Hathaway Scholarship not keeping up with costs Yellowstone sees

MONDAY
January 5, 2015
129th Year, No. 192
Serving Sheridan County,
Wyoming
Independent and locally
owned since 1887
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
75 Cents
Hathaway
Scholarship
not keeping
up with costs
CHEYENNE (AP) — The
state of Wyoming's
Hathaway Scholarship program isn't keeping up with
rising costs of attending the
University of Wyoming or
the state's community colleges.
The state started the
Hathaway Scholarship program in 2005 to assist qualifying Wyoming high school
graduates.
The Wyoming TribuneEagle reports that some
state lawmakers are considering whether the state
should act in the legislative
session that starts Jan. 13 to
increase awards under the
program.
Other lawmakers say the
best time for approving an
increase in scholarships
may be during next year's
budget session. The
Legislature last year
approved a 5-percent
increase.
Education Committee coChairman Sen. Hank Coe is
a Cody Republican. He says
he may support legislative
action approving another 5percent increase, but wouldn't favor making future
increases automatic as
tuition costs rise.
Yellowstone
sees rise in
marijuana
cases
CHEYENNE (AP) — An
increasing number of visitors to Yellowstone National
Park are being prosecuted
for possessing small
amounts of medical and
recreational pot, which
remains illegal on federal
land.
Park rangers attribute the
trend both to ignorance of
federal law and the growing
prevalence of legal pot in
other states, including
neighboring Colorado,
which has legal medical and
recreational marijuana.
The U.S. Attorney's Office
in Cheyenne reports it prosecuted 21 marijuana cases
from Yellowstone in 2010
and 52 in 2013. As of Dec. 17,
the office had handled 80
cases in 2014.
Those convicted of misdemeanor possession commonly receive a $1,000 fine.
SEE MARIJUANA, PAGE 2
Press
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PHOTOS, VIDEOS AND BREAKING
NEWS UPDATES
SHS wrestling not
phased by change
of opponent. B1
Bring on the snow
Weather
hampers
repeater
repair
BY HANNAH SHEELY
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — A repeater
used to page volunteer firefighters to fires, medical
emergencies and vehicle
accidents in Sheridan
County that went down
more than a week ago has
yet to be repaired.
‘Our goal is to make
sure everybody in
Sheridan and the county is
safe; this just makes it
harder.’
Bob Williams
Chief, Goose Valley Fire Department
The repeater services all
volunteer departments in
the county including Goose
Valley, Clearmont,
Ranchester, Dayton, Big
Horn and Story. Sheridan
Fire-Rescue uses a different
repeater and is still able to
transmit and receive pages.
It had been hoped on
Friday that a helicopter
could access the repeater
located at more than 9,000
feet on Little Goose Peak so
crews could make repairs
over the weekend. A helicopter was located but pilots
said the flight could not be
made due to the snowy and
windy weather conditions.
County Emergency
Management Coordinator
Dave Coleman said he spoke
with radio technicians on
Friday who said they would
get up to the repeater to fix
it as soon as they were able.
However with more snow
predicted — as much as 2
feet at Burgess Junction —
Coleman said crews may not
make it up the mountain
until Wednesday or
Thursday.
Rocky Mountain
Communications is the company working on fixing the
tower, Assistant Sheridan
County Fire Warden Fritz
Bates said.
Crews that were able to
access the repeater last
week said they found frozen
batteries and a generator
buried beneath 6 feet of
snow, Coleman said.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Dennis Bacon runs his snowblower in front of his neighbor’s home Saturday morning in Sheridan. Sheridan received several inches of snow Friday night and early Saturday morning, creating a lot of work for Sheridan residents and snow
removal crews.
More accumulation
expected this week
SHERIDAN — So far, it’s been
winter as usual, according to staff
with the National Weather
Service out of Billings, Montana.
National Weather Service
Observations Program Leader
Larry Dooley said snow accumulation in the Sheridan area has
been close to normal.
The National Weather Service
keeps records on snow events and
accumulation from trained cooperative weather observers. Dooley
said records were not up-to-date
for any stations in Sheridan but
did note that observations at
Burgess Junction showed 35.1
inches of snow accumulation to
date on Saturday, with two primary snow events Dec. 13-15 and
Dec. 22-26. The storm over
Christmas dropped approximately
20 inches at Burgess Junction.
An observation point in Story
showed a total of 28.5 inches of
snow in December, with a current
accumulation of 14 inches. Over
Christmas, Story received approximately 15 inches.
Dooley said more snow was
expected in the Sheridan area this
week. Today, there is a 100 percent
chance of snowfall with 2-3 inches
predicted. Another 1-3 inches is
expected Tuesday and into
Wednesday. Dooley said no heavy
snows are expected, just steady
accumulation for a couple days.
There could be heavier snowfall
and accumulations in higher ele-
vations.
High temperatures will range
between the low 20s to low 30s
throughout the week. Low temperatures will bounce from 12
degrees tonight to 3 Tuesday
night, 20 Wednesday night and 4
degrees on Thursday night. Wind
chill values tonight through
Tuesday night could be as low as 5
below zero.
Wednesday and Thursday are
expected to be partly to mostly
sunny before a chance of snow
begins again Friday and into the
weekend.
While the snowfall may be normal, it has still kept snow removal
crews with the city, county and
Wyoming Department of
Transportation busy. Snow
removal efforts by the numbers
for city, county and WYDOT crews
are as follows:
City of Sheridan
Sheridan County
WYDOT
Up to the storm on Christmas Day,
cumulative snow removal statistics for
Sheridan are:
• Miles of road plowed: More than 12,000
• Snow hauled: 33,216 cubic yards
• Ice slicer applied: 400 tons
• Salt brine applied: 2,850 gallons
• Man hours worked: More than 1,750 hours
• Total snow removal budget: $460,000
• Total spent to date: Approximately half
of the budgeted amount of $460,000
Snow removal statistics through Dec. 31 for
Sheridan County crews include:
• Miles of road plowed: Approximately 500
• Man hours worked: 816.5 hours
• Total cost of removal, including personnel
and equipment: $70,000
• Comparisons: Through Dec. 31, 2013, man
hours were 1,422.5 and total cost was
$136,628. Through Dec. 31, 2012, man hours
were 681 and total cost was $67,300.
• De-icer applied: Approximately 600 tons.
Snow removal statistics for WYDOT crews
in Sheridan County, not including Burgess
Junction, from Oct. 1-Dec. 31 include:
• Man hours for snow removal:
5,581 hours
• Equipment hours for snow removal:
4,322 hours
• Salt/sand used: 3,437 tons
• Liquid brine dropped: 51,749 gallons
• Liquid geo brine dropped:
13,600 gallons
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SEE REPAIR, PAGE 2
Federal regulations —
with big impacts in
Wyoming — up in 2015
Scan with your
smartphone for
latest weather,
news and sports
BY BENJAMIN STORROW
STAR-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER
The Keystone XL pipeline
garners most of the energy
and environmental attention
in Washington. But the
pipeline's fate is secondary to
implications for Wyoming in
2015.
Here is a look at five of the
The Sheridan Press
144 Grinnell Ave. Sheridan, WY 82801
307.672.2431
www.thesheridanpress.com
www.DestinationSheridan.com
biggest federal regulatory
issues of the year ahead:
Clean power plan
President Barack Obama's
signature environmental policy would reduce American
carbon dioxide emissions 30
percent of 2005 levels by 2030.
The rule is aimed at exist-
Today’s edition is published for:
Mildred Boardman
of Sheridan
ing coal-fired power plants,
which accounted for 42 percent of the country's carbon
emissions in 2011.
Obama has argued that the
measure is critical if the
United States is to spearhead
a global effort to combat climate change.
PEOPLE
PAGE SIX
ALMANAC
SEE REGULATIONS, PAGE 2
3 SPORTS
4 COMICS
5 CLASSIFIEDS
B1
B4
B5
A2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
SPD traffic stop results
in drug-related arrests
BY KELLI HEITSTUMAN-TOMKO
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
SHERIDAN — Patrons and employees of
the Holiday gas station on North Main
Street were surprised by an arrest at the
pumps Friday evening.
Three police cars boxed in a vehicle at
the outer gas pumps as it pulled over in
MONDAY, JANUARY 5, 2015
response to a traffic stop. According to Lt.
Tom Ringley of the Sheridan Police
Department, the stop was precipitated by
a call from a concerned citizen.
“It was another example of a member of
the community calling to report a potentially dangerous situation,” Ringley said.
According to police reports, a passenger
of a vehicle heading north on Main Street
was hanging out of the window yelling at
pedestrians. An officer responded to the
call, pulling the vehicle over, and was
backed up by two additional cars.
The occupants of the vehicle, Jody
Campbell, 45; Michael Bowman, 24; and
Everett Newell, 34, all of Sheridan, were
arrested on drug charges and are expected to appear in court Monday afternoon.
REPAIR: Dispatch has ability to utilize E-dispatch, but process time consuming
However, Sunday night there were several medical calls
to which Rocky Mountain Ambulance and SFR responded,
Final causes for the repeater going down have not yet
making GVFD next in line for ambulance service.
been specified.
Williams said police dispatch tried to page Goose Valley
“They know what they need to do to get it fixed; it’s just a twice, but the pages did not go through.
matter of getting up there,” Coleman said.
Williams and GVFD firefighters have been scanning
Last week, crews installed a portable repeater tower on a radio frequencies on their pagers to try to follow what is
hill in Big Horn, but its reach is limited and success with
going on. Williams can also sometimes get through to his
pages has been spotty.
firefighters on a direct channel on the scanner. He cannot
Coleman said a radio technician found a broken jumper
page them directly in that manner, but sometimes they can
wire inside the portable repeater and fixed it on Friday.
hear him and respond to the station.
The technician said test pages were sent to all volunteer
All the medical traumas cleared up Sunday night, but
fire departments and that the transmissions were success- shortly thereafter, there was a one-vehicle rollover in the
ful.
5900 block of Coffeen Avenue, which is GVFD’s district.
However, reports on the success of pages are conflicting.
Dispatchers said over the radio that they had attempted
Goose Valley Fire Department Fire Chief Bob Williams
to page the GVFD, but the page would not go through.
said the portable repeater was working, as far as he knew,
Williams had a crew at the station on standby when he
on Saturday. Sunday morning, it also appeared to be work- heard SFR get paged to the rollover accident.
ing because Ranchester and Dayton volunteer fire depart“Fortunately we could hear Sheridan Fire’s radio traffic
ments were able to receive pages. Williams said the transbecause they are on a different repeater system than we
mission was scratchy, but that he could hear them being
are,” Williams said. “Dispatch called me on the phone then
paged.
and we responded, as well, but it’s been a nightmare.”
FROM B1
In the last week, when pages have not gone through,
police dispatch has called the respective fire chiefs who
have used a phone tree system to alert volunteer firefighters to the call.
Big Horn Fire Chief Doug Enloe also showed Williams
how to do an E-dispatch, which is essentially a blast message sent to each firefighter’s cell phone. Williams said
Enloe had also shown dispatch how to do an E-dispatch.
However, it is time consuming, and dispatch has not yet
utilized that method of alerting fire departments when
page attempts fail.
Williams said he heard on the radio Sunday night that a
new antennae had been installed on the portable repeater
tower, so it will hopefully be in working order now.
Williams also noted that when Sheridan Fire-Rescue
must be called to a GVFD district or any other volunteer
district call, there is a potential gap in protection in the
city of Sheridan. It also involves calling in extra firefighters, which costs extra money for overtime pay.
“It’s a headache,” Williams said. “Our goal is to make
sure everybody in Sheridan and the county is safe, this
just makes it tougher.”
Quality time
together
Charges filed
in May
burglary of
downtown
Hospital
Pharmacy
Kelly Pascal Gould plays “Go Fish”
with her daughter Georgia Gould,
8, during the Sheridan girls hockey
game against Cody Saturday night
at Sheridan Ice.
FROM STAFF REPORTS
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
REGULATIONS: Sage grouse, ozone, oil, methane will be in play
FROM 1
The plan, which would be overseen by the
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, has
drawn fierce fire from coal companies,
Republicans and some utilities, who argue
that the proposal will lead to plant closures,
layoffs and skyrocketing electric bills.
Public comment on the proposal closed in
December. The EPA expects to finalize the
rule sometime in 2015.
Sage grouse
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is under
court order to issue a ruling by September. A
potential endangered species listing has farreaching implications in Wyoming.
The state is home to 37 percent of the
world's sage grouse population. But energy
companies and ranchers also work the sagebrush steppe
where the bird
2146 Coffeen Ave. • 673-1100
2590 N. Main • 672-5900
Smoothies
lives.
An endangered species listing could greatly
curtail both mineral extraction and ranching.
The issue was complicated further in
December when Congress passed a provision
prohibiting any new sage grouse conservation measures until September.
Methane
The EPA has been mulling whether and how
to reduce methane emissions from oil and gas
operations. However, the agency recently
delayed an unveiling of proposed methane
regulations.
Ozone
EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy has also
In November, the EPA unveiled a proposal to suggested that any new measures might be
lower the current ozone threshold from 75
voluntary.
parts per billion to a range between 65 and 70
parts per billion. Six Wyoming counties could
Oil exports
exceed the new standard.
The revision is part of a periodic review
Since winning control of the Senate in
required under the Clean Air Act to ensure
November, congressional Republicans have
that federal standards incorporate the latest
promised to propose legislation aimed at endscientific data.
ing the nearly four-decades-long ban on
Ozone has been linked to respiratory ailAmerican crude exports.
ments like asthma. The agency must finalize
U.S. Rep. Joe Barton, a Texas Republican,
the standard by a court-imposed October
has already proposed a bill to that effect.
deadline.
SHERIDAN — A man
involved in the May 30, 2014,
burglary of Hospital
Pharmacy at 1 S. Main St.
has been served an arrest
warrant.
Today, police served an
arrest warrant to Kyle
Logan Fearnow, 26, of
Sheridan.
Fearnow has been incarcerated in the Sheridan
County Detention Center
since his arrest on Aug. 6,
2014, when he was found in
possession of approximately
400 prescription medications. A subsequent search
warrant of his motel room
resulted in the location and
seizure of more than 6,000
prescription medications.
Fearnow is facing multiple
felony possession charges as
a result of that investigation.
Through the investigation
of the burglary at Hospital
Pharmacy, Fearnow has
now been tied directly to
that burglary of prescription medications through
physical evidence collected
at the scene.
Fearnow will have his initial appearance at 2 p.m.
today in Sheridan County
Circuit Court.
MARIJUANA: Numbers small compared to millions of visitors
pot in society.
Alex Freeburg, a criminal defense lawyer in
The numbers are small compared to the milJackson, Wyoming, frequently handles marijualions who trek each year to the nation's first
na possession cases from Yellowstone. He said
national park. The his clients often are surprised when they're
bulk of the 2.2charged for small amounts of marijuana.
million-acre park
"I think that it's fair to say that it is the legalis in Wyoming,
ization in a couple of states. They know it's illewith slivers
gal but they don't think it's a crime," Freeburg
extending into
said. "There's some sort of disconnect."
Montana to the
The typical marijuana case arises from a trafnorth and Idaho to fic stop in which rangers say they smell the drug
the east.
in the vehicle.
Tim Reid, the
"And most people, most of the time, if a ranger
chief ranger, said
says, 'Do you have any marijuana in your car?'
he believes the
they'll say yes," Freeburg said. "In which case,
increase mirrors
there's not a lot a criminal defense attorney can
the prevalence of
do for them."
FROM 1
That happened to Gary Godina, an artist from
Waipahu, Hawaii, who was cited in Yellowstone
in October 2013.
Godina said rangers pulled him over for speeding in a vehicle with Colorado plates and then
told him they smelled marijuana. He said he told
them he had 3 grams of the drug that he had
purchased earlier in Colorado.
"Yeah, I had to go overnight," Godina said.
"They took me up to some holding cell in
Montana."
Godina's home state is among 23 states and
Washington, D.C., that allow marijuana use by
people with various medical conditions. "I have
glaucoma, so it's basically a medical thing,"
Godina said.
In April, he pleaded guilty and was fined
$1,000.
MONDAY, JANUARY 5, 2015
PEOPLE
www.thesheridanpress.com
Sagebrush art center to host ‘Uncapped’ painting class
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Sagebrush
Community Art Center will host an
“Uncapped” painting class Thursday
beginning at 6 p.m.
The class is open to individuals of
all ages and skills, but attendees 12
and younger must be accompanied by
an adult. Attendees will follow along
as instructor Shanoa Gardiner leads
artists through the process of creating their own “poppies” painting.
The cost to participate is $35 and
includes all supplies.
For additional information or to
register, call 674-1970.
The Sagebrush Community Art
Center is located at 201 E. Fifth St.
Airman Konetzki graduates basic training
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — Air Force Airman
First Class Shawn L. Konetzki recently graduated from basic military
training at Joint Base San AntonioLackland in San Antonio, Texas.
Konetzki completed an intensive
eight-week program that included
training in military discipline and
studies, Air Force core values, physical fitness and basic warfare principles and skills.
Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree
through the Community College of
the Air Force.
Konetzki is the husband of Hannah
Konetzki. He is also the son of Lisa
and Lawrence Konetzki of Sheridan,
brother of Andrew Konetzki of
Aberdeen, Maryland, and son-in-law
of Arlee Thornton of Sheridan.
Konetzki graduated in 2011 from
Sheridan High School and he earned
an associate degree in 2013 from
Sheridan College.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
A3
Newton to discuss
Native American fur
trade at Archaeological
Society meeting
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan-Johnson County chapter of the Wyoming Archaeological Society will meet
at 6 p.m. Thursday at the Holiday Inn in the Le
Gourmet Room.
Dinner will be ordered from the menu, however
attendees are not required to purchase dinner in order
to attend the free program.
Following the dinner, at approximately 7:15 p.m.,
Sheridan archaeologist Cody Newton will present,
“Bison Robes and Baubles: Developing a Native
History of the Fur Trade through Archaeology.”
Newton is an archaeologist who has worked throughout the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains for more
than 14 years. He has a bachelor’s in anthropology
from the University of Wyoming and master’s in
anthropology from Colorado State University. Newton
is currently a doctorate student at the University of
Colorado — Boulder.
Newton’s research focuses on Native American
hunter-gatherer groups following the introduction of
European-derived goods and technologies, particularly
during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries
when Plains and Rocky Mountain Indian groups largely became equestrian as well as involved in Europeanbased economic systems. Other research includes
early European exploration and settlement, prehistoric bison-based subsistence and bison evolution,
Paleoindian studies and the historic Plains Indian
Wars.
Newton is currently an archaeological field director
at SWCA Environmental Consultants in Sheridan.
For additional information regarding Thursday’s
event, contact Scott Burgan at 673-5997.
The Holiday Inn is located at 1809 Sugarland Drive.
Crop improvement set
as topic for ‘Soupfest’
FROM STAFF REPORTS
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Ready to run
Four-year-old Brently Barelle sits as Xavier Bishop, 5, runs away in a game of duck, duck, goose Friday morning at First Light Children’s Center.
Earthquake
triggers rock
slides
CHALLIS, Idaho (AP) — A 4.9
magnitude earthquake in a
remote Idaho county triggered
rock slides that blocked some
road lanes Saturday but did not
cause any major damage or
injuries.
The quake followed a 3.7-magnitude temblor that also
occurred near the Custer
County area on Dec. 22 and
numerous smaller recent
quakes, according to the U.S.
Geological Survey website.
Linda Lumpkin, a dispatcher
for the sheriff ’s office told The
Associated Press that everyone
there felt it, but there were no
reports of damage. The earthquake was recorded at 10:44
a.m. Saturday and was centered about 4 miles east of
Challis, a small town of about
1,000 in the center of the state
surrounded by U.S. National
Forest land.
The Missoulian reported that
rumblings were felt in southwestern Montana’s Bitterroot
Valley.
Rock slides blocked lanes on
several roads, Lumpkin said.
Sheriff ’s deputies went out to
direct traffic as the transportation department began
cleanup.
Scrutiny on worker non-compete deals
ATLANTA (AP) — Fast food worker
Caitlin Turowski had this much in
common with high-paid CEOs: When
she quit her job, she couldn’t work for
a competitor.
Hired as a delivery driver for sandwich maker Jimmy John’s and later
made an assistant manager, Turowski
said she signed a two-year non-competition agreement banning her from
working for sandwich-making rivals
within three miles of a Jimmy John’s
store. Burned out by long hours and
low pay, Turowski quit in July, then
took a pay cut to work in insurance
telemarketing. She could earn more
waitressing or bartending, but fears
being sued.
“We’re struggling,” said Turowski,
now a plaintiff challenging alleged
wage violations and the non-compete
agreement.
Non-competition agreements are better known in contracts for senior executives who have business secrets of
interest to competitors. However, court
records show the restrictions have also
snared maids in Chicago, a nail stylist
in Texas, cable TV installers in
Michigan and agricultural workers in
Washington. In October, Democrats in
Congress asked the U.S. Federal Trade
Commission and Department of Labor
to investigate.
The agreements for low-wage workers might trap them in their current
jobs, allowing their employers to pay
them lower salaries, experts said. “It
has a chilling effect on people actually
going out and trying to seek jobs
because they fear getting sued,” said
Kathleen Chavez, an attorney for
Turowski and others. “This is not like
a high-wage, skilled worker who says,
‘OK, let them sue me. I’ll defend
myself.’”
Employers might seek noncompetition agreements because they fear losing money training a worker who quits
or who brings business secrets to a
rival.
“You certainly wouldn’t want anyone
to know in the competitive landscape
what’s around the corner,” Home
Depot spokesman Stephen Holmes
said. The retailer signs non-competes
with senior executives.
Researchers say there’s evidence
non-competes limit pay for executives,
and the same trend could hold for the
rank-and-file.
“If you can’t leave, you don’t have
leverage,” said Matthew Marx, a professor at MIT’s Sloan School of
Management.
States differ on enforcement. Almost
three dozen states allow judges to
rewrite defective non-competition
agreements, according to Russell Beck,
a corporate law attorney who conducts
national reviews. In a few states, he
said, judges can strike problematic
restrictions but keep the rest of the
deal. Just under half-a-dozen states
require that judges completely toss
non-compete agreements if any part of
it is legally flawed. Three states ban
the agreements.
It’s unclear how many workers are
subject to the deals.
“The idea that they’re only for highskilled workers is only wishful thinking,” said Evan Starr, a labor economist at the University of Illinois.
SHERIDAN — Grape
geneticist and University
of Wyoming instructor
Dr. Sadanand Dhekney
will speak at the
Sheridan County
YMCA’s monthly
“Soupfest” on Friday.
Dhenkey’s talk, entitled “The Development
of Improved Plant
Varieties: Boon or
Bane?” will focus on the
process of crop domestication and improvement.
He will also speak to the
advent of cutting edge
technologies in crop
improvement and their
effects on crop yield and
food quality.
The event will begin at
12:15 p.m. and the cost to
attend the luncheon and
program is $5 per person. Reservations are
needed by 10 a.m.
Thursday.
For additional information or to RSVP, call
the YMCA at 674-7488.
The Sheridan County
YMCA is located at 417 N.
Jefferson St.
Join Weight Watchers in Sheridan!
We have moved to a new location:
The Salvation Army
150 S. Tschirgi St.
We meet Mondays at 5:45 with weigh ins starting
at 5:15
No registration fee until March 31, 2015
A4
PAGE SIX
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, JANUARY 5, 2015
TODAY IN HISTORY |
10 things to
know today
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
FROM THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Your daily look at latebreaking news, upcoming
events and the stories that
will be talked about today:
1. JURY SELECTION TO GET
UNDERWAY IN BOSTON
MARATHON BOMBING
CASE
Seating jurors in the
case against Dzhokhar
Tsarnaev is set to begin
Monday under tight security at the federal courthouse in Boston and could
take several weeks.
2. WHO WILL TEST HIS
SWAY AGAINST GOP-RUN
CONGRESS
Fresh off a two-week
vacation, Obama immediately begins ramping up
for his State of the Union
address — his best chance
to set the agenda for 2015
on his own terms.
3. INDONESIA CRACKS
DOWN ON AVIATION
SECTOR AFTER AIRASIA
CRASH
The transportation ministry reveals harsh measures against everyone who
allowed Flight 8501 to take
off without proper permits.
4. NORTH KOREA BLASTS
U.S. FOR SANCTIONS OVER
SONY ROW
Pyongyang's rhetoric is
probably directed as much
at a domestic audience as
it is at Washington.
5. NEW CONGRESS TO
CONVENE WITH
REPUBLICANS IN CONTROL
The GOP is intent on
upending the president's
policies, including his 5year-old health care law
and his recent immigration actions.
6. AL QAIDA BRANCH IN
YEMEN SURGING
The group is finding new
support and recruits
among the country's Sunni
tribesmen angered by
expansion of Shiite rebels.
7. BOKO HARAM
EXTREMISTS SEIZE KEY
BASE ON NIGERIA-CHAD
BORDER
"They came in their hundreds... and immediately
began to throw explosives
and bombs," fisherman
Audu Labbo tells The AP.
8. WHAT THE FORECAST
FOR U.S. WILL BRING
Cold, and lots of it. A dip
in the jet stream means
frigid air from Canada and
points north will plummet
into the eastern two-thirds
of the United States this
week.
9. MEXICO SCANDALS
TAINT ALL LEVELS OF
GOVERNMENT
What is supposed to be
the nation's new era of
transparency and reform,
feels a lot like the same old
age of violence and corruption.
10. HOW TO RAISE YOUR
HOME'S IQ
At the International CES
gadget show in Las Vegas
this week, manufacturers
will promote devices and
functionality for creating
the so-called "smart home."
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Playing around at Sheridan Ice
Three-year-old Madison Ash pulls down her father Mike Ash’s hat down during the Sheridan girls hockey game against Cody
Saturday night at Sheridan Ice.
LOCAL BRIEFS |
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SMH to host ACA presentations this
week
SHERIDAN — Sheridan Memorial Hospital staff
will hold additional public presentations to assist
individuals interested in signing up for health
insurance through the marketplace under the
Affordable Care Act.
The presentations will be held Tuesday at 11 a.m.
and 6 p.m. and Wednesday at 6 p.m. at the Welch
Cancer Center. On Jan. 20 at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. and
Jan. 21 at 11 a.m., presentations will be held in the
SMH conference room B.
The Health Insurance Marketplace offers a wide
variety of Wyoming-based health plans.
All plans cover prescriptions, hospital stays, doctor visits and more. Some people may qualify for
financial help to pay premiums and out-of-pocket
expenses, such as deductibles and co-pays.
Depending on eligibility, the Affordable Care Act
may provide a tax credit to help applicants afford
health coverage purchased through the marketplace.
For those who already have health insurance
through the marketplace, staff can help them
review their plan and decide if they need to make
changes for 2015.
Sheridan Memorial Hospital staff and Enroll
Wyoming Navigators will be available to help individuals understand how the Health Insurance
Marketplace works, review coverage options and
assist with enrollment.
To learn more about the ACA, attend a public
presentation or contact the hospital at 672-1010 to
schedule an appointment with a navigator.
The Welch Cancer Center is located at 1585 W.
Fifth St. SMH is located at 1401 W. Fifth St.
Stop-motion animation activity set
for Tuesday, Thursday at library
SHERIDAN — The Sheridan County Fulmer
Public Library will offer programming for
“tweens” beginning in January.
Organizers of the events said the programs were
developed because many kids have outgrown children’s story time, but aren’t quite ready for the
teen section and are often overlooked.
The program, “Tween Challenge Takeover,” will
include activities and experiments that will draw
from the fields of science, technology, engineering,
art, mathematics and the “maker-space” movement.
The programs will be on Tuesdays and
Thursdays from 3:30-5 p.m. and are meant for kids
in fifth through seventh grades.
The following is the schedule of activities
planned for January and February.
Jan. 6 and 8 — Stop-motion animation
Jan. 13 and 15 — Legos
Jan. 20 and 22 — Anime art and creative writing
Jan. 27 and 29 — Building circuits
Feb. 3 and 5 — Mystery bag challenge
Feb. 10 and 12 — Computer coding
Feb. 17 and 19 — Robots
Feb. 24 and 26 — Marble maze
For additional information, contact the library
at 674-8585.
The Sheridan County Fulmer Public Library is
located at 335 W. Alger St.
TUESDAY EVENTS |
• 11 a.m., Health insurance enrollment presentation, Welch Cancer Center, 1585 W. Fifth St.
• 3:30-5:30 p.m., Stop-motion animation class for “Tween Challenge Takeover,” Sheridan County Fulmer
Public Library, 335 W. Alger St.
• 6 p.m., Zumba for the Cause, 118 W. Fifth St.
• 6 p.m., Health insurance enrollment presentation, Welch Cancer Center, 1585 W. Fifth St.
TIPPED OVER |
Edward Brooke, 1st black elected US
senator, dies
BOSTON (AP) — Former U.S. Sen. Edward W.
Brooke, a liberal Republican who became the first
black in U.S. history to win popular election to the
Senate, died Saturday. He was 95.
Brooke died of natural causes at his Coral
Gables, Florida, home, said Ralph Neas, Brooke’s
former chief counsel. Brooke was surrounded by
his family.
Brooke was elected to the Senate in 1966, becoming the first black to sit in that branch from any
state since Reconstruction and one of nine blacks
who have ever served there — including Barack
Obama.
Brooke told The Associated Press he was “thankful to God” that he lived to see Obama’s election.
And the president was on hand in October 2009
when Brooke was presented with the
Congressional Gold Medal, the highest award
Congress has to honor civilians. Obama hailed
Brooke as “a man who’s spent his life breaking
barriers and bridging divides across this country.”
Incoming Senate Majority Leader Mitch
McConnell recalled his first impression of the
newly elected senator when McConnell was a
Senate staffer and described Brooke as “a model of
courage and honesty in office.”
“... even from across the Senate chamber, you
could sense that this was a Senator of historic
importance,” the Kentucky Republican said in a
statement Saturday. “Indeed, he was.”
A Republican in a largely Democratic state,
Brooke was one of Massachusetts’ most popular
political figures during most of his 12 years in the
Senate.
Massachusetts Democratic Gov. Deval Patrick,
the state’s first black governor, remembered
Brooke for his unselfish public service.
“He carried the added honor and burden of
being ‘the first’ and did so with distinction and
grace,” Patrick said. “I have lost a friend and mentor. America has lost a superb example of selfless
service.”
Brooke earned his reputation as a Senate liberal
in part by becoming the first Republican senator
to publicly urge President Richard Nixon to
resign.
He helped lead the forces in favor of the Equal
Rights Amendment and was a defender of school
busing to achieve racial integration, a bitterly
divisive issue in Boston.
He also lent his name to the Brooke amendment
to the federal housing act, passed in 1969, which
limited to 25 percent the amount of income a family must pay for rent in public housing.
However, late in his second term, Brooke
divorced his wife of 31 years, Remigia, in a stormy
proceeding that attracted national attention.
Repercussions from the case spurred an investigation into his personal finances by the Senate
Ethics Committee and a probe by the state welfare
department and ultimately cost him the 1978 election. He was defeated by Democrat Rep. Paul E.
Tsongas.
Tsongas’ widow, U.S. Rep. Nikki Tsongas, said
Saturday that Brooke’s career was “as courageous
as it was historic.”
Today's Highlight in
History:
On Jan. 5, 1925, Democrat
Nellie Tayloe Ross of
Wyoming took office as
America's first female governor, succeeding her late husband, William, following a
special election.
On this date:
In 1781, a British naval
expedition led by Benedict
Arnold burned Richmond,
Virginia.
In 1895, French Capt.
Alfred Dreyfus, convicted of
treason, was publicly stripped
of his rank. (He was ultimately vindicated.)
In 1914, auto industrialist
Henry Ford announced he was
going to pay workers $5 for an
8-hour day, as opposed to $2.34
for a 9-hour day. (Employees
still worked six days a week;
the 5-day work week was instituted in 1926.)
In 1933, the 30th president
of the United States, Calvin
Coolidge, died in
Northampton, Massachusetts,
at age 60. Construction began
on the Golden Gate Bridge.
(Work was completed four
years later.)
In 1949, in his State of the
Union address, President
Harry S. Truman labeled his
administration the Fair Deal.
In 1964, during a visit to
the Holy Land, Pope Paul VI
met with Patriarch
Athenagoras I of
Constantinople in Jerusalem.
In 1970, Joseph A.
Yablonski, an unsuccessful
candidate for the presidency
of the United Mine Workers of
America, was found murdered
with his wife and daughter at
their Clarksville,
Pennsylvania, home. (UMWA
President Tony Boyle and
seven others were convicted
of, or pleaded guilty to, the
killings.) "All My Children"
premiered on ABC-TV.
In 1975, "The Wiz," a musical version of L. Frank
Baum's "The Wonderful
Wizard of Oz" featuring an allblack cast, opened on
Broadway.
In 1983, President Ronald
Reagan announced he was
nominating Elizabeth Dole to
succeed Drew Lewis as secretary of transportation; Dole
became the first woman to
head a Cabinet department in
Reagan's administration, and
the first to head the DOT.
Ten years ago: President
George W. Bush opened a new
drive for caps on medical malpractice awards, contending
the limits would lower health
care costs. The bodies of 18
young Iraqi Shiites taken off a
bus and executed in Dec. 2005
were found in a field near
Mosul. Cpl. Wassef Ali
Hassoun, a Marine charged
with desertion in Iraq after
mysteriously disappearing
from his post was again
declared a deserter — this
time for failing to report to
his U.S. base. (Hassoun turned
himself in to military authorities in June 2014.)
Five years ago: President
Barack Obama scolded 20 of
his highest-level officials over
the thwarted Christmas Day
terror attack on an airliner
bound for Detroit, taking
them jointly to task for "a
screw-up that could have been
disastrous" and should have
been avoided. The U.S. and
British embassies in Yemen
reopened their doors after a
two-day closure prompted by
security concerns.
One year ago: The Iraqi
military tried to dislodge alQaida militants in Sunni-dominated Anbar province,
unleashing airstrikes and
besieging the regional capital.
Acting with a court order, the
family of Jahi McMath, a 13year-old California girl
declared brain dead after a
tonsillectomy, removed her
from a California hospital to
be cared for elsewhere.
Thought for Today: "It is
the job that is never started
that takes longest to finish." —
J.R.R. Tolkien, English author
(1892-1973).
ALMANAC
MONDAY, JANUARY 5, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
REPORTS |
ROCKY MOUNTAIN
AMBULANCE
Wednesday
• Medical, 2800 block 10th
Avenue North, 9 a.m.
• Medical, 1700 block South
Sheridan Avenue, 9:45 a.m.
• Medical, 400 block
Gladstone Street, 1:29 p.m.
• Medical, 1300 block
Thomas Drive, 1:43 p.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 2:21 p.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 3:14 p.m.
• Medical, 2800 block
Coffeen Avenue, 3:20 p.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 3:30 p.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 5:10 p.m.
Thursday
• Medical, 2100 block
Coffeen Avenue, 12:35 a.m.
• Medical, 1500 block
Mydland Road, 12:59 a.m.
• Medical, 2100 Coffeen
Avenue, 1:59 p.m.
• Trauma, 500 block North
Main Street, 8:09 a.m.
• Trauma, 1500 block
Sugarland Drive, 9:54 a.m.
• Event Standby, 400 block
East Brundage Street, 3:27
p.m.
• Trauma, 600 block South
Carrington Street, 6:16 p.m.
• Trauma, Interstate 90, 6:26
p.m.
• Trauma, Interstate 90, 6:27
p.m.
Friday
• Trauma, 1500 block
Sugarland Drive, 7:42 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 11:23 p.m.
• Medical, 900 block North
Custer Street, 9:21 p.m.
Saturday
• Trauma, 400 block South
Sheridan Avenue, 12;26 a.m.
• Medical, 100 block West
12th Street, 1:19 a.m.
• Medical, Highway 335, 1:54
p.m.
• Medical, 400 block South
Sheridan Avenue, 1:56 p.m.
• Medical, 2000 block
Sugarland Drive, 2:47 p.m.
Sunday
• Medical, 1700 block Kroe
Lane, 2:16 a.m.
• Medical, 900 block North
Sheridan Avenue, 3:19 a.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 8:57 a.m.
• Medical, 200 block Dayton
Street, 11:23 a.m.
• Trauma, 2000 block South
Sheridan Avenue, 12:53 p.m.
• Medical, 1400 block West
Fifth Street, 2:27 p.m.
• Medical, 700 block Long
Drive, 4:15 p.m
• Trauma, intersection of
Coffeen and Avoca avenues,
4:57 p.m.
• Trauma, 5900 block
Coffeen Avenue, 5:35 p.m.
• Medical, 1500 block
Sugarland Drive, 6:11 p.m.
• Trauma, 1500 block
Sugarland Drive, 7:02 p.m.
• Medical, 1800 block Big
Horn Avenue, 8:22 p.m
• Trauma, Mary Cotton
Road, 9:11 p.m.
SHERIDAN
MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
Friday-Sunday
• No admissions or dismissals reported.
SHERIDAN POLICE
DEPARTMENT
Information in the police
reports is taken from the SPD
website.
Friday
• Bar check North Main
Street, 1:36 a.m.
• Suspicious vehicle,
Sugarland Drive, 5:10 a.m.
• Shoplifting, North Main
Street, 9:25 a.m.
• Dog at large, North Main
Street, 9:54 a.m.
• Damaged property,
Mydland Road, 10:28 a.m.
• Theft (cold), North Main
Street, 10:30 a.m.
• Abandoned vehicle,
Yonkee Avenue, 11:10 a.m.
• Abandoned vehicle,
Highland Avenue, 11:23 a.m.
• Abandoned vehicle,
Here are the results
of Friday’s
MegaMillions
lottery drawing:
Winning numbers:
13-15-35-62-74;
Megaball 12
Megaplier 4x
Here are the results
of Saturday’s
Powerball
lottery drawing:
Winning numbers:
4-18-43-46-55;
Powerball 25
Powerplay 3x
Estimated jackpot:
$146,000,000
THURSDAY
WEDNESDAY
15
21
27
Almanac
27
28
18
Temperature
High/low ........................................................... 7/-3
Normal high/low ............................................36/11
Record high .............................................59 in 1948
Record low ............................................. -30 in 1972
Precipitation (in inches)
Sunday............................................................ 0.01"
Month to date................................................. 0.21"
Normal month to date .................................... 0.07"
Year to date .................................................... 0.21"
Normal year to date ....................................... 0.07"
12
The Sun
Rise
Set
Today
Tuesday
Wednesday
7:45 a.m.
7:45 a.m.
7:45 a.m.
4:41 p.m.
4:42 p.m.
4:43 p.m.
The Moon
Rise
Set
Today
Tuesday
Wednesday
5:43 p.m.
6:40 p.m.
7:39 p.m.
7:41 a.m.
8:19 a.m.
8:53 a.m.
Last
New
First
Parkman
17/27
Dayton
17/28
Lovell
17/28
3p
4p
5p
The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection. Shown is the highest
value for the day.
0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High;
11+ Extreme
Cody
25/39
SHERIDAN
Big Horn
12/30
Basin
14/29
Jan 13
Jan 20
Jan 26
Feb 3
15/21
For more detailed weather
information on the Internet, go to:
www.thesheridanpress.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2015
Clearmont
12/23
Story
17/29
Gillette
16/31
Buffalo
18/32
Worland
8/28
Wright
15/31
Kaycee
20/35
City
Billings
Casper
Cheyenne
Cody
Evanston
Gillette
Green River
Jackson
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
31/21/c
35/25/pc
30/25/c
34/30/pc
44/28/s
27/25/pc
41/20/s
31/10/pc
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
23/3/pc
33/15/s
42/16/s
35/11/pc
42/22/s
27/-1/s
39/18/s
32/8/pc
City
Laramie
Newcastle
Rawlins
Riverton
Rock Springs
Scottsbluff
Sundance
Yellowstone
Tue.
Hi/Lo/W
40/15/c
28/1/sn
40/24/c
45/13/c
41/20/c
41/6/c
25/-3/sn
33/14/sn
Charter the
Sheridan Trolley!
Regional Cities
Tue.
Hi/Lo/W
18/3/sn
42/11/c
46/13/c
39/14/c
42/25/pc
31/0/sn
44/17/c
35/14/sn
Shown are
Tuesday's noon
positions of
weather systems
and precipitation.
Temperature
bands are highs
for the day.
Ranchester
15/25
Thermopolis
16/37
Weather on the Web
UV Index tomorrow
2p
Hardin
7/16
Full
Big Horn Mountain Precipitation
24 hours through noon Sunday ...................... 0.01"
9a 10a 11a Noon 1p
Shown is Tuesday's weather.
Temperatures are tonight's lows
and Tuesday's highs.
Broadus
2/13
Sun and Moon
Sheridan County Airport through Sunday
October 27, 1928 - January 2, 2015
National Weather for Tuesday, January 6
FRIDAY
4
Duane Currie Donahue
Call
The Press
at
672-2431
Clouds and sun; Turning colder in Cold with a thick
not as cold
the morning
cloud cover
3
OBITUARIES |
Delivery
problems?
Billings
15/18
Cloudy, a bit of
snow; cold
Billie Hollenbeck
Billie Hollenbeck, 87, of Sheridan passed away on Friday,
January 2, 2015 at Sheridan Manor. A Memorial Service will be
held at 2:00 PM on Wednesday, January 7, 2015 at Grace Baptist
Church, 1959 E. Brundage Lane in Sheridan with Pastor
Stephen Anderson officiating.
Arrangements are entrusted with Champion Funeral Home.
Duane Currie Donahue, 86, of Sheridan,
passed away on Friday, January 2, 2015, at
the Sheridan Manor. He was born on
October 27, 1928, in Sheridan, WY to parents Hershall and Evelyn (Currie)
Donahue.
Duane Currie
As a small child Duane attended schools
Donahue
in Sheridan, WY and Casper, WY. During
the summer months he spent lots of time
on his Uncle Jim Mattox's Ranch near Quitis and Broadus, MT.
In his high school years, he learned to fly airplanes. He worked
in the Big Horns for the Forestry Department – he loved the
mountains. Upon his high school graduation in 1947, he ventured to Ft. Collins, CO and the Forestry Department at then
Colorado A&M (now CSU). Also he was in ROTC.
Duane met Peggy Poor in Ft. Collins, CO, they were married
on September 16, 1950, in Ft. Collins. They lived there until his
graduation from Colorado A&M. He then went into the Air
Force. First being stationed at Victorville, CA, then Columbus,
MS, Chandler, AZ and Las Vegas, NV. Duane flew planes in the
Korean War in 1952 – 1953, flying F82 Sabre Jets in the 606 AC &
W Squadron and the 334th Fighter Intercepter Squadron at
Kimpo, Korea. Upon returning from overseas, he was stationed
at Las Vegas, NV (Nellis Air Force Base) flying and doing accident investigations until his discharge in 1957.
While in Las Vegas, he and Peggy had a son Michael J. who
was born in Sheridan, WY in 1954, while Duane was on leave.
After discharge from the Air Force they returned to Ft. Collins
(now CSU) to study and obtain a Teaching Degree.
They then moved to Sheridan, where Duane taught Math at
Sheridan High School. He was respected by many students and
local residents and still is this day. Always - “Mr. Donahue”. He
retired in 1988.
Duane and Peggy square danced for 43 years, traveling to
many states and making wonderful friends. Duane cued and
taught dancers to do the Round Dances (Circle dances connected to Square Dancing). He loved good western music!
Duane had many RV Trailers-campers and loved to go to the
Big Horns. They made many trips to Washington State to see
SEE REPORTS, PAGE 6
their son, his wife Amy and his two granddaughters, Jennifer
and Caitlin.
DEATH NOTICE |
Duane was proud of his Air Force career of eight years and
was
knowledgeable of many models of planes.
Paris L. Leslie
Duane was a red headed Irishman with a quiet temper. He
Paris L. Leslie, 94, of Sheridan passed away on Friday, loved snow and the mountains, his son and wife, Amy, and his
January 2, 2015 at Mountain View Living Center at the V.A. “2 gran girls,” Jen and Caitlin. He had and still has many, many
Medical Center. Services are pending. Arrangements are good friends. He could talk to anyone. His later years were hard
on him as he could not get around because of ill health.
entrusted with Champion Funeral Home.
Duane was preceded in death by his parents, Hershall and
Evelyn (Currie) Donahue, brother, Tom Donahue, aunts, uncles
OBITUARIES |
and cousins (Townsend's). He is survived by his wife, Peggy,
son, Michael J. (Amy) Donahue, granddaughters, Jennifer and
Theresa L. Gunville
Caitlin, sister in law, Nancy Donahue, brother, Byran H.
October 30, 1949 - January 1, 2015
Donahue and wife, Verla of MT, nephews, Sam Donahue and
family, Steve (Kathy) Donahue, John Donahue, Jim (Jen)
Theresa L. Gunville, 65, of Sheridan, Donahue and family, Suzanne (Bill) Moody and their boys,
passed away on Thursday, January 1, 2015, Willy and Tommy, cousin, Jack Donahue and Townsend Family.
Private Family Services will be held at a later date.
at the Sheridan Manor. She was born on
Online condolences may be written at www.kanefuneral.com.
October 30, 1949, in Rolette, ND to parents
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
Fred and Mary (Boyer) Gunville.
Theresa enjoyed sewing, puzzles, readTheresa L.
ing, movies, shopping and spending time
Gunville
with her family. She was a member of the
Catholic Church.
Theresa was preceded in death by her parents, three brothers, John Gunville, Jim Gunville, David Gunville, sister,
Margaret Strothman and grandson, Nicholas. She is survived
by her daughter, Colette (Virgil Huston) Gunville, of
Sheridan, siblings, Randy Gunville of Wordan, MT, Melvin
(Pat) Gunville of UT, Clarissa Wright of Powell, WY, Anne
(Jerry) Babb, of Savage, MT, and numerous nieces and
nephews.
Services for Theresa will be held at a later date.
Memorials to honor Theresa may be made to Colette
Gunville in c/o Sunlight Federal Credit Union at 1447
Sugarland Dr., Sheridan, WY 82801.
Online condolences may
be
written
at www.kanefuneral.com.
Kane Funeral Home has been entrusted with arrangements.
Regional Weather
5-Day Forecast for Sheridan
TUESDAY
• Animal injured, East Sixth
Street, 8:35 a.m.
• Snow removal, Exeter
Avenue, 8:40 a.m.
• Snow removal, South
Sheridan Avenue, 8:56 a.m.
• Hit and run, Taylor
Avenue, 9:10 a.m.
• Motorist assist, Sixth
Avenue, 10:18 a.m.
• Snow removal, South
Thurmond Avenue, 11:55 a.m.
• Abandoned vehicle, South
Thurmond Avenue, 11:57 a.m.
• Snow removal, East
Colorado Street, 12:21 p.m.
• Criminal entry, South
Linden Avenue, 12:48 p.m.
• Reckless Driver, Coffeen
Avenue, 12:54 p.m.
• Alarm, North Main Street,
2:11 p.m.
• Dog at large, De Smet
Avenue, 3:08 p.m.
• Motorist assist, Coffeen
Avenue, 4:45 p.m
• Civil dispute, Sheridan
Area, 5:15 p.m.
• Theft, Mydland Road, 5:20
p.m.
• Accident, Fifth Street, 7:17
p.m.
• Dog at large, Fourth
Street,
• Civil dispute, Exeter
Avenue, 7:30 p.m.
• Accident, Loucks Street,
8:27 p.m.
Sunday
• DUI, Coffeen Avenue, 3
p.m.
• Motorist assist, North
Main Street, 8:49 a.m.
• Burglar alarm, Coffeen
Avenue, 11:40 a.m.
• Motorist assist, Burrows
Street, 1:27 p.m.
• Citizen assist, Gladstone
Street, 1:30 p.m.
• Motorist assist, Big Horn
Avenue, 1:50 p.m.
Highland Avenue, 11:27 a.m.
• Abandoned vehicle,
Sparrow Hawk Road, 11:57
a.m.
• Dog at large, South Linden
Avenue, 12:05 p.m.
• Abandoned vehicle, West
Works Street, 12:09 p.m.
• Abandoned vehicle,
Weeping Willow Court, 12:30
p.m.
• Civil dispute, Cinnabar
Court, 2:07 p.m.
• Civil dispute, Taylor
Avenue, 2:40 p.m.
• Civil dispute, Holloway
Avenue, 3:17 p.m.
• Drug activity, North Main
Street, 3:53 p.m.
• Fraud, North Gould Street,
3:54 p.m.
• Accident (delayed report),
Coffeen Avenue, 4:18 p.m.
• Accident, Lewis Street,
6:29 p.m.
• Suspicious circumstance,
North Main Street, 6:57 p.m.
• Harassment, Illinois
Street, 7:25 p.m.
• Damaged property (suspended), Sheridan area, 8:17
pm.
• Breach of peace, East
Montana Street, 8:18 p.m.
• Suicidal subject, North
Custer Street, 9:19 p.m.
• Shots fired, East Heald
Street, 10:28 p.m.
• DUI, West Fifth Street,
10:47 p.m.
• DUI, Coffeen Avenue, 10:55
p.m.
Saturday
• Hit and run, College
Avenue, 12:10 a.m.
• DUI, College Avenue, 12:10
a.m.
• DUI, Coffeen Avenue, 1:48
a.m.
• Stolen vehicle (cold),
Adair Avenue, 3:34 a.m.
• Burglar alarm, Illinois
Street, 6:45 a.m.
Estimated jackpot:
$172,000,000
A flurry early;
cloudy
A5
SERVICE NOTICE |
SHERIDAN
FIRE-RESCUE
Friday
• Rocky Mountain
Ambulance assist, 900 block
North Custer Street, 9:23 p.m.
• Activated alarm, 1800
block Fort Road, 11:28 p.m.
Saturday
• No calls reported.
.Sunday
• RMA assist, Coffeen
Avenue and Sugarland Drive,
5 p.m.
• Motor vehicle accident,
5900 Coffeen Avenue, 5:29 p.m.
• RMA assist, 1500
Sugarland Drive, 6:14 p.m.
TONIGHT
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Wed.
Hi/Lo/W
36/26/pc
25/18/pc
38/28/pc
26/18/pc
39/24/pc
23/18/pc
32/23/pc
34/19/pc
Thu.
Hi/Lo/W
39/13/s
34/5/s
39/19/s
30/10/s
37/20/s
33/5/s
29/3/pc
32/7/pc
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms,
r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Add a touch of nostalgia to your event!
Just $110 an hour (2 hour minimum) gets you and
30 of your friends and family to your destination.
Call 672-2485 to reserve your trolley today!
A6
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, JANUARY 5, 2015
GOP focus for
Congress: Cut deficit,
don’t stumble
WASHINGTON (AP) — In the first
Republican-dominated Congress to confront President Barack Obama, GOP leaders will focus on bolstering the economy
and cutting the budget — and oh yes,
avoiding self-inflicted calamities that
make voters wonder if the party can govern competently.
When the new Congress raises the curtain Tuesday, Republicans will run both
the House and Senate for the first time in
eight years. GOP leaders want to showcase their legislative priorities, mixing
accomplishments with showdowns with
Obama but shunning government shutdowns and other chaotic standoffs.
Another priority is minimizing distractions like the recent admission by No. 3
House leader Steve Scalise, R-La., that he
addressed a white supremacist group in
2002.
“Serious adults are in charge here and
we intend to make progress,” incoming
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell,
R-Ky., told The Associated Press recently.
McConnell says the Senate’s first bill
would force construction of the Keystone
XL oil pipeline, which Republicans call a
job creator but Obama and many
Democrats say threatens the environment.
The House leads off with legislation letting small companies sidestep some
requirements of Obama’s prized health
care overhaul by hiring veterans, followed by other measures weakening that
law and pushing the Keystone pipeline.
Other bills likely early would block
Obama’s executive actions on immigration and ease environmental and business
regulations that the GOP contends stifles
job growth. Additional bills would cut
spending, squeeze Medicare and other
benefit programs, revamp tax laws,
finance highway construction and speed
congressional approval of trade treaties.
“We’re focused on job creation,” said
House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy,
R-Calif., and running “a more efficient,
effective, accountable government.”
Democrats say the GOP’s goal is cutting
taxes on the rich while crippling Obama’s
accomplishments, including expanded
health coverage and restrictions on financial institutions.
“In the minority, your role is to play
defense and stop the worst from happening,” said Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois,
the No. 2 Senate Democrat.
Republicans captured Senate control in
November’s midterm elections, adding
nine seats for a 54-46 advantage that
includes two Democratic-leaning independents. A 13-seat gain swelled their
House majority to a commanding 246-188
with one vacancy, the result of New York
Republican Michael Grimm’s planned
resignation following his guilty plea on a
tax evasion charge.
With McConnell and House Speaker
John Boehner, R-Ohio, jointly mapping an
agenda and scheduling long congressional work periods, goals and potential pitfalls include:
REPORTS CONTINUED |
From 5
• Dog at large, East Brundage Lane,
2:23 p.m.
• Motorist assist, East Works Street,
3:15 p.m.
• Accident, Lower Prairie Dog Road,
3:38 p.m.
• Welfare check, Long Drive, 4:09 p.m.
• Road hazard, North Main Street, 4:15
p.m.
• Motorist assist, East Montana Street,
4:51 p.m.
• Accident with injury, Coffeen Avenue,
4:57 p.m.
• Accident, North Main Street, 8:49
p.m.
• Littering, Coffeen Avenue, 10:58 p.m.
SHERIDAN COUNTY SHERIFF’S
OFFICE
Friday-Sunday
• No reports available at press time.
ARRESTS
Names of individuals arrested for
domestic violence or sexual assault will
not be released until those individuals
have appeared in court.
Friday-Sunday
• No reports available at press time.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Snow causes more work
A person is seen in the alley pushing snow below the Sheridan County Courthouse on Saturday morning
in downtown Sheridan. Sheridan received several inches of snow Friday night and early Saturday morning, creating a lot of work for Sheridan residents.
JAIL
Today
Daily inmate count: 81
Female inmate count: 18
Inmates at treatment facilities (not
counted in daily inmate count): 0
Inmates housed at other facilities (not
counted in daily inmate count): 3
Number of book-ins for the weekend:
16
Number of releases for the weekend:
13
Highest number of inmates held over
the weekend: 87
Guide for healthy eating may consider environment
WASHINGTON (AP) — The government
issues dietary guidelines every five years
to encourage Americans to eat healthier.
This year’s version may look at what is
healthy for the environment, too.
A new focus on the environment would
mean asking people to choose more fruits,
vegetables, nuts, whole grains and other
plant-based foods — possibly at the
expense of meat.
The beef and agriculture industries are
crying foul, saying an environmental
agenda has no place in what has always
been a practical blueprint for a healthy
lifestyle.
An advisory panel to the Agriculture
and Health and Human Services
Departments has been discussing the idea
of sustainability in public meetings, indicating that its recommendations, expected this month, may address the environment. The two departments will take
those recommendations into account as
they craft the final dietary guidelines,
expected by the end of the year.
The guidelines are the basis for USDA’s
“My Plate” icon that replaced the wellknown food pyramid in 2010 and is
designed to help Americans with healthy
eating. The guidelines will also be integrated into school lunch meal patterns
and other federal eating programs.
A draft recommendation circulated by
the advisory committee in December said
a sustainable diet helps ensure food
access for both the current population
and future generations. A dietary pattern
higher in plant-based foods and lower in
animal-based foods is “more health promoting and is associated with lesser environmental impact than is the current
average U.S. diet,” the draft said.
That appears to take at least partial aim
at the beef industry. A study by the journal Proceedings of the National Academy
of Sciences last year said raising beef for
the American dinner table is more harmful to the environment than other meat
industries such as pork and chicken.
The study said that compared with
other popular animal proteins, beef produces more heat-trapping gases per calorie, puts out more water-polluting nitrogen, takes more water for irrigation and
uses more land.
As the advisory committee has discussed the idea, doctors and academics on
the panel have framed sustainability in
terms of conserving food resources and
also what are the healthiest foods. There
is “compatibility and overlap” between
what’s good for health and good for the
environment, the panel has said.
The meat industry has fought for years
to ensure that the dietary guidelines do
not call for eating less meat. The guidelines now recommend eating lean meats
instead of reducing meat altogether,
advice that the current advisory committee has debated. A draft discussed at the
panel’s Dec. 15 meeting says a healthy
dietary pattern includes fewer “red and
processed meats” than are currently consumed.
After that meeting, the National
Cattlemen’s Beef Association sent out a
statement by doctor and cattle producer
Richard Thorpe calling the committee
biased and the draft meat recommendations absurd. He said lean beef has a role
in healthy diets.
The American Meat Institute issued
comments calling any attempt to take
lean meat out of a healthy dietary pattern
“stunning” and “arbitrary.”
Objections are coming from Congress,
too.
SPORTS
MONDAY, JANUARY 5, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
Lady Eagles
end break
with 49-35
victory at
Rocky
Mountain
BY MIKE DUNN
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
DAYTON — A week off for
winter break did little to stop
the Tongue River Lady Eagles
(6-1) in their 49-35 victory over
the Rocky Mountain (Cowley)
Lady Grizzlies.
“I was pleased with how our
girls performed,” head coach
Dianne Moser said.
“Especially after getting only
three days of practice in last
week.”
Tongue River is currently on
a four-game winning streak
spanning back to Dec. 19.
The Lady Eagles were led by
senior Eryn Aksamit and
sophomore Kylee Knobloch.
Both Aksamit and Knobloch
put up 13 points.
Moser said she was thrilled
with the performance of junior LeeAnna Mitchell.
Mitchell, a track athlete in her
first year with the team, drove
in 11 points and accounted for
numerous steals for the Lady
Eagles in Saturday’s contest.
“I have been waiting for the
track ability to come out [on
the court],” Moser said about
Mitchell.
Sophomore Libby
Heimbaugh took the reins at
point guard in the absence of
Amanda Buller, one of the
Lady Eagles’ leading scorers
this season. While Heimbaugh
did not put up any points in
her first start, Moser said she
was more than happy with her
on-court presence and ball
control throughout the game.
The Lady Eagles will play
host to the Southeast (Yoder)
Lady Cyclones on Thursday.
Moser predicts a tough game
against one of the top 2A basketball programs in the state.
“It’s going to be tough,”
Moser said. “They are a good
team … and they are going to
be well coached.”
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B1
Wrestling the weather
Snow forces changes at Border Wars, SHS wrestlers go 3-0
FROM STAFF REPORTS
SHERIDAN — It was supposed
to be a weekend full of matches
for Tyson Shatto and the
Sheridan High School wrestling
team, but when the weather kept
their opponents in Billings, a last
minute change meant wrestling
Cheyenne East instead.
The change didn’t deter
Shatto’s team.
Before the snow fell Friday
night, the Broncs took to the mat
against Riverton and Star Valley
and came away with two victories.
In the first dual of the weekend, Sheridan cruised to an easy
57-6 win over Riverton before battling to a much closer 31-27 win
over Star Valley.
It was the third time this season that the Broncs have faced
Star Valley. Sheridan lost 37-33
and 45-34 at the Battle of the Big
Horns in their final matches
before Christmas break in
December. Shatto was pleased to
see his team bounce back and get
a win in the rematch over the
weekend.
“It was nice to get that one
back,” Shatto said. “I was pleased
with the progress that the kids
made in their wrestling and their
mind set.”
The next morning, a Saturday
that was supposed to see a gym
full of wrestlers, Shatto met with
the coaches of the Wyoming
schools that were there from the
night before, including Cheyenne
East, and the three decided that if
they were stuck in Sheridan, they
might as well wrestle.
This meant an impromptu
match with Cheyenne East for
the Broncs, a match that resulted
in a 47-15 win for the host team.
“It was unfortunate that the
Billings schools couldn’t make
it,” Shatto said. “They bring good
teams. It was a setback, but it didn’t affect us. We were ready to
wrestle.”
Shatto added that it was a good
weekend of wrestling, because
the best practice his team can get
is in live situations.
“The more matches we have,
the better opportunities we have
to learn and prepare for regionals and state,” he said.
The Sheridan wrestlers are
back in action this weekend at
the Shane Shatto Invite in
Douglas.
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Learning from the best
Nine-year-old Riley Bunting, left, plays defense against Lady General Erika Erickson in an exercise during the Sheridan College Lady Generals youth basketball camp Saturday
at the college’s Bruce Hoffman Golden Dome.
Colts beat Bengals
26-10, get ready for Broncos
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Andrew Luck is
eager to get right back to work.
Rather than celebrate Sunday's 26-10 win
over Cincinnati, the Colts' quarterback
immediately explained he was moving on.
And rather than engage in a discussion
about another matchup with his predecessor, Peyton Manning, Luck focused on the
big picture.
‘I have a lot of respect for him,
what he does, what he still does
is amazing. He’s a stud.’
Andrew Luck
Indianapolis Colts quarterback
Yes, the third-year quarterback is starting to sound like a seasoned playoff veteran.
"I think we face the Broncos," Luck said
when asked about Round 3 with Manning.
"It's not the quarterback versus quarterback thing. We're not on the field at the
same time. I have a lot of respect for him,
what he does, what he still does is amazing.
He's a stud. I'll worry about the Denver
defense, that's what I worry about."
That's a stark contrast to the Luck of the
last two seasons.
After a nine-game turnaround in 2012,
they were the AFC's surprise playoff team
and subsequently made a first-round exit.
Last year, after Luck pulled off a 28-point
comeback to beat Kansas City, the Colts
were overjoyed. They wound up losing the
next week.
This year, Luck and the Colts (12-5) have
adopted a business-like approach.
Luck wound up 31 of 44 with 376 yards
and finished a playoff game without a
turnover for the first time. He also delivered the game-changing 36-yard TD pass as
Carlos Dunlap took him to the turf.
Now the Colts have bigger plans.
If Luck beats the Broncos (12-4) on their
home turf, something he failed to do in a
31-24 opening-week loss, Indy will face
either New England (12-4) or Baltimore (116) in the AFC championship game. It won't
be easy.
"They're a great football team and obviously they've got a great, great quarterback," Colts coach Chuck Pagano said. "It's
always a huge challenge and at the same
time, we're going to embrace the opportunity, embrace the moment. It's exciting, it's
fun. It's always a great chess match"
Here are some takeaways from Sunday's
game:
IMPERFECT: While Luck played well, the
Colts' offense was not flawless.
SEE BOOM, PAGE B2
Panthers coach Ron Rivera,
family not injured in house fire
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — The home
of Carolina Panthers coach Ron Rivera
sustained "significant" damage from an
early morning blaze spewing heavy
smoke and fire two days after his team's
playoff victory. No one was injured.
Early indications suggest the fire was
accidental, and the damage from fire,
smoke and water was kept "to a minimum, meaning a lot of their household
items are safe," the Charlotte Fire
Department said Monday.
"You are looking at a large house with
damage to the roof and attic area," Capt.
Rob Brisley, a department spokesman,
said at a news conference. "Anytime you
are faced with a fire and your family is
displaced it is significant for the homeowner and it is significant for the family.
We are just grateful that there are no
injuries."
Rivera and his wife, Stephanie, were
inside the home at the time of the fire
along with some out-of-town family,
team spokesman Charlie Dayton said.
"Everybody is OK and that's the most
important thing," Dayton said.
The Panthers were not scheduled to
practice Monday. Rivera is to address
the media Monday as he usually does.
Brisley said the fire started about 4
a.m. at the large two-story house. He
said the alarm system worked properly,
alerting the family to leave and the fire
department. He said it was not clear
what caused the fire and it's too early to
estimate the damage.
It took fire crews about an hour to
extinguish the fire. Television video
showed blackened windows in the attic
of the 7,000-square foot home, fire officials. The family will not be able to live
at the house at this time, Brisley said.
"When you at a fire like this, it is
never easy to deal with a family that is
being devastated," Brisley said. "But you
can tell they have good support at all
levels. It's a busy week for the city of
Charlotte, including this family."
The Panthers play Saturday in an NFC
divisional playoff game against the
Seattle Seahawks. The fire comes two
days after the Panthers beat the Arizona
Cardinals 27-16 in an NFC wild-card
game, Rivera's first postseason win in
his four seasons in Carolina.
Rivera told reporters at the scene he
heard smoke detectors going off and
that everyone was able to get out.
"The challenge with this large house
was this fire had escaped to the roof
area and it required more firefighters
and extra hoses to contain," Brisley
said. "The fire department was able to
control this fire in about an hour but we
have a long morning ahead of us.”
B2
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, JANUARY 5, 2015
Date set for
2015 Shrine
Bowl game
FROM STAFF REPORTS
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Holding her follow-through
Lady Generals Morgan Thiel, left, and Shayna Kretschman, far right, teach a group of campers proper shooting form during the Sheridan College Lady Generals youth basketball camp Saturday at the college’s Bruce Hoffman Golden Dome.
Longtime ESPN
sportscaster Scott dies at 49
RICK FREEMAN
AP SPORTS WRITER
Stuart Scott was in his element,
working a "Monday Night Football"
game, when he was forced to leave for
an appendix operation.
Doctors discovered a tumor during
surgery and Scott was diagnosed
with cancer. But he made a point of
continuing to live his life — at work
and outside of it.
"You beat cancer by how you live,"
he would later say. "So live. Live.
Fight like hell."
That fight ended Sunday when
Scott, the longtime "SportsCenter"
anchor and ESPN personality known
for his enthusiasm and ubiquity, died
at age 49.
Scott remained dedicated to his
craft even as he suffered through
chemotherapy, radiation and surgery.
ESPN President John Skipper said
in a statement that Scott was "a true
friend and a uniquely inspirational
figure" and that his "energetic and
unwavering devotion to his family
and to his work while fighting the
battle of his life left us in awe, and he
leaves a void that can never be
replaced."
Skipper also marveled at Scott's
dedication to keep fighting — literally.
‘You beat cancer by how you
live, why you live, and the
manner in which you live. So
live. Live. Fight like hell.’
Stuart Scott
Sportscaster
"Who engages in mixed martial arts
training in the midst of chemotherapy treatments?" Skipper said. "Who
leaves a hospital procedure to return
to the set?"
Fans and players at games around
the United States on Sunday stopped
to observe moments of silence,
including at the Bengals-Colts NFL
playoff game in Indianapolis, LionsCowboys in Arlington, Texas; the
Mavericks-Cavaliers NBA game in
Cleveland and at several college basketball games.
Some of the world's most famous
athletes expressed their grief online.
LeBron James wrote on Instagram:
"Thank you so much for being u and
giving us inner city kids someone we
could relate to that wasn't a player
but was close enough to them."
"Stuart wasn't covering heroes &
champions, it was the other way
around," Tiger Woods said on Twitter.
In July, Scott accepted the Jimmy V
Perseverance Award at the ESPYs.
During his speech, he told his
teenage daughters: "Taelor and
Sydni, I love you guys more than I
will ever be able to express. You two
are my heartbeat. I am standing on
this stage here tonight because of
you."
Scott is also survived by his parents, O. Ray and Jacqueline Scott; siblings Stephen Scott, Synthia Kearney
and Susan Scott; his daughters
Taelor, 19, and Sydni, 15; and girlfriend Kristin Spodobalski.
On Sunday morning, NFL Network
broadcaster Rich Eisen's voice broke
as he reported the death of his good
friend, with whom he worked on
"SportsCenter" broadcasts.
"I love this man," Eisen said.
ESPN anchor Hannah Storm called
him "our colleague, our friend and
our inspiration" as she reported the
news. On the network's NFL pregame
show, Chris Berman said, "Stuart
made ESPN what it is, he made us
better people."
Before North Carolina's women's
basketball team tipped off against
N.C. State, the arena observed a
moment of silence for Scott, and the
videoboard proclaimed the 1987 graduate "Forever a Tar Heel."
Born in Chicago, Scott attended
high school in North Carolina before
going to UNC. He returned to Chapel
Hill as the university's commencement speaker in 2001.
Scott worked at three TV stations in
the southern U.S. before joining
ESPN for the 1993 launch of its
ESPN2 network, hosting short sports
update segments.
He often anchored the 11 p.m.
"SportsCenter," where he would punctuate highlights with an emphatic
"Boo-ya!" or note a slick move as
being "as cool as the other side of the
pillow."
Scott went on to cover countless
major events for the network, including the Super Bowl, NBA Finals,
World Series and NCAA basketball
tournament.
He also interviewed President
Barack Obama, joining him for a televised game of one on one.
"I will miss Stuart Scott," Obama
said in a statement. "Stu helped usher
in a new way to talk about our
favorite teams and the day's best
plays. For much of those 20 years,
public service and campaigns have
kept me from my family — but wherever I went, I could flip on the TV and
Stu and his colleagues on
"SportsCenter" were there. ...
Michelle and I offer our thoughts and
prayers to his family, friends and colleagues."
In July, when he accepted the ESPY
award named for former N.C. State
coach Jim Valvano, who died of cancer in 1993, Scott shared what he had
learned from his struggle: "When you
die, that does not mean that you lose
to cancer. You beat cancer by how you
live, why you live, and the manner in
which you live.
"So live. Live. Fight like hell."
SHERIDAN — The
Board of Directors of the
Shrine Bowl of Wyoming
has announced the game
time for this summer’s
42nd annual Wyoming
Shrine Bowl football
game.
With the game scheduled for a 2 p.m. kickoff
on June 13, it will be the
first time in several years
that the game will be
played in the afternoon.
The game will be played at
Natrona County High
School in Casper, and the
board is excited for all of
the traditional pre-game
activities that have always
been included with the
Shrine Bowl game.
Big Horn head coach
Michael McGuire, who
was an assistant coach in
last year’s Shrine Bowl,
has been named an assistant for the North team
again this year. Players
have yet to be selected for
the Shrine Bowl.
BOOM: Replaced Richardson as starter
FROM B1
Daniel "Boom" Herron lost one of his two
fumbles and Indy was called for nine penalties. Those are two problems that plagued the
Colts in November and December. Receiver
T.Y. Hilton also dropped a couple of passes
that could have put the game away earlier
than Adam Vinatieri's two field goals in the
final 16 1/2 minutes. Indy must be sharper at
Denver.
HISTORIC MISERY: Cincinnati became the
first NFL team to lose four consecutive opening-round games. Andy Dalton tied Warren
Moon for the most consecutive opening-round
playoff losses (four) by a quarterback. Coach
Marvin Lewis tied Marty Schottenheimer,
Jim Mora and Steven Owen for most consecutive playoff losses (six) by a coach. Lewis also
tied Mora, the former Colts coach, for most
consecutive playoff losses to start a career,
and tied Owen for most consecutive playoff
losses with one team. Oh, and the Bengals (106-1) haven't won a playoff game in 24 years.
DE-FENSE: The Colts' defense is often overlooked. But Indy has been playing well lately.
Against a depleted Bengals offense, the Colts
limited Jeremy Hill to 13 carries for 47 yards.
Indy also dominated the second half, giving
up just 98 total yards and five first downs to
the Bengals.
LOWERING THE BOOM: Despite the fumbles, Herron had a career day. He ran 12 times
for 56 yards and scored on a 1-yard TD run
while catching 10 passes for 85 yards. He has
clearly supplanted Trent Richardson as the
starter.
Pagano said Richardson, who was almost
invisible because an illness kept him out of
practice Friday and Saturday, may have a bigger role next week.
ROAD WOES: Struggles on the road are
common in the playoffs. Luck is 0-2 in his
career, Cincinnati is 0-7 all-time and Indy has
lost its last three playoff games away from
home. The Colts' last win was 15-6 at
Baltimore in January 2007, a game with no
touchdowns that helped spur their championship run.home. The Colts' last win was 15-6
at Baltimore in January 2007, a game with no
touchdowns that helped spur their championship run.
MIKE PRUDEN | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Soaking it all in
Ross Mullen stands calmly on the ice during the singing of the National Anthem before the Wyoming Winter Classic
Thursday at Sheridan Ice.
MONDAY, JANUARY 5, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
B3
SCOREBOARD |
Golden State 26
5
.839
—
L.A. Clippers 23
11
.676
4½
Phoenix
20
16
.556
8½
Sacramento
14
20
.412
13½
11
23
.324
16½
L.A. Lakers
___
Sunday's Games
Dallas 109, Cleveland 90
Miami 88, Brooklyn 84
Detroit 114, Sacramento 95
Milwaukee 95, New York 82
Phoenix 125, Toronto 109
L.A. Lakers 88, Indiana 87
Monday's Games
Cleveland at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Charlotte at Boston, 7:30 p.m.
Dallas at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Washington at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
Houston at Chicago, 8 p.m.
New York at Memphis, 8 p.m.
Denver at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Indiana at Utah, 9 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Portland, 10 p.m.
Atlanta at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Phoenix at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Detroit at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Milwaukee at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
New York at Washington, 7 p.m.
New Orleans at Charlotte, 7 p.m.
Houston at Cleveland, 7 p.m.
Memphis at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Boston at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Utah at Chicago, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Orlando at Denver, 9 p.m.
Phoenix at Minnesota, 9:30 p.m.
Oklahoma City at Sacramento, 10 p.m.
Indiana at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m.
NFL |
NFL Playoff Glance
The Associated Press
All Times EST
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 3
Carolina 27, Arizona 16
Baltimore 30, Pittsburgh 17
Sunday, Jan. 4
Indianapolis 26, Cincinnati 10
Dallas 24, Detroit 20
Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 10
Baltimore at New England, 4:35 p.m. (NBC)
Carolina at Seattle, 8:15 p.m. (FOX)
Sunday, Jan. 11
Dallas at Green Bay, 1:05 p.m. (FOX)
Indianapolis at Denver, 4:40 p.m. (CBS)
Conference Championships
Sunday, Jan. 18
NFC, 3:05 p.m. (FOX)
AFC, 6:40 p.m. (CBS)
Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 25
At Glendale, Ariz.
Team Irvin vs. Team Carter, 8 p.m. (ESPN)
Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 1
At Glendale, Ariz.
AFC champion vs. NFC champion, 6:30 p.m. (NBC)
NCAAF |
College Football FBS Bowl Glance
The Associated Press
All Times EST
Saturday, Dec. 20
New Orleans Bowl
Louisiana-Lafayette 16, Nevada 3
New Mexico Bowl
At Albuquerque
Utah State 21, UTEP 6
Las Vegas Bowl
Utah 45, Colorado State 10
Famous Idaho Potato Bowl
At Boise
Air Force 38, Western Michigan 24
Camelia Bowl
At Montgomery, Ala.
Bowling Green 33, South Alabama 28
Monday, Dec. 22
Miami Beach Bowl
Memphis 55, BYU 48, 2OT
Tuesday, Dec. 23
Boca Raton (Fla.) Bowl
Marshall 52, Northern Illinois 23
Poinsettia Bowl
At San Diego
Navy 17, San Diego State 16
Wednesday, Dec. 24
Bahamas Bowl
At Nassau
Western Kentucky 49, Central Michigan 48
Hawaii Bowl
At Honolulu
Rice 30, Fresno State 6
Friday, Dec. 26
Heart of Dallas Bowl
Louisiana Tech 35, Illinois 18
Quick Lane Bowl
At Detroit
Rutgers 40, North Carolina 21
St. Petersburg (Fla.) Bowl
N.C. State 34, UCF 27
Saturday, Dec. 27
Military Bowl
At Annapolis, Md.
Virginia Tech 33, Cincinnati 17
Sun Bowl
At El Paso, Texas
Arizona State 36, Duke 31
Independence Bowl
At Shreveport, La.
South Carolina 24, Miami 21
Pinstripe Bowl
At Bronx, N.Y.
Penn State 31, Boston College 30, OT
Holiday Bowl
At San Diego
Southern Cal 45, Nebraska 42
Monday, Dec. 29
Liberty Bowl
At Memphis, Tenn.
Texas A&M 45, West Virginia 37
Russell Athletic Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Clemson 40, Oklahoma 6
Texas Bowl
At Houston
Arkansas 31, Texas 7
Tuesday, Dec. 30
Music City Bowl
At Nashville, Tenn.
Notre Dame 31, LSU 28
Belk Bowl
At Charlotte, N.C.
Georgia 37, Louisville 14
Fosters Farm Bowl
JUSTIN SHEELY | THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Get a grip
Lady General Shayna Kretschman shows Vella Gee, 5, how to hold the ball to
shoot at the basket during the Sheridan Generals youth basketball camp
Saturday at the Sheridan College Bruce Hoffman Golden Dome.
At Santa Clara, Calif.
Stanford 45, Maryland 21
Wednesday, Dec. 31
Peach Bowl
At Atlanta
TCU 42, Mississippi 3
Fiesta Bowl
At Glendale, Ariz.
Boise State 38, Arizona 30
Orange Bowl
At Miami Gardens, Fla.
Georgia Tech 49, Mississippi State 34
Thursday, Jan. 1
Outback Bowl
At Tampa, Fla.
Wisconsin 34, Auburn 31, OT
Cotton Bowl Classic
At Arlington, Texas
Michigan State 42, Baylor 41
Citrus Bowl
At Orlando, Fla.
Missouri 33, Minnesota 17
Rose Bowl
At Pasadena, Calif.
Playoff semifinal: Oregon 59, Florida State 20
Sugar Bowl
At New Orleans
Playoff semifinal: Ohio State 42, Alabama 35
Friday, Jan. 2
Armed Forces Bowl
At Fort Worth, Texas
Houston 35, Pittsburgh 34
TaxSlayer Bowl
At Jacksonville, Fla.
Tennessee 45, Iowa 28
Alamo Bowl
At San Antonio
UCLA 40, Kansas State 35
Cactus Bowl
At Tempe, Ariz.
Oklahoma State 30, Washington 22
Saturday, Jan. 3
Birmingham (Ala.) Bowl
Florida 28, East Carolina 20
Sunday, Jan. 4
GoDaddy Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
Toledo 63, Arkansas State 44
Saturday, Jan. 10
Medal of Honor Bowl
At Charleston, S.C.
American vs. National, 2:30 p.m.
Monday, Jan. 12
College Football Championship
At Arlington, Texas
Ohio State (13-1) vs. Oregon (13-1), 8:30 p.m.
(ESPN)
Saturday, Jan. 17
East-West Shrine Classic
At St. Petersburg, Fla.
East vs. West, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
NFLPA Collegiate Bowl
At Carson, Calif.
National vs. American, 4 p.m. (ESPN2)
Saturday, Jan. 24
Senior Bowl
At Mobile, Ala.
North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFLN)
NBA |
National Basketball Association
The Associated Press
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L
Pct
Toronto
24
10
.706
Brooklyn
16
17
.485
Boston
11
20
.355
New York
5
31
.139
Philadelphia
4
28
.125
Southeast Division
W
L
Pct
Atlanta
25
8
.758
Washington
22
11
.667
Miami
15
20
.429
Orlando
13
24
.351
Charlotte
11
24
.314
Central Division
W
L
Pct
Chicago
24
10
.706
Cleveland
19
15
.559
Milwaukee
18
17
.514
Indiana
13
22
.371
Detroit
10
23
.303
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L
Pct
Memphis
24
9
.727
Dallas
25
10
.714
Houston
23
10
.697
San Antonio
21
14
.600
New Orleans 17
16
.515
Northwest Division
W
L
Pct
Portland
26
8
.765
Oklahoma City 17
17
.500
Denver
14
20
.412
Utah
12
22
.353
Minnesota
5
27
.156
Pacific Division
W
L
Pct
GB
—
7½
11½
20
19
GB
—
3
11
14
15
GB
—
5
6½
11½
13½
GB
—
—
1
4
7
GB
—
9
12
14
20
GB
NCAAM |
This Week's Top 25 Fared
The Associated Press
1. Kentucky (13-0) did not play.
2. Duke (13-0) beat Toledo 86-69; beat Wofford 8455; beat Boston College 85-62.
3. Virginia (13-0) beat Davidson 83-72; beat Miami
89-80, 2OT.
4. Wisconsin (14-1) beat Penn State 89-72; beat
Northwestern 81-58.
5. Louisville (13-1) beat Long Beach State 63-48;
beat Wake Forest 85-76.
6. Villanova (13-1) beat Butler 67-55; lost to Seton
Hall 66-61, OT.
7. Gonzaga (14-1) beat San Diego 60-48; beat
Portland 87-75.
8. Arizona (13-1) beat Arizona State 73-49.
9. Iowa State (10-2) beat MVSU 83-33; lost to
South Carolina 64-60.
10. Utah (12-2) beat Carroll (Mont.) 85-49; beat
Southern Cal 79-55; beat UCLA 71-39.
11. Texas (12-2) beat Rice 66-55; beat Texas Tech
70-61.
12. Maryland (14-1) beat Michigan State 68-66,
2OT; beat Minnesota 70-58.
13. Kansas (11-2) beat Kent State 78-62; beat
UNLV 76-61.
14. Notre Dame (14-1) beat Hartford 87-60; beat
Georgia Tech 83-76, 2OT.
15. St. John's (11-3) lost to Seton Hall 78-67; lost to
Butler 73-69.
16. Wichita State (12-2) beat Drake 66-58; beat
Illinois State 70-62.
17. West Virginia (13-1) beat Virginia Tech 82-51;
beat TCU 78-67.
18. Oklahoma (10-3) beat George Mason 61-43;
beat No. 22 Baylor 73-63.
19. North Carolina (11-3) beat William & Mary 8664; beat Clemson 74-50.
20. Ohio State (12-3) lost to Iowa 71-65; beat Illinois
77-61.
21. Washington (11-3) lost to California 81-75; lost
to Stanford 68-60, OT.
22. Baylor (11-2) beat Norfolk State 92-51; lost to
No. 18 Oklahoma 73-63.
23. Northern Iowa (12-2) lost to Evansville 52-49;
beat Loyola of Chicago 67-58.
24. Colorado State (14-1) beat Boise State 71-65;
lost to New Mexico 66-53.
25. Georgetown (9-4) lost to Xavier 70-53; beat
Creighton 76-61.
NCAAW |
This Week's Women's Top 25 Fared
The Associated Press
1. South Carolina (14-0) beat Auburn 77-58; beat
LSU 75-51.
2. UConn (12-1) beat No. 10 Duke 83-52; beat East
Carolina 89-38; beat St. John's 66-50.
3. Texas (12-0) beat Rice 77-54; beat Kansas 6046.
4. Notre Dame (14-1) beat Florida State 74-68; beat
No. 21 Syracuse 85-74.
5. Texas A&M (14-2) lost to Washington 70-49; beat
North Texas 75-38; beat Vanderbilt 75-61; beat
Jones leads No. 5 Louisville past Wake, 85-76
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. (AP) —
Chris Jones kept No. 5 Louisville's
first Atlantic Coast Conference
game from turning into its first
ACC loss.
Jones scored 20 of his 22 points in
the second half and the Cardinals
won in their ACC debut, pulling
away to beat Wake Forest 85-76 on
Sunday night.
Jones — who entered with only
six more assists than turnovers for
the season — added a career-high
10 assists and had only two
turnovers.
"All Chris Jones has to do to be
one of the better point guards in
the country is listen," coach Rick
Pitino said. "He's gone from never
listening in junior college and high
school to listening about 70 percent
of the time. All he's got to do is get
it to 100 and we've got ourselves a
special player."
Jones quibbled only with his Hall
of Fame coach's math.
"I'd say I listen 80 percent," Jones
said, smiling. "Coach is wrong. I'll
tell him he's 10 percent wrong."
Montrezl Harrell had 25 points
and 13 rebounds for the Cardinals
(13-1, 1-0), who let a 13-point lead
slip away before Jones took over
late, scoring 14 points in the final 8
minutes and leading the decisive
16-3 run.
Devin Thomas had a career-high
31 points and 11 rebounds for Wake
Forest (8-7, 0-2), which led 69-68 on
Konstantinos Mitoglou's layup with
just under 6 minutes to play.
Jones put Louisville ahead to stay
two possessions later with a contested jumper that started decisive
run.
He was 6 for 6 from the free-throw
line in the final 5 minutes for
Louisville, which scored on nine of
its last 10 possessions.
Codi Miller-McIntyre and freshman Mitchell Wilbekin had 14
points apiece for Wake Forest,
which had its three-game winning
streak snapped but won't have to
wait long for another shot at a topfive team: No. 2 Duke visits later
this week.
"We could play with anybody
with that effort," Thomas said.
"We've just got to be better with
details, the scouting report, and
we've got to learn how to finish
games."
Terry Rozier added 18 points for
the Cardinals, who are playing in
their eighth basketball conference
and their third in three years, with
their one-season stint in the
American Athletic Conference in
2013-14 coming after the Big East
broke up.
This was their eighth straight
win in a conference road opener —
no matter the league.
HOME COURT
The ACC might be foreign territo-
ry to these Cardinals, but one of
their best players felt right home.
Harrell is a native of Tarboro who
had his own section of fans holding
up welcome-home signs at Joel
Coliseum.
He had 20 points in the first half
and was 2 of 3 from 3-point range
— after making just 1 of 17
attempts from long range during
his previous 11 games.
STAT SHEET
Wake Forest shot 52.8 percent and
became the only team this season
to shoot better than 50 percent
against Louisville. The biggest reason for that was Thomas, who was
11 of 14. His teammates combined
to shoot 43.6 percent.
TIP-INS
Louisville: Shaqquan Aaron finished with 11 points. ... Pitino
improved to 3-0 during his career
against Wake Forest. His other two
wins came in the NCAA tournament when he was at Kentucky.
Wake Forest: The Demon Deacons
fell to 0-2 this season against the
Pitino family. Minnesota —
coached by Rick's son, Pitino —
beat Wake Forest 84-69 on Dec. 2 in
the ACC-Big Ten Challenge.
UP NEXT
Louisville plays host to Clemson
on Wednesday night in its first
home ACC game.
Wake Forest plays host to Duke
on Wednesday night.
Arkansas 52-50.
6. Baylor (12-1) beat Prairie View 108-64; beat No.
18 Oklahoma State 61-45.
7. Louisville (14-1) beat Evansville 73-51; beat
Georgia Tech 75-48; beat Pittsburgh 63-57.
8. Tennessee (11-2) beat Missouri 63-53.
9. North Carolina (14-1) beat Albany (N.Y.) 71-56;
beat ETSU 95-62; beat N.C. State 72-56.
10. Duke (10-4) lost to No. 2 UConn 83-52; beat
N.C. A&T 87-36; beat Wake Forest 70-63.
11. Kentucky (13-2) beat Alabama 78-66; beat
Mississippi 64-58.
12. Nebraska (10-3) lost to Minnesota 72-69; lost to
No. 14 Maryland 75-47.
13. Oregon State (11-1) beat UCLA 65-47.
14. Maryland (11-2) beat Ohio State 87-78; beat
No. 12 Nebraska 75-47.
15. Stanford (9-4) beat Colorado 62-55.
16. Rutgers (10-4) lost to Ohio State 85-68; lost to
No. 20 Iowa 79-72.
17. Mississippi State (17-0) beat Arkansas-Pine
Bluff 83-26; beat No. 19 Georgia 64-56; beat
Missouri 53-47.
18. Oklahoma State (10-2) beat Northwestern
State 89-44; lost to No. 6 Baylor 61-45.
19. Georgia (13-2) lost to No. 17 Missisippi State
64-56; beat Alabama 64-47.
20. Iowa (11-2) beat No. 16 Rutgers 79-72.
21. Syracuse (10-4) beat CCSU 74-43; lost to No. 4
Notre Dame 85-74.
22. Arizona State (12-1) beat Washington 62-48.
23. Seton Hall (13-2) beat Butler 70-65; lost to St.
John's 59-50.
24. Michigan State (8-6) lost to Indiana 70-51; lost
to Michigan 74-65.
25. DePaul (10-5) lost to Villanova 79-76, OT; beat
Georgetown 105-85.
NHL |
National Hockey League
The Associated Press
All Times EST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP
W
L
Montreal
39
26
11
Tampa Bay
41
25
12
Detroit
39
20
10
Toronto
40
21
16
Boston
40
19
15
Florida
37
17
11
Ottawa
38
16
15
Buffalo
40
14
23
Metropolitan Division
GP
W
L
Pittsburgh
39
24
10
N.Y. Islanders 39
26
12
Washington
38
20
11
N.Y. Rangers 36
21
11
Columbus
37
17
17
39
14
18
Philadelphia
New Jersey
41
14
20
39
12
23
Carolina
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP
W
L
Nashville
38
25
9
Chicago
39
26
11
St. Louis
39
23
13
Winnipeg
39
20
12
Dallas
38
18
14
Minnesota
37
18
15
Colorado
39
15
16
Pacific Division
GP
W
L
Anaheim
41
26
9
Vancouver
37
22
12
Los Angeles 40
19
12
San Jose
39
20
14
Calgary
40
21
16
Arizona
38
15
19
Edmonton
40
9
22
NOTE: Two points for a win, one point
loss.
Sunday's Games
Carolina 2, Boston 1, SO
Anaheim 4, Nashville 3, SO
Washington 4, Florida 3
Tampa Bay 4, Ottawa 2
Chicago 5, Dallas 4, OT
Columbus 4, Colorado 3
Edmonton 5, N.Y. Islanders 2
Monday's Games
San Jose at Winnipeg, 8 p.m.
Tuesday's Games
Buffalo at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Ottawa at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Montreal, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Nashville, 8 p.m.
San Jose at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Colorado at Chicago, 8:30 p.m.
Columbus at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
St. Louis at Arizona, 9 p.m.
Detroit at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Vancouver, 10 p.m.
Wednesday's Games
Washington at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Boston at Pittsburgh, 8 p.m.
Detroit at Calgary, 9:30 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Anaheim, 10:30 p.m.
OT
2
4
9
3
6
9
7
3
Pts
54
54
49
45
44
43
39
31
OT
5
1
7
4
3
7
7
4
Pts
53
53
47
46
37
35
35
28
OT
4
2
3
7
6
4
8
Pts
54
54
49
47
42
40
38
OT Pts
6 58
3 47
9 47
5 45
3 45
4 34
9 27
for overtime
Report: Rams owner
plans NFL stadium
in Los Angeles County
INGLEWOOD, Calif. (AP)
— The owner of the St. Louis
Rams plans to build an NFL
stadium in Los Angeles
County, boosting the chances
that pro football could return
to the region, according to a
newspaper report.
Stan Kroenke has partnered with Stockbridge
Capital Group, owners of the
238-acre Hollywood Park site
in Inglewood, the Los
Angeles Times reported
Monday
(http://lat.ms/1BA13Ye ).
Kroenke and Stockbridge
say they plan to add an
80,000-seat NFL stadium and
6,000-seat performance venue
to a massive development of
retail, office, hotel and residential space.
It is the latest of numerous
Los Angeles-area NFL stadium proposals over two
decades. But Kroenke's move
marks the first time an existing team owner has controlled a local site large
enough for a stadium and
parking, according to the
Times.
The plan will add to pressure on St. Louis to either
strike a deal for a new stadium or watch the team return
to Southern California,
where it played from 1946 to
1994.
The Rams can choose later
this month to convert to a
year-to-year lease in St.
Louis. The team declined to
comment on any plans to
move, but it's no secret that
the team is unhappy in the
Edward Jones Dome, which
is outdated by current NFL
standards. St. Louis is
expected to offer the team a
new proposal by the end of
the month.
The San Diego Chargers
and Oakland Raiders are
similarly unhappy in old stadiums that don't offer updated amenities.
The earliest any team
could move would be 2016.
B4
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
BABY BLUES® by Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman
COMICS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, JANUARY 5, 2015
DRS. OZ & ROIZEN
Dr. Mehmet Oz and Dr. Michael Roizen
MARY WORTH by Karen Moy and Joe Giella
BORN LOSER® by Art and Chip Sansom
"The shin bone's connected
to the knee bone. The knee
bone's connected to the thigh
bone.
The thigh bone's connected to the ..." You know the
drill -- and while "Dem
Bones" is an amusing kids'
song, it also makes a very
important point about health
in general. One condition
often is connected to another,
and may serve as a clue to
other, possibly larger, health
issues.
Take male infertility:
About 15 percent of all couples have fertility issues, and
in half of those cases it's
because the man's semen (the
ejaculate that contains fluid
and sperm) is abnormal in
some way. Stanford
University researchers
looked at 9,000 guys 30-50 who
had fertility problems and
found that even in this relatively young sampling,
around 44 percent of the guys
also had some other significant health issue, such as
hypertension, vascular disease and heart disease. In
addition, they found that as
the number of defects (lower
semen volume, concentration, motility, total sperm
count and morphology
scores) in a guy's semen
increased, the more likely he
was to also have an endocrine
disorder or skin disease.
Researchers are analyzing
the data to determine which
specific endocrine and skin
conditions were most often
associated with fertility problems.
Because the average age
of study participants was 38,
the researchers suggest that
any younger guy with fertility challenges should get
checked out for cardiovascular, endocrine and skin problems. The good news is that
resolving those issues may
help resolve fertility problems and dodge other serious
health challenges down the
road.
Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of
"The Dr. Oz Show," and Mike
Roizen, M.D. is Chief
Wellness Officer and Chair of
Wellness Institute at
Cleveland Clinic.
DEAR ABBY
Pauline Phillips and Jeanne Phillips
GARFIELD by Jim Davis
FRANK & ERNEST® by Bob Thaves
REX MORGAN, M.D. by Woody Wilson and Tony DiPreta
ZITS® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
DILBERT by S. Adams
ALLEY OOP® by Dave Graue and Jack Bender
DEAR ABBY: I am
engaged to the father of my
son. We have been together
for five years. He's in a wheelchair and has been since he
was a child. I love him very
much and am ready to be his
wife.
Every time I would tell my
mother we planned to be married, she'd give me a thousand reasons why marrying
the man I love would be stu-
pid. We are now at a point in
our lives where we are financially stable and are finally
ready. When I told Mom, she
called me selfish and said she
won't be there. I am heartbroken.
Am I a horrible person for
marrying the man I love
despite the fact that my family can't accept his disability?
They keep asking if I understand the responsibility that
comes with being with a person in a wheelchair. I know I
can't change other people's
minds, but do people really
think it's bad for a walking
person to marry a person in a
wheelchair? -- ENGAGED IN
MICHIGAN
DEAR ENGAGED: You're
not a "horrible person," and
yes, some people do harbor
this prejudice. You appear to
be a young woman with her
head on straight, and I hope
you won't allow your mother's refusal to attend your
wedding to stand in the way
of your happiness.
While there are some
things people in wheelchairs
can't do, there are many
things at which they excel.
Many people with disabilities
earn a comfortable living
using the muscle between
their ears in careers such as
law, counseling, teaching,
Internet technology and
more, and some have become
fine craftsmen because of
their manual dexterity.
Perhaps if your family were
to concentrate less on what
your fiance can't do and more
on the things he can, they'd
be more accepting.
DEAR ABBY: I am a 25year-old woman. My parents
divorced when I was young. I
kept in contact with my
father until he dropped out of
my life when I was around
11.
I came across Dad again on
Facebook recently. He's now
in a domestic partnership
with another man. It wasn't a
shock because Mom had told
me some time ago she had
suspected he was gay.
What upset me were several posts he made about wanting a happy family with his
partner. I know the family he
made with Mom may not
have been his ideal, but my
sister and I ARE his family. I
feel like we were tossed aside
for this idea of a new family,
which seems cold and callous. I haven't mentioned it to
my sister because I think
she'd find it upsetting.
I want to confront Dad, but
also think it might be best to
just leave it alone. Any
advice? -- UNCOUNTED IN
CALIFORNIA
DEAR UNCOUNTED: I
think you should contact
your father, start a dialogue
with him and ask why he
dropped out of your life. His
reason may be that he was
made to feel that his presence in your life was unwelcome, or a fear that you
would not be able to accept
his sexual orientation.
It seems strange to me that
he would leave his daughters
behind for no reason. If you
would like to re-establish a
relationship, tell him so. He
may need to hear it from you
before he can move forward
and reconnect with you and
your sister.
Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Contact Dear Abby at
www.DearAbby.com or P.O.
Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
Abby shares more than 100
of her favorite recipes in two
booklets: "Abby's Favorite
Recipes" and "More Favorite
Recipes by Dear Abby." Send
your name and mailing
address, plus check or money
order for $14 (U.S. funds) to:
Dear Abby, Cookbooklet Set,
P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris,
IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and
handling are included in the
price.)
MONDAY, JANUARY 5, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
Wild-card rally doesn't spell relief for Romo
ARLINGTON, Texas (AP) — Tony
Romo has his first come-from-behind
victory in the playoffs, a refreshing
reprise for a career filled with seasonending disappointments.
The Dallas quarterback's late touchdown pass to Terrance Williams gave
the Cowboys a 24-20 wild-card victory
over Detroit on Sunday and sent them
to Green Bay for their first postseason
visit since the Packers won the Ice
Bowl for the NFL championship 47
years ago.
Anyone looking for a big exhale
from the 34-year-old quarterback who
avoided more heartache in Dallas' first
playoff game in five years, well, it's not
happening.
"There is no sense of relief," said
Romo, who also had a 76-yard TD toss
to Williams to start the rally from an
early 14-0 deficit. "Our aspirations
weren't winning the division, as great
as that was. And it's not just winning a
playoff game, as great as that was."
The Cowboys (13-4) will play their
third divisional round game under
Romo against the Packers on Sunday.
He lost the first two, including at
home to the New York Giants during
the 2007 season when Dallas was the
top seed in the NFC.
"I think people appreciate Tony as
having the skills that he has," owner
Jerry Jones said. "I hope they see that
he's made some pretty impressive
plays and had big games. The only
thing that will ever get them off his
back totally would be to get that Super
Bowl win."
The Lions (11-6) went 99 yards for
one of two first-quarter touchdowns,
but Matthew Stafford couldn't get
them in the end zone again.
Detroit was driving with a 20-17 lead
midway through the fourth quarter
when referee Pete Morelli announced
a pass interference penalty against
Anthony Hitchens on a third-down
pass to Brandon Pettigrew. But officials reversed the call without explanation, and Sam Martin followed with
a 10-yard punt.
"Not a good enough one. I'm going to
leave it at that," Lions coach Jim Caldwell said of the explanation he got.
"I'm not going to sit up here and act
like that was the play that made a difference in the game."
Things to consider after the Lions
missed out on just their second playoff
win of the Super Bowl era (The first
was against Dallas during the 1991 season):
THE EXPLANATION: Referee Pete
Morelli said the back judge threw the
flag on the pass interference penalty,
but the head linesman had a "better
view" and thought the call should be
changed.
The linesman said there wasn't
enough contact and that Hitchens was
face-guarding, which isn't a penalty in
the NFL.
"I thought it was ridiculous, to be
honest," Pettigrew said. "He ran
through me, pretty much, trying to get
back to the ball. To me, it was obvious."
CLINCHING THE WIN: After the reversal, Romo took the Cowboys 59
yards in 11 plays, including a 21-yard
pass to Jason Witten on fourth-and-6.
The winner was an 8-yarder to
Williams in the back of the end zone
after Romo had several seconds to
throw behind an offensive line among
the league's best because Dallas has
drafted linemen in the first round
three of the past four years.
The Cowboys had to wait a little
longer to celebrate. Rookie DeMarcus
Lawrence gave the Lions the ball back
with a fumble following Anthony
B5
No. 10 Duke rallies
to beat
Wake Forest 70-63
Spencer's sack that knocked the ball
loose from Stafford, who was 28 of 42
for 323 yards playing against his
hometown team.
Lawrence redeemed himself on the
clincher eight plays later, sacking
Stafford on fourth down near midfield
in the final minute.
EMOTIONAL SUH: Detroit defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh had consecutive sacks in the fourth quarter
after his week started with news that
he would be suspended for stepping on
Green Bay's Aaron Rodgers in the regular-season finale. He was reinstated a
day later.
He was so emotional after the loss
that he left the podium in tears, only
to return a minute later to finish talking about how the season suddenly
ended.
"I'm speechless. ... I didn't expect this
outcome," Suh said.
RESILIENT ROMO: The 34-year-old
who had back surgery in December
2013 and missed one game with another back injury bounced back from a
season-high six sacks to finish with
293 yards and a passer rating right in
line with a franchise-best 113.2 that led
the NFL in the regular season.
"I'm thrilled for him," said Jones,
who gave Romo the first $100 million
contract in franchise history almost
two years ago.
TOUGH SLEDDING: NFL rushing
leader DeMarco Murray slogged his
way to 75 yards on 19 carries against
the NFL's best run defense, including
a 1-yard plunge on fourth down that
pulled Dallas to 20-14 late in the third
quarter. His score was set up by the
only big play from Dez Bryant. The
NFL leader in receiving touchdowns
(16) had a 43-yard catch to inside the
10, but had just 5 yards on two other
grabs.
DURHAM, N.C. (AP) —
Senior center Elizabeth
Williams led No. 10 Duke
to victory with her aggressive play after the
Blue Devils got off to a
slow start against Wake
Forest.
Williams had 18
points, eight rebounds
and six blocks in Sunday's 70-63 win in the Atlantic Coast Conference
opener for both teams.
She also made a careerhigh five steals, including a key one to stop a
late Demon Deacons
rally.
"I thought Elizabeth
showed tremendous
leadership and aggression on the floor," Duke
coach Joanne P. McCallie said. "It was really
contagious. It was great
to see her play so, so
hard."
The Blue Devils (10-4,
1-0) won their 41st
straight meeting over
Wake Forest, but this
was the smallest margin
of victory in the last 18
games.
"We're obviously disappointed in the outcome,"
Wake Forest coach Jen
Hoover said, "but we
worked hard to come in
and I felt like we got a lot
of really good looks."
Wake Forest (9-6, 0-1)
scored the first 10 points
and built a 26-10 lead
with 10:20 left in the half
on Taylor Gordon's 3pointer.
But then Duke began
chipping away thanks to
its defense and three
drawn charges.
"Any hustle play is always good for us," said
senior guard Ka'Lia
Johnson. "That fuels our
offense."
Duke outscored Wake
Forest 24-7 the rest of the
half.
The Blue Devils took a
34-33 lead into halftime
after Oderah Chidom
stole an inbounds pass
in the backcourt and
made a layup.
Duke then built a 15point lead in the second
half before holding on
for the victory.
Johnson and freshman
Rebecca Greenwell finished with 15 points
each for the Blue Devils.
Dearica Hamby, Nicole
Floyd and Ataijah Taylor led Wake Forest with
11 points apiece.
CLASSIFIEDS
Phone: (307) 672-2431
TO PLACE YOUR AD
Fax: (307) 672-7950
DEADLINES
RATES & POLICIES
Deadline
Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 days . . . . . . . .6 days . . . . . . . . . . . .26 days
Monday ........................................................................Friday 2:30 PM
2 lines (minimum) . . . . . . .$10.75 . . . . . . .$16.00 . . . . . . . . . . . .$40.00
Tuesday.................................................................... Monday 2:30 PM
Each additional line . . . . . .$4.75 . . . . . . . . $7.00 . . . . . . . . . . . . .$17.50
Email : [email protected]
Wednesday ............................................................Tuesday 2:30 PM
Visit : 144 Grinnell Street, Downtown Sheridan
Thursday........................................................... Wednesday 2:30 PM
Mail : P.O. Box 2006, Sheridan, WY, 82801
Friday...................................................................... Thursday 2:30 PM
Include name, address, phone, dates to run and payment
Saturday ...................................................................... Friday 2:30 PM
We reserve the right to reject, edit or reclassify any advertisement accepted by us for publication. When placing an ad in person or on the phone, we will read all ads back to you for
your approval. If we fail to do so, please tell us at that time. If you find an error in your
classified ad, please call us before 9 a.m. to have it corrected for the next day’s paper. The
Press cannot be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion. Claims cannot be considered unless made within three days of the date of publication. No allowances can be
made when errors do not materially affect the value of the advertisement.
Phone: (307) 672-2431 Fax: (307) 672-7950
Monday – Friday, 8am – 5pm
Run Day
All classified ads run for free at www.thesheridanpress.com!
All classified ads running in Monday’s Press also run in the weekly PressPlus at no additional charge!
Houses, Unfurnished for
Rent
AUSSIE/BORDER
COLLIE
tri-color 3 BR/2 Ba. $950/mo +
puppies for sale. Call util. No smoking/pets.
673-2571 or 751-2198.
307-272-9867
For Lease
BUILDINGS
FOR LEASE
Rail Road Land
& Cattle Co.
Has Shop Space,
Warehouse Space,
Retail Space,
Office Space and
much more
for lease!
673-5555
Furnished Apts for Rent
1 BR. No smk/pets.
$650 + elec. Coin-Op
W/D. 307-674-5838.
ROCKTRIM $600/MO.
Wi-Fi/Cable 752-8783
Unfurnished Apts for
Rent
2BR. FRONT door prkg.
On site W/D. $600
+dep. Lease/ref's. Call
afternoon for appt. 7524735.
4 BR 2 BA.
Nice neighborhood.
Close to school.
$1800/mo. 673-5555.
3BR/1BA. LRG fenced
yard. W/D hooks. $950
+ util, lease & deposit.
Pet negotiable. 307631-6024
RECENTLY REMOD.
2BR 1ba, hardwood
floors, new appliances,
A/C, 2 car gar/shop.
fncd. yd. No smk.
$1150+util+dep. Owner
licensed realtor. 6832211 or 751-2390.
Houses, Furnished for
Rent
EXECUTIVE
HOMES
at The Powder
Horn for Rent,
furnished;
$2200/mo; utils
incl; thru May
only. Contact
Judy at Powder
Horn Realty, 6749545.
2 BR, 1.5 ba., W/D,
range,
Refrigerator,
water/swr. pd, patio,
fireplace, No pets/smk.,
$750/mo.
+
$750
deposit,
Avail. Mobile Homes for Rent
immediately,
1
yr. 2 BR 1 ba., $575/mo. +
contract, located at dep., includes lot rent,
1549 Taylor Unit #5, 751-2105
751-8291.
Storage Space
CALL BAYHORSE
STORAGE 1005 4th
Ave. E. 752-9114.
Help Wanted
NOW TAKING
applications for Line
cooks, Servers w/
experience. Morning &
eve. shifts avail. Apply
in person, 1373 Coffeen
Ave.
Now Hiring
*Wage DOE
Apply in person at the Front Desk.
1809 SUGARLAND DRIVE
SHERIDAN, WY
SHERIDAN MANOR
is now hiring CNA's.
Call Donna at 307674-4416. Also hiring
RN's & LPN's. Call
Brenda at 307-6744416.
LG 4 bd, 2 bath house
on 5 acres, 3 car
garage,horse pasture
and barns available.
$1100/month + dep.
751-2105
CIELO STORAGE 7523904
DOWNER ADDITION
STORAGE 674-1792
INTERSTATE
STORAGE. Multiple
Sizes avail. No
deposit req'd. 7526111.
PICKLES
NOW HIRING
housekeepers.
Apply at
Candlewood Suites
1709 Sugarland
Drive.
NOW HIRING Front
Desk, Housekeeping,
Breakfast Attendant.
Exp. Preferred.
Apply in person at
Motel 6 & Hampton
Inn.
NON SEQUITUR
• Maintenance
• Overnight
Maintenance
• Bartenders
• Hostess
Storage Space
CLEAN 1BR
Ranchester 4Plex no
smk util incl $610+dep
672-8641
Help Wanted
RIDLEY'S FAMILY
Markets is currently
seeking all Grocery
Positions, Deli,
Bakery, Meat and
Produce Clerks...
Apply at
www.shopridleys.com
GREAT
RESTAURANTS
BEGIN WITH
GREAT
EMPLOYEES!
The Open Range
NOW HIRING!
Line Cooks
Dishwashers
Bartenders
Host/Hostess
Wait Staff
Bussers
Applications available
at the Sheridan Inn
front desk Mon - Fri.
JANRIC CLASSIC SUDOKU
Fill in the blank cells using numbers 1 to 9. Each number can appear only once in each row,
level ranges from Bronze (easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).
Rating: BRONZE
Solution to 1/3/15
© 2015 Janric Enterprises Dist. by creators.com
Pets & Supplies
LOST
PET?
Place an ad in
The Press!
Call 672-2431
1/5/15
CLASSIFIEDS
B6 THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, JANUARY 5, 2015
TH E SH ERID AN PRESS
IS EX PAN D IN G STAFF
The S herid a n Pres s ,an i
nnovati
ve com m uni
ty dai
ly new spaper
wi
thnew s platf
orm s i
n avari
ety ofm edi
a,has an openi
ng f
orthe
posi
ti
on ofNew s Clerk.
Thi
si
s apart-ti
m e posi
ti
on and w ould be i
dealf
orsom eone
seeki
ng em ploym entfi
ve m orni
ngs aw eek.
Responsi
bi
li
ti
es i
nclude the w ri
ti
ng,organi
zi
ng and edi
ti
ng oflocal
new s bri
efs,press releases,subm i
tted photos.Thi
s posi
ti
on also
updates ourw eb si
te new s and photos,i
ncludi
ng breaki
ng new s.It
also requi
res updati
ng and m anagem entofthe Press’onli
ne and
pri
ntcom m uni
ty eventcalendars.The posi
ti
on m anages the
Press’m onthly edi
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alaudi
t.A nd otherduti
es as assi
gned by the
M anagi
ng Edi
tor.
The successfulcandi
date w i
llbe organi
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i
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n an energeti
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aw ard-w i
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ence w i
th
onli
ne m edi
aand basi
c spreadsheets.
Please send coverletterresum e to:
kris [email protected] thes herid a npres s .co m .
These Animals are Available
at the Dog & Cat Shelter
84 East Ridge Road
Dogs
Cats
“Wyatt”, 1 yr. old, NM, black & shite, Spaniel mix
“Colton”, 2 yr. old, NM, black, Labr mix
“Sawyer”, 2 yr. old, SF, black & brown, Hound mix
“Brut”, 2 yr. old, NM, black & brown, Presa Canario
“Pork”, 4 yr. old, NM, Black & Brown, Boxer/Terrier Mix
“Lego”, 2 yr. old, NM, brown, Chocolate Lab/Hound mix
“Jojo”, 2 yr. old, SF, black, Retriever/Heeler mix
“Harry”, 3 yr. old, NM, black & white Australian Cattle Dog
“Tango”, 11 mo. old, NM, brown, Retriever mix
“Bobert”, 7 yr. old, NM, gray & brown, tabby, DSH
“Stubby J”, 8 yr. old, NM, gray & white, bobtail, DLH
“Juan Pablo”, 2 yr. old, NM, gray tabby, DSH
“Matilda”, 2 1/2 yr. old, SF, black & white, DSH
“Patsy”, 4 yr. old, SF, black & orange, Calico manx
“Sabrina”, 10 yr. old, SF, cream, Siamese mix
“Ethel”, 3 yr. old, SF, gray & black, Main Coon mix
“Chelsey””, 1 yr. old, SF, orange & black Calico mix
“Sharon”, 1 yr. old, SF, orange & black Calico mix
DSH = domestic short hair DMH = domestic medium hair DLH = domestic long hair
NM = neutered male • SF= spayed female
We have 49 cats and 7 kittens, 14 dogs & 1 puppy up for adoption!!
Come up and see what we have for you!
Please bring your aluminum cans either to our Can Hut just inside the Shelter
gates or to our can trailer at Scotty’s Skate Castle. Recycling proceeds are
used to care for the animals.Thanks for your support.
Hints from Heloise
Dear Readers:
Here is this week's
SOUND OFF, about
some charities' solicitation methods:
"Charities keep
sending me letters
and address labels. I donate to
the charities I have ties to, or
those that I think do a good job.
Sending me multiple requests
with a little 'gift' will not
prompt me to donate. Rather,
I'll make a point to NOT donate
to that particular charity. What
a waste of resources and
money. I have even returned all
of that wasted paper in the
group's return stamped envelope." -- Anonymous in Maine
You bring up a very good
point, and one that charities
should take into consideration.
However, depending on the
group, the fulfillment may be
handled by a professional
group that does not pay attention to "do not send" requests. -Heloise
SEND A GREAT HINT TO:
Heloise
P.O. Box 795000
San Antonio, TX 78279-5000
Fax: 1-210-HELOISE
Email:
Heloise(at)Heloise.com
FAST FACTS
Heloise
Dear Readers: Here are alternative uses for hair spray:
* Spray recipe cards to make
cleaning splatters on them easier.
* Keeps a fresh wreath looking greener longer.
* Use as bug spray, in a pinch.
* Spray on children's chalk
artwork.
* After wicker is cleaned,
spray a light coating on it.
-- Heloise
WREATH CLEANING
Dear Heloise: I read your column in The Lamesa (Texas)
Press Reporter. How do I clean
the dust off an outdoor Christmas wreath? -- Pat in Lamesa,
Texas
To clean the dust off a
wreath, try using a clean, soft
paintbrush to gently remove
the dust. If that doesn't work,
here's a fun hint: Use a hair
dryer, on the lowest speed, and
hold it about a foot away from
the wreath. This should "dedust" the wreath. Make sure to
do this outside so you aren't
blowing dust into your house!
Depending on the size and
durability of the wreath, and if
you have a large buildup of
dust, you may try wiping it
with a dry microfiber cloth
first, then a damp one. When
putting the wreath away for the
season, wrap it in a plastic bag.
-- Heloise
TOWEL USES
Dear Heloise: I just read your
hints today and wanted to add
to the uses for old blankets and
towels. Here is how I use old
towels:
Several years ago, I was having my bathroom remodeled,
and they were putting tile in
the shower area and installing
a beautiful, custom glass
shower door. I had major concerns about keeping everything
clean, and the installers told
me it was simple -- just dry the
shower and door after each use;
do not let water stand on them.
I towel-dry my shower and door
every day with the old towels,
and they look like new. -- Ruth
in Florida
HANDY NUMBERS
Dear Heloise: All my children
and grandchildren have their
own cellphones. At my age, I
can't remember all of their
numbers. I printed their names
and numbers and a few others,
like those of friends and the
doctor's office, on a pretty piece
of paper, framed it and hung it
next to my kitchen phone. This
is a big help to me. -- Evelyn,
via email
Bridge
Phillip Alder
A JUNIOR
FOR MANY
YEARS TO
COME
At the end
of last week,
I described a couple of
deals featuring junior
players, for which the
age limit is 26 at the moment. In November, I
watched a game including Sam Hanser of Saint
Louis, who is only 13
years old. In this deal,
Hanser handled the ending nicely, overcoming
the bad trump break.
Given the adverse vulnerability and the unimpressive long suit,
opening two spades was
sensible.
West led a low diamond. Hanser ruffed
East's 10 and led his club
six. Although second
hand low is right most of
the time, here South was
marked with some club
length, given his diamond void. So West
should have won with
her ace, but she ducked.
After winning with
dummy's king, declarer
(not best) played another
club. East should have
discarded a heart, but
she threw a diamond.
West won with her ace
and gave her partner a
club ruff. East now
pushed through a
trump, South's nine losing to West's king.
South ruffed West's diamond exit and led a low
trump, getting
the bad news.
But declarer
ruffed the next
diamond and
played a heart to
dummy's queen,
bringing everyone down to four
cards.
Dummy had
the ace-seven of
hearts and two
high clubs. East
held the ace-jack
of spades and
two diamonds.
South retained
the queen-eight
of spades and
king-five of
hearts.
Declarer led a
winning club. If
East had ruffed
Omarr’s Daily Astrological
Forecast
BIRTHDAY GUY: Actor
Norman Reedus was born
in Hollywood, Fla., today in
1969. This birthday guy has
starred as Daryl Dixon on
"The Walking Dead" since
2010. He's also appeared on
episodes of "Hawaii Five-O,"
Law and Order: SVU" and
"Charmed." On the big
screen, Reedus' film credits
include roles in "Pandorum," "The Boondock
Saints" and "Deuces Wild."
ARIES (March 21-April
19): Strike a happy medium.
You may reach a pleasant
plateau where you can take
a breather or receive a reward for past efforts. Find a
pastime that allows you to
stretch mental muscles.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20): Don't try to organize
your way to a happier family life. Although you may
feel others are controlling
finances and your schedule,
you can't react by lashing
out and restricting them in
turn.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
Testify to your strengths.
Let people know about your
accomplishments. Your
partner may be wrapped up
in business or work and
need a break from that vicious circle.
CANCER (June 21-July
22): You know what they
say about the best laid plans
of mice and men. The mental picture you have of your
finances may not be accurate. Focus on social interactions and polish your
public image.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):
Straddle the issues. Worst
case scenarios can duke it
out with best case scenarios. The truth will become
clear in a few days, so hold
off on making decisions or
taking irrevocable steps.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Direct your thoughts. Old
friends or older people
might need a push in the
right direction. Ignore the
nagging voice that urges
you to indulge in costly
pleasures and spend your
hard earned cash.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
You may weigh whether an
offer is meant as an incentive or bribery. Don't let a
desire for security make
you timid when tough tactics are necessary. A change
low, South would have
overruffed and played
winners. When East discarded on dummy's last
two clubs, at trick 12 declarer led a heart
through East's ace-jack
of spades toward his
queen-eight. South lost
only four spades and one
club.
Jeraldine Saunders
of plan won't cancel out obligations.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov.
21): Honor commitments.
You can easily disconnect
from situations that rob you
of time, resources, or peace
of mind if they've been dealt
with honorably. Focus on
achieving long-term goals.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Someone who just
sits there could become a
sitting duck. Urge friends
and partners to be proactive
and get off the treadmill.
You can set a sterling example of productivity.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Dreams of success give
you a push in the right direction. You may want prestige in the form of a bigger
office or a new car to show
off your status. Family
members can motivate you.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18): Get out of your chair
and breathe some fresh air.
It can't hurt to take a walk
or challenge your physical
self with some laps in the
swimming pool or a test of
strength in the weight
room.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March
20): Remember the lesson
taught by Jack and Jill.
They had a great time until
one fell down and the other
came tumbling after. Be
charming, but wait to
launch a new commitment
or business project.
IF JANUARY 6 IS YOUR
BIRTHDAY: You may feel
like Dorothy during the
next 3-4 weeks and think,
"there's no place like home,"
but by February and March
you may feel more like the
great and powerful Oz. Hold
off on making major
changes during those
months, which could waste
your resources, because
something better should
come along in May. May is
also an excellent time to ask
for favors or to put crucial
plans into motion. You may
bask in increased popularity, making it easier than
ever to win that promotion
or find ardent admirers, especially in July. In October,
uou'll receive recognition
for your hard work and determination and be blessed
by opportunities to demonstrate your sound judgment.
YOUR ELECTED
OFFICIALS |
CITY
John Heath
Mayor
307-675-4223
Public Notices
MONDAY, JANUARY 5, 2015
www.thesheridanpress.com
WHY PUBLIC NOTICES ARE IMPORTANT |
Kristin Kelly
Councilor
307-673-4751
Shelleen
Smith
Councilor
307-461-7082
Robert
Webster
Councilor
307-674-4206
Alex Lee
Councilor
307-752-8804
Jesus Rios
Councilor
307-461-9565
COUNTY
Pete Carroll
Treasurer
307-674-2520
Eda
Thompson
Clerk
307-674-2500
Nickie Arney
Clerk of District
Court
307-674-2960
John Fenn
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
William
Edelman
4th Judicial
District Court
Judge
307-674-2960
Shelley
Cundiff
Sheridan
County Circut
Court Judge
307-674-2940
P.J. Kane
Coroner
307-673-5837
Terry
Cram
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Tom
Ringley
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Mike
Nickel
Chairman
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Steve
Maier
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Dave
Hofmeier
Sheriff
307-672-3455
Bob
Rolston
Commissioner
307-674-2900
Paul
Fall
Assessor
307-674-2535
Matt
Redle
County
Attorney
307-674-2580
STATE
Matt
Mead
Governor
307-777-7434
Rosie
Berger
Representative
House Dist. 51
307-672-7600
Kathy
Coleman
Representative
House Dist. 30
307-675-1960
John
Patton
Representative
House Dist. 29
307-672-2776
Mike
Madden
Representative
House Dist. 40
307-684-9356
Dave
Kinskey
Senator
Senate Dist. 22
307-461-4297
307-278-6030
Bruce
Burns
Senator
Senate Dist. 21
307-672-6491
PUBLIC NOTICE
Sheridan Area Water Supply Joint Powers Board Briefing
and Agenda Setting Session
Time: 9:00 am, Thursday, January 8, 2015
Place: Sheridan County Commissioner’s Library; 2nd
floor of the Courthouse Addition
SAWSJPB staff will brief members of the board and
present a draft agenda for the January 14, 2015 regular
meeting of the board.
Dan Coughlin
Sheridan Area Water Supply Project Manager
Publish: January 5, 2015.
B7
GLOSSARY OF TERMS |
Default: Failure to fulfill an obligation, especially the obligation to
make payments when due to a lender.
Encumbrance: A right attached to the property of another that may
lessen its value, such as a lien, mortgage, or easement.
Foreclosure: The legal process of terminating an owner’s interest in
property, usually as the result of a default under a mortgage.
Foreclosure may be accomplished by order of a court or by the
statutory process known as foreclosure by advertisement (also
known as a power of sale foreclosure).
Lien: A legal claim asserted against the property of another, usually
as security for a debt or obligation.
Mortgage: A lien granted by the owner of property to provide
security for a debt or obligation.
Public notices allow citizens to monitor their government and make sure that it is
working in their best interest. Independent newspapers assist in this cause by
carrying out their partnership with the people’s right to know through public
notices. By offering an independent and archived record of public notices,
newspapers foster a more trusting relationship between government and its
citizens.
Newspapers have the experience and expertise in publishing public notices and
have done so since the Revolutionary War. Today, they remain an established,
trustworthy and neutral source that ably transfers information between
government and the people.
Public notices are the lasting record of how the public’s resources are used and are
presented in the most efficient and effective means possible.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
The Town of Ranchester, Wyoming will receive sealed
bids for the Main Street Mercantile Project. This project
is funded by the Wyoming Business Ready Community
Grant and Loan Program and the Town of Ranchester.
These improvements are generally described as follows:
New Wood framed Structures and associated site work
for a new Retail building with 3 tenant spaces.
Sealed bids will be received until 4:00 p.m. local time on
February 10th, 2015. The bids will then be opened and
read aloud at the Ranchester Town Hall.
All bids shall be submitted in accordance with and on
the forms included in the Project Manual. Bids shall be
submitted in a sealed envelope addressed to:
Town of Ranchester
145 Coffeen Street
PO Box 695
Ranchester, Wyoming 82839
Contract Documents have been placed on file and may
be examined at Ranchester Town Hall, 145 Coffeen
Street, Ranchester, WY or at the Office of the Architect.
Contract Documents may be obtained at the office of
the Architect: Dale Buckingham Architects, 45 East
Loucks St., Suite 301, Sheridan, WY 82801 at the nonrefundable cost of $150.00 per set. Electronic Copies of
the Contract Documents are available at no cost.
A non-mandatory Pre-bid conference will be held at
2:00 PM local time the Ranchester Town Hall on
January 29, 2015.
Contractors, in submitting their respective bids,
acknowledge that such bids conform to all
requirements of Wyoming State Statutes W.S. § 15-1-113
and W.S. § 16-6-101 et. Seq, and the Wyoming
Preference Act W.S. § 16-6-201 through 16-6-206. Each
bidder must include a Wyoming Certificate of Residency
if you are a resident contractor and a bid security with
the bid, payable to the Town of Ranchester. Bids must
be submitted in accordance with the Instructions to
Bidders.
No bidder may withdraw its bid after the scheduled
time of the bid opening. Bids are to remain open for 60
days after the bid opening.
The Owner reserves the right to reject any and all bids or
parts thereof, and to waive any irregularities of any bid.
The Owner also reserves the right to award the contract
to such responsible bidders as may be determined by
the Owner.
Town of Ranchester, Wyoming
Publish: January 5, 14, 24, 2015.
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
The Sheridan Press publishes Legal
To Know
Notices under the following schedule:
If we receive the Legal Notice by:
and be informed of
Monday Noon –
It will be published in
Thursday’s paper.
government legal
proceedings is
Tuesday Noon –
It will be published in
Friday’s paper.
embodied in public
notices. This
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Saturday’s paper.
newspaper urges
every
Wednesday Noon –
It will be published in
Monday’s paper.
citizen to read and
study these
Thursday Noon –
It will be published in
Tuesday’s paper.
notices.
We strongly advise
Friday Noon –
It will be published in
Wednesday’s paper.
those seeking
to exercise their
right of access to
public records and
public meetings.
Disclaimer: The foregoing terms and definitions are provided merely as a guide to the
reader and are not offered as authoritative definitions of legal terms.
LEGAL NOTICE POLICY
Your Right
further information
Power of Sale: A clause commonly written into a mortgage
authorizing the mortgagee to advertise and sell the property in the
event of default. The process is governed by statute, but is not
supervised by any court.
Probate: The court procedure in which a decedent’s liabilities are
settled and her assets are distributed to her heirs.
Public Notice: Notice given to the public or persons affected
regarding certain types of legal proceedings, usually by publishing
in a newspaper of general circulation. This notice is usually
required in matters that concern the public.
• Complete information, descriptions and billing information are required with
each legal notice. A PDF is required if there are any signatures, with a Word
Document attached.
• Failure to include this information WILL cause delay in publication. All legal
notices must be paid in full before an "AFFIDAVIT OF PUBLICATION" will be
issued.
• Please contact The Sheridan Press legal advertising department at 672-2431 if
you have questions.
One of our County and State's legendary historians, photographers, and authors, Elsa Spear Byron, is pictured here.
Elsa was born near Big Horn in 1896 to Willis and Virginia
Benton Spear. When 12 years old her mother gave her a
camera and she took photos for over 80 years. Her Crow Indian photos are part of the permanent collections in the
Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman, Montana. Dubbed
'Grand Lady of the Bozeman Trail', by National Geographic
in their special "Trails West" edition, she was also inducted
into the Cowboy and Cowgirl Halls of Fame. Three of her
small books 'Fort Phil Kearny: Dakota Territory'; 'Trailing
the Campfires'; and 'Bozeman Trail Scrapbook' have been
compiled into one...Bozeman Trail Scrapbook. The Sheridan County Museum, the Wyoming Room at the Sheridan
Library; and the Big Horn City Historical Society all have
large collections of her artifacts, written materials, and
photographs. The photo is from the "Elsa's Pics" collection
in the Sheridan County Museum's Memory Book Project.
P U B LI C N O T I C ES
I
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sh governm ental
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New spapers have long had the experi
ence,experti
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new spaper to the front secti
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i
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i
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O ur publi
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Content matters.
144 G ri
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B8
THE SHERIDAN PRESS
www.thesheridanpress.com
MONDAY, JANUARY 5, 2015
© 2014 by Vicki Whiting, Editor
Jeff Schinkel, Graphics
Newspaper reporters interview
people to get the information
for their news reports. With
your learning buddy, select
and read one article in today’s
newspaper. As you read,
discuss what questions you
think the reporter asked to get
the information in the article.
Vol. 31, No. 5
Complete the following:
Headline:
Question a reporter might have
asked:
Fact from the article that
answered that question:
Question a reporter might have
asked:
Fact from the article that
answered that question:
Question a reporter might have
asked:
Finding
Freedom
Look through
the newspaper
for five or more
words that
describe or are
about
“freedom.” Use
these words to
write a poem or
a paragraph
about freedom.
Fact from the article that
answered that question:
Standards Link:
Writing: Group together
related ideas and maintain
a consistent focus.
Standards Link: Reading Comprehension: Follow multiple-step directions.
Justice for All
Imagine that one day your teacher
said only kids with freckles could sit
at desks and be first in line. Would
this be fair? Your teacher would not
be treating all students equally.
For many years, black Americans
were treated differently from white
Americans. Black children could not
attend the same schools or use the
same drinking fountains that white
children used.
In the 1950s and 60s, thousands of Americans worked together
to change these unfair laws. One of the leaders of this
movement was a dedicated minister named Martin Luther
King, Jr. Each year we celebrate his birthday and remember the
struggles and sacrifices he made so that the United States of
America truly could be a land of equal opportunity for all.
Standards Link: History: Students understand the importance of individual action and
character and explain how heroes from the recent past make a difference in others' lives.
EQUALITY
MARTIN
KING
LUTHER
JAIL
FREEDOM
UNFAIR
SQUARE
BLACK
WHITE
MARCH
BUS
FIRST
VOTE
LAW
Find the words in the puzzle,
then in this week’s Kid Scoop
stories and activities.
R
I
… helping others in your
community.
A F N U L E T T
F E E T
I
H W R S S
E E Q L T D O R K Q
L M I
U R R
I
C
I
U
N A G T A F A E O A
J U W H M L B U S R
A L
I
E B K
I
N G E
T H C R A M E T O V
T M O D E E R F Y N
Standards Link: Letter sequencing. Recognizing identical
words. Skim and scan reading. Recall spelling patterns.
Heroes in the News
SERVICE
The noun service means
the act of helping.
Jason provided his
grandmother a great
service when he carried
her groceries.
Try to use the word service
in a sentence today when
talking with your friends
and family members.
My Favorite
Leader
Find an article about someone who has done
something heroic or significant. Make a chart
or Venn diagram comparing and contrasting
that person’s life and accomplishments to those
of Martin Luther King, Jr.
Who is your favorite
leader? Explain why
this person is
important to you.
ANSWER: They played different people.
Standards Link: Reading Comprehension: Compare and contrast
information about characters presented in reading articles.
This week’s word:
`