineups, and
the records seem to reflect
that. The No. 01 team won
four Rolex’s in the time
between Dixon’s 2006 victory and Sunday.
Ganassi beat defending race winner Action
Express Racing, which
was driven by Joao Barbosa, Christian Fittipaldi
and Sebastien Bourdais,
by 1.33 seconds.
Wayne Taylor Racing, runner-up the last
two years, lost a shot to
challenge Dixon when it
realized under a caution
with 20 minutes remaining that Jordan Taylor had
exceeded his allotted time
allowed in the car. He was
forced to pit from second
to let older brother Ricky
Taylor close out the final 9
minutes of the race.
MELBOURNE, Australia — In their latest public
display of friendship, Serena Williams and Caroline
Wozniacki posted a photo
of getting their nails done
before the Australian Open.
The camaraderie, in a sport
better known for its rivalries, has prompted discussion among players on what
it’s like in the locker room
and behind-the-scenes with
top women’s tennis stars.
Is everyone friends? The
answer: it depends who
you ask.
The No. 1-ranked Williams, who plays her fourthround match Sunday and
is known for having some
of the highest-profile rivalries on the tour, says the
mood has changed since
she joined the professional
ranks way back in the 90s.
“It’s like a big family now,”
said Williams, who at 33 is
pushing for her 19th Grand
Slam title and shows no sign
of easing her dominance.
She came of age during a
different era, recalling that
rivals Steffi Graf and Moni-
AUSTRALIAN OPEN FOURTH ROUND
Singles
Women
Eugenie Bouchard (7), Canada, def. IrinaCamelia Begu, Romania, 6-1, 5-7, 6-2.
Ekaterina Makarova (10), Russia, def.
ca Seles “never spoke.”
Now, things are different, partly because players
spend more time together
due to the packed schedule of tournaments yearround.
Social media has played a
big role in opening a window into the players’ private lives, with many posting comments to each other
or photographs of their offcourt friendships.
The former No. 1-player
Wozniacki, who exited in
the second round of this
year’s Australian Open,
shared the picture of herself and Williams getting
pedicures the weekend
before the tournament.
Asked about competing against a friend at the
top level, Wozniacki later
said: “Whenever you’re on
court, you just want to win.
It doesn’t matter who is on
the other side.”
BY JOHN PYE
AP Sports Writer
MELBOURNE, Australia — After
the clock ticked past midnight, Andy
Murray became aware that it was officially Australia Day and he already
knew from the crowd reaction what
to expect in the quarterfinals.
Murray, a two-time Grand Slam
champion and three-time Australian Open finalist, fended off racketsmashing Grigor Dimitrov 6-4, 6-7
(5), 6-3, 7-5 in a fourth-round match
that started Sunday but continued
into the early hours of Jan. 26, the
national holiday that regularly occurs
during the Australian Open.
Midway through his match against
No. 10-ranked Dimitrov, who beat
him in the Wimbledon quarterfinals
last year, Murray heard a distinctive
roar that started somewhere in the
distance and echoed through Rod
Laver Arena.
“I heard a lot of noise — I had to
ask my box what it was for,” he said.
It was for 19-year-old Nick Kyrgios,
AUSTRALIAN OPEN FOURTH ROUND
Singles
Men
Rafael Nadal (3), Spain, def. Kevin Anderson (14),
South Africa, 7-5, 6-1, 6-4.
Tomas Berdych (7), Czech Republic, def. Bernard
Tomic, Australia, 6-2, 7-6 (3), 6-2.
Nick Kyrgios, Australia, def. Andreas Seppi, Italy,
5-7, 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (5), 8-6.
Andy Murray (6), Britain, def. Grigor Dimitrov (10),
Bulgaria, 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 7-5.
who came back from two sets down
and saved a match point to beat
Andreas Seppi 5-7, 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (5), 8-6
on Hisense Arena — the No. 3 court
at Melbourne Park — to become the
first Aussie male to reach the last
eight at the Australian Open since
Lleyton Hewitt in 2005, and the first
male teenager since Roger Federer
in 2001 to reach two Grand Slam
quarterfinals.
Kyrgios has developed quite a reputation for his audacious blend of
shots, for his crowd interaction, for
his outbursts and for his results: as
a wild-entry with a No. 144 ranking at Wimbledon last year, he beat
then No. 1-ranked Nadal in the fourth
round. That was after he’d saved nine
match points and come from two sets
down to beat Richard Gasquet in the
second round.
As a couple stood to leave Hisense
Arena on Sunday during the fifth set
— one in which Kyrgios let a 4-1 lead
slip and then had to save break points
— he called out to them: “Hey, where
are you going?” The show, evidently,
was not over.
His first words after the win, as the
crowd continued to chant and scream
like soccer fans: “Thanks mate. Feels
so good.”
“It’s crazy,” he said. “When I saw
I had finally won the match it was
incredible — it was the best feeling
I ever had. It’s just massive confidence.”
Murray, who was broken when serving for the second set and lost the
subsequent tiebreaker, rallied from
5-2 down in the fourth set to beat
Dimitrov, who shattered his racket
on the court after surrendering his
last service game.
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The two friends faced off
in a Grand Slam final at
last year’s U.S. Open, which
Williams won. Two days
later, Wozniacki showed up
to support Williams at her
first runway show during
New York Fashion Week.
Williams then live tweeted
from the New York City
Marathon as she cheered
on Wozniacki, who ran an
impressive 3 hours and 26
minutes.
“Is it normal to cry when
someone finished (a) marathon? So proud of you
Caro,” Williams tweeted
after the race. The two have
been spotted at the beach,
hockey games, basketball
games and concerts.
Williams has been quoted
as saying that Wozniacki is
her closest friend on the
circuit other than her sister, Venus.
Naturally, though, tense
rivalries remain, and Wil-
Murray prepares for Australian challenge
Where Service Matters Most
60020526DT
Julia Goerges, Germany, 6-3, 6-2.
Maria Sharapova (2), Russia, def. Peng
Shuai (21), China, 6-3, 6-0.
Simona Halep (3), Romania, def. Yanina
Wickmayer, Belgium, 6-4, 6-2.
liams doesn’t like to talk
about them. There was
great speculation about
Williams’ apparently icy
relationship with Sloane
Stephens, after the young
American upset the No.
1-ranked player in the 2013
Australian Open quarterfinal.
No. 2 Maria Sharapova,
who advanced to the quarterfinals on Saturday, has
publicly said she has no
friends on the women’s
tour.
She and Williams have
long had a not-so-friendly
rivalry that made headlines
in 2013 when the pair traded personal barbs relating
to their romantic relationships.
Williams could face
Sharapova in the final. To
have any chance of that
happening, Sharapova has
to clear a quarterfinal hurdle against rising star Eugenie Bouchard, a rematch
of last year’s French Open
semifinal that Sharapova
won en route to the title.
T h e N o . 7- r a n k e d
Bouchard also prefers to
keep competitors at a distance.
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SPORTS | 5B
THE DAILY TIMES
Monday, January 26, 2015
www.thedailytimes.com
SEARCH: DeBord visits UT;
Jones to interview on road
FROM 1B
“Obviously we want an
individual that’s been a
coordinator before,” Jones
said, “that’s called plays in
meaningful games, meaningful situations. But also
an individual that can bring
some knowledge by (having coached) multiple positions, because it’s all about
getting better as a staff.”
Mike Bajakian — Tennessee’s offensive coordinator
the last two years and the
only play-caller Jones has
had in his eight-year head
coaching career — left the
Vols on Thursday to join
the NFL’s Tampa Bay Buccaneers as quarterbacks
coach.
“It’s a great opportunity
to build upon what we’re
doing here at Tennessee,”
Jones said of the vacancy
created by Bajakian’s departure. “And it’s an opportunity to get better.
“Very excited for the
opportunity that coach Jake
has, but for us it’s being able
to bring in an individual
who can elevate everyone
on our staff.”
With the massive overhaul
of the roster through two
years, Jones said his offense
isn’t changing regardless of
who’s hired.
“For us, we’re not looking
for a major overhaul offensively, we’re just looking
to enhance our system,” he
said. “Going into Year 3 now,
and playing the inordinate
amount of freshmen we had
to play last year, now they
understand the system.
“Now the thing we can’t
do is go backwards and
spend our times installing
a new offensive system,”
Jones added. “We have to
be able to enhance it, continue to grow and elevate it.
That’s where we can spend
more time on the fundamentals and the fine details
of what it takes to play winning football.”
Arizona State’s Mike Norvell, North Carolina’s Gunter Brewer, South Carolina
G.A. Mangus and a handful
of other names have also
surfaced as potential candidates for the job.
‘It’s a great
opportunity to
build upon what
we’re doing here
at Tennessee.’
Butch Jones
UT head coach
DeBord was in Knoxville interviewing with
Jones and meeting with
other assistant coaches
and players between Friday and Sunday. VolQuest
reported Sunday night that
Jones will be flying out to
conduct other interviews
while on the road recruiting, continuing his search
for the right fit.
“Even though you have a
coordinator, everything is
about staff involvement,”
Jones said. “When we present the plan on game days,
that’s hours and hours of
work behind the scenes by
our staff. We have tremendous coaches here, obviously family environment
is a big fit as well.
“Obviously the recruiting
aspect of it, development
of quarterback play. Creativeness, energy.”
Jones mentioned DeBord
by name near the end of
the interview — as well as
Arizona coach Rich Rodriguez and Notre Dame coach
Brian Kelly — when asked
about coaching mentors
he’s leaned on throughout
his career.
“Jon Gruden and I have
come very close, we spend
a lot of time on the phone,”
Jones said. “And Peyton
Manning as well.
“Even going through this
coordinator search, I’ve had
great resources from Phillip
Fulmer, to coach Gruden, to
Peyton Manning, to a number of individuals. You’re
always trying to establish
your network and continue
to grow.”
FOLLOW @GRANTRAMEY and
@TDT_Sports on Twitter for
the latest on UT’s coaching
search.
FLU: Scots to travel more
than 2,398 miles in 13 days
FROM 1B
the CDC advisory on
epidemic like flu counts
in Blount County, the
Scots can only wish they
faked it like Ferris Bueller, because they get no
days off.
Maryville was already
slated to open the heart
of South Division play
within the USA South
with three road games in
eight days — Piedmont
on Jan. 31, Covenant on
Feb. 4 and LaGrange on
Feb. 7 — but the makeup
road dates against the
North were tacked into
that span. The Scots now
add tonight’s trip to MU
and drive back over the
mountains Monday, Feb.
2, to get the Greensboro
College reschedule. It
ends up as five games and
2,398 miles over 13 days.
For the MC women,
it’s a spin that includes a
who’s who cast of Clue,
who would all like to be
one who bumps off the
conference front-runner
with a national ranking. No ill will involved,
well not too much anyway, but with twice as
many teams as Division
I, knocking off a Top 25
can make a Division III
team’s season. Greensboro is playing tag with
Meredith to lead the
North, Piedmont and
LaGrange are both chasing MC (15-1, 7-0) in the
South with one-loss each,
and in the polls where
both could jump from
“also receiving votes” to
a number value by the
expedience of catch-
ing the Scots in a wrong
night and right place setting.
To keep that 14-game
win streak headed
toward teetering on
20 when this five-stop
roller coaster returns to
Randy Lambert Court
on Valentine’s Day, the
Maryville women will
have to rely on what got
them into the polls in the
first place. MC isn’t just
benefitting from the hot
hand adding the scoring support to preseason
All-America Mackenzie
Puckett. They are capitalizing on a team versatility that lets MC set up
a group of players to take
advantage of situations,
then seeing who steps
up to thrive in the environment. And when all
else fails, rely on a team
defense that on bad days
in formidable and on
good afternoons — like
Saturday when a weak
Mary Baldwin team was
held to 8 first half points
— absolutely terrifying.
POLL: Transylvania got
two Katelyn Smith free
throws Saturday to hold
off Rose-Hulman in a
67-66 win for the No. 15
Pioneers (16-1). Maryville
remains TU’s only loss
this season, but even
a month later, Transy
remains five spots above
Maryville, with the
d3hoops.com Week 8 poll
due out late today.
MARCUS FITZSIMMONS is
sports editor at The Daily
Times, who enjoys reading
comments posted to this column at thedailytimes.com
GENE J. PUSKAR | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
TEAM TOEWS CAPTAIN JONATHAN TOEWS (19) of the Chicago Blackhawks skates between Team Foligno captain Nick Foligno (11)
and Ryan Johansen of the Columbus Blue Jackets in the NHL All-Star game Sunday in Columbus, Ohio.
Defense need not apply
Toews wins offense-minded NHL All-Star game
BY RUSTY MILLER
NHL ALL-STAR GAME
AP Sports Writer
TEAM TOEWS 17, Team Foligno 12
COLUMBUS, Ohio — John Tavares
of the New York Islanders matched
a record with four goals, and Team
Toews beat Team Foligno 17-12 on
Sunday night in the highest-scoring
NHL All-Star game.
The wild, no-defense exhibition
even featured a fake fight to go with
goals in bunches.
The 29 goals were the most in the
event’s 60-year history, eclipsing
the 26-goal burst in North America’s 14-12 victory over the World
in 2001.
Ryan Johansen, of the hometown
Columbus Blue Jackets, had two
goals and two assists for the losing
team but still won the MVP award
in voting by fans on Twitter.
Philadelphia Flyers forward Jake
Voracek — formerly of the Blue Jackets — scored three goals and tied
a game record with six points for
Team Toews. That mark was set by
Mario Lemieux.
Tavares’ four goals gave him a share
of the All-Star record that was established by Wayne Gretzky in 1983, and
equaled by Lemieux (1990), Vincent
Damphousse (1991), Mike Gartner
(1993) and Dany Heatley (2003).
Captain Jonathan Toews of the
Chicago Blackhawks had a goal and
four assists, as did Boston’s Patrice
Bergeron. Dallas’ Tyler Seguin had
two goals and two assists, Filip Forsberg of Nashville, and Rick Nash of
the New York Rangers — another
former Columbus star — both scored
twice, and Florida’s Aaron Ekblad
and St. Louis’ Vladimir Tarasenko
each had four assists.
For Team Foligno, led by Blue Jackets forward Nick Foligno, Chicago’s
Patrick Kane and Tampa Bay’s Steven Stamkos had two goals and an
assist apiece, Philadelphia’s Claude
Giroux had a goal and two assists,
and Washington’s Alexander Ovechkin added three assists.
The NHL has determined the teams
by a number of geographic and divisional setups over the 60 years. Just
like on ponds around the globe, these
lineups were determined by a player
draft on Friday night.
The fake fight provided some energy to a capacity crowd of 18,901 on
the game’s first visit to Ohio’s capital city. Late in the second period,
during a scrum in front of the net,
Ovechkin and Foligno pretended
to mix it up with Calgary’s Mark
Giordano and Chicago’s Brent Seabrook.
All of the players were laughing
after they grabbed and hugged each
other.
It was fitting that Toews scored
the goal that shattered the record.
He held off defenseman Brent Burns
of San Jose to find the net with a rising shot with 5:39 left.
With the game tied at 4 after a
period, Team Toews broke it open
with six goals in 91⁄2 minutes — and
a record seven in the frame.
The teams scored twice within
8 seconds in the opening minute
and three goals in a 58-second span,
as the arena announcer stacked up
goal announcements and was three
behind at one point.
Tavares had two goals, Voracek
notched his second, and Ryan Suter,
Nash, Forsberg and Anaheim’s Ryan
Getzlaf each notched their first for
Toews.
Steve Stamkos tallied twice in the
period for Team Foligno, which
trailed 11-8 heading into the third and
never came close to catching up.
Nash, a former Blue Jackets captain who was booed every time he
touched the puck, provided the goahead goal 4:08 in.
Pittsburgh’s Marc-Andre Fleury
had a particularly forgettable period.
He gave up six goals on the first 10
shots he faced.
Johansen tallied twice in the opening period, once on a wrister while
coasting from left to right across the
high slot, and the other on a wicked
one-timer at the left dot off a crossice pass from Ovechkin.
COACH: Krzyzewski improves his record to 1,000-308
FROM 1B
enjoy this one right
now.”
Sir’Dominic Pointer had
21 points and 10 rebounds
for the Red Storm (136), who were looking
for a huge win to put on
their NCAA tournament
resume. They were in position to get it, but got worn
down late by Duke and let
this one slip away.
No. 1,000 came about 500
miles from the cramped
and cozy confines of Cameron Indoor Stadium, but
Coach K was hardly on
unfamiliar soil.
After all, Madison Square
Garden was where he
notched victory No. 903
against Michigan State in
November 2011, breaking
the Division I record previously held by his college
coach and mentor, Bob
Knight.
The 67-year-old Krzyzewski improved to 1,000308 in a 40-year coaching
career that began in 1975
at his alma mater, Army.
He is 927-249 in 35 seasons
at Duke, guiding the Blue
Devils to four NCAA titles
and 11 trips to the Final
Four.
The lively crowd of 19,812,
mixed with fans of both
schools, included about
15-20 former Duke players
as well as Carmelo Anthony and Phil Jackson from
the New York Knicks; St.
SETH WENIG | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
DUKE’S JUSTISE WINSLOW (12) loses the ball while St. John’s
D’Angelo Harrison (left), Chris Obekpa (second from left) and
Sir’Dominic Pointer defend Sunday in New York.
John’s greats Chris Mullin,
Lou Carnesecca and Felipe
Lopez; and Nike boss Phil
Knight.
Around 30 minutes before
the opening tip, rising ticket prices ranged from $225
to $888 on stubhub.com —
which also covered admission to the Iona-Niagara
doubleheader finale.
By midway through the
first half, Krzyzewski was
on his feet as St. John’s
erased an 11-point deficit.
Wearing a blue suit and
white sneakers to support Coaches vs. Cancer,
Krzyzewski stalked after
the officials at the end of the
half to argue that D’Angelo
Harrison’s buzzer-beating
3-pointer came after the
shot clock expired.
Coach K didn’t get the
call, and the Red Storm
went into the locker room
leading 43-39.
TIP-INS: Duke — The
Blue Devils are 26-8 at
Madison Square Garden
under Krzyzewski, including 18 wins in their last 21
games. ... Syracuse coach
Jim Boeheim is second on
the Division I men’s list
with 962 wins. Ex-Tennessee coach Pat Summitt
holds the women’s Division I record with 1,098
victories. ... Duke’s decisive 18-2 spurt began with
consecutive three-point
plays by Cook, Jones and
Okafor, who hit a layup
following three offensive
rebounds by the Blue Devils on one possession. That
basket with 6:35 left was
the first of the second half
for the freshman phenom.
St. John’s— Rysheed Jordan scored 18 points, and
Phil Greene IV added 13.
GO ONLINE TO
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Call 865-981-1170 to place your ad
Fax: 865-981-1117
On the web: thedailytimes.com/classifieds
E-mail: classifi[email protected]
6B
THE DAILY TIMES
Monday, January 26, 2015
Public Notices
General Help Wanted
Medical / Dental
Houses For Rent
PUBLIC NOTICE
BICYCLE ENTHUSIASTS
Cade's Cove Trading Co. is looking
for mechanically inclined individuals
willing to be trained and certified on
bike building, maintenance and safety. Seasonal jobs begin Mar.1 and
end Oct 31. Salary $8-$10/hr depending on exp. 303-258-6720 or apply on line at cadescovetrading.com
ORAL SURGERY OFFICE seeks AR
clerk for Ins. Dept. FT position. Must
have experience with medical and
dental insurance. Fax resume to 865977-4132.
3BR, 2BA, next to Eagleton Elem.
School. No pets, no smoking. $850
mo. + dep. Call 865-216-1118.
Antiques
FIRST TIME BUYERS
Why rent when you can own?
No money down & under $850
1-800-899-4057 ID#1052
TRADIN' TREASURES
Firewood
on AM 1470
Saturdays
9am to 10am
To Hear YOUR Ad!
PAYING TOP DOLLAR for standing
timber, hardwood & pine, 5 acres or
more. 865-982-2606.
The City of Maryville is looking for a
location to dispose of waste dirt which
may contain clay, rock and asphalt.
Anyone willing to accept this type of
soil can contact Scotty Martin, City of
Maryville Water and Sewer Department at 865-273-3365.
January 23-27, 2015
CONTENT MANAGER
Auctions
FISH DAY!
IT’ S TIME TO
STOCK YOUR POND!
DELIVERY WILL BE:
Friday, February 13
MARYVILLE
10:30 - 11:15
@Blount Farmer’s Co-op
LOUDON
12:00 - 12:45
@Valley Farmer’s Co-op
“LIKE” us on Facebook
FISHWAGON
The
(Maryville,
TN)
Daily
Times/TheDailyTimes.com,
an
award-winning multimedia outlet
near Knoxville, has an opening on its
Newsroom content management
team. The preferred candidate will
have keen news judgment; excellent
grammatical and writing skills; excellent knowledge of software and processes related to preparing content
for print and online production, including Adobe InDesign, InCopy and
Photoshop; and basic knowledge of
Web-related technologies. The preferred candidate will have a bachelor's degree in communications or an
equivalent degree. He or she will be
deadline conscious, objective and
able to accept constructive criticism.
Send non-returnable PDFs of a cover letter, resume and samples of
your print page design and/or online
work to [email protected]
The Daily Times is an equal-opportunity employer.
ORAL SURGERY OFFICE seeks
RDA. FT Position. Fax Resume to
865-977-4132.
Professional
RE/MAX FIRST
FULL-TIME
MAINTENANCE WORKER
612 Crawford St.
Maryville, TN 37804
(865) 981-1004
www.maryvillerentalproperties.com
Entry level, operating mower, trimmer,
chainsaw, litter clean-up, athletic field
maintenance, painting, etc. 40 hrs/wk,
$24,100/yr + full benefits. Apply or send
resume: Maryville-Alcoa-Blount Co.
Parks & Rec., 316 S. Everett High Rd.,
Maryville, TN 37804. Applications also
available online at www.parksrec.com,
About Us, Employment Opportunities.
www.fishwagon.com
50026698TDT
Lost and Found
LOST – BLACK MOUTH Cur mix,
cream colored short haired, 41” tall
with red collar. Name is Tank, very
friendly. Lost in Allegheny Loop Rd.
REWARD! Call 865-310-9148.
Of Interest
PLEASE CHECK YOUR AD
for errors the FIRST DAY it
appears in print. Our paper will not
be liable for incorrect ads after the
first day of publication. You may
request a proof of your ad be sent
to you by fax or email before
it prints to correct any errors.
Apartment / Duplexes
Deadline for Corrections:
Noon 1 day prior to publication.
865-981-1170
Classified hours are:
Monday-Friday 8am-5pm
W. MARYVILLE/CITY, 3 or 4 BR, 2.5
BA, brick, sun porch, hardwood. No
pets. $1050 mo. Call 865-984-8475.
Adult Care
FOR 10 YEARS, our trained,
bonded and insured CAREGivers
have provided home care services
for local seniors. Call us.
Home Instead 865-273-2178.
Child Care
3RD SHIFT CHILDCARE for ages 4
to 13. For safe, dependable child care
call now, 865-936-0511.
Driver OTR / Delivery
CDL CLASS A
DRIVER
Local only, $14/hr.
Benefits available.
4 Years Experience
Kellems Recycling
865-740-7990
Looking for that second vehicle?
Check out The Daily Times’
TRANSPORTATION section
for the Best Deals in Town!!!
Shared / Roomates
EXPERIENCED climber, bucket operator & grounds person for Tree Service
needed immediately. 865-977-1422
$345 - $450 GREAT VALUE,
RIVERSIDE MANOR, Alcoa Hwy.
865-970-2267 1, 2 & 3 BR's
riversidemanorapts.com
FT NANNY NEEDED by professional couple in Maryville to care
for girl (4) and boy (2) during afternoons and early evenings. Catfriendly, non-smoker, laundry/light
housekeeping.
$15-20/hour.
Please email [email protected]
1 & 2 BR, C/H/A, W/D conn., referencess & lease, no pets. Starting at
$275/mo. + deposit. 982-6446
1 BEDROOM on small farm. Utilities &
W/D included. Fenced yard, pet welcome. Avail. Feb. 1. $650 660-5732
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
1-2 BR APTS.
$325-$395, No Dogs.
865-977-4300
NOW HIRING FT & PT Cleaners.
Background check & drug testing required. Call 865-556-0459.
Medical / Dental
CHIROPRACTIC ASSISTANT & CNA
needed. Drug test may be required.
Call 865-977-0916 for appointment.
FULL TIME LPN
Chota Community Health
Services, Madisonville, TN,
is seeking full-time LPN.
Requires Tennessee
License, current CPR
certification; experience
preferred. Competitive
wages and benefits, health
insurance, 401K.
Send resume to
[email protected]
1354 LODWICK DR.
2BR, 1BA DUPLEX. Both units for
rent immediately! Quiet with large
yard, new paint & floors. $600/mo.
+ $600 deposit. Call 865-978-2070
or [email protected] gmail.com.
2BR, 1BA Very clean, W/D conn., all
appliances, eat in kitchen. 1 level.
No pets/smoking. $600 977-7831
2BR, 2BA 1200 SF, appliances, CH/A,
water & lawn care furnished. $700/mo.
+ dep. No pets. Call 865-363-8847.
NO RENT TIL FEBRUARY 1st. New
spacious, upscale Condo. City of
Maryville, loaded with extras. 2BR,
2.5BA, $850 mo. 865-216-3983
Condominium Rental
745 CASEY LN. Conveniently located, City of Maryville. 1 story with
garage. 2Bd, 2Ba, $930/mo. Call
865-982-3427.
LAKEFRONT - Attractive Townhouse,
2Bd, 1.5Ba, 1 mi. off Airport Hwy. on
Little River. W/D hookup, balcony, boat
dock. 1 yr. lease $850. Larry Henry
865-607-3472.
Houses For Rent
ATTENTION ADVERTISERS
No cancellations or corrections will be made on the day of publication. It is the
Advertiser's responsibility to check their ad on the first day of publication and
notify the Classified department if it is not correct. Blount County Publishers,
LLC, is responsible for only one incorrect insertion. All advertising, whether paid
for or not, whether initially accepted or published, is subject to approval or
rescission of approval by Blount County Publishers, LLC. The position, subject
matter, form, size, wording, illustrations, and typography of an advertisement
are subject to approval of Blount County Publishers, LLC, which reserves the
right to classify, edit, reject, position, or cancel any advertisement at any time,
before or after insertion. Blount County Publishers, LLC does not investigate
statements made directly or indirectly in any advertisement and neither makes
any representations regarding the advertisers, their products, or their services
or the legitimacy or value of the advertisers or their products or services. In consideration of publication of an advertisement, the Advertiser and any advertising
agency that it may employ, jointly and severally, will indemnify and hold harmless Blount County Publishers, LLC. their officers, agents, and employees
against expenses (including all legal fees), liabilities, and loses resulting from
the publication or distribution of advertising, including, without limitation, claims
or suits for libel, violation of privacy, copyright or trademark infringement, deception, or other violations of law. Except as provided in this paragraph, Blount
County Publishers, LLC, shall not be liable for any damages resulting from error
in or non-publication of ads, whether paid for or not, including but not limited to,
incidental, consequential, special, general, presumed, or punitive damages or
lost profits. The sole and exclusive remedy against Blount County Publishers,
LLC, for any error in, or non-publication of, an ad shall be a refund of the cost of
the ad or the printing of one make- good insertion, in the discretion of the Publisher; provided that Advertiser and/or its agency has paid for the ad containing
the error or which was not published; otherwise, the sole remedy shall be one
make-good insertion. No claim for repetition shall be allowed. No allowance
shall be made for imperfect printing or minor errors. Blount County Publishers,
LLC, shall not be liable for failure to print, publish, or circulate all or any portion
of an advertisement or of advertising linage contracted for, if such failure is due
to acts of God, strikes, accidents, or other circumstances beyond the control of
Blount County Publishers, LLC, shall not be liable for errors in or nonpublication of advertisements submitted after normal deadlines. Any legal action arising from these terms and conditions or relating to the publication of, or
payment for, advertising shall, if filed, be commenced and maintained in any
court situated in Blount County, Tennessee. Other terms and conditions, stated
on our Advertising Rate Cards and Contracts may apply. This service is not to
be used to defraud or otherwise harm users or others, and Blount County Publishers, LLC, reserves the right to disclose a user's identity where deemed necessary to protect Blount County Publishers, LLC, or others or to respond to
subpoenas or other lawful demands for information.
Furniture
3 TALL (34”) Bar Stools, special order, bronze metal, never used. $350
for all 3. Call 865-983-6345 for pics.
GLASS TOP TABLE $30 865-6806945
SEVIER COUNTY UTILITY DISTRICT OF
SEVIER COUNTY, TENNESSEE
BALANCE SHEET
(UNAUDITED)
OCTOBER 31, 2014
(DOLLARS IN THOUSANDS)
ASSETS AND DEFERRED OUTFLOWS OF RESOURCES
Current assets:
Cash
Accounts receivable, net of $60 allowance
Unbilled revenues
Materials and supplies inventory
Natural gas in storage
Other current assets
Total current assets
$
Vacation / Time Share
BEAUTIFUL OCEANFRONT
2Bd, 2Ba, sleeps 8 on beautiful Cocoa Beach. Steps from Cocoa
Beach Pier. Recently remodeled.
1st & 2nd weeks in May. $6000 per
week or $10,000 for both.
423-949-9114
7,618
1,640
123
518
1,562
393
11,854
Restricted assets:
Cash - customer deposits
Cash - debt service funds
Certificates of deposit - customer deposits
Total restricted assets
749
390
700
1,839
Property and equipment, at cost:
Utility plant in service
Construction in progress
70,576
282
70,858
(19,149)
51,709
Less accumulated depreciation
Net property and equipment
Mobile/ManufacturedHome Lots
LOT FOR RENT Maximum size,
14x60. Garbage pick up included.
No outside pets. $150/mo. 982-5222
MOBILE HOME LOTS $200
www.edgeotownmhc.com
Or 865-719-1467
Mobile Manufactured
Home Rentals
65,402
Total assets
Deferred outflows of resources:
Unamortized refunding costs
Interest rate swap
52
960
Total deferred outflows of resources
Total Assets and Deferred Outflows of Resources
1,012
66,414
Current liabilities:
Accounts payable
Payable to customers
Payroll, sales and other taxes payable
Over-recovered gas cost
Accrued franchise fees
Deferred compensation
Accrued compensation
Accrued compensated absences
Total current liabilities
$
Liabilities payable from restricted assets:
Current maturities of long-term debt
Accrued interest
Customer deposits
Total liabilities payable from restricted assets
740
63
1,449
2,252
28
960
524
6,560
384
14,851
Licensing payable, less current portion
Interest rate swap
Accrued compensated absences
Long-term debt, less current maturities
Other post-employment benefits obligation
Total liabilities
Net position:
Net investment in capital assets
Restricted for debt service
Unrestricted
Total net position
43,965
328
7,270
51,563
Total Liabilities and Net Position
2 or 3 BR, $400-$550 mo.
Rent to own, Friendsville.
No pets. Call 865-995-2825.
2BR, 1BA Mobile Home, good condition, 1 mi. from Lanier School. No
pets. $500mo./$500dep. 389-5404
3BD/2BA SINGLEWIDE in Friendsville.
Not in park. $450/mo., $450 deposit.
No pets, references. 865-582-5411
3BR/2 BA Double Wide $5000
down (Why rent when you can
own). Owner Finance with monthly
payments.
66,414
SEVIER COUNTY UTILITY DISTRICT OF
SEVIER COUNTY, TENNESSEE
STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENSES AND
CHANGES IN NET POSITION
(UNAUDITED)
YEAR ENDED OCTOBER 31,2014
(DOLLARS IN THOUSANDS)
Operating revenues
Sale of natural gas
Sale of appliances
Other operating revenues
Uncollectible accounts
$
Operating expenses
Cost of sales
Transmission and distribution
Customer accounting and collection
Sales promotion
Administrative and general
Depreciation and amortization
Franchise fees
3BR/2BA “Great Community
near Walmart” $3,000 down &
own it in 5 yrs.
**YOU CAN Rent It or YOU CAN Buy
It!** “WE FINANCE” Regardless of
Credit! Many Available 865-696-2571
2BD, 1BA All appliances & lawn care
included. No pets, no smoking inside.
$700 per month. 865-982-2039
3 OR 4 BED/OFFICE, 2 bath, 2 car
garage, open floor plan, hardwood.
$1500/mo. + $1500/dep. 865-257-7503
3BD, 1BA 807 Mountain View near
Maryville High School. $800/mo., references/deposit. No pets. 982-3244
3BR, 2BA, 2 car garage. 1522
Raulston Rd. $1000 per month. 865255-7491.
3BR, 2BA, CH/A, all appliances, very
nice. Lawn care furnished. $850 mo.
+ dep. No pets. Call 865-363-8847.
3BR, 2BA, CH/A, totally remodeled
throughout. $850 mo. + dep. 865-9847495.
3BR, 2BA, MARYVILLE CITY, large,
like new. No Pets. $1000 mo. Call
865-406-3166.
22,387
257
459
(11)
23,092
11,101
2,202
568
512
4,248
1,831
677
21,139
1,953
Operating income
1BR, 1BA CABIN in Townsend. No
smoking. $525 mo. Call 865-4486727.
1,517
168
77
1,112
677
210
42
340
4,143
Commitments:
Grayson Apartments in Alcoa.
2 BR, $575 mo., 3 BR, $675 mo.
Housing accepted. 865-982-3427
1 year Assisted Living/Memory Care
experience preferred.
Must pass drug & background
screens. EOE
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share large
country home. $450 mo. for lg. furnished BR with private kitchen, bath &
entrance. For more info 865-984-7495.
627 GRANT ST Alcoa schools! Remodeled 2BR, 1BA with new CH/A &
W/D connection! $550 per month. Call
Bill Mclain with Realty Executives at
865-454-1451 or 865-983-0011
JOIN OUR AWESOME TEAM
Bring all pertinent documentations
such as IDs, certificates & licenses to:
Williamsburg Villas, 3020 Heatherton
Way, Knoxville, TN 37920.
M&D APPLIANCE Paying $20-$30.
Kenmore, Whirlpool, Roper Washers, Dryers, Ranges, Fridges.
Steve 253-6172 or Ernie 659-9198.
REFRIGERATOR/FREEZER Side by
side with water & ice dispenser, lazy
Susan & can holders. Very Good condition. $249 cash. 865-679-8102
LIABILITIES AND NET POSITION
SPACIOUS LAKESIDE LIVING! 2BR
Garden Style Apts., off Alcoa Hwy.
New Saltwater pool, Basketball &
Tennis courts, dock for fishing. Call
for more details. 865-982-9678.
*PRN LPN positions all shifts.
*FT, PT & PRN CARE ATTENDANT
positions all shifts.
322 RUSSELL RD (HOUSE)
2Bd, 1Ba $700/mo., $700 dep.
1910 E. BROADWAY (HOUSE)
3Bd, 1Ba $850/mo., $850 dep.
DISHWASHER
NEED NIGHT CAREGIVER for Fri.Sun., 7pm-7am. Must be able to
transfer patient from lift chair to
wheelchair and to bed. Patient has no
strength to assist with caregiving.
Paid weekly. Call 865-256-8807.
Appliances
153 S. MAGNOLIA ST (APT)
1Bd, 1Ba $395/mo., $395 dep.
447 PINE LAKES LANE (CONDO)
2Bd, 1.5Ba $825/mo., $825 dep.
Shannondale of Maryville is currently
looking for a Dishwasher. We offer
competitive pay and benefits. Apply in
person to Shannondale Way. EOE
We have a great team and want you
to be a part of it! FT/PT flex hours
available in outbound call center.
Will train! BI-LINGUAL candidates
also needed. 865-246-1823 or send
resume: [email protected]
314 RUSSELL RD (HOUSE)
3Bd, 1Ba $850/mo., $850 dep.
Tune In To
325 ROCKFORD CEDAR ST (MH)
2Bd, 2Ba $650/mo., $650 dep.
To place an Order Call
Toll Free:
1-800-643-8439
2363 SKYVIEW DR (HOUSE)
3Bd, 2Ba $1250/mo., $1250 dep.
Appliances
Non-operating revenues (expenses)
Investment income
Interest expense
Gain on disposal of utility plant assets
31
(322)
77
(214)
1,739
Income before contributions
600
Capital contributions
MOBILE HOME PARK located off
Hwy 411 S. 2 & 3 BR Mobile Homes.
$400-$500 month. Call 865-856-0639.
Change in net position
Net position, beginning of year
49,224
WHY RENT when you can own?
Small down payment, no banks.
2BR/1BA in Walland. 865-548-2021
Net position, end of year
51,563
SEVIER COUNTY UTILITY DISTRICT OF
SEVIER COUNTY, TENNESSEE
SUMMARY OF TRAVEL COSTS/EXPENSES
(IN ACCORDANCE WITH
TCA SCT. 7-82-401 (d))
(UNAUDITED)
YEAR ENDED OCTOBER 31, 2014
(DOLLARS IN THOUSANDS)
Mobile/Manufactured
Home Sales
1989 16x80 MOBILE HOME 3 Bedroom, 2 bath, fireplace. $7,000. 865983-5272
1993 MOBILE HOME, 2BR, 1.5BA,
appliances furnished. $9000 cash, lot
rent $150 mo. Call 865-984-1995.
I BUY OLDER
MOBILE HOMES
Any size, age considered.
Call 865-207-8825
USED 14X60 Set up in Little River
MHP. 2Bd, 2Ba with all appliances &
H/AC. Only $8,995. 865-207-8825
2,339
Travel costs/expenses
Commissioner travel
Commissioner continuing education
Management travel
Management continuing education
Other employee travel
Other employee continuing education
Travel costs/expenses paid by other entities
associated with the District
January 26, 2015
$
$
9
3
47
11
42
20
132
$
1
Monday, January 26, 2015
CLASSIFIEDS | 7B
THE DAILY TIMES | thedailytimes.com/classifieds
Automotive Parts /
Accessories
Daily Bridge Club
Farm Equipment /
Supplies
Easy game?
By FRANK STEWART
Tribune Content Agency
When I began bridge, I was
fascinated by advanced play
techniques such as complex
squeezes. Then a more experienced
and successful player commended to
me his philosophy as declarer: “Just
draw trumps and take finesses. That’s
all there is to it.”
Something can be said for that
approach. In today’s deal, South won
the second club and embarked on
ruffing losers in dummy. He ruffed
his last club, took the A-K of
diamonds and ruffed a diamond.
East overruffed and shifted to the
king of spades, and South took
dummy’s ace. When East won the
next spade and led a third spade, West
was sure to score a trump trick for
down one.
DRAWS TRUMPS
A simpler line of play would
succeed. After South wins the second
club, he cashes the A-Q of trumps.
When trumps break 3-2, he takes the
king, ruffs his last club in dummy and
lets the jack of diamonds ride for a
finesse.
West takes the queen, but South is
home. He has 10 tricks: four trumps,
three diamonds, a club, a club ruff
and a spade.
DAILY QUESTION
You hold: K Q 9 6 J 8
8 4 A 9 8 5 3. Your partner
opens one heart, you bid one spade
and he rebids two hearts. The
opponents pass. What do you say?
ANSWER: This decision is close.
Your partner has six or more hearts.
He would never be compelled to
rebid a five-card suit over your onespade response. A hand such as A 5 3,
K Q 10 9 5 4, J 6, K 4 will make four
hearts a fine contract. Raise to three
hearts, especially if your side is
vulnerable.
South dealer
N-S vulnerable
NORTH
A 7 5 4 3
Q743
J5
72
WEST
J8
10 9 6
Q9762
Q J 10
GLIDER ROCKER Oak carvings,
green pillows, reclines, $95 firm. Excellent condition. Call 865-724-4047.
AIR IMPACT WRENCH, Air Paint
Gun and Air Drill. All for $100. 865680-6945
Miscellaneous
Want To Buy
FOR SALE high speed, Dot Matrix
Printers by GENICOM for information
processing, distribution networks.
business computing systems, mail
processing, bar codes, labels, and
forms.
Model 4840e: Out of working order;
good for parts $65
Model 5000 Series 500 LPM printer.
Out of working order; good for parts
$75. Greeneville, Tennessee, 423359-3151 or 423-359-3172.
TERRY'S FURNITURE & AUCTION
A Family Tradition since 1958
We are a consignment auction,
accepting new consignments daily!
We buy antiques, used furniture,
glassware & estates.
(865) 681-7228 or (865) 973-4577
TFL# 2485
2 GOLF CARTS (1) Yamaha gas cart
& (1) Club Car battery cart. $1700
each. 865-684-8158
SUVs / Jeeps
984-6385
Hay, Feed, Grain
Just Cut - HAY ROLLS, $35 ea.,
Square bales, $4/bale & Construction
Hay, $4/bale. Call 865-235-2357.
100 PLUS cars $5,995 or less.
DougJustus.com New location:
Airport Motor Mall.
FSOB 2000 Jag “S” model. V8, very
good condition, low miles. $5750
865-233-3352 or 865-850-4786
2007 CHEVY TRAILBLAZER SS V8,
red, 4 door, tilt cruise, power seat/windows, loaded. 20” wheels with 4 new
tires with less than 300 miles. Excellent
cond. 74K miles. $16,000 970-7422
Trucks - Imports
watersmotorsinc.com
3019 E. Lamar Alexander Pkwy.
A short drive to Waters Motors
will save you money!
BACKHOE, DUMP TRUCK & trailer
for sale. $42,000 for all. For more info
call 865-982-4854 or 865-414-3919.
04 TOYOTA TACOMA 4x4 double
cab, 3.4 V6, ARE camper shell, Yahoma roof rack, sprayed bed liner,
160K. $13,000 Call 865-742-3013
87' TOYOTA 4x4, x-tra cab, AC, auto,
many new parts, low miles, sharp,
$5000. Call 865-242-6210.
Automotive Parts /
Accessories
$3000
$2000
You Know Better
JUNK CARS
East
Pass
Pass
Call for best
CASH offer.
Free Pick up!
(C) 2015 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
Tools
Sporting Goods
SET OF 20” Mag. Wheels, fits Chevy
pickup, excellent condition. New
$1200, asking $600 obo. 659-9481
Opening lead — Q
Furniture
PRESSURE WASHER 5 hp Briggs &
Stratton engine, needs work. $50
865-680-6945
Midland Plaza
Antique / Collector
Vehicles
EAST
KQ96
J8
84
A 9 8 5 3
West
North
Pass
2
Pass
3
All Pass
GREAT RIDE
Under 7,000 miles! 2009 Yamaha VStar 250, rides smoothly and quietly.
Under the KBB, asking only $1,900.
Call 865-724-7788.
Commercial / Industrial
SOUTH
10 2
AK52
A K 10 3
K64
South
1 NT
2
4
POLICE STYLE push bar for Silverado pickup or similar vehicle. Excellent
condition and includes the mounting
brackets, $50. Call 865-983-4073.
Autos - Imports
Tractor Parts,
Accessories &
Farm Antiques
Motorcycles
PAYING CASH
CABLE'S RECYCLING
Mon-Fri. 9a-5:00p & Sat, 9a-3p
*Cans .55/lb., *Batteries $10/$13
*Computer Towers $2 ea.,*Alum. .45/lb.
*Scrap Metal $7/$9. Now Buying Gift
Cards, Cell Phones & Catalytic Conv.
865-556-8812 or 865-556-8845
WE BUY Used Furniture, Antiques,
Estates. Hall's Furniture & Auction
865-983-1598 or 865-983-2465
865-216-5052
Domestic Pets
JUNKERS &
CLUNKERS!
We buy scrap cars.
ASCA REG. AUSSIE PUPS 6 wks.
old, Black tri's, male & female. 1st
shots. 865-250-0403
FREE TO LOVING HOME Female
Chihuahua, white, loves being with
kids. Approx. 6 years old. 865-3081695
Pet Supplies
CAT TREE 5 feet tall. $75 865-2337888
CAT TREE 6 feet tall. $75 865-2337888
HIGHEST price
paid in East TN!
WE ALSO BUY
YOUR OLD
CLUNKER!
865-856-4590
LIKE NEW 2003 Chevy fiberglass low
top bedcover for a pick-up truck, red.
New $1200, asking $700. 659-9481
PAIR OF NEW block distributors for
272/312. $200 865-805-0811
Adult Care
Drywall
Home Improvements
Masonry
Plumbing
Roofing
CHORE & HOMEMAKER
ASSISTANCE
Need help with daily tasks?
I clean homes, have car to run errands to store, pharmacy & doctor.
Also do yard work or clean gutters,
etc. Call 6am-2pm, 983-0382 or
2pm-10pm, 244-0520.
ALL DRYWALL REPAIRS,
patching, finish, texturing. Small
jobs OK. Rocky Top Drywall
865-335-4877 or 865-771-0812
*HELP IS A PHONE CALL AWAY
Carpentry, screening, painting,
plumbing, pressure washing
& miscellaneous repairs.
Honesty & Integrity, Lic. & Ins.
BRICK/BLOCK MASON
SANDS PLUMBING
TERRY MORTON
Excavating
The Handi-Helper
865-681-8298
CNA OR COMPANION
Will care for elderly or disabled person in their home or place of residence. 24 hour care available in
my home for monthly flat rate. Over
30 years experience with references. 865-673-5992 or 865-4051825 (cell).
*Bobcat *Backhoe *Tractor
*Bushhog *Dump Truck
*Tree/Stump Removal
No Job Too Small, Reasonable
Rates, Licensed & Insured
865-661-2565 or 865-705-5403
FARMERS EXCAVATING
Air Conditioning
SUTTON'S AIR COMFORT
Its Fall! Service & Sales of most
name brands. Also, Mobile Home
parts and some mixed matches.
R-22 equipment.
Call us for questions.
Call 865-216-5028.
TENNAIR – 1 HEATING/AIR
Fast, reliable service. Installations.
Professional duct cleaning.
We service all brands.
865-983-1384 or 865-995-9660
Car Wash /
Detailing
MURPHY'S BOBCAT
Your complete excavating
and hauling company.
No job too big or small.
Free estimates.
Licensed & Insured.
865-389-7231
Fencing
RC CALDWELL & SON
The Fence Specialist
™6luminum Fence
™Galvanized and Vinyl Coated
Chain Link Fence
™Kinyl Picket and
Privacy Fence
865-850-1289
WWW.FENCEPROS.COM
AUTO CLEAN & SHINE
Complete Auto Clean-up
10% off full detail with this Ad.
™LVming ™7uffing ™Hhining
™+time Readers Choice Linner
™777 Accredited
Teds Auto Detailing
2532 E. Broadway Ave
865-982-3600, owner Ted McKee
Concrete Services
BILL'S CONCRETE SERVICE
Grade, Form, Pour, Finish,
30 Years Experience
Bill Correll 865-856-8632
STORY CONCRETE
Form, grade and finish, driveways,
slabs, parking lots, etc. 25 plus
years' experience. 865-977-4373
SAVE MONEY!
Find What You Need in
The Daily Times
CLASSIFIEDS
Handy Man
1. HONEY DO HANDYMAN
™Painting ™Pressure Washing ™Odd
Jobs™Light Carpentrn™Landscaping
Free Estimates, Gutter Cleaning.
Army Vet. Call Mike at 865-724-6817
KENNY'S HOME REPAIR
& REMODELING
Painting, drywall, tile, flooring, all
carpentry & much more. Quality
work, reliable contractor. Lic. & Ins.
Call 865-268-9854.
Located in Friendsville, TN
SLANSKY BUILDERS
HOME IMPROVEMENTS
(865) 983-6144
*Decks *Screen/Sun Rooms
*Kitchens *Bathrooms *Flooring
*ADA compliant and Custom
Tile Showers
*Small Projects Welcomed!
No money down. FREE Estimates
Family owned and operated in
Blount Co. since 2001.
TN Contractor, licensed, & insured
to $1,000,000.
Call now to speak to a live person.
www.slanskybuilders.com
Lawn Maintenance
BLOUNT LAWN SERVICE, LLC
All lawn care, All landscape.
Licensed General Contractor
Irrigation Specialist
Tree Removal & Stump Grinding
Free estimates, Lic. and Ins.
(865)805-4572 or 805-1147
www.blountlawnservice.com
20 YEARS MAINTENANCE EXP.
No Job Too Small!
Free Estimates, Vietnam Vet.
865-388-0029
FULL SERVICE LAWN CARE,
LLC. Licensed & Insured,
ONE MAN HANDYMAN
Painting, flooring, baths, kitchens &
more. Very experienced, take pride in
workmanship. Call 865-320-7267.
Call Taylor or Josh
Free Estimates.
Trust us for all your
lawn care needs.
865-776-5791 or 865-776-7328
[email protected]
Reporting the news
since 1883
All Types Brick Work & Repair
Quick, Professional Service
35 Years Experience
Christian Ethics
Licensed & References Available.
Please Call 865-216-7474
Miscellaneous
MURPHY'S
BOBCAT
Fill dirt and gravel. Year round
dry topsoil. Mushroom Compost
by scoop or dump truck load.
865-389-7231
Painting
COLONIAL PAINTING
& WATERPROOFING
Interior, exterior, residential, commercial. Quality, creative, affordable, solutions for your home and
business needs. 30 years exp.
Free Estimates. US Navy Vet.
Ken Bear ™ 865-982-8840
PAINTING – Interior & Exterior,
Pressure Washing. 40 yrs. exp.
Terry Morton 865-661-1015
or 865-984-5059.
Paving
SEALCOATING
™Driveways
™Parkin\Lots
™HoiRubberized
Crac`Sealing
™Striping/Pavement
Markings
LiXZchZYInsured
Dedicated to excellence
& service!
™FrdoZcPipes
™Free:htimates
™DraicCleaning
™ResidentialCommercial
™LicensZYInsured
™Caaa24/7
CdJdWIddSmall/TodBig
865-209-5195
Remodeling
BUILD DECKS & REMODELING
Best carpenter in town. Hire the
best, not the rest. Terry Morton
865-661-1015 & 865-984-5059.
ROCKY TOP BUILDING
& REMODELING
Painting, Doors/Windows, Honey-Do
List, Drywall, Siding, Trim Work, Fixtures. Licensed & Insured 254-3455
Restoration
DAVID LEE NICHOLS
Roofing/Siding Replace & Repair
Int. & Ext. Paint & Stain
Chem prep Mold Removal System
Complete Home Restorations
Debris cleaning & removal
Walker Home & Business Sec.
Guards. All local workforce,
$20 hr. 865-210-3005
Roofing
™Hhingles ™Betal Roofing
™Eressure Washing
Free Estimates
38 yrs. experience
References on request.
865-661-1015 or 865-984-5059
Siding
AFFORDABLE SIDING
AND GUTTERING
Call James Stinnett
at 865-977-9092
Tree Services
!! BUBBA'S !!
TREE & STUMP REMOVAL
Licensed and Insured.
Proudly serving Blount
County for 20 yrs.
Specializing in all types
of tree work.
No tree too tall, No limb
too small, We do it all!
Local References.
24 hr. Emergency Service
865-977-1422
GOT STUMPS?
™Hmall $5 and up
™Bedium $25 and up
™AVg\Z$40 and up
Job minimum $50.
865-984-8815
www.asphaltmaintenanceoftn.com
865-719-2340
**2014 Reader's Choice
Runner-up**
SAVE UP TO 20%
on your energy bills with added
attic insulation.
R19 insulation at 90¢/sq. ft.
Its Pruning Season. We have 2
Certified Arborist on staff to help
you. We have Workers Comp...
do they? 865-980-1820
JIM'S TREE SERVICE
AND LANDSCAPING
™Igee Removal
™8lean-up ™Ig^bb^ng
™Lot 8aeag^ng
;gee Esi^mates, Ins. & Ref.
865-233-4212 or 865-209-3864
8B | COMICS
THE DAILY TIMES
www.thedailytimes.com
BETWEEN FRIENDS
WUMO
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
PEANUTS
[email protected]
THE AMAZING SPIDERMAN
SHOE
THE DUPLEX
GARFIELD
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
SHERMAN’S LAGOON
PICKLES
PRICKLY CITY
MALLARD FILLMORE
BEETLE BAILEY
DUSTIN
BABY BLUES
SNUFFY SMITH
HI AND LOIS
B.C.
Monday, January 26, 2015
WEATHER, PUZZLES | 9B
THE DAILY TIMES
Monday, January 26, 2015
www.thedailytimes.com
Today
Tuesday
Slight chance of
rain
Mostly cloudy
Light wind
Wednesday
Mostly sunny
Light wind
Friday
Thursday
Chance
showers
$(",,)!*'1 ,- +1
Partly cloudy
41 25 4025 43 31 5032 41 28
-# +,1,- ',(*+ $*$--$)(!)+ ,-!)+())(-)1 '* +-.+ )&)+(,+ -)13,*+ $- #$"#,
H
H
Billings
62/39
Minn. St. Paul
39/26
San
Francisco
64/52
H
H
H
H
Los
Angeles
66/55
Juneau
32/18
#!"
() **,)
'.
() **,)
'$
)'&+
Honolulu
79/63
)%
)'&+
++#'&)0
)'&+
"'. )*
')%$
/
1075'
# +)% 1002'
)."&,
1710'
)(-(
)+-).).( 813'
$/,, 1526'
&-)($&& 795'
1020'
)++$,
(- -&# 1941'
Atlanta
46/39
Miami
73/52
H
H
'++ *+ 84° at Oxnard, CA
''$ *+ -13° at Mt. Washington, NH
*+')%*
#&
$,))# *
&'.
HOROSCOPE
HAPPY BIRTHDAY for
Monday, Jan. 26, 2015:
This year you have a strong
sense of direction, and you tend to
command others’ attention and
respect. Your home and domestic
life will become far more important than in the past. You also
might develop a home-based business.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
★★★★ You are likely to indulge
a loved one. At the same time, you
might want to share a master plan
that you would like to try out. Take
into consideration the temperament of the person you choose to
share with.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
★★★★★ You’ll emerge from
the weekend willing to greet whatever heads your way. Someone
could drop by or email you with an
idea that will be nothing less than
inspirational.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
★★★ You might not feel like
your usual sociable self. Make that
OK. Pull back and try to find the
right solution to a problematic
situation.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
★★★★ You could be thinking about how you might want
to present a new idea. The words
one chooses often tend to be more
important than the idea itself.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
★★★★ You are in the limelight,
and you’ll sparkle accordingly. You
might not be aware of how much
someone else listens to you and is
able to respond with equally exciting statements.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
★★★★ Reach out for more
information, especially if you
feel as if someone’s statement is
incomplete. Try to look at the matter from a detached perspective.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
★★★★★ Deal with a loved one
directly. This person will appreciate the attention and the way you
interact with him or her. An associate in your daily life might irritate
you with an obscure thought.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
★★★★ Others come forward,
as they have a lot to share. You
could be questioning the pros and
cons of going along with someone
else’s idea.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
★★★ You are likely to trudge
into the day with the mentality of
“same old, same old.” Of all the
signs, you have the best ability
to spice up life, so why aren’t you
doing so?
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
★★★★ Someone might want to
share more news, but you’ll need
to be up for it. This person could be
a child or new friend. You will need
to state your limits or time constraints before you give in to his or
her whimsical needs.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
★★★★★ You might feel worn
out by what is happening around
you. It wouldn’t be inappropriate to consider taking the day off.
Stay focused, and understand your
limits and needs. You will be more
resilient and responsive if you take
a break.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
★★★★ Focus on one thing at a
time. You could be unusually tired
and/or withdrawn. Know that you
don’t need to share everything
that is on your mind.
The Stars Show the Kind of Day
You’ll Have: 5-Dynamic; 4-Positive;
3-Average; 2-So-so; 1-Difficult
'0 '%'))'.
#+0
#'/ #'/
Atlanta
46/39/pc 51/32/pc
Atlantic City
37/22/sn 30/18/sn
Baltimore
37/27/sn 37/21/sn
Birmingham
45/34/pc 55/32/pc
Boston
26/22/sn 24/17/sn
Charleston, SC 60/34/pc 54/31/pc
Charlotte
53/29/r 48/27/pc
Chicago
31/26/i 33/22/pc
Cincinnati
31/21/cd 32/18/cd
Dallas
69/46/s 74/48/pc
Denver
68/36/s 67/36/pc
Destin
56/43/pc 64/43/pc
Houston
65/47/s 74/50/pc
'0
#+0
#'/
Jacksonville
59/35/pc
Las Vegas
63/50/pc
Los Angeles
66/55/sh
Louisville, KY
35/29/cd
Miami
73/52/sh
Myrtle Beach
57/37/sh
New Orleans
57/44/s
New York City
25/19/sn
Orlando
66/43/pc
Philadelphia
32/22/sn
Raleigh
51/30/sh
San Francisco 62/54/pc
St. Louis
44/34/pc
Washington, DC 40/27/sn
'%'))'.
#'/
60/37/pc
62/45/r
64/55/pc
39/24/fl
69/55/s
47/32/pc
64/45/s
23/16/sn
63/44/s
30/18/sn
41/25/pc
60/51/pc
46/30/pc
37/22/sn
'+#'&
-&$(.+"
**&#$(
-&))# %$ #
NEWSMAKERS
* ,&*
.......... 8
25 - 35"
........ 12
40 - 65"
.........17
54 - 60"
...........11
14 - 42"
GOOD
#&'$$,+&+ Ozone
'0 good
7:40
a.m. 5:56 p.m.
11:38 a.m. 12:05 a.m.
Jan. 26
First
Feb. 3
Full
Feb. 11 Feb. 18
Last
New
Trivia Fun by Wilson Casey
Who said he’d never take up jogging as, “It makes me spill my martini?’ Bob Hope, Jackie Gleason,
George Burns, Rodney Dangerfield
Which boxer does Muhammad Ali rate as being the best-ever, pound-for-pound? Dempsey,
Robinson, Louis, Figg
Who’s been the only U.S. president born in Pennsylvania? Jefferson, Buchanan, McKinley,
Eisenhower
More teasers? Comments? [email protected] — See answers below Sudoku
Brakes
on
most
vehicles
are
$
109.95
Ogle’s Auto Center
Owner: Chuck Ogle
Midland Shopping Center
Hours: Mon-Fri 7:30 am - 5:00 pm
126 S. Calderwood St,
Alcoa, TN 37701
“Free”
alignment
check with
purchase
of 4 tires
Phone: 983-6100
CRYPTOQUOTE
For Tennessee, a few morning rain
showers won't be out of the question
in the east.
'0 '%'))'.
#+0
#'/ #'/
Bristol
39/25/r
34/21/fl
Chattanooga
42/31/r 46/29/pc
Crossville
37/28/sn 39/25/pc
Gatlinburg
41/23/r
39/23/fl
Jackson
44/34/pc 52/29/pc
Johnson City
39/25/r 34/20/fl
Kingsport
39/23/r 36/20/fl
Knoxville
42/26/r 40/25/pc
Memphis
48/38/pc 56/34/pc
Nashville
39/32/cd 47/28/pc
,)) &+ ")
- $ "&!
1044.6'
0.2'
953.5'
0.2'
1653.0'
0.1'
809.4'
0.3'
1484.4'
0.5'
794.1'
0.3'
999.4'
0.3'
'
0'
*
*
*
*
*
*
* *
*
*
* *
Key: 0/ -# +,.,.((1!+!$+**+-&1&).1&&).1#2#2 !"!)",#,#)/ +,++$(2+$22& -,-#.( +,-)+',,(,()/,!4.++$ ,$$ ,& -)+!+ 2$("+$(/$/$(1'0/$(- +1'$0+$((,()/
PRECIPITATION
24 hours ending 6 p.m.................... 0.00"
Month-to-date................................... 3.21"
Normal month-to-date.................. 3.48"
Year-to-date.......................................3.21"
Normal year-to-date....................... 3.48"
--$,-$,+ -#+)."#'1 ,- +1
Washington D.C.
40/27
Houston
65/47
Anchorage
2/-10
HUMIDITY
*'-)1 47%
Kansas City
58/33
DFW
Metroplex
71/47
TEMPERATURES
,- +1#$"#&)/ 54°/32°
Normal high/low........................ 48°/29°
Record high.............................. 77° (1950)
Record low ................................. 2° (1948)
New York
25/19
Detroit
20/11
Chicago
31/26
Denver
68/36
offthemark
Lock of Lincoln’s hair
among items in auction
The Associated Press
DALLAS — A collection of Abraham Lincoln memorabilia that
includes a lock of the
slain president’s hair
has been sold for more
than $800,000 at auction Saturday in Dallas.
The Donald P. Dow
collection brought top
bids totaling $803,889,
doubling expectations, said Eric Bradley,
spokesman for Dallasbased Heritage Auctions.
The lock of hair, taken by Surgeon General
Joseph K. Barnes shortly
after Lincoln was shot
by John Wilkes Booth,
sold for $25,000.
An 1861 letter written by Booth to a friend
boasting about his
career and value as an
actor sold for $30,000.
“The public was so
disgusted by Booth’s
atrocity that most all
letters, signatures and
documents mentioning him were destroyed
after Lincoln’s death,
making any that survive
150 years later exceedingly rare and valuable,”
said Don Ackerman,
Consignment Director
for Historical Americana at Heritage Auctions.
“The Dow Collection
gave us a unique perspective of the assassination and I doubt we’ll
ever see a grouping like
this outside of a museum
setting.”
Other items included:
›XZc`gg`e^f]c`e\e
from Lincoln’s death bed
and stained with Lincoln’s blood, for $6,000;
›Xe(/-+c\kk\ij`^e\[
by Lincoln and authorizing prisoner-of-war swap
involving Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s
son from a Union POW
camp, for $27,500;
›Xc\kk\ij`^e\[Yp
Mary Todd Lincoln on
her personal mourning
stationary, for $10,625;
›Xe[9ffk_Êjd`c`$
tary arrest warrant, for
$21,250.
10B | CLASSIFIEDS
THE DAILY TIMES | thedailytimes.com/classifieds
Monday, January 26, 2015
OPEN
t)JHIXBZ4PVUI.BSZWJMMF5/
M-Saturday
8-7:00pm
Sunday
WE WANT YOUR BUSINESS 12-5:30pm
Super
It’s Tax Time in Tennessee and the
Winning Team is here at I-DEAL.
Sale
Shop I-DEAL for
Let our friendly sales staff & finance
manager put you in the vehicle you
the Best Deal!
deserve. Score a touchdown with our
great selection of used vehicles.
Use Your Tax Refund
So what are you waiting for. Come
be a part of the winning team today.
Here & Save More!!!
www.idealautosalesonline.com
TRUCKS
WE BUY CARS
MANAGERS SPECIAL
4x4, Auto #7369
$ 3 ,9 9 5
%PEHF3BN
3FH$BC
%PEHF3BN
&YU$BC
%PEHF3BN
$ 4 ,9 9 5 #7293
MANAGERS SPECIAL
.B[EB4QPSU
5SVDL
6 cyl, 2wd, Good Tires, 61k
Auto, 4x4, Local Trade #7290
Ext Cab, 2WD, PL-PW
2wd, Running Boards #7081
$ 8 ,9 9 5 $IFWZ4JMWFSBEP 'PSE'&YU$BC
Camper Top, Auto, 101k,
Auto, 6.0, 72k #C8396
$8 ,2 5 0
'PSE'&YU$BC
$IFWZ
'MBUCFE
Auto, 87k, 2WD #7132
$ 7 ,9 9 5
WE BUY TRUCKS
#6837
$9 ,9 9 5
$1 0 ,9 9 5
%PEHF3BN
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 4x4,
Local Trade #7387
Auto, 2wd, 81k, Air,
PL-PW #7264
$1 0 ,9 9 5
$1 1, 4 9 5
MANAGERS SPECIAL
%PEHF%BLPUB
$SFX$BC
$IFWZ$PMPSBEP$SFX$BC
Auto, 4x4, PL-PW, 5 cyl,
Lift Kit, New Tires #7384
$1 2 ,9 9 5 'PSE'$SFX
$BC'MBUCFE
Auto, 6.0 Powerstroke Diesel #402
#7403
$1 3 ,9 9 5 'PSE'$SFX$BC
'9
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 4 WD,
Diesel Powerstroke 6.0 #7319
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 4x4
Leather, PL-PW, Air, 4x4,
Navigation, Sunroof #7199
$2 2 ,9 9 5
$1 7 ,9 9 5
'PSE'$SFX
$BC,JOH3BODI
$2 3 ,9 9 5
$1 8 ,9 9 5
15$SVJTFS
Auto, PL-PW, Local Trade
Auto, PL-PW, Air
$4 ,9 95
7PMLTXBHFO+FUUB
/JTTBO4FOUSB
#7216
#7135
$6 ,4 95
Auto, Leather, 4x4, PL-PW,
Air #7365
Auto, V8, PL-PW, 4x4, 5.7
Hemi, Leather #7277
$1 9 ,9 9 5
#C2121
4x4, PL-PW, 6 Speed, Power
Stroke Diesel #7309
$1 9 ,9 9 5 $2 1, 9 9 5
Kit, Chrome Rockstar Wheels
#7364
$2 6 ,9 9 5
$2 8, 9 9 5
#7270
$3 2 ,9 9 5
LOW, LOW RATES
MANAGERS SPECIAL
MANAGERS SPECIAL
'PSE'PDVT4&4
.FSDFEFT4-
$7 ,9 95
Crew Cab, 90k Miles,
Leather, Power Sunroof,
4x4, PL-PW #C7889
Auto, 4x4, Leather, PL-PW, Air
$2 5 ,9 9 5
Leather, Auto, PL-PW,
2 Door #7236
Auto, 126k, PL-PW #7086
$6 ,4 95
-JODPMO.BSL 'PSE'&YU$BC
-5
'PSE'$SFX %PEHF3BN$SFX$BC %PEHF3BN$SFX$BC
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 4x4, 4k, Lift
$BC
Auto, 4x4, 22k Miles
Auto, 4x4, PL-PW, Air, PS,
CD, 43k, Local Trade #7364
$2 4 ,9 9 5 $1 9 ,9 9 5
CARS
WE GIVE YOU MORE FOR LESS
Air, Auto, Leather, PL-PW,
Sunroof, 81k Miles #7219
%PEHF3BN
$SFX$BC
'PSE'$SFX$BC
-BSJBU
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 109k, 4x4
#7178
$IFWZ4JMWFSBEP
$SFX$BC-5
$1 8 ,9 9 5 %PEHF3BN$SFX$BC
Auto, 6,0, Pl-PW, Leather #7396
$2 3 ,9 9 5
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air,
4x4, Z71 #7385
7.3 Powerstroke Diesel,
4x4, PL-PW #7406
4x4, Crew Cab #6953
'PSE'$SFX$BC'9
(.$4JFSSB
&YU$BC
'PSE'
&Y$BC
Auto, 111k, PL-PW, Air,
$IFWZ4JMWFSBEP-5
#7320
$1 3 ,9 9 5
'PSE'
$1 6 ,9 9 5 $1 5 ,9 9 5 Auto, 4x4, Air
2-Wheel Drive, PL-PW, Air
#7121
%PEHF3BN
Ask
$IFWZ4JMWFSBEP
Open
%PEHF3BN
'PSE'
'PSE'
Open
$SFX$BC
'PSE'
&Y$BC-4
$SFX$BC%JFTFM Sunday
4VQFSEVUZ&YU$BC
5.9 Cummings Diesel, 4x4,for lana
4QPSU
8am-7pm
Auto
2WD, 4-Door, Local
-POH#FE3FH$BC Auto, Powerstroke Diesel,
Auto, 4x4, PL-PW, 109k
4x4, Auto, 122k
Auto,
PL-PW,
Air,
Local
or Nick
#C3456
4x4, New Tires #7305
91k, Auto, 2WD #7255
Trade,Daily
PL-PW, Air #7381 12-5:30Trade #7366
#7028
$1 4 ,9 9 5 $1 5 ,9 9 5 $1 5 ,9 9 5 $1 1, 9 9 5 $1 5 ,9 9 5 $1 5 ,9 9 5
'PSE'
$IFWZ.BMJCV
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 4 cyl
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air, Local
Trade #7172
#7391
$8 ,0 00
/JTTBO"MUJNB
$8 ,9 95
$9 ,9 95
MANAGERS SPECIAL
'PSE-JNJUFE
7PMLTXBHFO#VH
Auto, 68k, Leather, Pl-PW, Air
Auto, Leather, Sunroof
#7246
$9 ,9 95
#7376
.FSDFEFT#FO[4
$1 0, 99 5
#C55572
/JTTBO4FOUSB
)POEB"DDPSE
%PEHF$IBSHFS
Auto, 52k Miles, 2-Door, Air #7183
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 62k #7249
#7214
$1 2 ,4 95
"VEJ"5
12 7PMLTXBHFO+FUUB4&
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air
#7211
#C4132
$1 7, 99 5
46k, PL-PW, Air, Black Leather, 6-Speed
#C1122
Auto, PL-PW, Air
#7343
$5 ,9 9 5
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 2wd
#7254
*OGJOJUJ4
Auto, 4 Door, PL-PW, Leather, Power
Sunroof, Heated Seats #C8888
#7100
$1 3, 99 5
$6 ,4 9 5
.FSDVSZ.BSJOFS
Auto, 4x4, PL-PW, Local Trade
#7217
$7 ,9 9 5
5PZPUB"WBMPO-JNJUFE
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air, 89k
$1 4 ,4 95
*OGJOJUJ(
$PVQF$POWFSUJCMF
.JOJ$PPQFS$POWFSUJCMF
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, 57k Miles, Local Trade
6-Speed, 43k, Leather #C9876
#7407
$2 5 ,9 95
'PSE&YQMPSFS
$IFWZ5BIPF
135k, Leather, Sunroof, 2WD,
PL-PW, Air #C3555
Auto, 4x4, PL-PW, Air,
New Tires, Local Trade #7298
$8 ,9 9 5
$IFWZ$BNBSP44;-
$2 8, 00 0
SLASHED PRICES
Auto, 4x4, PL-PW, Air
$1 4 ,9 95
25k, Auto, PL-PW, Leather #C7777
$IFWZ5BIPF
#7253
#C7771
$2 5 ,9 95
$1 1, 99 5
$1 1, 4 95 SUVs & VANS
'PSE&YQFEJUJPO
#7344
$1 1, 30 0
$ISZTMFS$
$2 2 ,9 95
LOW, LOW RATES
'PSE&TDBQF
$1 3, 99 5
#7054
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air, 129k #7260
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air, Power Sunroof
$IFWZ$PSWFUUF
2.5, Auto, PL-PW, Air, 4 Door, 27k
$1 5 ,9 95
$1 3, 5 00
5PZPUB$BNSZ9-&
Auto, PL-PW, Air, Leather
Auto. PL-PW, Air, Leather, 88k
$1 0, 99 5
Auto, 4 cyl, PL-PW, Air, 34k
#VJDL-BDSPTTF
$IFWZ.POUF$BSMP44
75k Miles, Auto, Leather, PL
$8 ,9 9 5
$8 ,9 9 5
+FFQ8SBOHMFS
5 Speed, 6 cyl, 4x4
#7328
$9 ,9 95
MANAGERS SPECIAL
Auto, 4x4, PL-PW, Air,
6 cyl #7291
$1 0 ,9 9 5
+FFQ8SBOHMFS9
2wd, Unlimited Sport, 4 Door Soft
Top #C4567
$1 7 ,9 9 5
'PSE&YQMPSFS9-5
V6, Auto, PL-PW, Air,
4x4 #7200
$1 0 ,9 9 5
+FFQ8SBOHMFS
5 speed, 78k Miles, 4x4, Air
#7345
$1 8, 9 9 5
'PSE&TDBQF
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 94k
#7198
$1 2 ,9 9 5
$IFWZ5BIPF-5
Auto, PL-PW, Air, Third Seat,
Leather, 4x4, CD #7259
$1 8, 9 9 5
'PSE&YQMPSFS
'PSE&EHF
Auto, Eddie Bauer, 3rd Row, 2wd #7195
$1 3 ,9 9 5
Auto, 67k Miles, 4x4, Air
#7356
#7377
$1 3 ,9 9 5
$IFWZ4VCVSCBO-5;
+FFQ8SBOHMFS
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air, AWD
$1 9 ,9 9 5
Auto, Third Seat, Leather, 4x4,
PL-PW #7355
$2 1, 9 9 5
+FFQ(SBOE
$IFSPLFF-BSFEP
Auto, 4x4, PL-PW, Air #C7654
$1 7 ,9 9 5
$1 7 ,9 9 5
,JB4FEPOB
'PSE&DPOPMJOF7BO
Auto, 68k, PL-PW, Local Trade
Auto, PL-PW, Air, Local Trade,
Great Shape #7367
#7174
$6 ,4 9 5
MANAGERS SPECIAL
$6 ,9 9 5
MANAGERS SPECIAL
%PEHF(SBOE$BSBWBO
'PSE'SFFTUZMF
Auto, Stow & Go Seats, PL-PW,
Air, 75k #6670
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air, Third
Seat #8978
$BEJMMBD&TDBMBEF
Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air, Third
Seat #7321
$6 ,9 9 5 $7 ,2 5 0
%PEHF(SBOE$BSBWBO
7PMLTXBHFO3PVUBO
89k, Auto, Third Seat, PL-PW #7339
Auto, PL-PW, Air, Third Seat
$8 ,9 9 5
#7338
$1 0 ,4 9 5
All prices include $250.00 doc fee. Not included TT&L.
/JTTBO2VFTU
Auto, PL-PW, Air, 92k,
Local Trade #7161
$1 1, 4 9 5
$ISZTMFS5PXO
$PVOUSZ
Auto, 3rd Seat, PL-PW, Air #7294
Not Actual Colors Shown in pictures above.
$1 3 ,9 9 5
)POEB0EZTTFZ&9Auto, Leather, PL-PW, Air, Power Sunroof,
Power Doors & Hatch, 82k, DVD #7017
$1 6 ,9 9 5
45026149DT
+FFQ(SBOE$IFSPLFF
-BSFEP