Document 69144

been involved in this endeavor on a number of fronts. The success that this group has achieved in a
very short time has been nearly awe-inspiring. Grant monies have been secured for property acquisition. A “Riverscape” planning document has been created. Most importantly, a road map for using a
community asset that has not been accessible to most of our population has been put into motion.
3. New Terre Haute Children’s Museum Project – Few would argue that our children are our most
precious assets. Anything we can do as a society to spark our children’s enthusiasm for learning will
be paid back one hundred-fold in the future. An idea for a new museum facility to spark our children’s
imaginations is literally taking shape before our eyes at the southwest corner of Wabash Avenue and
8th Street. This new multi-million dollar facility would still be a pipe-dream but for the initiative and
generosity of its board of directors and literally hundreds of supporters who range from individuals
who purchased bricks as part of a fund-raising initiative to multi-billion dollar corporations that have
made six-figure donations. Again, the common goal of a better future for our children is the tie that
binds the hundreds of individuals who have made our new children’s museum a reality.
4. Rural Health Innovation Collaborative – Terre Haute’s Rural Health Innovation Collaborative, or
RHIC, is an aggressive initiative to respond to current and anticipated health care worker shortages in Vigo County and surrounding rural communities. From an economic development standpoint,
however, it can also be seen as an initiative to leverage significant, long-standing assets for the purpose of creating new job and investment opportunities in our community. Although only a few months
old, the RHIC initiative is gathering great momentum and holds the promise of being a significant
economic development engine for our community for a long time to come. Once again, this effort
would not be possible except for the vision of long-time members of our local health care and higher
education communities coupled with the on-going work of numerous representatives of the RHIC’s
founding members.
Shown left to right: Steve Witt, President; Mark Fuson, Chairman
LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT
So, there you have it – four significant local initiatives that are driving our community forward.
Each was conceived right here in our community. Each is being made possible by local residents
who share common visions for a better tomorrow. Without question, these initiatives serve as
examples of what we can accomplish primarily through the talent and resources already contained
within the community.
In regard to economic development, particularly during challenging economic times, it is understandable that one may feel a bit of helplessness. Events set in motion a world away from Terre Haute/Vigo
County, Indiana can have consequences – both good and ill – for our local area economy. With this
fact in mind, one may wonder: what can a local community do to make itself more attractive for future
economic development opportunities while improving the quality of life for its residents at the same
time? A great question, because I have a great answer – four answers, in fact. Indeed, four significant
initiatives are under way in our community that will make Terre Haute/Vigo County a better place to
live, while making us more attractive for future economic development. These projects include...
Preferred Concept
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ENHANCEMENTS
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1. On-going Downtown Redevelopment – Enumeration of all the initiatives and projects (along
with the individuals involved) associated with the redevelopment of Terre Haute’s downtown over
the past many years is beyond the scope of this document. However, with regard to private sector
investment, I would submit that downtown redevelopment commenced in the late 1980s with
the construction of First Financial Bank’s downtown headquarters facility. This investment led the
way for many other private sector investments (both large and small) over the years. This string of
successes continues to this day with the recent announcement of the new Barnes & Noble bookstore facility to be constructed near the intersection of 5th and Cherry Streets. The revitalization of
downtown Terre Haute would not be where it is today except for the efforts of literally hundreds of
individuals over the years who all shared a common vision of a revitalized downtown.
The New Terre Haute Children’s Museum
OVERLOOK
OFFICE/ MIXED USE
BOARDWALK
BARK PARK
FAIRBANKS PARK
WILDLIFE REFUGE
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RIVERFRONT
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SIGNATURE
PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE
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2. Wabash Riverfront Development Initiative – The Wabash River is one of our community’s most
recognizable assets. The effort to envision a better future for our riverfront property can be traced
to our community’s strategic planning efforts of nearly 10 years ago. A small community working
group known as Community Appearance and Environment spawned the riverfront visioning initiative.
Again, much like downtown redevelopment efforts, dozens – if not hundreds – of individuals have
Wabash River Development and
Beautification Inc. (WRDBI)
Vigo County Area Plan Commission
In association with:
PASSIVE RECREATION
PARK / EQUESTRIAN
TRAILS
TROLLEY
TURN-AROUND
US 41 STREETSCAPE
ENHANCEMENT
TRAILHEAD
Shown left to right: James Buechler, M.D., Director Emeritus, Richard G. Lugar Center for Rural Health; Steve Witt, President, Terre Haute EDC;
Honorable Duke Bennett, Mayor of Terre Haute; Jeff Pittman, Chancellor, Ivy Tech Community College-Wabash Valley; Daniel Bradley, PhD, President
Indiana State University; David Doerr, President and CEO, Union Hospital Health Group; Stephen Leapman, M.D., Executive Associate Dean for
Educational Affairs, Indiana University School of Medicine.
Pictured below: Alorica’s energetic people thrive at keeping the customers who call in happy, while making Alorica a fun, motivating place to work.
Top-right: Travis Vickers, Site Manager, comments on Alorica’s history of expansion and on the great workforce Terre Haute has to offer. Bottom-right:
Mayor Duke Bennett and Steve Witt officially open Alorica’s Terre Haute facility for business.
...it is believed that the
development of the
Collaborative will lead
to neighborhood
revitalization and
economic development in the general
geographic area
between Indiana State
University and Union
Hospital.
RURAL HEALTH INNOVATION COLLABORATIVE:
Transforming Terre Haute for Generations to Come
“Transforming Terre Haute for Generations to Come!” was the headline of the press release that
accompanied the announcement of the Rural Health Innovation Collaborative on December 2, 2008
at the Landsbaum Center for Health Education in Terre Haute.
The Rural Health Innovation Collaborative, or RHIC, is a collaborative effort of Indiana State
University, Union Hospital and its Lugar Center for Rural Health, Indiana University School of Medicine
– Terre Haute, Ivy Tech Community College, the City of Terre Haute and the Terre Haute Economic
Development Corporation. It is expected that the RHIC will continue to evolve through discussions
and inclusion of additional partners.
At its core, the formation of the RHIC evolved as a topic of informal discussions over the past couple
of years as part of partnership efforts to expand Indiana University School of Medicine – Terre Haute
to include a four-year rural training program for medical students. During these informal discussions,
local leaders recognized that tremendous resources already exist within Terre Haute to respond to
current and worsening health care worker shortages. In addition to addressing workforce needs, it
is believed that the development of the Collaborative will lead to neighborhood revitalization and
economic development in the general geographic area between Indiana State University and Union
Hospital. More specifically, it is anticipated that business expansion and attraction activities, training
and research endeavors, rural health care services activities, and physical infrastructure build-out will
help transform this near-northside area into an economic growth engine for the greater Terre Haute
community for decades to come.
For a fledgling initiative less than six months old that is not yet a formal, legal entity, one would
be hard-pressed to find another community initiative (in this community or elsewhere) where the
enthusiasm for the cause has been so contagious, so quickly. It is believed that over 50 representatives from the six founding members are already passionately engaged in the various working groups
and committees associated with the RHIC. With this type of enthusiasm and passion for the cause,
great things are bound to result from this Collaborative for rural health innovation.
ALORICA, INC. CREATES OVER 800 NEW JOBS IN TERRE HAUTE
“It is our goal to help
increase the potential
for future job growth
in Terre Haute while
fulfilling the needs of
our clients.”
-Andy Lee, Founder and CEO
On May 15, 2008, California-based Alorica, Inc. – a leading customer service management firm – announced the opening of an in-bound customer service center at 1800 Fort Harrison Road. At the time
of the announcement, Alorica projected the creation of 600 new jobs by the end of 2008. In fact, by
March, 2009, the company had created over 800 new jobs with plans to grow even more through the
balance of 2009.
Alorica is a technology company headquartered in Chino, California. The company has 13 locations
and more than 7,100 employees worldwide. Since its founding in 1999, Alorica has experienced staggering year-over-year growth fueled by its rapid expansion in the U.S. and global marketplaces. The
company is a leading customer service management firm that manages the entire customer lifecycle,
from front-office customer interaction to back-office fulfillment. Alorica delivers fully integrated services such as customer interaction management, service logistics, depot and onsite repair services,
as well as total eBusiness solutions.
“It is our goal to help increase the potential for future job growth in Terre Haute while fulfilling
the needs of our clients,” said Andy Lee, founder and CEO of Alorica, at the time of the project
announcement.
At the project announcement ceremony, Steve Witt, President of the Terre Haute Economic Development Corporation, added, “It is the rare economic development project that creates 600 new jobs in
one fell swoop. We welcome Alorica to our community with open arms. We anticipate the company
will enjoy great success in Terre Haute.”
Indeed, we welcome Alorica and look forward to the company’s continued growth and prosperity
here in our community.
Governor Mitch Daniels chats with Terre Haute EDC President Steve Witt at the annoucement of Alorica’s new Terre Haute facility.
The Kellogg project
was truly a team effort.
Officials from Kellogg,
the Indiana Economic
Development
Corporation, Vigo
County, the Town
of Seelyville and the
Terre Haute Economic
Development
Corporation all worked
together to make this
project a reality for our
community.
CHEMGEN CORPORATION ESTABLISHES BIOTECHNOLOGY
PRESENCE IN TERRE HAUTE
KELLOGG COMPANY ACQUIRES SEELYVILLE
FACILITY: 300 New Jobs to Be Created
Observant passers-by of the former Alpharma facility at 1st and Hulman Streets have likely observed
a great deal of activity at the facility since June, 2008. This activity can be attributed to ChemGen
Corporation’s acquisition and refurbishment of the former Alpharma plant site for the production of
ChemGen’s proprietary biotechnology products.
While our nation’s economy continued its recessionary downward-spiral in Autumn of 2008,
our community received exciting economic news in the form of Kellogg Company’s announcement
that it had acquired the assets of IndyBake Products LLC as part of Kellogg’s plans to expand its
snacks products production capabilities.
Founded in 1985, ChemGen is a Maryland-based biotechnology company that specializes in developing products through the use of microbial fermentation technology. The company’s mission is to discover and commercialize novel feed enzymes. Its most well-known product, Hemicell® Feed Enzyme, is
patent-protected and is registered and sold worldwide for use in poultry, swine and other animal feed.
In addition to pioneering the development of enzymes for use in soy-containing feeds, ChemGen also
was instrumental in the innovation of post-pelleting application techniques for the addition of smallvolume liquid ingredients to animal feed, and was the first company to provide the feed industry with
an enzyme assay service to ensure the proper application of the enzyme product to the feed.
Kellogg Company is, of course, one of the world’s most respected and well-known company brands.
Founded in Battle Creek, Michigan in 1906 by Will Keith (W.K.) Kellogg, the Kellogg Company today
produces cereals, snacks and meal alternatives under the brands of Kellogg’s®, Keebler®, Pop-Tarts®,
Nutri-Grain® and Kashi® to name a few. The company has grown steadily over the years from the
manufacture of its first product – Kellogg’s Corn Flakes® – to the world’s leading producer of
convenience foods including cookies, crackers, toaster pastries, cereal bars, fruit snacks, frozen
waffles and veggie foods. The company’s total annual revenue exceeds $11 billion.
Specifically in regard to its new Terre Haute facility, ChemGen has been diligently making improvements to the 67,000-square-foot facility for the manufacture of new products. The company will be
creating 20 new engineering, production and administrative jobs at the facility within two years, with
the potential for another 10 or more positions thereafter. The average annual salary for the new jobs to
be created will exceed $50,000 per year.
At the time of the project announcement in May, 2008, ChemGen president Bernie Treidl stated, “We
are pleased to be joining the Terre Haute community, an area known for extensive technical capabilities, including pivotal historical involvement in industrial fermentation. ChemGen plans to use the new
production facility to bring novel feed enzymes to the global marketplace.”
We look forward to ChemGen becoming a part of our community’s continued legacy of significant
industrial fermentation research and production.
“We are pleased to be
joining the Terre Haute
community, an area
known for extensive
technical capabilities,
including pivotal
historical involvement
in industrial
fermentation.”
-Bernie Treidl, President
In addition to the approximately 210 hourly, salaried and contract positions that were in place to
operate the IndyBake facility prior to the Kellogg acquisition, Kellogg anticipates the creation of
another 315 hourly, salaried and contract positions over the next three years, thus bringing total
employment to the Seelyville facility to over 500.
“Expanding our snacks business is a key element of Kellogg’s business strategy and commitment to
driving sustainable growth,” said David Mackay, President and Chief Executive Officer of Kellogg
Company in a statement released September 3, 2008. “This acquisition will help us expand our
capacity to manufacture existing and proprietary snacks products as well as enable new product
innovations.”
The Kellogg project was truly a team effort. Officials from Kellogg, the Indiana Economic Development Corporation, Vigo County, the Town of Seelyville and the Terre Haute Economic Development
Corporation all worked together to make this project a reality for our community.
TERRE HAUTE EDC STAFF
Left to right: Claudia Tanoos,
Steve Witt and Lisa Johnson
ABOUT THE
TERRE HAUTE
EDC
The Terre Haute Economic
Development Corporation
team works to grow
employment opportunities,
population, and tax base to
strategically position our
community to better compete
in the global economy, to
facilitate the creation of
high-paying jobs, and to
retain graduates of our higher
education institutions.
WHO IS THE TERRE HAUTE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION?
To be successful, an economic development organization must have dedicated and committed partners that will work together toward
improving the economic climate of the community and region. The Terre Haute Economic Development Corporation is fortunate to
have just such a group of investors. Together we make things happen! These community and regional partners are:
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Mark Fuson
Chairman,
Terre Haute New Car Dealers Assoc.
Rick Jenkins
Chairman Elect,
Rick Jenkins Construction
Greg Gibson
Vice Chairman,
Retec
Tom Dinkel
Immediate Past Chairman,
Sycamore Engineering
Brian Miller
Secretary/Treasurer,
MillerWhite, LLC
Mayor Duke Bennett
Member,
City of Terre Haute
Rick Burger
Member,
Duke Energy
Jeff Pittman
Member,
Ivy Tech Community College
Paul Thrift
Member,
ThompsonThrift
PRIMARY MEMBERS
Deron Allen
Indiana American Water Company
Judy Anderson
Vigo County Commissioner
Carole Barr
Western Indiana Employment & Training Services
Roberto Bohrer
CSN, LLC
Rick Braden
Landstone Building Products
Jeff Heffner
CertainTeed
Don Schroeder
Old National Bank
Dr. Daniel Bradley
Indiana State University
Chris Hill
Terre Haute Regional Hospital
Jeff Smith
Princeton Mining Company, Inc.
Jim Burdick
Wabash Valley Asphalt
Jennifer Isbell-Scott
Vectren
Mark Unger
Freitag-Weinhardt
Anibol Carlo
Pfizer
Dr. Jerry Jakubowski
Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology
Brian Wells
Bemis
Irene Christophers
Time Warner Cable
Archie Kappel
Clabber Girl Corporation
SUPPORTING MEMBERS
Andy Hendricks
Distributors Terminal
Bart Colwell
Terre Haute Savings Bank
Cliff Lambert
Terre Haute Department of Redevelopment
Kenny DePasse
Republic Services of Indiana
Lisa Lee
Workforce Network, Inc.
David Doerr
Union Hospital
Norm Lowery
First Financial Bank
Tim Dora
Dora Brothers Hospitality Group
John Lukens
Forrest Sherer
Earl Elliott
Sackrider & Company
Paul Mason
Vigo County Commissioner
Galen Goode
Hamilton Center
Jennifer McCammon
Harris Bank
Tom Gregory
WIN Energy
Barry Miller
Novelis
Dennis Handschu
Aisin Brake & Chassis
Michael Mitchell
Sony DADC U.S. LLC
David Hannum
C.H. Garmong & Son
Michael Pleasant
Plumbers & Steamfitters Local 157
Brian Harris
Eli Lilly & Company
Dave Pluckebaum
The Corradino Group
Rick Harruff
CDI, Inc.
John Ragle
Ragle & Company
Fredia Haviland
Kelly Services
Tim Schooler
Fifth Third Bank
Andy Theisz
HNTB
ASSOCIATE MEMBERS
Nancy Dowell
Vigo County Public Library
Rod Henry
Terre Haute Chamber of Commerce
Tom Long
Terre Haute International Airport
Dave Patterson
Terre Haute Convention & Visitors Bureau
Turk Roman
Terre Haute City Council
Darrick Scott
Vigo County Council
Danny Tanoos
Vigo County School Corporation
The Terre Haute Economic Development Corporation is a gateway to connect and assist business development, growth,
and diversification. The THEDC is a public-private not-for-profit economic development organization.
630 Wabash Avenue, Suite 101 • Terre Haute, IN 47807 • Ph: 812.234.2524 • [email protected] • www.terrehauteedc.com
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