January–February 2015 Newsletter - People's Food Co-op

Co-op
Shopper
Jan uar y/ Febr uar y 20 15
LA CROSSE
ROCHESTER
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WWW. PFC .COOP
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FRESH PRODUCE
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GROCERY
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DELI
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BISTRO
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4 Producer profile:
Slattery Family Farm
8 Annual meeting report
9 Coulee Region Community
Fund changes its name
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New election
information !
PAGE 13
JIM RIDDLE
2014 Annual meeting
guest speaker:
Educating membership
about organics and GMOs
The Co-op Shopper is published by the
People’s Food Co-op of La Crosse
and Rochester, 315 Fifth Avenue
South, La Crosse, WI 54601 and 519
1st Avenue SW, Rochester, MN 55902.
The Co-op Shopper serves to
educate shoppers about food issues,
community activities and events,
co-ops in general, and membership in
the PFC. The views expressed are
those of the writers and do not
necessarily represent those of the
People’s Food Co-op or its
membership.
The Co-op Shopper is a nonprofit
publication printed on recycled paper.
All articles and pictures submitted for
publication become property of
People’s Food Co-op. PFC reserves
the right to refuse publication of any
article for any reason.
contributors
proofing
advertising
editor/design
photography
Michelle Schry
Ray Schmitz
Heidi Blanke
Liz Haywood
Jen McCoy
Kevin Ducey
Sue Knopf, Graffolio
Kevin Ducey
Kevin Ducey
Lauri Hoff, Kevin Ducey,
Karissa Kostka
KNOW YOUR BOARD
Heidi Blanke vice president
BECOME A CO - OP MEMBER
Our Mission— (What we strive to accomplish in our work every day)
The mission of the People's Food Co-op is to build community, grow a loyal and
thriving membership and be the best fresh food market in the country.
MEMBERSHIP BENEFITS
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Become a part owner of the People’s Food Co-op!
Five percent discount on your choice of one shopping trip each month
Member-only specials
Reduced rates for cooking and gardening classes
A vote on Co-op issues (one vote per membership)
Eligibility to run for the Co-op board
Ability to request refund of your equity investment if you discontinue membership
Patronage rebates (in years the board declares them) on the basis of Co-op
profitability and the amount of money you’ve spent at the Co-op during the year
I T ’ S E A S Y TO J O I N
• Ask any cashier for an application and fill it out
• Pay for your membership. It’s $100 for the first (primary) member plus $25 each
for up to two additional members. You may sign up for the installment plan and
pay $25 per quarter until you’re paid in full ($7 administrative fee applies).
• Enjoy the benefits of membership!
STUDENT MEMBERSHIP
The Co-op offers one-year memberships for only $10 to college and university
students who show a valid student ID! Join now and reap the benefits:
• One-year membership, September through August
• Five percent discount on one shopping trip per month
• Member-only specials
• Reduced rates for cooking and gardening classes
• Students are not eligible to vote on Co-op issues, run for Co-op board, receive
patronage rebates, or have membership fees refunded
Tessa Leung
Dan Litwiller president
Katherine Logan
Monica Lunde
Beth Moore secretary
Jocy Poehler treasurer
Ray Schmitz
Contact the board at [email protected]
Cover photo: Jim Riddle at 300-year-old fig plantation in Iran, after speaking at an
organic farming conference in Tehran, May 2014.
2
PEOPLE’S FOOD CO-OP
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JAN UARY – FE B RUARY
2015
BOARD MEMBERS ’ REPORT
Ray Schmitz and Heidi Blanke,
Board Members
Y
our People’s Food Co-op Board of
Directors is eager to know how we
can best keep in touch with you, the
many Co-op members. As Board Directors,
our job is to not only set policy, but also to act
as a conduit between you and those policies.
For example, this year, the Board dealt with
the voting process and issuing additional
member shares; we discussed GMOs and
long term growth; we debated the merits of
electronic voting.
Through it all, the Board of Directors
remains beholden to all members. We want
to hear from you, no matter what, good or
bad. If it’s out of the Board’s jurisdiction,
we’ll get your comment to the right person.
Most of all, we want to know how we can
best represent you and how we can best
keep you in touch with board activity.
Suggestions boxes are tried and true, but
you can also reach us through the Co-op’s
web page, our Facebook page, or Twitter.
Even if the Board of Directors isn’t listed as
a direct contact, we’ll hear or read the
message and will get back to you.
So, leave a comment at the store, visit the
Co-op electronically, or simply stop us as
we do our own shopping. We’re members,
just like you, whose goal is to build a
community based on being the best fresh
food market around.
NEWS AND UPCOMING EVENTS
Patronage Refund
People’s Food Co-op had a record
$23 million in sales for fiscal year 2014. Net
income exceeded budget, and in November
the Board of Directors approved a
patronage refund to Co-op members.
Patronage refunds are proportional to
purchases made by members throughout
the year. The total refund for the fiscal year
ending September 26, 2014 is $102,351, a
little over 1% of member purchases.
Patronage refund checks are expected to be
mailed by April 1, 2015. When paired with
$214,911 in monthly member discounts
during 2014, members have experienced a
return of 3.24¢ for every dollar spent. Watch
for your People’s Food Co-op 2014 Annual
Report for more information about the
health and performance of your co-op.
2nd Annual “Be Well Bash”
in Rochester
January 1, 6 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Join us to rejuvenate after a night of revelry
and to fuel up for a fantastic new year!
Save on all personal care items from the
Wellness Department: 10% off all day long!
Enjoy our classic homemade brunch all day!
Pancakes, sausages, frittatas, vegetables,
oatmeal, bacon-and-egg sandwiches, and
the now-famous Breakfast Platterito (just
ask for it!). Made-to-order starts at 6:00
a.m. and the hot buffet starts at 10 a.m.
Rochester Wellness Lunch-In
Every Monday, starting Monday, January 5,
12:15 to 12:30, Rochester Community
Room, FREE! No registration required.
Join our new education series—it’s short, it’s
sweet, and it puts you in charge of your own
health. Feel free to buy lunch beforehand
and eat during the Lunch-In. Watch
www.pfc.coop for details on upcoming
Lunch-Ins.
Topics we’re covering in the first eight
weeks:
• Using turmeric for health
• Omega basics
• Using bee products for immunity
• Reducing salt in your daily diet
• Aromatherapy
• Stretching at the office
• Making good food choices
• Choosing the right Vitamin C
Rochester Movie Night!
Bring a date or come alone—we have a fun
night out planned for you! Friday, February
6, 7–9 p.m.
Short, fun, food-related movies running in
the Community Room throughout the
evening, starting every 15 minutes. Wine
samples from Tessa’s Office Wine and
Liquor. Food sampling throughout the
store. Live music in the dining room.
FREE! No registration required.
Hackberry’s Valentine’s Day
Chef Charles George plans a special
Valentine’s menu for you at Hackberry’s
Bistro. Join us on Saturday, February 14th,
to fill your loving cup. Call for reservations:
608.784.5798 ext. 2202.
PEOPLE’S FOOD CO-OP
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JAN UARY – FE B RUARY
2015
3
PRODUCER PROFILE :
SLATTERY FAMILY FARM
LATE
Harvest
Brussels sprouts and cabbage
inding good, local sources for our food is a goal that People’s
Food Co-op is rightly proud of, but the fact is, North America’s
Upper Midwest grows disappointing bananas. Wisconsin and
Minnesota are excellent regions for cabbages and other winter-hardy
vegetables, however. The products that thrive and excel in the
Driftless Region are our legacy from the land and the people who
settled here.
F
One advocate of the local is Patrick Slattery of Slattery’s Family
Farm. He’s been a supplier of People’s Food Co-op since the 1980s.
At that time he supplied spinach to the Co-op. Patrick now
specializes in cruciferous vegetables, a family which includes
cabbages, turnips, kales, and Brussels sprouts, among others. “We
are the perfect region to be growing Brussels sprouts,” Patrick says.
“We have a cool-down in the fall here that California doesn’t have.
And that drop in temperature imparts a sweet taste to the sprouts.
We have a simply superior product to California’s.”
According to Patrick, the Brussels sprout has been poorly served by
the Californian agribusiness model, which has turned a sweet-tasting,
delicate vegetable into a bitter, foul-tasting sham—the castaway
vegetable on every child’s plate. The californication of the sprout has
made it probably the only vegetable disliked even more by kids than
canned peas. Unlike peas, sprouts are too big to hide successfully
under your mashed potatoes or to slip to the dog. Patrick Slattery
hopes to see the Brussels sprout become the preferred vegetable of
the region’s children and their parents.
It’s not only the climate
The Slattery farm is 20 miles east of La Crosse, across from St.
Peter’s Church in Washington Township, Wisconsin. Patrick reports
the architecture of the church is Bavarian, reflecting the German
settlement of the region. “We’re newcomers to the area,” he says,
“we moved in only 31 years ago.” According to Oxford University’s
Food and Drink in America, Wisconsin is the nation’s leader in
cabbage production. Perhaps the early German immigrants
naturally migrated to the best place in the new country when it
was time to make sauerkraut. “I wish people didn’t eat so much
broccoli as they do,” Patrick says. “Cabbages are far superior.”
The Slattery farm has a long-standing commitment to organic
produce. The Slatterys attended the first Organic Valley meetings
in 1988, and Patrick is an exuberant advocate for the local. “We can
produce brilliant crops here. A third of the food grown in the U.S.
is from one valley in California. Think about the trucking costs
involved. The whole thing doesn’t make sense. Our soil is really
good here: loam on top, clay below. We don’t need all the irrigation
required in California.”
In addition to Wisconsin’s excellent climate for cold-hardy
vegetables, Patrick also believes that local organizations such as
Organic Valley have been key in sustaining local agriculture. He
reports that in the years his family has lived in the area he’s seen
many local dairy producers give up the business. “I remember when
there were four cheese factories in the neighborhood—all gone
now.” He credits the organic movement, specifically Organic Valley,
for saving what’s left. “They’re the salvation of dairy. We have
cooperative relationships and knowledge-sharing we wouldn’t
otherwise have. We don’t feel alone out here.”
Nonetheless, organic farming is still rare enough in the area:
Patrick reports he’s a road hazard when he gets down on his hands
and knees to cultivate in his field along Hwy 33. “People will stop
to check that I’m okay. Nobody sees a farmer in the dirt anymore.
So everybody stops to see if I’ve had a heart attack. I get a lot
of that.”
Sprouts on the stalk in mid-October.
4
PEOPLE’S FOOD CO-OP
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JAN UARY – FE B RUARY
2015
The Slattery Family Farm is not a big
operation. It has an acre of asparagus, an
acre of tomatoes, some fall squash, some
rutabagas and sprouts. The current project,
though, is Brussels sprouts and cabbages.
The Slattery Farm has gone in with several
other local growers to purchase a
mechanical sprout stripper from Holland —
used to strip the individual sprouts from the
stalk. How does one go about finding a
sprout stripper? “Oh, they’re on the
Internet. Ours is antiquated—like a one-row
corn picker— but it helped a lot.”
On the day of the interview, the stripper
was at the farm of one of the other copurchasers. Pat admits he’s not a mechanic
and isn’t quite used to the working of the
machine yet, noting that they can strip the
sprouts from the stalk almost as fast by
hand. Sprouts are labor-intensive. The farm
transplants the stalks by hand in June and
harvests in late fall.
Medicine man
“I’m a healthcare provider,” Patrick says.
“This food is full of anti-cancer compounds
and Vitamin K.” Websites will tell you that
cruciferous vegetables are fantastic foods
for a healthy diet. Brussels sprouts are a
relatively new addition to the ancient
cruciferous line. While cabbages appear in
early Greek and Roman literature (the
ancients too believed cabbage to have
excellent medicinal value, perceiving,
among other things, that cabbage eaten
with a meal helps prevent drunkenness),
sprouts were developed in Belgium only
some 500 years ago. Brussels sprouts made
their way to the U.S. early in the 19th
century, and Thomas Jefferson was
planting them by 1812.
Late harvest
When we spoke with Patrick in early
December, he reported the sprout harvest
is ongoing. “I’ll be in this week to the
[La Crosse] store with some sprouts. The
harvest has brought 5,000–6,000 pounds
of cabbage this year, shipping to Co-op
Partners and People’s.” Patrick pauses for
breath and then adds: “Thank you,
People’s Food Co-op shoppers, for
buying this food.”
Happy Hour—Rochester
Wednesdays at
People’s Food Co-op!
Brussels sprouts
Your local sprouts may not need much
cooking. Simply shred them and toss with
olive oil, a little pepper, and lemon juice;
add a bit of Sartori parmesan and some
toasted almonds or hazelnuts and you
have a tasty fall salad.
If you decide cooking’s the way to go:
you may steam your sprouts for five
minutes, then fry for a minute in butter
or bacon grease—though I’ve had good
results skipping the steam and going
directly to the frying pan. Add some
sliced garlic or chopped almonds, salt
and pepper and serve.
Finally, you should try roasting your
sprouts. Cut them in half, toss them in
olive oil, salt, and pepper, and place on
a baking tray. Cook in a 400ºF oven for
30 minutes, stirring once or twice. Any
loose leaves should turn brown and
crispy, sweet and delicious.
Helping you solve your animal
health problems...naturally
Small & Large Animal Medicine & Surgery
Veterinary Spinal Manipulation • Acupuncture
Herbal Medicine • Homeopathy
Caring Professional Veterinary Services –
Conventional and Holistic
Wednesdays from 4 to 7 p.m. at PFC—Rochester!
Get 50% off select, top quality produce!
50% off selected Co-op’s Own meats
50% off anything from our coffee/tea/smoothie deli menu
Fish tacos made fresh for you!
Look for the starburst signs to find the deals!
SAMPLES , UNBEATABLE DEALS , DELICIOUS
FOOD — AT PEOPLE ’ S FOOD CO - OP !
Marta W. Engel, DVM
Certified by the American Veterinary
Chiropractic Association
Janna Kottke, DVM
Certified by International Veterinary
Acupuncture Society
315 E. Decker St.
608-637-2227
Viroqua, WI
www.risingsunvet.com
PEOPLE’S FOOD CO-OP
•
JAN UARY – FE B RUARY
2015
5
ROCHESTER
FROM THE
STORE MANAGER ’ S DESK — ROCHESTER
Lizzy Haywood,
Rochester store manager
A
classic tension exists at the start of
the American adult’s New Year: the
Resolution. Aiming to fix ourselves
in a myriad of ways, we often pit a sweetsdeprived body against a stressed-out mind,
and before long we throw in the towel. Let
me issue a different challenge to begin our
year together: I invite you to meet some
local folks who bring all kinds of good things
to our community. As you accomplish this
resolution, I promise you’ll feel better.
First, it is my pleasure to introduce you to
the people who really make things happen
at PFC Rochester. Pictured below are some
members of our management team. They
are responsible for getting the best food,
wellness products, and staff into the store so
that your needs can be met at every
shopping trip. Next time you’re in, introduce
yourself to one of our department leaders—
we love to make connections with our
members. After all, we’re here to serve you!
Here are a few others in the community
who are making a difference in our culture.
Even if you don’t see them, you may want
to check out what they’re doing!
Brianna and Mike Elwood: This couple is
stepping up Rochester’s food game by
taking Rochester Food Tours into its second
season. After being inspired by a walking
tour of Chicago eateries a few years ago,
they now show off Rochester’s delicious
offerings to locals and visitors alike. The
next season of tours starts in April.
Kelly Corbin: Kelly’s official title is
Community Health Specialist with
Olmsted County Public Health, and at
PFC we have gotten to know her through
her activism with the Rochester Bicycle
Coalition. Along with Brad Smith, PFC’s
Rochester Outreach Manager, she helped
bring a certification course for League
Cycling to Rochester last October, and she
advocates year-round for bike-friendly
systems in our city.
Jan Joannides: Jan is the Executive
Director of Renewing the Countryside. It is
not an exaggeration to say that Jan’s work
has been integral to building Minnesota’s
local food economy. For the past fifteen
years, she has been an advocate and
organizer for rural communities. Last
November she helped bring the first
annual (and very successful!) FEAST
celebration to Rochester. You can find her
at the MN State Fair with the Local Foods
Exhibit, or at the Sustainability Stage
highlighting partnerships between farmers
and restaurants.
Jason Pearson, Curator of Education at
Rochester Art Center. Of the many great
things about the Art Center, one of my
favorites is Free Family Day. On the first
Saturday of the month, Jason and the staff
invite everyone to create original art pieces
and tour the center, all free of charge.
Jason has also helped bring the work of
Rochester artists into the Co-op for
viewing in our dining room.
—Lizzy
Left to right, these are the managers
of our main departments: Maura Henn,
Deli Kitchen & Bakery; Elizabeth
Canale, Front End, Floral, Books &
Housewares; Ethan Schandelmeier,
Meat & Seafood; Brigitte Heublein,
Wellness; Carey Shanahan, Grocery;
(seated) Karla Meyer, Grocery; Jessi
Stewart, Deli Counter & Cheese;
Scott Weaver, Produce.
6
PEOPLE’S FOOD CO-OP
•
JAN UARY – FE B RUARY
2015
LA CROSSE
FROM THE
STORE MANAGER ’ S DESK — LA CROSSE
Jen McCoy,
La Crosse store manager
or many of you, shopping at the Co-op
is just something you do. Maybe it’s
about convenience, or for the
atmosphere, or because we have the products
you have come to know and trust. Maybe it’s
for our friendly service and the availability of
our staff to answer questions. Maybe it just
feels good. Mostly it is a combination of
these things and more and whatever your
reason, we are glad you shop with us.
F
Our members and shoppers make us
successful, and our staff is focused on
satisfying your needs— from product
selection to service that goes the extra
mile. But the good we do doesn’t end with
your shopping experience. We are making
decisions every day that affect not only the
successful operation of our cooperative
grocery and restaurant but also our
community at large. It is part of our mission
to give back to the community that
supports us so that in the end, we are all
stronger and more successful.
We are invested in education and seek to
educate our community in a variety of ways.
At our annual meeting we had Jim Riddle
speak on the value and future of organic
agriculture. In our classroom we host a wide
variety of groups and classes to learn about
food, cooking, wellness, nutrition, and the
cooperative economy. On the floor we host
demos about our products and offer samples
and information to help you make informed
buying decisions. Through our newsletter we
seek to connect local farmers with our
members and shoppers by telling their stories
and putting faces with the products we sell.
And in February we are proud to be a major
sponsor of the Midwest Organic Sustainable
Education Service Conference (MOSES).
We will welcome thousands of organic
farmers of all ages to our community.
Education is not the only way we impact
our community. We also do it by building
community connections. Our Beans for
Bags program is one way we seek to draw
connections in our community through the
monetary support of organizations
championed by our membership. This
program does good in so many ways. First,
by encouraging shoppers to bring their own
bags. We are reducing the number of bags
we buy, use, and throw away. Second, we
are raising awareness of the many
organizations that do great things in our
community by including bios on our bean
jars and giving shoppers information about
programs available in our community.
Third, we are keeping our democracy and
cooperative economy alive by asking you
to vote for how we distribute our
donations.
One of my favorite daily moments at our
store is watching Co-op kids in the checkout line waiting for their beans to fill a jar.
It is in this way that we are teaching the
important lessons of conservation and
giving to the next generation of Co-op
shoppers. In the last year, through our
Beans For Bags program in La Crosse
and the Wooden Nickel program in
Rochester, we donated over $19,000,
saving 380,000 bags.
Thank you for helping to make our
community stronger every time you shop.
Be warm and well this winter. I’ll see you in
the store.
—Jen
New item in our
!
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Well
Children’s allergy alert wristbands
• Customizable
• Perfect for school, camp, sleepovers, daily use
PEOPLE’S FOOD CO-OP
•
JAN UARY – FE B RUARY
2015
7
MEMBERSHIP
Annual Meeting
I
n early December, People’s Food Co-op
members met for the Annual Meeting at
the Myrick Center in La Crosse. PFC
members enjoyed a buffet lunch from the
La Crosse Co-op and a chance to
reconnect with old friends before the
afternoon’s program. Members heard a
presentation from the Co-op’s general
manager, statements from board
candidates, and a talk from Jim Riddle,
organic farmer and former chair of the
National Organic Standards Board.
Year in review
Michelle Schry, PFC General Manager, gave
a brief recap of the Co-op’s year. She noted
some of the events and honors that People’s
has received, notably an award from the U.S.
Department of Housing recognizing the
success that the Co-op has made of a HUD
CDBG loan in 2004. HUD named PFC
“one of the 10 best projects in the U.S.”
Michelle also noted some financial
highlights of the year. The two stores both
showed very strong growth in sales and
memberships. La Crosse sales were up 3.5%
from last year’s and La Crosse now has 5188
registered members. The Rochester store
had a 91.7% increase in sales (this was its
first year, after all) and an increase in
2014
membership of 46%, to 2374 members in
the Rochester area. “We saw almost
900,000 transactions through our two
stores,” Michelle reported.
We also heard presentations from Board
candidates. It was revealed that more than a
couple of the candidates found their future
spouses at People’s Food Co-op. Take note,
lonely hearts.
In support of organic practices, and to rebut
those who claim organic is impractical, Jim
cited recent Iowa State University research
that shows organic management practices
improve corn and soybean yields over
conventional practices by the fourth crop
rotation. Research also shows that alternative
cropping practices decrease the amount of
nitrate contamination, a major problem in
conventional agriculture that leads to “dead
zones” in waterways and the Gulf of Mexico.
Guest speaker
This year’s Annual Meeting guest
speaker was Jim Riddle, founding chair
of the Winona Farmers Market and
the International Organic Inspectors
Association, (IOIA); he is also a
former chair of the National Organic
Standards Board.
Jim’s talk was an overview of the challenges,
achievements, and opportunities of the
organic food movement. He started with
the following definition (taken from the
Organic Standards): “Organic production
[is] a production system that is managed …
to respond to site-specific conditions by
integrating cultural, biological, and
mechanical practices that foster cycling of
resources, promote ecological balance, and
conserve biodiversity.”
Jim also spoke about the spread of
genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in
the United States. He cited problems
created by “escaped” transgenic organisms,
such as recent findings of GMO canola that
has cross-pollinated with wild relatives,
creating transgenic weeds resistant to
herbicides. The Bt toxin, used in certain
GMOs, has been found to remain active in
the ecosystem long after application,
disrupting riverine ecosystems.
Jim points to significant increases in food
allergies coincidental to the introduction of
glyphosate herbicides into the conventional
food system. Glyphosate-resistant weeds
have been on the increase, leading industry
scientists to recommend application of
multiple herbicides, such as Atrazine,
Simazine, 2,4-D, and other herbicides in order
to kill weeds. The result: more chemicals to
manage the weeds resistant to chemicals.
“Why should we farm organically?” Jim
asked. He gave the answer that organic
farmers have often given to this publication:
“to protect my family.”
Jim’s PowerPoint presentation, with links to
the research mentioned here, can be found
on People’s website, www.pfc.coop.
***
A special thanks to PFC IT director Jason
Turonie, who was on hand a with backup
projector when the Myrick Center’s
projector went down.
8
PEOPLE’S FOOD CO-OP
•
JAN UARY – FE B RUARY
2015
COULEE R EGION CO - OP COMMUNITY F UND
(CRCCF) CHANGES ITS NAME
C
oulee Region Co-op Community Fund (CRCCF) is
changing its name to People’s Food Co-op Community
Fund (PFCCF). CRCCF, a 501(c)(3), was established in
2003 with the specific mission of providing supplemental or projectspecific funding to local nonprofit organizations that have missions
consistent with the goals of PFC. Priority is given to grant requests
for educational projects, development projects, and events that
have a focus on, but are not necessarily limited to, food and food
systems, nutrition, health and well-being, sustainable agriculture,
cooperative education, and social change.
People’s Food Co-op’s community fund was established with a
$5,000 matching grant from the Twin Pines Cooperative Fund.
Twin Pines provides management services to People’s Food
Co-op’s community fund as well as to more than 30 other food
co-op-based community funds throughout the United States.
Over the past decade PFC has worked to build its endowment
in the fund, which today stands at nearly $50,000. Fund earnings
are used to provide grant monies to local nonprofits in the
communities that we serve.
Some previous grant awardees include:
• Cornucopia Institute (ongoing operational funding)
COMMUNITY
• Coulee Children’s Center (Diet
Resource Group materials
funding)
• Houston Community Garden
(community garden project)
• La Crescent Area Healthy
Community Partnership (funded
garden tiller purchase for
community garden)
• Pleasant Ridge Waldorf School
(school garden program)
• Riverway Learning Community (poultry to school project)
• Scenic Bluffs Community Health Centers (bi-lingual diabetes
education materials)
• Women’s Resource Center of Winona (children’s summer
garden project)
In February 2015 People’s Food Co-op’s Community Fund will begin
accepting grant applications from nonprofits in our region who need
the kind of assistance described above. Grant application materials
can be found at www.pfc.coop. Click on the “Our Co-op” tab at the
top of the page and look for “PFC Community Fund.”
BUILDING IN
L A C ROSSE
beans for bags
W
henever you shop at the La Crosse People’s Food Co-op, bring
your own shopping bags. For every reusable bag you use, you’ll
get a bean to throw into the jar of the worthy organization of
your choice. Each bean means a donation of five cents, which is the
reusable bag credit.
Bean totals for September and October 2014 were:
The International Owl Center, Houston, MN
$315.36
Friends of the Marsh
$445.44
Howard Bowers Fund
$144.48
As this issue of The Shopper goes to press, the bean jars for November
and December are steadily filling. La Crosse People’s shoppers are
currently helping to support La Crosse Community Thanksgiving Dinner,
Salvation Army Meal Program, and the “Come For Supper” Tuesday night
meal program at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church.
Rochester Wooden Nickels
In our Rochester store, donate your reusable bag credits to community
building through the Wooden Nickels program. For every reusable bag you
use, you’ll receive a Wooden Nickel token to donate to a local organization.
Alice the Great Horned Owl (right) from the
International Owl Center, Houston, MN, with her
human, Karla Bloem.
PEOPLE’S FOOD CO-OP
•
JAN UARY – FE B RUARY
2015
9
Another benefit of membership:
Take advantage of these sales all
month long, or pre-order by the
case to take an additional 10% off !
MEMBER SPECIALS
y
r
a
u
n
Ja
All member specials are
available at both stores!
BULK
Chia Seed organic
Save $2.00/ lb
reg. price $9.99/lb
MARIEKE
Goudas,
local Select Milk
all varieties
Save $2.00/ lb
BULK
North Bay Trading Co.
Soup Mixes
Save $1.00/ lb
Save 30¢
half gallon, reg. price $2.19 to $2.59
SAMI ’ S
Lavash
Save $1.00
12 oz, reg. price $5.99
reg. price $5.99 to 8.49/lb
SIMPLY BEE NATURALS
PFC BRAND
GREY DUCK
Immune Support
Basic Multi
Chai
Save $11.20
Save $3.40
Save $1.50
local
40 caps, reg. price $27.95
y
r
a
u
r
Feb
HOLYLAND
local
60 count, reg. price $11.25
SARTORI
WW HOMESTEAD
Montamore Cheese
Milk
Save $1.50
7 oz, reg. price $5.99
local
Hummus
Save 30¢
half gallon, reg. price $2.09 to $2.99
SNO PAC
loca
l
Strawberries or Blueberries
Save 74¢
Save 75¢
10 oz pkg, reg. price $3.49–$4.39
5 pack, reg. price $4.99
SIMPLY BEE NATURALS
PFC BRAND
Breathe Better
Garlic
Save $6.00
Save $1.79
2 oz liquid, reg. price $14.95
•
local
Bagels
7-12 oz, reg. price $3.39 to $4.69
PEOPLE’S FOOD CO-OP
local
reg. price $8.99 qt
ST PAUL BAGELRY
Save $1.00
10
KEMPS
JAN UARY – FE B RUARY
100 count, reg. price $5.99
2015
SEVEN SUNDAYS
local
Muesli
Save $1.00
12 oz, reg. price $6.89
COOKING CLASSES
La Crosse location
&
demos
Rochester location
All about bees
Raw foods class
Thursday, January 22 • 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. • with Bob Hoffman and
Oscar Carlson
Saturday, January 24 • 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. • with Matt Bennett
The hard-working honey bee is an important player in our food
system. In this presentation local beekeeper Bob Hoffman will
describe the bee life cycle, how pollination works, how bees create
their hive environment, and how a beekeeper facilitates hive life
and harvests honey. Co-presenter Oscar Carlson will guide us
through a honey taste-test comparison. Sweet!
Cost: Free for members; $5.00 for nonmembers. Proceeds will be
donated to the La Crosse Area Beekeepers Association
Love and pie for Valentine’s Day!
Wednesday, February 4 • 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. • with Monique Hooker
and Jessica Rizzolo
Join Monique Hooker, owner of Got2HavPie, and Jessica Rizzolo
to learn about pie crust from the experts! We’ll use Monique’s
Got2HavPie crusts and puff pastry to make special Valentine’s Day
treats. Learn how to handle crust for best results and get ideas for
both sweet and savory pies. There will be plenty of pie to sample,
too! PFC 2nd Floor Community Classroom.
COOKING CLASSES
Co-op classes: $15/members
$25/nonmembers Except where noted
Start your new year off right with Matt Bennett, a raw foods
aficionado and PFC produce employee, who will be walking you
through different recipes using raw foods. An emphasis will be
placed on healthy fruits and vegetables, and unique juicing recipes.
Kid’s casserole
Sunday, February 8 • 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. • with Jessica Saw
Ready for family fun? Bring your kids and a casserole dish for this
interactive class aimed at getting kids (and parents) excited for
cooking. Learn that there are no mistakes in the kitchen when fun is
being had. Participants will leave with recipes and a dish to throw in
the oven at home.
Natural skin care workshop
Date TBD • with Chersten Kiellor of Lillybud Naturals
We’ll make a face scrub to take home, learn all about natural
ingredients, holistic skin care essentials, and the most important
facial care steps. Materials are supplied.
Class policies: All classes require preregistration. Classes with
fewer than eight registered 24 hours before class time will be
canceled or rescheduled. All cancelations made by preregistered
participants must be made 48 hours before class time to qualify
for a refund. Please wear a hair restraint to all cooking classes.
(Dishes may be subject to change at instructor’s discretion.)
• Register in person or over the phone.
• Payment is due at the time of registration.
• La Crosse: 608-784-5798 • Rochester: 507-289-9061
Monique Hooker has the pie crust for your Valentine’s Day! See
class listing for La Crosse February 4.
PEOPLE’S FOOD CO-OP
•
JAN UARY – FE B RUARY
2015
11
welcome
NEW PFC OWNERS
A hearty welcome to our many new members !
Blythe Newburg
Stanley A Bissen & Cassandra A.
Bissen
Lori Campbell
Christine Reynolds
Jill Blaken
Kristy Holinka
Eric Warner
Amy Wettstein & Andrew Wettstein
Tammy (Tamera) Frei
Bonnie Lovell
Zhuo Julia Wang
Teresa Goodier
Joyce Altobelli
Jennifer Karnowski
Jeanette Von Ruden
Dawn Gale
Jennifer Solfest
Jerrilyn Brewer
Samantha Behrens
Becky Prichett & Gregory Prichett
La Crosse Members
Nona G. Hagel
Earl Sanders
Patrick Paulino
Chelsey Willms
Kristine Stemper
Miranda Roberts
Jerry W. Blake
Betsy Neil & Brian Neil
Barret Myers Wolfson & Elliott
Wolfson
Danielle Rathke
Jay Schnoor & Connie Schoor
Ariana Gonzalez Organista & Will
Albertsen
Thomas Schoenfeld
Richard Loomis & Anne M. Loomis
Josh Dirks
Kristina Lemmer
Stephanie Brunkow
Kristen Reich
Free Introduction to
Mindfulness-Based Stress
Reduction (MBSR)
All interested are welcome
(Required for those interested in
eight-week MBSR Program)
Tuesday, January 20, 2015, 6:30–8:30 p.m.
Franciscan Spirituality Center
Rochester Business
Tuesday, February 17– April 7, 2015
6 – 8 p.m. Consecutive Tuesdays
Teachers: Vanee Songsiridej, MD
Marty Kreuzer, LCSW
Ryan T. Kazamba, Rochester Earned
Services
Rochester Members
Chris Higgins
Susan Bartels
Julie Ellingson
Sherry Wolf
Karen Koka
Paul Johnson & Nancy Johnson
Karen Hanson & Harlan Hanson
For fee schedule, more information,
and registration go to
http://7riversmindfulness.com
or call our office at 608-784-8688.
PEOPLE’S FOOD CO-OP
•
JAN UARY – FE B RUARY
La Crosse Business
Mathias Harter, MWH LLC
Eight-Week MBSR
12
Claire Rueckheim
Patty Van Gundy
Laura Vanderlei
Rachel McKenney
Tim Leonard & Carrie Leonard
Gerald Mengelkoch
Diane Gray
Todd McGinnity
Mahnaz Farahmand
Tyler Lee
Ashley Deets/Vega & Raymond Vega
Lindy Messerly & Larry Messerly
Ben Miller
Guerra T. Peterson
Michael Horn
Benjamin Parsons & Jana Parsons
Justin Creswell, Tammy Creswell &
Jeanne Creswell
Deborah Nerud
Doug Seberg & Jenny Clark (Seberg)
Juan F. Jimenez & Kristine Von
Ruden
Kevin Boser & Jessica Boser
Erik Johnson
Karen Gaede
Whitney Thooft & David
Baumgartner
Richard Pearse
Heather Linville
Peter Gorski
Alexandra Matthews
Erica Krause-Wagner & Andy Wagner
Lindsay Murray
Ronald Ammerman
Ryan Schultz & Morgan Gantenbein
John Brevik
Jane Donaldson
Diane Dippel
Stephanie Loizzi & John Loizzi
Harald Bringsjord
2015
Ann Jost & Jay Jost
C. Russ Gambrell & Lauren Gambrell
Alexander Ginsburg & Melissa
Glader
Shane P. Erickson
Deanna Swanson &
Sarah Upton & Jesse Reed
Judith Young & William Young
Rebecca Nesse & Rob Nesse
Licelle Cayer
Jennifer Pickard
Laura Anderko
Kady Weigel
Becky Oppold
Moritz Binder
Guy Eastep
Victor Jortack
Dan Kohrs
Siyao Gu
Ken Edelbach & Christina Edelbach
Joseph Vavra
John Reiser
Dan Kenney
Mary McKie & Paul McKie
Yvonne Van Veldhuizen
Jennifer White
Leslie R. McClellon
Parker Quammen
Chris Ostendorf & C. Blake Frazier
Chris Thompson
Sandra TePoel
Jillian Markus & David Field
Joseph Alexander & John Alexander
Jennifer DeClercq
Janet Lewis
Yonggang Wang
Laura Wyttenbach
Marie J. Maher
Kari Grabowsky
Nicole Bakri
Rick Welch
Cara Tracy & Tim Tracy
Chad Nelson & Kris Haeussinger
Bruce Goff & Kary Kay Goff
Valerie Willis & Vanessa Allen
Kathryn Stolp
Earlene Hackenmiller
Valerie Waldner
Nancy Walsh
Joseph W. Gelwicks
June Wicks
Angie Hutchins
Gay Eastman & Tom Eastman
Shannon Killeen
Penny Thomas
$
BOARD ELECTION REPORT
Dan Litwiller,
Board President
T
he 2014 PFC Board Election and
Bylaws vote failed to achieve the
required member quorum,
unfortunately. As you know, democratic
control is a defining feature of our
cooperative, and member election
participation is vital to the continued success
of our food co-op. Without your participation
in our elections, the Board cannot effectively
conduct business on your behalf.
The Board of Directors has opted to re-run
the election at a substantial cost to the
Co-op of about $10,000. Please watch your
mailbox after the beginning of the year for
a new ballot packet (printed on bright green
paper as in previous years). Please note, all
previously returned ballots are VOID. If you
voted before, you must vote again in this
new election. Please vote, using either the
postpaid mailer or the store ballot box.
In addition to the usual Board Election, the
2014 ballot includes a number of proposed
amendments to our bylaws intended to
streamline the governance process and to
support the continued success of our
growing food Co-op. We urge you to
support these sensible amendments.
Again, your participation in the democratic
process is vital and much appreciated.
Please don’t hesitate to contact your Board
with questions or comments and please
don’t forget to vote!
On behalf of the Board,
Dan Litwiller, President
[email protected]
No qu
Boar orum!
re-sch d election
edule
d!
New election information !
• New ballots will be mailed in early January.
• Look for the bright green mailing.
• Ballots due February 5! • Ballot boxes available in stores.
• Membership meetings in both stores January 29 to discuss bylaw changes.
New Members continued
Anthony Reyes-Kneen
Carla Nelson
Kamille Bustos
Cheryl A. Kupp
Sherry Rengstorf
Colin Gentling
Sean McCauley & Joselyn
Raymundo
Karla Knockel
Sara Mangan
Robin Phillips & Randy Phillips
Kathryn A. Dewey
Amanda Van Ness
Dawn Meldahl
Ruth Morton
Gail Eadie
Thomas Borell & Mark Meillier
Kay Johnson
Kathy Hoeft
Mike Enke
Elizabeth Lavine
Jeanne M. Townsend
Audrey Graffeo
Jill Tacl
Coleen Rieder & Mark Rieder
Deirdre Graff-Radford (Pachman) &
Jonathan Graff-Radford
Mary Williams
Rachel Sutliff
Joel Schroeder & Teresa Joswick
Amanda Marnholtz & Will Marnholtz
Eric Reeve
David Williams
Lesa Brusse
JoAnne Ryan & Steve Groth
Sarah Leigh & Mark Leigh
Aaron McGrath
John R. Masters & Carol
Kerian-Masters
Constance Williams
Katherine Skleba
Jodie Meurer
Debra Wilkinson
K.C. Hinz
Susan Niemeyer
John Mueske
Ryan Oldenburg
Lyndon Leining & Mary Leining
Deb Rundquist
Mattie Roberson
Louanne Brooks
Gary Ryba
Dennis L. Damerval
Terra Boraas
REMINDER TO MEMBERS
If you have changes to your membership please
remember to notify the Co-op by filling out a
Membership Change form at the service desk.
Thank you for keeping us up to date!
PEOPLE’S FOOD CO-OP
•
JAN UARY – FE B RUARY
2015
13
Healing
from Brazil
Pamela will talk about her trips
to Brazil at a free program.
Tuesday, January 13 • 6–7:45 p.m.
La Crosse Public Library
800 Main Street • La Crosse
Come learn about:
Pamela Radosen, M.S.
• The world-renowned healer affectionately
known as John of God
• The Casa de Dom Inácio de Loyola,
his famous healing center in Brazil
• Pamela’s guided trip to the Casa:
April 26– May 10, 2015
Sixta Insurance, LLC
Providing a Full Range of Quality Financial
Services and Products ~Since 1981
Everyone is welcome!
Robert Sixta, CLU
MN State License #1001480
WI State License # 1071463
pamelaradosen.com
608.787.1865 | La Crosse • Wisconsin
425 15th Avenue SW
Rochester, MN 55902
[email protected]
Life Insurance
Annuities
Estate Planning
Retirement
Business 507.288.2366
Cell 507.259.8357
Home 507.281.3358
Fax 507.288.2358
Dr. Frederick George Kriemelmeyer
Mercury-free Dentistry for over 20 years
• Chronic Pain
• Orthodontics
• TMJ
• Jaw Orthopedics
319 Main St. Suite 400 • downtown La Crosse
608.784.1730
14
PEOPLE’S FOOD CO-OP
•
JAN UARY – FE B RUARY
2015
cleanse
Colon Hydrotherapy
221 Pearl Street
La Crosse, WI
Digestive issues
to detoxing…
www.dimsumteashop.com
Hrs: Mon.– Sat. 10 a.m.– 7 p.m. & Sun 11 a.m . – 3 p.m.
Ph. 608-738-1221
for FAQs visit
cleansellc.com
Veggie & Yoga Night
Bulk Tea & Gifts
Bubble Teas • Smoothies
Dim Sum & Soups
Tea Tasting Parties
Valentine’s Day gifts for your sweetheart!
608.784.9806
[email protected]
1526 Rose St. • La Crosse, WI 54603
ABLAN
MICHael aBlaN
laW FIRM, S.C.
Home Birth • Water Birth
Birth Center Birth
Denise Doerr
Certified Nurse Midwife
Office 608-634-3664
215 Ramsland St.
Cell 608-606-2598
Westby, WI 54667 [email protected]
The twin pines emblem, a symbol of
cooperation, was created in 1922 by Dr.
James Peter Warbasse, NCBA’s first president.
Dr. Warbasse defined the symbol in this way: The pine tree is
the ancient symbol of endurance and fecundity. More than
one pine is used to signify cooperation. The trunks of the trees
are continued into roots which form the circle, the ancient
symbol of eternal life, typifying that which has no end. The
circle represents the all-embracing cosmos, which depends
upon cooperation for its existence. The two pines and the
circle are dark green, the chlorophyll color of man's life
principle in nature.
The symbol is still in use today.
If you are interested in
advertising in the Co-op Shopper,
please contact Kevin Ducey,
marketing,
@ 608.784.5798
or e-mail Kevin at
[email protected]
PEOPLE’S FOOD CO-OP
•
JAN UARY – FE B RUARY
2015
15
Find us on Facebook Badge
People’s Food Co-op
CMYK / .eps
Follow us on Twitter
postal return address:
315 Fifth Avenue South
La Crosse, WI 54601
608.784.5798
@pfccoop
www.pfc.coop
La Crosse Hours:
7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Daily
Rochester Hours:
6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Daily
change service
requested
Bistro
Valentine’s Day Menu
Saturday, 14 February
5 to 9 p.m.
Our special menu will be available
from 5 to 9 p.m. for Valentine’s Day!
Reservations recommended 608.784.5798
ext.2202
details at www.pfc.coop
PRSRT STD
U.S. Postage
PAID
DPC
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