Forgotten Story Longmeadow Tid Bits Dan Blocker

Doc Hammill: A Lifetime
with Horses-Part Two
Forgotten Story
Longmeadow
Discussing Corneal Ulcers
Tid Bits
Dan Blocker
Andalusian
Illinois Horse Fair
Horse Law:
And Much More . . .
THE
Page 2 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
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Page 4- Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
Doc Hammill – A Lifetime with Horses
by Heather Thomas
Part two – Teaching Others About Draft Horses and Driving
After Doc Hammill sold his tourist business--with the
wagons, sleighs and driving horses--he wanted to get
away from such a busy life for awhile. He found a remote old homestead in near East Glacier, Montana--in
the National Forest and on the back side of the Blackfoot Indian Reservation. This property had been a
small dude ranch from 1913 into the 1940s. A
nephew of the people who homesteaded it owned the
land and wanted someone on it.
“I took my favorite horses that I hadn’t sold with the
business, along with my wagons, and ended up buying
the place a year later (in 1996), and living there about
15 years. It was a place you couldn’t drive to in the
winter,” he says.
“One of the important things in my personal education
about horses was being able to observe feral horses on
that Reservation. There were stallions with their mare
bands, bachelor groups of males, in a natural situation.
I spent a lot of time hiking the hills watching them,
studying their behavior, their society, interactions and
relationships.”
In the meantime Hammill had been trying to learn
about natural horsemanship before it was called natural horsemanship. “In the early 1970’s, Dr. Robert
Miller came into my life. I went to a veterinary conference here in Montana, where Bob spoke and gave a
demonstration with live horses. That changed my life
and my horsemanship. Up until that time, it had been
trial and error when I was a kid, and my old time mentors who were very traditional. They loved horses and
were considerate of horses, and always tried to do
things in a cooperative way, but if they ran out of tools
for a cooperative way, they resorted to tradition,” Hammill says.
“It was a perfect time for me, when I met Bob Miller at
that conference, because I was looking for a kinder,
gentler way to deal with animals in my veterinary practice and with my own animals. I remember Bob saying
that there are very few males under the age of 35 who
are receptive to these methods. My silent response was
that I was going to be one of them! I was not yet 35 and
I wanted to learn as much as possible about the psychological approach Bob was advocating.”
When Hammill got back from that conference, he kept
the notes from Dr. Miller’s talk. “In those early years I
re-read those notes and studied them. This changed
how I practiced medicine, handling animals, changed
me as a person, and changed my horsemanship. My
old mentors were greatly appreciated and gave me
many things that master horsemanship clinicians
never could have—in terms of working with draft
horses and mules. But Bob’s input was a key component of what makes me who I am today and how I do
things,” he says.
Hammill went on a quest for more information. “I had
been studying the old horse masters, horse charmers,
horse whisperers and horse tamers of the 17th and
18th centuries, like John Rarey, Jesse Beery, Dennis
Magner, Oscar Gleason, Denton Offut, etc. While I really admired and appreciated everything I learned
about them, there was still a lot of mechanics and force
in their methods. They had incredible understanding
themselves, about horses, but many of the tools they
used were then taken by others with less skill, and
abused,” he explains.
“All these different avenues of learning that I had opportunity to follow have been thrown in the pot, shaken
up, and the ones that worked for me I sorted out and
kept. I encourage my students to learn from as many
sources as they can, and pick out what makes sense to
them and what they think fits for them—and become
their own horseman. I have trouble with clinicians who
expect people to become their clones,” says Hammill.
DRIVING HORSE WORKSHOPS – In 1999 he started
doing workshops at the ranch by East Glacier, and writing several work horse handbooks. “I tried 2 workshops the first summer, and they were hugely
successful. For many years I scheduled 6 each summer. I had done some clinics and workshops sporadically, on driving working horses, but at that point it
became my sole source of support. I was doing more
writing again, but rather than veterinary topics I wrote
about driving, working, and training horses in harness.”
“I put up all my loose hay with horses, got out firewood, posts and rails with horses, and used them as
extensively as I could. In the spring of 2010 I moved
the workshops to the place where I am now. My partner Cathy Greatorex and I leased a ranch near Eureka,
Montana,” he says.
See Doc Hammill on Page 5
Feb./March, 2014- Central States Horseman - Page 5
Doc Hammill from Page 4
“Cathy and I met when she came to a workshop many
years ago. For a number of years she came to workshops as a student. Then at one point we both found
ourselves single again, and got together. Now she’s a
great partner. If it wasn’t for her I would not be doing
this; there is no way I could have taken things to the
level we are doing now, by myself.” Cathy has a long
history with draft horses and a background in education.
The ranch they are leasing is 700 acres, which includes
45 acres of hay, lots of pasture, and some timber. “We
have a lot more room here, and more opportunity for
farming, haying and planting-type activities for workshops. The name of our business is Doc Hammill
Horsemanship. We specialize in ground work and
driving, working and training horses, mules and donkeys in harness,” says Hammill.
Although he has trained a lot of horses, bred and raised
a lot of Clydesdales, he has never been a professional
horse trainer. “I have simply trained my own and have
done demonstrations on starting them in harness in
round pens at horse expos and other places. I realized
a long time ago that the horses don’t need much training; it’s the people who need training.” If a horse is
nicely trained and then goes back to an owner who
doesn’t understand how to handle the horse, the training is mostly wasted.
“Someone could buy the perfect team, but then the
minute they take the horses home, they start to
change. If the person doesn’t have enough knowledge
and skill to maintain the training, they won’t be able to.
So we try to train the people who handle the horses.
Horses already know how to walk, trot, run, jump,
turn, go forward, backward, up, down. All we need to
do is figure out how to get them to comfortably and
willingly do what we want them to do, when we want
them to do it,” he explains.
“Our workshops have evolved over the years. When
we started, we were teaching people the basics of handling horses, hitching and driving them. Now we find
that if we can give people an understanding of how the
horse’s mind works (what is logical to a horse, how the
horse perceives things and reacts, and how horses
learn), things go more smoothly. If we learn how to get
horses to willingly cooperate—and if we communicate
in their silent body language and use an understanding
of herd dynamics—we have more success. If people
can learn how to gain trust and mutual respect, they
can get to the point where the horse chooses to accept
them as leader. If we can get this idea across to people
and give them a little knowledge and skill in that direction, then the driving and working horses in harness,
the training, all falls into place for them, and works so
much better for the horses,” Hammill says.
PROMOTING GENTLE TRAINING - “Things have
evolved in concepts of training. We used to think in
terms of physically controlling the horse. Now, most
of what I do is work with the psychology of working
with the horse. For instance, people ask how much a
horse can pull, and I tell them it depends. Most horses
can pull more, physically, than they can psychologically. This is because we don’t take their psychological
comfort and well-being into consideration. We have
not been taught about how important this is.”
One of his favorite quotes from Dr. Miller is that horses
are strong and fast, but psychologically fragile. “We
try to help people work with the horse and for the
horse, and put aside their own goals. If we take care
of the horses and keep them comfortable and relaxed
with whatever we happen to be doing, the horse will respond. I tell people that comfortable, relaxed horses
don’t run away and they don’t have wrecks. So our
first and most important job is to manage our horses’
comfort and keep them relaxed and willing so everyone
stays safe,” says Hammill.
“I’ve dedicated my life to helping people with their
horses, as a way of helping the horses have a better
life. Instead of slowing down and thinking about retirement, as a lot of people are at my age, I’m thinking
about how I can broaden this and give to more people
what I have been so fortunate to learn—to the benefit
of other people and their horses, mules and donkeys.”
A few years ago one of his students came to Montana
and started filming videos on the fundamentals of driving and working horses in
harness, and teaching horses to drive.
“Now we have 9 titles of various DVDs on
ground work, communication and relationship building, harnessing, hitching, driving
and working, and training horses in harness,” says Hammill. He also continues to
write articles and do phone and on-line
coaching, consulting and question-answering.
He does a lot of private work with people
and their horses, at their own places. Often
it’s someone who has been to a workshop.
“We encourage people to study the videos,
come to a workshop, then let us help them
at home with their own horse. We support
all of these steps with on-line and phone
coaching and consultation. We have plans
for a service on our website where people
can subscribe for access to articles, discussion groups,
questions and answers. We are planning to do some
webinars (seminars on the web) where people participate via cell phone or computer.” The seminars will be
designed so students can interact with Doc, Cathy and
other horsemanship professionals.
“These are ways we can continue to do what we love,
and hopefully help more horses and people. Last year
Cathy and I were on the road 96 days. I am now ready
to talk more people into coming to Montana workshops. I don’t want to quit traveling but I want to spend
more time at home and less on the road,” he says.
There has been a subtle change in draft horse use. In
1999 when he started the workshops, about 80% of
the people who came were interested in recreational
driving and draft horses as a hobby—doing a little
work on their place with horses, or doing carriage
rides, etc. “Only 20% wanted to do something commercial like farm, log, or commercial rides with horses.
In the time since then, those percentages have flipflopped,” he says.
“A lot of our workshops now are held at organic farms
that are horse-powered. We start with instruction and
end up doing real work with the horses. About 80%
of the people that we serve in workshops now are interested in doing income-producing work with horses.
Many are doing organic market gardens and small
scale farms. The percent of students doing only hobby
and recreational things with horses is now less than
20%.”
Doc and Cathy enjoy teaching people to better understand and communicate with horses and to develop cooperative relationships, to start and train their horses
in harness and do productive work. Being part of the
worldwide revolution from traditional horsemanship
to gentle/natural horsemanship has been very gratifying.
“It makes me feel good from several perspectives.
One, I am a much better person for having learned this
type of horsemanship—the gentle, effective, kind,
horse-friendly safe type of horsemanship. I am a better
person with people, and with horses. Second, this is a
way of honoring my great mentors and teachers,” he
says.
“Today, doing my driving courses is a way to pass on
what my mentors dedicated their lives to, and to keep
that knowledge alive. I am still collecting tidbits of historical information that is in danger of being lost. Another reason I do this is to help people work with their
horses, mules and donkeys in ways that work better
for the animals. That’s the biggest reason.”
Page 6 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
Discussing Corneal Ulcers
With Dr. Tim Ellis
We recently sat down with Dr. Tim Ellis,
who has a intense interest regarding anything that affects equine eyes, to discuss the
most common eye ailments affecting horses.
We discussed cataracts, glaucoma, uveitis,
detached retinas, common cancers, and
corneal ulcers. For the purposes of this article we will focus on corneal ulcers, as this is
the most common affliction affecting the eyes
of horses.
Understanding Corneal Ulcers:
The cornea is an amazing tissue that is
clear as a glass but yet is indeed a living tissue. It allows light to enter the eye, which
permits the horse to see. The cornea is approximately 1.5mm thick which is approximately the thickness of a penny. The cornea
is exposed to all the elements of our environment and therefore serves as a protective
cover, shielding the eye from bacteria and infection.
There are three primary layers to the
cornea; the outer layer or epithelium, stroma
(the middle, thickest layer), and the endothe-
lium (the interior layer). When the epithelium
is scratched or punctured it allows bacteria
or fungi access to the inner layers of the
cornea. Bacteria and fungi can thrive in this
environment and once established can result
in the loss of an eye. All of this the result from
a minor scratch that breaks the outer barrier,
the epithelium, and disease can then set in.
Ulcers can sometimes be seen with the
naked eye but ulceration is positively diagnosed using special ophthalmic stains. A
healthy cornea is smooth and nonporous and
stains will slide off the cornea. When the
outer layer of the cornea is breached or damaged it exposes the stroma (the middle layer
of the cornea). The Stroma is porous and the
stain will adhere to it, exposing the damage.
The fluorescein stain strip is orange but the
stain on the eye will be bright green. We also
use a Rose Bengal stain, which is a deep red
color. This stain will not stick to the cornea if
the tear film is normal and well adhered to the
cornea. The tear film is critical to the health
of the eye and an abnormal tear film will seriously compromise an ulcers ability to heal.
Again, be aware that any size ulcer in the eye
is a serious situation and you should seek immediate medical attention. Prompt treatment
could save your horses eyesight or eye.
Q&A With Dr. Ellis
Q: What are the most common reasons a
horse develops a corneal ulcer?
A: Corneal ulcers develop when bacteria
and/or fungi gain access to the interior of the
cornea, generally as the result of trauma.
This “trauma” is generally a non-event and
goes undetected. When we think of trauma
we think of a catastrophic event. In many
cases the traumatic event is simply a piece
of hay that scratched the cornea. Horses eating large round bales are at an increased risk
because they prefer the better hay in the center and will bury their heads trying to reach
the better hay. This creates an increased risk
of scratching the cornea. Other possibilities
include foreign bodies lodged in the eye, or
blunt force trauma such as a stick, fence
post, or even another horse. The cornea
doesn’t have blood vessels, consequently
See Dr. Ellis on Page 7
Feb./March, 2014- Central States Horseman - Page 7
Dr. Tim Ellis from page 6
these injuries don’t bleed and this often delays owners from noticing subtle signs of impending problems
Q: If an owner believes there is a foreign
body in the horse’s eye is it okay to shine a
light in the eye to exam it?
A: Yes. Shining a light into your horse’s eye
is fine if you suspect something may be in the
eye. If you spot something however, we encourage you not to try flushing it out. Call
your veterinarian first. It is very easy for foreign bodies to get buried in the soft tissues
of the eye otherwise called conjunctiva and
this can complicate and therefore delay extraction.
Q: If the traumatic injury can be as subtle as
a scratch from a piece of hay how can an
owner detect that there is a problem?
A: Eye injuries are often very painful and
physical signs will develop. However if you
look at your horse’s eyelashes you may be
able to detect a problem very early on. Compare the lashes on one eye to the other. If
they are drooping or not pointing straight out,
this could be one of the first indicators that
the eye has an issue. Eventually your horse
may develop excessive tearing, redness,
squinting, holding eye shut, and the cornea
may be cloudy. These symptoms signal a significant problem and help should be sought
as soon as they are detected.
Q: If an owner suspects an eye problem
should they flush the eye and try to treat it on
their own before calling a veterinarian?
A: We do not recommend trying to treat the
eye on your own. Old medication may be outdated or contain bacteria. Having a tube of
triple antibiotic ointment in your first aid kit is
a good idea, but should only be used in the
interim once veterinary help is sought and on
the direction of your vet.
Q: Sometimes with medical issues if we give
them a day or two they will resolve themselves. Is this the case with corneal ulcers?
A: Eye problems can go bad fast. This is the
one time being patient may not be to your
horse’s advantage. Veterinarian assistance
will most likely be required. Once an infection
gets established in the eye, it gets difficult to
treat and the danger of loosing site or the eye
is very real. The time frame can be short and
hours can make the difference. If you notice
your horse squinting, I wouldn’t even wait
until morning to seek help.
Q: Why can deep ulcers be difficult to treat?
A: A good supply of healthy blood is needed
for healing. The cornea doesn’t have blood
vessels as most other tissues. If they did, the
cornea wouldn’t be clear. A good blood supply allows the bodies defense mechanisms
to “attack” an invading bacteria or fungus, but
since the cornea doesn’t have a blood supply, it is vulnerable to infections that get out
of control. While the body will begin to grow
blood vessels in an attempt to repair itself,
this is a slow process and much too slow to
do much good in beating back an infection.
Q: With proper treatment how quickly can a
corneal ulcer repair itself?
A: The good news is that with proper treatment an ulcer can heal up to 1mm per day.
So if a horse has a ½ cm ulcer the horse
could potentially be ulcer free in 5 days if
complications are prevented. Problems arise
when the ulcer goes undetected and untreated for even brief periods of time. It can
rapidly become large and deep making treatment more difficult. If an infection becomes
established deep in the stroma, it is possible
to develop into a stromal abscess. This complication becomes very difficult to treat and
often results in loosing the eye.
Q: What are the challenges with treating a
larger or out of control ulcer?
A: Time and money are generally the two
leading challenges. Treatment can require
that medication be delivered to the eye every
hour around the clock for days. Many owners
are unable or available to do this. This necessitates that a horse be admitted to the hospital where medication can be delivered
around the clock. As the medicating intervals
become less intensive horses are sent home
to finish up treatment.
As you can imagine an extended stay in
the hospital, medications, and follow-up visits
can become very costly, especially if the
horse is not covered by insurance. This is the
second challenge. In some cases treating the
eye is not a financial option and eye removal
is the only alternative. Enucleation (eye removal) can, in some dramatic cases, be fraction of the cost of treating a serious
well-established corneal ulcer.
If an eye has to be removed take solace in
the fact that most horses continue on with life
as usual. They are not affected in ways owners often worry they will. Remember, horses
are prey and they fear movement. Any
movement to a horse could be a predator.
This is why horses have developed with eyes
set wide on their heads giving them great peripheral vision. They are not frightened of
what they don’t see! This is why carriage
horses where blinders. Unlike people, horses
don’t suffer emotional trauma and tend to
continue about their business with little interruption. This is the good news, however we
want to save every eye we can and early
treatment is key.
Q: How do I know if my horse has lost its
sight due to a corneal ulcer or other eye disease?
A: Look for what we call the “dazzle response”. Shine a bright light into the eye and
watch for a slight closing of the upper eyelid.
Essentially the horse is letting you know they
sense the light. Care must be taken to avoid
touching the eyelids so a little distance from
the eye is important and it can require an intensely bright light.
Q: Are there any surgical options to repair a
corneal ulcer?
A: Some horses are good candidates for a
conjunctival flap graft. This surgical procedure relocates a flap of live tissue from the
edge of the eye (the pink inner part of the
eyelid), which is then sutured over the affected area of the cornea. The graft brings
blood supply to the area to promote healing.
This procedure requires general anesthesia
and is not suitable for all cases. It may also
result in additional scarring. In more serious
cases, corneal transplant grafts are becoming a more accepted treatment. This procedure also leaves a very significant scar,
however saving the eye and their sight is the
goal and this can be helpful in achieving success.
Takeaway Message
Catching a corneal ulcer early improves the
changes of your horse keeping its’ eyesight
or even the eye itself. Recognizing the signs
your horse’s eye is in pain and seeking the
help of a professional gives both you and
your horse options that might not otherwise
be available.
Note: If you would like to learn more about
other eye diseases: cataracts, glaucoma,
uveitis, detached retinas, squamous cell carcinoma, please visit our website MidRiversEquine.com or contact us at the clinic.
636.332.5373
Page 8 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
Bonanza’s. . .
Dan Blocker
Dan Blocker and Goldie Hawn
Blocker was born “Bobby Dan Davis
Blocker” in De Kalb, Tx. on December 10,
1928 the son of Ora Shack Blocker and wife
Mary Davis Blocker. Dan and his family was
hurt by the Great Depression that began the
year after he was born, so they moved to the
small town of O’Donnell, Tx, where his parents operated a grocery store.
During his years at school, he had worked
part time in a beer bar, performing in rodeos,
and then later becoming the bouncer. At this
time, his size was a large factor - he was 6
foot, 4 inches tall and weighed around 300
pounds. He was very good-natured despite
his intimidating size.
He attended Texas Military Institute and in
1946 started his undergraduate work at Baptist-affiliated Hardin Simmons University in
Abliene, tx, where he played football. It was
there he fell in love with acing when he was
recruited by girlfriend to pay a role in the
campus production of “Arsenic and Old Lace”
(1944) as they needed a strong man to lift the
bodies that the sponster aunts had dispatched up from the cellar.. He graduated in
1950 with a degree in English from Sul Ross
State Teacher’s College in Alpine, Tx, After
graduation Blocker went east where he did
repertory work in Boston. The draft quickly
ended his apprenticeship.
Blocker was drafted into the United States
Army and served in the Korean War , he
served as an Infrantry sergeant in F Company, 2nd Battalion, 179th Infantary Reegiment, 45th infantry division in Korea,
December 1951 to August 1952.. He married Dolphia, Paker, whom he had met while
a student at Sul Ross State. They were
blessed with 4 children each with names beginning with “D’s” - Dirk Blocker, twin daughters, Debra Lee, and Danna Lynn. Their 4th
son was named David Blocker - he won a
1998 Emmy for producing “Don King: Only
in America.”
After receiving a Purple Heart for wounds
in combat, Blocker was a high school English
and Drama teacher in Sonora, Tx, and then
a sixth grade teacher and coach at Eddy Elementary School in Carlsbad, New Mexico
and then finally became a teacher in California while preparing for his PhD. studies.
Blocker picked up bit parts in television,
making his debut as a bartender in “Sheiff of
Cochise” (1957). His career rise was steady
and rapid, and he appeared on many Westerns, including Gunsmoke (1955), Have Gun
- Will Travel (1957) and Maverick (1957). He
claimed his turn as Hgnose Huges on Maverick, the comic Western starring James Garner, was the seminal role of his career/
He was cast in recurring role of “Tiny” Carl
Budinger in the short lived Western series
“Cimarron City” (1957). Its cancellation after
one season made him available for “Bonanza” which was “Cimarron City” creator
David Dortort’s next project. He had previously appeared on Dortort’s Wester Series,
“The Restless Gun” (1957).
“Bonanza” debuted in September 1959 on
Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. on N.B.C. which was
owned by R.C.A. oposite the popular “Perry
Mason” The new Western was shot in color,
R..C.A. made color TV sets and saw the pro-
gram as a good advertisement for it wares.
The company sponsored the first two seasons of the show and the sponosorship and
R.C.A. onership of N.B.C. was likely why it
wasn’t calceled after its shaky first season,
when it placed #45 in the ratings for the
1959-60 season. The following year, it
cracked the top 20 at #17, but it wasn’t until
it was shifted to Sundays at 9 p.m. in the
1961-62 season that it became a ratings phenomenon, coming in at #2. It was the first of
nine straight season in the top 5.
Once “Bonanza” was ensconced as America’s favorite Western, Blocker and his three
co-stars, Lorne Greene, Pernell Roberts and
Michael Landon were paid an extremely
handsome salary that eventually rose to approximately $10,000 per episode each by the
time Roberts quit after the sixth season.
Commenting on Roberts departure, Landon
said,” we took one leaf out of the dining room
table and we all made more money because
we split the take three ways instead of four.”
Salary, Royalities from Bonanza-reated merchandise and business ventures (Blocker
stared the Bonanza Steak House chain
1963, and an eventual $1 million payout from
N.B.C. to buy out the residual rights of each
of the three remaining stars made them all
rich.
“Bonanza” made Dan Blocker a very
wealthy man, but more importantly, it made
him a televion immortal. the series continues
to be re-run in syndication 40 years after
Hoss exited the stage.
See Blocker on Page 9
Feb./March, 2014- Central States Horseman - Page 9
Blocker from Page 8
Blcoker a performance automobile fan,
once owned a 1965 Chevrolet Chevelle
SS396 “Z-16” (RPO Z16 ooption) as Chevrolet was the commercial of the show. He also
owned a 1965 Huffaker Genie MK10 race
car, nicknamed the “Vinegaroon”. The car
was run by Nickey Chevrolet in the 1965 and
1966 US Road Racing Championship series
as well as the 1966 Can-Am championship.
On May 13, 1972, Blocker died in Los Angeles of pulmomary embolisn following a gall
bladder surgery. The writers of Bonanza took
the unusal step of referencing a major character’s death in the show’s storyline that autumn. Bonanza lasted another season
without Hoss, as the fourteenth and final season ended on January 16th, 1973. Blocker’s
remains are interred in a family plot in Woodmen Cemetery in DeKalb, Texas, alathough
he had lived there only briefly. The common
grave site is marked by a plain stone with the
name “BLOCKER” engraved; three family
members are buried beside him.
Vaughn Monroe, Susie Scott & Dan Blocker
Note: There is a “Dan Blocker Room” on
the second floor of the O’Donnell Heritage
Museum in O’Donnell, Texas where he was
rearaed.
Dan Blocker on the Three Stooges
Mon - Sat
10:00 am - 8:00 pm
Sun
10:00 am - 6:00 pm
Windowsills Cafe & Marketplace is a
counter service Café with our inhouse brined and smoked meats,
homemade sides, and homemade
pies and pastries. The marketplace
side offers coffee, sauces, jams and
jellies, chocolate covered nuts and
coffee beans, Ka-Kao chocolate, St.
Louis books, local honey and other
specialty items from local market
areas.
1326 Clarkson/
Clayton Center
Ellisville MO 63011
(636) 527-6400
Dan Blocker
The Bonanza Gang
Michael Landon, Pernell Roberts &
Dan Blocker
Dan Blocker and Mort Mills on the Rifleman
Page 10 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
Hope
Givers
Message
God flooded the earth; he saved the animals
with Noah and his family only. When this
flood was finished, he placed a rainbow in the
sky as a sign that he would no
Longer flood the earth. Again, a change
had taken place on how God
dealt with man.
By Dennis &
Cindy Cappel
We live under the dispensation of Grace;
we are no longer under the dispensation of
the law which was given to Moses. Again, a
change in how God deals with man.
When I am training horses, if I don't make
clear distinctions between maneuvers, it will
create confusion in the horse. For example;
if I am trying to get a horse to stop and he
thinks I want him to turn, he
will not be able to either turn properly or
stop properly because the two maneuvers
have become blurred. This same type of
thing happens when dispensation from the
bible are mixed.
What is a dispensation? The word dispensation means the act of
dispensing or dealing out. A dispensation
is how God dispenses his dealings with those
under him. It is usually connected with a time
period; however it is more encompassing
than a period of time alone. A dispensation
will reveal the changes in how God deals with
his people, not that God himself has
changed.
For example: In the Garden of Eden before
Adam and Eve ate from the fruit they spoke
directly to God in open communication, they
were naked and not ashamed. After they ate
of the fruit it says in Genesis 3: 9-10 But
the Lord God called to man, where are you?
10) He answered; I heard you in the garden
and I was afraid because I was naked so I
hid!
They no longer walked in fearless communication with God. In fact God cursed them
and the land. You see there was a change in
how God dealt with man.
There was another change later on when
Under the dispensation of the law which
was given to Moses, if you did well you received good, if you did badly you got bad.
The ten commandants given by God are
good and holy in themselves. But in practicality, they are impossible to keep. God gave
them to us to use much like a mirror to reveal
our imperfections. Not to be used to clean up
our imperfections, but rather to show our
need for a Savior. His name is JESUS!
John 1:17 For the law was given through
Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus
Christ.
Hope Givers Working Ranch,
Dennis Cappel
Feb./March, 2014- Central States Horseman - Page 11
Equine Consulting with Cal Middleton . . . .
Who is Cal Middleton ?
What should I
do with my colt
to prepare him
for his first ride?
The art of starting a colt is truly an art. It’s
something that should definitely be left up to
professionals. My goal when starting colts is
to get them to give up their feet respectfully
when I apply pressure. In essence, to teach
the horse to give to pressure. All of what we
do happens in their brains, so that’s where I
focus my energy in the beginning. Horses all
need to be started the same way no matter
what their goal or discipline may be. There
are certain principles that all horses need to
understand before we move on to certain
jobs or events. Horses need to reach a level
of contention and happiness before we try to
shove them into the sport of our choosing.
We need to always keep the horses’ best interest in mind, not our own agenda. I put on
colt starting clinics from time to time, but the
idea of teaching people how to start colts by
writing it down on paper is a little silly to me.
Colt starting is about feel, timing, decisiveness, judgment, discernment, patience, experience.
There are a lot of tools that people use
when starting colts. It is important to remember that they are all just tools. The key is to
learn how to use your hands, feet, and most
importantly your brain. Round pens can be
useful but are not necessary, and are often
Cal is a professional horse
trainer who makes his living riding horses, coaching non pros,
and competing at shows on the
state and national level where he
has won numerous titles including a world championship in
Reining at the APHA Congress
and a 4th place finish in Jr Working Cow Horse at the ApHC Nationals. Cal starts colts and takes
them all the way to the show ring.
He also works with trail riders
and youth. Cal competes in Roping, Cutting, Working Cow Horse
and Reining. Cal puts on numerous clinics around the country.
He also gives online video lessons and has an equine consulting service where he helps
people make decisions regarding
their horses. You can learn more
about Cal at www.calmiddleton
.com or call him at 816-2569597.
overused to the point where they make
horses worse rather than better. Flags are a
great tool but are often used for way too
much desensitizing and can make horses
worse. Tools are only as good as the minds
that use them.
For the colts’ sake, I would recommend
that you consult a professional before attempting to start a colt on your own. Also, realize that not every professional horse trainer
has your colts best interest in mind. Colt
starting, as well as horse training, or horsemanship in general ,has become commercialized and sellable, but be careful not to fall
in to that trap. Learning to start colts is developed over years of experience, not watching
a few dvds. Are there good dvds to watch
and learn from ? Yes of course. Just be careful not to overlook the horse.
I will leave you with a few thoughts for
starting a colt, or working with any young
horse.
• Do not get your horse too bendy and flexible in the neck.
• Do not get your horse too dull and desensitized.
• Do not back your horse up away from the
bit.
• Do not use your legs too much to steer.
• Do not get your horse worried about your
hands or feet.
• Be patient yet keep ur horse moving slow
and easy.
• Get control of his feet, via his face, with
your reins.
• Keep your colt happy and moving forward
with curiosity.
• Keep his face connected to his feet.
I hope that helps. Come over and see
some colt starting anytime. Ill be starting
some colts in Scottsdale, Arizona this winter,
then I’ll be back to Kansas City in March.
Until next time, ride smarter, not harder !
Send
your
questions
to
[email protected]
calmiddleton.com.
Page 12 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
Forgotten
Story
By Garth Rumsmoke
Seems my memory slips sometimes. All
this remembering and writing about the west
coast sort of jarred some thoughts loose. A
number of times folks have asked what ride
do I remember the most To tell the truth, not
any one comes to mind, but when something
does it is the other things that may come up.
The one that I laugh at the most and have the
most fun telling is getting lost on a beach.
Just the title makes one stop and wonder.
The wonder is, I have never wrote about it in
the Central States Horseman. Ok, so I will
share it with you.
The last beach stop we made in Oregon
is in a place called Nehalem. Inland a few
miles, and up in the air is a place or area
called “Round Top” yep it’s a mountain top.
Sort of, just under 3000 ft. West of Portland.
Nearest town is Glenwood. Well the water
starts running down hill from there, makes a
northern swing and then west to the ocean.
It’s called the Nehalem River as it comes
along. It comes almost to the ocean, 1/4 mile
or so and then swings south, following the
coast for a while and then cuts out to the big
water, a couple miles or so as it makes it’s
last turn it passes the Nehalem state park
area. On the south end of the the parks
camp ground is the horse area. This turn
leaves a finger of land running north and
south with water on both sides. The ocean
on one and the river on the other. Not much
in-between, sand and some very high beach
grass.
On this trip we had wanted to take some
videos of us riding the beach at sunset. Set
the camera up, looking toward the sunset
and ride along the beach in the video. As luck
would have it all the sunset up to that point
had been bad. This one was not, really did
put on a show.
We had arrived late afternoon, got set
up just in time to saddle up and get on the
beach.
The beach was not hard to find, just ride
west. NO trail, just go a couple hundred
yards and your there. That’s what we did.
Making our way through and around the
beach grass, that seemed to grow on top on
huge mounds of sand. It Left only a small
areas between these lumps, and making the
only place you could ride. We had no idea
where we were going except into the sun. Fi-
No trail here.
nally we came up to the base of a large sand
from sight of the beach. NO problem, big
dune. Up and over and Walla, the ocean.
log. Ok, So we rode south to the rivers enThe sun was setting up one of those pink
trance, turned around and started back. By
and black and orange sky’s. This was it, get now its dark dark, one could just see the
out the camera, set up and wait for the perwater and north in the distance the lights of
fect moment. We had
moved down the beach
aways to avoid the crowd
of campers doing the same
thing we were doing. The
sun was seting as we rode,
and it was perfect.
Once the sun was
down, we packed up the
camera equipment, and
decided to take a ride down
the beach in the semi darkness. As we started out I
asked Kathy if she saw any
land marks so we could
find our way back. The
Day light view of the strip in between camp and the river and ocean
dune was so high along the
top, it hid the camp area
See Oregon Trail on Page 13
Feb./March, 2014- Central States Horseman - Page 13
Oregon Trail from Page 12
town, must have been
the town of Manzanita.
The lights
were a long ways off,
but knowing the camp
was ahead and off to
our right, we just kept
riding, and looking for
a BIG log.
NO log, on we
went, no log, we went
up on the dune top to
look for lights to see
where we were. No
lights, just a long
ways north. Thinking
we had rode a lot further than we thought,
we kept going. Up the
dune, no light, back to
the beach and north.
Finally coming
up with the idea, the
camping area had a Nehalem Beach Looking back from the highway in the north. You
can see the river in the left side
power outage. Great,
no lights for a beacon.
When I ask where the
Then up the beach aways we saw flashlights
camp was, she must have
moving. Up the beach at a gallop we went. thought we were crazy, “right
Scared the daylights out of a couple teenage
there” she said looking over
girls, as we came running up. They told us
her shoulder. I took a look
the camp was right behind them. Up the
from where I sat, which was
dunes and still no lights. Back on the beach
higher than she, I could not
the girls were gone. Each time we topped
see any lights.
the dunes we could see across to the river
She offered to show us.
and the moon lights reflection, and knowing
Following a path we could not
the horse camp had to be in between was
see, she lead us around the
sort of disturbing..
tall grass and coming out
Here we were on top of the dune, looking
under a huge canopy of limbs,
for lights and not seeing anything. Then out into the RV park area. The
of the dark, right in front of the horse appears
trees in the campground grew
a lady with two little kids in tow. And a flashtall and thick enough to black
light.
out the dim camp lights. Huge umbrellas, No
wonder we could not see them. Riding
through the RV section got us some not so
nice comments about us being there. Back
at our camp (no lights at all) we had a good
laugh. The next morning I spoke to one of the
other horse campers about the lack of a good
land mark to find the trail from the beach
coming back to the horse area. “Oh there is
one right one top on the dune, a flag on a
pole” Humm, later we rode back to the
beach to see this pole. It was a foot tall and
had a white sock tied to it... So much for that.
. (Take a look at google maps for a clear
idea of how it looks) (the horse camp is the
circle on the bottom) (Looking now at the aerial view I can see the horse camp trail on the
north end of the camp , we never used it )
Getting lost on a beach... can’t happen,
Kathy said, “we should have had the GPS
with us.”
Adding insult to injury, I thought... Who
would need a GPS on a beach.
Till next time tis me Garth Rumsmoke, the
take nothing and leave only tracks...
Perfect night
Horse camp area (note thick trees)
Page 14 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
Breed Organizations Support AQHA in Clone Registration Lawsuit
The world's largest horse breed organization hopes to preserve its right to bar cloned
horses from registration.
It wasn't too long ago that cloning was something
out of science fiction. But in the decade since
Prometea, the world's first cloned horse, was
born, the practice has moved from mad-scientist
territory to a viable commercial enterprise. Some
well-heeled owners will commit a sizable investment to create a genetic duplicate of a favorite
horse. Among the well-known cloned horses are
Olympic show jumpers Gem Twist and Sapphire,
champion barrel racer Scamper and three-day
eventing legend Tamarillo.
Gem Twist and Scamper were both gelded before the height of their careers, and their clones
have been used to pass on those celebrated
genes. The clones of Sapphire, a mare who is
still very much alive and having a second career
as a broodmare, may appear the jumper ring in
the future. But cloning is still a controversial topic,
and many breed registries have prohibited cloned
horses from being registered, which also prevents them from competing in breed competitions.
The American Quarter Horse Association
(AQHA) is the official registry of the most populous breed of horse in the world, and one of the
organizations that has barred clones. In 2013,
Quarter Horse breeder Jason Abraham and veterinarian Gregg Veneklasen sued the AQHA,
stating that their prohibition of cloned horses constituted a monopoly. The jury ruled in favor of
Abraham and Veneklasen, the plaintiffs, but
awarded no damages in the case. The plaintiffs
had sought up to $5 million.
The AQHA is appealing the court's ruling, and
has sought the support of other breed registries.
Earlier this month, several organizations jointly
filed an Amicus Brief, also known as a "friend-ofthe-court brief," which is information provided by
someone not directly involved in the case but
who may be affected by the result. The breed organizations included in the brief are the American
Paint Horse Association, Appaloosa Horse Club,
Arabian Horse Association, the Jockey Club
(Thoroughbred registry), the Pinto Horse Association, the American Morgan Horse Association
and the U.S. Trotting Association (Standardbred
registry.) The American Horse Council and the
American Kennel Club, which oversees purebred
dog breeding in the U.S., joined the brief as well.
Not all of these groups share the AQHA's ban on
clones. According to a news release from the
American Morgan Horse Association, the organization has no stance on cloning but supports the
brief on the basis of these two statements from
it:
1) The Amici Curiae do not believe the AQHA can
violate the Sherman Anti-Trust Act as found by
the trial court, because a single entity is incapable of conspiring with itself for the purposes of
the Sherman Act. As the brief describes, the officers or committees of a single organization are
not separate economic actors pursuing separate
interests, so agreements among them do not
suddenly bring together economic power that
was previously pursuing divergent goals. Accordingly, the single entity rule excludes from the
Sherman Act unilateral conduct by an organization. Further, actions taken by a single organization or entity are presumed to be independent
action rather than concerted action and, thus, are
not prohibited under the Sherman Act.
2) The Amici Curiae do not believe a court should
mandate that any private organization must
adopt certain specific rules, as the trial court did
by ordering that AQHA adopt eleven specifically
worded rules. Private organizations have a right
to govern themselves through the adoption, administration and interpretation of their own rules.
Judicial intervention by rewriting those rules improperly interferes with the internal affairs of the
organization
The second point will resonate with many horse
owners, regardless of their stance on cloning.
While the AQHA has decided not to allow clones
or their offspring to be registered, that does not
prevent owners of Quarter Horses from cloning
them if they wish to do so. Scamper, the cloned
barrel racer, was a Quarter Horse. His clones and
their offspring are not registered, but because
most barrel competitions do not have a breed requirement, they are still potentially valuable
equine athletes.
The AQHA does not prevent cloning of Quarter
Horses from occurring, but it believes that it has
the right to make rules based on the will of its
membership. According to an AQHA survey, 86%
of its members believe that clones should not be
registered.
The American Paint Horse Association's Executive Director Billy Smith explained succinctly why
his organization supported the brief.
"APHA filed a friend-of-the-court brief in support
of AQHA because we felt that the judge’s ruling
put all breed associations at risk and in a position
where we couldn’t make and enforce our own
rules," Smith said.
The AQHA states the following arguments in regards to registering clones.
Since its inception in 1940, American Quarter
Horse breeders have been in the honorable business of working to make each generation of
horses better than the generation before. There
is a fundamental, shared belief among AQHA
members that the art and science of breeding is
the way to improve the breed. Cloning doesn't improve the breed; it just makes Xerox copies of the
same horses. With clones we're not moving forward, we're staying the same."
Feb./March, 2014 - Central States Horseman - Page 15
Illinois Quarter Horse Announces
Horseback Riding Year-End Award Winners
BATAVIA, IL – The Illinois Quarter Horse Association (ILQHA) will honor 10 top riders and 12
horses who participate in its statewide Horseback Riding Rewards Program at its Annual
Convention, January 11, 2014, Keller Convention Center, Effingham, Illinois.
The ILQHA Horseback Riding Rewards program, founded in 2007, operates similar to a
frequent flyer program and asks participants to
keep track of when and where they ride or drive
their horses in the state. The ILQHA then
stores the information in a statewide database
detailing how often and in what locations Illinois
horse owners ride horses on both public and
private lands. This usage data is available to
researchers, public officials, and others involved in equestrian land resource planning
and management. To encourage riders to log
and report the hours, ILQHA provides milestone incentive prizes at certain levels along
the way and annual recognition for the top riders and horses in three Divisions – Registered
Quarter Horse, All Breeds, and Elite Rider.
The 2013 top award recipients and their
horses include,
Laura Collins, Joliet, IL and Jewel’s Key
Docker, Grand Champions Registered Quarter
Horse Adult Divisions, 209.25 hours.
Macrae Barnett, Hanna City, IL and Abby’s
Promise, Grand Champions Registered Quarter Horse Youth Division, 111.5 hours.
Steve Cenkar, Varna, IL and Mercedes, Grand
Champions All Breeds Adult Division, 340.5
hours. Steve is also the 2013 All-Around
Champion Rider.
Katelyn Barnett, Hanna City, IL and Pogosalpiconia, Grand Champions All Breeds Youth Division, 215.5 hours. Katelyn is also the 2013
Reserve All-Around Champion Rider.
Monte Akire, Low Point, IL rode three horses to
earn the Grand Champion title in the Elite Rider
Division – Don’t Worry Be Peppy, Drew’s
Chocolate Badger and Bailey’s Bouquet.
728.75 hours.
“I am quite pleased with the success of the program and the commitment of the riders to help
us document equestrian land usage in Illinois”,
said Heidi Coop long-time committee chairwoman and one of the founders of the program.” “We are fortunate to have a dedicated
group of participants in every corner of our
state logging and reporting their horseback riding hours”, said Vickie Wheeler a member of
the committee and co-founder of the program.
“We expect to see this program continue to
grow and contribute to our understanding of the
usage of horses by the Illinois equestrian community”, said Coop.
Founded in 1952, the
Illinois Quarter Horse
Association promotes
statewide interest in
horse ownership and
supports
all-breed
equine development
and welfare in the
state of Illinois. It is an
affiliate of the American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA), the
world’s largest equine
breed registry, and
has the expressed
purpose of promoting
interest in owning, riding, breeding, raising,
training, exhibiting,
and racing of the
American
Quarter
Horse. To learn more
about the Association
visit www.ilqha.com.
David Roberts, DVM, DABVP
Doctor Roberts founded the Manchester
West Veterinary Hospital in 1993 . He's a
1986 graduate of the University of Missouri
College of Veterinary Medicine.
Mary Stauder, DVM
Doctor Stauder is a St. Louis native, a 1987
graduate of the University of Missouri College
of Veterinary Medicine.
Matthew Bechtel, DVM
Doctor Bechtel is a 2002 graduate of the University of Missouri, College of Veterinary
Medicine.
16396 Truman Road
Ellisville, MO 63011
We're located just off
Manchester Road (Hwy 100)
one mile West of Clarkson Rd
636-458-9010
Fax - 636-458-9464
CEDAR LANE EQUINE
CLINIC
NANCY L. ROTH, DVM
• practice limited to horses
• portable x-ray and ultra sound
• breeding services & dentistry Available
Standing - Pik Ravenclaw - jet black
Holsteiner/Hanoverian Stallion
Brentwood - 17H gray TB/Percheron Stallion
American Warmblood and AQHA
Sporthorses For Sale
Two MHSA Eventing/Dressage Shows.
573-237-6111 or
1-636-390-6024
3134 Highway E, New Haven, MO
Page 16 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
Two of the Lucky
Ones: Scarlett
and Django
This summer, a dozen horses found a
safe haven at Longmeadow Rescue
Ranch. At the time of rescue, most were
slowly dying from starvation and suffering
from parasites and other torments. For
some, HSMO was notified too late. This
is the story of two who survived.
Scarlett and Django were in a group of
four horses who arrived at Longmeadow
in mid-August. The body condition of all
four was a 1 out of a possible 9, indicating
severe malnutrition. Two of the mares
were too weak and did not survive.
Scarlett, a 16-year-old sorrel mare, was
so weak that she was unable to get up
without assistance, and she staggered as
she walked to the rescue trailer. She had
pressure sores all over her bony body. In
her early days at the ranch, she required
round-the-clock care, feeding, and treatment for her sores. When she lay down,
it took straps and several employees to
pick her up off the ground—and this had
to be done even during the nighttime
hours to prevent injury to her internal organs.
Django, a big, gray gelding in his midteens, also had rain rot, internal and external parasites, digestive problems, and
badly overgrown hooves. His teeth
needed floating so that he could eat comfortably. At the time of his rescue, Django
was 300 pounds underweight.
Both horses began the careful re-feeding program that we use with all of our
rescued animals. Though it seems
counter-intuitive, starved horses must be
fed only tiny amounts of hay every two
hours for the first two weeks, because
their systems are not used to digesting
feed at all, and especially healthy feeds.
Since they are so fragile during this
time, staff and volunteers handle the
horses quietly and gently, to rebuild their
trust in humans. After two weeks of hayonly feeding, we slowly transition them
onto a senior feed which contains a lot of
fiber. The re-feeding process takes
months, but we have had very good results with starved horses.
However, even with this careful transition, Scarlett coliced after a couple of
weeks—she developed an impaction that
required three days of intensive treatment
at the veterinary clinic. Upon her return to
Longmeadow, she had to be hand grazed
for 20 minutes three times each day, and
was re-fed carefully with grass hay, alfalfa hay, senior grain, and a bran mash.
Scarlett began to gain weight and
strength, and she is now back to her
ideal weight. As she gets her strength
back, she is being ridden more frequently, and is ready to go to a forever
home. According to ranch director
Amanda Mullen, “Scarlett has a lot of forward motion and would be best for an intermediate to advanced rider.” She has
a sweet nature and wants to please.
Django’s recovery was less problematic. He quickly began to regain weight
and muscle mass. His appearance and
lip tattoo indicate that he is a Thoroughbred, but we believe he has had considerable retraining since his racing career.
He’s a big, sturdy horse who is responsive to leg and seat cues and has
smooth, pleasant gaits. He will make a
great mount for a lucky person.
Both horses have responded very well
to our staff’s careful handling, and they
love attention! Django is a real gentleman, with an outgoing personality. He’s
become an “official greeter” at the
Ranch, and will even leave his food to
come say hello. Scarlett, now that she’s
healthy again, has blossomed and loves
to run and play with her pasture mates.
It is quite expensive to bring a rescued
horse back from the brink of death, as
we did with Scarlett, and to nurse her
back to health and fitness. The initial veterinary costs for a “normal,” uncomplicated recovery like Django’s (exam,
coggins, teeth floating, deworming, vaccinating, treatment for lice, etc.) is more
than $700 per horse—and that doesn’t
include repeat deworming, gelding, or
pregnancy checks that may be needed.
Nor does that $700 include staff time or
re-feeding costs.
For a horse like Scarlett, who requires
hospitalization or surgery, veterinary
costs will run four or five times that
amount, and the hands-on time by staff
and volunteers is far greater. Without our
dedicated volunteers, who put in countless hours assisting Longmeadow staff
in caring for the animals, the work we do
would not be possible.
If you would like to help support our ef-
By By Kay L. Tomlinson
and Longmeadow Staff
forts in giving these deserving animals a
second chance, there are several things
you can do. First, you can adopt one of
them! Rescued animals make the most loving partners—it seems like they know
they’ve been given a new lease on life, and
they are grateful.
Django is one handsome dude, and he knows it! He is outgoing and always willing to greet a visitor. He will make
someone a wonderful riding companion.
Scarlett is a sweet, loving mare who enjoys being groomed
and handled. Her kind nature shows in her face. Her new
forever friend will be a very lucky person indeed.
See Longmeadow on Page 17
Feb./March, 2014- Central States Horseman - Page 17
Longmeadow from page 16
If you can’t adopt, please consider donating either volunteer time or money to help
us out. The rewards of knowing you’ve
made it possible for wonderful animals like
Scarlett and Django to finally experience
love, caring, and safety are beyond words.
You will not regret it.
Kay L. Tomlinson, PhD, is a psychologist
who specializes in equine-guided learning
and volunteers her time at Longmeadow. To
become a volunteer at the Ranch, call or
email Linda Chapman (314-646-5672,
[email protected]). If you would like
more information on our programs or our
wonderful adoptable animals, call us at 636583-8759 or visit us online at www.longmeadowrescueranch.org.
Despite our careful re-feeding, Scarlett coliced and required
a stay at the veterinary clinic. Here, she returns to Longmeadow to continue her long rehabilitation.
Old friends Scarlett and Django say hello. By this point, both
horses have regained a substantial amount of weight and
were ready for their forever homes.
t is dreadful to see a horse in this condition. Scarlett’s body was covered with pressure sores
because she was so weak and could not stand up for long, and could not get back up when
she lay down.
Django, when he arrived at Longmeadow, was almost as thin as Scarlett. He was able to
stand on his own, but was more than 300 pounds underweight.
Looking at Django now, you would never guess that only a few months ago he was near
death from starvation. He enjoys being ridden and is very comfortable to ride.
Scarlett was trained for riding when she arrived, though of course we did not discover
this until she regained her weight and strength. She is a very willing mare with lots of forward movement.
Page 18 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
25th Anniversary Illinois Horse Fair
is One You’ll Want to See –
March 7-9th at the
Illinois State Fairgrounds, Springfield, IL
Headlined by Chris Cox and Yvonne
Barteau and featuring Terry Myers, Liz
Graves, Scott McKinsey, Susan White, Steve
Kutie, Jennifer Kotylo, Tim Boyer and many
others, including Lyle East with his worldclass stock dogs. With clinics, demonstrations, Breed/Sports, HorsesForSale, Stallion
Row, shopping, and over ninety (yes 90!) educational and informational seminars to
choose from, you won’t find a dull moment at
the 2014 Illinois Horse Fair. “It’s busy in a
good way!” are the early reports on our
schedule.
Be sure to see all that our sponsors have
to offer including the full line of Purina Feeds,
over thirty trailers from Midway Trailer Sales,
and join Illinois Farm Bureau to get your free
“Know Before You Tow” DVD. New for 2014,
see the full line of Kubota equipment for
horsemen, and check out the latest Ram
Trucks from Dodge!
Don’t forget to get your advance tickets to
the evening show “East Meets West – An
Equine Extravaganza!” which promises to
thrill fair goers of all ages with the magic and
musicality of horses! Produced by Kim and
Yvonne Barteau, formerly with Arabian
Nights, the show will feature the best of the
East and the West and where they meet in
the middle with a special appearance by
Chris Cox! Sponsored by Barrington Saddlery, Ariat International, and Steak ‘n Shake,
tickets are on sale now!
You’ll want to see the new Heartland
Horseman’s Challenge! In the “Challenge”
four Illinois-based horsemen: Jud Carter (DeWitt), Gigi Iacovelli (Barrington Hills), Laurie
Treber (Shirley), and Jason Forby (Goreville)
will be given the opportunity to choose and
work with a rescue horse, culminating in a
freestyle ride and challenge course. The
horses will be available for adoption throughout the event from our Challenge partner the
Hooved Animal Humane Society (HAHS) of
Woodstock Illinois. Sponsored by The State
House Inn, visit our website to learn more
about the competitors, horses, and judges for
the inaugural Heartland Horseman’s Challenge.
Also at the Illinois Horse Fair for 2014 see
Mr. Truck from RFD’s Equestrian Nation and
get the latest information on how to maximize
your trailer towing experience. Mid-Rivers
Equine Centre will give daily tours of their
Mobile Medical Care Unit with capabilities
such as lameness exams, injections, ultrasounds, x-rays, dentistry, reproductive medicine, and standing surgeries. The Young
Riders area will feature daily activities for our
future horsemen including our Queen and
Princess Pageants, and the IN/IL Competitive Mounted Orienteering group will have a
daily orienteering “competition”.
Come see the variety that is in store for
you at the 25th Annual Illinois Horse Fair!
The Illinois Horse Fair is proud to have Purina Equine Feed, Midway Trailer Sales, Illinois Farm Bureau, Kubota USA, and Green
Dodge Ram Trucks as presenting sponsors.
Produced by the Horsemen’s Council of Illinois with a largely volunteer workforce, the
success of the Illinois Horse Fair allows HCI
to advocate for equine related activities in
Springfield and throughout the state for all
horsemen regardless of breed or discipline.
For exhibitor information or to find out how
to volunteer at the Illinois Horse Fair, contact
Karen Freese, Manager, at (217) 677-2267
or [email protected]
Feb./March, 2014 - Central States Horseman - Page 19
Chris Cox,
Yvonne Barteau
Headline 25th
Illinois Horse Fair
Chris Cox
Yvonne Baratteau
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. - Texas horseman,
Chris Cox, three-time colt starting world
champion and Chicago horsewoman,
Yvonne Barteau, United States Dressage
Federation (USDF) Gold Medalist will headline the East Meets West themed 2014 Illinois Horse Fair, March 7 - 9, at the Illinois
State Fairgrounds in Springfield. The Illinois
Horse Fair is sponsored by Purina Feed,
Midway Trailer Sales, Illinois Farm Bureau
and Kubota USA and is produced by the
Horsemen's Council of Illinois. Horse lovers
of all stripes will enjoy diversity as never before at Illinois Horse Fair's Silver Anniversary celebration.
Chris Cox has had a lifetime of education
with the greatest, most important teacher of
all, the horse. Raised on a cattle ranch in the
wilds of Australia, Chris had opportunities
that most horsemen never experience. With
only horses for transportation, Chris learned
at an early age how to appreciate the abilities and traditions of the great men and
horses around him. Influenced in his early
years by both English and Western traditions, Chris has implemented a style and
technique that can be applied universally
between both worlds. His common sense,
straightforward approach allows the average
horseman, as well as the advanced rider, in-
sight into horse behavior and leads them towards that ultimate goal, a versatile and useful partnership between human and horse.
Yvonne Barteau has dedicated her life to
understanding horses and preparing them
for their careers whatever they might be. "I
have been in the horse business all my life
and have trained and competed horses in
everything from Team Penning and barrels,
to Standardbred racing, from 100 mile endurance rides, to equine theatre to Grand
Prix Dressage." Yvonne has trained horses
to the Grand Prix Level and has won numerous USDF Horse of the Year titles as well as
being a FÉDÉRATION EQUESTRE INTERNATIONALE (FEI) trainer, competitor and instructor.
The author of Ride the Right Horse,
Yvonne is a sought-after instructor and clinician as well as an authority on recognizing
equine personality types and targeted training strategies to communicate with particular
temperaments.
Information on clinicians, schedules, and
tickets will be posted at www.HorsemensCouncil.org/HorseFair as it is finalized.
Those interested in having information
emailed to them may sign up for Horse Fair
Updates on the same home page or can participate in the mounting excitement through
our Facebook page www.facebook.com/IllinoisHorseFair.
Illinois Horse Fair annually offers training
and riding clinics by nationally and internationally known trainers, seminars by horse
experts, great shopping with 140 vendors
selling all things equestrian. Programming
includes Breed and Sport Demos, Stallion
Row and Parade, HorsesForSale Aisles, the
All-Youth Judging Trials, Young Riders Area,
and Queen/Princess Contests.
For exhibitor information contact Karen
Freese, Manager, at (217) 677-2267 or
[email protected]
###
Editor's Note: The following is a list of additional clinicians for the 2014 Horse Fair. More
information will follow on these exciting additions: Terry Myers, showing; Liz Graves,
gaited riding; Scott McKinsey, cutting; Susan
White, jumping; Steve Kutie. reining; Jennifer
Kotylo, western dressage; Tim Boyer, horsemanship; Nikki Klein, barrel racing; Lyle East,
dog herding.
Page 20 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
APHA Paint Alternative
Competition (PAC) Program
Expansion adds Youth-Spe
cific Category Designations
and Overall Versatility
Champion Title
by Amy Stapleton
December 17, 2013
Thirteen new categories provide youth opportunities for
achievement and recognition
FORT WORTH—The Paint Alternative Competition (PAC) program offers Paint Horse
owners opportunities to establish permanent performance records for their horses at
events outside of traditional APHA-approved shows. PAC is open to almost any type of
activity as long as the competition is sponsored by an organization that keeps official
records on the performance of all horses entered in the event. In addition to potentially
increasing the value of their horses, PAC participants are also eligible for year-end awards
and titles from the American Paint Horse Association (APHA).
Beginning January 1, 2014, an exciting expansion of the popular program adds 13
youth-specific categories. For the first time, youth (18 & under) will be able to compete
amongst their peers.
“Our Executive Committee understands the importance of allowing a larger spectrum
of participants with an opportunity to receive recognition for their hard work,” said PAC
Coordinator Karen Utecht of the program changes approved by the Executive Committee.
Existing Categories
Halter, Dressage, English Equitation, Equitation, Barrel Racing, Games, Showmanship,
Timed Events, Trail, Walk-Trot, Western Pleasure
New Categories Added for 2014
Youth Halter, 4-H Halter, Youth Dressage, 4-H Dressage, Youth English Pleasure, Youth
Equitation, Youth Barrel Racing, Youth Game, Youth Showmanship, Youth Timed Events,
Youth Trail, Youth Walk-Trot, Youth Western Pleasure
Additionally, the committee approved a new PAC lifetime achievement award. The
PAC Versatility Champion title will be awarded to any horse that has earned a PAC Certificate of Achievement in 5 different categories.
PAC enrollment is easy and rewarding. Get started building a permanent performance record for your Paint Horse at: apha.com/programs/pac
WORLD WIDE PAINT
HORSE
CONGRESS
MOVES TO TULSA
IN 2014
“It became necessary to find a new
home for the Congress,” stated Congress
Chair Casey West, “and we were fortunate
Tulsa’s Built Ford Tough Livestock Complex at
Expo Square was available on our 2014 dates:
Wednesday, July 30 through Sunday, August
3. The facility is definitely a plus and offers
every amenity our exhibitors require: ample
stalls, warm up pens and a great main show
arena. As we go forward in this new direction,
we’d like to thank the Missouri Paint Horse
Club for their participation the past three
years.”
Given an overwhelming request for a decrease in the number of judges, the event will
feature two 4-Judge open PORs; a total of
eight (8) judges. The 2014 Congress Committee is in the process of formulating the slate of
classes and the format for this eight (8) judge
venue.
Stated KPHA Interim President Sheri
Grinstead, “Easing the number of judges over
the same timeframe will allow us to incorporate
some exciting changes and new class additions. It is definitely a ‘can’t miss’ event in
2014.”
For on-going updates:
www.kansaspainthorse.com, Kansas Paint
Horse
Association
on
Facebook,
www.equinechronicle.com, Central States
Horseman
Diane Gage: [email protected]
Casey West: [email protected]
“DOC BAR
BREEDING AT
ITS BEST”
By Doc’s Voyager (MQHA) Bronze Award winner and HUM by Doc Bar
(AQHA Hall of Fame stallion) Tommy’s babies do it all team penning,
cutting, barrel racing, CMSA and are bomb prout on trails.
2444 LEE PYLE • DE SOTO, MO 63020
636-337-7263
www.threecornesranch.com
Feb./March, 2014 - Central States Horseman - Page 21
by Duke Neff
S
WONDERFUL Christmas-time visit with old
friend TERESA VISSER in North Dakota.
TERESA also teaches, and works with a full
range of kids, so her stories somewhat echo
some of my experiences. AND...to her delightful credit...we talk about FISHING...and
she would like to judge and fish in the Midwest. We sure covered a variety of topics
and always a treat to hear about she and her
family.
Had some great feedback about a couple
of times JOHN EDD TABB, from TENNESSEE, had helped people at recent
Judges Seminars, especially the RANCH
HORSE event in KENTUCKY. Talk about
covering-the-waterfront...JOHN ED can
judge, steward, announce, stage, and promote a horse event. recently sent him a
book...hope he enjoys it!
Phone call from SAMMI SCHEURING and
husband RON about the mini industry, about
the great job JIM KNIGHT did with their LITTLE MAN mini horse, and the fact that
daughter TOUIE is getting married in May.
SAMMI is a MIZZOU MOM...her son played
at MISSOURI for Coach STULL. Speaking
of friends MIZZOU...watched the bowl game
with MARTHA and JERRY STULL.
MARTHA keeps me somewhat up-to-date on
SUZETTA BUSBY, who is now in TEXAS at
BECKY GEORGE' place. I understand the
horses are there also,. Hope SUZETTA is
feeling better.
Talked with JEAN ANDREWS and things
were good in NEBRASKA. Wasn't able to
work her show, but she had GLENDA MASTELLER call, and was able to do a NEBRASKA PINTO show for her in the fall.
TALKED with GAYLE BIEGANOWSKI about
several things, including for SPLASH OF
COLOR Paint/PINTO, which she secretaries.
Had dialogue with PAM KLEIN of COLORADO POA, and may be working for them
in AUGUST. I know VICKY is real interested
in getting to ESTES PARK this year.
Went to dinner with JOHN BALLWEG, and
he is still riding 7 days a week...at 91 !
And in all kinds of weather. He does ride inside...but we had several days recently when
it barely got to ZERO! And I sent a picture of
JOHN to HARDY OELKE in GERMANY.
HARDY has written about JOHN in WESTERN magazines in EUROPE.
VICKY and I will be going to the GEORGE
STRAIT CONCERT this weekend. One of the
most enjoyable events of the holidays was
the GARTH BROOKS CONCERT on TV
from VEGAS...really well done. Was telling
VICKY that I used to run to Texas thru
STRINGTOWN, OKLAHOMA...anyone know
who grew up there? Check at bottom...
GRAND-DAUGHTER JESSICA was in
touch with us about graduation. She will
graduate in May, and the ceremony will be at
SOUTH FLORIDA UNIVERSITY. I am very
proud of her...has better than a 4.0 this year!
And going on to college also.
STACEY RIEHL called for WISCONSIN
BUCKSKIN and will be working there in Wisconsin at JEFFERSON, then driving after the
show to meet JERRY STULL to fish the next
three days in CANADA. And understand the
KANSAS BUCKSKIN has their schedule in
place for three wekekends in Topeka, and I
think those shows are joined with KANSAS
SHOW HORSE ASSN.
DEWEY ROBERTS called about an APP
show in IOWA, and we will be doing that
with JOHN AIPPERSBACH. Also doing
APPS for DAWNA HARAWELL in Waco
TEXAS...working there with ANDREA
KOEHN and DELENA DOYLE.
Heard from SHAWN HEINLEY, TOM
KEELING and several others via Christmas
card...always a treat to sort through that mail.
Also get several cards from kids I taught or
coached in school. Time runs by pretty
quick...
Finally, headed to FLORIDA in a few days
to work for-and-with old friend JIM COONES.
JIMMY runs the Florida State Fair now, and
he has expanded their Fair events again.
JIM does a great job there and catching up
will be fun.
Could we get back to 60 degrees pretty
quick?
STRINGTOWN OKLAHOMA ? Reba McIntire.
Have a great 2014 !
Duke Neff
[email protected]
Caretaker Needed . . .
Private ranch located in Missouri, less than 1 hour
Southwest of St. Louis, is seeking a caretaker. Primary
duties will include caring for approximately 5-8
horses; general up keep of equestrian facilities; and
possible other duties based upon the persons individual
skills. The ideal person will be a friendly and outgoing
self starter with horse care experience and general
handyman skills. In exchange for approximately 1518 hours of work per week, we offer a nice private 3
bedroom, 2 bath residence on adjoining property. Additional compensation may be available depending on
candidates skills and experience. This is a smoke and
drug free environment.
Please contact David at:
[email protected] or
call 314-308-4889 to learn more or to apply.
Page 22 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
Missouri Paint Horse Club
Hope all of you enjoyed a wonderful holiday
with friends and family and surviving the cold
temperatures.
Be sure and mark your calendars for
the Missouri Paint Horse Club 2013 Awards Gala
to be held on February 8, 2014 at the Sedalia
Best Western. The general membership meeting will be held at 1:00 p.m.; the youth meeting
will be at 3:00 p.m. The fun begins with a cash
bar at 6:00 p.m. and dinner will be served at 6:30
p.m. The awards presentation will start at 7:30
p.m. In addition, a tack drive will be held for
Peggy Knaus who had a tragic barn fire on October 25th.
You will not be receiving a formal invitation this year in the mail. Further information regarding the banquet can be found at
http://www.missouripainthorseclub.com/banquet/2013/MPHC%20Banquet%20Ad.pdf.
MEMBERSHIP DUES AND HORSE
NOMINATIONS
2014 membership applications and horse
nomination forms will be available on the MPHC
website soon. Please try and fill out all of your
paperwork prior to the first show. That will save
our show secretary an enormous amount of time
for both you and her if you have that information
already taken care of. Thanks in advance.
Looking for updated information regarding our Club? Information can be obtained in
several different ways: Facebook – Missouri
Paint Horse Club; The Central States Horseman
on-line: www.centralstateshorseman.com, as
well as a monthly paper forwarded to you as part
of your membership; and on our MPHC website:
www.missouripainthorseclub.com/.
TENTATIVE 2014 SHOW DATES
Central MO Events Center – Columbia
Saturday, May 3 – 2 Judges
Sunday, May 4 – 2 Judges
Central MO Events Center – Columbia
Memorial Day Weekend
Saturday, May 24 – 2 Judges
Sunday, May 25 – 4 Judge Youth/
Amateur POR
Monday, Memorial Day, May 26 – 2 Judges
No June Show
MO State Fairgrounds – Sedalia
Show Me Classic - Two 4-Judge PORs
Friday, July 11 – 1st POR - 4 Judges Performance
Saturday, July 12 – 8 Judges - Halter
Sunday, July 13 – 2nd POR 4 Judges Performance
Central MO Events Center - Columbia
Saturday, August 9 – 2 Judges
Sunday, August 10 – 2 Judges
MO State Fairgrounds – Sedalia
Labor Day Weekend
Saturday, August 30 – 2 Judges
Sunday, August 31 – 2 Judges
Monday, Labor Day – No Show
Central MO Events Center - Columbia
Saturday, October 11
Sunday, October 12
CHANGES IN YEAR-END AWARD QUALIFICATIONS & NEW CLASSES ADDED
Please note that in order to qualify for
year-end awards for Youth/Amateur you must
show to 22 judges. The show season for youth
and amateur classes consists of 34 judges. In
order to qualify for open year-end awards, you
must show to 20 judges of the 28 judges. Nomination and Membership fees will be the same as
last year. However, in order to qualify for yearend awards, your horse must be nominated by
Monday, May 26, 2014.
The following classes have been added
to the show bill for 2014: Stakes in Youth, Amateur and Open and SPB barrels, poles and
stakes in Youth, Amateur and Open. Year-end
award will be given to a speed event horse per
division in lieu of individual class awards. Printed
information will be available soon.
SHOW MANAGERS NEEDED FOR 2014
We currently have show managers for the
Memorial Day weekend, the July POR and the
Labor Day weekend, but we need show managers for the remaining shows. Please contact
Kim Garrett if you are willing to manage one of
the shows.
APHA SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATIONS
Scholarship applications to the APHA
Foundation are due by March 1. There are currently 46 endowments that award $1,000 scholarships. In addition, the AjPHA’s Presidential
Project Bring It Home is working towards fully
funding another 22 scholarships. Joyce Conklin
sent an email with attachments that include all information and forms to all MjPHA members on
January 8th.
A link to FAQs can be found at:
http://apha.com/docs/default-source/ajpha-documents/scholarshipsfaq.pdf.
PAC PROGRAM
The APHA PAC program has included
more divisions for individuals to show in. Please
spread the word. Thanks to Schellie Blochberger
for all your PAC promoting you do! Additional information regarding the program and additional
classes can be found at: http://www.apha.com/association/pressroom/releases/2013/12/17/aphapaint-alternative-competition-expansion.
Looking forward to spring and warmer
weather! 620-921-501Until next month . . . .
Susan Cridlebaugh
MPHC Reporter
816-260-6238 (cell)
816-474-0464 (home)
MPHC TENTATIVE 2014 SHOW DATE
Central MO Events Center – Columbia
Saturday, May 3 – 2 Judges
Sunday, May 4 – 2 Judges
Central MO Events Center – Columbia
Memorial Day Weekend
Saturday, May 24 – 2 Judges
Sunday, May 25 – 4 Judge
Youth/Amateur POR
Monday, Memorial Day, May 26 –
2 Judges
Clip
and
Sav
e..
.
No June Show
MO State Fairgrounds – Sedalia
Show Me Classic - Two 4-Judge PORs
Friday, July 11 – 1st POR 4 Judges- Performance
Saturday, July 12 – All 8 POR Judges-Halter
Sunday, July 13 –2nd POR 4 Judges- Performance
Central MO Events Center - Columbia
Saturday, August 9 – 2 Judges
Sunday, August 10 – 2 Judges
MO State Fairgrounds – Sedalia
Labor Day Weekend
Saturday, August 30 – 2 Judges
Sunday, August 31 – 2 Judges
Monday, Labor Day – No Show
Central MO Events Center - Columbia
Saturday, October 11 - 2 Judges
Sunday, October 12 - 2 Judges
ave .
S
d
n
a
Clip
....
Feb./March, 2014- Central States Horseman - Page 23
MPHC from page 24
Missouri Junior Paint Horse Club
PRESIDENT’S LETTER
Hello Paint Horse Friends,
Brrrr, it's cold outside! I hope that everyone
is staying safe and warm
this season. I am sure
looking forward to springtime and warmer weather!
The only thing in news
right now is the addition of youth PAC credit
categories. I encourage you all to take advantage of these new opportunities and have
some more fun with your paint horses. Also,
feel free to post your winter photos and horse
activities on the youth Facebook page and let
everyone know what you are up to with your
horses.
Happy trails,
Erin Blochberger
FROM YOUR CO-YOUTH ADVISER,
JOYCE CONKLIN
As we usher in the New Year, we also
embrace changes. Many have moved up in
their class levels and will be experiencing
new challenges and setting new goals. For
those that have graduated to Amateur, we
will miss you. We also want to thank everyone for their support and participation
throughout the year. We appreciate all you
do.
We are looking forward to the MPHC
Awards Banquet to be held February 8th at
the Sedalia Best Western. If you haven’t purchased your tickets yet or made your reservations, please do so. You won’t want to
miss the fun. The Annual Youth Meeting will
be held at 3:00pm. We will elect officers and
discuss the year’s events and goals. As a reminder, we still need all youth members to
submit their profiles and pictures for the
scrapbook.
MjPHC has been asked to provide
classes for the Missouri State 4-H Horse
Judging. This event will be held March 15 at
Trowbridge on the University of Missouri-Columbia campus. We have been asked to provide 4 classes; 2 halter, a Hunter Under
Saddle and a Western Pleasure class. With
over 100 youth from across the state competing, this is a fantastic way to promote both
Paint Horses and the club. Any Youth, Ammy
or Open exhibitors that would like to participate, please contact Joyce Conklin. We will
also have an information booth at this event
that will need volunteers.
The 2014 MPHC show schedule is
posted. As you put these dates on your calendar and begin thinking about the show
season and warmer weather, note that there
are some changes. We will keep you up to
date on upcoming events and club information via our Facebook page so be sure to
“Like” it. Hope to see you all at the Banquet
in February.
APHA SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATIONS DUE BY MARCH 1
A reminder that scholarship applications and letters of reference to the APHA Foundation are due
by March 1. There are currently 46 endowments that award $1,000 scholarships. In addition, the
AjPHA’s Presidential Project Bring It Home is working towards fully funding another 22 scholarships.
Scholarship applications and Recommendation forms can be found on the American junior Paint
Horse Association website: www.ajpha.com. Click on Programs, then Scholarships. Should you
need information sent to you, e-mail [email protected]
VERIFY 2013 APHA POINTS
To verify that APHA’s point show records are accurate, please check on www.apha.com to verify
your horse’s show record. Review the record carefully and if you find any discrepancies, notify Joy
Hardwick in the MemberCare department immediately by calling 817-834-2742, extension 252 or email Joy @ [email protected] In your e-mail or phone call, provide the show location, date,
horse’s name, judge, classes and the discrepancy.
All corrections must be received by January 15, 2014, in order for APHA year-end awards to be
correct
Page 24 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
Andalusian
The cherished horse of Spain is one of the
ancient breeds of the world. Its ancestry traces
to the cave dwellers of the Meslithic Age, living
about 8,000 years ago in the mountains of the
Iberian Peninsula. Together with the Arabian
and Barb strains, the Spanish horse is responsible for founding nearly all the other recognized breeds known today. The Spanish, or
Iberian horse was well known to the Romans
as a superior war horse because of its strength
and agility. The Romans used them under saddle and to pull their chariots. Julius Caesar
wrote of the noble steeds of Hispania in De
Bello Gallico, and they are depicted in many reliefs and statuary of the period.
Hannibal relied on Spanish horses as well as
elephants to take him across the Alps during
his 218 B.C. invasion of Italy. History also notes
that Richard the Lionhearted and many of his
knights were mounted on Spanish horses
when they rode to victory over the Saracens of
Cypress. As further tribute to the noble breed,
Sir Walter Scott put his great Ivanhoe aboard
an Andalusian. As a breed, the Andalusian
dates back to the 8th century and the Moorish
invasion of Spain. The Moors brought with
them the fine Barb horses of their homeland.
These they crossed with the native Iberian
horses in an effort to produce a breed that
combined the finest points of each equine type.
The Moors were perhaps the most patient and
critical horse breeders of their time.
After the Spanish reclaimed their lands, their
efforts to develop an unexcelled war horse
were continued by the breeders of the Spanish
province of Andalusia. The horse that they bred
was very sturdy, with a long sloping shoulder,
wide chest, deep heart and strong back. He
also possessed extremely sturdy legs, round
hindquarters and a well-crested neck with a
natural arch. The horse was bred with inimitable Spanish flair. He carried himself with
such style and presence that he was much
sought after by kings and rulers all over the
world. Because of its strength and agility, this
popular steed became the premiere war horse
of Europe and was used in all of Spain's successful conquests. The Spanish horse practically carried Spain to greatness. As a result,
the Spanish horse enjoyed the admiration of
the world for thousands of years. With the
heavy use of Spanish blood, new breeds of
horses were developed throughout Europe and
older, more established breeds were improved.
Eighty percent of all modern breeds trace part
of their lineage back to the illustrious horse of
Spain. Due to a heavy infusion of Spanish
blood, the English Thoroughbred breed was already well established before the arrival of the
celebrated Oriental stallions.
When Europe surged into the New World,
the Spanish horse was integral to the explorer's
efforts. As a result, it has been called the "great
colonizer." As Spain's influence as a world
power grew, it established stock farms in the
Caribbean and supplied horses to all colonizing
countries. In 1493, a law was passed that required every ship leaving Spain to carry at least
12 native horses. For hundreds of years, the
Spanish horse was the equine representative
in the Americas. All New World breeds carry its
blood, owing at least part of what they are
today to what the Andalusian was 500 years
ago.
One example of the Spanish horse's influence is the American Quarter horse, whose development traces from the Colonial Short
Horse-an animal of Spanish heritage-so
named because it was unbeatable in short-distance races. The Short Horse was also crossed
with a number of English Thoroughbreds when
they were imported to what is now the United
States. This mixing of blood produced most of
the modern North American breeds, including
the Quarter Horse, Morgan, American Saddlebred and the original American Thoroughbred.
Ironically, the very breeds that the Andalusian
spawned were to be his near undoing. Size became the fad in Europe. The Neapolitan, the
Norman and the English Thoroughbred grew in
popularity and in numbers until finally, they surpassed the position of the Spanish horse. The
Andalusian breed was all but extinct in all areas
except Spain and Portugal, where it became
known as the Lusitano.
Then tragically, the plague followed by
famine, nearly pushed the breed into oblivion.
Fortunately, the horses survived in a few mountainous areas of Spain, notably at the Carthusian Monastery. The animals of this herd are
today known as the Carthusians, the finest of
the Spanish horses. In order to conserve the
rare horses for breeding, the government of
Spain placed an embargo on their export. For
more than 100 years, the Andalusian was virtually unseen by the rest of the world. Then in
the 1960's the export ban was lifted.
Now the popularity of the Andalusian horse
is once again on the rise. Horsemen are rediscovering the traits that made the Andalusian
the most sought-after horse in the world; the
strength, agility, beauty, pride and docility bred
for centuries into the Spanish horse. The Spanish stallions are unique because they are fiery
and tractable.
This seeming contradiction stems from the
edict of King Ferdinand of Spain, who enforced
the old law that gentlemen must ride only stallions. This severe edict must have resulted in
a few Spanish grandees being dumped on their
heads, until horsemen began to breed their
steeds for good temperament, knowing that
they would not only have to ride stallions, but
they would also be selling saddle stallions for
a living.
The temperament, agility and strength of the
Andalusian are again being sought after for
dressage purposes. Dressage and the Spanish
horse were almost synonymous in the beginning. The Spanish horse was so strong and
agile that he could be trained to do amazing
things, and the techniques that are now recognized as modern dressage were actually methods used to train the superior war-horses.
The Andalusian was so adept at this training
that nearly all of the oldest and most famous
riding schools started with Spanish horses. The
best example of this is the Spanish Riding
School in Austria, thus named for the Spanish
horses that it used. The Lipizzan breed is an
ancestor to the Andalusian, being almost totally
of Spanish blood. As recently as 1968, a fouryear-old stallion of the Carthusian line of the
Andalusian was imported to rejuvenate the
present line of Lipizzans in Austria.
See Andralusian on Page 25
Feb./March, 2014 - Central States Horseman - Page 25
Andalusian from page 24
The Spanish Riding
School (German: Spanische Hofre-
Although less popular today among dressage horse breeders, the Spanish Andalusian
is still a superior dressage mount. Occasionally
overlooked by modern dressage riders, who
consider him a "circus horse," the Andalusian
significantly contributed to the Thoroughbred
and most of the other popular European dressage breeds.
itschule) of Vienna, Austrias a traditional riding school for Lipizzan horses, which perform
in the Winter Riding School in the Hofburg.
Not only is it a centre for classical dressage,
the headquarters is a tourist attraction in Vienna that offers public performances as well
as permitting public viewing of some training
sessions. The presentation builds on four
centuries of experience and tradition in classical dressage. The leading horses and riders of the school also periodically tour and
perform worldwide.
Nonetheless, the Andalusian is proving that
he is not only suitable, but perhaps the best
choice for the dressage arena. The list of the
breed's winnings and the spread of its fame is
limited only by its rarity. The Andalusian is excelling in other areas as American horsemen
discover his great level of versatility. As a Western-riding horse, his skills are surpassed only
by his grandchild-the Quarter Horse. However,
when it comes to agility and the ability to work
cattle, there is none better than the Andalusian.
After all, he has been through countless battles
with wild and deadly Iberian bulls.
For well over 1,000 years, he has worked at
close quarters with these bulls, both in and out
of the bullfighting arena. With death only inches
away, he has had to carry his rider close
enough to a maddened bull to place a rose between his horns and then whisk away before
being gored. When not in the arena, he was the
only horse quick enough to work the unpredictable and dangerous herds.
As a show and parade horse, the Andalusian's trademark movements, combined with
his noble appearance with a long, lush mane
and tail, make him a winner. His shiny gray or
white coat glistens as he moves with all of the
pride and style bequeathed to him by his ancestors who carried Caesars and kings in their
day of triumph and splendor.
His strength and boldness make him a very
good hunter and jumper. His agility and endurance make him ideal for trail riding crosscountry. Generally, the Andalusian is a horse
for all seasons and for all sports, even though
he is a relative newcomer to the United States.
Not until 1965 were the first Andalusians registered in this country. Today, their numbers are
only about 700, making them precious as gold
to their owners.
See Spanish School on Page 26
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Page 26- Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
Spanish Riding Schooll from Page 25
The riding school was first named during
the Habsburg Monarchy in 1572, long before
the French manege of Antoine de Pluvinel,
and is the oldest of its kind in the world.[1]
Records show that a wooden riding arena
was first commissioned in 1565, but it wasn't
until 1729 that Emperor Charles VI commissioned the architect Joseph Emanuel Fischer
von Erlach to build the white riding hall used
today. Prior to that time, the School operated
from a wooden arena at the Josefsplatz. For
a time, the riding hall was used for various
ceremonies, but it is now open to the public,
who may witness the training and performances by the stallions.
The Spanish Riding School was named for
the Spanish horses that formed one of the
bases of the Lipizzan breed, which is used
exclusively at the school. Today the horses
delivered to the Spanish Riding School are
bred at the Piber Federal Stud located near
the village of Piber in western Styria, Austria.
One of the original studs used to develop the
breed was Lipizza, now called Lipica, near
Trieste in modern Slovenia, which gave its
name to the breed.
The Spanish Riding School has antecedents in military traditions dating as far
back as Xenophon in Ancient Greece, and
particularly from the military horsemanship of
the post-medieval ages when knights attempted to retain their battlefield preeminence by shedding heavy armor and learning
to maneuver quickly and with great complexity on a firearms-dominated battlefield.[2]
Traditionally, Lipizzaners at the school
have been trained and ridden wholly by men,
although the Spanish Riding School states
that there has never been an official ban on
women. In October 2008, two women, an 18year-old from the United Kingdom and a 21year-old from Austria, passed the entrance
exam and were accepted to train as riders at
the school - the first women to do so in 436
years.[3]
1.The methods used by the Riding School
are based on François Robichon de la
Gueriniere. It is a common myth that the
movements were developed to aid in battle;
in fact, they were used to strengthen the war
horse's body and mind and make him a
supreme athlete, not to actually attack. All
movements are based on those naturally
performed by the horse when at liberty, with
the exception of one-tempi changes.The stallions are taught in three stages:
Remontenschule: ("forward riding") This
stage begins when the horse is first brought
to the Spanish Riding School as a 4-year-old.
The stallion is taught to be saddled and bridled, and is started on the longe to teach him
the aids, to improve his obedience, and to
strengthen his muscles in preparation for a
rider. Work on the longe includes transitions
between the walk, trot, and canter, and
changes of tempo within the gait, and lasts
2–3 months before a rider is ever placed on
the animal's back. After longeing, the horse
is ridden in an arena on straight lines, to
teach him to respond correctly to the rider's
aids while mounted. The main goals during
this time are to develop free forward movement in the ordinary (not collected or extended) gaits, with correct contact and on a
long rein, and to begin to cultivate straightness. Additionally, the training should have
improved the animal's strength and stamina
to prepare him for the next stage.
Courbette
Capriole
2.Campagneschule: ("campaign school")
The horse is usually ready for the second
stage after a year of riding in the first stage,
although this time-frame is always adjusted
to the individual horse. Young stallions are always placed with experienced riders during
this second stage, to help prevent the development of bad habits due to incorrect work.
During this time, he is taught collection, and
is ridden in turns and circles at all gaits. The
main purpose of this phase is to develop impulsion, improve the natural paces, promote
self-carriage, make the horse supple and
flexible, and gradually develop the muscles
of the horse. The horse will learn to bend correctly in the neck, body, and at the poll as appropriate for his conformation. It is during this
time that the majority of training takes place,
and the horse learns to shorten and lengthen
his gait and perform lateral movements, with
most of the work taking place at the trot. This
phase requires the most time of the three,
generally two-thirds of the total time it takes
to produce the "finished" horse. Before the
end of this phase, the stallions are introduced
to the double bridle, to refine the rider's aids
.3. Hohe Schule: ("high school" or Haute
Ecole) In this stage, the rider will gradually
push the horse to perfection in straightness,
contact, suppleness, collection, and impulsion, to produce improved gaits. Through this
work, the horse will learn to perform some of
the most difficult movements such as pirouette, passage, piaffe and One-TempiChanges. Many of the exercises first taught
in the Campaign school are utilized in this
phase, focusing on the quality of the work
and using them to help teach the more difficult exercises. The stallions are then assessed to determine if they are suitable for
the demanding "airs above the ground," the
final step in their training. Once they are chosen, the horses are taught their most-suitable
school jump, first on the ground and then
under saddle.
Levade
See Spanish Riding on Page 27
Feb./March, 2014 - Central States Horseman - Page 27
Spanish Riding from page 26
The riders, too, are carefully schooled.
They first work on the longe without stirrups
and reins on well-trained horses for up to 3
years, to teach a balanced and independent
seat. They are then allowed to control the animals themselves, under the eye of an experienced rider, until they can perform the high
school movements. With intensive training,
this will take 2–4 years. The rider is then allowed to train a young stallion from unbroken
up to High School, a process that usually
takes 4–6 additional years.
Performances at the Spanish Riding
School were originally only presented to
guests of the Court, and then when they were
finally opened to the general population at
the turn of the century, it was only for special
occasions. However, after the fall of the Austro-Hungarian empire in 1918, the school
opened up regular performances to the general public to help pay for its upkeep.
The original performances were quite
short, with the chief riders presenting stallions in the High School movements, airs
above the ground, work in-hand and exercises on the long rein, and then a Pas de
Deux (two horses in mirror image) and a fourrider Quadrille would finish the performance.
The program today has expanded. It begins with the "Young Stallions" which have
recently arrived from the stud farm at Piber.
They demonstrate the first phase of training,
in which the horse moves forward and accepts the aids. The next section is the "All
Steps and Movements of the High School"
where four fully trained stallions perform
each of the movements seen in the Olympic
Grand Prix Dressage test, including the flying
change, passage, pirouette, and piaffe. The
horses are ridden in double bridle, to demonstrate their high level of training. The "Pas De
Deux" is then shown, with two horses
demonstrating High School movements in
mirror image.
The next section is the "Work in Hand", to
show how the horses are trained for the
school jumps levade, courbette, and capriole,
all in-hand. This demonstration includes work
on the diagonal, on the wall and between the
pillars. All stallions wear a snaffle bridle,
cavesson, side reins, some on short hand
rein, some with a short back longe. All carry
the traditional white saddle of the school.
Then one stallion is then worked "On the
Long Rein", in which a fully trained Lipizzan
performs all the movements it would be
asked to do under saddle. In this section, the
horse wears a red snaffle bridle and a red
shabrack (saddlecloth) with the golden coat
of arms of the Austrian Empire.
The "Airs Above the Ground" follows; all
horses are under saddle, but the riders do
not have stirrups. Movements performed include the levade, capriole and courbette. The
performance finishes with the "School
Quadrille", consisting of 8 riders working in
formation at the walk, trot, and canter, with
flying changes, pirouettes, the half pass and
the passage. The ride is performed to classical music. Lasting 20 minutes,
the School Quadrille of the Spanish Riding School is the longest
and most difficult in the world.
The young stallions are not exhibited in
the same equipment as the more mature
animals. They are ridden in a plain snaffle
bridle and a simple dressage-style English
saddle. For training sessions, black bridles,
both snaffle bit bridles and double bridles,
are used for all horses.
All riders wear the traditional
uniform: a brown tailcoat, a bicorne-style hat, white buckskin
breeches, white suede gloves,
and black top riding boots. Swan
neck spurs are also part of the
uniform. The empire style uniform (1795–1820 in fashion) has
remained relatively unchanged
for 200 years.
During performances, the fully
trained stallions wear a traditional
gold-plated breastplate and crupper, called a Goldzeug. They also
carry a "school saddle", which is
made from buckskin and larger
than the more commonly seen
English saddle used by the
school when training the stallions
and riders. Gold-plated double
bridles are only used for performances. All horses, except the
young stallions, wear red and
gold or green and gold
shabracks, or saddlecloths,
under the saddle. Red is for "All
Steps and Movements of the
High School", "Pas de Deux", "On
the Long Rein", "The Grand Solo"
and "The School quadrille." Green
is used for "Work In-Hand" and the
"Airs above the Ground". The
shabrack is also used to differentiate the status of each rider: the director of the school has three gold
bands and gold fringe, the chief riders have three bands and no
fringe, riders have two bands, and
assistant riders have one.
Horses are clean and well groomed. The
Capriole horses wear a braided tail wrapped
short in a "queue" (known elsewhere as a
"mud tail"), which is fixed with a decorative
tail bag (Schweiftasche). These horses are
sent to a Retirement Farm at the end of their
career where they are groomed, fed, watered
and turned out in the pastures daily. They basically have the life of riley until there last
days.
Page 28 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
Kansas State Fairgrounds, Hutchinson,
Kansas
-June 7th and 8th
Kansas State Fairgrounds, Hutchinson,
Kansas
-World Wide Paint Horse Congress
last week of July
-August 16th and 17th
Kansas Pavilion, Park City, Kansas
The HotR N Heck Show held with the Oklahoma Paint Horse Club proved to be a successful partnership. Please make plans to
attend on the 16th and 17th.
-September 9th and 10th
KPHA Year End Award Changes and Updates for 2014
In 2014, an exhibitor must show to 50% of
the judges offered during the year excluding
World Wide Paint Horse Congress in order to
qualify for KPHA year-end award consideration. (In 2014, the total number of judges one
can exhibit under will be 16; you must therefore
show to at least 8 judges). This was approved
to simplify the procedure of tracking year end
points. Previous rules dealing with exhibiting
at specific shows in front of numerous judges
to earn KPHA year end points are now null and
void.
A horse exhibited in Youth classes does not
have to be owned by the contestant showing
the horse, however, in order to be eligible for
the various APHA points, titles and awards
sponsored by the APHA and for exhibiting at
shows sponsored by the APHA (World Show)
it must be owned by a family member as determined in the APHA rule book YP-015 Ownership. Points earned by individuals showing
horses not owned as described in YP-015 will
be recorded by the APHA and will count only
for the purpose of determining Novice Youth eligibility. The KPHA Board of Directors voted
this fall to clarify our rules and stipulate in writing an acknowledgement of APHA rule YP-015
allowing youth who exhibit in KPHA events to
qualify for year-end awards with any horse they
exhibit regardless of ownership.
Going Mobile
With an inventory of trail equipment, ribbons,
award items etc. storage space and accessibility of KPHA assets was getting to be a concern.
Several options were discussed however the
2013 Board of Directors determined that the
best solution would be a mobile unit. Sufficient profits from WWPHC allowed the group
to fund the purchase of a “like” new cargo
trailer. Next spring we are hoping to have signage placed on the trailer to clearly identify and
promote KPHA and WWPHC. If any members
have a relationship with a vinyl sign company
or similar business which would consider work
for advertisement, please let a board member
know.
Scholarship Opportunities
Scholarships are available from APHA at
both the Zone and National levels to AJPHA
members. In addition, KPHA offers two $500
scholarships each year to our youth members,
the Art Carpenter Memorial Scholarship and
the KPHA Scholarship. Art Carpenter was involved in the promotion and judging of Paint
horses, also educating the youth in the benefits
and camaraderie of showing and caring for
Paints. The Kansas Paint Horse Association is
proud to continue his work through the scholarship founded in his name and to add a scholarship of its own to further aid its members in
achieving their educational goals.
Both the Art Carpenter and KPHA scholarships were established to assist students in the
Kansas Paint Horse Association in achieving
their educational goals. The scholarships, in
the amount of $500, must be applied for annually and you must be a member of KPHA. The
Art Carpenter scholarship is available for use
at a junior college or university, while the KPHA
scholarship may be used by an adult returning
to school and for vocational trade schools. Applications are due July 1 of each year and will
be awarded with a formal presentation at the
annual awards banquet. Please see our website for complete eligibility information and application forms.
2014 Show Schedule
We are excited to announce the 2014 Show
Schedule which is as follows:
-April 26th and 27th
Find Us
Current association and show information
can be found on the KPHA website at
http://kansaspainthorse.com or Kansas Paint
Horse Association on Facebook for show
dates, locations, judges, the show bill and
much more.
2013 KPHA Board of Directors
Sheri Grinstead: Acting President and Board
Member (term expiring- eligible for re-election)
Nancy Beneda: Secretary and Board Member
(assigned term expiring- eligible for election)
Shop . . .
McLaughlin Western
Store
• Show Clothes
• Chaps, Boots
• Felt & Straw Hats
• Jewelry, Belts
Kansas State Fair, Hutchinson, Kansas
Shortly after the 2013 Kansas State Fair,
members of the KPHA Board of directors met
with leaders of the Kansas State Fair to discuss
changes to the State Fair show dates. We are
very pleased to announce that KPHA will be
holding our Kansas Fall KPHA Circuit Show on
Tuesday and Wednesday during the Kansas
State Fair in Hutchinson, Kansas.
Ground work is in motion to include more exhibitor friendly events and activities at our
shows. In addition, we will be working with
other equine sporting groups in hopes of bringing more diversity to our association and encouraging horse owners to consider
participation in KPHA. Plans are being made
to host 4-H classes at one of our early shows
in conjunction with our weekend show bill to
encourage greater youth participation. Please
promote our efforts as you visit with your
equine friends.
• Rustic/Western Furniture
• Home Decor
• Saddles & Tack
• Casual Clothes
22684 Highway 24 • Paris, MO 65275
www.mclaughlinwesternstore.com
660-327-4869
Becky Cummings: Board Member
Bette Mayfield: Board Member
Cookie Nonken: Board Member
Casey West: Treasurer
Please feel free to contact any member of
the KPHA Board with questions or concerns.
Phone numbers, addresses and email contact
information is noted on the KPHA website. Our
goal is to provide transparent leadership to our
membership.
Feb./March, 2014 - Central States Horseman - Page 29
Page 30- Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
MISSOURI QUARTER HORSE ASSOCIATION
Missouri Quarter Horse Youth Association
Hi Everyone!
I can’t believe it is already 2014! I hope you
all had a great Christmas. I was very sad that the
break is over and that school is back in session.
The Missouri show season is going to be here
before we know it! I hope you will find the following information helpful in planning for the upcoming show season.
HAVE YOU MADE YOUR RESERVATION FOR
THE MQHA CONVENTION!
February 7-9, 2014
Tan-Tar-a Resort
Osage Beach, MO
If you did not receive a convention packet in the
mail, check the website at www. moqha.com for
the details!
SILENT AUCTION
If you are planning on attending the convention,
please remember to bring a few items for your
donation to the silent auction. It can be any item
you desire, something for your horse, western
home décor, clothing, sports related, make-up,
Starbucks cards, restaurant cards, use your
imagination and try to come up with something
unique! Anything you can bring is greatly appreciated! This has been a huge fundraiser in the
past.
WE STILL NEED YOUR PICTURES!
Please email us any and all of your photos
from 2013! It is so cool to watch the DVD presentation at the convention and see all the fun
that everyone has had during the show season.
Deadline is January 20th!!!
WHAT OFFICE DO YOU WANT TO RUN FOR
IN 2014?
Have you made your decision on which position
you would like to run for at the convention? Here
is how it works. At the convention on Saturday
morning there is a youth meeting. You will need
to mention to another youth member or one of
our youth advisors, what office you would like to
run for, and then you will be nominated. You will
be asked to give a short speech (maybe 3-5 minutes), the voting will take place and the new
board of officers will be announced! I can’t urge
you enough to run for an office. None of the positions are really time consuming. It also looks
great on your future resume! So start now working on your speech!
REMAINING 2014 QUALIFYING SHOWS
FOR THE YOUTH WORLD AND NYATT
TEAMS
February 27 – March 2
March To The Arch
National Equestrian Center - Lake St. Louis,
MO - (6 JUDGES)
March 8-9
Ozark QH Show
Lucky J Arena - Carthage, MO
Contact: Janice Klenke, 660-473-1140
(2 JUDGES)
Dates to be announced!
Barrel Bash
SPEED EVENT ONLY
Boone County Fairgrounds- Columbia, MO
April 12-13
Ozark QH Show
Lucky J Arena - Carthage, MO
Contact: Janice Klenke, 660-473-1140
(2 JUDGES)
April 26-27
Maple Leaf Circuit
Boone County Fairgrounds - Columbia, MO
Contact: MQHA Office, 816-537-0610
or
[email protected]mail.com
(4 JUDGES)
Trailer Sales & Service
Farmington. MO 63640
1-800-431-8854
www.parklandtrailer.com
May 23-26
Gateway Classic
Show
National Equestrian
Center - Lake St. Louis,
MO
Contact: MQHA Office, 816-537-0610
or
[email protected]
(6 JUDGES)
WORLD SHOW
QUALIFYING, LET-
TERS OF INTENT, SPONSORSHIPS,
FUNDRAISING
Please plan on spending some time discussing
our world show qualifying system, letters of intent, sponsorships and fundraising at the meeting. With our smaller number of kids showing
currently, we really need to rethink the way we
are doing all of these things. I think after checking with several other states that the time has
come to have kids pay their own expenses to the
world show and congress. Our biggest expense
is the amount we pay for everyone’s stalls at the
youth world show. We need to decide if we still
want to do sponsorships or do fundraising too. I
am working on figuring out how everything fits together and will try to have a couple suggestions
for how we could make changes to suit everyone
and keep our organization strong! Please feel
free to contact me if you have any suggestions!
Think of some great fundraising ideas to share
with the group at the convention!
2013 YEAR END AWARDS
Congratulations to everyone who is receiving
year end awards this year! Thank you so much
for getting your orders placed so quickly! The
Tack Room is working very hard to hopefully
have everyone’s items ready to be awarded at
the convention! Please remember that to be eligible to win year end awards, you must show at
a minimum of 10 shows (judges) for the year.
You also must have a minimum of 10 state points
in a class to receive an award in that class. Also,
for the High Point All-Around award you must
have a minimum of 10 halter points in addition to
your other points. We had several kids this year
that missed out on winning awards because they
only showed at 9 shows!
Well, that is all the important information I have
for now. I don’t have a lot of news this month.
Mostly I want to make sure you are planning on
attending our annual convention. It is really a
great time to get to know everyone and have fun
in a social setting. Don’t forget to pack your
swimsuits for the water park! I hope to see you
all in February!
Linda Murphy
MQHYA Youth Advisor
573-579-8840
[email protected]
Feb./March, 2014 - Central States Horseman - Page 31
MQHA from Page 30
AMATEUR CLASSES
POINTS THRU 9/15 - HABHA
AM 2 YR MARES
I Dream Only of You - Sandee Kraft
Kiddins Blondie - James Peddicord
23
4
AM 3 YR MARES
Zip Up My Blumers - Lindsey Wily Perotti 9
Riding On Dreams - Ken Inchoistro
7
One Cool Player - Sandee Kraft
1
AM AGED MARES
CR Touchdown Chic - Steve Kastning
Impulsive Is Good - Pam Randolph
JBL Magic Dream - Janet Deckman
Cool la de Da - Sandee Kraft
Macs Candy Time - Harry Troncin
RR Please Invite Me - Shelley Miller
Totally Sensuous - Sandee Kraft
Irrestible Impulse -Mary Wright
PS Fancy Cat - Lee Ann Vaughan
Shez A Cruisin - Debbie Tankersley
Now Your Dreamin - Laurie Kastning
AM AGED GELDINGS
Dominates Ruler - Nicci DeMint
Kinetic Krymsun - Dianne Schaefer
Midnite Invite - Lori Nelson
Lope The Bases - Kelly Eddy
Invitation Man - Tonya Schnell
138
63
51
42
20
14
12
7
7
4
1
159
39
30
28
17
AM SHOWMANSHIP
Kinetic Krymsun - Dianne Schaefer
Chex Made Me A Sta - Mary Bluhm Holsten
JBL Magic Dream - Janet Deckman
Zipin N My Beatlebug - Tina Milligan
Emmy Ivy - Rachel Duff Robinson
Zip Up The Gold - Leah Kemble
RR Please Invite Me - Shelley Miller
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
CR Touchdown Chic - Steve Kastning
Macs Candy Time - Harry Troncin
Easter Tillie - Sarah Shoemake Doles
AM SELECT SHOWMANSHIP
Impulsive Is Good - Pam Randolph
Passable Inclination - Martha Lou Oltjen
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
Zippos McDreamy - Susan Hirschvogel
Shez A Cruisen - Debbie Tankersley
Irresistible Impulse - Mary A Wright
Ty One on Ty - Catherine Jackson
RR Moonlite Mister - Nina Baker
Dominates Ruler - Greg DeMint
CR Touchdown Chil - Steve Kastning
Prada Pine - Betty Allen
I Dream Only of You - Sandee Kraft
97
89
54
31
15
12
12
5
5
2
1
75
73
49
40
34
27
16
11
10
8
2
1
AM BARRELS
Rowdy Susie - James Tankersley
Gone To Xtremes - Dawn M Smith
Straight Silver Doc - Dawn M Smith
Ice Art - Dawn M Smith
34
16
12
8
AM POLES
Rowdy Susie - James Tankersley
11
AM REINING
Roses Lime Juice - Sherri Hayes
50
Nu Chexz Lady - Sherri Hayes
37
Bonita Sonador - Jennifer Kandlik
10
Highlowandinbetween - Shannon Dudley 8
KR Smoken Tee - Karen Creech
5
AM RANCH HORSE PLEASURE
Smart Redeemin Chic - Sheryl Haviland
Bonita Sonador - Jennifer Kandlik
Lope The Bases - Kelly Eddy
Highlowandinbetween - Shannon Dudley
Tallula Can Hula - Shannon Dudley
Coco Valentina - Lawrence Henry
Playgun Chic Olena - Steve Mitchell
48
40
38
10
9
8
3
AM WESTERN RIDING
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
Riding On Dreams - Ken Inchiostro
41
38
Lope The Bases - Kelly Eddy
29
Coco Valentina - Lawrence Henry
10
Chex Made Me A Star - Mary Bluhm Holsten 5
Im Just Too Good - Erin Nichols
5
AM SELECT WESTERN RIDING
Mostly Chocolate - Twylla Lynn Brown
17
AM TRAIL
JBL Magic Dream - Janet Deckman
Im Just Too Good - Erin Nichols
Kinetic Krymsun - Dianne Schaefer
RR Please Invite Me - Shelley Miller
My Invitation Is Dun - Lisa Ramsey
59
42
30
13
12
AM SELECT TRAIL
Midnite Invite - Lori Nelson
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
Intricate Invitation - Twylla Lynn Brown
Mostly Chocolate - Twylla Lynn Brown
Impulsive Is Good - Pam Randolph
78
50
46
33
24
Kinetic Krymsun - Dianne Schaefer
Chex Made Me A Star - Mary Bluhm Holsten
JBL Magic Dream - Janet Deckman
Emma Invy - Rachel Duff Robinson
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
64
64
33
21
19
AM SELECT HUNT SEAT EQ
Passable Inclination - Martha Lou Oltjen 28
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
22
AM PERFORMANCE MARES
Prada Pine - Betty Allen
16
AM PERFORMANCE GELDINGS
Chex Made Me A Star - Mary Holsten
62
RR Moonlite Mister - Nina Baker
45
Passable Inclination - Martha Lou Oltjen 15
Kinetic Krymsun - Dianne Schaefer
9
Lope The Bases - Kelly Eddy
6
Ty One on Ty - Catherine Jackson
3
AM SELECT HORSEMANSHIP
Midnite Invite - Lori Nelson
Passable Inclination - Martha Lou Oltjen
Impulsive Is Good - Pam Randolph
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
Mostly Chocolate - Twylla Lynn Brown
65
47
42
23
14
AM WESTERN PLEASURE
Sheiks Hot Lady - Christina Kreisch
Riding On Dreams - Ken Inchoistro
My Invitation Is Dun - Lisa Ramsey
Sudden Top Notch - Melinda Maxson
Easter Tillie - Sarah Shoemake Doles
JDS Rebel Force - Elizabeth Creech
Katallac Invitation - Pat Ramsey
Shes A Katallac - Pat Ramsey
One Time Invitation - Pat Ramsey
RR Please Invite Me - Shelley Miller
Investin Good Bar - Amy Mitchell
Invitation Man - Tonya Schnell
28
27
27
19
19
11
10
10
5
4
2
3
AM SELECT WESTERN PLEASURE
Midnite Invite - Lori Nelson
Gotta Certain Touch - Linda A Hall
Impulsive Is Good - Pam Randolph
Katallac Invitation - Pat Ramsey
Dont Be Radical - Keith R Alexander
JDS Rebel Force - Karen Creech
Coco Valentina - Lawrence Henry
Texas Time Zone - Debbie Tankersley
My Invitation Is Dun - Lisa Ramsey
Zippos Im Gold - Veda Gardner
Tiny Investments - John Randolph
Shes A Katallac - Pat Ramsey
74
59
54
51
37
9
8
6
5
3
1
1
AM HUNTER UNDER SADDLE
Kinetic Krymsun - Dianne Schaefer
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
JBL My Magic Dream - Janet Deckman
Emma Invy - Rachel Duff Robinson
Chex Made Me A Star - Mary Holsten
Stroke of Approval - Julie Horton
88
31
24
15
6
5
AM SELECT HUNTER UNDER SADDLE
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
28
RR Moonlite Mister - Nina Baker
18
Midnite Invite - Lori Nelson
11
Got Me Hot - Veda Gardner
5
AM HUNT SEAT EQ
NA AGED MARES
Impulsive Is Good - Pam Randolph
JBL My Magic Dream - Janet Deckman
18
13
13
12
10
5
3
NA HUNTER UNDER SADDLE
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
JBL My Magic Dream - Janet Deckman
Stroke of Approval - Julie Horton
Got Me Hot - Veda Gardner
70
30
9
3
NA HUNT SEAT EQUITATION
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
JBL My Magic Dream - Janet Deckman
Stroke of Approval - Julie Horton
81
28
5
NA WALK TROT HUNT SEAT EQUITATION
JBL My Magic Dream - Janet Deckman
6
NOVICE AMATEUR CLASSES
AM HORSEMANSHIP
Chex Made Me A Star - Mary Bluhm Holsten - 57
Kinetic Krymsun - Dianne Schaefer
33
Shieks Hot Lady - Christina Kreisch
29
JBL Magic Dream - Janet Deckman
28
Impulsive Is Good - Pam Randolph
10
Im Just Too Good - Erin Nichols
10
Highlowandinbetween - Shannon Dudley 9
Midnite Invite - Lori Nelson
9
6
Lope The Bases - Kelly Eddy
Sudden Top Notch - Melinda Maxson
6
Credit Rate - Martha Lou Oltjen
5
5
RR Please Invite Me - Shelley Miller
Chute D Invitation - Amanda Long
Spot A Good Bar - Shelly Burke
IE Jdz - Heather Townsend Macan
Investin Good Bar - Steve Mitchell
Dee Golly Goodbar -Sarah Shoemake Doles
Sheez Dreamy - Bud Hirschvogel
Ima Special Kiss - Kelly Eddy
19
14
NA AGED GELDINGS
Invitation Man - Tonya Schnell
17
NA SHOWMANSHIP
JBL My Magic Dream - Janet Deckman
RR Please Invite Me - Shelley Miller
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
Zipin N My Beatlebug - Tina Milligan
Zippos McDreamy - Susan Hirschvogel
Shez A Cruisen - Debbie Tankersley
JDS Rebel Force - Elizabeth Creech
Easter Tillie - Sarah Shoemake-Doles
79
74
47
46
43
37
3
2
NA REINING
Bonita Sonador - Jennifer Kandlik
16
NA WESTERN RIDING
Riding On Dreams - Ken Inchiostro
Lope The Bases - Kelly Eddy
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
Im Just Too Good - Erin Nichols
64
49
26
14
NA TRAIL
JBL My Magic Dream - Janet Deckman
RR Please Invite Me - Shelley Miller
Impulsive Is Good - Pam Randolph
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
Im Just Too Good - Erin Nichols
Smart Redeemin Chic - Sheryl Haviland
Chute D Invitation - Amanda Long
My Invitation Is Dun - Lisa Ramsey
94
51
50
44
44
26
10
8
NA HORSEMANSHIP
RR Please Invite Me - Shelley Miller
Sheiks Hot Lady - Christina Kreisch
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
JBL My Magic Dream - Janet Deckman
Im Just Too Good - Erin Nichols
Sudden Top Notch - Melinda Maxson
Smart Redeemin Chic - Sheryl Haviland
JDS Rebel Force - Elizabeth Creech
Tiny Investments - Heather Townsend Macan
Lope The Bases - Kelly Eddy
Coco Valentina - Lawrence Henry
Ima Special Kiss - Kelly Eddy
93
69
36
35
33
16
14
13
10
5
2
1
NA WALK TROT HORSEMANSHIP
JBL My Magic Dream - Janet Deckman
Ima Special Kiss - Kelly Eddy
5
2
NA WESTERN PLEASURE
Zhips Sonny Dee Bar - Heather Townsend Macan55
Riding On Dreams - Ken Inchiostro
38
RR Please Invite Me - Shelley Miller
34
JDS Rebel Force - Elizabeth Creech
31
Invitation Man - Tonya Schnell
30
Zippos Old Gold - Veda Gardner
26
Tiny Investments - John Randolph
26
Easter Tillie - Sarah Shoemake Doles
19
OPEN CLASSES
POINTS THRU 9/15 - HABHA
2 YR MARES
I Dream Only of You - Gary Werner
Kiddins Blondie - James & Renee Peddicord`
20
4
3 YR MARES
Zip Up My Blumers - Lindsey Wily Perotti 7
Ms Cowboys Honey - Rick Brockwell
5
Riding On Dreams - Ken Inchiostro
4
AGED MARES
CR Touchdown Chic - Laurie Kastning 109
Cool la de Da - Gary Werner
41
Impulsive Is Good - Pam & John Randolph
37
Totally Sensuous - Gary Werner
25
JBL My Magic Dream - Janet Deckman 18
Macs Candy Time - Penny Hembry
13
Kiss A Hot Star - Abby Weins
9
An Impulsive Asset - Maggie Mathews
7
PS Fancy Kat - Lee Ann Vaughn
5
Certainly Shy - Scott Mitchell
3
Roses Lime Juice - Robert Hayes
1
AGED GELDINGS
Doninates Ruler - Nicci DeMint
Invitation Man - Tonya Schnell
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
124
25
4
BARRELS
Cash B Tuff - Kasey Fredendall
Straight Silver Doc - Bruce & Dawn Smith
Rowdy Susie -Melissa Tankersley
Skeets Forty Five - Hannah Mitchell
8
4
4
1
POLES
Mucho Poco Doc - Ally Jo Grote
Rowdy Susie - Melissa Tankersley
Miss Wrangler Lena - Scott Mitchell
Strait Silver Doc - Bruce & Dawn Smith
16
12
3
2
REINING
Nu Chexz Lady - Robert Hayes
Roses Lime Juice - Robert Hayes
High Skippin Cat - Scott Mitchell
Traditional Fudge - J D Roberson
KR Smoken Tee - Karen Creech
Hilowandinbetween - Jim Dudley
Tullula Can Hula - Jim Dudley
Investment Salty Dee - Patti Finch
Skeets Forty Five - Hannah Mitchell
56
55
28
25
24
19
9
2
2
RANCH HORSE PLEASURE
Lope The Bases -Joe & Kelly Eddy
Smart Redeemin Chic -Sheryl Diane Haviland
Tullula Can Hula - Jim Dudley
Playgirls Boogie - Jeff Roberson
Highlowandinbetween - Jim Dudley
Nu Chexz Lady - Robert Hayes
Investment Salty Dee - Patti Finch
Im Just Too Good - Mickie Nichols
Ms Cowboys Honey - Rick Brockwell
93
25
17
17
15
5
4
3
2
Page 32 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
MQHA from Page 31
Colonels Choco Latte - Erin Nichols
Traditional Fudge - J D Roberson
WESTERN RIDING
Lope The Bases - Joe & Kelly Eddy
Coco Valentina - Lawrence Henry
Riding On Dreams - Ken Inchiostro
Mostly Chocolate - Twylla Lynn Brown
Passable Inclination - Martha Lou Oltjen
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
Sheiks Hot Lady - Christina Kreisch
Im Just Too Good - Mickie Nichols
GREEN WESTERN RIDING
Passable Inclination - Martha Lou Oltjen
Sheiks Hot Lady - Christina Kreisch
Lope The Bases - Joe & Kelly Eddy
Riding On Dreams - Ken Inchoistro
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
Coco Valentina - Lawrence Henry
Im Just Too Good - Mickie Nichols
JUNIOR TRAIL
Kinetic Krymsun - Dianne Schaefer
Lil Boss Man - Michael Strouse
Ms Cowboys Honey - Rick Brockwell
2
1
73
32
31
29
14
10
9
3
42
28
27
24
21
8
6
11
4
1
SENIOR TRAIL
Mostly Chocolate - Twylla Lynn Brown
30
Kiss A Hot Star - Abby Wiens
23
Intricate Invitation - Twylla Lynn Brown
20
Midnite Invite - Lori Nelson
11
Im Just Too Good - Mickie Nichols
8
JBL My Magic Dream - Janet Deckman
5
RR Please Invite Me - Shelley Miller
5
Passable Inclination - Martha Lou Oltjen 4
Shes One Hot Secret - Twylla Lynn Brown 2
Investment Salty Dee - Patti Finch
1
GREEN TRAIL
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
Passable Inclination - Martha Lou Oltjen
Kinetic Krymsun - Dianne Schaefer
RR Please Invite Me - Shelley Miller
Ty One On Ty - Catherine Jackson
Ms Cowboy Honey - Rick Brockwell
Lil Boss Man - Michael Strouse
20
18
17
10
5
4
3
JR WESTERN PLEASURE
Gotta Certain Touch - Linda Hall
65
Spot A Good Bar - Shelly Burke
37
Invite Me Im Lazy - Melinda Maxson
12
Impulsive Is Good - Pam & John Randolph
5
Investin Good Bar - Steve Mitchell
5
One Time Invitation - Patrick & Lisa Ramsey 5
DW Ovations - Doug Wasson
5
Im Cool an Fancy - Nancy Kallsnick
5
SR WESTERN PLEASURE
Zippos Im Gold - Brooke Gardner
40
Certainly Shy - Scott Mitchell
25
Zhips Sonny Dee Bar - Heather Townsend-Macan22
Tiny Investments - John & Pam Randolph 19
Chute D Invitation - Amanda Long
16
Katallac Invitation - Lisa & Pat Ramsey 13
Sheiks Hot Lady - Christina Kreisch
11
Don't Be Radical - Keith Alexander
2
JDS Rebel Force - Elizabeth Creech
2
GREEN WESTERN PLEASURE
Krymsun For Sure - Doug Wasson
20
Sudden Top Notch - Melinda Maxson
11
Texas Time Zone - Debbie Tankersley
10
Shes One Hot Secret - Twylla Lynn Brown 4
An Impulsive Asset - Maggie Mathews
1
Coolest Kid in Lace - Lauren Yeager
1
HUNTER UNDER SADDLE
Kinetic Krymsun - Dianne Schaefer
Mr Big N Zipped - Karen Higgins
Zip Up My Blumers - Lori Wilt
Stroke of Approval - Julie Horton
Got Me Hot - Veda Gardner
Things Hoped For - Heather Macan-Townsend
Formal Terms - Linda Wulff-Risner
An Impulsive Asset - Maggie Mathews
32
12
11
8
6
3
3
1
GREEN HUNTER UNDER SADDLE
Kinetic Krymsun - Dianne Schaefer
24
Zip Up My Blumers - Lindsey Wilt Perotti 11
Emma Ivy - Rachel Duff Robinson
3
PERFORMANCE MARES
Kiss A Hot Star - Abby Weins
Tullula Can Hula - Jim Dudley
Playgirls Boogie - Rosella Roberson
6
2
2
PERFORMANCE GELDINGS
Chex Made Me A Star - Mary Holsten
Visibly Good To Go - Kierstin Tackitt
Desperado In Black - Hayley Tackitt
RR Moonlite Mister - Nina Baker
Lope The Bases - Joe & Kelly Eddy
48
31
9
5
5
YOUTH CLASSES
POINTS THRU 9/15 - HABHA
Y - 3 YR MARES
Riding On Dreams - Hannah Inchiostro
3
Y - AGED MARES
Macs Candy Time - Vanessa Troncin
Kiss A Hot Star - Abby Wiens
An Impulsive Asset - Maggie Mathews
Formal Terms - Haden Garrett
Ima Special Kiss - Justin Eddy
36
12
6
3
3
AGED GELDINGS
Donimates Ruler - Max DeMint
Invitationtotheblues - Allison Heying
JM Investers Rusty - Kayla Tamborski
Lil Boss Man - Sarah Strouse
Chex N Frisky - Kelsey Ward
Dressed Up Hot - Brittany Israel
114
28
30
10
4
3
Y - SHOWMANSHIP
Kiss A Hot Star - Abby Wiens
Playgirls Boogie - Rosella Roberson
JM Investers Rusty - Kayla Tamborski
Jim Sunnys Jayhawk - Stacy LeRosen
Ty One on Ty - Elizabeth Jackson
Macs Candy Time - Vanessa Troncin
An Impulsive Asset - Maggie Mathews
Gold Cody Money - Stacy LeRosen
Dressed Up Hot - Brittany Israel
44
27
13
6
4
4
3
2
2
Y - BARRELS
Strait Silver Doc - Denim Marie Smith
Gone to Xtremes - Denim Marie Smith
SC High Performance - Kayla Wilson
Mucho Poco Doc - Ally Go Grote
Ice Art - Denim Marie Smith
Prime Time To Slide - Kylie Spinner
29
24
19
17
7
1
Y - POLES
Strait Silver Doc - Denim Marie Smith
Mucho Poco Doc - Ally Jo Grote
Gone to Xtremes - Denim Marie Smith
Prime Time To Slide - Kylie Spinner
Spe San Peppy Frost - Ally Jo Grote
25
21
9
5
5
Y - STAKE RACE
Mucho Poco Doc - Ally Jo Grote
Spe San Peppy Frost - Ally Jo Grote
Prime Time To Slide - Kylie Spinner
12
4
4
Y - REINING
Playgun Chic Olena - Molly Mitchell
Chexed N Frisky - Kelsey Ward
Skeets Forty Five - Molly Mitchell
Lil Cee Lady - Kelsey Ward`
High Skippin Cat - Shayla Mitchell
Wimpy Cee Winpy Do - Hannah Mitchell
Wimpys Little Olena - Brock Murphy
Traditional Fudge - Rosella Roberson
Investment Salty Dee - Patti Finch
49
45
39
29
18
10
9
4
2
Y - RANCH HORSE PLEASURE
Chexed N Frisky - Kelsey Ward
Playgirls Boogie - Rosella Roberson
Lil Cee Lady - Kelsey Ward
Wimpys Little Olena - Brock Murphy
High Skippin Cat - Shayla Mitchell
Traditional Fudge - Rosella Roberson
Playgun Chic Olena - Molly Mitchell
Skeets Forty Five - Molly Mitchell
Coco Valentina - Madeline Henry
Y - TRAIL
Kiss A Hot Star - Abby Wiens
Dressed Up Hot - Brittany Israel
Certainly Shy - Shayla Mitchell
Investment Salty Dee - Patti Finch
A Lopen Good Bar - Haden Garrett
9
8
6
4
4
17
11
5
3
3
Y - HORSEMANSHIP
OK Pulse Me - Giorgia Medows
Kiss A Hot Star - Abby Wiens
Playgirls Boogie - Rosella Roberson
Lil Boss Man - Sarah Strouse
OK Im Hot - Miranda V Reed
A Lopen Good Bar - Haden Garrett
Investment Salty Dee - Patti Finch
Investin Good Bar - Hannah Mitchell
Dressed Up Hot - Brittany Israel
Playgun Chic Olena - Molly Mitchell
66
28
20
17
11
6
4
3
3
1
Y - WESTERN PLEASURE
OK Pulse Me - Giorgia Medows
Zippin Gold Nugget - Maddox Murphy
Investin Good Bar - Hannah Mitchell
Kiss A Hot Star - Abby Wiens
A Lopen Good Bar - Haden Garrett
Macs Candy Time - Vanessa Troncin
PS Fancy Kat - Lauren Vaughan
A Hot Centerfold - Hannah Henderson
Dressed Up Hot - Brittany Israel
A Classic Premium - Hailey Henderson
Coolest Kid in Lace - Lauren Yeager
Certainly Shy - Shayla Mitchell
62
34
24
16
8
8
6
5
5
4
4
2
Y - HUNTER UNDER SADDLE
Lil Boss Man - Sarah Strouse
Dressed Up Hot - Brittany Israel
Kiss A Hot Star - Abby Wiens
Gold Cody Money - Stacy LeRosen
JM Investers Rusty - Kayla Tamborski
A Lopen Good Bar - Haden Garrett
Formal Terms - Haden Garrett
OK Im Hot - Miranda V Reed
32
8
8
6
6
3
2
2
Y - HUNT SEAT EQ
Kiss A Hot Star - Abby Wiens
Lil Boss Man - Sarah Strouse
A Lopen Good Bar - Haden Garrett
Dressed Up Hot - Brittany Israel
JM Investers Rusty - Kayla Tamborski
27
15
6
4
4
16
15
14
14
6
6
6
3
3
3
NY TRAIL
Dressed Up Hot-Brittany Israel
Invitationtotheblues - Allison Heying
A Lopen Good Bar - Haden Garrett
JM Investers Rusty - Kayla Tamborski Chips Glowgirl - Justin Eddy
Macs Candy Time - Vanessa Troncin
Topnotch Cadence - Kelly Wiedemann
20
16
6
5
4
3
1
NY HORSEMANSHIP
Lil Boss Man - Sarah Strouse
Invitationtotheblues - Allison Heying
OK Pulse Me - Giorgia Medows
Dressed Up Hot - Brittany Israel
Macs Candy Time - Vanessa Troncin
An Impulsive Asset - Maggie Mathews
A Hot Centerfold - Hannah Henderson
A Lopen Good Bar - Haden Garrett
Chips Glowgirl - Justin Eddy
A Classic Premium - Hailey Henderson
JM Investers Rusty - Kayla Tamborski
Topnotch Cadence - Kelly Wiedemann
Coolest Kid in Lace - Lauren Yeager
Zippin Gold Nugget - Maddox Murphy
NY WALK TROT HORSEMANSHIP
Chips Glowgirl - Justin Eddy
4
52
48
32
26
23
22
12
10
10
8
8
6
5
4
2
1
41
34
30
25
22
11
4
47
33
26
18
14
7
3
3
3
9
5
Y - PERFORMANCE GELDINGS
Visibly Good To Go - Kierstin Tackitt
Desperado In Black - Hayley Tackitt
A Lopen Good Bar - Haden Garrett
37
23
11
NY HUNTER UNDER SADDLE
Lil Boss Man - Sarah Strouse
Invitationtotheblues - Allison Heying
JM Investers Rusty - Kayla Tamborski
An Impulsive Asset - Maggie Mathews
Dressed Up Hot - Brittany Israel
Gold Cody Money - Stacy LeRosen
Topnotch Cadence - Kelly Wiedemann
NY AGED MARES
An Impulsive Asset - Maggie Mathews
2
NY HUNT SEAT EQUITATION
Lil Boss Man - Sarah Strouse
JM Investers Rusty - Kayla Tamborski
Dressed Up Hot - Brittany Israel
Invitationtotheblues - Allison Heying
An Impulsive Asset - Maggie Mathews
A Lopen Good Bar - Haden Garrett
Gold Cody Money - Stacy LeRosen
OK Pulse Me - Giorgia Medows
Topnotch Cadence - Kelly Wiedemann
NY AGED GELDINGS
Dressed Up Hot - Brittany Israel
JM Investers Rusty - Kayla Tamborski
Gold Cody Money - Stacy LeRosen
15
6
2
NY SHOWMANSHIP
Playgirls Boogie - Rosella Roberson
JM Investers Rusty - Kayla Tamborski
Credit Rate - Rosella Roberson
Lil Boss Man - Sarah Strouse
Invitationtotheblues - Allison Heying
33
31
23
23
16
Y - WALK TROT QUALIFIERS
Justin Eddy
Evelyn Doles
June Roberson
Hayley Tackitt
42
30
36
19
11
9
8
6
5
5
4
4
2
1
NY WESTERN PLEASURE
Lil Boss Man - Sarah Strouse
A Touch of Otoe - Alexis Maes
Macs Candy Time - Vanessa Troncin
Zippin Gold nugget - Maddox Murphy
An Impulsive Asset - Maggie Mathews
Dressed Up Hot - Brittany Israel
Invitationtotheblues - Allison Heying
Cant Touch My Stuff - Sabrina Ross
JM Investers Rusty - Kayla Tamborski
A Classic Premium - Hailey Henderson
Investin Good Bar - Hannah Mitchell
Topnotch Cadence - Kelly Wiedemann
A Hot Centerfold - Hannah Henderson
Coolest Kid in Lace - Lauren Yeager
PS Fancy Kat - Lauren Vaughan
Chips Glowgirl - Justin Eddy
Y - PERFORMANCE MARES
Kiss A Hot Star - Abby Wiens
Playgirls Boogie - Rosella Robinson
NOVICE YOUTH CLASSES
47
21
16
14
Dressed Up Hot - Brittany Israel
Macs Candy Time - Vanessa Troncin
Chex N Frisky - Kelsey Ward
An Impulsive Asset - Maggie Mathews
A Classic Premium - Hailey Henderson
Jim Sunnys Jayhawk - Stacy LeRosen
Coolest Kid in Lace - Lauren Yeager
Gold Cody Money - Stacy LeRosen
Chips Glowgirl - Justin Eddy
Topnotch Cadence - Kelly Wiedemann
NY PERFORMANCE HALTER MARES
Topnotch Cadence - Kelly Wiedemann
2
NY PERFORMANCE HALTER GELDINGS
Visibly Good To Go - Kierstin Tackitt
12
Desperado In Black - Hayley Tackitt
7
A Lopen Good Bar - Hayley Tackitt
4
Feb./March, 2014- Central States Horseman - Page 33
Page 34 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
HORSE LAW: ARE PERSONS WHO WORK
FOR YOU INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS,
By Mary B. Schultz
OR EMPLOYEES?
Mary B. Schultz
Individuals who provide services (and/or goods)
for you and/or your horse(s) might be classified in
different ways. The most significant distinction is
whether an individual is an independent contractor
or an employee. The categories of your workers in
NOT determined by labels or intentions. Rather,
what service(s) and/or goods are provided, and
under that circumstances determines the categories of specific workers.
If an individual is your employee, you must withhold certain state and federal income taxes, social
security (FICA), unemployment tax, and employee
benefits.
The number of employees you have also triggers, at various different thresholds, application of
other statutory obligations.
Conversely, if an individual who provides services (and/or goods) to you and/or your horse(s), is
an independent contractor (and NOT an employee)
you are NOT obligated to withhold or pay taxes
and/or provide benefits.
Independent contractors are self-employed. The
general rule is that an individual is an independent
contractor if you have the right to control or direct
only the result of the work and not the means and
methods of accomplishing that result. If an individual is an independent contractor, and not an employee, you are only obligated, at the end of each
year, to prepare and issue 1099s to each independent contractor who provided some service (and /or
good) for you and/or your horse(s) within the past
year.
The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has begun
investigating the classification of employees designated as independent contractors, and has initiated
prosecution for the same, and has imposed severe
penalties, back taxes, and interest relating to employees that have been improperly classified and
treated as independent contractors. Such an IRS
investigation is automatically triggered whenever an
individual is paid more than $10,000 from a single
source. The IRS looks at 20 factors to determine
whether an individual is an employee or independent contractor.
The IRS’s primary factors are:
1. Do you have the right to require compliance
with significant instructions?
2. Do you have the right to set the hours of
work?
3. Do you have the right to set the order or se-
quence of services to be performed?
4. Do you have the right to discharge the service provider?
5. Does you have the right to hire, pay, and
supervise assistants as the nature of the work
requires?
6. Does the individual have the ability to real
ize a profit or loss?
7. Does the individual have an investment in
significant tools, materials, and other equip
ment when such items are necessary to accomplish the task, or do provide tools, materials, or other equipment?
8. Does the individual have a significant investment in facilities when they are necessary
to accomplish the task, or do you customarily
provide the facilities?
The IRS secondary factors are:
9. Do you train the individual?
10. Do you have the right to require oral or written
reports?
11. Do you pay the individual by the hour, week
or month?
12. Does the individual pay for business and/or
travel expenses?
13. Does the individual have the right to require
personal service?
14. Does the individual work only for you, or does
that individual usually work for more than one firm
at a time?
15. Does the individual maintain a continuing re
lationship with you?
16. Does the individual maintain a continuing re
lationship with you?
17. Does the individual devote substantially full
time to the service recipient?
18. Does the individual have the right to terminate
the relationship at any time without incurring lia
bility?
19. Is the individual integrated into your busi
ness?
20. Does the individual make his or her services
available to the public on a regular and consistent
basis?
According to an article provided by the University
of Missouri Extension Service (NCR546, Aug. 1994)
by Sharon Stevens (Assistant Coordinator, MOTAC, Department of Textile and Apparel Management, called “Independent Contractor vs.
Employee: Exploring the Categories”, there are
three explanations that would facilitate an IRS determination the you are “safe”:
1. Reasonable basis for classification
Tax law (Section 530 (2)) Section 530 (2) provides several standards that constitute safe havens
in determining reasonable basis. These are: (Oden,
Debra Hall. "Independent Contractor: A Legitimate
Classification with Reclassification Protection."
Taxes. May 1991. pp. 319-325.)
…
2. Consistent treatment requirement
Tax law (Section 530 (a)(1)(A).) requires that the
employer not treat the service provider as an employee for any time period after Dec. 31, 1977.
If, while the company is under investigation, it anticipates a negative ruling from the IRS and withholds employment taxes or files current
employment tax returns, by doing so it has treated
the Service Provider as an employee and has violated this "consistent treatment" requirement.
In addition, "If all substantially similar workers are
treated as independent contractors, then all the
workers are covered under the safe-haven protection. If, however, some workers holding substantially similar positions are treated as employees,
then none of the workers is covered under the safehaven provisions." (Oden, Debra Hall. "Independent Contractor: A Legitimate Classification with
Reclassification Protection." Taxes. May 1991. pp.
319-325.)
3. Return filing requirement
The third requirement for safe haven protection is
that the taxpayer must have filed all required federal
tax returns and that the employee status used on
those returns must have been independent contractor. If the worker has failed to file self-employment
tax returns, that failure may disqualify the company
from protection under these safe haven provisions
of the federal tax law.
In addition, the employer must have filed Form
1099-Misc. to report fees, commissions or other
payments made to independent contractors who
are either sole proprietors or partnerships, on payment totalling $600 or more in a calendar year. If
the employer has filed a W-2, Wage and Tax Statement for any individual, then that individual has
been treated as an employee and the employer
would not be able to rely on the safe haven provisions of this section.
Useful IRS publications
• Publication 937, Employment Taxes and Information Returns
• Form SS-8, Determination of Employee Work Status for Purposes of Federal Employment Taxes and
Income Tax Withholding (Available in the printed
version of this publication)
• Publication 911, Tax Information for Direct Sellers
• Publication 1026, Regulations, Part 530: Employment of Homeworkers in Certain Industries
• Publication 587, Business Use of Your Home
• Publication 535, Business Expenses
• Publication 533, Self-Employment Tax
• Publication 522, Record Keeping for Individuals
• Publication 583, Taxpayer's Starting a Business
• Publication 334, Tax Guide for Small Business
• Circular E, Employer's Tax Guide
To obtain these and any other IRS publications, call
the IRS at 800-TAX-FORM (800-829-3676).
See Horse Law on Page 35
Feb./March, 2014- Central States Horseman - Page 35
Horse Law from Page 34
In Missouri, many booklets and forms are also
available from the Department of Economic Development, 800-523-1434.
ADDENDUM TO HORSE LAW COLUMN IN DECEMBER ISSUE OF CENTRAL STATES HORSEMAN (Update on Horse Slaughter in Missouri)
The United States Court of Appeals for the 10th Judicial Circuit lifted its TRO – emergency injunction,
which was a hurdle to clear for horse meat processing plants, including the horse meat processing
plant proposed for Missouri. The Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) issued a general meat processing permit to Rains’ proposed
facility in Missouri, Rains Natural Meats. However,
the permit stated that the plant’s waste water lagoon is only authorized to process non-equine
species of animals. Rains has sued MDNR at the
agency level. Front Range Equine Rescue (FRER)
has filed material supporting MDNR. A decision has
not been issued, but is expected soon.
Mary B. Schultz is a partner in the law firm of
Schultz &Associates LLP, www.sl-lawyers.com, 640
Cepi Dr., Suite A; Chesterfield (St. Louis), Missouri
63005, (636) 537-4645. Mary B. Schultz graduated
from Northwestern University Law School more
than 30 years ago, in 1985, and has been practicing
primarily in Missouri ever since. Mary B. Schultz is
admitted to practice in Missouri and Illinois.
This column is intended to provide general information only. It does not constitute, nor should be relied
upon, as legal advice or a legal opinion relating to
specific facts or circumstances.
Reproduction of all or any part of this column is permitted, provided credit is given to Mary B. Schultz.
Happy
Valentines
Day
Prepairing for Cold Winter . . . .
By Ben Murray of MFA’s Equine News
Cold winter brings questions and problems
with tank heaters. For those customers using
open tanks to water their livestock, they are a
must this time of the year. Here is some basic
information on tank heaters. One of the most
important things our customers need to know
is that they must use a working Ground Fault
Circuit Interrupter for any electric water heater,
even pressure waterers. This is for their safety
and that of the livestock. We should recommend that the wiring be done by a professional
electrician.
The element must be kept clean. Calcium or
other mineral build-up can cause the element
to overheat and fail. It can also cause holes in
the element that will result in electrical shock.
Any build-up over 1/64” can cause problems.
The frequency of cleaning depends on the
water supply. The higher the mineral content,
the more frequent the cleaning. Cleaning adds
to the life of the unit and safety to those in contact with the water.
What size deicer do I need for my stock
tank? This is a question we often get and it is
not a simple question. Many variables play into
the answer: surface area of water in the stock
tank, the lowest temperature to cover, how
much wind hits the
tank, and tank insulation. Another factor is
the power supply. How
many amps does the
circuit provide and how
far is it to the deicer?
Most tank deicers are
in the 1000 to 1500
watt range and draw
8.5 to 12.5 amps. The
circuit
and
wiring
needs to be adequate
to cover this load.
Farm Innovators has a
product guide on their
UNLIMITED
EQUESTRIAN TACK, APPAREL AND GIFTS
CONSIGNMENTS WELCOME
WWW.HORSEQUESTUNLIMITED.COM
217-525-4259
1925 CATALINA LANE
DON & KEE KEE WILLETT
SPRINGFIELD, IL 62702
OWNERS
E-mail: [email protected]
website (http://www.farminnovators.com/agricultural.html). This is only a guide on the best
unit to use. There are no guarantees that when
the thermometer hits 0 degrees and the wind
is 40 mph that the thank won’t freeze.
Is there a solar powered tank heater? We
get this question several times each year. I
have looked and did not find a tank heater that
runs off solar power. I see tanks that the sun
heats directly, but not tank heaters. To find a
battery bank (heaters have to run in the dark)
and a solar panel big enough to generate
1000-15000 watts, would be very expensive.
Water shocking livestock (and the producer)
happens on occasion. Make sure you unplug
the unit first. Second, check to see that the unit
is plugged into a properly grounded GFCI outlet. If it is properly wired, there may be a problem with stray voltage on the ground wire of the
electrical system. This can be corrected by providing a separate ground for the deicer, isolating it from the electrical system ground. Allied
precision has instructions on their website
(hhtp://www.alliedprecision.com/gags.html). It
is also a good source for many other questions
that we get each year
Page 36 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
The Way of Horses
And The Beat Goes On....
will be in the vicinity of the last cheek tooth - inside the jawbone. When you reach the right location you'll feel a cord-like shape. Press that
structure lightly against the jawbone - you should
detect the pulse. You need to exert some gentle
pressure, just touching the skin will not be
enough.
clipped. We're using the left front leg for the
demonstration.
The artery for which you are searching is
"bundled" with vein and nerve. This "bundle" lays
in the groove between the suspensory ligament
(raised cord-like structure in the hollow area on
the side of the leg) and flexor tendon (runs down
the back of the leg). This area is above the fetlock
Eleanor Blazer
Quick - what's the average resting pulse rate
of your horse?
You may know the normal resting pulse
rate of an adult horse is between 25 and 50 beats
per minute (bpm), but what is your horse's rate?
Because of the wide margin of normalcy, the resting pulse rate for individual horses should be
recorded.
The pulse is one of the three vitals signs
taken to check the condition of the horse's health.
The other two are the temperature and respiration rate.
An abnormal resting pulse rate can signify infection, dehydration, stress, pain and an erratic heart beat.
The pulse must be taken when the horse
is calm and resting. Do not try to get an accurate
reading when there is a lot of activity in the barn;
just before feeding time or after exercise. Don't
make a big production of it - stay calm and keep
the horse quiet.
The pulse should be taken at the same
time every day for five days. Make a note of each
reading and average them. To get an average,
add the results of the five days and divide the answer by five: the answer is the average normal
pulse for that horse.
The easiest way to check a horse's heart
rate is to use a stethoscope and listen to the
heart. Place the stethoscope on the girth area
just behind the left elbow. The heart makes two
sounds, lub then dub, which counts as a single
beat.
Count the number of beats that occur in
15 seconds. Multiply that by four and you'll have
your horse's resting heart rate per minute. *Hint
- most watches no longer have second hands, so
I use the timer on my phone.
You should also know how to manually
take the pulse. In order to do this you have to find
where an artery is close to the surface. There
are several locations, but the easiest to find is
under the jaw.
Stand on the left side of a haltered horse;
hold the lead shank with your left hand and use
your right hand to locate the pulse.
You are trying to find the facial (mandibular) artery. Use the fingers of your right hand and
feel along the inside of the lower jaw. The artery
Count the number of beats that occur in 15
seconds and multiply by four.
There is a second location for taking a
horse's pulse, the digital pulse.
An easily detected digital pulse can be a
sign of inflammation in the hoof. Inflammation is
a symptom of laminitis, an internal abscess, a
bruise or other trauma to the hoof. (Be aware
that a horse could be suffering from one of these
illnesses and still have a normal digital pulse rate.
Make note of other symptoms, such as heat,
lameness, temperature, depression, accelerated
heart rate and overall attitude.)
There are two digital arteries. Just above
the fetlock they branch off from the medial palmar
artery and continue down to the hoof - one on
each side. The one to the inside of the horse is
called the medial palmar artery; the one to the
outside is the lateral palmar artery. Above and
below the fetlock they are close to the surface
and can be monitored for pulse.
In a normal horse the digital pulse can be
very hard to detect. But, that is a good thing.
An abnormally strong digital pulse is described as a "bounding pulse".
Dr. Jack Sales, DVM explains, "A bounding pulse is not a fast pulse, but a strong, throbbing sensation. The digital pulse still corresponds
to the heart rate, but it is stronger because there
is an increased amount of blood going to the foot
because of the inflammation."
It is possible for one or more legs to have
a bounding digital pulse and the others to be normal. Both front legs presenting a bounding pulse
may indicate laminitis. One leg exhibiting a
bounding pulse may signify an abscess.
Practice locating the digital pulse.
Start with a clean, haltered horse. It will
help if the long hair on the fetlock and pastern is
joint and on both sides of the leg.
The two nerve, artery and vein bundles continue over the each back "corner" of the fetlock
and down the back sides of the pastern. The
bundles are not directly centered under the back
of the fetlock, but are on each "back edge".
If you get too far forward you may confuse the bundle with the suspensory ligament
branch. The ligament is toward the center of the
pastern, when looking at the leg from the side. It
will feel hard and not have a pulse.
When searching for the artery you'll have
to apply light pressure. It will be hard to detect
by just touching the surface. When you find it
you'll feel the cordlike bundle under your fingertips.
Using light pressure, concentrate and try
to feel the pulse; don't press too hard or you'll
stop the blood flow and there will be nothing to
feel. The pulse will be very light in a healthy
horse. If the horse has a bounding pulse, it will
be easy to detect and you'll need to consult a veterinarian.
Learn how to detect the digital pulse on
all four legs. Just checking one leg won't rule out
a problem with one of the other hooves. Also a
normal heart rate detected with a stethoscope or
checked under the jaw will not rule out a foot
problem.
Feb./March, 2014 - Central States Horseman - Page 37
Now under new management and looking for more boarders. Perfect place to retire your trusted friend. Horses are in herd 24/7 on lush grass pastures, weather
permitting. Resurfaced dry lots contain horses when wet. All horses brought into
barn daily for grain feed so physical check is made on each horse. Miles of private
wooded trails for the peaceful ride. Lighted covered arena, ten stall barn, large
open arena, private lodge, ample parking. A perfect place to rent for birthdays,
reunions, picnics, weddings, and more.
Cedar Hill, MO
(636) 222-3708
Page 38 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
A Horse, Of Course
—— By Don Blazer
There are all kinds of conceptual contradictions in the
horse world, and inflammation is one of them.
There are all kinds of conceptual contradictions
in the horse world, and inflammation is one of
them.
Inflammation can be both good and bad at
the same time.
And to relieve the bad effects of inflammation horsemen often deliberately create more in
the hope that an injury will be healed in a shorter
length of time.
Inflammation is a reaction of the body to injury, and is commonly characterized by heat, redness, swelling, pain and disturbed function.
Since inflammation is a natural response by injured tissue, inflammation is present every time
the horse sprains, strains, bumps, twists, cuts or
punctures some part of his body. It also occurs
when the horse is attacked internally by viruses,
bacteria, chemicals or parasites.
The immediate reaction to an injury is usually swelling of the surface of the injured area;
redness is noted. The body sends an increased
supply of blood to the injured area, much as we
would send extra fire-fighting units to a major
blaze. The increased blood supply provides
more white blood cells which are responsible for
removing contamination and debris caused by injury.
The purpose of natural inflammation is to
kill infectious agents, prevent the spread of disease, clean up the damage and heal the injury.
But sometimes horsemen want to hasten
the natural healing process. This is done in two
ways.
The first is to clean the injury and make it
as free of contamination as possible. This creates the most advantages climate for the body to
heal itself, and is a very good idea.
In an effort to hasten the healing, horsemen
sometimes create additional inflammation by
using an agent which causes even more damage, thus creating an even greater supply of
blood to the area.
An example is blistering a horse if the animal has shin bucked. When a horse shin bucks,
the tissue along the front of the cannon bone is
damaged and natural inflammation is immediate.
The application of a blister (through the use of a
caustic agent) encourages additional swelling
due to increased blood supply; the increased
blood supply resulting in quicker healing.
Internal blisters within joints are often performed by veterinarians.
Whether any blisters or “firing” are beneficial is a matter of opinion.
It’s my opinion that blistering or firing is ineffective, unnecessary and without any reasonable justification. Unfortunately it is impossible
to prove the benefits or lack thereof of an increased inflammation.
There are alternative ways to treat injury…
such as “cooling”. But no matter how it is treated,
when there is an injury there is inflammation.
Given enough time, (a tincture of time is
often the best medicine) the natural healing
process usually repairs or replaces the damaged
tissues and restores good health to the area.
Ordinarily horsemen don’t say “inflammation”, but instead indicated what is inflamed by
adding “itis” to the word for the affected area of
the horse. For example, an inflamed tendon is
“tendonitis”, whereas an inflammation on the
horse’s skin would be “dermatitis”.
When a horse is injured, inflammation is
beneficial because it is part of the natural healing
process. At the same time it is bad because if
creates swelling, congestion, pain and heat.
And inflammation is even more contradictory because horsemen often make it worse in an
attempt to make it better.
Visit A Horse, Of Course at www.donblazer.com
Don Blazer teaches the course Training Performance Horses for www.horsecoursesonline.com
Making Money with Horses
The next time someone tells me you can’t
make money with horses, I’m going to reply:
Jackie Keith.
Jackie Keith is making money as a horse
trader by doing the 6 things every horse business
needs to do to be successful.
First, Jackie Keith is focused. He’s dedicated to selling horses. Successful as a businessman in years past, Keith decided he wanted
to enjoy a new career with horses, so he set out
to do what so many say can’t be done.
Second, Keith selected a niche within the
market. He sells nice gentle horses that virtually
anyone can ride. Notice I didn’t say he sold show
horses, or jumping horses or a specific breed of
horse. He isn’t trying to be everything to everyone. Keith doesn’t care if the horse is short or
tall, long or lean, pinto or bay….he just cares that
the horse is gentle and a very solid ride.
Third, Keith is a different kind of horse
trader.
Primarily he trades his horses on the Internet. (www.keithranches.com) and he guarantees
every horse to be what you want or you can exchange the horse for another until you find that
perfect horse for you.
On the website, Keith shows pictures of the
horses he has for sale, and, of course, each has
a “name”. Shown by appointment only, Keith is
Don Blazer
blunt about his rules of purchase. You have an
exchange guarantee unless you bring a trainer or
veterinarian with you to see the horse.
“Trainers and vets are supposed to know
what they are doing,” Keith says. “So if they okay
the horse you buy, then that’s your horse. I’m not
going to be responsible for their mistakes.”
When you come to try out a horse, Keith
has plenty of equipment for your use and purchase. “We’ll put the tack on the horse that you
like and feels good to you. If one saddle doesn’t
fit right, we’ll change saddles until we find the one
that does fit and feels good.”
Fourth, Keith has his “credentials.” Born
and raised on Texas ranches, Keith knows what
it means to use horses for work every day. His
experience turned into success proves he knows
what he’s doing.
Fifth Keith is an expert at selling horses,
because he’s an expert a buying horses. Keith
says he looks at a dozen or more horses before
he buys one. And out of every 5 that he buys,
he’s says there will be at least two which he’ll discover won’t work for him.
Keith employs several riders that “test”,
condition and polish the training the horse already has. “When my riders say a horse is ready
for sale, I know that horse is gentle and can be
handled by a beginner, novice or intermediate
rider.”
Finally, Keith is a great networker. He considers one of the keys to his success is having
so many “networkers” finding horses for him.
There is no way I could travel all over the
country looking for horses, Keith says, so it’s imperative people bring horses to me. They know
what I want by now. I have no trouble telling
them to “take a hike” if they bring me junk horses.
Visit Keith’s website. It’s enjoyable and a
real education.
Don Blazer teaches the course Make
Money With Horses for www.horsecoursesonline.com. The course can earn the student credit
toward a Bachelor’s degree or Professional Certification.
Feb./March, 2014 - Central States Horseman - Page 39
Mid-Rivers Saddle Club
2013 Class Winners
Our show season
is right around the
corner.
All 2013
MRSC shows will be
held at The National
Equestrian Center in
Lake St. Louis, MO.
Please join us on the
following dates:
April 5 – 6
May 3 – 4
Mare Halter: - Elizabeth Weir, Casey Bivens, Michelle Fanning,
Gary Merrill, Caitlin Jacobsen, Lydia Clark
Gelding Halter: - Ashley Morrison, Kevin Ryan, Kayla Tamborski,
Megan Preuss, Tammy Barton, Amber Herron
Lead Line: - JJ Wasser, Stella Rose Keimon, Baleigh Wood,
Samantha Kloos, Oliver Hartin
Walk Class: - Brooke Inchiostro, Ellah Geiser, David Geiser, Callie Cooley, Taylor Buckman
May 31 – June 1
July 12 – 13
August 2 – 3
October 25 – 26
We would also like to welcome
the 2014 Officers and Board Members:
Brad House – President
Heather Romriell – Vice President
Amy Comparato – Treasurer
Michelle Fanning – Recording
Secretary
Mary Ann Griffith – Show Secretary
Shannon Giesman – Public Relations
Teresa Edwards - Awards Secretary
Tim Griffith – Sergeant at Arms
See page 40 from
more of the 2013
Class Winners from
Mid-Rivers Saddle
Club.
Melinda Botkin – Board Member
Mike Preuss – Board Member
Chris Mochel – Board Member
Ken Inchiostrio – Board Member
Bob Mochel – Board Member
Missouri Equine
Transportation,
LLC.
We are looking forward to a great year!
Cedar Hill/
Northwest Towing
BB & Hwy. 30
Cedar Hill, MO
636-285-1817
4637 Gravois
House Springs, MO
636-671-8668
Have Trailer, will Travel . . .
Greg Shepard
314 • 704 • 7777
[email protected]
Page 40 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
Mid-Rivers Saddle Club 2013 Class Winners from Page 39
13 & Under Showmanship: - Brooke Faerber, Sydney Reardon,
Amber Herron, Maddie Giesman, Sydney Feager, Audrey Agnew
Youth Equitation: - Jenny Preuss, Cammi Giesman, Addison
Donnell, Delsey Griffith, Margaret Curran, Kelsey Ward
Novice Showmanship: - Zoe Phillips, Michelle Reardon, Mary
Page, Mandie Herron, Karlie Patterson, Stacey Spitzer
13 & Under Western Walk Trot: - Brooke Faerber, Amber Herron,
Hannah Inchiostro, Grant Kelly, Lydia Clark, Sydney Reardon
Youth Western Walk Trot: - Caitlin Jacobsen, Addison Donnell,
Cory Barton, Jenny Preuss, Elizabeth Weir, Kayla Sherwood
Novice HUS Walk Trot: - Zoe Phillips, Mandie Herron, Kylie
Shannon, Karlie Patterson, Lauren Rikand, Alyssa Inchiostro
2013 13 & Under Walk Trot Division High Point Winners:
High Point Brooke Faerber - Reserve High Point Amber Herron
2013 Youth 18 & Under High Point Winners: - High Point Elizabeth Weir - Reserve High Point Jenny Preuss
Novice Western Walk Trot: - Kevin Ryan, Mary Page, Mandie
Herron, Michelle Reardon, Stacy Spitzer, Alex Tourville
Youth Showmanship: - Kayla Tamborski, Elizabeth Weir, Addison Donnell, Maggie Mathews, Alison Heying, Kelsey Ward
Open HUS Walk Trot: - Melinda Botkin, Brooke Faerber, Megan
Cron, Christin Giessmann, Alex Wolf, Amber Herron
Novice Western Pleasure: - Mandie Herron, Kevin Ryan, Nanci
Ryan, Stacy Spitzer, Lauren Rikand, Judith Bauer
Youth HUS Walk Trot: - Jenny Preuss, Cammi Giesman, Kayla
Tamborski, Megan Preuss, Allison Heying, Maggie Mathews
Open HUS: - Brooke Faerber, Megan Cron, Alex Wolf, Beth Lullman, Heather Romriell, Amber Herron
2013 Novice High Point Winners - High Point Mandie Herron
(Amber Herron pictured) - Reserve High Point Zoe Phillips
Feb./March, 2014 - Central States Horseman - Page 41
Mid-Rivers Saddle Club 2013 Class Winners from Page 40
Open Jr. Horse Western Pleasure: - Caitlin Jacobsen, Stacey
Spitzer
Adult HUS Walk Trot: - Melinda Botkin, Olivia Mack, Megan
Cron, Alex Wolf, Beth Lullman, Amy Comparato
Adult Showmanship: - Olivia Mack, Melinda Botkin, Liz Keimon,
Megan Cron, Beth Lullman, Michelle Fanning
Youth Horsemanship:
Elizabeth Weir, Kelsey Griffith, Cammie Giesman, Margaret
Curran, Addison Donnell, Alison Heying
Youth Trail:
Elizabeth Weir, Cammi Giesman, Jenny Preuss, Kelsey Griffith, Margaret Curran, Alison Heying
NOVICE CLASSES AND WINNERS NOT PICTURED:
Novice HUS:
Mandie Herron, Lauren Rikand, Zoe Phillips, Kylie Shannon,
Karlie Patterson, Marissa Keith
Open Select Western Walk Trot: - Michelle Fanning, Kevin
Ryan, Sharon Eyrich, Karla Dietz, Mary Page, Beth Lullman
Adult Western Walk Trot: - Stephanie Baker, Michelle Fanning, Karla
Dietz, Elizabeth Hartin, Beth Lullman, Amy Comparato, Liz Keimon
Novice Equitation:
Zoe Phillips, Karlie Patterson, Mandie Herron, Lauren Rikand,
Kylie Shannon, Marissa Keith
Novice Horsemanship:
Mary Page, Mandie Herron, Zoe Phillips, Michelle Reardon,
Nanci Ryan, Karlie Patterson
Novice Trail:
Michelle Reardon, Lauren Rikand, Judith Bauer, Mandie Herron, Stacy Spitzer, Kevin Ryan
Open Jr. Horse Western Walk Trot: - Sharon Eyrich, Lydia Clark,
Caitlin, Jacobsen, Gary Merrill, Stacey Spitzer, Pat Shelhart
Adult Trail: - Melinda Botkin, Olivia Mack, Beth Lullman, Amy
Comparato, Tina Sloan, Heather Romriell
ADULT CLASSES AND WINNERS NOT PICTURED:
Adult HUS:
Olivia Mack, Melinda Botkin, Beth Lullman, Megan Cron, Alex
Wolf, Amy Comparato
Adult Equitation:
Melinda Botkin, Olivia Mack, Beth Lullman, Megan Cron, Alex
Wolf, Amy Comparato
Adult Western Pleasure:
Olivia Mack, Sissie Merrill, LeAnn Meyer, Kim Slaughter, Liz
Keimon
Adult Horsemanship:
Olivia Mack, Melinda Botkin, Liz Keimon, Beth Lullman, Megan
Cron, Amy Comparato
Open Sr. Horse Western Walk Trot: - Michelle Fanning, Stephanie
Baker, Karla Dietz, Cory Barton, Beth Lullman, Brooke Faerber
13 & UNDER CLASSES AND WINNERS NOT PICTURED:
13 & Under Hunter Under Saddle Walk Trot:
Brooke Faerber, Amber Herron, Sydney Feager, Sydney Reardon, Maddie Giesman, Audrey Agnew
13 & Under Equitation Walk Trot:
Brooke Faerber, Sydney Reardon, Maddie Giesman, Amber
Herron, Audrey Agnew, Grant Kelly
13 & Under Horsemanship Walk Trot:
Sydney Reardon, Amber Herron, Maddie Giesman, Brooke
Faerber, Hannah Inchiostro, Grant Kelly
2013 Adult High Point Winners - High Point Olivia Mack
Reserve High Point Melinda Botkin
13 & Under Trail Walk Trot:
Amber Herron, Sydney Reardon, Brooke Faerber, Hannah Inchiostro, Sydney Feager, Grant Kelly
2013 YOUTH 18 & UNDER CLASSES AND WINNERS NOT PICTURED:
Youth HUS:
Cammi Giesman, Kayla Tamborski, Maggie Mathews, Addison
Donnell, Megan Preuss, Alison Heying
Youth Western Pleasure:
Elizabeth Weir, Addison Donnell, Caitlin Jacobsen, Merrill
Morse, Kelsey Ward, Maggie Mathews
OPEN DIVISION CLASSES AND WINNERS NOT PICTURED:
Open Sr. Horse Western Pleasure:
Brooke Faerber, Sissie Merrill, Kimberly Slaughter, Lauren
Rikand, LeAnn Meyer, Amber Herron
Congratulations to
all the Winners
from. . .
The Central
States Horseman
Page 42 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
Missouri Ranch Horse Association
Potluck – Please bring a dish to share
For More Information, Contact Dennis
Cappel at 314-486-4065
From The President’s Saddle
I bet you’re
relieved that
this year we
won’t have to
hear all the
stories about
bugs
the
being so bad
because winter was too
mild.
Congratulations to all the 2013 High
Point and Reserve, Rookies of the Year,
and Class/Division Award winners. We
hope that everyone that came out to
compete enjoyed their time with us and
are looking forward to a great 2014.
The New Novice program was designed with beginner riders in mind in
the hopes it will help riders develop the
confidence and skills needed to compete at a higher level. We are offering
Novice Amateur and Novice Youth
classes in Ranch Riding, Ranch Trail,
Horsemanship, Showmanship, Ranch
Reining, Ranch Cutting, and Ranch
Boxing. A Novice Cattle designation
“cattle only” is also offered for those
who have been successful in riding
events but have never shown in cattle
events.
Get ready, set, and practice.
Mark your calendar for a Fun Clinic
on March 29th at Wright Equestrian
Center, Troy, MO.
Bring your horse and we will work on
teaching you how to work a flag properly. You will learn how to position your
horse on a cow and how to arrange
your horses’ body so that he can stop
and turn properly. This will be a good
time to get your horse use to different
situations and will help prepare you for
this coming show season.
I’d like to thank our sponsors for their
continued support of MoRHA. Welcome
to our newest sponsors, The Inchiostro
Family and The Golden Horseshoe
Tack Shop. We appreciate your support
for 2014 and look forward to working
with you.
Get involved as a volunteer because
it’s always more fun to participate. We
welcome you! Contact Heather at 814289-1649 for more information.
With regards,
Dennis
MoRHA Cattle Clinic
Saturday, March 29, 2014 ~ 11am
Wright Equestrian Center –
1028 Mennemeyer Rd, Troy, MO
Flag Work – Positioning ~
This Clinic WILL NOT include
live cattle
$20 Adults -- $15 Youth
MoRHA Calendars NOW AVAILABLE!
You can now place your order for the
2014 MoRHA Fund-raising Calendar.
They sell for $18 each. To order a calendar, mail a check payable to MoRHA,
2626 Country Rd, High Ridge, MO
63049 please indicate Calendar in the
memo. Online Ordering is also available
on the MoRHA website.
FACEBOOK
Get all the latest information on our
Facebook Page! We would love to have
www.facebook.com
you “like” us!
/MoRHA
Calling All Youth
The youth of MoRHA will be coming together to plan fun, interactive activities
and events for the youth (and young at
heart) in 2014!!! If you are interested in
being involved, please contact Elizabeth
Weir at [email protected]
2013 High Point and Reserve
Open High Point
Leaguers Finest Heir
Owner: Tim Weir
Exhibitor: Exhibitor Elizabeth
Open Reserve
Lady Bird Lark
Owner: Quintana Garcia
Exhibitor: Quintana Garcia
Amateur High Point
Smart Redeemin Chic
Owner: Sheryl Haviland
Exhibitor: Sheryl Haviland
Amateur Reserve
Putting In R Time
Owner: Mary Stassi
Exhibitor: Mary Stassi
Amateur Rookie of the Year
High Point – Mark Warren – Kiss My Buns
Reserve – Stacy Peters – Paintedup Powerstroke
Youth High Point
Leaguers Finest Heir
Owner: Tim Weir
Exhibitor: Exhibitor Elizabeth
Youth Reserve
Creek Rider
Owner: Mike and Reba Poole
Exhibitor: Katie Shadowens
Youth Rookie of the Year
High Point – Megan Sansoucie - CR Smokin
Little Lena
Reserve – Kelsey Wilson - Wimpys Little
Rock
For placings 1st – 5th for each class/division, Please visit the MoRHA website.
www.missouriranchhorse.com
Get Ready for the 2014 Show Season!
Renew / Join ARHA for 2014
Register your horse with ARHA if you
haven’t already
Renew / Join MoRHA for 2014
Read the new 2014-2015 Rulebook
Mark your Calendar for these important
dates:
February 9, 2014
MoRHA Year End Awards
and Silent Auction
February 22, 2014
ARHA Awards Banquet
April 26-27, 2014
1st show of 2014 at NEC,
Lake St. Louis - Double Judged
May 17-18, 2014
Show at CMEC, Columbia, MO Double Judged
June 21-22, 2014
Show at CMEC, Columbia, MO Double Judged
July 7-12, 2014
ARHA World Championship Show
August 23-24, 2014
Show at CMEC, Columbia, MO Double Judged
Shows Start at 8am Each Day
Friday Night Activities Vary (clinics and
other events)
Sunday Morning Cowboy Church –
7AM - Visit the MoRHA website.
www.missouriranchhorse.com or contact [email protected] for forms
Become a MoRHA Member!
Family $40 ~~ Individual $25
Memberships run January 2014 - December 2014 and include:
• Subscription to the MoRHA
E-Newsletter (when published)
• Reduced Show Fees (owner and ex
hibitor must both be members of
MoRHA to qualify)
• Year End Awards (owner and exhibitor
must both be members of MoRHA to
qualify)
• Opportunities to participate in clinics
and other events.
• Camaraderie and family-friendly at
mosphere provided by the MoRHA
charter.
• Central States Horseman Publication
delivered to your mailbox
• Application Available Online www.mis
souriranchhorse.com
1st MoRHA Show of 2014
National Equestrian Center, Lake St.
Louis, MO - APRIL 26 and 27, 2014
Double Judged – Double Points
Judges: Paul Zink and Sherrye Trafton
MoRHA Member Show All Weekend
Fees: Double Judged Show (Includes
Both Judges) - Owner/Exhibitor must be
a MoRHA member to be eligible for All
Weekend Fees and Year-End Club
Awards
DOES NOT Include Cattle Charges
All Age OR Amateur: $130
All Age AND Amateur: $150
Novice Amateur: $80
Novice Youth OR Youth: $30
(Youth Classes are age 18 and under)
Non Member Class Fees
(Includes Both Judges)
DOES NOT Include Cattle Charges
All Age: $20
Amateur: $20
Novice Amateur: $20
Youth: $10
Novice Youth: $10
(Youth Classes are age 18 and under)
Cattle Fees: Per Run $25 ($20 MoRHA
Members)
Sorting Fee: $12.50 ($10 MoRHA Members)
Office Fee - per Horse - $10
ARHA Fee - ($5 per Judge) - $10
Camping Fee - per Day - $30
Stall Fee (weekend): $45 DOES NOT
INCLUDE SHAVINGS
NO OUTSIDE SHAVINGS ALLOWED
Shavings must be purchased through
facility
min. 2 per stall ~ No Tie-Outs, All
Horses Must Be Stalled
Stall Reservations - ONLINE!
Call or Text Chris at (314) 609-9875 or
email [email protected]
Saturday (Begins at 8:00 a.m.)
1. ALL AGE Herd Work
2. ALL AGE Ranch Cutting
3. NOVICE AMATEUR Ranch Cutting
4. AMATEUR Ranch Cutting
5. NOVICE YOUTH Ranch Cutting
6. YOUTH Ranch Cutting
7. ALL AGE Working Ranch Horse
8. AMATEUR Working Ranch Horse
9. YOUTH Working Ranch Horse
10. ALL AGE Boxing
11. NOVICE AMATEUR Boxing
12. AMATEUR Boxing
13. NOVICE YOUTH Boxing
14. YOUTH Boxing
15. MoRHA Ranch Sorting**
16. ALL AGE Ranch Sorting
17. AMATEUR Ranch Sorting
18. YOUTH Ranch Sorting
Break
19. MoRHA Lead line**
20. MoRHA Novice Walk/Trot**
21. MoRHA 2 & 3 YR Walk/Trot**
22. Jackpot Walk/Trot**
23. Senior Ranch Riding
24. Junior Ranch Riding
25. NOVICE AMATEUR Ranch Riding
26. AMATEUR Ranch Riding
27. NOVICE YOUTH Ranch Riding
28. YOUTH Ranch Riding
29. 2 Year Old Ranch Riding
30. NOVICE AMATEUR Horsemanship
31. AMATEUR Horsemanship
32. NOVICE YOUTH Horsemanship
33. YOUTH Horsemanship
Break
34. ALL AGE Ranch Reining
35. NOVICE AMATEUR Ranch Reining
36. AMATEUR Ranch Reining
37. NOVICE YOUTH Ranch Reining
38. YOUTH Ranch Reining
Sunday
Cowboy Church: 7:00 a.m.
Show Begins at 8:00 a.m.
39. 2 and Under Stallions
40. 3 and Over Stallions
*Grand/Reserve Stallion
See MoRHA on Page 43
Feb./March, 2014 - Central States Horseman - Page 43
MoRHA from Page 42
41. AMATEUR 2 & Under Stallions
42. AMATEUR 3 & Over Stallions
*Grand/Reserve AMATEUR Stallions
43. 2 & Under Geldings
44. 3 & Over Geldings
*Grand/Reserve Geldings
45. AMATEUR 2 & Under Geldings
46. AMATEUR 3 & Over Geldings
*Grand/Reserve AMATEUR Geldings
47. YOUTH 2 and Under Geldings
48. YOUTH 3 and Over Geldings
*Grand/Reserve YOUTH Geldings
49. 2 & Under Mares
50. 3 & Over Mares
*Grand/Reserve Mares
51. AMATEUR 2 & Under Mares
52. AMATEUR 3 & Over Mares
*Grand/Reserve AMATEUR Mares
53. YOUTH 2 and Under Mares
54. YOUTH 3 and Over Mares
*Grand/Reserve YOUTH Mares
55. NOVICE AMATEUR Showmanship
56. AMATEUR Showmanship
57. NOVICE YOUTH Showmanship
58. YOUTH Showmanship
Break
59. SR Ranch Trail
60. JR Ranch Trail
61. NOVICE AMATEUR Ranch Trail
62. AMATEUR Ranch Trail
63. NOVICE YOUTH Ranch Trail
64. YOUTH Ranch Trail
65. 2 Yr Old In Hand Trail
66. Yearling In Hand Trail
67. ALL AGE Reining
68. AMATEUR Reining
69. YOUTH Reining
70. ALL AGE Barrels
71. AMATEUR Barrels
72. YOUTH Barrels
73. ALL AGE Poles
74. AMATEUR Poles
75. YOUTH Poles
All participants MUST show proof of
ARHA horse registration, current 2014
ARHA membership card, and Current
Negative Coggins - NO EXCEPTIONS. Photocopies accepted.
Health Certificates required for out of
state horses.
**MoRHA classes open to ALL horses,
but do not accrue ARHA points.
Novice Walk/Trot riders cannot cross
enter into loping class - Western attire
required for all classes: long sleeved
shirt, hat, and boots. Horses to be
shown naturally: no hoof black or
banded manes. No silver tack or
equipment, working tack only.
For Show Information
Dennis Cappel 314-486-4065
Heather Northcutt 814-289-1649
HELP WANTED
NO Prior Experience Required! WE
will Train YOU!!
SCRIBE: Attire: Western attire (Jeans,
Long Sleeved Western Shirt, Cowboy
Boots and Western Hat) Assist judge
with paperwork, keeping notes and
scoring classes.
GATE PERSONNEL: The gate steward supervises those who enter the
arena before, during and after the
competition.
RUNNER: To help run messages between Office, Announcer, Gate Steward, Ring Steward, Show Manager,
barns, etc. Help get Judges, Scribes ,
Ring Steward, and Announcer refreshments as needed.
SET UP CREW: Assist in setting up
pens for cattle, moving panels for cattle,
taking down pens, setting up barrels,
poles, and obstacles for respective
classes.
CATTLE ASSISTANTS: Assist in moving cattle, opening pen doors, etc. during the classes that involve cattle.
Please
Contact
INTERESTED?
Heather at 814-289-1649 or [email protected]
partnership, we offer various levels of advertising for your business or organization. The following will detail your
advertising levels.
2014 Back Numbers
MoRHA will be selling back numbers
for the 2014 show season. They are
laminated card stock with the number
that YOU CHOOSE. You will receive
two numbers for your saddle pad and
one number for you for only $10. No
more removing a number from your
saddle pad to pin to you. Pickup at the
banquet OR the first show of 2014. Get
your order in early before someone else
gets YOUR Number! No payment necessary until you pick up your
number/numbers. Contact morhachris
@gmail.com with your order for each
horse. Please include the number you
would like along with the horse’ registered name
Silver - $200
Logo Advertisement and Link on the
MoRHA Website For 2014
Your Company Banner (1- Provided By
You) Displayed In or Around the Arena
during Each Show
Your Business Announced During Our
Shows As Our Sponsor.
1/2 page Advertisement in each MoRHA
Newsletter
2014 ARHA World Championship Show
Mark your calendars for July 7th-12th,
2014 at the L.D. Brown Agricultural
Center in Bowling Green, Kentucky!
2014 will be ARHA's 10 Year Anniversary so we are working on making this
a real celebration- we hope you will
make plans to join us!
ARHA Adds New Divisions and Classes
ARHA has added a new Novice division
for 2014! The ARHA Novice division was
designed with beginner riders in mind in
the hopes it will help riders develop the
confidence and skills needed to compete
at a higher level. Classes offered in
Novice Youth and Novice Amateur divisions are: Ranch Riding, Ranch Trail,
Horsemanship, Showmanship, Ranch
Reining, Ranch Cutting, Ranch Roping
and Ranch Boxing.
A Novice Cattle designation “cattle only”
is also offered for those who have been
successful in riding events but have
never shown in cattle events. This gives
these exhibitors the opportunity to compete with others that are also new to cattle classes and help to develop the
all-around horse and rider.
Novice Youth and Novice Amateur riders are also eligible for the National Year
End Novice High Point and Reserve High
Point awards presented at the end of the
year at the annual ARHA Awards Banquet. For more information about the
Novice program and eligibility requirements, please visit the ARHA website:
www.AmericanRanchHorse. net
2014 MoRHA Sponsors Wanted
Advertise your business with US!! We
are seeking 2014 Sponsors for our
awards program, youth scholarship, and
various other programs. In return for your
Gold - $500
Logo Advertisement and Link on the
MoRHA Website For 2014
Your Company Banner (1- Provided By
You) Displayed In or Around the Arena
during Each Show
Your Business Announced During Our
Shows As Our Sponsor.
Advertising on our FACEBOOK Page
as requested
Full page Advertisement in each
MoRHA Newsletter
Bronze - $100
Logo Advertisement and Link on the
MoRHA Website For 2014
Your Company Banner (1- Provided By
You) Displayed In or Around the Arena
during Each Show
Your Business Announced During Our
Shows As Our Sponsor.
1/4 page Advertisement in each MoRHA
Newsletter
Class Sponsorship - $25 per show
Link on the MoRHA Website For 2014
Business Announced During the Class of
your choice at the show of your choice.
For More Information on becoming a
Sponsor, please visit our Sponsor Page
on our Website. www.missouriranchhorse.com or email morhachris
@gmail.com to request a Sponsorship
Form.
2014 MoRHA SPONSORS
Gold Level Sponsors - Myer Hotels –
Branson
Silver Level Sponsors
Dennis Cappel Horsemanship, Silex,
MO - The Inchiostro Family
Prater Farms and Riding Center, Fulton,
MO - Segundo Insurance
Bronze Level Sponsors
MFA – Columbia, MO
Cathy Jackson – Massage Works Therapeutic Massage
The Golden Horseshoe Tack Shop –
Eureka, MO
Wright Equestrian Center, Troy, MO
Class Sponsors
Youth Barrels - Wright Equestrian Center, Troy, MO
Youth Poles - Wright Equestrian Center,
Troy, MO
Youth Showmanship - Wright Equestrian Center, Troy, MO
Many Thanks to our 2014 Sponsors!
We appreciate your support!
2014 Officers and Board Members
President, Show Manager, &
Charter Representative
Dennis Cappel
66 White Wildlife Road
Silex, MO 63377
314-486-4065
[email protected]
www.horseshoeingandtraining.com
Vice President
Danny Wright
625 Apricot Drive
St. Charles, MO 63301
636-578-8035
Treasurer/Webmaster
Chris Diehl
2626 Country Road
High Ridge, MO 63049
314-609-9875
[email protected]
Administrative Secretary
Mona Prater
Prater Farm and Equestrian Center
Fulton, MO
573-220-0492
[email protected]
Show Secretary
Heather Northcutt
Guthrie, Missouri
814-289-1649
[email protected]
Youth Director
Christine Watts-Wright
Wright Equestrian Center
Troy, MO 63379
636-462-3334
http://www.wrightequestrian.com
ARHA Amateur Representative
Robyn Wade
[email protected]
Directors
Quintana Garcia
Garcia Performance Horses
636-358-1636
[email protected]
Terri Pietka
636-633-0166
[email protected]
Please feel free to contact a member of
the Board if you have questions or concerns
For More Information on the Missouri
Ranch Horse Association, please visit
www.missouriranchhorse.com
Page 44 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
Auto Repair
Classified
Hardings Auto Works, LLC
Collison Repair, Restoration
and Custom Design Specialist:
House Springs/ 636-671-3878
Horse Trailer Rental . . . . . .
2 horse slant load, step up,
w/tack room 6' wide 7' tall – 24
hours $69.50 – or /3 horse
$82.50.
2/11
Directory
High Ridge Auto Repair
2835 High Ridge Blvd.
High Ridge, MO
24 Hour Towing 636-677-8376
Directory Ads for only $50.00 per YearCall to Place Your Ad Here Now!! - 314-638-0682
2/12
Red Horse Sharpening
Blanket Service
Motorcycle Repair
Clipper Blade Sharpening, Clipper Service and
Repair, Local Pick-up and Delivery, Mail Orders
Accepted - Contact -- Casse Ward, -
Wren Farm Horse Blanket Serv.
Professional Washing &
Repair Drop Off
Golden Horseshoe Tack Shop
314-605-2226
2/12
Boarding
Stables
Greensfelder Equestrian
Full-care boarding, lessons, and
Horse Hotel for overnight or
short-term stays
www.greensfelderequestrian.com
3/12
636-458-1353
Sand Creek Stables
Full service boarding, leasing/
sales, scenic trails & riding arenas.
Peaceful setting - must see to appreciate. located near
Cedar Hill, MO.
636-222-3708
Equine
Photography
Silver Spurs Equestrian Center,
357 Highway EE, Winfield, MO 63389,
(636) 734-1158,
[email protected],
www.redhorsesharpening.com
Show Circuit
Horseshoeing
Spirit Ranch Professional Farrier
Jim Rickett
Cell 314-304-0317
Serving Franklin. Jefferson,
Saint Louis Co.
Nebraska Hunter/Jumper Schooling Show Circuit
Academy, Equitation, Medal, Beginners, Intermediate,
Advanced Hunter Classes. Jumpers up to Level 5
“Show points tabulated w/year end awards!”
www.nebraskahorseshows.com or
call Sybil @ 402-310-2718 for info.
www.Spiritranchquarterhorses.t83.net
Tack Repair
RW Professional Horseshoeing
573-218-8924
Serving Franklin, Jefferson, St.
Louis County, Washington Co, St.
Francios & St. Genevieve Countys
Svensson Tack Repair
& Leather Goods OPEN
Three Creek Farms
7 DAYS
71 Wolfrum Road
Weldon Springs, MO 63304
Carlos Svensson (941) 928-5974 or
Teresa Adams at (636) 399-3222
Horse Trailer Repair
Photography, Design, Advertising
www. Rosemary Lahmann.com
573-468-8506
TNT HORSE TRAILER REPAIR
Rust Repair, Sandblasting,
Painting, Steel welding,
Aluminum welding
Body work, Floor replacement,
Electrical, Tires & Wheels
Bob Lakowski 314-623-0544
[email protected]
Equine & Pet Photography
MM Photography
www.mmphotostudio.com
314-540-7748 for appt or Info
Gateway Metal Works
Hitches Installed Brake Work
Complete Trailer ServiceOver 20 yrs. Exp.
636-671-0888 2/12
Rosemary Lahmann
Photography
Rich’s Cycle Center
American and Metric / Scooters
Parts•Accessories•Sales•Service
9500 Gravois 314-631-1300
St. Louis, MO 63123
www.richscyclecenter.com
Tack Shops
East Meets West Tack
1400 E. Highway 50, OFallon, IL
618-632-2645
www.eastmeetswesttack.com
2/12
Golden Horseshoe Tack Shop
319 N Central Ave.
(Blankets Cleaned)
Small Square Bales of Hay
Brome, Mixed Grass or Orchard Grass
- Located in Eureka, Mo or Drake, MO
Delivery Available
636-299-3943
Mattress’s
Trainers
Mattress Concepts
Specializing in mattress’s for
campers, & horse trailer living quarters.
3033 High Ridge Blvd. - High Ridge, MO 63049
Phone: 314-406-1597
www.mattressconceptsstl.com
275 Lemay Ferry Rd –
St, Louis, MO 63125
Sales: 314-631-5600
800-392-5655
Serv: 314-631-3500 –
Parts: 800-798-5655
***
Need Trailer Repair?
Full Service Horse Trailer Repair - Rust, Sandblasting, Painting, Steel Welding, Aluminum
welding, Body work, Floor replacement, Suspension, Electrical, Tire & Wheels - Call Bob
Lakowski - 314-623-0544
[email protected]
•••
EQUINE AND FARMERS
HELPER
• Ranch Management
• Hay Cutting
• Brush Hogging
• Livestock Hauling
• Fence Mending
• Always looking for Land Leases
• Any Type of Handyman Work
Just Call Gene
at 314-800-5656
• • •
50CC SCOOTERS AVAILABLE
No License or Plate required
Call Now!!
314-631-1300
• • • FOR SALE: 2010 AQHA gelding and 2008 AQHA mare; both
trained cow horse and reining.
660-327-4869
• • • Eureka, MO 63025
636-938-4309-
HAY
MB Thomas Trailer Sales
2/11
Crescent Ridge Ranch
Training.Lessons.Sales.Boarding
www.cr-ranch.com
636-463-2254 or 636-384-0059
FOR SALE: Alfalfa/Orchard Grass
Mix - 3rd & 4th cutting, very fine
stemmed tender Hay. $6.00 per
bale, Delivery Available. Bonne
Terre, MO - 573-518-4929
Feb./March, 2014 - Central States Horseman - Page 45
Recipes From
P
O
R
K
Ingredients:
1 (2 pound) boneless pork loin
1 teaspoon ground sage
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 clove garlic, crushed
1/2 cup water
Glaze:
1/2 cup brown sugar
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
1/2 cup water
2 tablespoons soy sauce
He says he’s got a gold medal for Hay eating. Is that true?
Directions:
Combine sage, salt, pepper and garlic. Rub over roast. Place in Dutch Oven
with 1/4 cup water. Cook at on 350 degrees (f) for 1 1/2 hours. Approximately
35-40 minutes later, reduce heat and
add glazet about6-8 hours. About 1 hour
before roast is done, combine ingredients for glaze in small sauce pan. Heat
and stir until mixture thickens. Brush
roast with glaze 2 or 3 times during the
last hour of cooking. Serve with remaining glaze on the side
Page 46 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
Calendar
February
Feb. 1
Puxico Horse Sale, 6:00 p.m. - Highway 51,
North Puxico, MO - 573-222-6229.
Feb. 7
TAH Livestock Inc. Horse & Tack Consignment Auction. Winslow, IL 815-367-5581.
Feb. 7
Southern Illinois Equine Horse Sale. 1st and
3rd Friday’s of each month. 6:00 p.m. on Tack
and 8:00 p.m. on Horses. 2755 Goreville
Road, Goreville, IL for Info: Barn 618-9959365.
Feb.
Lolli Brothers Horse Sales, Registered &
Grade Horse Sale, Highway 63 South, Macon,
MO 816-385-2516 or 8 16-385-2000.
Feb. 8
MISSOURI PAINT HORSE CLUB
ANNOUNCES YEAR END BANQUET
Best Western State Fair Inn/Sedalia, MO
Feb. 8
Jefferson County Trailriders. Big River Saddle
Park, Grubville, MO - Highway Y, two miles off
of Highway 30. for Info: 636-274-2711.
Feb. 8
Bertrands Horse Ranch - Horse, Tack & Trailer
Auction - 3 miles north of Highway 1, Watseka, IL - 815-432-2425.
Listings
February 22, 2014
ARHA Awards Banquet
February 27 – March 2
March To The Arch
National Equestrian Center - Lake St.
Louis, MO - (6 JUDGES)
Feb 28- March 1st
No Foot - No Horses Weekend Shoeing Class
- www.Dennis Cappel.com 314. 486.4065
MARCH
Mar. 1
Lolli Brothers Horse Sales, Registered &
Grade Horse Sale, Highway 63 South, Macon,
MO 816-385-2516 or 8 16-385-2000.
Mar.. 1
Puxico Horse Sale, 6:00 p.m. - Highway 51,
North Puxico, MO - 573-222-6229.
Mar.. 7
TAH Livestock Inc. Horse & Tack Consignment Auction. Winslow, IL 815-367-5581.
Mar.. 7
Southern Illinois Equine Horse Sale. 1st and
3rd Friday’s of each month. 6:00 p.m. on Tack
and 8:00 p.m. on Horses. 2755 Goreville
Road, Goreville, IL for Info: Barn 618-9959365.
Feb. 8
Farmington Livestock Market Horse Sale,
Farmington, Missouri 573-756-5769 or 573756-7134.
Feb. 13
Missouri Foundation Quarter Horse Club “Fun
Night” - 7:00 p.m. Green Acres Heated Indoor
Arena - 17555 Highway 72, Rolla, MO 573341-3004
Feb. 15
Puxico Horse Sale, 6:00 p.m. - Highway 51,
North Puxico, MO - 573-222-6229.
Feb. 21
Southern Illinois Equine Horse Sale. 1st and
3rd Friday’s of each month. 6:00 p.m. on Tack
and 8:00 p.m. on Horses. 2755 Goreville
Road, Goreville, IL for Info: Barn 618-9959365.
Feb. 22
Farmington Livestock Market Horse Sale,
Farmington, Missouri 573-756-5769 or 573756-7134.
Listings
Mar. 8
Jefferson County Trailriders. Big River Saddle
Park, Grubville, MO - Highway Y, two miles off
of Highway 30. for Info: 636-274-2711.
Goreville, IL Barn 618-995-9365 for Fax: 618995-1865.
Mar. 8
Bertrands Horse Ranch - Horse, Tack &
Trailer Auction - 3 miles north of Highway 1,
Watseka, IL - 815-432-2425.
Mar. 8
Farmington Livestock Market Horse Sale,
Farmington, Missouri 573-756-5769 or 573756-7134.
Mar. 21
Southern Illinois Equine Horse Sale. 1st and
3rd Friday’s of each month. 6:00 p.m. on Tack
and 8:00 p.m. on Horses. 2755 Goreville
Road, Goreville, IL for Info: Barn 618-9959365.
Mar. 22
Farmington Livestock Market Horse Sale,
Farmington, Missouri 573-756-5769 or 573756-7134.
Mar. 8-9
Ozark QH Show
Lucky J Arena - Carthage, MO
Contact: Janice Klenke, 660-473-1140
(2 JUDGES)
April 26 - 27th
Kansas Paint Horse Club
Kansas State Fairgrounds, Hutchinson,
Kansas
Mar 13
Missouri Foundation Quarter Horse Club “Fun
Night” - 7:00 p.m. Green Acres Heated Indoor
Arena - 17555 Highway 72, Rolla, MO 573341-3004
April 12-13
Ozark QH Show
Lucky J Arena - Carthage, MO
Contact: Janice Klenke, 660-473-1140
- (2 JUDGES)
Mar. 15
Puxico Horse Sale, 6:00 p.m. - Highway 51,
North Puxico, MO - 573-222-6229.
April 26-27
Maple Leaf Circuit
Boone County Fairgrounds - Columbia,
MO - Contact: MQHA Office, 816-5370610 or [email protected] -(4
JUDGES)
Mar. 18
Southern Illinois Equine Sale - Monthly Dealer
Tack Sale, the 3rd Tuesday of each month
starting at 10:00 a.m. 2755 Goreville Rd,
New Friendship Column
Coming Soon!
February 9, 2014
MoRHA Year End Awards
and Silent Auction
Feb. 18
Southern Illinois Equine Sale - Monthly Dealer
Tack Sale, the 3rd Tuesday of each month
starting at 10:00 a.m. 2755 Goreville Rd,
Goreville, IL Barn 618-995-9365 for Fax: 618995-1865.
Calendar
Friends Forever
We are looking for Cowboys and Cowgirls who are looking to meet other Cowboys and Cowgirls.
Send us your profile, what you are looking for, your interests, your age and an
email for someone to hook up with you
and you can take it form there. - Send
$2.00 along with your info to: Friends @
9509 Gravois, St. Louis, MO 63123
We are not giving out names, addresses
or phone numbers, just list your email.
DISCLAIMER: Central States Horseman newspaper (and/or its employees or representatives) are in
no way responsible for the content of any post(s) in this column, including but not limited to any
error(s), overstatement(s), or fabrication(s). Nor is Central States Horseman newspaper (and/or its
employees or representatives) responsible for any action or inaction resulting from any information
appearing in this column.
Central States Horseman newspaper expressly reserves the right to accept or reject, in its sole discretion, with or without any explanation, any information to be posted.
Anyone posting information appearing in this column understands and agrees that it will hold harmless and indemnify Central States Horseman newspaper, for any and all damages, including costs
and attorneys fees.
Feb./March, 2014 - Central States Horseman - Page 47
INDEX OF ADVERTISERS
ATCHA . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 & 37
Allen’s Pony Express . . . . . 35
Bryan Sundsak. . . . . . . . . . . 35
Byrnes Mill Stables . . . . . . . 29
Caretaker Needed . . . . . . . . 21
Cedar Hill/NW Towing . . . . . 39
Cedar Lane Equine Clinic . . 15
Coast to Coast . . . . . . . . . . . 37
CSH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Dennis Cappel . . . . . . . 19 & 20
Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Dolan Realty (Gina P) . . . . . 37
Earth & Fire Wheel . . . . . . . . 47
Friendship Ad . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Golden Horseshoe . . . . . . . . . 2
Horse Quest . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
IL Horse Fair . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Jim’s Motors . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Manchester W. Vet. Clinic . . 15
McLaughlin Western Store . 28
MFA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
MO Buckskin . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Mo Eq. Transportation . . . . . 39
MM Photography . . . . . . . . . 47
Parkland Truck & Trailer . . . 30
Printing Unlimited . . . . . . . . 14
Advertise your shows and events in the
Calendar at No Charge!!!
Get more attendance and New members.
email Jan at
[email protected]
or Fax at 314-638-0748 or
Call Jan at 314-638-0682.
Rolling Acres . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Sand Creek Stables . . . . . . . 37
Three Corners Ranch . . . . . 20
Wildwood Pub . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Windowsills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Page 48 - Central States Horseman - Feb./March, 2014
The all new two step by Exiss.
flush floor 12’ slide,
Two sets of steps
10 year warranty