AA Degree with Accounting

Program Objectives
Richfield University Resident Associate of Arts in Business Administration with option in accounting
degree program provides a solid foundation of academic disciplines in management, business
communications and practices, information management, and business ethics with a specialization in
accounting.
Career Opportunities
The program graduates learn how to understand and perform important accounting task such as
recording and posting business transactions, handling payroll, inventory, accounts receivable and
payables. With the foundation knowledge in business administration, the graduates can contribute to the
office supervision and management and successfully handle business operations that require the use of
accounting information and resources.
Admission Requirements
1. Completion, submission, and approval of the application form and the supporting documents,
including the payment of the required fees.
2. Possession of a high school diploma or GED. Submission of official high school transcripts from a state
approved high school or its equivalent. High school diplomas earned outside the United States must be
evaluated and approved by Richfield University’s Admissions Office before admission to any program.
3. Proficiency in English evidenced by one of the following:
a) 70% or above passing score on Richfield University English Proficiency Examination (RCEPE), or
b) A score of 600 or above on the paper-based Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL),
corresponding to a score of 100 or above on the internet-based (iBT), or
c) High School Diploma or a minimum of one (1) year University education at an institution with
English as its official instructional language.
Associate of Arts in Business Administration With Option in Accounting Degree Program only accepts
students who have graduated from a high school and does not accept any student based on the ability to
benefit as described in §94904 of the California Educational Code (CEC).
Program Course Requirements
Associate of Arts in Business Administration with Option in Accounting program is
made of 60 semester units in the following areas:

General Education Courses (24 units)

Major (core) Courses (12 units)

Option Courses (12 units)

Elective Courses (12 units)
Program Outline
Approved Prior General Education Courses *
CODE
SUBJECT/COURSE
In-Class Hours
Total Clock
Hours
Semester
Credit
Units
Group A: Natural or Applied Science (9 units-All Required)
CHM
100
General Chemistry
45
45
3
BIO
100
General Biology
45
45
3
PHS
100
University Physics
45
45
3
CODE
SUBJECT/COURSE
In-Class Hours
Total Clock
Hours
Semester
Credit
Units
Group B: Behavioral Science (6 units-All Required)
PSY
100
General Psychology
HEA
100
Physical Health
Nutrition
CODE
SUBJECT/COURSE
and
45
45
45
45
In-Class Hours
Total Clock
Hours
3
3
Semester
Credit
Units
Group C: Arts and Humanities (6 units-Any two Courses)
HIS
100
American History
45
45
3
ENGL
101
English Grammar and
Composition
45
45
ENG
102
Effective
Communications
45
45
Art 101
Art Appreciation
45
45
3
Art 102
Music Appreciation
45
45
3
3
3
CODE
SUBJECT/COURSE
Lecture/Lab
and Projects
Hours
Total
Hours
Clock
Semester
Credit
Units
Group D: Mathematics (3 units-Any One Course)
MAT
101
College Algebra
45
45
MAT
102
General Statistics
45
45
CODE
SUBJECT/COURSE
Lecture
/Lab
and
Projects
Hours
3
3
Total
Hours
Clock
Semester
Credit
Units
Group E: Electives of General Education (12 units-Any Four Courses)
HIS 201
World History
45
45
ENG 201
English
and
Literature
45
45
ENG 202
Critical Thinking & Creative
Writing
45
45
PHI 201
World Philosophy
45
45
3
REL 201
World Religions
45
45
3
COM 201
Business Communications
45
45
3
CODE
American
SUBJECT/COURSE
3
3
3
Lecture/L
ab
and
Projects
Hours
Total
Clock
Hours
Semeste
r Credit
Units
Option in Accounting Courses - Core 12 Units
ACC 201
Accounting Principles
45
45
3
ACC 202
Managerial Accounting
45
45
3
ACC 203
Cost Accounting
45
45
3
ACC 204
Principles of Taxation
45
45
3
CO
DE
SUBJECT/COURSE
Lecture/L
ab
and
Projects
Hours
Total
Clock
Hours
Semester
Credit Units
(Major)Core Required Courses 12 Units
MG
M
20
0
Principles of Management
45
45
3
BU
S
20
0
Introduction to Business Law
45
45
3
CIS
20
0
Principles of Information Security
45
45
3
MI
S
20
0
Management Information Systems
45
45
3
Description of All Courses:Approved Prior General Education Courses *
CODE
SUBJECT/COURSE
In-Class
Hours
Total Clock
Hours
Semester
Credit
Units
Group A: Natural or Applied Science (9 units-All Required)
CHM 100
General Chemistry
45
45
3
BIO 100
General Biology
45
45
3
PHS 100
University Physics
45
45
3
CHM 100 General Chemistry
This is an introductory laboratory course. It introduces principles, laws, and the properties of inorganic
and organic chemistry. It serves to fulfill general education requirements. Students who successfully
complete this course will understand basic chemical principles and will have practiced quantitative
reasoning and problem solving skills. Students will also have learned various lab techniques, including safe
and competent handling of chemicals and laboratory equipment.
Learning Outcomes

The major in chemistry provides training for students planning careers in the chemical Sciences and
also for those whose interests lie in biology, medicine, earth sciences, secondary education, business, and
law.

This course introduces students to thermodynamics, acid base chemistry, chemical equilibrium, and
to the crystal structures of simple inorganic solids.

Advanced coursework and educational activities outside the traditional classroom, such as
independent research provide students the opportunity to conduct individual research projects or
participate as member of a research team.
Reference Books



General Chemistry By Linus Pauling, Dover Publications, 2014.
Principles of General Chemistry By Martin Silberberg, McGraw-Hill Education, 2012.
General Chemistry: Principles and Structure By James E. Brady, Wiley, 1990.
BIO 100 General Biology
This course introduces the basic concepts of biology. Topics include cells, genetics, simple to complex
organisms, and ecology. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to identify the
parts of a cell, describe reproductive and physiological processes, and demonstrate their understanding of
heredity.
Learning Outcomes

Describe and practice laboratory safety guidelines relating to working with chemicals,
microorganisms, body fluids and/or dissection.

Define and correctly use scientific terminology in regard to biological organisms and processes.

Correctly focus and adjust lighting on microscope slides, to locate and identify biological organisms
and their parts.
Reference Books

Vascular Epiphytes: General Biology and Related Biota By David H. Benzing, Cambridge University
Press, 2008.

General Biology: A Book of Outlines and Practical Studies for the General Student By James George
Needham, Literary Licensing, LLC, 2012.

An Introduction to the Study of General Biology By Thomas C. MacGinley, William Collins, Sons, &
Co.'s Educational Work.
PHS 100 University Physics
This course covers selected topics in physics. Topics include the fundamental principles of science,
Newton’s laws of force and motion, Newton’s laws of universal gravitation, and laws of thermodynamics.
Upon successful completion of this course students will be able to solve problems dealing with equilibrium,
momentum, energy, thermodynamics, light, and sound waves.
Learning Outcomes

Apply the basic laws of physics in the areas of classical mechanics, Newtonian gravitation, special
relativity, electromagnetism, geometrical and physical optics, quantum mechanics, thermodynamics and
statistical mechanics.

Recognize how observation, experiment and theory work together to continue to expand the frontiers
of knowledge of the physical universe.

Apply basic mathematical tools commonly used in physics, including elementary probability theory,
differential and integral calculus, vector calculus, ordinary differential equations, partial differential
equations, and linear algebra.
Reference Books

Schaum's Outline of College Physics, 11th Edition By Frederick Bueche, Eugene Hecht, McGraw-Hill
Companies, 2011.

College Physics, Volume 1 By Nicholas Giordano, CengageBrain, 2012.

Essentials of College Physics By Raymond A. Serway, Chris Vuille, CengageBrain, 2007.
CODE
Total Clock
Hours
Semester
Credit
Units
45
45
3
45
45
In-Class
Hours
SUBJECT/COURSE
Group B: Behavioral Science (6 units-All Required)
PSY 100
General Psychology
HEA 100
Physical Health
Nutrition
and
3
PSY 100 General Psychology
This survey course introduces modern psychology by presenting scientific and humanistic interpretations
of the human mind and behavior. Topics discussed include the methods psychologists use to gather data,
the biological bases of behavior, and the basic processes of perception, learning and motivation, the
development of thinking and personality, and social influences on behavior.
Learning Outcomes

Describe the basic theories, principles, and concepts of psychology as they relate to behaviors and
mental processes.

Apply psychological theories, principles, and concepts to everyday life, including industry and
organizations.

Discuss how research and theory in cognition psychology have been applied to “real world” problems.
Reference Books

General Psychology By Abraham, McGraw-Hill Education.

A textbook of general psychology By Walter F. Daves, Chandler Pub. Co., 1975.

General Psychological Theory: Papers on Metapsychology By Sigmund Freud, Simon and Schuster,
2008.
HEA 100 Physical Health and Nutrition
This course will help the students develop the knowledge and skills they need to make healthy decisions
that allow you to stay active, safe and informed. The lessons and activities are designed to introduce
students to important aspects of the main types of health: emotional and mental, social and consumer, and
physical. Among other topics, you will explore nutrition, understanding and avoiding disease, first aid and
CPR, and human sexuality. The fundamental components and principles of fitness is also covered.
Learning Outcomes

Students predict the long- and short-term consequences of health behaviours on the health of
themselves and others and propose actions to promote health now and in the future.

Students demonstrate behaviours and actions to provide care or manage risk in responding to unsafe
or risky situations and behaviours.

Students perform games, sports or physical activities in ways which reflect their ability to modify
movement skills and sequences using basic movement concepts.

Students suggest and demonstrate actions, behaviours and attitudes that support positive
interactions with family, special people and friends.
Reference Books

Physical Activity and Nutrition for Health By Christopher A. Hopper, Bruce Fisher, Kathy D. Munoz,
Human Kinetics.

Child Health, Nutrition, and Physical Activity By Lilian W. Y. Cheung, Julius Benjamin Richmond,
Human Kinetics.

Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Health in Early Life, Second Edition By Jana Parizkova, CRC Press,
2009.
CODE
SUBJECT/COURSE
In-Class
Hours
Total Clock
Hours
Semester
Credit
Units
3
Group C: Arts and Humanities (6 units-Any two Courses)
HIS 100
American History
45
45
ENGL 101
English Grammar and
Composition
45
45
ENG 102
Effective
Communications
45
45
Art 101
Art Appreciation
45
45
3
Art 102
Music Appreciation
45
45
3
3
3
HIS 100 American History
This course Surveys United States history from its beginning to the present. The course focuses more on
the modern history of the United states. American life, culture, economy, government, and politics are
covered.
Learning Outcomes

An international perspective can be integrated into the history curriculum in various ways. This
committee chose to focus on the general education courses in history, particularly the American history
survey.

Grasp temporal relationships and integrate multiple chronologies within the same analytical frame of
reference.

Demonstrate the capacity to deal with differences in interpretation.

Critically analyze narrative structures and construct narratives.

Demonstrate an ability to recognize and interpret multiple forms of evidence (visual, oral, statistical,
artifacts from material culture).
Reference Books

Barron's American History the Easy Way By William O. Kellogg, Barron's Educational Series.

The Oxford Handbook of Latin American History edited by Jose C. Moya, Oxford University Press,
2011.

The New American History edited by Eric Foner, Temple University Press.
ENG 101 English Grammar and Composition
A study of grammar, syntax and usage, including the principles of writing skills is covered. Emphasis on
sentence structure, grammar, punctuation and paragraph development. Essays are assigned in the course.
Learning Outcomes

The students will be able to effectively prepare and write a memorandum.

The students will be able to effectively prepare and write a resume and a cover letter to accompany
the resume.

The students will be able to effectively prepare and write a customer business letters.

The students will be able to revise their writing by adhering to the rules of Standard American
English, including grammar, punctuation, and capitalization.
Reference Books



English Composition and Grammar By John E. Warriner, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich.
High School English Grammar & Composition By Wren Pc, H. Martin, S. Chand.
High School English Grammar and Composition By Percival Christopher Wren, Wren Martin, S. Chand.
ENG 102 Effective Communications
This course in rhetoric emphasizes clear, effective written communication and preparation of different
written documents including the research paper.
Learning Outcomes

Demonstrate scientific literacy concerning a range of global issues. Articulate similarities and
contrasts among cultures, demonstrating knowledge of and sensitivity to various cultural values and
issues.

Develop attitudes central to lifelong learning: openness, flexibility, intellectual curiosity, and a broad
perspective that values diversity of thought.

Demonstrate appropriate social skills in group settings, listening and being receptive to others’ ideas
and feelings, effectively contributing ideas, and demonstrating leadership by motivating others.
Reference Books

Effective Communication (Revised Edition): The Most Important Management Skill for All By John
Adair, Pan Macmillan, 2011.

Effective Communications By Elearn, Elsevier, 2013.

Effective Communications: Essential for Sucess in Any Workplace! By Nick Vandome, John S. C. McVey,
Smart Learning.
Art 101 Art Appreciation
An introduction to artistic practices by exploring the visual culture in our world through a cross-cultural
approach. This course examines themes in art like Religion, Power, Reproduction and Sexuality, and traces
them across cultures and time periods. Emphasis will be placed on learning the language of visual culture
both in terms of the formal elements of design as well as the content of style and subject matter and finding
connections and differences.
Learning Outcomes

Student will gain knowledge about drawing, painting, printmaking, photography and graphic design.

Student will recognize how history, politics, religion, philosophy, science, technology, and economy
influence art.

Student will be able to recognize different styles and trends in art.

Student will recognize current trends in art today, and the importance of art criticism.

Student will be able to experience visual arts on exhibit at local museums and galleries.
Reference Books



Introduction to Art Appreciation and Aesthetics By Panizo, Rustia, Rex
The Psychology of Art Appreciation By Bjarne Sode Funch, Museum Tusculanum Press, 1997
Art Appreciation: Introduction to the Humanities By Claudio V. Tabotabo, Mindshapers Company
Art 102 Music Appreciation
Study of major genres, forms, styles and historical periods in music since the Middle ages. Emphasis on
listening techniques, appreciation of classical and popular music and recognition of styles, composers and
periods.
Learning Outcomes

Compare and contrast diverse musical genres using the elements of music and expressive devices.

Identify diverse musical genres using the elements of music and expressive devices.

Evolve specific criteria for making informed, critical evaluations of the quality and effectiveness of
performances, compositions, arrangements and improvisations and apply the criteria in their own
personal participation in music.

Analyze a performance, composition, arrangement, or improvisation by comparing it to similar or
exemplary models.
Reference Books



A humanistic approach to music appreciation By Alden Buker, National Press, 1964.
Music appreciation, Volume 1 By Robert Hickok, Addison-Wesley Pub. Co., 1975.
Music Appreciation: An Active Force in Child Development By Sadie Rafferty, Silver Burdett Company.
CODE
SUBJECT/COURSE
Lecture/Lab
and Projects
Hours
Total Clock
Hours
Semester
Credit
Units
Group D: Mathematics (3 units-Any Course)
MAT 101
College Algebra
45
45
3
MAT 102
General Statistics
45
45
3
MAT101: College Algebra
This course covers an overview of the fundamental concepts of algebra. Topics include linear and quadratic
equations and inequalities; the Cartesian plane and graphing; using a graphing utility; functions; graphs,
and models; polynomial and rational functions; exponential and logarithmic functions; systems of
equations, inequalities and matrices.
Learning Outcomes

Understand basic ideas of Algebra: Expressions, Transforming Expressions, and Equations.

Understand concepts of Function, Equivalent Expressions, Functions and Equations, and Functions
and Change.

Understand Linear Functions, Expressions for Linear Functions, Linear Equations.

Apply concepts of Equations of Lines to solve real world problems (Modeling With Linear Functions).

Understand concepts of Systems of Linear Equations and its applications to solve real world
problems.
Reference Books

College Algebra: Concepts and Contexts By James Stewart, Lothar Redlin, Saleem Watson, Phyllis
Panman, Cengage Brain.

College Algebra By R. Gustafson, Jeff Hughes, Cengage Brain.

College algebra By Louis Leithold, Addison-Wesley Pub. Co.
MAT102-General Statistics
Learning Outcomes

Distinguish between different types of data.

Interpret examples of methods for summarizing data sets, including common graphical tools (such as
box plots, histograms and stem plots) and summary statistics (such as mean, median, mode, variance and
IQR).

Assess which methods for summarizing a data set are most appropriate to highlight interesting
features of the data.

Identify the features that describe a data distribution.
Reference Books

General Theory of Statistics By Victor Aladjev, Valery Haritonov, Fultus.

General Statistics By Warren Chase, John Wiley & Sons, 1991.

Theoretical Statistics By D.R. Cox, D.V. Hinkley, CRC Press.
CODE
Lecture/
Lab and
Projects
Hours
SUBJECT/COURSE
Total
Hours
Clock
Semester
Credit
Units
Group E: Electives of General Education (12 units-Any Four Courses)
HIS
201
World History
ENG
201
English
and
Literature
ENG
202
45
45
45
45
Critical Thinking & Creative
Writing
45
45
PHI
201
World Philosophy
45
45
REL
201
World Religions
45
45
COM
201
Business Communications
45
45
American
3
3
3
3
3
3
HIS 201 World History
This course emphasizes the historic, economic, geographic, political, and social structure of various
cultural regions of the world from the dawn of civilization to the present time. Special attention is given to
the formation and evolution of societies into complex political and economic systems.
Learning Outcomes
• Be able to identify major societies of the pre-1500 C.E. era and make historical comparisons between
them, in regard to political systems, trade and economic, social structures, religious beliefs, and gender
roles.
• Demonstrate a basic geographical knowledge of the world, and more importantly, develop the ability to
discuss how geographical and environmental realities, as well as cross-regional interactions, have
impacted historical development.
• Gain an appreciation of influential cultural works produced in a variety of pre-modern societies and
through them comes to a clearer understanding of the fundamental values held by past peoples.
• Be able to analyze historical questions and issues clearly, assess historical information accurately, and
distinguish between questionable and valid historical assertions.
Reference Books
• The Essential World History By William J. Duiker, Jackson Spielvogel, Cengage Brain.
• Rethinking World History: Essays on Europe, Islam and World History By Marshall G. S. Hodgson,
Cambridge University Press.
• Teaching World History: A Resource Book edited by Heidi Roupp, M. E. Sharpe.
ENG 201 English and American Literature
This course introduces students to English and American literature, its history and development, and its
rich variety of forms and techniques. It surveys English and American literature from its beginnings to
approximately 1900.
Learning Outcomes
• Distinguish main ideas and supporting details and employ active reading strategies to understand texts
at the critical level.
• Construct clear, grammatically correct sentences using a variety of sentence structures and appropriate
academic vocabulary.
•
Demonstrate good control of paragraph form and structure in a wide variety of rhetorical forms.
• Demonstrate a consistent ability to use coordinating conjunctions, adverb clauses of time, contrast, and
cause and effect, and adjective clauses with who, whom, which, whose, and that.
Reference Books
•
A People's History of English and American Literature By Eugene V. Moran, Nova Publishers.
•
A Brief Survey of English and American Literature By Frederick Monroe Tisdel, Kessinger Publishing,
2010.
•
Discourse: Essay on English and American Literature, Volume 14 By John W. Crawford, Rodopi.
ENG 202 Critical Thinking & Creative Writing
This is a course which provides the student with an opportunity to apply argument theory, critical
thinking, and writing skills to a variety of current issues. Student will have the opportunity to not only
become familiar with what other writers think about issues, but they will also have the opportunity to
read, analyze, and write extensively about this chosen issue.
Learning Outcomes
• An understanding of the conventions, technical features and the historical and cultural contexts of
literature and language.
•
Reading competence and advanced literacy through their interpretation and analysis of a range of
texts.
•
Competency in all stages of the process of writing, and will develop techniques for recognizing,
employing and adapting the technical, imaginative and rhetorical features of English as demanded by a
range of writing situations.
Reference Books
• An Introduction to Critical Thinking and Creativity: Think More, Think Better By J. Y. F. Lau, John Wiley
& Sons.
•
Critical Thinking and Creative Responses By Laura Magner, Pieces of Learning.
•
Countdown to Creative Writing By Stephen Bowkett, Routledge.
PHI 201 World Philosophy
This subject aims at being an introduction to philosophical thinking in general rather than to provide a full
survey of philosophical disciplines, their methods, doctrines and leading ideas. The aim is to become
familiar the student with major philosophical problems and the methods of dealing them as well o
demonstrate what does it mean to adopt "philosophical attitude" as an elevated form of human curiosity
and resistance to any kind of dogmatism.
Learning Outcomes

Students demonstrate knowledge of core concepts and central figures in major subfields in
philosophy.

Students demonstrate understanding of comparisons and connections between Western/non-
Western and traditional/non-traditional philosophies.

Students demonstrate skill in use of dialectical approaches to learning and discussion.

Students demonstrate understanding of ethics/human values as a foundation for life-long learning as
well as for interaction with others in a diverse and complex world.
Reference Books

The Oxford Handbook of World Philosophy edited by Jay L. Garfield, William Edelglass, Oxford
University Press.

A Comparative History of World Philosophy: From the Upanishads to Kant By Ben-Ami Scharfstein,
SUNY Press.

Introduction to World Philosophy: A Multicultural Reader By Daniel A. Bonevac, Oxford University
Press, 2009.
REL 201 World Religions
This class will introduce students to a number of religious traditions in their classical formulations and
their contemporary practices. Students will also explore the academic study of religion, considering how
various disciplines approach the myths, stories, symbols, rituals, ideas, and ethical practices of these
religions. This introduction will provide students a framework within which to reflect on their own
experiences, as well as prepare them for further academic study in humanities and social sciences.
Traditions include: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.
Learning Outcomes
• Demonstrate an understanding of the subject matter of, and various methods used in, the academic
study of religion.
•
Describe the nature and diversity of world religions.
•
Demonstrate competence in a concentrated area of religious studies.
•
Assess various theories, concepts, and materials (e.g., written texts, oral reports, archaeological data)
central to the academic study of religion.
Reference Books
•
World Religions: A Voyage of Discovery By Jeffrey Brodd, Saint Mary's Press.
•
The World's Religions, Revised and Updated By Huston Smith, Harper Collins.
• Understanding World Religions: A Road Map for Justice and Peace By David Whitten Smith, Elizabeth
Geraldine Burr, Rowman & Littlefield.
COM 201 Business Communications
This course examines basic interpersonal communication processes within written and oral channels, with
practical applications for the business environment. Issues regarding cross-cultural communications and
ethical considerations in business communication are discussed. The course emphasizes three areas: 1)
planning, researching, organizing, writing, editing, and revising business-related documents; 2) planning,
organizing, and delivering oral presentations in a business setting; and 3) preparing for professional
success in the business world, including career planning, networking, job searching, resume preparation,
job application and interviewing. Written assignments and oral presentations are required.
Learning Outcomes
• Students will demonstrate and apply an understanding of the theories and process underpinning
communication in a business setting.
• Students will demonstrate and apply an understanding of the influence of their own and others’ selfconcept, perception and culture on the communication process.
•
Students will demonstrate and apply an understanding of interpersonal communication skills in a
business setting.
Reference Books
• "Harvard Business Essentials: Business Communication, Harvard Business Press.
•
Business Communication By Thomas Means, Cengage Brain.
•
Essentials of Business Communication By Mary Ellen Guffey, Dana Loewy, Cengage Brain.
CODE
SUBJECT/COURSE
Lecture/Lab
and Projects
Hours
Total
Clock
Hours
Semester
Credit
Units
Core Required Courses 12 Units
MGM 200
Principles of Management
45
45
3
BUS 200
Introduction to Business Law
45
45
3
CIS 200
Principles of Information Security
45
45
3
MIS 200
Management Information Systems
45
45
3
MGM 200 Principles of Management
This course presents a thorough and systematic coverage of management theory and practice. It focuses
on the basic roles, skills and functions of management, with special attention to managerial responsibility
for effective and efficient achievement of goals. Special attention is given to social responsibility,
managerial ethics, and the importance of multi-national organizations.
Learning outcomes

Describe and discuss the elements of effective management, planning, organizing, communication
and control processes.

Identify environmental issues, develop strategies to adapt to these environments and issues involved
in diverse workforce.

Identify, discuss and/or describe various theories related to the development of leadership skills,
motivation techniques, teamwork, effective communication, case studies and problem analysis.
Reference

Principles of Management By Robert Kreitner.

Principles of Management By Tony Morden.

Principles of management: a modern approach By Henry Herman Albers.
BUS 200 Introduction to Business Law
This course is meant to provide a general introduction to the legal environment that affects individuals,
businesses, and business transactions. In addition to providing a general introduction to the American
legal system, this course will focus on specific legal topics such as contracts and the Uniform Commercial
Code.
Learning Outcomes:

Describe the roles of the legislative, executive and judicial branches in creating legal rules.

Recognize basic legal issues in the areas of business contracts, torts, and business crimes intellectual
property, cyber law and state the basic legal rules applicable thereto using appropriate legal terms.

Analyze legal problems commonly associated with contractual relations of commercial enterprises,
identifying and how we can resolve these issues.

Recognize the relationship between and the differences that exist in the legal, ethical and social
responsibilities of business.
Reference books:



Introduction to Business Law By Lucy Jones Cengage Advantage Book.
Introduction to Business Law By Jeffrey Beatty, Susan Samuelson.
Introduction to Business Law By Jeffrey F. Beatty, Susan S. Samuelson.
CIS 200 Principles of Information Security
This course will describe the basic principles of information systems security, including cryptography,
identifications and authentications, access control models and mechanisms, multilevel database security,
Internet security, and planning and administering security. The students will gain an understanding of the
threats to information resources and learn about counter measurements and their limitations.
Learning Outcomes:

Understanding of the key themes and principles of information security management and various
principles in designing solutions to managing security risks effectively.

Able to understand how to apply the principles of information security management in a variety of
contexts for effective decision making.

Have an appreciation of the interrelationship between the various elements of information security
management and its role in protecting organizations including cyber law.
Reference books:

Principles of Information Security By Michael Whitman, Herbert Mattord.

Principles and Practice of Information Security: Protecting Computers from Hackers and Lawyers By
Linda Volonino, Stephen R. Robinson.

Information Security: Principles and Practice By Mark Stamp.
MIS 200 Management Information Systems
Managers have increasing responsibility for determining their information system needs and for designing
and implementing information systems that support these needs. Management information systems
integrate, for purposes of information requirements, the accounting, financial, and operations
management functions of an organization. This course will examine the various levels and types of
software and information systems required by an organization to integrate these functions.
Learning Outcomes:

Integration of business and technology for effective decision making.

Role of information in Management, Concept of Knowledge management.

Effective communication skills for working in dynamic environment of the world.
Reference Books:

Management Information Systems By Ken Laudon, Jane Laudon.

Information Systems Strategic Management: An Integrated Approach By Steve Clarke.

Designing Management Information Systems By Johannes Govardus Maria van derheijden.
CODE
SUBJECT/COURSE
Lecture/La
b
and
Projects
Hours
Total
Clock
Hours
Semeste
r Credit
Units
Option in Accounting Courses - Core 12 Units
ACC 201
Accounting Principles
45
45
3
ACC 202
Managerial Accounting
45
45
3
ACC 203
Cost Accounting
45
45
3
ACC 204
Principles of Taxation
45
45
3
ACC 201 Accounting Principles
This course presents essential principles of accounting. Topics include the accounting cycle, special
journals and subsidiary ledgers, internal control principles and practices, notes and interest, inventory
systems and costing, plant intangible assets accounting, and depreciation methods and practices. Upon
successful completion of this course, students will be able to identify elements of cash flows, prepare
journals and ledger entries, and year end statements for a service or merchandising business.
Learning outcomes

Understand the audit process from the engagement planning stage through completion of the audit,
as well as the rendering of an audit opinion via the various report options.

Apply cost accounting methods to evaluate and project business performance.

Demonstrate an understanding of the taxation of individual income.

Apply appropriate judgment derived from knowledge of accounting theory, to financial analysis and
decision making.
Reference Books

Principles of Accounting By Belverd Needles, Marian Powers, Susan Crosson, Cengage Learning,
2012.

Accounting Principles, Peachtree Complete Accounting Workbook By Weygandt, Paul D. Kimmel,
Kieso, John Wiley & Sons 2010.

Accounting principles By Roger H. Hermanson, James Don Edwards, Roland Frank Salmonson,
Business Publications, 1987.
ACC 202 Managerial Accounting
This course provides a decision making approach to managerial accounting. Topics include the use of
relevant costs in decision making, incremental analysis, CVP analysis, activity-based costing and activitybased management, and the use of the theory of constraints as it can be used to analyze decisions relative
to across-the-board cuts. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to apply these
managerial accounting tools and approaches to real-world situations enabling them to optimize the
situations that confront managers daily.
Learning Outcomes

Demonstrate an understanding of the functional areas of accounting, marketing, finance,
management, and economics.

Demonstrate an understanding of the global, legal and social environment of business.

Demonstrate an understanding of the ethical obligations and responsibilities of business.

Demonstrate the ability to use business tools.
Reference Books

Managerial Accounting By Charles E. Davis, Elizabeth Davis, Wiley, 2011.

Managerial Accounting By James Jiambalvo, Wiley 2009.

Managerial Accounting: An Introduction to Concepts, Methods and Uses By Michael Maher, Clyde
Stickney, Roman Weil, Cengage Learning, 2011.
ACC 203 Cost Accounting
This course covers the basics of cost accounting. Topics include cost and management accounting
environments, introduction to cost management systems, organizational cost flows, activity-based costing,
job order costing, process costing, special production issues, implementing quality concepts, cost
allocation for joint products, and standard costing. Upon successful completion of this course, students will
be able to perform a basic cost analysis of job orders, processes, joint productions, and activities. Evaluate
evidence.
Learning Outcomes

Understand the framework of Cost Accounting and perform cost accounting functions using the
various costing methods.

Advise Management on business decisions based on cost and management accounting concepts.

Analyse and develop the cost accounts and use variance analysis to guide decision making.
Reference Books

Cost Accounting: A Managerial Emphasis By Charles T. Horngren, Pearson Education India, 1962.

Cost and Management Accounting: An Introduction for Students By MR Alan V Pizzey, SAGE, 1989.

Managerial and Cost Accounting By Larry M. Walther, Christopher J. Skousen, Bookboon.
ACC 204 Principles of Taxation
This course provides an introduction to taxation, and is tailored for students who intend to pursue careers
in accounting. This course is designed to develop the following: an understanding of basic tax concepts
and their applications, the ability to identify and solve common tax problems, enhanced written and oral
communication skills, and an appreciation of how taxation influences business decisions with an emphasis
on the contractual relations between parties and the government. Personal and business taxation is also
covered.
Learning Outcomes

Recognize situations (business or otherwise in relation to individuals and other entities) that have
income tax or goods and services tax implications.

Identify the tax issues involved; Research for and apply the relevant tax law to those situations and
issues.

Compute the quantum of tax base and tax liability; Identify tax planning opportunities; Analyses and
evaluate the tax implications of alternative arrangements; communicate their reasoning, computation,
conclusions and recommendations in a clear and concise manner with reference to relevant statutory
provisions and case law.
Reference Books

The Theory, Principles and Management of Taxation: An introduction By Jane Frecknall-Hughes,
Routledge.

Principles of Taxation By Hastings Lyon, General Books LLC, 2013.

Principles of Taxation By William FREND, BiblioBazaar, 2011.
Total Units In General Education
24
Total Units In Electives of General Education
12
Total Units In Major (Core)
12
Total Units In Option of Accounting- Core
12
Total Units Required for Associate Of Science Degree in Accounting
60
Learning & Research
1) The Case Gloopy Ketchup Company makes and sells bottles of tomato ketchup. Annual demand is
24,000 bottles. For each bottle of ketchup they need six pounds of tomatoes, which they normally
purchase for $0.30 per pound. Ordering costs are $180 per order of tomatoes, and carrying costs are $1
per pound. Lead time for ordering is three days (the time between placing the order and receiving the
tomatoes.
Do the following:
1. Calculate the EOQ (economic order quantity) for the tomatoes.
2. Find the number of orders Gloopy must place to satisfy the EOQ, and also find the reorder point. Use 360
days for a year, not 365 days.
3. Now assume that stockout costs are $1.90 per pound of tomatoes. The probability of needing exactly the
EOQ per period is 65%, but there is a 10% chance they will need an extra 200 pounds, and a 2% chance
they will need an extra 400 pounds above the EOQ. Find the optimal amount of safety stock to carry given
the above information.
4. Refer to the original information and the EOQ you calculated in part 1. Assume that you were incorrect
about the costs—that the ordering cost is really $160 per order and the carrying cost is $1.20 per pound.
Find the cost of prediction error using only the relevant costs(ordering and carrying costs.)
5. Now let us move from the purchasing to the production aspect of the Gloopy Ketchup Company. Setup
costs for bottles of ketchup are $135 per setup and carrying cost for a bottle of ketchup is $2 per bottle.
Gloopy uses a MRP (materials requirements planning) system to produce ketchup in batches of 2,000
bottles each month (one batch per month). Gloopy’s variable product costs excluding the cost of the
tomatoes (the direct material) are $1.50 per bottle. What is the total annual cost of making 24,000 bottles
of ketchup (variable product cost + setup cost + carrying cost)?
6. Why would you NOT close the Conversion Cost Control account on April 9? If you did close it then, show
the journal entry that you would make on that date. (Assume there was no beginning balance in the
account on April 1.)
7. Why would lean accounting be unnecessary for the Gloopy Ketchup Company?
2) Cost information:
1) Stoneridge charges you $2,500 rent per month, which includes utilities, telephone, cleaning, and
maintenance. You estimated that 90% of the rent was related to factory operations and 10% was related
to selling and administrative activities.
2) You will order white, cotton t-shirts from a T-shirt wholesaler. Each T-shirt costs (including taxes,
shipping, and handling) $3.75 to purchase.
3) To store T-shirts that were bought, but not yet imprinted, you will rent a storage unit. The storage unit
costs you $125 per month.
4) You agreed to pay your artist friend a $10,000 annual contract fee plus a $300 design fee for each of the
12 T-shirt pictures designed. This same term is renewable for the next 3 years.
Each T-shirt picture will only be used for one year. Therefore, in the second year, 12 new pictures will be
designed at $300 each and another $10,000 annual contract fee will be charged.
5) You will buy several items before that start of your business:
[a] A computer and a printer: You will pay $6,000 (including taxes, shipping and handling) to buy a
computer and a printer. You expect both to last about 3 years without salvage value. You will use the
straight-line method for depreciation. You estimate that about 90% of the computer and printer will be
used for factory operations and 10% will be for selling and administrative activities.
[b] A heat press machine: You will pay $4,500 (including taxes, shipping and handling) for a heat press
machine. The machine is used for imprinting t-shirts only and is expected to last 3 years without salvage
value.
[c] Transfer paper: Each case of transfer paper costs $400 and contains 1,000 sheets of 8.5×11 transfer
paper. You expect to use one transfer paper to print one T-shirt.
[d] Ink-jet cartridges: On average, each cartridge costs $50 and can make 500 prints. Each T-shirt requires
one print. You also need to print flyers, etc. for selling and administrative purposes. For this nonmanufacturing printing, you will print about one page for every 5 T-shirts sold.
[e] Laser paper: You will buy several reams of laser paper to print promotion flyers, etc. Each ream costs
$20 and contains 200 sheets of 8.5×11 laser paper.
6) Wrapping paper and box: Each T-shirt costs about $0.20 to wrap and box. Wrapping and boxing are not
considered as manufacturing.
7) You will hire three fellow students as part-time workers. They not only help you operate the machine,
but also help fold, wrap and box T-shirts. Sometimes, three of them work at the same time. But, sometimes
they don’t because of their different class schedules. On average, printing 10 shirts will take one labor
hour. Folding and packaging 20 shirts also will take about one labor hour. You will pay each of your
workers $8 per hour. Folding and wrapping are not considered as manufacturing.
8) You (the owners) do all the selling and administrative work by yourselves. You will pay yourselves a
total of $12,000 per year (to be divided among all owners).
9) To protect your business from legal obligation, you will purchase a liability insurance that will cost you
$3,600 per year.
10) You will hold four end-of-quarter parties to promote sales of your t-shirts. Each party costs you about
$1,000.
Practical Requirements:
(1) Give your company an attractive name.
(2) What and how much of your costs are variable costs? List your manufacturing and non-manufacturing
variable cost items and present each of them in cost per T-shirt basis.
(3) What and how much of your costs are fixed costs? List your manufacturing and non- manufacturing
fixed cost items and present each of them in total cost per year.
(4) Write out your yearly cost formula in Y = a + bX format. Be sure to include both manufacturing costs
and non-manufacturing costs in the cost formula.
(5) Assume that you make and sell 7,800 t-shirts in the first year. Use your cost formula to calculate your
first year’s total cost. If you sell these t-shirts at $15 each, how much would net profit be in the first year?
Evaluation
MEASURING YOUR ACQUIRED SKILLS: The acquired skills and learning are measured according to the
grading criteria and rubrics outlined below. As a part of the course requirements and based on the
educational assessment model adapted by the college, you are expected and are required to work on the
out-of-class work (assignment, research, project, and other instructor assigned activity) a minimum of two
times of the class weekly lecture time. For example for a three unit course you must document a minimum
of six hours of out-of-class course related academic activities.
Grading:
Grade Scales:
Activity
Poi
nts
Per
cent
Points
Percent
Attendance, Collaboration, and
Group Discussion Participation
Text
and
Online
Projects/Exercises/Assignments
100
10
%
10
%
940-1000
900-939
861-899
840-860
800-839
94-100%
90-93 %
87-89 %
84-86 %
80-83 %
Quizzes and Examinations
250
25
%
770-799
740-769
700-739
77-79 %
74-76 %
70-73 %
Focused Projects
100
10
%
650-699
600-649
66-69 %
60-65 %
Course Project
200
0-599
0-59%
Final Examination
250
20
%
250
%
Total
100
0
100
G
ra
d
e
A
AB
+
B
BC
+
C
CD
+
D
F
The above grading is based on
Richfield College qualitative grade
standards
100
%
ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT PERFORMANCE: GRADING CRITERIA
A = 94-100 POINTS C+ =
77-79 POINTS
A- = 90-93
C=
74-76
B+ =87-89
C- = 70-73
B = 84-86
D+ = 66-69
B- = 80-83
D=
60-65
GENERAL GRADING GUIDELINES
“A” = clearly stands out as excellent performance. Definitely completes all the course requirements in a
superior fashion, has unusually sharp insight into material and initiates thoughtful questions, goes beyond
the basic requirements of the course by incorporating additional research, sees many sides of an issue,
articulates well, and writes logically and clearly; integrates ideas previously learned from this and other
disciplines/courses and anticipates the next steps in the progression of ideas.
“B” = Clearly completes all the course requirements in a professional way, grasps subject matter at a level
considered to be good to very good, is an active listener and participant in class discussion, speaks and
writes well, accomplishes more than the minimum requirements, and produces work in and out of class
that is of high quality.
“C” = Demonstrates a satisfactory comprehension of the subject matter, accomplishes only the minimum
requirements, displays little initiative, communicates orally and in writing at an acceptable level for a
graduate student, and has a generally acceptable understanding of all basic concepts.
“D” = Quality and quantity of work in and out of class is below average, unsatisfactory and barely
acceptable.
“F” = Quality and quantity of work in and out of class is unacceptable.
Note: To remain in good standing, a BUSINESS & MANAGEMENT student must maintain a minimum
cumulative GPA of 3.0 or higher.
GRADING POLICIES:
Grades are not negotiable. Incompletes will not be issued except in cases of a fully documented emergency
and at the instructor’s discretion based on each case.
This course covers the need for research, sample sizes, types of samples, and data collection. Students will
analyze and interpret data through data collection, summarizing data, and data presentation; hypothesis
testing, regression, and correlation; random variables, and probability densities.
`