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1 rgo Newspaper
Stockton State College
Pomona, NJ 08240
Office: G-206
(609) 652-1776 ext. 4560/4573
Hi
Argo is not an official publication of Stockton
State College but is published by an independent corporation licensed in New Jersey.
February 4, 1988
Volume 35 Number 2
Pomona, NJ I
Stockton Celebrates
African Americans
Esther Rolle addressing a crowd at the PAC. Photo by John
Tiffany Wilson
Stockton will celebrate February as
African American History Month with a
wide range of activities including panel
discussions and lectures.
Educators, who saw Black Americans
as having been traditionally neglected in
historical accounts, recognized the need
to heighten public awareness concerning
their contributions.
"It is important that everyone is aware
that blacks have made many contributions to society and have shaped
America with their efforts," said Adrian
Blair, president of the Unified Black
Students Society.
^African-American History Month
will highlight for a minute the positive
dimensions of a people," said Franklin
Smith, Professor of Sociology." "Let's
get a real picture of history, not a préfabrication or an agreed upon set of
fables. A lot of studies, like Afro-American Studies, Women Studies, and
Jewish Studies, are designed to take the
vable and the 'his' out of history."
Smith pointed out that the dominant
group in society often integrates aspects
of minority culture without acknowledging the true source.
"Unless you provide identification
and outline and define the breadth of
culture that exists, the culture is exploited," Smith said, "It is stealing instead of borrowing."
McElwain.
Although Blacks have made great
strides in the areas of mathematics,
medicine, and philosophy, to name a
few, it is commonly thought that their
efforts are often credited to people of
European descent. Ineffective curriculum planning is blamed.
"The people who institute the curriculum are judged to be competent,
Smith said, "Why isn't pluralistic flexibility a part of that judgement of competency?"
Although courses which emphasize
the contributions of minorities are available, students frequently graduate from
college without taking courses of this
kind.
"White students need to pack African-American courses and men need to
pack Women's Studies courses," said
Smith, offering a solution to the problem.
Bill Gilmore, Associate Professor of
History, agrees that courses like African American Studies and Women's
Studies are valuable. However, he feels
that students should not neglect the
larger picture.
" T h e problem with segregating a
specific segment of history and only
studying it is that you may miss all of the
actual advances incorporated into the
broader history," Gilmore said. Gilmore also stated that for the past twenty
continued on page 11
Esther Rolle Inspires Student Community
By Len Holmin
The Stockton Performing Arts Center
was charmed by the presence of Esther
Rolle on Monday. Ms,Rolle presented
her views on Black American History,
encouraged young black writers to enter the McDonald's Corporation 11 th
Annual Literary Achievement Award
competition, and conducted a master
class in acting as part of the Black
Theatre Series of the Stockton Theatre
Workshop Program.
Ms. Rolle seemed to sense the excitement of the audience on her eagerly
anticipated arrival, as well as the nervousness of the four young actors who sat
beside her on stage, prior to their performances of two scenes from Lorraine
Hansberry plays which she would later
critique. Putting everyone at ease she
said, " W e all have the same disease:
Students Unite
page 3
scared. It's easier to be scared together.
It's our insecurities that we're feeling."
Anxiety and self-consciousness,
whether stemming from racial*or individual differences, were addressed by
Ms. Rolle. "If we were all stripped of our
hair and skin we wouldn't be able to
identify our own kin-folk. Our differences....That's what makes the garden of
humanity beautiful. If we were all potatoes we would be dull."
Rolle said she deplored the poor understanding of Black American history
in the United States. "Foreign students
know more about your history than you
do. It's sad, you come back (from a
foreign country) and you feel like beating
every teacher you ever had."
"We're going to stop it here and now,"
Rolle said of the lack of emphasis on
and accuracy of Black history in Am-
erican education. "Until historians stop
writing novels I have to tell you about
this. When you find your truth you'll
find your freedom. You can't climb a
ladder with one foot on my neck in the
gutter."
With disarming humor and several
anecdotes from her professional acting
career (which has included Broadway
plays, television movies and comedy
series with a starring role in "Good
Times"), Ms. Rolle commented on the
two scenes performed by Stockton students Lewis Terry, Clynthia Trueitt,
Paul Skeen, and Jody Hatcher. She first
reassured the four students by disclosing
her philosophy of criticism: "If you can't
help, don't hinder."
She gave many tips for student actors,
using the two performances as examples.
Israeli Struggle
page 5
"The human instrument is the most
delightful to play on; nothing can do
what a live instrument can. The body is
talking all the time. Let your body lead
you into the feeling. Sit for awhile and
watch a baby. He knows when you're
angry or happy. Actors have to get back
to childhood."
Much of Esther Rolle's advice for
aspiring actors was inspiration for all
people, "Keep that monster off of your
shoulder. He will be there the rest of
your life. He's called 'fear' and 'insecurity.' You've gotta watch out for him."
" W e drop our cloak of fear and all of
the formalities and we aspire to be the
best we can in the fields we have chosen...no one can take what is yours
from you; it is yours forever and ever."
see page 3 for
more events calander
Stockton's 1st Place Battle
page 12
ARGO
Page 2
February 4, 1988
The Amazing Science Emporium *
Natural High
By Dan Mushalko
Since the 1960's the popular perception of college has been paradoxical.
People see a place like Stockton as a
great institution for higher learning. .
.and as a community of free-flowing
drugs. But college as a haven of the drug
culture is a totally undeserved view.
Drug abuse is a product of our entire
country's social norms.
Let's face it: we are a nation of addicts
in every sense of the word. Millions of
people say that they just can't make it in
the morning without their cup of coffee..
. they need the caffeine as a stimulant.
Then, through the day, they'll continue
with a variety of drugs: nicotine addicts
puff away on their cigarettes; after a
hyper-meeting, executives will pop a few
D.C. Follies 2
Valium. These are all legal drugs; of
course, there are plenty of illegal drugs
as well.
The problem is, legal or not, almost all
these drugs have bad side effects. For
example, most of us are quite familiar
with the negative effects of ingesting too
much alcohol. The symptoms are called
a "hangover."
Now, there comes news of a brand
new drug which can give you any kind of
high you desire. It'll boost your mood
and clear your mind, or it will calm you
down.. .maybe even put you to sleep, if
that's what you prefer. Best of all, there
are no dangerous side effects. If you
overdose on this drug, you'll start to put
on a few pounds; that's the worst that
could happen. This drug is something
you see and use every day, and it's
perfectly legal. We call it: food.
Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found that the
foods you eat can have a definite affect
on your mood. Proteins pick you up, and
carbohydrates calm you down.
Sound strange? It's not, really, Our
brains naturally product neurotransmitters—chemicals that set our mental pace
and help send messages through our
brain cells.
Our grey matter makes three of these
neurotransmitters out of the foods we
eat. Two of them—dopamine and norepinephrine—make you more alert, stimulated, and motivated. Their components are in low fat, protein rich foods
like skim milk, peas and beans, tofu, and
yogurt. Serotonin, on the other hand,
calms you down, relieving stress and
improving relaxation. . .even helping
you fall asleep. And what helps your
brain make serotonin? Carbohydrates.
You'll find them in bread, crackers,
pasta, and such. . .even in sweets!
When you eat these protein or carbohydrate rich dishes, amino acids leave
the food, enter the bloodstream, and
travel to the brain. Different foods have
different amino acids. . .and different
amino acids amke different neurotransmitters, which in turn give you different
moods!
So don't waste your money on expensive drugs. Just start a well-planned
dite, and you really can eat your cares
away!
Ordinary Heros
of the Wall Street Journal reporter she
By Chick Yeager
was having lunch with. Several weeks
If World War Three had broken out
later on her own initiative, she arranged
last week, no one would have discovered
an interview with Budget Director, David
it by watching local TV news in WashStockman, and when the interview was
ington. Ninety-three newspersons had
published
in a major political journal
been dispatched to the Superbowl in San
everyone
knew
she was better than the
Diego so that residents could be informed
highly
paid
reporter.
There were no
on everything about the Superbowl—
cheerleaders
or
energized
fans on the
even including a five minute piece on the
side
lines
to
help
her
score
that touchHenry the Chicken, who predicted a
down.
Redskin win by nine points.
I thought of the polite quiet student,
Modern TV politics pretends to be a
who had been jailed for 10 months for
lot about heroes, so you can imagine
receiving stolen property, who when he
what happens when this political city has
found he was slipping again, joined Alits hometown team playing in the Supercoholic Anonymous in order to get his
bowl. Before leaving for San Diego the
priorities
straight. He showed himself
aspiring Redskin heroes were given a and
his
family
that he had truly changed
sendoff by the genuine "15 minute hero"
when
he
performed
admirably as a govOllie North. But heroes arc not limited to
ernment
professional
in Washington.
Washington and they are not restricted
There was no television time allocated to
to only those who always win. I can think
this only certifiable miracle that I have
of some Stockton Washington interns
ever seen in my life,
who were heroes too.
Over the years the Washington InThere was the EOF student a number
ternship program has allowed me to
of years ago who, prior to Stockton,
watch weak people become strong, smart
never had a decent educational coach
people become talented and broken peand who had to take six years to struggle
ople become whole. They did this withto a 2.0 average. He was determined to
out shouting about their "bad calls",
show the doubters that he could perform
"off sides", or "unfair odds" that each
in a challenging setting. He did this
could legitimately claim. I think the
without once calling a referee to give
word "hero" should be reserved for
him extra yardage for the racism, social
ordinary people who, given a set of
deprivation and education malpractice
circumstances react with courage, dignity,
he had endured.
compassion, and faith that they can
I though of the brilliant young woman
become more than they have already
who chain smoked her cigarettes in awe
been. Heroes are those who challenge us
to listen to our own inner higher power
telling us to become more than our secret
inner fears say we really are.
The trouble with Americans is that we
cheer only those who have already won
and have no time to praise those who
lose but continue to play: We hail the
Ivan Boesky's with all of the money and
forget the working stiffs who put food on
the table so their kids can go to school at
Stockton. We have hours for the naturally
gifted but no time to celebrate the simple
victories of the common man.
Last weekend I think America celebrated the wrong heroes and cheered for
the wrong champions. The Superbowl
was great entertainment, but it was not
heroic. It is only when we begin to look
for our heroes much closer to home that
we will find those who can give us the
inspiration to triumph over our own
inner fears that are holding us back.
POMONA
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LAUNDRY
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Pomona Shopping Center
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965 5855
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ARGO
Page 3
February 4, 1988
Faculty
Column
By Bill Miley
Professor of Psychology
Anorexia Nervosa ( nervous loss of
appetite) is a name given to an eating
disorder that has received wide publicity
lately. Such highly publicized cases as
the singer, Karen Carpenter, who died
from the disorder, have brought the
disorder to national attention. The disorder is fatal in 5 to 15% of the diagnosed cases. College students are partularly prone to this disorder because of
various characteristics that I will shortly
mention. I am going to talk about some
research regarding the disorder, and in
the interest of clarity and brevity I will
not be giving due credit to the people
who did the research. I will be glad to
share the studies with anyone interested.
Much of the research is mentioned in
James Kalat's new book on biological
psychology.
Anorexia Nervosa is found in half of
one percent of young women in their late
teens. It has not been found before
puberty, and rarely after the early
twenties. It may continue, once started,
for many years. It is very rare in men,
and for reasons unknown, much less
commom in black women than in white
women. Women who suffer from this
Eating Disorder Examined
disorder show an interest in food (contrary to the formal meaning of the disorder), but have a pathological desire to
be thin. A disorder known as bulemia is
often associated with Anorexia Nervosa. This is characterized by excessive
eating, sometimes to the point of literally
bursting the stomach, and by induced
vomiting and/or purging by laxatives.
People with these conditions also may
exercise excessively, sometimes up to
six hours a day.
Family dynamics have sometimes
been implicated as related to the disorder. The young woman may feel excessive pressures to be perfect in everyone's eyes, to be thin, and she may
have some resistance to becoming an
adult woman, with the attendant pressures for sexual intercourse, and pregnancy. This resistance could sometimes
be developed by being around very
powerful and successful parental role
models, and feeling inadequate in
measuring up to them. Losing weight is
one aspect of the afflected individual's
life that she can control and feel adequate about, and at the same time receive adult attention (psychologists call
this secondary gain). In addition, with
the loss of weight, secondary sexual
Womanscape
By Katherine Rondeau
Womanscape is a new column for the
ARGO, which will be appearing every
other week. This is by way of introduction, and I would like to mention
some of the reasons why I feel a column
of this type is necessary. Also, you
should know something about me—my
beliefs, my biases, just what is behind
Womanscape. The column will address
a variety of issues, new ones and old, we
need to remember our history, we need
to develop a public forum on those
concerns of important to women. The
quality of women's lives is at stake—
yours and mine~we must gain the ability
to assume our rightful positions as equal
productive members of society.
J am a feminist and have become
increasingly disturbed by the apparent
lack of interst by other young women in
our movement. Today there is a
casual acceptance of the benefits of the^
feminist movement and a cavalier tossing out of principles, both of which were
won in hard-fought battles by courageous women. If these benefits and principles are allowed to die, if for no other
reason; than the apathy of "liberated"
women, they will be terribly difficult to
resurrect when their importance is inevitaby understood. I want to take a hard
look at this apathy, and figure out what it
is going to take to get American women
back on the feminist bandwagon.
I am a 24 year old Political Science
major working towards graduate school
in Women's Studies as well as a law
degree ( I see myself eventually working
on a women's law project). I have no
particular party afficilation (all I can say
is that I am left of the Democrats and
right of the Shining Path), and my mindset says: "Enough Bullshit—Equality
Now!"
Finally, this column will not be antimen, but it will be anti-patriarchy and
pro-humanist. Women must be given
chances and choices that most men
accept as "givens," and we must continually fight and demand historically
denied opportunities. Well, that's all for
this week. Now that you know who I am
characteristics are suppressed such as
breast development, etc., and therefore
she can continue as a child.
Psychologically, even after the young
woman has lost significant amounts of
weight, she does not see herself as thin.
This inability to see herself as thin is an
abnormal continutation of her earlier
perception of herself as a fat person.
Why she can not easily unlearn this
perception is unclear, but some therapies focus on attempts to get the afflicted individual to perceive herself in a
new light.
A biological predisposition may also
be present. Women with Anorexia
Nervosa often have low levels of reproductive hormones which resemble
prepubertal girls. Some investigators
have speculated that the pituitary gland
in these women is abnormally slow in
developing the adult pattern of hormonal
production. Losing weight, by itself,
reduces the production of reproductive
hormones. Long distance women runners of Olympic, and near Olympic
quality, often lose their menstrual periods which is related to their extemely
low body fat, and consequent reduction
in reproductive hormones. Apparently,
at least 5 to 10% body fat is necessary in
women to maintain normal reproductive
hormone status. Natural selection may
have selected against women with low
body fat as bad risks for nourishing
infants with their milk, by preventing
their hormonal systems from developing
a viable fetus.
A variety of drugs and hormonal
treatments for the disorder have met
with mixed results. The best treatment
so far is behavior modification in a
controlled setting, with lots of ancillary
individual, and family counseling. Even
this treatment approach is not fail-safe,
and a return to full functioning often
takes 4 to 5 years. Some therapists and
researchers believe that there are residual psychological effects in recovered
individuals that go beyond this time
period. In any event, the earlier this
problem is identified and treated, the
better the chances for a more rapid and
complete recovery.
In summary, Anorexia Nervosa is a
multi-faceted disorder, with cultural,
familiar, and biological components.
Much is still not known about the disorder. College students that may be
sufferning from this disorder can get help
at the Counseling Center or from licensed psychologists.
Students Attempt to Unite Nationally
By Anthony Teski
On February 6-8, a national student
conference will be held at Rutgers University, whose purpose will be, according
to the organizers, "to build a national
student organization. This organization
will coordinate and organize national
response from students to U.S. sponsored
violent agression abroad, and racial,
sexual and economic inequality at home."
This would be an advance over the
present student movement in which isolation and fragmentation has led to a
decline.
The organizers' aim is to create a
democratic multi-issue national student
organization. The rejection of single issue
politics is an important step since all the
movements (the anti-apartheid, women's, and gay rights movements) are
intimately connected.
It is commonly thought that if you work
on a single issue, it is too easy to disarm
xrs
U.B
the movement by giving a few reforms.
The divestment movement is a good
example. The students who for the most
part shared belief in the above movements were demobilized wheni colleges divested when, if they had taken a
multi-issue approach more could have
been accomplished.
The organizers of the conference wish
to form a new S.D.S. (Students for a
Democratic Society) which was an organization popular in the 1960's. The
organizers are trying to recliam the legacy
of the '60's, and wish to learn from the
lessons and mistakes of the period's
radical movements.
The most recent letter from the host
committee said," we do not seek a coalition, nor do we intend on allying with
any existing political organization. We
are simply the youth of America, and we
demand to be heard."
STOCKTON STATE COLLEGE
African-American History Month Celebration
"Celebrating the Immovable Pillars of Our Heritage"
All
SUNDAY
MONDAY
A r t i f a c t s Exhibit
Library
Plav — "Purlie"
PAC — « 1 5 p m
L e c t u r e — "Black Malei A n
Endangered Species" — F r a n k l i n
Smith. B-I2b — 5:15 p m
Ebony Ensemble Concert
A - W i n g — 11 a m
In order for such an organization to be
strong it is important for it not to be
coopted into the Democratic party. Also
if it is to call itself the youth of America it
has to include working, and unemployed
youth. Organizing the youth of America,
starting with the students, should be the
aim of any national organization beginning at the Rutgers Conference.
How is this révélant to Stockton students? A student union would address all
the concerns of students from housing,
financial aid and admissions all the way
to International questions such as Palestine, the Persian gulf, and Central
America. The successes of the recent
student movements in France, Spain
and Mexico were due in great part to the
presence of, or moves to, form this kind
of organization.
C.B.F.S.
F E B R U A R Y 198 8
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
"Forus on Apartheid
Gallery —
Opening Réception
A n C a l l e r ) — 5-B p m
"Paintings by Watson & Edmond
anJ Sculptures by Wilkit"
E-Wimr
Panel D i s c u s s i o n — "Blacks in
Corporate America" — G e o r g e
Ballard, Greg Marks. " J a m e s
Wade. B-126 — 4:30 p m
Reception
FRIDAY
THURSDAY
Film, N - W i n g — 7 p m
10-4
pm
Speaker, Yusef A b d u l Ali
C C - 1 0 3 — 4:30 p m
Reception
Film, N - W i n g — 7 p m
Essav C o n t e s t Registration
Deadline
Film, N - W i n g — 7 p m
Essav C o n t e s t D e a d l i n e
L e c t u r e , "Sisters. Black is
Beautiful!" — Adeie Beverly
B 125 — 4 : 3 0 p m
P a n e l D i s c u s s i o n . "Black Women
Changing
Times"
C C - 1 0 3 — 5:15 p m
Speaker, Sister Falaka F a u h
B 1 2 5 - 4:30 p m
P a n e l D i s c u s s i o n . "Black on
Black Cnme" — W i l l i a m
Jaynes, CC-103 — 5:00 p m
" A n Show — M a r k S n e a d
E - W i n g C a l l e r y — 11 - 4 p m
L e c t u r e . " Empowering of the
Black Community: Linking History
and Problem Soiling" —
• M a v o r Primas of C a m d e n . NJ
B-126 — 4 : 3 0 p m
R e c e p t i o n (SJCPA)
& ItbrA
SAIURDAY
C A B A R E T , m u s i c b y Yusef
A b d u l Ali
N-Wtng — 7 p m
Film. N - W i n g — 7 p m
•Tentauvc
Essay Contest Reception
N-115 — 7 pm
A c t i v i t i e s c o o r d i n a t e d b y t h e U n i f i e d B l a c k S t u d e n t s S o c i e t y a n d C o u n c i l of B l a c k F a c u l t y staff
Page 4
ARGO
February 4, 1988
Editorial
While we were putting this paper together last night the Contras were being put
on hold. By a slim 8 vote margin the House killed Reagan's 36 million dollar
Contra aid proposal:
This will undoubtedly be viewed as a serious defeat for the President who's
been lobbying hard against the "communist influence" in Nicaragua for the past
two weeks. It also stands as a symbol of the harrowing end to the 8 year Reagan
Administration.
Meanwhile back in G-wing some of us rejoiced in the decision that may give the
Arias Peace Plan a chance...while others in the TV room anxiously waited for the
"St. Elsewhere" to come back on.
We will now return to our regularly scheduled program, already in progress.
OP-ED
Laurels & Darts
Laurel: To Congress for defeating
Reagan's request for Contra aid.
Dart:To Meal Plan for providing too
many twinkies and not enough hot
vegetables (potatoe chips don't count).
DarfcTo the Bowling Club for stealing
Tenant's Assoc.'s spot in G-Wing.
LaurekTo Jim Hollis for being a great
teacher.
LaurelrTo Student Services for realizing that the sidewalks shouldn't be
pulled in after 5:00pm On a college
campus and has extended its hours.
Dart:To Student Records for denying a
senior any of his pre-registered classes.
Dart:To all the professors who won't let
a second semester senior get into a class
to graduate.
LaurekTo A-Court of throwing a hell of
a party.
LaurelrTo Joe Rubenstein for daring to
go where no faculty member has gone for
years.
LaurekTo Frank Carr for not breaking it
up.
Video Conspiracy
To the Argo Staff:
I am not an avid video-game player.
Most games I have a great deal of trouble
with. Despite this, during the videogame craze of the early 80's, I read many
magazines dealing with electronic games.
One thing mentioned often was a disreputable, but legal, practice on the part
of the owners of video-game parlors.
It seems that, much like home videogames, arcade video-games have a skilllevel controller, usually 1 (easiest) through
"Join up,
or Pay Up!
99
By Mark Davies
Heard much lately about the Tenants
ARGO
Editor-in-Chief
Jennifer LaBarbera
Associate Editor
Business Manager
Lavent Cruictahank
Denise Klein
Photo Editor
Sports Editor
Tom Healey
Typesetter
Brigette Gebhard
Caroline Rubens
Creative Writing
Photography
Paul Glaser
Caroline Rubens
Wendy Robertson
John Cash
Art Editor
Type Assistants
Matt Ivans
Elaine Marley
Kristen Marley
Advertising Manager
Arts & Entertainment
Wendy Robertson
Caroline Ruben*
Production
Shari Conti
Nate Eaton
Tim Freund
Stu Mark
Lewis TeriyKevin Babcock Pete Yerrone
Staff Writers
Pamela Ash
Victor Crui
Mark MeCabe
Tara Kelly
James Grambart
Pete Morano
Tiffany Wilson
Dan Mushalko
Katherine Rondeau
F
The above people are the only ones qualified to represent the ARGO unless otherwise verified by
an ARGO staff member, The ARGO is a student newspaperpublished by the ARGO corporation
licensed by the Stçte of New Jersey. Subscriptions are $12 per school year. The ARGO
is located in G-206, (609)652-4560/4573. Business telephone (609)652-4298.
8(most difficult). In order to achieve
high turnover and big profits from these
machines, owners would (and will) automatically set the machines at the highest,
most difficult skill level.
I would like to know if this is a practice
in the N-Wing video game parlor. If so,
could the machines be set at a more
moderate level of skill? Not all of us are
tournament-level players.
Thank you
Rob Morris
Association? Probably not, although
this organization serves the Stockton
community in a variety of ways. It helps
run the most popular events on campus.
The Spring Challenge, which gets
thousands together for food, sports, and
the Battle of the Bands. Word also has it
that "wild parties" go on in the courts.
Originally the Spring "Bash" this allday party became the Challenge when
the drinking age was raised in New
Jersey.
To this you might say, "wow, sign me
up!" But I say let's take a harder look at
this -group (of which I am a member), and
remind ourselves of its original purpose-namely to represent student-tenants on
campus. In its present form it bears little
resemblance, for example, to a New
York City tenants group struggling to
fight for better living conditions. Rarely
are lists of demands or threats of rent
strikes presented to the landlord whent
the Association feels the rights of their
members have been violated. At Stockton we spent most of our time planning
picnics and theme parties.
On this campus we spend a lot of time
complaining about things, but very little
energy on action and organization.
Frustrated and angry, student-tenants
feel powerless and without a voice. I and
others in the Association feel a change of
focus is needed so that the real problems
of housing will be addressed (of course
the events, which contribute to the
quality of life in residential housing,
should not be ignored.)
Some date the history of our loss of
focus to a 1983 letter by the then President of the Tenants Association to Director of Housing, Ron Rice. In this letter
a strong and friendly relationship between housing and the Tenants Assoc.
was advocated. While noone can argue
that this is admirable, some have questioned that this "special relationship" has
gotten too cosy and made the organization ineffective in presenting a strong
critical voice when its concerns run
counter to Housing. Perhaps it is time
the Association re-think its relationship
to Housing and establish its own identity
in order that grievances stand a fairer
chance of being heard.
Last semester the Tenants Assoc.
took a positive step. It reorganized and
three committees were formed: Challenge, Meal Plan, and Housing. The
Challenge Committee now handles all
aspects of the Big Event, plus other
social functions on campus; Meal Plan
works to improve the quality of the food,
and Housing is specifically interested in
tenants' rights. This is a start toward
developing a more efficient organization
and hopefully there will develop quick
and fair mechanisms for addressing
complaints.
At present our effectiveness remains
to be seen. It took us so long to get our act
together, and now changes do not come
over night. The "events" mentality still
is pervasive, and we pay fine, after fine,
after fine. On a personal level I'm sure I
saw a cockroach dancing on my food,
my laundry tokens get eaten regulary,
and of course I still pay those fines.
There are 3000 prospective members on
this campus, it can't be that we all are
unconcerned. The time to speak up is
now, without organization nothing will
change-I say "join up, or pay up!"
Meetings of the Tenants Assoc. are
held every Tuesday at 8pm in G-208.
Letters should be addressed to the
Tenants Association, Upper G-Wing.
ARGO February 4, 1988
OP-ED
Page 5
Ronald Reagan's Worst Enemy
By James Grambart
The President's last State of the Union
message could only have come from
Rambling Ron. It was a hodgepodge of
self-praise (Nancy got her full share),
and meaningless platitudes. And it certainly underlined his contempt for Congress. Yet, after bad-mouthing Congress
on prime time television, he then solicited
its help in making his last year in office
also his best. Fat chance. If that speech
had any real result it was to more solidly
polarize Congress against him. You don't
make friends by belting them in the
mouth.
with arms sales. Note that our navy
convoys only American-flagged Kuwaiti
tankers that may be carrying oil from
both Kuwait and Iraq. Washington
doesn't object when Iraqi planes attack
ships carrying Iranian oil. The United
States is still officially neutral in the
Persian Gulf war but President Reagan
is certainly not.
So far Mr. Reagan's Persian Gulf
adventure (to which Congress objects)
has cost the lives of 37 sailors killed by
an Iraqi air attack on the US S Stark.
Had the attacking plane been from the
other side we might be in a shooting war
with Iran. No doubt, the President would
As I write this, Congress is debating
the wisdom of supplying more funds to
the Contras in Nicaragua which Mr.
Reagan has requested. The vote is due
Feb. 3 and there seems to be a fair
chance that further aid will be voted
down by a Congress still smarting under
the President's public rebuke. If aid is
refused it will be added proof that this
President is, in the eyes of Congress, a
very lame and a very dumb duck.
It will also indicate that Congress is
tired of throwing good money after bad.
After seven years it is beginning to sink
in that Reagan's War is not only morally
wrong; it can't be won.
While he studiously avoided mentioning it in his recent address, Mr. Reagan
will never live down the Iran-Contra
debacle which seriously wounded his
presidency and personally discredited
him. I suggest that our idiotic involvement in the Persian Gulf War and Reagan's frantic attempt to unseat Ortega
are both largely motivated by revenge. It
was Iran that alerted the world to Reagan's
attempt to ransom Middle East hostages
love to destroy the nation that blew the
whistle on his Iran-Contra scam.
And there's no doubt that he wishes to
destroy the Nicaraguan government that,
by its determined resistance, has cost
him so much political capital over the
last seven years. But Reagan has a
deeper motive.
Remember Senator Joe McCarthy,
R-Wis.,who, in the early Fifties, dismayed the country with tales of imagined
commie hordes infiltrating Washington?
Investigation proved old Joe was lying;
he was drummed out of the Senate and
wound up in a drunkard's grave. Well,
Mr. Reagan has a McCarthy mindset.
He sees a communist conspiracy in the
political evolution of every Third World
country struggling upward from colonialism. And if a bona fide conspiracy
doesn't exist, like the defunct McCarthy,
he manages to make one.
"I did not come to office to preside
over the communization of Central
America," the President recently declared. And through his proxy army, the
Contras, he is fighting to defeat what he
sees as New World communism.
Congress, however, doesn't see
Reagan's demons. Rep. Lee Hamilton,
D-Ind., says we have "a choice between
funding a war and supporting a peace
process."
Rep. Tony Coelo, D-Ca., House
jority Whip, says, "The Contras are a
destabilizing force", and that "we should
give the peace process a chance."
Coelo says he has the votes to "close
out Ronald Reagan's doctrine in Central
America." But Reagan says that if Congress turns down his Contra aid request
he will seek funds from "third countries".
His Iran-Contra cohorts, Poindexter and
North, tried that. They didn't dare ask
funds from democratic countries; Reagan's proxy war in Nicaragua has no
supporters in Europe or Japan. So they
went, hat in hand, to authoritarian councontinued on page 11
Now for the WHOLE Story...
By Staci Light
First of all, let's get things into perspective here. The Palestinian problem
in Israel occupied territory dates back
over twenty years. Let's also remember
that Israel did not seek to conquer its
presently occupied territories. In 1967
Israel was attacked by an overwhelming
number of Arab forces. Fortunately,
Israel held her own, and today the nation
of Israel still stands strong.
Over the past twenty years Israel has
repeatedly expressed a need to negotiate
the territorial problem. However, leaders
of the P.L.O. and Arab nations do not
recognize the right of Israel's existence,
and thus will not enter into talks.
On the other hand, the P.L.O. instigates riots because they want Palestinian casualties and deaths. For it is
these casualties that are the P.L.O.'s
best propaganda weapon. And the American media is eating it up. It is pertinent
to stress that the P.L.O. terrorizes Israeli's
as well as Arabs, thus they are able to
silence Arabs interested in negotiations
with Israel.
As to the enforcement procedures
practiced by the I.D.F.-What would
one expect a country to do when faced
with a chaotic and threatening situation
with public safety as an issue?
Also, it should be pointed out that
although the West Bank Palestinians
hold Jordanian passports, they are allowed and do work in the State of Israel.
Certainly a country as democratic as
America would applaud such an action.
But they don't. Maybe because America,
the home of opportunity does not allow
anyone who is not an American citizen
to work legally in the U.S. Come on
America, criticize when necessary, but
praise when it is due.
Furthermore, the press coverage by
American media giants such as ABC,
CBS, and NBC have shown a despicable
lack of professionalism. For example, do
you know that in Gaza the Egyptian
army opened fire (and they weren't using
Israeli rubber bullets) on Palestinian
protesters? Where was the American
media then? Moreover, much of the
violent "spontaneous protests" have taken
place only because the media was present.
It's great propaganda, and obviously, it
works.
David Bar-Illan in his article "Simplistically Blaming Israel" (The New
York Times,Dec 3,1987) stated that the
media coverage is, "Simplistic and superficial, it views the present situation
out of the context of history and offers
quick fixes without regard to consequences." Television's rebuttal:
. .(it)
must squeeze it's film footage into a
minidrama of the 7 o'clock news."
Another issue the media doesn't point
out is the many Israeli casualties and
deaths. For example, the media seems to
have a problem explaining what has
caused the recent outbursts of violent
protests. They seem to have forgotten
that a car containing terrorists armed
and laden with ammunition tried to enter
Israel through Gaza, and the shoot out
that occured because of it.
The media also seems to have had a
memory lapse concerning the Israeli
businessman that was murdered on Dec.
9, 1987 in Gaza. The party claiming
responsibility for die muderous act was
"Force 17 " - a unit of Yasir Arafat's
Fatah (extremist terrorist group.) With
800 American reporters stationed in
such a small country and Israel, I wonder
why none of them have been able to dig
up any of this documented information.
Or don't they want to?
In rebuttal to James Grambart's article
"Israel's Worst Enemy" in last week's
Argo, I must say get your facts together
before taking something out of context.
Grambart quoted "the 2.2 million Arabs
who live in Israel and the occupied
terrorists are an oppressed... underclass." First, any Arab living in Israel
has the vote, as well as every right that
any other Israeli citizen has, besides
entering the army. Even then, however,
Druse and Bedouin Arabs do participate
in army call. Secondly, the Arabs living
in occupied territories are not Israeli
citizens. Would you want peoples in an
occupied territory of the U.S. to vote in
our next election? Since the Palestinians
living in the West Bank are Jordanian
citizens holding Jordanian passports,
why doesn't Jordan's government step in
and help the situation? Moreover, if the
situation was so horrible in the occupied
territory, why don't they move and live
under Moslem rule? Could it be that they
prefer living in Israeli occupied territory?
Furthermore, why did Egypt abandon
their obligations to the Palestiniams in
Gaza? What I want to know is, since the
Palestinians are Arabs, why don't their
mother countries help provide for their
own people as the Israeli's do for the
Palestinians? Finally, I need to know
why Israel must take full responsibility
for the brunt of the criminal murderers.
The other Arab countries scream that
the 9 convicted murderous terrorists
should not be expelled, yet these same
countries will not grant entry visas.
As far as the U.N. is concerned, keep
your lousy votes and do something about
this age old problem in which nobody
wins. Either help peace negotiations or
keep your criticisms and opinions to
yourselves—actions speak louder than
words.
The W.Z.O. Information Department
sites the following as Israel's options:
1. Unilateral annexation of JudeaSamaria and Gaza District. At present,
both Arabs and Israeli's find this unacceptable.
2. Withdrawal from occupied areas
without negotiations. Obviously leading
terrorist activity to such( a great extent
that it would threaten Israel's very existance.
3. Maintain status quo. Legal and
political status of the Palestinian Arabs
is kept open until negotiations. Israel has
chosen this option, however, as previously stated, Arab leaders will recognize the State of Israel and thus refuse
negotiation.
Israel should and will continue to
maintain public order and safety, as well
as to continue to work towards a higher
quality of living for Palestinian Arabs
(although not citizens of Israel) in the
West Bank and Gaza.
ARGO February 4, 1988
Page 6
An Epic Work
By Elizabeth Schwartz
The Fords: An American Epic,
Collier, Peter, and Horowitz, David,
Summit Books, New York, 1987, 496.
The authors of The Fords: An American Epic, Peter Collier and David
Horowitz, are professional biography
writers who concentrated on presenting
an accurate history of the Ford family
and the Ford Motor Company instead of
the shoddy and currently vogue practice
of writing specifically to appeal to the
prurient attitudes of contemporary book
buyers. As a result of their professional
approach to their subject, it is apparent
that the authors had no "axes to grind"
or "hatchets to bury" with the Ford
family or the Ford Motor Company.
Conversely, the authors did not glorify
the Ford family or extol the policies and
actions of the Ford Motor Company
either.
Previous to writing The Fords: An
American Epic, Peter Collier and David
Horowitz (who both started out their
writing careers as reporters) collaborated on two other historical biographies
about wealthy and powerful Americans.
Their first effort, The Rockefellers: An
American Dynasty was a best-seller.
Their second book was the number-one
best-seller The Kennedys: An American Drama. Currently, they are involved in their fourth project together
and are working on a biography of the
Roosevelt families. It is this previous
background in writing historical biographies that lends credibility to the
authors point of view and their expression of it.
In short, what the authors examined in
The Fords were the effects of time,
ambition, and success on the Ford
family (and on a larger scale all American families of great wealth and
power). The author's point of view was
unbiased; giving credit where credit was
due, but they also presented unfavorable
points of the Ford family and Motor
Company as well. Consequently, The
Fords is much more than just a biography of the Ford family, it is a history
of one of the most powerful and influential families in the United States
and of their massive corporate empire,
the Ford Motor Company.
Of course, in a work history laden like
The Fords the authors view of the subject is constricted to what the documented evidence permits to be exposed
(as witnessed by the ample endnotes at
the end of the work). Remembering their
successful journalism backgrounds, the
authors reported the history of the Fords
as they uncovered it and shied away
from interpreting it. The book starts with
the early years of Henry Ford I and
carries the reader through three generations of one of the greatest families in
the history of the United States. By the
time the book closes over four hundred
pages later with Henry Ford II, the
reader has actually "experienced" the
Ford family. The Fords; An American
Epic is a must read for all people who are
interested in 20th Century American
history. In fact, I liked the biography so
much that I recommend it to anyone who
can squeeze the time in to their schedule
to read it.
ACROSS
1. Bottom
S. Bit; Scrap
8. Stop the flow
12. Range; scene
13. Each
14. Microphone (slang)
15. Circle
16. Resort bath
17. God of War
18. One who takes
another out
20. Without purpose
22. Narration
24. Fuss; Stir
27. Rough casing around
seeds
28. 4th letter, Greek
Alphabet
32. Pilgrim
34. Leaky
35. Tidbit
36. Age
37. Single
38. Uttering
41. Intertwined
44. Church platform
48. Claim; charge
49. Beverage
51. From Gr. Ares
(comb, form)
Editors Note: Elizabeth Schwartz is a
10th grade honors student at Southern
Regional High School in Manahawkin,
NJ. Her plans for the future include
going to college and then to medical
school, eventually establishing her own
medical practice. The ARGO staff
wishes to congradulate Elizabeth for
her excellent academic progress and
extends their best wishes for her continued success in reaching her goals.
A Dream
Come True
By Greg Cross
Todd M. Cohen, a Stockton alumnus,
made his television debut on KYW channel 3 Eyewitness News Nitecast as a
guest Arts & Entertainment critic on
January 29.
Cohen was a participant in Nitecast's
"3 Wishes" segment. The production
allows viewers to write to the station
with a "wish". If the wish is possible and
the viewer is selected, the station will
grant it and air it on the 11:00 news.
Cohen's wish was to review a show in
Atlantic City.
"I want to review a show in Atlantic
City just like Judi Barton," Cohen said.
Barton is the Arts & Entertainment
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A few weeks ago, Cohen got his wish.
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He got the chance to review "A.M.: A
blast From the Past," a musical appearing at Caesar's Hotel Casino.
The result aired Friday night.
Although his first television appearance, the segment wasn't his first review.
Back in 19.81, Cohen worked as the Arts
& Entertainment editor for The Argo,
reviewing movies and school productions.
Cohen graduated from Stockton in '82
with a B.S. in business. He now works as
a bookkeeper for an Atlantic City law
firm.
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2. Melody for one voice
3. Send (p.t.)
4. Ready
5. Rhea
6. Fix
7. Feature
8. Lesser
9. Wheel
10. Squeezes
11. Snafu
19. Gave back
21. Virgin Mary
23. Dog
24. Just
25. Daughters of the
American Revolution
(abbr.)
26. Shout of approval
29. Card game
30. Brewer's vat
31. Enzyme (suf.)
33. Afternoon show
34. Hawaiian dish
36. Oldest
39. Slack off
40. Lens
41. Bad case of
the
42. Wealthy
43. Air (comb, form)
45. Lope
46. Airy; aerial
47. Spoils
50. Copper or bronze
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ARGO February 4, 1988
Page 7
Art.... . Entertainment
Business....
Spectacle....
"Company" -Marriage and the Single Guy
By Len Holmin
While the rest of the Stockton community retreated into their Winter break,
a predominantly student cast worked
full-time under professional theatre rehearsal conditions. The resulting production of the Stephen Sondheim musical comedy "Company" directed by
Mary Meikleham, enthralled the audiences which filled Stockton's Experimental Theatre during the first of two
weekends of the show's performance.
Five married couples in New York
City try to convince their favorite unmarried friend Robert (played by David
Ihrig) tht he's overdue to take a wife. At
the same time, they realize how dependent they are upon "good ol' available Bob" to lend an objective ear to
conflicts within their own relationships.
As the play unfolds, Robert struggles to
discover the meaning of marriage and his
married friends do their best to help him
do so, each in their characteristic way.
city, an effect which enhanced the imThe show was performed on a set
aginative, energetic choreography of the
(designed by Michael Kleintop) conshow.
sisting of multi-level platforms with
The emotional involvement of the cast
minimal suggestion of the environment.
was often intimate, and the casting
Each married couple made their 'home' _ seemed to be consistent with many of the
on a different level of the set, with a
strengths which have been displayed by
central space which changed from Robthese actors in previous workshop proert's apartment to a disco bar to a living
ductions. At the same time, a developing
room in which Robert's surprise birthair of professionalism was apparent in
day party was given. This use of the
their performances.
spaces created illusions of rooms which
Although the dialogue often contained
shrunk, expanded, and flowed into each
glaring indications that the show was
other, and of the events taking place
written with an older cast in mind, a
simultaneously in different parts of the
contagious sense of fun pervaded the
The Last Emperor
Graces Towne 16
By Carl DeVecchis
Opening Friday at the Towne 16 at
Shore Mall is Bernardo Bertolucci's incredible epic, "The Last Emperor". The
movie is an offering which reflects the
theater's new program to present an "art
film" in one of its cenemas at all times.
The low price matinees ($3) make it a
bargain, too.
Bertolucci's epic is the true story of
PuVi, the last emperor of China, and
follows his life, from his unexpected
ascension to the throne, at the beginning
of the century, all the way to his death in
the wake of the Cultural Revolution. It
has been aptly contrasted with other
epics in that it is not a story about a man
who changed history, but a story about a
man who was swept along by it.
The powerful visual images of the film
become apparent in the first minutes as
Pu is taken from his mother and summoned to Pekings's Forbidden City. He
has been chosen by the dying emperor as
his successor. The child is presented to
what appears to be thousands of servants, warriors, and other subjects who
simultaneously prostrate themselves
while arranged in regimented rows and
dressed in brilliant silken robes of every
possible color and description. The
irony is that Pu is too young to know the
significance of what has happened to
him. He only misses his mother and
would prefer to play with a grasshopper
performances, allowing the production
to claim it's own special character and
entitling it to a few quirks.
Outstanding was the fast, frantic
"Getting Married Today" performed by
Catherine Hernesh, solo and intricate
duet with Charlie Abbate singing a
counter melody, "Today Is For Amy."
A touching, bittersweet rendition of
"Sorry Grateful", a song about a husband's mixed feelings about marriage,
was performed by Michael Hinman,
Thomas Presti, and the vocally impressive Darrell Hill.
The leading role of Robert was a
progression for David Ihrig who reached
an emotional pitch during his performances of the longing lonely song, "Being
Alive."
The single women in Robert's life
were portrayed by Carolyn Foti, giving a
bubbly characterization of a dumb
stewardess. Spike as a city girl giving a
melodious performance of "Another
Hundred People", and Cindy Hawkins
who gave a skillful solo performance of a
risque night club style dance.
Jody Hatcher and Kathy Murphree
were hysterical as zany home-bodies,
and Patricia Hall Carver was spicy as an
abrupt and predatory swinger. Craig
Hunt and Noreen Lynch as a divorcing
couple convincingly and humorously
punctuated Robert's double-take as they
announced their separation.
The ensemble performance was
smooth and expressive during the warm
theme of friendship "Side by Side".
Final performances of this production
of "Company" will be given in the E.T.
on Feb. 4-7 at 8pm, with a 2pm matinee
on Sunday. Admission is $5.00 or $250
for Stockton students.
AUDITIONS
Stockton Experimental Theatre
Saturday, February 6, 1988
1 lam-5pm
For Workshop one-act plays by Anton
Chekov and Israel Horovitz, and for the
mainstage production "Enter Laughing" to be presented in the PAC.
1
By the time Pu reaches the age of six,
the currents of history have limited his
actual rule to the palaces of the Forbidden City and he is, in effect, imprisoned there. He is not even allowed to
leave for his mother's funeral. So, although the movie is a big-budget extravaganza, it is also the personal story of a
young man living a life he did not choose
and could not change.
The movie continues with Pu's exile,
subsequent installation as the puppet
leader of Manchuria during the Japanese
occupation, capture by the Chinese
communists, and life at a camp where he
is "reprogrammed". Finally the film
ends with his happy life as a humble
gardener.
John Lone plays the character of Pu
both effectively and convincingly. Other
noteworthy performances are given by
Joan Chen, as the lovely and insightful
empress, and Peter O'Toole as Pu's
English tutor. The production crew includes some of the most talented people
on three continents. The costumes and
setting are unsurpassed.
It will be a great injustice if "The Last
Emperor" is not at least nominated for
best picture at the Academy Awards.
The highest honor will more than likely
be reserved for an American film.
The longest walk.-photo
Acoustic guitar masters Leo Cocky
and Windam Hill recording artists
Micheal Hedges will appear in concert
by Caroline
Rubens.
on Feb. 13th, at 8pm at the Count Basie
Theater, Red Bank. For ticket infornation call (201) 842-9000 or (201Y
653-5633.
Page 8
ARGO
February 4, 1988
The Noyes Museum: Little-Known Local Treasure
Thinking the South Jersey arts scene
was virtually non-existent and traveling
as far as Philadelphia or even New York
in search of quality museums, I was
pleasantly surprised to find an alternative right under my nose here in Galloway Township. Located just 4 miles
from Stockton State, overlooking picturesque Lily Lake, sits the only museum in South Jersey-The Noyes Museum. Nestled on a small rise overlooking
the lake and adjacent to the Brigantine
National Wildlife Refuge, the buildings
facade has the appeal of a sea-weathered
boathouse. Inside, the crisp line and white
walls are offset by exposed wooden
beams and a clever series of skylights
that spread a soft, warm light through its
five galleries. Greeted in the main gallery by its' director Anne R. Fabbri, we
toured the exhibits and discussed the
architecture, the collections, and the
constant struggle for public recognition
waged by its' small staff.
"Unfortunately", Ms. Fabbri says,
"some people think we are attached to
the wildlife refuge and are diss appointed." Actually, one room does hold
a collection of hand carved duck decoys
with a full-time carver, Gary Giberson,
on hand for demonstrations. This room
reflects the life-long love of Fred Noyes,
a local artist and carver, who with his
wife Ethel endowed the 4 million dollars
that began the museum. But this is but
one facet of this electric museums' holdings and temporary exhibits. Strolling
through the rooms, quality is the word
that comes to mind: The quality of the
furaishings-Kandinsky chairs and American Indian rugs (c. 1860); the quality
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of the architecture (even the flooring,
which is made up of individual pieces of
end-grain fir); and most importantly the
quality of the artwork itself.
The permanent collection houses
works by contemporary artists mainly,
but not exclusively, from New Jersey.
The styles range from abstract expressionism to photo-realism. Ignorant of
local artists, the strength of these works
are extremelv evident, especially the
centerpiece, "Hesperus" by Walter
Darby Bannard, an imposing statement
on movement and light.
A traveling exhibition, the Discerning
Eye: Prints, traces the process and aspects of printmaking and includes an
impressive array of works by the likes of
Albrecht Durer, John Stewart Curry,
and Milton Avery.
Another one of the galleries holds the
recent work of sculptor Gerald Lynch, a
local artist whose work was seen in the
1985 Academy Award winning documentary, "The Stone Carvers." Working exclusively with the human form in
the almost forgotten medium of marble,
he is directly linked with the styles and
traditions of the past. His timeless
themes of love (The Lovers, 1986) and
fear (Angst, 1986) are mixed with
homages to the past (Temple Ruins,
1987, and Demi-urge 1986). But these
works are not merely historical exercises for in each work, especially "The
Bag Lady" "Radiation" and "Beauty/
Decay" is embodied the fragility of
modern life.
Ms. Fabbri and her staff are responsible for bringing in the fine artwork that
graces this building. Talking with her
and two of her assistants, Stacey Smith
and Bonnie Bird, the sense of frustration
caused by a lack of recognition of this
fine institution is palpable. The problem
is that not enough people know what or
where the museum is and what treasures
lie waiting within. In the 75 minutes I
spent touring the museum and chatting
with the friendly staff, the only other
patrons were a group of third graders
watching a decoy carving demonstration. As I stood in the main gallery that
looks out over the lake (a unique innovation in museums is a large wall of
glass that lets nature be part of the
gallery) a lone iceskater pushed a puck
up and down the otherwise deserted
surface of the lake. Each of us was
perfectly content in our solitary worlds,
but that is a shame for such a wonderful
place like the Noyes Museum and its'
staff to hold but one observer.
Located on Lily Lake Road in Oceanville, just one tenth of a mile from route
9, the Noyes Museum is open Wednesday to Sunday, 11 am to 4pm. Admission for students is just .$50. Visit and
enjoy, the staff would be glad to see you.
Upcoming events include a juried exhibition open to any artist currently
working or living in New Jersey and
working in the media of fiber, wood, or
metal. For details write to: the Noyes
Museum, Lily Lake Road, Oceanville,
NJ 08231.
Unscrambling Your
Psych at 3:00 A.M.
By Caroline Rubens
Anyone who finds themself doing
homework with the TV on into the early
morning hours may stumble upon the
curious program "Getting In Touch"
with David Viscott.
The early morning schedule goes as
follows: "Letterman" ends, but Dave
lost interest half-way through the show
and so have you, "Love Connection"
comes on and Chuck "didja' get any?"
Woolery plods through a series of
humiliating date-failures, "Hour Magazine" brings Gary Collins, the captoothed wonder, who stumbles over,
under and around such issues as aids and
Western Omlettes and finally, that
theme, which sounds like the opening to.
a show that is going to be really sensitive.
It wafts over the airwaves like an alarm
that the paper is due in a few hours and
yes the sun is going to come up again
today goddamit.
The announcer says "Welcome to
'Getting In Touch' with psychiatrist
David Viscott. Today David will be
talking with Jeff, who hates his parents,
Stacey, who cannot leave her home
except to be part of studio audiences and
Marta, who likes to eat and doesn't know
why."
When we first meet David he is
usually sitting sensitively within the
audience. He has a sensitive Jack Kennedy-haircut and is probably forty-five
but has kept himself looking thirty-five
because he is so sensitive. He chats with
an audience member or two about sensitive things and breaks for a commercial.
Ready to tackle the first problem,
usually the most serious of the polled
audience, David sits in a chair across
from the "patient" on a soundstage
made to look like a $100-an-hour
analysts' office. The set-up reeks of
contrived professionalism. Leaning intently forward, he vigorously probes the
patient. "So Jeff, why do you think you
hate your parents?"
Within the first two minutes, Jeff
remembers that they kcked him out of
the house when he was seven years old.
" So what does that say to you Jeff?" Jeff
is thick and does not make the connection, but the audience knows—we
are in on it. David makes us say "C'mon
Jeff stop rationalizing, stop projecting,
stop (fill in anh psych 101 term). David
finally says "C'mon Jeff! stop blocking!" (so that's it! What a sensitive guy).
David says "Now Jeff, I want you to call
your parents and ask them why they
kicked you out of the house when you
were seven. Will you do that for me
Jçff?"Jeff relents just in time for the
commercial.
The "patients" are rarely in shadow
(only upon request) and the announcer
assures us that "these are not actors but
real people." Yet it is difficult to understand why people would go on national television and spill their guts: the
lure of being famous for 15 minute?
David's winning haircut? Or perhaps the
American addition to quick-fix ie.'T can
have my hamburgers in five minuteswhy not my mental health?"
Stacey can't leave her home because
she likes food and Marta likes food
because she can't leave her home. We'll
be back after these messages.
I wonder what Jeffs parents will say
when he confronts them. Maybe they've
already seen the show. Maybe they've
been on it.
SUPER ROSES!
SINGLE OR BY THE DOZEN
Balloon
Beautiful Cut Flower
Arrangements
Arrangements
ALL YOUR VALENTINE
m
NEEDS
GODFREY ASCHMANN
FLORIST •
652-0734
it
717 South 6th Ave,
Absecon Highlands
m
Page 9
ARGO February 4, 1988
BULLETIN
PUBLIC HEALTH SOCIETY
A new club is forming in the interest of
Public Health. Our first meeting of the
new year is Tues. Feb 9 4:30 to 5:30 in
N110. All welcome.
Washington Internships
The only time this semester to get on
the mailing list and meet with former
Washington Interns will be on Thur.
Feb 18, in B-126 at 4:30pm. Internships
are available for all majors, not only
BSNS and POLS. You receive 12-16
credits, and the cost is only about $600
more than an on-campus semester at
Stockton. In order to make sure that the
credits earned in Washington fit within
the 128 required for graduation, students
should plan for this as early as possible.
W.L.F.R. A C A D E M I A
Want to get a 4.0 GPA? Join 91.7
W L F R F M Lake Fred Radio. (Just
kidding about the 4.0)
Need Help With 88-89
N J F A F Forms
Come to G-208 on 2/5-12:30, 2/811:30, 2/9-2:30-6:00,
2/10-10:00,
2/11-3:30.
Deadline for the 88-89 N J F A F is
March 1. Any questions contact the
Financial Aid Office.
Thirst Quencher
A weekly support/discussion group
for students concerned about their alcohol/drug use and its resultant problems.
STUD SENATE ELECTIONS
Student Senate petitions will be available starting on Feb.9. Any Stockton
studfent who submits a valid petition by
Feb. 19 may be elected to serve on the
1988-89 Student Senate. Students must
have a voice in a community oriented
around them. Be a part of the voice. Pick
up your packet in any campus activities
office, information booth, or student
services offices.
Circle K International
Circle K International is a unique
organization for Stockton students. It is
sponsored by Kiwanis International and
emphasizes three major areas: service,
leadership, developement, and fellowship. Through these areas members
build strong lives which in turn build a
better world. Circle K'ers grow, develop
and mature by performing service that
challenges the members. Why not learn
more about Circle K? Open House Feb.
28, N-110, 6:30-9:00.
CLASSIFIEDS
RESUME'S PROFESSIONALLY
DESIGNED AND PREPARED
Reasonably priced package includes
ten copies of typset quality, personal
interviews, and a personalized cover
letter. All information electronically
stored. We specialize in resume's for
management. Call the Business Center
at 272-1707.
LADIES
New company looking for serious
minded people to earn $2000 plus a
month. N o investment. Call Donna or
Marc at 266-0669.
FREE ROOM & BOARD
In exchange for babysitting two nice
little boys. Beautiful Margate home.
Must love kids. Car necessary. Preferably non-smoker. Call 822-4277.
FOR SALE
Beer signs, mirrors, lights and neons.
Call 652-2557, ask for Bill. Reasonable
prices.
«MaPaEMOaBBBBKSMOtgWB»**^^
D O YOU PLAY K E Y B O A R D ?
Are you interested in joining an established rock band on Stockton's campus? If your answer is yes, contact Alan
or John in C - l 1, 652-5901, for an audition. Must have your own equipment.
In-No-sense.
TEACHERS STUDENTS, O F THE
WORLD UNITE
You have nothing to lose but your
chains. What's the key to economic
freedom? Capitalism. How do you escape the tedium of the desk? Free enterprise. seize ownership of the means of
retail distribution! Become an amway
distributor. Call 484-2880.
YOU W R I T E , I ' L L T Y P E
$ 1 per page. Editing available two day
turn around for papers. Call Beverly at
652-2402.
s
TRIJMP PLAZA
HOTEL AND CASINO
COME MEET WITH US
Saturday, February 6, 1988 10:00 A.M.-6:00 P.M.
at
MISSISSIPPI A V E N U E A N D T H E B O A R D W A L K
A T L A N T I C CITY, NJ 08401
C H E L S E A ROOM A & B (SIXTH F L O O R )
FULL-TIME.
PART-TIME,
AND SEASONAL
POSITIONS
FOR A D D I T I O N A L
INFORMATION CALL:
609-484-7660
JOB HOTLINE 609-484-7686
CAGE CASHIERING
CASINO GAMES
PIT C L E R K
SECURITY
SLOT CASHIERING
TRUMP PLAZA IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
SUBJECT TO THE RULES AND REGULATIONS OF THE NJ CASINO
CONTROL COMMISSION.
B O A R D \
S.A.V.E.
Stockton Action Volunteers for the
Environment (SAVE) Meetings every
Tues, at 4:30 in F-212. See you there.
LOTUS W O R K S H O P
On .Thurs., Feb. 11, the BSNS
C O M P U T E R LAB will present an introduction to the spreadsheet package
L O T U S 123, at 4:30 in room D-108.
Topics discussed at this session will
include how to load, save, and edit
worksheet files. Everyone is invited to
attend. You may wish to bring a formatted disk with you.
SAVE A L I F E
C P R classes will be held starting
Feb.4 at 7:00 p.m. in K102 and Feb.5 at
the same time. Save a life.
ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES
Starting Feb. 16, WLFR will air a new
weekly radio series entitled "Environmental Issues of South Jersey". The
series will explore such issues as hazardous waste, ocean pollution, and overdevelopment. The first program in the
series will consist of an essay presented
by Bob Hughey, former commissioner of
the Dept. of Environmental Protection.
Bob Hughey's essay, "Environmental
Problems: A Regional Perspective" will
be aired on Tuesday, Feb. 16 at 8:00
p.m. and be rebroadcast on Sunday,
Feb.21 at 2:00 p.m.
LIFESAVING
From Feb.9 tp March 10 get your red
cross card! Only an $8.00 fee is required.
It takes place from 7-10 p.m. in the pool,
bring your suits!!
PERSONALS
To Sue Bell
Thanks for the Air matress. It felt good.
You know who
Janice P
Poodles suck!
You know who
Frank
Hi. how are you. I miss you. give me a
call.
Love
Your best buddy. Brigette
Lynn
Have camera, will travel.
Angie
Your the best sister-daughter an AGD
could ask for.
Love yoour sister-mom
Maureen
George
Happy Anniversary, It's been the best
six-years of my life.
Love Maureen
Nina.
Shut your hole, Woman.
Love your AGD Roommie
Maureen
To the newly installed officers of Sigma
Sigma Sigma.
Congratulations! thank you for your
never ending devotion to Tri Sigma. It's
gping to be a great semester!
Love your sisters
Special thanks to all those who attended the
Sigma Sigma Sigma-AGD rush parties.
We hope you will discover the many
treasures of sisterhood.
Love, the Sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma
Piatt, Dor & Endres
Thanks for taking my mind off things this
weekend. I'll miss you guys next year!
Love ya Py
CJC
I just want you to know that no matter
what you'll always have a special piece of
the PY!
Love always Mary Py
WANTED
A few good women to join the great
organization. Alpha Gamma Delta, the
opportunity of a life time. Call 652-6633. or
652-1401
T o Matt, Mop, Bean, Nancy Sushie,
Wrecker, Claus, Erin and Brainless
Thanks for making me feel at home. Let's
keep on partying!!
Manhmellow
Val
Congratulations on becoming a sister.
Love you AGD mom
Darryl
You know it seems "silly" or maybe
"friendly," but I love you.
Love Renee
Suprêmes
You guys are the best.
Love a Supreme
Hey Dudes,
Where the heck's the exit sign? Ant
knows.
Mop
Genius
Steamboat and Jumpin Jay
Cheers to you for Friday Night. I hope
you find the chairs comfortable at the
Arrowhead because we know that you guys
will be passed out inthem! Are you sure you
don't need a handicap?
Shell & Bell
Congraduations to the new iniates of Alpha
Gamma Delta!
Michele, Sue, Debbie and Stacey
To the AGD Pledges Class fall 87
We all need someone to lean on! We
made it. Thanks foe everything!
Love ya'll
Dana
Dear LB, Sue. Mb & Bridget,
You all make the word friends really
stand out. Thanks for all your help.
Love Doreen
Dear Jeff,
I love you. My college life would never
have been the same without you.
Love Doreen
To my sisters
WHERE'S THE PENNEE?! I can't
find it! Maybe it's in the peenee bowl.
Guess Who!
Butch
Thanks for making things a little more
interesting!
Love ya Rosie
(Cathy & Lisa
This is our last semester together-but our
friendships and sisterhood is forever. I love
you guys!!
Erin
Dionysus:
You know the deal . ..It's time to take your
paycheck and spin the wheel. Don't trust
anyone with a smile. Male bonding forever!
Love ya oodles
A-hole
Donna G
Hope you get the Birthday present you
wish for G 2.
Love your favorite roommates!
mare, Bora & Py
Lauren
So it's been three months who would of
thought that game of quarters would have
meant so much to me. you're a great person.
I love ya babe. Let's finish this Saturday
night.
John
To the sister of AGD who have supported
me You guys are what sisterhood is all
about! Remember, the future is in your
hands.
Valerie
Hey Bean,
Lisa B & Doreen,
Let's be buddies forever. The mikes
Thank you for showing me the true
would like it.
meaning of sisterhood!
Love Bear
Love Lynn
Ricky
Val
Thanks for the Hot Toddy & ride
You are the best roommate ever. I am so
Love Lucy
glad we became such good friends.
Frank.
Love Lynn
These have been the craziest best and
Petie
happiest three months or so . You have an
Sorry for being so inconsiderate. I still
angel and make it so easy to love you
love you!
Pesha
Love Dj
Smooch
To a certain WLFR DJ
Terruso,
Thanks for the compassion during the
Who the -uck is Meisner?!
Rock Block. We feel our entertainment was
Faithfully,
consistent even with our difficulties.
The Stanislavskians
Syndicate
To My A G D Sisters
Your the best
Yoosas Erin
Best of luck in the upcoming elections.
Let's make Spring 88 the beginning that will
Parakalo. sygnomy, merenda, B-52's.
truly
never end.
are you homesick yet? I think we need a
Luv
Glifada night!
Love Your Little Doe
Your treasurer
DEar Joni
Dear Bimbo, Bandit, & Daughter
I really lucked out when I got you for a
You three are the best roommates anyone
roomie! It's going to be a great semester.
could ask for. Thanks for all the ftin so far.
Love Susan
Can't wait to make tots more.
Ria
Love you to death
Thanks for bailiing us out. Have a great
Chow Chow
semester.
Your favorite Roommate
Love the ARGO
y
Michele Moodey
"Sittin on the dock of the Bay" David
Letterman Rules.
You know who
PS Porche sucks
To F-22
Thanks for making me believe in friendship again. And thanks for a temporary
home!
Love Darn
To F-5
Thanks for a great apartment! I love it!
Thanks Dana
Dear New pledges of AGD
Congratulations and welcome to this
chapter!
Love
All the AGD sisters
Dear Val
Don't ever give up! I love you sis!
L/jve lis»
Lynn
You're irreplaceable.
Val
Carrol
Do you want to go crazy?
God
Dogs of war
Aw Aw Aw Absolutely Bad Ass!
Matt
Did you know that cats can become
addicted to beer?
Pauli
The SSC Public Health Society will be
havingfa meeting on tues.,. Feb. 9, 4:305:30 in N-UO
All Welcome
Dear Erika & Robyn
Happy 21st Birthday to both of you!
You've been great roommates and I miss
living on campus with you! Be merry!
Love Sharon
Kris ten
I love you
Jimbo
KRH
Take your time, but 2 1/2 years?
Spike
Kris
I live for your love!
JJ
K. Ross
How about you and I do some foul shots?
Spike
To B-cups
You are the greatest. I love the idea that
you sleep in the nude.
Spike
Brent
Brent
College radio's just not the same without
you! Happy belated Birthday.
Love ya
Jennifer
Tino,
Let's go "all night" bowling at the
Showboat!
Love
Your bowling partners
PS Don't forget your ball
Ria
Happy Birthday! friends forever!
Love ya
Dennis
Earthpeople
Let's go hack outside the E-wing Gallery.
You bring the Merle Haggard, well be the
one's in tye-dye.
We love ya
Brigette
Only approximately seven more hours to
[email protected](@*)®-)1-l-K*A«%$®1®!n
Snake
Krissy
Do you want to wrestle? Ill bring the mud
JL
Krissy
Let's
To everyone who helped make my birthday
so special: Thanks for everything. You
made my 25th something I'U always
remember. Ole!
Love Brent
Nancy P., Anal
Here's to raising Heil in Florida!!!! And
don't forget we have to visit Mickey, and
Donald Duck. Disney Land here we come!!
The Gidge
ARGO
Page 10
Some Answers
Am I a simple person
with very complex thoughts,
needs, desires?
or
Am I a complex person
with very simple thoughts
needs,desires?
What is simple?
What is complex?
Why can't I be both?
What am I asking you for?
Some Answers.
Adam Berardo
February 4, 1988
Missy
I didn't have a dime
yesterday
And who knows what comes with
Tomorrow
Today,
I am wealthy
For I have you
Thank you Adam for such a dream
as I can have while wide-awa ke
And if she be nothing more than a dream
than all the better to live by
For should I realize she were not a dream
what good would it be
Stu Mark
2/2/88
To have her; and her in me
but to live in sleep without ever knowing
Martus
•••••DECADENCE*****
DO THE DECADE DANCE
DO THE DECADE DANCE
WE'RE WORKING FOR WAR
TO BUILD OUR AMMUNITION
THEN WE LEAVE IT UP TO RONNIE
TO MAKE THE BIG DECISION
CAUSE IT'S EASY TO BE
BUT YOU KNOW IT AINT FREE
TO DO THE DECADE DANCE
HE'S THE MAN WITH THE PLAN, WHO'LL DO WHAT HE CAN
BUT HE NEEDS ADVICE JUST TO CROSS THE HALL
AND HIS FUNHOUSE MIRROR SAYS HE'S TEN FEET TALL
JUST A YEAR AWAY
AND WE'RE GONNA GET READY
IF YOU DONT HAVE A DATE
YOU CAN BRING YOUR TEDDY
YES YOU CAN DO IT HARD
YOU CAN DO I T FAST
BUT IF YOUR GONNA DO IT
YA GOTTA FORGET THE PAST
AMERICA WE ARE
AND WE LOOK SO PRETTY
BUT THE OTHER FOLKS SAY
THAT WE SMELL REAL SHITTY
• Just those crazy idealistick 60'swasn't viet nam some fast food
Chinese
dish.
AND DO THE DECADE DANCE
DO THE DECADE DANCE
WE DON'T CARE
ABOUT WHAT THEY HAVE TO SAY, BECAUSE SOONER
OR LATER THEY'RE GONNA HAVE TO PAY TO DO THE
DECADE DANCE
DO THE DECADE DANCE
DO THE DECADE DANCE
CAUSE IT'S EASY TO BE
BUT YOU KNOW IT AINT FREE
TO DO THE DECADE DANCE
DO
DO
DO
DO
CAUSE IT'S EASY TO BE
BUT YOU KNOW IT AINT FREE
TO DO THE DECADE DANCE
THE
THE
THE
THE
FREEDOM FIGHT
CONTRA SCAM
CONDO
WALL ST. SLAM
EAT ALL YOU WANT
YOU GOT THE ELASTIC WAIST
BUT WHAT YOU DON'T WANNA EAT
YOU CAN THROW OUT TO WASTE
WE USED UP OUR LAND
NOW IT'S YOUR TURN TO PLAY
SAY THE MAGIC WORD
AND WE'LL INVADE YOU TODAY
• Some say that our inflation of invasion
got so out of hand, that we were invading countries to overthrow dictatorships that we had just finished instituting during ourprevious invasion...A in't
that somethin
IF YOU LIKE TO SHOP
TO EASE THAT CONSUMER FIX
BUY ANYTHING YOU WANT
DO IT JUST FOR KICKS
* But you gotta be very careful, because
most foods these days consist of so
many preservatives that it would take
H NDR S
F
F F Y F N /° R ! H E F FOOD,TO BJ°:
degrade....kinda
ion
HELLO GEORGE, MACY, TOM, AND VISA
WE'RE DROPPING BOUNCING CHECKS
FROM THE TOWER OF PISA
isS
I'M SO HAPPY WITH MY FEET ON THE GROUND
SO HAPPY, MY HEAD SPINS AROUND
QUITE CONTENT TO SIT ON THIS FENCE
QUITE CONTENT NOW A LITTLE BIT OLDER
LOVE AND ROCKETS
like historical
nutnt-
Paul Giaser
am, was
and always will be
most essentially
me
§11
M a r k Arillius
Page 11
ARGO February 4, 1988
continued from page 1
years or so, history has treated blacks,
women, and hispanics fairly.
"Training in graduate schools in the
sixties brought attention to these weaknesses. An excellent pluralistic perspective on American history is taught
now throughout the United States,"
Gilmore said.
Events have been planned throughout
the month to raise the historical consciousness of the community. Today,
"Focus on Apartheid" is scheduled in
the E-Wing gallery.
continued from page 3
in future columns I'll take on: Democrats and Republicans: a comparison of
their records on women's rights, the
presidential candidates: views on women's issues, and an examination of new
laws that try to curb past victories of the
women's movement. Sisterhood and
Peace.
FIGHT
24.17 SEP'79
TOOTH
continued from page 5
tries like Brunei, Saudi Arabia and Taiwan. It was a sorry sight occ ixcagan s
minions asking foreigners for funds to
support a policy that had been condemned
by Congress.
Still acting as bag man for the Contras,
Reagan said he would tell Congress
before sending them any more arms. But
Congress, remembering the illegal and
secret arms supplices revealed by the
Iran-Contra hearings, see no reason to
truse him. Once bitten, twice shy.
National polls have repeatedly shown
that the American public is against further aid to the Contras and Congress is
well aware of that fact. If Mr. Reagan
lacks public support for his undeclared
war against Nicaragua he has only himself to blame. The self-destructive IranContra debacle proved he is his own
worst enemy.
Is your computer syntax
throwing a loop in your
schedule?
Is getting a proper meal
an exercise in quantum
mechanics?
Fear not. Domino's Pizza
will give your brain a
break as well as provide
nutritious energy.
We deliver made-to-order
pizza in 30 minutes or less.
DECAY
Bulletin
Board
SPRING CHALLENGE
Spring Challenge is coming, and the
time is now to get organized. We are now
accepting ideas from clubs to participate
in Spring Challenge by sponsoring an
event. If your club or organization has an
idea for Spring Challenge, please get in
touch with Jim Averell as soon as possible (phone num 652-6084, Room A307
or upper G-Wing. Deadline: Feb.23,
1988.
SCUBY DUBY DO!
That's rieht. scuba at Stockton! For a
mere $135.00 fee, you can learn how to
scuba dive. You also get text, pool and
classroom work, boat fee for two ocean
trips and equiptment rental fee for certification dives. Starting Feb 8 to March
9, 6:00-10:00 in the Pool! Be there!
T H E O U T D O O R S CLUB
The Stockton Outdoors Club is looking
for new members. Joining the club is a
great way to meet many exciting people
and to have fun hiking, canoeing, white
water rafting and camping in the great
Y outdoors. It's the perfect way to get back
to nature. If anyone is interested please
contact Paul Chambers in Athletics or
Joe Archer Box 4681.
Now, that's a formula you
can't afford to miss!
Call us.
484-9696
782 White Horse Pike
Absecon
Our drivers carry less
than $10.00.
Limited delivery area.
©1983 Domino's Pizza, Inc.
Now Hiring Drivers
TOURNAMENTS
It's tournament time again! Starting
Tuesday, Feb.2, will be the beginning of
the spring semester game tournaments.
This semester we will have competition
in Trivial Persuit, Pool, and Air Hockey.
Trivial Persuit has a group competition
so if any club or organization would like
to sponsor a team please contact Julie
Onnembo at Ext.4706 during the evening
hours. The tournaments take place every
Tues., Wed., and Thursday, at 8 p.m. in
the N-wing gameroom.
Guest Speaker
Find out what's really going on with
guest speaker: Ephraim Segoli. When?
Tuesday, February 9th, Time? 4:30pm,
Place? CC-103. Join us and find out:
what caused the recent violent outbreak
in Gaza on the West Bank? Sponsored
by the Jewish Student Union.
ARGO
Page 12
February 4, 1988
SPORTS SPORTS SPORTS SPORTS
NJAC Title Is Up For Grabs
By Curt Simmons
Stockton's Men's basketball team knew
last week was going to be a challenge,
with co-leaders of the NJAC, Jersey
City and Trenton, visiting on Wednesday
and Saturday. Stockton faced Jersey
City and lost Wednesday night 86-82.
That set up Saturday's Trenton showdown as a must-win situation for the
Osprey's. And win they did: 73-70. The
week that looked as if it would answer
questions about who would be the top
team in the conference did not. The three
teams are still tied for first place in the
conference after last week's action.
Jersey City came to town with revenge
on their minds after losing at home to the
Ospreys earlier in the Season. At the
tipoff the Stockton faithful were at fever
pitch and our men got off to a strong
start. Stockton jumped out to a quick 206 lead and it looked like this one might be
a slaughter. Michael Menefee led the
offensive charge early on with most of
the starters getting into the act.
The tide turned quickly though, as
Jersey City closed the Stockton advantage as quickly as the Ospreys had
opened it. Jersey City used pressure
defense to keep the Stockton men off
balance offensively and narrowed the
Osprey lead to two points at the 10:40
mark in the first half. For the rest of the
half neither team could get a decided
advantage.
The second half was a different ball
game. After a small scuffle around the
halfway mark of the half, the refs tightened their grip on the game and didn't
really let the players get back into a
natural flow. The refs' tightening of the
game combined with Jersey City's pressure defense kept the tempo to Jersey
City's liking. Stockton's failure to figure
out a way to break Jersey City's full
court pressure consistently, cost them
the game. Jersey City also went to the
reserves often, and this helped them in
executing their effective pressure defense.
Jersey City began to open up a fairly
comfortable lead at about the 15 min.
mark of the half and it seemed as if the
game was over. Stockton didn't give up
though and Jersey City almost let the
Ospreys steal the game from them at the
end.
Stockton's
fouls and Jersey City's
inability to hit the clutch and shots down
the stretch together with some clutch
shooting by Stockton's men almost led
to an Osprey victory.
mm-
George Briscoe puts one up and over Jersey City's
Jack Cipriano.
Caroline Rubens' Photo
OSPRE Y SPORTS SCHEDULE
-WOMENBASKETBALL
-MEN2/6 Rutgers University <è Newark ( A ) 8;00pra
2/6 Salisbury Sta$a Cfclteg® (M«iytewl) 5:30pts
2/8 N Y Umvemty @ New Plat* ( A ) 8:00pm
2/10 Rutgers University # Cmvteti (A) 5<50pm
2/10 Rutgers D i v e r s i t y % Camden ( A ) 7;30pm
2/13
fcamapo
Colles»
(A)
2:30pm
r
2/13 Raroapo College (A) 4:30pm
-IN0OOR TRACK"
a/5 M^îrosè-Madïson Spare .Ctade»,NY City
FENCING.
2/7 Delawe
2/13-2/15 Junior Olympics, Cleveland OH
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Bowling League Begins
By Greg Cross
The Stockton Bowling League got off
to a flying start Monday night as 50 plus
students showed up to exhibit their bowling skills (and lack thereof). The opening
night was very informal, with teams
being formed and the members bowling
to establish averages.
A few teams returned from last year
including the fall semester champs HardO
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balls and the Golden Surfil. Mostly the
league attracted a number of new faces,
with next week's turnout expected to be
even bigger.
Competition between teams begins
this Monday so it's not too late to still
join. Individuals are especially encourageed to come out to fill up the short
teams, while there are a few team spots
still available.
FREE
EYE SCREENING
Saturday afternoon the Stockton gym
was again at fever pitch with anticipation.
All eyes were on 5'7 "junior Greg Grant
of Trenton State College. The incredibly
quick Grant came into the game as the
nation's leading Division III scorer averaging over 32 points per game. However, the Stockton defense, led by George
Briscoe, effectively shut down Grant
holding him to less than half of his
season average. Brisco's offensive production suffered slightly but he did an
excellent job keeping the ball out of the
speedy Grant's hands.
Ray Magee got a jam and two blocks
by the midway point in the first half. Pat
Mullahey (from Wayne) added two steals
but Stockton was still down 13 -10 at the
10:35 mark.
The first half, though it was played
well by the teams, can be summed up in
two words: poor officiating. Stockton
had 7 fouls and was in the penalty when
Trenton State received its first foul. The
total count at the end of the half was 7-3,
and the score was 33-37 in favor of
Trenton. The fans were all over the
officials and from were I sat it was
justifiable. It seemed as if every time
Trenton State got the ball in the point
and missed a shot, it was an automatic
foul on Stockton.
Pat Holdon, who got off to a rough
start when he missed a free throw by
three feet as the fans cheered "air ball",
got things turned around quickly for
himself. Holden, Grant's backcourt partner and co-captain, reaped the benefits
of Stockton's justified preoccupation with
Greg Grant.
Holden finished with 19 points, Grant
wound up with only 16 points, and was
held to two three pointers by my count
Jimmy Glover rounded out the top scorers for Trenton with 15 points. Glover
scored most of his points with good
hustle on the offensive glass.
Stockton State, on the other hand, was
led offensively by Ray Magee with 23
points. Magee also added a couple of
dunks, a breakaway layup, a key steal,
and by my count, three blocked shots on
defense to pace Stockton. Marc Kleinman
had a strong offensive showing with 14
points, many of which came on the
offensive boards. Michael Menefee, the
polished freshman, had his usual strong
performance scoring 13 and George
Briscoe added 11.
In the second half, the game seesawed
with each team playing strong defense
and smart offense. Trenton tried to apply
full court pressure on Stockton, attempting to take a page out of Jersey City's
book. Stockton broke the press effectively
with smart, crisp passing. The game
went down to the wire with the outcome
in doubt until the final seconds. George
Briscoeywith nerves of steel, sank 5 of 6
free throws, in the clutchjwith less than
40 seconds remaining in the contest.
The only real answers produced by
this week's action were that these three
teams (Jersey City, Trenton, and Stockton)
are very close talent wise and very
competitive. The quality of play was
extremely high. Let's just hope our men
don't have a let down this week.
Fencers off to Junior Olympics
By Pete Verrone
Next weekend the Fencing Club will
travel to the Stouffer's Plaza Convention Center in Cleveland Ohio to participate in the Junior Olympics,an
annual tournament in which the top
three fencers from divisions across the
country compete for the honor of being
number one.
While having nothing to do with the
traditional Olympics we've all grown to
know and love, the Junior Olympics is a
highly regarded national competition
where scouts get the chance to see the
upcoming hopefuls for the national
team. Our fencers earned the chance to
compete in this prestigious event this
past December at the South Jersey
Division Junior Olympic qualifiers at
the Southern Regional Middle School in
Manahawkin NJ. In the under twenty
men's sabre competition, fencing club
president, John Modlin took first place,
& sophomores Bruce Johnson and
Frank Bauman took second and third. In
the under twenty men's competition
Tom Rosa from Salle Bosco fencing
Academy finished first while John
Modlin took second and Frank Bauman
third. The same three people took the
same positions in the under twenty
men's foil competition. The Stockton
fencers, along with coach Bruce Canino
will travel to Ohio Friday the 12th and
battle for three days before returning
home on Sunday.
Next Week In Sports:
by Dr. Lloyd Pritz
-Women's Basketball update
CAMPUS HEALTH SERVICES
NEXT VISIT
Wednesday
February 10, 1988
1:00-5:00pm
Appointments Necessary, Call ext. 4 7 0 1
-Jeanine Taylor is EC AC player of the month
- M o r e Basketball
-Intramural Results