January - Woodcreeknews.net

JANUARY 2015
B R AT I N
E
L
19
G
CE
Your Community News Source — Serving Northwest Roseville Since 1995
YEARS!
IN THIS ISSUE
From Your Placer County Supervisor ...3
Woodcreek High School Football ......5
Dry Creek School District ...................6
Christmas Tree Pick Up .......................7
Maidu Museum ...................................8
Merle Whitten-Pear Harbor Survivor....9
woodcreeknews.net
Roseville Named
One of Top Tech
Cities in United
States for 2014
The Center for Digital Government
(CDG) has named the City of Roseville,
California one of the top technologically
progressive and innovative cities its size
in the United States for 2014. This marks
the fourth time in five years Roseville has
finished as one of the top five highly ranked
cities based on population in the CDG’s
annual Digital Cities Survey.
“Roseville is committed to being at
the forefront of innovation and citizen
engagement. Being a technologically
(cont’ on page 7)
Woodcreek Profiles .........................11
2015!
WN Gardening Corner...................12
Seniors Need to Know! ..................13
Historic California .........................14
Classifieds .......................................15
And Much More . . .
Downtown Roseville Improvements Will
Continue Into 2015 And Beyond
BY RAY KERRIDGE,
Roseville City Manager
ECRWSS
RESIDENT
ROSEVILLE, CA 95747
Woodcreek News
5098 Foothills Blvd., #3-405
Roseville, CA 95747
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We have already seen
great strides in the city’s
goal of making downtown
Roseville a unique and
active destination. We’ll see
even more improvements
and upgrades in 2015 and
beyond.
The Vernon Street
Town Square celebrated its
one-year anniversary with
a Sammy Hagar concert in
the square on September
13. Through the first year,
more than 100,000 people
have attended events and
festivals in the square.
Based on that success, we
are looking to bring larger musical acts
to downtown Roseville.
The Oak Street Improvement
Project, which includes the roundabout
at Washington Boulevard and Oak Street,
was completed in December. It has
improved traffic and pedestrian safety
in the area and eased the flow of traffic.
It is a great addition.
You’ll see more dirt being moved in
2015. We have plans for three pedestrian
bridges connecting downtown and Royer
Park. One of those is the existing Rube
Nelson (or Ice House) Bridge, which
will be rotated this year to provide better
access to the park for pedestrians and
cyclists. A new bridge near
the Downtown Library will
also begin construction this
year. Plans are still being
drawn up for the third
bridge, which will align with
the Vernon Street Town
Square. Construction on
this bridge is not expected
until 2016 or 2017.
As more people come
to downtown, there is a
need for more parking. We
are working on plans for a
second parking structure.
This garage would be behind
the Roseville Theater and
other businesses on the 200
block of Vernon Street. Depending on
funding, this parking structure could hold
250-500 cars. We hope to break ground
this spring or summer.
Site work will begin this spring on
the new Fire Station No. 1, to be located
(cont’ on page 11)
2
WOODCREEK NEWS • JANUARY 2015
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WOODCREEK NEWS • JANUARY 2015
The Woodcreek News is a monthly publication, published by EGnews Inc.
5098 Foothills Blvd., #3 PMB 405 • Roseville, CA 95747
(916) 727-6383 • Fax: (916) 727-6373 • E-mail: [email protected]
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From Your Placer County Supervisor
BY JACK DURAN
District 1 Supervisor
much, we can do more.
We have a homeless issue in
So where do we go from
Placer County and it is growing.
here? I think we continue to
This population by its very nature
offer help through the county’s
is transient and unstable, and
service providers. We work with
therefore difficult to accurately
Jack Duran
our cities for their input and gain
count. The last countywide census
cooperation in addressing the issue with
we were able to take for this population
us. We continue to work with our faithwas nearly 600 persons. But they’re not just
based and homeless-advocate community
numbers. We cannot forget the basic fact that
partners. We await the assessment and action
they’re human beings who need some help.
plan that should be available in a few weeks
While the homeless issue has perhaps
and use that document as another tool in
been somewhat hidden from view, camping
our toolbox. We take action to fix as much of
out in unpopulated areas and under
the problem as we possibly can. In the short
overpasses frequented by few, of late it has
term we provide emergency shelter to those
been very visible with an encampment on
who need and want it, and work towards a
a grassy area in the county’s own Dewitt
longer term solution that perhaps includes
Government Center in Auburn.
transitional housing options, job training
There is no one solution to the
and health services.
homeless issue because there are many
To those who are just down on their luck,
different reasons why people end up
a victim of some financial or personal crisis
that way. Mental illness, physical illness,
that has spiraled out of control, there are
substance abuse and addiction, chronic or
services that we should, as a compassionate
sudden unemployment, PTSD, a distrust
and caring society, be offering. While drugs
of government, and domestic violence are
and drink cloud the thinking of some mired
just some of the causes. Short or long term
in homelessness and mask their plight,
financial hardship are another reason.
many do not want to be there and simply
But before we can craft a plan to deal
need some help. While having the homeless
with the problem, we need to thoroughly
once again become productive members of
understand it.
society is good for our community at large,
Last September, the Placer County
the benefit it does to the individual’s soul
Board of Supervisors hired a well-qualified
is immeasurable.
consultant to develop a homeless needs
As always, it is an honor and a privilege
assessment and action plan. While that
to serve you. I always welcome your feedback
plan is expected to be ready in February,
and can be reached by e-mail at [email protected]
I have personally met with advocates for
placer.ca.gov or by phone at 916-787-8950.
this segment of our population and talked
to homeless people to get a sense of what
they need and where we can better provide
services and assistance.
While I think we can reach more of these
people and provide them with things such as
housing, medical services, substance abuse
treatment and employment assistance, we
cannot lose sight that sometimes what these
people need are basic necessities: food, a
shower, a toothbrush, shoes that don’t have
holes in them and clean clothes.
While I firmly believe we can be more
effective in reducing the population of
homeless people in our community, I am
also a realist and understand that there are
some who do not want, nor will they take,
any assistance. While we can only do so
4
WOODCREEK NEWS • JANUARY 2015
HAPPY NEW YEAR!
All of us join in Wishing you a
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New Year!
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WOODCREEK NEWS • JANUARY 2015
5
Woodcreek High School Football Recap
BY JAMIE TOPPER
At the end of another season
for the Woodcreek varsity football
team, there is a lot to celebrate
despite struggling for wins in
SFL league play. In addition to
some strong athleticism on the
grid, the squad raised money in
support for breast cancer, had a
player recognized as player of the
week by the Sacramento Bee, and
had seven players recognized by
the league.
It was a long, productive
season for the Timberwolves.
They participated in the San
Mateo Passing Tournament in
late summer after a dedicated
summer practice routine, and
faced five preseason opponents.
They entered the season with an
undefeated record before facing
some dominant forces in the Sierra
Foothill League such as Folsom, who went
on to take the league championship spot.
In October, the Timberwolves raised
money in support of breast cancer at
the annual Breast Cancer Awareness
game, once again allowing players to
demonstrate that they play for more than
just the game. Fans packed the stands
wearing pink and/or “Woodcreek Tackles
Photo by John Ray Studios
for a Cure” t-shirts to support the cause.
Malcolm (MJ) Thomas, Jr. was
recognized as the Sacramento Bee’s
Von Housen Star of the Week in early
September, and quarterback Isaiah
Harborth was nominated. Thomas was
4th in league standings with 907 receiving
yards this season.
Several players also earned Sierra
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Foothill League All League Honors!
Seniors, Malcom Thomas, Jr. (Wide
Receiver) and Dominic Balmer (Offensive
Guard) were named 1st Team Offense.
Senior Lenny Nelson (Defensive Back)
was named 1st Team Defense.
Seniors Matt Ahnin (Defensive
Back), Brian Lee (Defensive Line), and
Jared Rice (Inside Line Backer) were
named 2nd Team Defense, along with
junior Matt Miller (Outside Line Backer).
Indeed, the players have a reason to
hold their heads high as the season comes
to an end, and they celebrate their team
banquet and team awards in early January.
In the end, they lived up to their motto:
Respect All, Fear None!
6
WOODCREEK NEWS • JANUARY 2015
Dry Creek School District Update
BY BRAD TOOKER, Superintendent
The New Year brings with it
Applications for Intra-District
the opportunity to turn aspirations
transfers are granted based
into goals and potential into
on space availability at the
plans for individuals and
requested school. The majority
organizations alike. In the Dry
of applicants will be notified
Creek Joint Elementary School
of their enrollment status by
District (DCJESD), planning
May 31, 2015. Applications for
and preparing is a continual
Intra-District Transfers can be
Mr. Tooker
process enabling us to anticipate
found at each school office, the
the needs of our students and
District Office and on the Dry
community. Early enrollment activities
Creek Joint Elementary School District
and careful planning ensure that programs
website at www.drycreek.k12.ca.us in the
and services are ready when our student’s
Parent Resources section.
need them.
Students who reside outside the
Starting this month, enrollment for
district who wish to attend a DCJESD
the 2015-16 school year begins with Open
school should begin the Inter-District
Enrollment for Intra-District Transfers
Transfer process with their district of
and continues in February with New
residence during January as well. Please
Student Registration for all grades. Please
note that Inter-District Transfer Requests
note the following dates:
must first be approved by the district of
Jan. 12th - Feb. 27th: Intra-district
residence before they can be considered by
transfer Open Enrollment period
DCJESD. Questions regarding DCJESD
February 15 - 16: New Student
Intra or Inter-District Transfers can be
Registration for Transitional Kindergarten
directed to Human Resources at 916(TK), Kindergarten, and 1st – 8th grade
770-8875.
students
New Student Registration, beginning
Intra-District Transfers are for
in February, is the time for all eligible
students who reside permanently within
TK and Kindergarten-age children to
the boundaries of the District to apply
enroll. Registration for all 1st – 8th grade
for enrollment at a DCJESD school
students who are new to the district, or
other than their school of residency.
who are returning from charter schools,
private schools, or Inter-District transfers
also begins in February. For incoming
TK and Kindergarten students, please
note the age requirements as you plan
enrollment. If your child was born in the
year 2010 and will be 5 years old on or
before September 1, 2015 your child is
eligible for kindergarten. If your child
was born in the year 2010 and will be 5
years old between July 1 - December 2,
2015 your child is eligible for Transitional
Kindergarten. Details of the enrollment
process, including dates and locations for
application pick-up and return, will be
listed on the district website by February
1, 2015.
If you intend to request an Intra or
Inter- District transfer or enroll a student
at a DCJESD school for the 2015-16 school
year, please complete the process as early
as possible. We look forward to welcoming
our new and transferring students.
Let us know what special things
your kids are doing in Woodcreek!
See page 3 for submission info.
Loving Families
Needed!
Have you been wondering how you
can vonlunteer in your community, but you
have limited time? Host a Foreign Exchange
Student! This is a great way to serve the
world community and promote cultural
understanding. The United States needs
strong international public diplomacy.
Students from all over the world need
host families for the 2015-2016 school year.
• Students are ages 15-18 and attend local
high schools for a semester or full academic
year.
• Host Families provide shelter, basic
food and loving support. The students have
their own spending money for all other
expenses and they carry medical & dental
insurances.
• Ongoing local support is provided, as
an academic coordinator will serve as a liaison
between the family, the student and the school.
For more information, please contact
Academic Coordinator Valerie Boughner @
916-807-0431 or visit our website, Cultural
Homestay International at www.chinet.org
*Cultural Homestay International is a
Non-Profit Educational Exchange Program
that was founded in 1980. We carry a FULL
listing with the Council on Standards for
International Educational Travel (CSIET) and
we’re approved by the State Attorney General’s
office for participation in California schools.
WOODCREEK NEWS • JANUARY 2015
Roseville Annual Christmas Tree Pick Up
By Roseville’s Boy Scouts of America
Roseville Boy Scouts will once again
be picking up Christmas trees. The scouts
will pick up trees Saturday, Jan. 3 and
Sunday, Jan. 4. Place your tree at the curb
by 9 a.m. on the morning you want your
tree picked up. Place a donation envelope
on your door or porch (do not attach to
tree). Tax-deductible donations cover Boy
Scout summer camp costs. Cash or check
accepted. Make checks payable to Boy
Scouts of America. We appreciate your
donations to the Boy Scouts of America.
Cub Scout Pack 252 is looking for New Scouts!
Do you like adventures? Cub Scout Pack 252 is looking for boys in 1st – 4th grade
who want to join cub scouts. Cub Scout Pack 252 serves Quail Glen Elementary School.
Come and check us out, we meet on the 3rd Thursday each month from 7:00 – 8:15
in the Multi-Purpose Room at Quail Glen Elementary School – 1250 Canevari Drive.
For more information please contact our Pack at: [email protected]
Roseville Genealogical Society
Roseville Genealogical Society will meet at Maidu Senior Center, 1550 Maidu Dr.,
Roseville. Meeting 1-3 pm. James (Jim) M. Baker, PhD. CG will come on January
13, 2015. He will be talking on “ Fining the Un-Findable”. Everyone welcome. More
information please call Gerry Sawyer at (916-624-0373)
Roseville Named One of Top Tech
Cities in United States for 2014
(cont’ from page 1)
advanced city means a higher quality
of life for our residents and important
advantages and cost savings for our
businesses” said Hong Sae, Chief
Information Officer for the City of
Roseville. “This award is a great honor and
an outstanding achievement for the city.”
“This year’s Digital Cities’ winners
brought about impressive change across
all aspects of government by leveraging
information technology investments
to expand open government, citizen
participation and shared services,” said
Todd Sander, Executive Director of the
Center for Digital Government.
The Center for Digital Government
is a national research and advisory
institute for information technology
policies and best practices in state
and local government. This award
program consistently demonstrates
and recognizes the public entities for
effectively incorporating innovative
technologies and leadership practices in
the 21st century.
Roseville ranked second in the 2014
survey for cities with a population between
125,000 – 249,999. Roseville ranked third
in 2013, first in 2011 and fourth in 2010 for
cities with a population between 75,000 -
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network security; and data availability
and reliability.
Among the city’s ongoing information
technology initiatives are continuous
efforts to make it easier for residents
and businesses to interact online with
city government; maintaining a reliable
citywide communications infrastructure;
proactive emergency preparedness
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WOODCREEK NEWS • JANUARY 2015
Maidu Museum &
Historic Site — Jan/Feb Events
Location: 1970 Johnson Ranch Drive,
Roseville
916-774-5934 • [email protected]
roseville.ca.us
Museum Hours: Monday-Friday,
9:00am–4:00pm, Saturday, 9:00am1:00pm, 3rd Saturdays 6:30pm-8:30pm.
Guided Tours Saturdays at 10am. Selfguided tours on weekdays.
Admission Fees: $4.50 Adults, $4.00
Senior/Child, $16/Family of Four, $2.00
after 2pm, Tribal Members are Free
January 2015 Events —
Night Out at the Museum: Please join
us Saturday, January 17, from 6:30pm8:30pm for a Night Out at the Museum,
part of the 3rd Saturday Art Walk.
Opening art reception for “Indians, Irony,
and Identity” curated by artist Judith
Lowry (Mountain Maidu, Hammawi Band
Pit River, and Washo). Featured speaker
Dr. Brian Baker (Bad River Chippewa),
is the Director of Native American
Studies at California State University,
Sacramento and is the curator of “The
Americana Indian: American Indians
in the American Imagination”. Museum
doors open at 6:30pm. Program starts at
7pm. Light refreshments will be available.
FREE Event.
New Exhibits —
Exhibit Show Dates: January 17 –
April 13, 2015
“Indians, Irony, and Identity” curated
by artist Judith Lowry (Mountain Maidu,
Hammawi Band Pit River, and Washo).
This exhibit explores stereotypes of Native
Americans in general.
Continuing Exhibits —
“Fixing the Earth: NOW!”
Exhibit Show Dates: October 18,
2014 – January 31, 2015
“Fixing the Earth: NOW!” is an
art exhibition exploring the world
renewal ceremonies of the Hupa, Karuk,
Tolowa, Yurok, Wiyot, and Ts’nungwe
of northwest California. Today, Fix the
Earth is the descriptive term for the
northwest California annual and bi-annual
ceremonial practices during which the
natural world is remade. The primary
purpose of the rituals and ceremonies is to
remake, to repair, and reset the earth onto
its prop. This exhibition asks Native artists
to consider how this age-old indigenous
spiritual practice inspires their art.
February 2015 Events —
17th Annual Sacramento Museum
Day: On Saturday, February 7, 9am-4pm.
Free admission, free guided tours and free
children’s activities all day.
Night Out at the Museum: Please
join us for a very special Night Out at
the Museum on Saturday, February
21, from 6:30pm-8:30pm. The Maidu
Museum & Historic Site is celebrating
the 5th anniversary of its Grand Opening!
We will have an opening reception and
artists talk for “Let’s Fix Our World”,
a new exhibit from artist Charley Burns
and “Framescapes: Images from the
Construction of the Maidu Museum”,
the black and white photography of
Wayne Olts. Charley Burns is a Yurok
artist from the Humboldt County,
Klamath River area. Wayne Olts is an
inveterate photographer and a Professor
of Anthropology at Folsom Lake College.
Museum doors open at 6:30pm. Program
starts at 7pm. Light refreshments will be
available. FREE Event.
AARP – Free Tax Returns
AARP volunteers will prepare and
electronically file Federal and State
income tax returns for low-to-middle
income seniors at the SCR Lodge
Computer Room and at SAFE Credit
Union on Blue Oaks Blvd. from Feb. 1
through April 15. There is no charge for
these services that are sponsored by the
IRS and AARP. Volunteers are tested
annually by IRS and are trained for most
returns, except those for real estate rentals
and complex small business. To make an
appointment for any Roseville site, call
Maidu Senior Center, 774-5960, beginning
in early January.
Games! Games! Games!
Join us for the 6th annual Souper
Saturday, January 31 at 11:15 in the Sun
City Roseville Timbers Ballroom. After
a nice lunch with friends play bridge, mah
jong, Mexican train or any game of your
choice. This event is designed to enjoy
camaraderie with other gamesters, banish
winter blues and help local young women
achieve educational goals. Sponsored by
P.E.O. Chapter XF, tickets are $30. Call
Judy Myers-771-3929.
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WOODCREEK NEWS • JANUARY 2015
9
Merle Whitten — Pearl Harbor Survivor
BY ANN WAHLENMEIER
Merle Whitten may be the last
Pearl Harbor survivor in west Roseville.
Born in 1922 in Amarillo, Texas, Merle
graduated high school in May of 1940.
After one semester in Junior College,
Merle decided he really wanted to be
a Marine and enlisted in the Marine
Corp in Oklahoma City on February 5th,
1941. After Boot Camp in San Diego,
Merle reported to Admiral Kimmel,
the commander-in-chief of the USS
Pennsylvania at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
in May of 1941.
Seven months later, on December
7th, 1941, Merle was aboard his ship
when the Japanese flew over Pearl
Harbor dropping torpedos.
“I was at Sub Base barracks on the 3rd
floor when the bombing started,” Merle
describes.
“At 7:55am, I was quartered at the
submarine base barracks, chatting with a few
of the other Marines.” he explained. “We heard
the first bomb explode and stepped out onto
the second floor lanai. I could see the fire on
Ford Island and within seconds a Japanese
plane flew by toward battleship row. It was
very low and less than five hundred feet away
and was strafing the area.”
“Our Marine Sargeant ordered us to
grab our rifles and meet at the ballpark.
Then he ordered us to the top of Cincpac’s
Headquarters,” he continues.
From there, Norm was sent to decoding
at Fleet Communications to prevent any
a widow, lives in Rancho Cordova with
her pet dog. Sue and her husband have
two children and live in Woodland.
David lives in Arlington, Virginia,
and Patrick and his wife
have one child and live
in Virginia City, Nevada.
When Sun City
Roseville started its
development, Merle and
Allyce purchased their
retirement home. Merle
became a member of the
Veteran’s Club. In 2004,
Merle Whitten —
Allyce passed away.
Jean Ehmann and Merle Whitten
Through
the
Circa 1943
Photo by Richard Paine Veteran’s Club, Merle
Merle Whitten
was asked by Steve
After Charles and Allyce’s passing, Jean
Quesinberry, a teacher at Vacaville High
unauthorized persons from entering the
and Merle continued their friendship and now
School, to answer his student’s questions about
decoding room.
have been together since 2006.
his experience at Pearl Harbor. Merle has
“I could hear the action outside, but
Jean loves to knit. She volunteers for
saved his responses to those students.
couldn’t see the bombing coming from
Project Linus, a non-profit organization that
It was at Bank of America that Merle met
the second round of Japanese planes that
makes blankets for children in need. From
Charles Ehmann, also a long time employee of
followed,” he explains.
neonatal age to 18 years of age, children in
BofA. The Whitten’s and Ehmann’s became
While the troops were conditioned to
hospitals, in foster care, are homeless, or just
friends.
expect war to start any day, Merle and his fellow
going through a difficult time can depend on
Jean Ehmann, was born in Indiana.
troops thought there would be a declaration at
Project Linus to keep them warm. Sheriffs also
When she was twelve, the family moved to
least hours if not days before the action started.
use the blankets for children who are separated
Sacramento, CA. She met and married Charles
“I never had to fire a shot during the attack.
from their parents.
Ehmann. And they, too, raised four children.
I grew up that day,” Merle adds.
Merle is 92 and Jean is 89. He suffered
Daughter, Lynda and her husband, Rob, live
When Merle’s tour in Pearl Harbor was
a stroke in 2008. He has speech issues. That
in Virginia Beach, VA. Patti Brecht, a widow
over, he returned to the United States and
doesn’t stop him.
lives in Eldorado Hills. Charles, Jr. and his
began his 40-year career with Bank of America.
And Merle remembers Pearl Harbor like
wife Sharon live in Roseville; and Sharon and
He also married his sweetheart, Allyce. Bank
it was yesterday. If he forgets something, he
Bruce MacClean live in Sacramento. Jean has
of America brought the Whitten family to
has several albums to remind him of “the day
10 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren.
Sacramento, California.
he grew up”.
Charles, Sr. passed away in 1995.
Merle and Allyce have four children. Ann,
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10
WOODCREEK NEWS • JANUARY 2015
Jones Hall
Placer County Fairgrounds
800 All American Blvd. Roseville, CA.
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$40 E t s:
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For Tickets Contact:
Roseville Host Lions Club
Debra Pattison OD - Family Eye Center
215 Vernon St., Roseville
916.783.8144
Rotary Club of Roseville Sunrise
John Massey
916.849.4317
[email protected]
Kiwanis Club of Roseville
Ted Smith
916.580.9899
[email protected]
Or PayPal Is Available At:
www.rosevillekiwanis.org
Sacramento Metropolitan Lions Club
Cecilia Macias
916.878.8740
[email protected]
Presented By:
ROTARY CLUB
OF ROSEVILLE SUNRISE
ROSEVILLE HOST
LIONS CLUB
KIWANIS CLUB
OF ROSEVILLE
SACRAMENTO METROPOLITAN
LIONS CLUB
WOODCREEK NEWS • JANUARY 2015
little ones healthy, independent sleep
skills. It’s been a fun and exciting journey
for Stephanie as she gets to do something
she feels passionately about and loves to
help others. In the past few months, she
has been on Good Day Sacramento twice
and also on Fox40, discussing sleep!
Stephanie also loves to run. You
may see her running, sometimes with her
daughter and sometimes
BY LISA LISONBEE
by herself. You may also
see Troy working on his
We h a v e b e e n
paintings in the garage,
privileged to get to
should the weather permit!
know many families who
Troy and Stephanie
have lived in the area
both love to travel.
for decades and have
Stephanie studied abroad
helped establish schools,
for seven months when
organizations and the
she was in college. Her
strong community feel.
study abroad program
This month we are happy
was based in England, but
to meet the Carslake
while she was there she got
family.
to see Spain, Germany,
Troy and Stephanie
Italy, France, Belgium,
Carslake have enjoyed
Czech Republic, Ireland,
the community and the
Scotland, Wales and the
central location. Before
Stephanie and Troy Carslake with their daughter Athena.
Netherlands.
moving to the area, they
After Stephanie
lived in Elk Grove and
completed her teaching
Citrus Heights for a couple years.
enforcement. He received a Bachelor’s
credential program at California State
Troy’s life has mostly been spent living
degree in sociology from California State
University, Sacramento, Troy and she
in Broderick, Elk Grove, Sacramento and
University, Sacramento. Now he is a fullspent six weeks in Europe together,
San Diego. He went to nearby Foothill
time student in a Marriage and Family
including highlights such as Greece, Italy,
High School. Stephanie lived in Hayward
Therapy Master’s Program, and also a
France and England again! Troy was even
until she reached sixth grade, Fremont
part-time substitute teacher.
accepted into an art program in Florence
during junior high and high school, then
Troy also loves to paint. He is a
during the summer of 2012.
in San Diego as she attended college.
part-time instructor for Paint Nite.
But mostly, they love spending time
It was in San Diego that Troy and
At Paint Nite, people with no artistic
together as a family. They have an almost
Stephanie met, at a dance club called On
experience can come and create their own
two-year-old daughter Athena, who is
Broadway, that is unfortunately not there
masterpieces by watching step-by-step
“super smart, and super cute!”
anymore! Of their meeting, Stephanie
instructions, while enjoying a fun and
says, “Troy and I both agree that the only
relaxing atmosphere at a local restaurant
reason we even met is because I thought
or club.
he could dance and he thought I could
Stephanie taught both middle school
dance!” They have been married since
and elementary school for the past six
2006.
years. Currently, she owns her own
Do you know a neighbor who should be
Dancing is just one of the things
business as a Certified “Sleep Sense”
recognized? Well, just let us know. Send
that Troy and Stephanie do well. A
Consultant. She was specifically chosen to
your names or suggestions to the
Renaissance couple, they have many
travel to Florida to be trained to consult on
talents and interests. Troy was in the
Woodcreek News at [email protected]
The Sleep Sense Program and she remains
United States Marine Corps until his
the only consultant north of Monterey and
Or call us at 727-6383.
military contract ended in 2007. (They
south of Seattle. Her business is called
lived in San Diego until that time.)
“Sleep Tight, Good Night (LLC)”.
After the end of his military career,
She teaches classes and consults on
he completed the Sheriff’s academy in
a private level with parents to teach their
2008, but chose a path different than law
— WOODCREEK PROFILES —
Getting to know you...
The Carslake Family
ESTATE PLANNING
LAW OFFICE OF JAMES S. HALL
(916) 772-2522
Offering our clients experienced professional services
with convenient access to their attorney.
AARP LEGAL SERVICES PROVIDER
• Living Trusts • Wills
• Powers of Attorney • Health Care Directive
• Document Review & Updates • Probate
1380 Lead Hill Blvd., Suite 106 • Roseville, CA 95661
Phone: (916) 772-2522 • Email: [email protected]
Website: www.JSH-legal.com
Member: California State Bar, Placer County Bar Association, AARP Legal Network Attorney
11
Woodcreek Oaks
Neighborhood
Association
The Woodcreek Oaks Neighborhood
Association (WONA) January meeting
will be held on Monday, January 5th,
2015. We meet the first Monday of each
month, excluding holidays.
The Association is a non-profit
organization, affiliated with Roseville
Coalition Of Neighborhood Associations
(RCONA). The function of the association
is in part to share information, provide
resources, and build community.
If you are interested in being
a member, or on the Board, with
the Association, please contact us at
[email protected]
Downtown Roseville
(cont’ from page 1)
at Oak and Lincoln Streets. This will
replace the current but outdated Fire
Station at Oak and Grant Streets. It will
also open up valuable creek frontage for
future development. We expect the new
fire station to open in 2016.
With the City Council goals of
economic development and a great
downtown, we are also considering
building a new 4-story, 60,000 sq. ft. office/
retail center at 316 Vernon Street, across
the street from the Civic Center. This
could provide space for Sierra College or
another school to bring their classes and
students to downtown. The existing post
office, which recently signed a new 5-year
lease, would remain in place.
12
WOODCREEK NEWS • JANUARY 2015
WN Gardening Corner —
Keeping Plants Warm
BY GEORGE PORTER
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around the house and outside. Ace Hardware
sells these “old” [C9 hot and C7 warm] light
strands from late October right through the
end of the year and are not terribly expensive.
The C9 strands are available on-line from Ace
all year long. They ARE warm and they make
a difference.
What we do at our house is use remotes to
turn on the light strands from inside the house
whenever the temperatures are forecast to be
in the low 30’s or even the highest 20’s. For
colder nights, we use blankets and towels, in
addition to turning on the light strands.
The lights can remain in place until
warmer weather arrives. The blankets need
to be removed each day – which explains why
we use them only on the colder nights. Using
both is doing the best job you can do, short of
using fire/smoke pots or moving to Arizona!
George Porter directed the landscaping and
landscape maintenance work for over 20-years at the
Northgate Property Owners Association in Walnut
Creek, CA before moving to Sun City Roseville
(SCR) in 1999. At SCR, he has worked with various
staff specialists to provide the landscape designs and
upgrades to the Common Areas as well as a number
of Golf Course locations. At his SCR home, he grows
almost all of the plants used in his designs. His home
and garden have been featured on a number of local
home/garden tours.
Free Structured Walking Program
Over 30 Years Experience!
Serving the Woodcreek Area.
Family Owned & Operated Business
Sunday Meetings at the Roseville Chapel:
1240 Junction Blvd. • Roseville
For more information, please call:
Scott Etherington at 916-780-8745
Some of our frosty winter nights are cruel
when it comes to our plants that just do not
like cold nights. Those that shed their leaves
(deciduous plants) are asleep in winter and
are generally safe. Those well known to suffer
include lemons, some of the other citrus, Little
John Bottlebrush, and the succulents like ice
plant. Pelargoniums (Geraniums) also suffer
on cold nights.
Blankets, bath towels, and frost cloths sold
by the Garden Centers are one very effective
solution. Why? The moist earth below our
plants takes on a winter temperature that
is pretty much the average of temperatures
throughout the day. For example, if daytime
highs are 50 degrees and nighttime lows are 20,
then the soil is going to be around 35 – midway
between. And warmth from the soil rises up
when the air temperature is cooler which helps
to keep plants warm. Blankets and towels trap
this heat so it doesn’t ‘get away’.
Planting cold-sensitive plants next to your
house is another widely-used trick since the
heat from the home radiates outward to warm
the plants. Mobile patio plants are rolled up
against the house in winter – same idea.
Another surprisingly effective method of
‘saving’ our plants on cold winter nights is to
use the old style Christmas lights that years
ago we used to decorate almost everything
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Placer Independent Resource Services
(PIRS), in partnership with the Arthritis
Foundation continues to provide The
Arthritis Foundation Walk With Ease
Program for adults over 60 in Placer County.
PIRS will be providing this program from
Wed. January 21, 2015 through Wed. March
4, 2015 at the Recreation Park located at
123 Recreation Dr., Auburn, CA 95603.
The group will meet Monday, Wednesday
and Friday from 10:00 to 11:00 am for a
total of 18 sessions for this comprehensive
program. This is a free program to all senior
participants.
Walk With Ease is a structured walking
program that offers support, information and
tools to help participants develop successful
exercise routines. Individuals join others
in an eighteen session group series led by
a certified leader. During the program,
participants will learn proper stretching
and pain management techniques, as well
as build stamina and walking pace. The
program can even be modified to meet the
needs of individual participants so that each
person can develop an exercise routine that
fits their unique goals.
Pre-registration for The Arthritis
Foundation Walk With Ease Program is
necessary. Please let us know if special
accommodations are necessary. If you
are interested in attending, or for more
information, please contact Michele Irwin,
certified Walk With Ease Instructor, at Placer
Independent Resource Services (PIRS),
11768 Atwood Road, #29, Auburn, CA
95603. (530) 885-6100 ext. 12, TTD, (530)
885-0326, [email protected]
PIRS is a non-profit, independent living
center. Our mission is to advocate, empower,
educate the community and provide services
for people with disabilities enabling them to
control their alternatives for independent
living.
The Arthritis Foundation is the
leading health organization addressing the
needs of some 46 million Americans living
with arthritis, the nation’s most common
cause of disability. Founded in 1948, with
headquarters in Atlanta, the Arthritis
Foundation has multiple service points
located throughout the country
and offers programs that
can decrease the pain and
disability associated
with arthritis.
WOODCREEK NEWS • JANUARY 2015
Seniors Need to Know!
What Medicare Does (and Doesn’t) Cover
BY DAVID SAYEN
Medicare helps pay for a wide variety
of medical services and goods in hospitals,
doctor’s offices, and other healthcare
settings. But it doesn’t cover everything, and
it’s useful to know what is and isn’t included.
Services are covered either under
Medicare Part A or Part B. If you have
both Part A and Part B, you can get many
Medicare covered services whether you
have Original Medicare or a Medicare
health plan.
Part A is Hospital Insurance and it
helps pay for:
* Inpatient care in hospitals;
* Inpatient care in a skilled nursing
facility (not custodial or long term care);
* Hospice care services;
* Home health care services:
* Inpatient care in a religious nonmedical
health care institution.
You can find out if you have Parts A
and B by looking at your Medicare card. If
you have Original Medicare, you’ll use this
card to get your Medicare-covered services.
If you join a Medicare health plan, in most
cases you must use the card from the plan
to get your Medicare-covered services.
Part B (Medical Insurance) helps
cover medically necessary doctors’ services,
outpatient care, home health services,
durable medical equipment such as
wheelchairs and walkers, and other medical
services.
Part B also covers many preventivecare services.
Under Original Medicare, if the yearly
Part B deductible ($147 in 2014) applies,
you must pay all costs (up to the Medicareapproved amount) until you meet the Part
B deductible before Medicare begins to
pay its share.
After your deductible is met, you
typically pay 20% of the Medicare approved
amount of the service, if the doctor or other
healthcare provider accepts assignment.
(“Accepting assignment” means that a doctor
or other provider agrees to be paid directly
by Medicare, to accept the payment amount
Medicare approves for the service, and not
to bill you for any more than the Medicare
deductible and coinsurance.)
You’ll pay more if you see doctors or
providers who don’t accept assignment.
And there’s no yearly limit on what you pay
out-of-pocket.
If you’re in a Medicare Advantage
plan (like an HMO or PPO) or have other
insurance, your costs may be different.
Contact your plan or benefits administrator
directly to find out about the costs.
Under Part B, Medicare pays for many
preventive services (such as screenings for
cancer and heart disease) that can detect
health problems early when they’re easier
to treat. You pay nothing for most covered
preventive services if you get the services
from a doctor or other qualified provider
who accepts assignment.
However, for some preventive
services, you may have to pay a deductible,
coinsurance, or both.
Medicare doesn’t cover everything,
of course. If you need certain services that
aren’t covered under Part A or Part B, you’ll
have to pay for them yourself unless:
* You have other insurance (or Medicaid)
to cover the costs;
* You’re in a Medicare health plan that
covers these services.
Some of the services and goods that
Medicare doesn’t cover are:
* Long-term care (also called custodial
care);
* Routine dental or eye care;
* Dentures;
* Cosmetic surgery;
* Acupuncture;
* Hearing aids and exams for fitting them.
David Sayen is Medicare’s regional
administrator for Arizona, California,
Nevada, Hawaii, and the Pacific Territories.
You can always get answers to your Medicare
questions by calling 1-800-MEDICARE
(1-800-633-4227).
The views expressed here are those of
Mr. David Sayen, and do not necessarily
represent those of the Commission or
individual members.
“Don’t Pay Big Companies Overhead!”
13
A Little Night
Music Concert
Assistance League® of Greater Placer
is once again hosting a concert fundraiser to
support its philanthropic programs. “A Little
Night Music” is an ensemble featuring: Bob
Draga, clarinet; with Jason Wanner, piano;
Shelley Denny, bass; and Ron Jones, drums.
The event will be held February 5th, 2015 at
the Rocklin Event Center, 2650 Sunset Blvd,
Rocklin. Complimentary hors d’oeuvres and
no host bar will be from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m. The
concert and dancing will run from 7:00 to 9:00
p.m. with complimentary dessert and no host
bar at the Intermission. Cost is $45.00 per
person of which $25.00 is tax-deductible.
Tickets are available at the Assistance
League Thrift Shop, 1263 Grass Valley Hwy,
Auburn or by calling the Thrift Shop at 530885-1982.
As with last year’s concert, funds raised
at this event will help Assistance League
continue its philanthropic programs that are
administered by over 200 volunteers in our local
communities. These programs provided school
clothing and supplies for over 1,600 children;
2,800 teddy bears to comfort traumatized
children; over 2,000 dictionaries to third grade
students; screening for 230 pre-school children
for amblyopia; and classroom tutoring and life
skill classes, including puppet programs on
bullying and safety, to over 4,500 children in
kindergarten through third grades.
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St. John’s Episcopal Church
2351 Pleasant Grove Blvd. Roseville
welcomes YOU
“to come experience the love of JESUS CHRIST”
SUNDAY SERVICES
8 a.m. Traditional Eucharist
9:30 a.m. ADULT EDUCATION
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14
WOODCREEK NEWS • JANUARY 2015
W.ROSEVILLE REAL ESTATE UPDATE
FirstoffHappyNewYeartoall!Iexpect2015to
beastrongyearforhomesalesalthoughIdon’t
expectmuchinthewayofappreciation.Weended
theyearwithseveralmonthsofslowingsalesand
morecompetitivehomesellerswhohadtoadjust
theirpricestofindthemarket.Inventoryhasfallen
offasitalwaysdoesthistimeofyear
soironicallytheNewYearfindsthe
marketinabettersellersituation
thantheendofthispastsummer.
Wearealsoseeingagreaternumber
ofnewhomesenteringthemarket
asbuildershavebegun
WRITTEN BY
torampup.
GEORGE BROWN
W.Roseville Averages
Third Quarter 2014
$420,000
$418,112
$415,000
Stagecoach Drivers and Their Whips
BY ALTON PRYOR
$410,000
$405,000
$400,000
$400,301
$395,000
$390,000
Listing Price
Selling Price
Average Selling Price Per Sq. Ft. / $192
[email protected]
www.PeckHeatingAndAir.com
Historic California —
916-409-0768
ll No w
Winter is coming..Ca
Wi nt er
Tu ne -U p
Be prepared!
$ 6 9 50
Three Generations Strong
Please patronize
our advertisers,
and let them
know you saw
their ad in the
Woodcreek News!
Read the Woodcreek News
on-line at
woodcreeknews.net
Not everyone could manage a stagecoach.
The stagecoach driver was held in higher
esteem when on the summit of the Sierra than
was the millionaire statesman who might be
riding beside him.
While most stage drivers were sober, at
least while on duty, nearly all were fond of an
occasional “eye opener.” A good driver was
the captain of his craft. He was feared by his
timid passengers, awed by stable boys, and was
the trusty agent of his employer.
The seat next to the driver, weather
permitting, was the preferred seat of the men
passengers. But this was one seat that was
reserved, and it was not gotten by simply being
the first to hop on the left front wheel rim and
climbing into the box.
If the driver didn’t want the person who
took the seat there, he would firmly order
him down, and then enjoy the passenger’s
discomfiture for the next ten miles.
To sit in the driver’s seat, one proceeded
very much in the manner of securing an
appointment to a high office. He went to
the source of authority—above the driver
himself—to the superintendent and even to
the president of the company.
Charlie Parkhurst was one of the more
skillful stagecoach drivers, not only in
California, but throughout the west. He was
variously called “One-eyed” or “Cockeyed”
Charlie, because he had lost an eye when kicked
by a horse. For 20 years, he drove stagecoach
in California.
Twice Charlie was held up. The first time,
he was forced to throw down his strongbox
because he was unarmed. The second time,
he was prepared.
When a road agent ordered the stage to
stop and commanded Charlie to throw down
its strongbox, Parkhurst leveled a shotgun blast
into the chest of the outlaw, whipped his horses
into a full gallop, and left the bandit in the road.
One-eyed Charlie was known as one of
the toughest, roughest, and the most daring of
stagecoach drivers. Like most drivers, he was
proud of his skill in the extremely difficult job
as “whip.” Proper handling of the horses and
the great coaches was an art that required much
practice, experience, and not the least, courage.
Whips received high salaries for the times,
sometimes as much as $125 a month, plus
room and board.
“How in the world can you see your
way through this dust?” one passenger asked
Charlie.
“Smell it. Fact is,” Charlie replied, “I’ve
traveled over these mountains so often I can tell
where the road is by the sound of the wheels.
When they rattle, I’m on hard ground; when
they don’t rattle I gen’r’lly look over the side
to see where she’s agoing.”
Yet, little was really known about Charlie
Parkhurst before or after he came to California.
It wasn’t until his body was prepared for burial
that his true secret was discovered.
Charlotte “Charlie” Parkhurst was a
woman. One doctor claimed that at some point
in her life, she had been a mother.
Unknowingly, Parkhurst could claim a
national first. After voting on Election Day,
November 3, 1868, Charlie was probably the
first woman to cast a ballot in any election. It
wasn’t until 52 years later that the right to vote
was guaranteed to women by the nineteenth
amendment.
All stagecoach drivers, including Charlie,
considered their whips worth their weight in
gold. Drivers considered their whips a badge
of honor.
Some drivers would as soon be caught
without their pants as without their whips.
Many of the whips used by the stage drivers
were fine works of art, generally ornamented
with handcrafted silver ferules girdling a handle
made of hickory. Many of these whips are
prized museum pieces today.
Whips were never sold, loaned, borrowed,
or traded. In his book, “Stagecoach Days in
Santa Barbara County, Walker A. Tompkins
wrote, “Whips were considered a part of the
driver, who kept the lashes well-oiled and as
pliable as “a snake in the sun.”
Most stagecoach whips had buckskin
lashes, usually from 11 to 12 feet in length,
attached to a five-foot hickory shaft. The lashes
were 10 feet too short to reach the lead team,
which was controlled by reining.
Some rare drivers did carry a “six-horse
whip” with a 22-foot lash, but these were
mainly for circus and rodeo appearances, and
considered too unwieldy for practical use.
The driver took his whip with him when
off duty, and always hung it up. He never
rested it in a corner for fear of warping the
stock. Neither did he wrap the lash around the
handle for fear of curling the thongs.
Stagecoach drivers were scornful of the
way they were depicted in the movies. The topgrade stagecoach drivers used cracking of the
whip sparingly. These drivers were concerned
that the “pistol-shot” sounds made by the whips
would only startle their passengers out of their
naps or, worse yet, spook their teams.
Roads had to be built at public expense
before stagecoaches were given a route. Some
were little more than ox-cart tracks linking the
various ranchos. Even the El Camino Real,
the storied “King’s Highway”, was little more
than a foot trail.
A tale is told about stage driver Whispering
George Cooper. He got his name because of
his loud bellow, which was said could be heard
for miles, even against a wind, while he pushed
his team up a treacherous pass.
At one point, Whispering George
needed to repair a broken single tree that had
developed a bad split. He scoured the stage
for a bit of rope or a scrap of baling wire, to
make the repair.
At that moment, a rattlesnake slithering
across the road in front of them spooked his
team.
George killed the snake, which measured
five feet or more in length. A passenger
commented how much the snake resembled
a rope.
“By gawd, that’s what I’ll use it for!”
exclaimed George. He wrapped the dead
snake around the single tree and knotted it
into place. It worked, holding the damaged
single tree together until it reached a relay
station.
The term “stagecoach” came about in
medieval Europe, when public coach travel
was the only way one could get from one point
to another without walking.
Trips were generally made in easy stages
because of bad roads and the lack of overnight
lodgings along the way. Hence, the term
“stage” coach.
Alton Pryor is a West Roseville resident and
has been a writer for magazines, newspapers,
and wire services for more than 50 years. Readers
who are interested in his books can request a
catalog by emailing the author at [email protected]
surewest.net. His books can be seen at www.
stagecoachpublishing.com.
WOODCREEK NEWS • JANUARY 2015
15
WOODCREEK NEWS C L A S S I F I E D S
SERVICES
TURN YOUR UNWANTED items into
cash! I’ll sell them on ebay for you. Antiques,
collectibles and more. I can also buy your
items. Call George 916-768-4694.
•••
ENTERTAINMENT FOR YOUR
EVENT! Magician and Master Balloon
Artist. Pro since 1991. www.sirlantz.
com, [email protected] 916-472-2864.
•••
S U P R E M E C L E A N : We e k l y ,
biweekly, monthly, move out/move
in cleanings. Licensed. Insured.
Bonded. Call 916-642-2842 or email
[email protected]
•••
Q UA L I T Y F I R S T W I N D O W
REPAIR: Window & Patio Door
Repair Specialist. 916-764-1757.
State Contractors License #677808.
www.qualityfirstwindowrepair.com
•••
HARDWOOD/LAMINATE. $600
for a 10’x12’ room. Over 50 colors.
Good references. Randy 916-847-4357.
Lic#852123.
•••
JACK CARLISLE MASONRY; brick,
block, stone; quality work, no job too
small. License #783619. 729-4515.
•••
GARAGE DOORS: Sales, repairs,
residential, commercial, new doors,
operators, cables. Lic. Contractor. Call
916-747-2343.
•••
D AD IN
ASSIFIE
L
C
R
U
!
YO
K NEWS
PLACE
DCREE
O
O
W
5
E
1
Y !
TH
JANUAR
:
E
IN
L
DEAD
AFFORDABLE COMPUTER HELP.
Computer help in your Home. 15%
SENIOR DISCOUNT! Speed Up your
Computer! Viruses, Bugs, Spyware,
Malware, Adware, Tracking Cookies,
Trojans & Internet Popups removed. New
PC setup, Wireless, High Speed Internet,
Tune-ups, Upgrades, System Restores,
New installation, Customized PC Training
in your HOME, or general PC HELP. PO
Box 981, Lincoln, CA 95648. Reg #85117.
Call Jerry at 916-663-4500.
•••
FOR SALE: TWIN BEDS sold separately for $200 or pair for $350. Each bed
includes matching sheets, pillow cases,
pillows, blankets, electric blankets, bed
skirts, coverlets of designer quality. Plus
brass headboards, bed frames, and decorative pillow. All in excellent condition.
Call 916-782-2082.
•••
CHILDCARE
FOUND/WANTED
FOR RENT/FOR SALE
SEEKING POSITIVE, enthusiastic
individuals to substitute teach in K-12
classrooms throughout Center School
District. Sub rate: $140 full day, $80 half
day. Submit applications to the Center
Personnel Office, 8408 Watt Ave. For
additional information contact Jenny
916-338-6407.
•••
“TOYS FOR TOTS BRIGADE”.
Musters at Thunder Valley Casino. First
Monday 1000 hours. Join us and show
your support. Gunner Joe at yahoo.com.
We will buy your first breakfast.
•••
MEETING PLACE FOR RENT for
club, organization or church, St. Andrews’s
Church, 7850 Watt Ave., 916-332-1476.
•••
MOMS Club of Roseville-West supports
stay-at-home moms with friendship and
family-friendly activites. Contact Tovah:
[email protected]
•••
MOMS Club of Roseville North Please
visit our website for more information at
www.northrosevillemom.com
•••
FOUND: On Foothills and Foxborough
young persons tan leather wallet two dollars
inside and describe the outside of wallet.
Call 916-945-1882 to claim.
•••
WANTED: RECORDS. 1950’s and 60’s:
jazz, blues, rock, classical, etc. Buying
small and large collections: LP’s, 45’s and
78’s. Also looking for reel-to-reel tapes
(all types) and music memorabilia. Call
530-273-8490.
•••
FOR SALE: BRAND NEW traditional
Queen bed room set (head & foot board,
chest & night stand); (4) swivel bar
stools; two (8) foot Bernehart couches;
like new 52” square coffee table; various
rugs, pictures and miscellaneous décor
items. No reasonable offer refused. Call
916-626-9391 for details.
•••
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• First 15 words FREE, additional words 50¢ each
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PLACING A CLASSIFIED AD:
Write your ad on the form provided and mail to:
Woodcreek News
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Woodcreek News has a distribution of 9,500 copies,
which go directly to residents and businesses in the Woodcreek
area the first week of each month.
THE ROSEVILLE CHAPTER NO 9
Of The Widowed Persons Association
hosts a general information and meeting the second Friday of each month at
Woodcreek Country Club off Hwy 65
between Blue Oaks Blvd and Pleasant
Grove Blvd. 5880 Woodcreek Oaks Blvd
in Roseville. Information: 916 990-9751.
•••
ROSEVILLE EMBLEM CLUB
BREAKFAST 1st Sunday of the Month
8:30am-11:30am. $6 Includes Juice and
Coffee. 3000 Brady Lane Roseville.
•••
ROSEVILLE ELKS BINGO! 3000 Brady
Lane, Roseville. First Tuesday of the month!
Spaghetti dinner starting at 5:30 pm, $8. Stay
for BINGO starting at 7pm. Open to the
public. All cash prizes! All proceeds benefit
our Veterans. For more info: 916-783-4515.
•••
ANSWERTHECALLTOHELPFIGHT
CANCER. Help by donating gently used
furniture, clothing and household items.
Volunteersareneededtopickupanddeliver
your donations to the American Cancer
Society’s Discover Shop in Roseville. Call
771-5267 for more info.
•••
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16
WOODCREEK NEWS • JANUARY 2015
SOLD
WEST ROSEVILLE’S
REAL ESTATE OFFICE
For Sale
Don’t Trust Computer
Generated Home
Value Estimates
Call us for an Expert
Home Price Evaluation
771-4177
George Brown
TEAM
THOMPSON+BROWN
Thompson + Brown
Real Estate
Serving West Roseville
Since 1991
STOP BY OR CALL
US FOR MORE
INFORMATION
ON THESE HOMES
OR FOR THE
MARKET VALUE
OF YOUR HOME
771-4177
184 Glenwood Circle
1740 Fontenay Way
6124 Granite Flat Lane
4(5) Bedroom, 3 Bath, 2822 Square Feet
Situated in the highly desirable Diamond Oaks
Subdivision this home has an upstairs loft, large
master suite, granite tile with tile back splash,
stainless appliances and fresh paint throughout.
4 Bedroom, 3 Bath, 2268 Square Feet
Well maintained Crocker Ranch home has
bedroom and full bath downstairs. Large
Master, open loft bonus room upstairs, cherry
cabinets, granite counter tops...list goes on!
2 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 1547 Square Feet
Very well maintained Sun City Shasta model
with terrific features! Popular den option, pony
wall at entry to define living room, crown
molding and lots of cabinet space in the garage.
$380,000
$422,500
$359,000
1339 Muscat Circle
5009 Dreamgarden Loop
618 Hovey Way
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 1558 Square Feet
Move in ready home with separate living and
family rooms located in a quiet neighborhood
within a short walk to elementary school, park
and shopping. Very well maintained home.
$272,500
4 Bedroom, 3 Bath, 2493 Square Feet
2 Bedroom, 2 Bath, 1618 Square Feet
Beautiful 4/5 bedroom with 3 car garage.
Sun City Roseville Calaveras model in a great
Granite counters with island. Pool, built in
location featuring a heated and cooled sun
island with BBQ, refrigerator and putting green room. Recent HVAC, water heater, gas cook top
in back. ALL major upgrades have been done and double oven. Finished garage with cabinets.
here! Truly a must see. Move in ready.
Low maintenance yard.
$385,500
$372,500
FREE SERVICES OFFERED
Need to make a few copies?
Send a fax?
Have a house key made?
Stop by during business hours and we will be happy to assist!
Key making service available Monday - Friday 9am - 1pm. 8008 Walerga Rd. #300, Antelope, CA
Call us today to answer any real estate questions you may have.
CALL (916) 771-4177 OR VISIT www.thompson-brown.com