A story just for Christmas

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HARTFORD AND BEAVER DAM, KENTUCKY
VOLUME 149 • NUMBER 51
HIGH: 54 LOW: 48
Serving All of Ohio County Since 1865
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2014
2 SECTIONS • 24 PAGES • 50¢
A little girl and her faithful dog
A story just for Christmas
By: Dave McBride
[email protected]
been around the Helton house
for more than 10 years.
Until Priscilla came on the
Priscilla - or “Prissy” as scene, Lasso kind of had a
some preferred to call her lock on attention. He seldom
- was three years old and caused problems - sanitary
pretty much considered the or otherwise - and spent most
boss around her family of of his time giving love and
mom, Betty, dad, Felix, three accepting love. But the animal,
brothers and a dog that was like many humans have been
known to do, took exception
scared to death of her.
She came along eleven years to the little girl stealing his
after her youngest brother, thunder. He wasn’t hostile
Pete, and that prompted an toward Priscilla, but he wasn’t
uncle, the brother of her dad, overly friendly, either.
to affectionally call her “Oops.” The girl was quick to pick
Regardless, Priscilla was a up on Lasso’s indifference,
beautiful girl gifted in every but refused to relinquish
way a spoiled youngster can her number one household
be. What she asked for and position. The dog could be
didn’t get yesterday very likely number two and that’s the way
would become available the the totem pole of popularity
would remain.
day after. But along with that oftentimes But that wasn’t exactly the
familiar penchant for ruling way things would remain.
the roost, Priscilla also was It was the middle of July - an uncommonly sweet person. a hot, sultry July day. Felix
She possessed a rapid method Helton was at work, the boys
for stealing hearts and could were out in the neighborhood
with friends and Betty Helton
melt them equally fast.
“Sure, she pretty well controls was in the house doing
things around here because her daily chores, Priscilla,
that’s what all of us have unknown to her mother, had
allowed,” Felix Helton told slipped out of the house and
a neighbor. “But she’s kind- was bouncing a rubber ball on
hearted, very thoughtful and the concrete surrounding the
shares just about everything backyard pool when the toy
took a crazy bounce and went
she has.”
And about the dog - a mixed into the water.
breed called Lasso that had Thinking she could retrieve
Three-year-old Priscilla and her loving family had a very Merry Christmas thanks to
the quick thinking of her faithful dog Lasso. (Stock photo)
the plaything, Priscilla got
down on her hands and knees,
reached as far as she could,
lost her balance and fell into
the deep end of the pool.
Only seconds passed before
her struggling gave way to
exhaustion and the girl slipped
under the surface.
With that last splash,
however, came Lasso. Number
two was about to claim at least
half of number one. The dog
jumped into the pool, quickly
managed to work his way
underwater and clamped his
powerful jaws around a portion
of Priscilla’s clothing. Even
with the weight of the girl and
her struggling, he managed to
surface and make his way to
the edge of the pool. There he
pressed the girl’s body against
the side of the enclosure and
started a barking regimen that
would awaken the dead.
Never having heard that
level of frantic barking out of
the pet, Betty Helton went to
a nearby window, looked out
and immediately saw what
See Christmas...page 2-A
Briefly
Lawmakers
facing tough
smoking ban
Health advocates are
targeting the 2015 session
of the Kentucky General
Assembly for passage of
a comprehensive smokefree
law
that
would
cover all indoor public
places and workplaces.
On Wednesday of last
week,
lawmakers
on
the Health and Welfare
Committee took a look
at how such a law would
impact property rights.
Brent Cooper, a
businessman in Northern
Kentucky,
believes
a statewide law is a
sensible
compromise.
“It’s perfectly reasonable to
ask people to step outside,”
Cooper said. “You don’t have
the right to do anything
you want in your building
if it negatively impacts the
health of your customers
or
your
employees.”
Still, some lawmakers
remain hesitant to tackle
the property rights issue
even though the Kentucky
Chamber
of
Commerce
says 92 per cent of its
members who responded to
an annual survey support a
statewide smoke-free law.
Approximately one-third
of Kentuckians presently
live in smoke-free zones.
See more Briefly on A-2
What better Christmas spirit boost could anybody want than an infant exploring the beauty, excitement and
wonder of a Christmas tree. Colebin Dockery, 17-month-old grandson of Richie and Georgina Dockery, Echols,
may be a little young to understand what Christmas is all about, but he knows something pretty and interesting
when he sees it.
Bad news at Christmastime
39 miners losing their jobs
By: Savannah Pennington and operates the Kronos Mine
in Centertown, announced that
octimesnews.com
39 people lost their jobs Friday,
For 39 coal miners at the Dec. 19.
Kronos Mine, this Christmas
“It was bad news and the timseason could be more blue than ing was bad,” said Judge-execuwhite.
tive David Johnston. “There is
Armstrong Coal, which owns
a nationwide movement by the
EPA to try and hurt the mines.
They haven’t hurt us badly,
though. This isn’t a deep cut,
but it is a cut.”
Johnston said the layoffs are
the result of regulations placed
on the coal mining industry by
the Environmental Protection
Agency.
“The reasons for this layoff
are bad,” Johnston said. “This
is an agency that is supposed to
See Coal...page 2-A
Page A-2 December 23, 2014, Times-News
Christmas...
Continued from A-1
was happening. She dropped
the hand duster she was
holding, raced out a back door
and to the pool and took her
daughter out of the dog’s lifesaving grasp.
Luckily, the girl was not in
a near-drowning condition,
returned her breathing to
near normal, grabbed both
her mother and Lasso around
their necks and sobbed
uncontrollably. Acting on the side of caution,
Betty took the girl to the
hospital emergency where
she was checked, found to
be okay and released shortly
thereafter.
It was after that near-tragic
happening that arithmetic - at least that part involving
contested number ones and
number twos - was removed
from the lives of a little girl
and a faithful pet and a
beautiful relationship evolved.
They became almost constant
companions held close by love
and respect.
But continuing trouble would
not loosen its hold on Priscilla
and on a Saturday two weeks
from
Christmas
another
tragedy and heartbreak would
crash down on the entire
Helton family, an entire
community and a pet.
While shopping with
her mother at Cassidy’s
Department
Store
in
downtown
Hillsborough,
Priscilla disappeared from her mother’s sight and the crowded
store. Into thin air would
have been a sad, but accurate
description of the incident.
Nobody saw anybody else with
a little girl that didn’t look like
they belonged together.
Betty Helton, with panic
oozing from every pore, raced
through the store crying and
screaming.
“Please, oh’ please, if you can
hear me, please don’t hurt my
little girl,” she begged. “Please
don’t hurt my little girl.”
As would be expected, there
were no replies to Betty’s
fevered requests and the
store took on the presence of a
locked-down venue of sadness
and concern. Management
personnel and numerous
shoppers could do nothing to
quell the mother’s suffering.
A battery of law enforcement
officers
also
ran
into
unforgiving walls of resistance
in trying to spring the
slightest lead. Priscilla Helton
was gone and only the person
or persons responsible for her
disappearance could shed any
light on that mystery.
Felix Helton was summoned
and joined his grieving wife
at the department store. The
two walked aimlessly inside
and around the building, but
to no avail. Finally, an officer
in charge of the immediate
investigation garnered what
information he could about
the girl and talked the heartbroken couple into going home
and to hope for some quick
and encouraging news.
“Please know, Betty and
Felix, that we’ll do everything
possible to find Priscilla and
get her back in your care,”
he said. “Just pray and have
faith.”
Felix pulled the car into the
driveway of the Helton home
and a sense of emptiness
immediately prevailed. A
once warm and inviting house
stood only as a reminder of
a life-shattering loss. Even
Lasso, who was waiting as he
always waited for his masters
to return home, sensed
something was wrong. Felix
and Betty got out of the car,
but Priscilla did not.
As a dog oftentimes will
do when confronted with
yearning or disappointment,
Lasso walked repeatedly
around the car while making
those mournful sounds.
“She’s not with us, Lasso,”
Betty cried. “She may never
be with us again.”
Days passed and the people
of Hillsborough, the county
and distances beyond waited
for what was hoped would
be a happy conclusion to
an otherwise tragic story.
Churches of all denominations
joined in a crusade of prayerful
allegiance. The oldest citizens
of Hillsborough could not
recall or had never heard of
a kidnapping of a child. Such
things simply didn’t happen
in an area where brotherhood
tended to dominate.
But there was no such
development. The overriding
issue was a family’s ability to
survive the Christmas holiday
without the little girl around
which much of it would have
been planned. Would there be
presents under the tree that
would not be opened?
Throughout the grieving and
anxiety, nobody seemed to
pay much attention to Lasso.
Nobody noticed that he was
staying away from home for
unusually long periods of time
and that when he was around
the house he would spend time
in Priscilla’s bedroom - time
used to observe in an animal’s
sort of way and to seek out and
lock onto familiar scents. The
dog knew nothing of human
suffering, but he was in direct
contact with his own. The
little girl he once saved needed
saving again.
But how does a so-called dumb
animal muster the intelligence
and ability that was not yet
available to a virtual small
army of law enforcement
officers using every available
means to solve a complex
undertaking? If man couldn’t
do it, how could a dog?
Then comes the day before
Christmas Eve. Still no word,
no clues and hardly any
hope. Despite hurting more
than than any hurting ever
devised, the Helton Family
was going ahead with its
usual Christmas celebration.
Plans called for a lot of family
company on Christmas Eve,
the opening of presents early
on Christmas Day and another
large family get-together later
that day. Priscilla - even
though nobody knew where
she was or even if she was
alive - was squarely in the
middle of those plans. There
would be no letting down until
time and circumstances said
there would be.
Lasso left home early on that
December 23, not knowing
where he was going and not
knowing what he was going to
do. Instinct propelled his body
and a canine sense of caring
empowered his mind.
There were a lot of people in
downtown Hillsborough that
morning, many hoping to wrap
up their Christmas shopping
and others managing various
forms of business. Some
looked familiar to the dog and
others were total strangers.
And there was one total
stranger that caused Lasso to
stop dead in his tracks. The
man, perhaps 35 or 40 and
dressed in jeans and a denim
jacket, appeared intent on
getting wherever he was going
in a big hurry.
That destination turned out
to be a liquor store where two
large bottles of whiskey and
a carton of cigarettes were
purchased. Lasso, again on
instinct, waited outside for
the seeming purpose of trying
to determine just what it was
that first attracted him to the
stranger. As it turned out,
the second attraction was the
same as the first. A scent to a
dog can sometimes be as good
as a roadmap.
Lasso’s presence obviously
became an irritation to the
man and he was kicked at
as the stranger neared his
pickup truck.
“Get out of here, dog,” the
man shouted. “I don’t have
anything for you.”
But Lasso wasn’t sure. He
waited for the man to get
into his vehicle and followed
it as the driver headed down
Fourth Street and in an outof-town direction.
It was relatively easy for the
dog to keep up with the truck
as long as the city’s speed
limits were obeyed, but the
going got tougher once the
pickup reached the edge of
town and Highway 942. And
it wasn’t long before the truck
went over the crest of a hill
and disappeared.
Still, Lasso sensed something
was wrong and ran east on
that highway as fast as his
tiring legs would carry him.
All along the way he kept a
close eye out for the green
pickup truck.
It was some three and onehalf miles out of Hillsborough
that the dog glanced to his left
and saw what appeared to
be the truck parked next to a
large sedan in front of a small,
white frame house. Slowing
his pace to a walk, Lasso
approached the house and
was able to determine that the
pickup was the same one he
had followed out of town.
At the same time, something
else was being determined.
The man who had driven the
truck just happened to look
out a front window - in what
some would say was a guarded
sort of way - and saw Lasso
walking up the driveway.
Without hesitation, he went
into another room, grabbed
a 22-caliber rifle, returned to
the front door and took two
shots at the dog. The first
missed, but the second found
its mark in the animal’s right
front leg.
Lasso immediately fell to
the ground and it must have
appeared to the shooter that
the dog was fatally injured.
He closed the front door and
returned the gun to the room
it came from. Hurting and
bleeding, Lasso got up and
used caution in his limping
approach to the house. Instead
of following the long driveway,
he moved over to a clump of
trees and slowly made his way
to the dwelling. It was near
a window on the home’s west
side that the animal knew his
mission was complete.
“You’ve got to let me go,” a
young girl’s voice rang out.
“My mom and dad will be
looking for me.”
“They can look all they want,”
a male voice shouted back.
“They’re never going to see you
again. You’re going to a home
in California and we’re going
to get a big price for you.”
Sobbing commenced before
the house went quiet. And
while not intending to,
Lasso growled in a defensive
manner. He also moved away
from the house and made
his way back to the highway
where he started the long and
labor-some trip back to town.
Back near the edge of
town,
two
Hillsborough
police officers were leaving a
restaurant after having lunch
when one of them looked down
the street and saw Lasso
slowly making his way on a
still bleeding leg.
“Say, Tom, isn’t that the
Helton dog coming this way?”
Sgt. Bratcher asked. “It’s either
been hit by a car or shot.”
On closer inspection, the
officers determined that Lasso
had been shot in the leg.
Feeling everything wasn’t as it
should be, the sergeant walked
to his cruiser, got in touch
with headquarters and asked
the dispatcher if she could try
and get hold of somebody in
the Helton family.
Felix Helton had just walked
in the back door when the
phone rang. The dispatcher
informed him about the dog
and told him the two officers
would remain with the animal
until he showed up to claim it.
Not sure why Lasso would
be in that part of town, Felix
told his wife, Betty, what
was happening and left
immediately to meet with the
officers and claim his pet.
“What are you doing out here
and how did you get shot?”
Felix asked while petting
his dog. “We’ve been worried
about you.”
Lasso, however, was not in the
mood for a lot of small talk. He
broke free of Felix’s attention
and ran a few yards in the
direction from which he had
just limped into town. Barking
a few times, he ran back to his
master and then again ran in
an easterly direction as if he
was telling Felix and the two
officers to follow him.
“Felix, if I didn’t know better,
I’d say your dog is trying to
tell us something,” Tom said.
“That animal has something
on his mind.”
“I’ve never seen him act like
this,” Felix said.
With that, the dog came back
to its owner, nudged him on
the leg and again barked and
started off in the direction of
the small white house.
“This is crazy,” Felix said.
“I’ve seen dogs do things
like this in movies and on
television, but I’ve never had
it happen to me.”
“I think it would be
worthwhile trying to find out
what your dog is trying to tell
us,” Sgt. Bratcher said. “Put
him in your car, Felix, and
we’ll follow. Let’s see what’s
going on.”
Lasso jumped into the
front seat of Felix’s car
and immediately started
pawing at the dashboard
and windshield, indicating
he wanted his master to
drive east on Highway 942.
And that, with the two police
officers following, is what
Felix did.
Nearing the driveway where
the pickup and car were
parked in front of the small
frame house, Lasso went
into a barking frenzy. That
driveway was on the left and
the dog already had jumped
over Felix’s lap and was
frantically scratching on the
left front window.
“I this it, boy?’ Felix asked
“Is this where you want me to
go?”
Naturally, the dog did not
know what his master was
saying, but he did know how
to act on instinct. Profuse
barking was his only means of
communicating. So he barked
and he barked some more.
Acting on his own instincts,
Felix stopped his car short
of the driveway, got out, and
walked back to the police car.
“I don’t have any idea what’s
going on here, but maybe we
better not just drive up to that
house without knowing,” he
told the officers.
“I think you’re right, Felix,”
Tom said. “Let’s drive on up
Briefly continued...
Burglarized
Two Owensboro men were arrested Sunday and charged with burglarizing a home in Beaver Dam.
According to an Ohio County Sheriff’s Department report, the house is owned
by
Hayward
Spinks
and
occupied
by
Spinks’
granddaughter,
Adrian
Alvey.
Spinks reportedly told School Resource Officer Chris Stafford that Joshua C. Tolson, 25,
did not have permission to be in the house. Alvey, the report stated, told the officer Tolson
had permission to enter her storage facility in Hartford but not her home in Beaver Dam.
The second Owensboro man, Joshua L. Fulkerson, 24, reportedly was involved in the same alleged
burglary and was arrested along with Tolson. Both were charged with burglary in the second degree.
Roger W. Philpot, 19, Cromwell, was arrested and charged with operating a vehicle under the influence,
no vehicle registration, failure to produce proof of insurance and leaving the scene of an accident.
Philpot, according to the arrest report, told Stafford that he had taken a prescription drug and smoked
marijuana
Office hours altered
With an amended schedule already in force because of the Christmas holiday, the Ohio
County Times-News also will alter its office schedule because of the New Year holiday.
Because the U.S. Post Office will be closed at noon on New Year’s Eve, the TimesNews will be published on Tuesday, with home deliveries being made on Wednesday.
It is requested that all advertising be submitted by noon on Monday of next week.
the road a piece, park our
cars, and try approaching that
house on foot.”
And that was what was
done. With Lasso leading the
way, the three men made
their way to the rear of the
house without being spotted
and ironically approached the
same window from where the
dog heard what he was sure
was Priscilla’s voice.
“Please let me go,” a small
girl’s voice again was heard.
Felix froze in his tracks.
“My good Lord,” he whispered
to the others. “That’s my
daughter talking. That’s my
daughter talking.”
“Okay, okay,” Sgt. Bratcher
said in a like tone. “This looks
like it could be the living
room window and the front
door will be right around the
corner. Felix, if you’re up to it,
go knock on the front door and
get the attention of whoever’s
in there. Tom and I will make
our way to the back door.”
“Here’s hoping, “ Felix said.
“But don’t do anything to
jeopardize the safety of my
daughter.”
With that, the officers moved
toward the rear of the house
and Felix made his way to the
front door. Before starting,
however, the anxious father
told Lasso to sit and remain
seated.
“What do you want?” the
man that shot Lasso asked on
answering the door.
“I’m sorry to bother you, pal,”
Felix said. “But I’m having
car problems and need a little
help. Do you have a phone?”
“We don’t have a phone so
why don’t you just move on
and get help elsewhere,” the
man said.
“Gee whiz, man, I’m just
asking for a little help. Where’s
your Christmas spirit?” Felix
again tried.
“I don’t have any and you’re
not going to have any, either if
you don’t get out of here,” the
gruff man snapped.
It was then, from inside the
house, that Priscilla heard and
recognized her daddy’s voice.
“Daddy, Daddy,” she cried.
“Is that you, Daddy?”
Inside the living room with
the little girl was another
man, a burly brute of some
300 pounds. He dropped a
sandwich he was eating,
sprang to his feet and ran
to the front door with a
revolver in his right hand..
In the meantime, the officers
managed to jimmy the back
door lock and made their way
into the living room where
they escaped notice by the
kidnappers.
With
pistols
drawn, they yelled for the two
suspects to drop to the floor.
Made clear of their weapons,
the two men were handcuffed
and a little girl and her father
were reunited in a tearful
embrace.
“Let’s go home, sweetheart,”
Felix said. “Let’s go home.”
At the Helton home some
20 minutes later, Betty was
trying heartlessly to prepare
lunch for her three sons. She
didn’t hear the front door open
and she didn’t hear a little girl
tip-toeing up behind her. What
she did hear was a familiar
voice say, “Hi, mommy.”
“Please let it be,” the mother
said on quickly turning around.
“Please, God, let it be.”
And it was. A little girl, a
loving mother, a father wiping
away at a face filled with tears
and three brothers jumping
up and down in unbridled
happiness.
A merry Christmas had
returned. And a dog named Lasso was
absolutely sure he now shared
number one - even if he
couldn’t brag about it.
Coal...
Continued from A-1
be trying to look out for people, and instead they are
looking the other way.”
Despite the unfortunate timing for the layoffs,
which affected only coal miners within the organization, there is still some hope left, he said.
“There is a possibility that a new mine is going to
be opened in Muhlenberg County and another one
here in Ohio County,” the judge-executive said. “We
are also looking at the possibility for existing mines
here in the area to expand and pick up some of these
people.”
The other mines referred to are also owned by Armstrong Coal, Johnston said.
Even with the decrease in employment, Ohio County’s economy is still faring well, he said.
“We are in good shape still,” Johnston said. “Our
economy is still strong in Ohio County, and there are
lots of jobs to be had here thanks to new businesses coming in and other businesses are expanding all
the time. Anyone looking for an entry level job here
should have no trouble finding one.”
LOCAL DEATHS
THE TIMES-NEWS
The family of
MITCHELL FUSON
Mary Ann
Evans
Mary Ann Evans, 68,
of Hazard, Kentucky,
died Thursday, Dec. 18,
2014, at Rockcastle Regional Hospital in Mt.
Vernon, Kentucky. She
was born Nov. 21, 1946,
in Ohio County, to the
late Melvin and Hattie
Kessinger. She was of
the Baptist faith.
She is survived by
her son, Cecil Owen
Evans of Hartford; one
grandchild; brothers,
Kenny Kessinger and
Johnny Morton; and
sisters, Patty Kessinger and Maggie Kessinger.
Private
graveside
services were held at
Oakwood Cemetery in
Hartford.
James H.
Davis Funeral Home &
Crematory in Owensboro was in charge of
arrangements.
Messages of condolence may be made
at www.davisfuneralhome.com.
Gordon
Simpson
Gordon Simpson, 95,
of Beaver Dam, passed
away, Thursday, Dec.
18, 2014, at Beaver Dam
Nursing and Rehab Center. He was born Oct. 11,
1919, in Butler County
to the late Guy Willard
and Lillie Jane Johnson
Simpson. He was of Baptist faith and a retired
coal miner.
Beside his parents he
was preceded in death
by seven brothers, Oscar
Simpson,
Floyd
Simpson, Sam Simpson,
Audley Simpson, Orvel
Simpson, George Simpson and Tom Simpson;
and three sisters, Jewell
Jackson, Gradie Chapman and Gladis Holland.
Survivors include several nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were
held Saturday, Dec. 20,
at William L. Danks Funeral Home in Beaver
Dam. Burial was in Morgan-Smith
Cemetery
near Morgantown.
Online messages of
condolence can be made
at www.danksfuneralhome.com.
Page A-3, December 23, 2014, Times-News
Tumpy Heflin
Tumpy Heflin, 62 of
McHenry, passed away,
Tuesday, Dec. 16, 2014,
at Ohio County Hospital in Hartford. He was
born June 27, 1952,
in Hartford to the late
Paul Glenn and Loretta Southard Heflin. He
was of Baptist faith and
a retired line worker for
American Nonwoven in
Beaver Dam.
Beside his parents,
he was preceded in
death by one brother,
Danny Heflin.
Tumpy was survived
by four brothers, Garry Lacefield of Bowling
Green, Larry Heflin of
McHenry, Jeffrey Heflin
and David Heflin, both
of Beaver Dam; and four
sisters, Regenia Henderson and Patricia Adcock,
both of Cromwell, Cindy
Heflin and Carla Heflin,
both of Beaver Dam.
Funeral
services
were held Friday, Dec.
19, at William L. Danks
Funeral Home in Beaver Dam. Burial was in
Happy Hollow Cemetery
near McHenry.
Expressions of sympathy may take the
form of contributions to
Tumpy Heflin Memorial
Fund, c/o Danks Funeral Home, P.O. Box 407,
Beaver Dam, KY 42320.
Online messages of
condolence can be made
at www.danksfuneralhome.com.
YEARLY SUBSCRIPTIONS
In-County $27.50
Out-of-County $29.70
Out-of-State $32.00
6 MONTHS SUBSCRIPTIONS
In-County $13.75
Out-of-County $14.85
Out-of-State $16.00
We thank everyone for their kindness while Mitch was
sick. The hugs, the prayers, food, and the pallbearers; the
Bevil Brothers, bless them as they treated us like family.
Bro. Lealin Geary and Terry Moore, Jr. for preaching,
Paula for singing for her Pappa; and Mitch’s children and
grandchildren for their love.
In Memory of
Larry “Noochie” Spencer
Those we love can never be more than a thought away for as long
as there’s a memory they live in our hearts to stay. Larry you will
always be in my heart. I know you are having the best Christmas
ever in heaven. I will always love and miss you. There is never
a day that goes by that I don’t think of you.
Love,
Helen
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Thomas James
Tichenor
Thomas
James
Tichenor, 46, of Hartford, died Thursday,
Dec. 18, 2014, at his
home. He was born in
Blue Island, Illinois,
and was a heavy equipment operator.
Survivors include his
mother, Gloria Tichenor;
three sons, Kyle, Aaron
and Thomas; one brother, Larry; and three
sisters, Debbie, Sharon
and twin sister, Maria.
A memorial service
will be held at a later
date. Bevil Bros. Funeral Home in Beaver Dam
is in charge of arrangements.
Kay Davison
Peters
Kay Davison Peters,
78, of Deerfield Beach,
Florida, died Tuesday,
Dec. 16, 2014, at Willow Bay Nursing Home
in Deerfield Beach.
She born in Pattiville
and was the daughter
of the late Edward and
Gladys Davison. She
was retired as chief
airline
stewardess
for Southern Airways
and was a member of
Pleasant Grove Baptist
Church.
Survivors
include
her husband, Gene Peters of Deerfield Beach,
Florida; three stepchildren, Cindy Knoess
of West Palm Beach,
Florida, Lindy Sliman
of St. Augustine, Florida, and Ray Peters
of Walhalla, South
Carolina; a brother,
Charles (Diana) Davison of Fordsville; a
sister, Linda (Gerald)
Masdon of Newnan,
Georgia; six grandsons;
and several nieces and
nephews.
Funeral
services
were held Saturday,
Dec. 20, at Pleasant
Grove Baptist Church,
Pattiville, with burial in Pleasant Grove
Cemetery.
Geary
Funeral
Home, Fordsville, handled the funeral arrangements.
Happy
New Year
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Page A-4, December 23, 2014, Times-News
Kentucky Afield Outdoors: Mid-winter is time to hunt rabbit
Outdoors
enthusiasts of a certain age
well remember their
grandfathers extolling
the virtues of fried rabbit, declaring it superior
to filet mignon and better than any restaurant
meal you could buy.
Many hunters scratch
around for something to
get them afield during
that dull period from
Christmas until the
first warm winds of
spring. Grab a shotgun,
don some brush pants,
a hunter orange vest
and walk an overgrown
fencerow to jump a rabbit.
“The rabbit population is still really good,
we have a lot of rabbits in Kentucky,” said
Ben Robinson, small
game biologist for the
Kentucky Department
of Fish and Wildlife
Resources.
“Hunters
should find good winter
rabbit hunting across
the state.”
Mail carriers in rural
areas help Kentucky
Fish and Wildlife by
recording rabbits they
see while driving their
daily mail routes. “Last
year, we had our highest mail carrier survey
since the early 1980s,”
Robinson said. “They
were down a little this
year, but there are still
plenty of rabbits.”
Late December and
January are great rabbit hunting times. Robinson hunted rabbits
this past week and did
well, harvesting several. “Even if you don’t
have a dog, you can still
hunt rabbits successfully,” he said. “Kick
around some cover and
you can jump some rabbits up.”
Robinson and his
hunting group had their
best success in woody
cover. “This cover grows
more important for rabbits as the weather gets
colder,” he explained.
“We found our rabbits
in blackberry thickets,
in small creek drainages, along fencerows
and in wood lots near
fields.”
He also said rabbit
hunters without dogs
must be quick on their
feet. “You don’t have
the set-up time that you
do with dogs,” Robinson said. “When you get
near the cover, be prepared for a quick shot.”
Don’t give up on a rabbit if it bolts from thick
cover and you don’t get
a shot. “That rabbit is
likely close by,” Robinson said. “Hunt the
next decent cover you
come across. A rabbit is
not going to run farther
than it has to. They
hide quickly.”
Cedar thickets make
excellent rabbit hunting spots on cold, windy
days or when snow
blankets the ground.
Thick stands of young
cedar offer a windbreak
as well as hiding cover.
Make sure to stop and
wait periodically when
hunting cedar thickets.
“Being still makes them
nervous and they will
flush,” Robinson said.
The Bluegrass Region
and the mountains of
eastern Kentucky hold
the highest rabbit densities, but practically
any wildlife management area in Kentucky
offers decent rabbit
hunting.
“Some of our smaller off-the-beaten-path
wildlife
management
areas don’t get as much
hunting pressure and
have good populations
of rabbits,” Robinson
said, “especially those
outside the Louisville,
Lexington and northern
Kentucky corridor.”
Shotshells
loaded
with No. 6 shot make
an
excellent
rabbit
load. Most rabbit shots
are fairly close when
hunting without dogs
in winter. An improved
cylinder choke works
fine. When hunting
with dogs, a modified
choke is a good choice.
Don’t over-choke your
shotgun and damage
the tasty rabbit meat.
“You will be more successful hunting with
dogs,” Robinson said.
“A lot of dog owners are
looking for someone to
hunt with them. It is
worth a try to ask to
join them. If you have
Kentucky must double up
efforts to close achievement gaps
The best gift my
mother and father gave
me was to value education. My father was an
illiterate coal miner and
a tenant farmer who
signed his name with an
X, and my mother had
an eighth grade education making her the academic in the family.
My mother taught
me
that
education
would give me a sustainable income. My father,
who did not have the
opportunity to attend
public schools, believed
there were two things
worth fighting for–your
family and your education. His argument was
that an education would
provide the opportunity to choose my path in
life. His words still echo:
“Son, do all you can do-no matter what--to get
an education.”
As an African-American growing up in poverty in rural eastern
Kentucky, chances of
continuing my education beyond high school,
much less continuing
through to a doctoral
degree, were slim. If not
for the constant cheers
of my mother, my educational achievements
would not have happened. While they could
never provide financial
assistance, my parents
made me proud of them
for what they could provide—their insights on
valuing education and
achievement.
Today, in my role at
the Council on Postsecondary Education, I am
extremely fortunate to
help lead the charge so
that more students can
achieve their dreams.
But many face obstacles
that have led to what
we call “achievement
gaps,” different levels
of performance between
different groups of students, whether it be
students from higher-income and lower-income
households,
minority
and majority students,
or students who come
into college prepared
and those who come in
with a number of remedial needs.
While Kentucky has
received national accolades for remarkable
progress in the college
and career readiness of
high school graduates, it
is still alarming that our
most
disenfranchised
students who choose to
attend college are having difficulty staying
in college and earning
their degrees.
Just consider the
data. Statewide, nearly 50 percent of firsttime, full-time bachelor’s degree students
who enter ready to take
credit-bearing courses
complete a degree within six years, compared
to 37 percent of low-income students, 28 percent of underprepared
students, and 33 percent
of minority students.
Funding for many of
these students creates
another obstacle to success and compounds the
achievement gap issue.
The state’s need-based
aid programs are substantially
underfunded since far too many
qualifying students who
applied for need-based
aid in 2012-13 failed to
receive awards since
funds were depleted.
Closing achievement
gaps in Kentucky is mission critical and a full
call to action is required.
In cooperation with our
campuses and the P-12
community, we are committed to giving every
student the opportunity to enter and succeed
in college. All students,
regardless of their parent’s level of income or
education or the color of
their skin, need the opportunity to participate
in education to make a
life for themselves, their
children and for generations to come.
Education is not just
a private good as many
claim; it is a public
good. College graduates
not only earn more and
contribute more to the
state and federal coffers
by paying higher income taxes, but they are
much less likely to be on
public assistance, incarcerated or unemployed.
College graduates are
also more likely to vote,
volunteer and have better health.
In the spirit of this
gift-giving season and
as we reflect on the new
year, my hope is that
parents, coaches, teachers, employers and other role models will make
It doesn’t hurt
pets to be spayed
or neutered.
IT HURTS
WHEN
THEY’RE NOT!
an extra effort to give
a child or an adult the
very best gift my parents gave me—the value
of an education. It will
take all of us doubling
up our efforts—at the
state policy level, in our
classrooms and in our
communities—to move
all students across the
finish line.
Aaron
Thompson,
Ph.D., is executive vice
president and chief academic officer for the
Council on Postsecondary Education, the
state’s
coordinating
agency for postsecondary and adult education.
some access to land to
hunt and they have
dogs, you can make a
partnership.”
Rabbit season closes
Jan. 31 in the Eastern
Zone. The season closes
Feb. 10 in all counties
west of and including
Hancock, Ohio, Butler,
Warren and Allen. The
daily bag limit is four
rabbits.
Robinson asks rabbit
hunters to participate
in the Hunter Cooperator Survey and fill out
a hunting log. This log
provides valuable population information to
biologists so they can
make more informed
decisions
regarding
rabbit
management.
Participants receive a
small gift and a copy
of the annual survey. Hunters can find
printable hunting logs
on the Kentucky Fish
and Wildlife website at
fw.ky.gov. Click on the
“Hunt” tab, then the
“Game Species” tab.
Author Lee McClellan is a nationally
award-winning associate editor for Kentucky
Afield magazine, the
official publication of
the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. He is a
life-long hunter and
angler, with a passion
for smallmouth bass
fishing.
The Kentucky Department of Fish and
Wildlife
Resources
manages, regulates, enforces and promotes responsible use of all fish
and wildlife species,
their habitats, public
wildlife areas and waterways for the benefit
of those resources and
for public enjoyment.
Kentucky Fish and
Wildlife is an agency of
the Tourism, Arts and
Heritage Cabinet. For
more information on
the department, visit
our website at fw.ky.
gov.
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Page A-5, December 23, 2014, Times-News
THE TIMES-NEWS
Editorial
VIEWPOINT
Something better on which to focus
We should, we suppose,
try to focus our attention on Christmas and
the great event responsible for that annual
holiday and not the first
of the year when our
U.S. Congress will go
back to doing nothing
and the possibility of a
racial divide growing
deeper.
Christmas does, indeed, appear the be the
better choice. Even if
we’ve flattened our wal-
lets and strained our
credit cards, the holiday
season can out do ridiculous politics and the
foreboding tentacles of
racial unrest.
But the Christmas season lasts only a few days
and Washington politics - and the politics that
feed it - will hang on
for as long as there are
people who think only of
themselves and not the
people they represent.
But since when did hon-
esty and integrity have
anything to do with it?
And about the racial
divide. Hopefully the
unfortunate incident in
Ferguson, Missouri will
eventually play itself
out and cooler heads
will prevail. Certainly
the nasty scene in New
York where two police
officers were ambushed
and shot to death will
not help a lot.
Let’s just hope that
the national media - That, unfortunately, is
specially those talking just another partisanheads on a couple of se- ship curse. It’s all done
lect news networks - do to make one political
not take it, run with it, side make the other look
and help turn it into an like a total waste of time
issue of unacceptable and effort. Advertisers
proportions.
Common buy it, both sides buy it
sense is needed, not and the beat goes on.
talking heads who use The Christmas season
their political agendas will, indeed, end,all of
to push some public inci- our lights and decoradents to absurd lengths tions will be put up for
just to outdo there com- another year and we’ll
petitive talking heads.
have to focus on issues
I always respond by saying, "I'm going to make
a New Year's resolution
not to eat cake anymore
for the rest of the year."
How I get away with
this New Year's resolution is that I make it two
days before the end of
the year. And so, for the
rest of the year, which
includes two days, I will
eat no cake or cookies
or pie while the world
stands.
Temptation is not a
serious thing unless
backed into a corner and
forced to yield to that
temptation.
The
Bible
Says,
"There hath no temptation taken you but such
as is common to man:
but God is faithful, who
will not suffer you to be
tempted above that ye
are able; but will with
the temptation also
make a way to escape,
that ye may be able to
bear it" (1 Corinthians
10:13).
Temptations
never
count unless for some
reason I yield to the
temptation.
Consider improving your
character for this new year
that are focused on by
newspapers,
television, radio and word of
mouth. We will watch,
read, listen, digest and form conclusions.
What we conclude very
likely will differ from
what others conclude
and we’ll wish it was
Christmas again.
Then congress will
re-convene and our voting abilities will again
come into question. Do Christmas
temptations really count?
By:Dr. James L. Snyder
All my life I have been
careful about succumbing to the temptations
of life. I have not always
been successful and
have fallen into some.
Oscar Wilde famously
said, "I can resist anything except temptation." We all know the
end of his life.
Temptation is the
hardest thing in life to
resist. I have watched
myself and in spite of
watching myself, I have
succumbed to temptation. Just when I think
I have overcome everything and have stepped
beyond temptation, I
find myself tempted.
It is not being tempted
that is difficult, because
everybody is tempted.
The hymn writer said,
"Yield not to temptation, for yielding is sin."
So the temptation is not
sin, it is how I react to
that temptation.
I must say I have had
some abundant help
from the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage
whose major role in life
is to keep me from yielding. She has kept me
from who knows how
much yielding I will
never know. I do know
this, I do not want to
yield to some temptation and then have to
face her. Enough said.
But this is the holiday season, celebrating
Christmas and everything that goes with it.
One major activity that
goes with this kind of
holiday is eating.
Now eating is something we do all the time;
at least I do. It is not the
eating; it is what I am
eating that poses some
problems. The Christmas holiday offers so
many cookies and cakes
and pies that I cannot
eat them all, but I try.
Oh boy, do I try.
"Don't you think you
have had enough cake?"
She always asked me
in the middle of eating
a piece of cake. If my
mouth was not full with
cake, I would like to tell
her, "No, I don't think I
have had enough cake
and when I do I'm certainly not going to tell
you."
You all know where
that will get me!
What I want to know
is simply this; how
much cake or cookie or
pie is really too much?
It is a simple question
and I would like to have
a simple answer.
Where I get into trouble is when my wife and
I go to some Christmas
party. I feel as a responsible partygoer I need to
taste all of the cake and
cookies that the gracious
host has provided for us.
That's just the way I
think about it. I believe
it would be insulting to
go to a party and not eat
all of the party vittles,
at lease sample them.
My wife, as you may
guess, has an altogether
different view of it. She
has this strange notion
that when I go to a party, particularly when
she is accompanying me,
the less I eat the more I
honor the hostess. According to her, I should
leave a party hungry.
My idea is simply that
if it is a holiday party
with Christmas cakes
and cookies the calories are on holiday and
do not count. At least I
am not counting them. I
think at Christmas time
bookkeeping should be
put aside and the enjoyment of the season
should be foremost.
If the host comes to
me in the middle of a
party and asks me how
I liked her cake, I feel I
have the responsibility
to give a very educated
critique of the cake. I
owe it to her. After all,
she took the time to bake
it and I should take the
time to eat it and enjoy
it and critique it. Giving
my honest opinion about
the Christmas vittles is
a very important part of
who I am.
It is after the party that I encounter the
greatest difficulty. That
is, explaining to my wife
why I ate so much cake
and cookies and pie.
She does not very
much accept the, "I just
do not want to be rude,"
explanation.
This is one of the few
places in life that we differ or I should say that
I stand up and differ. I
know that while I am at
the party indulging in
the delicacies all I will
get is a poke in the rib
and one of her "looks."
I can handle that. After
all, Christmas delicacies
are worth it.
It is when I get home
that I have to deal with
the Christmas temptations I yielded to at the
party.
For several years and
I plan to use it this year,
The Ohio County Times-News
welcomes public involvement in the
form of letters to the editor. Opinions,
the newspaper’s management feels, should not be
limited to staff members, but, rather, to anybody
with a voice desiring to be heard. However, with
space constraints, the newspaper asks that those
submitting letters be mindful of the limitations
and keep their submissions to a maximum of
between 150 and 200 word. Excessively long l
etters cannot be accepted, but those contributors
will be contacted and allowed to shorten their
opinions or suggestions.
Rev. James L. Snyder
is pastor of the Family
of God Fellowship, PO
Box 831313, Ocala, FL
34483. He lives with his
wife, Martha, in Silver
Springs Shores. Call
him at 1-866-552-2543
or e-mail [email protected] or website
www.jamessnyderministries.com.
Q: What are your feelings about New Year's
resolutions? Do you
make them, and if so,
what are some of them?
Jim: It's hard to believe we've already arrived at this time of
year when we typically
pause, reflect, regret,
repent and resolve to
make some changes.
By the time the Times
Square Ball falls in
New York City Wednesday night, millions of
Americans will have
compiled their lists.
And I can't say for certain, but I imagine that
losing weight, getting
fit and (with Christmas
behind us) getting out
of debt are at the top of
many lists.
The truth is, we're all
works in progress, and
for many people New
Year's resolutions can
be a helpful exercise
in our efforts to realize growth and positive
change. Although I usually don't have a specific list every year, I do
reflect on the past and
set goals for the future.
That's important. This
season of taking personal inventory is like
a much needed wheel
alignment.
As I've aged, though
-- and hopefully matured -- I'm learning
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that self-actualization
and my own personal
achievements bring less
satisfaction and have
far less impact than
the development of my
character and the giving
of myself to others. The
brilliant 18th-century
theologian and evangelist Jonathan Edwards
understood this, too -and at a much younger
age. First among his
well-known 70 Resolutions (many written at
the age of 19) is:
"Resolved, that I will
do whatsoever I think
to be most to the glory
of God ... to do whatever
I think to be my duty,
and most for the good
and advantage of mankind in general."
As we turn the page
on 2014 and look with
anticipation
toward
2015, I'd encourage all
of us to resolve to do the
same.
Happy New Year!
******
Q: Our daughter and
former son-in-law were
married for 10 years
until he left her and
their two kids three
years ago. Although
they've divorced, he
continues a relationship with her and the
children. Our daughter is insistent that he
join us for New Year's,
otherwise none of them
will come. Though I haven't told her, we'd really rather he not. Should
we just cave in and let
him come?
Greg Smalley, Vice
President, Family Ministries: I feel for you and
the difficulty of your
predicament. You didn't
spell out what's beneath
your reluctance to have
your former son-in-law
come along, but you're
likely wrestling with
several emotions. Maybe you're still hurt and
angry over the abandonment of your daugh-
ter and grandkids and
the way he's treated
them. Maybe you've
never gotten along, or
perhaps you have reservations about whether this kind of arrangement is unhealthy and
potentially hurtful and
confusing to the kids.
Your feelings and
concerns are understandable, and the
situation is less than
ideal. Still, in this
case, I would encourage you to defer to your
daughter's assessment
of things. She's been
charged with the responsibility for the
well-being of her kids -that's her call -- while
you have ownership of
your attitude toward
her former husband.
Rather than view his
joining you as "caving
in," consider this an opportunity to extend unconditional love to your
former son-in-law, to
deepen your relationship with and influence
on your grandchildren,
and to demonstrate respect and show your
daughter how much
she matters to you.
Admittedly,
this
won't be easy, so it's
important that you
and your spouse get on
the same page beforehand so that you can
discuss your needs and
ways you can support
one another when the
clan's together. Please
call our Focus counselors at 855-771-HELP
(4357) if we can be of
help.
Jim Daly is a husband
and father, an author, and
president of Focus on the
Family and host of the
Focus on the Family radio program.
Catch up with him at
www.jimdalyblog.com or
at www.facebook.com/
DalyFocus.
Page A-6, December 23, 2014, Times-News
KWC basketball team visits Wayland
Katie Childers class members include: Annagail Autry, Savana Ball, Bryan Bartlett, Micah
Baughn, Andy Brooks, Madison Durbin, Rayanna Dulton, Wiley Ferguson, Tyson Gibson,
Brandon Henson, McKristen Howard, Addyson Miller, Rachel Murphy, Kylee Nabours, Kiera Sapp, Nick Scott, Kameron Smith, Levi Sweeney, Nolan Vanover, Brennen Vanlandingham and Kon Willoughby. KWC student athletes include: Adam Stanford, Beau Deveaux, Tre
Boutilier, Marcus Fillyaw, Logan O’Bryan, Ken-Jah Bosley, Nick Riley, Bryce Walker-Byrd, C.
J. Blackwell, Luis Becerra, Devin Langford, Patrick Neel, Ifeanyichukwu Ude and Zay Henderson.
PHOTOS BY TREG WARD
Wayland Elementary student Brennon Varlandingham reads with KWC senior Ifeanyichukwu Ude from Abuja, Nigeria.
Titus Henson and Nick Scott read with Basil Deveaux
who came from Nassau, Bahamas to play basketball and
continue his education at KWC.
The Kentucky Wesleyan College men’s basketball team came to visit Mrs.
Katie Childer’s primary class at Wayland Elementary on Dec. 17.
Green River Health Department awarded national accreditation
Green River District
Health
Department
(GRDHD) has achieved
national accreditation
through
the
Public
Health
Accreditation
Board (PHAB). The
national accreditation
program
works
to
improve and protect the
health of the public by
advancing the quality
and performance of
the
nation’s
Tribal,
state,
local,
and
territorial public health
departments. GRDHD
is the 7th public health
agency in the state
of Kentucky and one
of approximately 60
across the country to
successfully
achieve
accreditation
status
through PHAB, the
non-profit organization
that administers the
national public health
accreditation program.
This
recognition
comes as the agency
is celebrating its 40th
anniversary.
“We are extremely
excited to be recognized
for achieving national
standards that promote
effectiveness
and
continuous
quality
improvement,”
said
Deborah
Fillman,
Public Health Director.
“The
accreditation
process helps to ensure
that
the
programs
and
services
we
provide are responsive
to the needs of our
community. Achieving
and
maintaining
a c c r e d i t a t i o n
demonstrates increased
accountability
and
credibility
to
the
public, funders, elected
officials and partner
organizations
with
which we work.” The
national accreditation
program,
jointly
supported
by
the
Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention
and the Robert Wood
Johnson
Foundation,
sets standards against
which
the
nation’s
more
than
3,000
governmental
public
health
departments
can
continuously
improve the quality
of their services and
performance. To receive
accreditation, a health
department
must
undergo a rigorous,
multi-faceted,
peerreviewed
assessment
process to ensure it
meets or exceeds a set
of quality standards and
measures.
“Whenever you see our
seal of accreditation,
you will know that
Green River District
Health
Department
has been examined
and meets or exceeds
national standards that
promote
continuous
quality improvement for
public health,” Fillman
said.
Public health
departments play a
critical role in protecting
and
improving
the
health of people and
communities. In cities,
towns, and states across
the
nation,
health
departments provide a
range of services aimed
at promoting healthy
behaviors; preventing
diseases and injuries;
ensuring
access
to
safe food, water, clean
air,
and
life-saving
immunizations;
and
preparing
for
and
responding to public
health emergencies.
Green River District
Health
Department
is completing a three
year cycle of community
health
improvement
begun in January 2012
in each of the seven
counties
throughout
the district. “This has
provided GRDHD with
an excellent opportunity
to
collaborate
with
community partners and
address common health
issues and concerns
such as obesity, tobacco
and substance abuse,
access to care and teen
issues.” Fillman said.
“We are looking forward
to beginning the three
year cycle again in
January 2015.”
Green River District
Health
Department
joins the growing ranks
of accredited health
departments in a strong
commitment to their
public health mission,”
said PHAB President
and CEO Kaye Bender,
PhD, RN, FAAN. “The
peer-review
process
provides
valuable
feedback
to
inform
health
departments
of their strengths and
areas for improvement,
so that they can better
protect and promote
the health of the people
they serve in their
communities. Residents
of a community served by
a nationally accredited
health department can
be assured that their
health
department
has demonstrated the
capacity to protect and
promote the health of
that community.” The
national accreditation
program was created
collaboratively over a 10year period by hundreds
of
public
health
practitioners
working
at the national, Tribal,
state, and local levels.
Since the program’s
launch in September
2011, hundreds of public
health
departments
have applied to PHAB
for accreditation, and
hundreds
of
public
health
practitioners
from across the nation
have been trained to
serve as volunteer peer
site visitors for the
program.
“ A c h i e v i n g
accreditation indicates
that
Green
River
District
Health
Department is dedicated
to
improving
and
protecting the health
of the community by
striving to continuously
improve the quality of
the services it delivers,”
said Leslie M. Beitsch,
MD, JD, chair of PHAB’s
Board of Directors and
chair of the Department
of Behavioral Sciences
and Social Medicine at
Florida State University
College of Medicine.
“Accreditation
also
promotes
consistency
in meeting standards.
With
an
everincreasing number of
health
departments
now applying for and
becoming
accredited,
you will be able to expect
to receive the same
quality of public health
services wherever you
go in the United States.”
Green River District
Health
Department
serves
the
counties
of Daviess, Hancock,
Henderson,
McLean,
Ohio,
Union
and
Webster.
About
the
Public
Health
Accreditation
Board
The Public Health
Accreditation
Board
(PHAB),
established
in 2007, was created
to
serve
as
the
national public health
accrediting body, and
is jointly funded by the
Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention
and the Robert Wood
Johnson
Foundation.
The
development
of
national
public
health
accreditation
has involved, and is
supported by, public
health
leaders
and
practitioners from the
national, Tribal, state,
and local levels. Learn
more about PHAB or
sign up for the PHAB
e-newsletter by visiting
www.phaboard.org.
Wearing his Santa hat Andy Brooks asks Patrick
Neal about their book.
Go to church
this week
Be Thankful
Every day!
Page A-7 December 23, 2014, Times-News
Fordsville McTeacher’s Night
Andrew Blanco and Ashley Lynca start their shift at McDonalds.
PHOTOS BY TREG WARD
Kaden Cusher delivers with a smile at the Fordsville McTeacher night.
McKenzie Richards, Tammy Fuqua and Rachel Gaddis talk at McDonald’s
during Fordsville McTeacher night.
Just when you have spotted Santa at the McDonald’s it ends up being Cameron Phelps and
Court Smith.
Handing off orders at McDonald’s through the pickup window is Linda
Warren.
Suzie King smiles with Michael Groves behind the counter.
Mall Cinema - Hartford, KY
CALL THEATRE FOR SHOW TIMES 270-298-3315
Cinema I Cinema II
NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM
SECRET AT THE TOMB
(PG)
THE HOBBIT
(PG-13)
The Spirit of Christmas
Christmas is a time of year that creates kinship in the community
as people show appreciation for one another. This is a good thing
and because of it some have asked, “Why can’t it be like this all the
time?” I completely agree. Love, mercy, and generosity should always
abound even without Christmas, especially since the holiday is not
found in the Bible.
In the New Testament, Jesus taught His followers to remember His
death by taking the Lord’s Supper (“Do this in remembrance of Me,”
Luke 22:19-20). This is the only memorial He wants in worship (1 Cor. 11:23-26), and always on the first day of
the week (Acts 20:7). Neither He nor His apostles taught people to celebrate His birth, let alone on December
25th. History shows that date became viewed as Jesus’ birth as a response to the pagan holiday of worshiping the
sun. Obviously, Christmas is no longer viewed that way - in the same way the days of the week no longer honor
the pagan gods they were named after. Christmas has become various things to people, and has both religious
and social aspects to it. Even atheists will celebrate the goodwill of the season. And though no one has permission to change what God wants in worship (Mark 7:6-7), we may partake of the social customs associated with a
religious practice as long as we do not violate our conscience or encourage others to violate theirs (1 Cor. 8:7-8).
In this sense some say “Merry Christmas” and exchange gifts without referring to the birth of Christ. Regardless,
love and kindness should never be based on a holiday or limited to one time of year. Jesus always wants His
people to “be rich in good works, ready to give, willing to share...that they may lay hold on eternal life” (1 Tim.
6:18-19). - Mike Thomas
Radio Program on Sundays at 10:15 a.m. on 99.9 F.M.
BEAVER DAM CHURCH OF CHRIST
www.beaverdamchurch.com
Sandi Mullikin takes cookies around for the
Fordsville McTeacher Night.
SUNDAY
SERMONS
ON 99.9
8:00 - 8:30 a.m. .Ohio County Churches of Christ
8:30 - 9:00 a.m. ...........Hartford Christian Church
9:00 - 10:00 a.m. .....Beaver Dam Baptist Church
10:15 - 11:00 a.m...Beaver Dam Church of Christ
11:00 a.m. - Noon ...........Hartford Baptist Church
Call now while openings remain for
the Sunday Morning Schedule.
Discuss the huge possibilities to grow
your congregation and reach more
people than ever on 99.9.
Call 298-3268 and ask
to talk to Jerry Wright.
OHIO COUNTY
DEVOTIONAL
PAGE
Kevin L. Rice
Agency Owner
Kevin L. Rice Allstate Insurance
24-Hour Customer Service
Allstate Insurance Company
707 W. Everly Bros. Blvd - Suite 2
Central City, KY 42330
Office 270-757-0012
1001 S. Main Street - Hartford, KY 42347
Office 270-298-9574
1-800-844-6218
Providing skilled
nursing, medical social
work, physical, occupational
and speech therapy
in your home.
270-274-3614
JOHN FOREMAN - OWNER
“Five Generations of Quality Bar-B-Q”
338 Washington Ave.
Owensboro, KY 42301
Phone (270) 926-9000
Fax (270) 683-0747
Beaver Dam Nursing &
Rehab Center, Inc.
Stacey Bullock, RN, BSN, LNHA Administrator
1595 US Highway 231 South • Beaver Dam, KY 42320
[email protected]
270-274-9646
Cell: 270-875-2324
Fax: 270-274-0484
HARTFORD BUILDING
& SUPPLY
621 Old Main Street
Hartford, KY
“For All Your Painting &
Building Needs”
Phone: 270-298-3039
William L. Danks
Funeral Home
222 Lafayette • Beaver Dam
270-274-7124
24 Hour Funeral Service Info
270-274-3444
Hometown
Flooring
g
Carpetin
•Free Estimates
•Residential & Commercial
1102 Town Square Drive, Beaver Dam
(231) South
270-274-0760
Fordsville
NURSING AND REHABILITATION
CENTER
Fordsville
270-276-3603
Serving The Community For Over
35 Years
PIZZA KINGS
270-274-6775
235 South Main Street - Beaver Dam
FREE DELIVERY/FAMILY OWNED &
OPERATED
CHURCH DISCOUNT
Sun. 2-9 Mon. - Thurs. 11-9 Fri.-Sat. 11-10
THIS DEVOTIONAL AND DIRECTORY IS MADE POSSIBLE BY
THESE BUSINESSES WHO ENCOURAGE ALL OF US TO ATTEND
WORSHIP SERVICES.
APOSTOLIC
APOSTOLIC CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST - Rev. Jerry Bratcher
ABUNDANT LIFE WORSHIP CHURCH
202 W. Second Street, Beaver Dam - Charles Shepherd, pastor
BAPTIST
ADABURG BAPTIST CHURCH - George Barker, pastor
BARNETT’S CREEK BAPTIST - Matt Shaffer, pastor
BEAVER DAM BAPTIST CHURCH - (270) 274-7174
BELLS RUN BAPTIST CHURCH - Rev. John Cummins (270) 281-9321
CENTERTOWN BAPTIST CHURCH - Rodney M. Albin, pastor
CENTRAL GROVE BAPTIST - Rick Beard, pastor
CLEAR RUN BAPTIST CHURCH - Bryon Priar, pastor
CONCORD BAPTIST CHURCH - Brother Jeff Hawkins
COOL SPRINGS BAPTIST - Rochester Rd. - Jerry Alexander 270-754-1945
DEANEFIELD BAPTIST CHURCH - Joe Colburn, pastor
DUNDEE BAPTIST CHURCH - Don McGuire, pastor
EAST FORK BAPTIST CHURCH - Bro. Adam Jarboe
EAST HARTFORD BAPTIST - Pastor Bro. Troy Richards
EMMANUAL BAPTIST TEMPLE - Hwy. 62, McHenry - Jim Hohimer
FAIRVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH - Jason Bratcher, pastor
FORDSVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH - Joe Simmons, pastor
FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH OF CABOT - 2964 Easton Cabot Rd., Fordsville
Pastor: Vernon Veteto
FRIENDSHIP FREEWILL BAPTIST - Hwy. 54, Fordsville - Roger Hill - 270-274-3695
GREEN RIVER BAPTIST CHURCH - Kelly Harris, pastor - Hwy. 231, Cromwell
GOSPEL LIGHT BAPTIST CHURCH - 226 E. 1st Street, Beaver Dam, Clyde Shaffer, pastor,
270-302-1595
HARTFORD BAPTIST CHURCH - 415 Liberty Street - Ed Mitchell, pastor
HARTFORD SECOND BAPTIST - 1011 White Avenue - Pete Leach, pastor
HOPEWELL BAPTIST CHURCH - Hopewell Rd. - John Daugherty, pastor
INDEPENDENCE MISSIONARY BAPTIST - Jerry Toler, pastor
LIVING FAITH BAPTIST - Hwy. 231 North - Bro. Greg Hillard, pastor
McGRADY CREEK BAPTIST - Fordsville - Bobby Renfrow - 270-276-9927
McHENRY BAPTIST CHURCH - Brent Howard, Pastor
MOUNT CARMEL BAPTIST - 607 Buford Rd., Utica - Chris Taylor, pastor
MT. ZION BAPTIST - Ricky Taylor, pastor
NARROWS BAPTIST CHURCH - Pastor: David Ford
NEW HARMONY BAPTIST - Brother Geary Hines, pastor - Hwy. 269, Beaver Dam
NEW HOPE BAPTIST - 1255 St. Rt. 54 E, Fordsville - Bro. Jerry Embarton, pastor
NEW LIBERTY MISSIONARY BAPTIST - Gene Gardner, pastor
NEW PANTHER CREEK BAPTIST - Hwy. 764 - Pastor: Roy Douglas 270-684-0723
NEW ZION BAPTIST - Gerald Geary, pastor 270-274-7937
OLATON BAPTIST CHURCH
PATHWAY MISSIONARY BAPTIST - 3973 U.S. Hwy. 231 S., - Beaver Dam, Pastor: Don Beverly
PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST - Butch Ford, pastor
PLEASANT HILL BAPTIST - Pastor: Kenny Sapp
POND RUN BAPTIST CHURCH - Alton “Doc” Crowe, pastor - 270-256-4455
PROVIDENCE BAPTIST CHURCH - Bro. Shane Tucker, pastor
RIDGECREST BAPTIST CHURCH - Ridgecrest Dr. & 2nd Street
ROCKPORT BAPTIST CHURCH - Charles Brownd, pastor
ROSINE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH - Nicholas Westerfield, pastor
SLATY CREEK BAPTIST - Rev. Truman, Johnson, pastor
SMALLHOUS BAPTIST CHURCH - Rossie Stewart, pastor - St. Rt. 69 South, Centertown
SUGAR GROVE BIBLE BAPTIST and CHRISIAN ACADEMY
Fordsville, 276-5265, Eddie Calloway 270-233-9080
TAYLOR MINE UNITED BAPTIST
WALTON’S CREEK BAPTIST - Barry Davis, pastor
WEST POINT BAPTIST CHURCH - George Darnell, pastor
WEST PROVIDENCE BAPTIST - Barry Black, pastor
WORD MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH - 132 Veller Dr., - Beaver Dam, Bro. Darrell Maran
Sunday School 10 a.m. - Worship 11 a.m. & 6 p.m.
WOODWARD’S VALLEY BAPTIST - David Isbell, pastor
ZION BAPTIST CHURCH - Zion Church Rd., Reynolds Station - Bro. Chad Patterson, Pastor
270-754-2600
Jeff D. Embry
3321 Liberty Road - PO Box 94
Beaver Dam, KY 42320
Cell: 270-256-2205
800-270-5105
270-274-4011
Fax: 270-274-4031
Charlieʻs
Lawn & Garden
315 Clay Street
Hartford, KY
(270) 298-7800
Authorized Sales
& Dealer
Bank of Ohio
County
Conway & Keown
124 West Union Street
P.O. Box 25
Hartford, KY 42347
Telephone
(800) 242-4115
(270) 298-3231
(270) 526-0592 Morgantown
Fax
(270) 298-7855
1830 N. Main St.
Hartford, KY 42347
270-274-9994
Mall Cinema - Hartford, KY
TC Sanderfur
Tyson Sanderfur
FARM BUREAU
INSURANCE
270-338-5040
CALL THEATRE FOR
SHOW TIMES
270-298-3315
(270) 754-3000
DRIVE-IN
OPEN ON WEEKENDS
SUPERCENTER
1701 N. Main, Beaver Dam - 270-274-9608
Open 24 Hours A Day 7 Days A Week
OHIO COUNTY
DEVOTIONAL
PAGE
CASE STORAGE
All-Types Storage
270-274-9333
‘Second Month Free’
1209 N. Main • Beaver Dam
270-274-3318
Gift Gallery & Medical Equipment
“Everyday Low Prescription Prices”
RicePharmacy.com
RiceGiftGallery.com
ALLEN ASPHALT
SEALING & STRIPING
270-274-9123
132 McHenry
Church
Road
Protect Your
Asphalt Investment!
•Parking Lots • Driveways •Seal Coating
•Concrete Work
April Bradley - Agent
1389 N. Main St. - Beaver Dam, KY
42320-8957
[email protected]
ShelterInsurance.com/ABradley
P 270-274-9915
C 270-363-1068
F 270-274-5152
Beaver Dam Building Supply
(270) 274-9605
For All Roofing & Construction Needs
202 South Main St.
Fax: 270-274-9665
LIKENS
PLUMBING SUPPLY
201 Broadway
Beaver Dam, KY
270-274-9825
HARTFORD RECYCLING
A DIVISION OF PHILLIPS ENTERPRISES, INC
WE BUY ALL TYPES SCRAP METAL
270-298-4033
-Hours• JUNK CARS • PREPARED STEEL • SHEARING • FARM EQUIPMENT
• TIN • APPLIANCES • STAINLESS STEEL • ALUMINUM
• ALUMINUM CANS • COPPER • BRASS
Monday - Friday
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday 8:00 AM - 12 Noon
WE’RE RECYCLING, ARE YOU?
Hwy. 231 N.
270-274-3449
Mon. - Sat. 5:30 a.m .- 10 p.m.
Sun. 7 a.m. - 10 p.m.
Randy Webb
Sales Representative
West Kentucky
809 McGinnis Quarry Road/Bowling Green, Ky 42101
Phone (270) 782-5905 / Fax (270) 782-3454
Cell (270) 991-2301
[email protected]
Bevil Bros.
Funeral Homes
301 Liberty
42347
Beaver
Dam Street • Hartford, Kentucky
Hartford
(270) 298-3287 • FAX (270) 298-3288
270-274-9600
270-298-3287
226 Louisville Road
Ultimate
Beaver Dam, Kentucky
42320-0003 Look
Phone (270) 274-9600 • Fax (270)
274-9622
Salon
Jerry Bevil Ruby Garner
Larry Bevil
Cosmetologist
1391 North Main Street • Beaver Dam, KY 42320
270-274-0083
See me for your special needs!
Find Ultimate Look on Facebook!!!
THIS DEVOTIONAL AND
DIRECTORY IS MADE POSSIBLE BY
THESE BUSINESSES WHO
ENCOURAGE ALL OF US TO
ATTEND WORSHIP SERVICES.
CATHOLIC
ST. JOHN’S CATHOLIC - Fr. Gerald Baker, pastor - 270-233-4196
HOLY REDEEMER CATHOLIC - Fr. Jean Kalombo, pastor - 270-274-3414
CHRISTIAN
HARTFORD CHRISTIAN CHURCH - Walnut Street - Sr. Minister Mike Sweeney - 1-270-298-7222
Associate Minister of Youth - Chris Parker - 1-270-298-7222
HORSE BRANCH CHRISTIAN - Jim Swaford, pastor
CHURCH OF CHRIST
BEAVER DAM CHURCH OF CHRIST - Mike Thomas, Minister - 1235 Williams St. - 270-274-4451
FRIENDSHIP CHURCH OF CHRIST - 9776 Sunnydale Road
Fordsville, Gary Hall, minister - 270-684-7294
HARTFORD CHURCH OF CHRIST - West Washington Street - Jim Hogan, minister
270-298-3800
McHENRY CHURCH OF CHRIST - Kirby Duncan
NEW BAYMUS CHURCH OF CHRIST - Davison Station Road
New Baymus - Dewayne Johnson, miniter - 270-274-7440
SUGAR GROVE CHURCH OF CHRIST - Minister: Ethan Eadens
CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST
LATTER DAY SAINTS - 308 Liberty Street, Hartford
James Wiles, Pres., 270-274-7034
CHURCH OF GOD
ECHOLS CHURCH OF GOD - Rev. Scott Simms, pastor
LIBERTY LIGHTHOUSE CHURCH OF GOD - Madison & Sycamore Sts., Mary K. Doepel, pastor
270-298-9047
HORSE BRANCH CHURCH OF GOD - Earnest Whitely - 11955 U.S. Hwy. 62 East
OAK GROVE CHURCH OF GOD - 270-274-7227 Hwy. 505 - Cromwell, Steven D. Leach, pastor
REFUGE CHURCH OF GOD - Hwy. 62 West, Beaver Dam - Fire Dept. Multi-Purpose Bldg.
THE CHURCH OF GOD - 270-298-9950 - 1377 Beda Rd - Pastor Hollis D. Peters
CHURCH OF GOD PROPHECY
CHURCH OF GOD PROPHECY - 229 W. Main Street, Fordsville - Neville Green 270-276-3782
CHURCH OF GOD PROPHECY - 701 St. Rt. 1245, McHenry - Bro. Roy Smith - 270-589-0521
CHURCH OF GOD PROPHECY - Oakwood Drive, Hartford - Robert Randolph - 270-274-3891
GENERAL BAPTIST
BROADWAY GENERAL BAPTIST - Tim Smith, pastor
CEDAR GROVE GENERAL BAPTIST - Between Hwy. 1164 & 1544, Near Olaton - Pastor Larry Embry
EAST FAIRVIEW GENERAL BAPTIST - Jr. Decker, pastor
ECHOLS GENERAL BAPTIST
HORSE BRANCH GENERAL BAPTIST - Terry Tarrence, pastor
HUMBLE VALLEY GENERAL BAPTIST - Between Hwy. 69 N. & 1164 - Pastor Tom Dever
LEACH CHAPEL GENERAL BAPTIST - Arnold Leach Road, - Horse Branch, Ricky Dockery, pastor
LONE STAR GENERAL BAPTIST - Bro. Kenny Shephard
LONGVIEW GENERAL BAPTIST - Jay Raymond, pastor
MT. OLIVE GENERAL BAPTIST - Joey Blanton
VICTORY GENERAL BAPTIST - Horse Branch
INDEPENDENT
BIBLE BAPTIST CHURCH - Hwy. 231 S., Beaver Dam - Bro. Cleatus Bowman, pastor
BETHESDA BIBLE CHURCH - Robert Bailey, pastor 270-274-3169
CALVARY INDEPENDENT CHURCH - 1580 Dan Road, - Horse Branch, KY 42349, 270-274-3094
JEHOVAH’S WITNESS
JEHOVAH’S WITNESS KINGDOM HALL - 878 Hwy. 231 S. - Beaver Dam,
270-363-2427 or 270-274-4056
METHODIST
BARNES CHAPEL UNITED METHODIST - 11 Church Street - Beaver Dam, Bro. Ray Austin, pastor
BEAVER DAM UNITED METHODIST - Third & Lafayette - Gary Hardin, pastor
BEECH VALLEY UNITED METHODIST - 4661 Sunny Dale Rd. - Kevin Campbell, pastor
CENTERTOWN UNITED METHODIST - 139 Church Street - Rob Stout, pastor
CROMWELL UNITED METHODIST - 5750 US 231 - Mike Taylor 270-274-9290
DUNDEE UNITED METHODIST - 11503 SR 69 - John Jarboe, pastor
EASTON UNITED METHODIST - 35 SR2124 - Hancock County - Richard Burgraff, pastor
FORDSVILLE UNITED METHODIST - 263 E. Main St. - Richard Burgraff, pastor
GOSHEN UNITED METHODIST - 1409 SR 273 - Mike Taylor, pastor 270-274-9290
HARTFORD UNITED METHODIST - Center & Liberty - Bro. Bob Clements, pastor
LIBERTY UNITED METHODIST - 2433 SR 2718 - Rob Stout, pastor
MT. PLEASANT UNITED METHODIST - 2756 Mt. Pleasant Rd. - Kevin McGee, pastor
NO CREEK UNITED METHODIST - 1770 SR 136 - Steve Flener, 270-256-6950, pastor
ROSINE UNITED METHODIST - 61 McLeod Street - Contact Mike Baldwin - 270-314-0468
SHILOH UNITED METHODIST - 1103 Shiloh Church Road - Kevin McGee, pastor
NON-DENOMINATION
BEAVER DAM COMMUNITY CHURCH - G.H. Young, pastor
CENTERTOWN TABERNACLE - Ruby St. - Centertown - Marty Bowlds, pastor
CHARITY FAITH CHAPEL - Larry Minton, pastor - 270-274-7715
CROSSROAD COMMUNITY CHURCH - East First Street - Beaver Dam - Anthony Goff, pastor
MT. MORIAH CHURCH - Ricky Leisure, pastor
NEW ASSEMBLY CHURCH - Hwy. 1543, Hartford - Pastor: Bro. Lealin Geary 270-298-7843
NEW HOPE CHURCH - Warren Brooks, pastor 525-2854 or - 270-274-7077 or 270-232-4319
REFLECTION OF CHRIST CHURCH - Hwy. 231 & Boling Rd. - Pleasant Ridge - 270-275-2555
REMNANT WORSHIP CENTER - 201 Midtown Plaza, Beaver Dam - Todd Leach, pastor 270-526-5744
RIVER OF PRAISE WORSHIP CENTER - Terry & Eileen Morris
237 S. Main Street - Beaver Dam - 270-256-5767
THERE IS HOPE COMMUNITY CHURCH - Pastor, Darrell Blacklock
UNION GROVE RESURRECTION COMMUNITY CHURCH - 1778 Taffy Road, Hartford
Pastor: Don Goatee
PENTECOSTAL
CENTERTOWN HOLINESS CHURCH - Rev. Bruce Lindsey, pastor
NEW COVENANT TABERNACLE - Bro. Dale Calloway 270-274-4065
PLEASANT RIDGE HOLINESS - Hwy. 231 N., Ancie Wilson
UNITED PENTECOSTAL
THE PENTECOSTALS OF OHIO COUNTY - 1103 Main St. - Hartford - Pastor: Kenneth Moore
PRESBYTERIAN
BEULAH CUMBERLAND PRESBYTERIAN - Rev. Mike Justice, pastor
SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST
SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST - Goshen Road - Beaver Dam - Christopher Rollins, pastor - 270-703-9945
*Commercial ~ Residential
*Asphalt Paving
ALT
FREE
ESTIMATES
THE
DEPOT
Gifts & Interiors
2 LOCATIONS:
121 Broad St - Central City - 270-754-1595
117 North Main St. - Greenville
270-338-2144
Visit us on Facebook - www.depotgifts.com
Free Glamours Gift Wrap - Call In Your Gift Order!
Compliments of
YOUNG
Manufacturing
BARRY K. STEVENS, D.M.D.
1221 N. Main Street
Beaver Dam, KY 42320
Telephone: (270) 274-3379
COMPLETE COMFORT
HEATING & COOLING,
INC.
270-274-4201 & 270-298-7217
Owners: Keith Shephard & Marty Shephard
We accept Visa & Mastercard
HVAC MO1443
Miller-Schapmire
Funeral Home
114 West Walnut
Hartford, KY
HOMETOWN
IGA
1137 HWY. 231
270-298-3709
COMMONWEALTH
COMMUNITY BANK
“We Try Harder”
FOUR LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU
Greenville
Hartford
270-338-2125
270-298-3261
Centertown
270-232-4231
Fordsville
270-276-3663
www.cwcbank.com
BRIAN ADDINGTON
CO-OWNER/MANAGER
M & B AUTO PARTS
1340 S. MAIN - HARTFORD, KY 42347
(270) 298-4900
(270) 298-4941 FAX
Telephone: (270) 274-3294
NC.
ASPH
Need a Gift? - Birthday? Anniversary? Wedding?
Baby? Home?
,I
ICES
V
R
SE
Don House
(270) 298-3073
(270) 274-0095
*Rock *Sand *Marble *Fertilizer *Slag
*Lime * Dirt *Coal
Ray Jones Trucking, Inc.
“Specialize in Bulk Hauling”
Ray Jones, Pres. (270) 338-2417
Fax (270) 338-7725
2296 State Route, Hwy. 181
South
Greenville, KY 42345
Jonathan Shrewsbury, O.D.
Mallory Sanderfur Roberts, O.C.
Doctors of Optometry
1303 N. Main St.
Bluegrass Family Eyecare
Beaver Dam, KY 42320
TAMMY’S
“Boots & clothes for the
working man”
Carhartt, Redwing, & more
We carry the best brands
270-274-0203
Mon - Fri 10am - 5pm
Sat 9am - 4pm
Closed Sunday
726 North Main Street
Beaver Dam, KY 42320
& TREE SERVICE Trimming
& Tree Removal
• Stump Grinding
& Tree
T
REE
SERVICE
Tree Trimming & Tree Removal Full Service Lawn Care 330 Mallard View Drive
Lic
ens
270-­274-­0025 ed Cromwell,
Kentucky
42333
FREE ESTIMATES ESTIMATES
270-274-0025
or 270-256-7574
Lawn Care, Tree Service & Stump Removal
FREE ESTIMATES
Licensed & Insured
red
Insu
Page A-10, December 23, 2014, Times-News
Cromwell/
Oak Grove News
BD Celebration
winners announced
By Erma Lee McKinley Phone 274-4396
Christmas greetings
and our sympathy to
all who lost loved ones,
including Eric Burden,
son of Billy Burden and
the late Lula (Haven)
Burden, also Tumpy
Heflin and Len Nanney.
Let us also remember
all the sick and shutin during this season,
including Tom Juvrud
and Frances Leach.
(There also seems to be
several cases of the flu
in our area.)
Howard McKinley at
Beaver Dam Nursing
& Rehab has not been
feeling quite as well.
He was pleased to have
the following visitors
last
week:
Ronnie
Butler
(who brought
him a plate lunch),
Bill Burgess, J.W. and
Chris Green and several
others. He had a good
phone visit with his
sister, June Maddox in
North Carolina, who
also lives in a nursing
home there.
He
appreciates
his regular visitors,
including
Bud
and
Tommy Baize, Erma
McKinley, also Bonnie
Daniel, who brought
him a bowl of chicken
dumplings
Sunday
afternoon. (She says she
plans to spend some time
visiting and bring a plate
lunch on Christmas Day
this week!) Howard’s
roommate,
Darrell
Durham, also enjoys the
visits!
Bonnie
reported
that Arthur Kidd in
Pennsylvania had died
recently. He was the
brother of her brotherin-law, Andy Kidd of
Columbiana, Ohio.
Many churches in
the area have been
having their Christmas
programs. Oak Grove
Church of God had
theirs, “Is There Still
Time For Christmas?”
Sunday night, directed
by
Brother
Major
Deweese.
(It
was
very
interesting, especially
ending with an altar
invitation following Act
II, “Ready?”)
All the church youth
were featured, including
Children’s
Church,
who
presented
“Its
Called Christmas With
a Capitol “C.” This
was directed by Sarah
Wilson
and
Becky
Deweese. Sarah also
directed the Christmas
choir in singing several
carols.
Brother
Jed
Richardson,
director
of One Voice Student
Ministries
(OVSM),
has been doing a swell
job with all the church
youth, as they meet
every
Wednesday
night in the Family
Life Center in the new
building
across
the
street. (This is children
of ages 1-18 years.)
We were glad to have
visiting churches, Slaty
Creek Baptist and Green
River Baptist, attending
the Christmas program.
Bonnie Daniel reported
that she attended the
Christmas
program
at Liberty Lighthouse
Church in Hartford,
Sunday night. It was
very good, and she knew
several families whose
children had parts in it.
Let us all keep “Christ”
in our Christmas this
season and into the next
year!
A former pastor of
Oak
Grove
Church
of God, back in 19882003, Brother Henry
Montgomery, who now
lives and pastors the
Wurtland,
Kentucky
Church of God,
has
published a book, “The
Redheaded Boy From
Tank Pond Hollow,”
which is a memoir of his
life in the ministry. In it,
he tells of churches he
has pastored, including
Oak Grove. It is very
interesting!
Larry
Morphew of Beaver Dam,
originally of Cromwell,
has some copies of the
book. Larry was saved
during the time Brother
Montgomery pastored
and conducted a tent
revival in Cromwell.
They have kept close
contact throughout the
years.
I had phone visits
with numerous friends
and cousins last week,
including
Elizabeth
Ward
(cousin)
in
Morgantown, Kentucky.
She was daughter of
Glenna
(Martin),
a
sister to my mother,
Anna Mae (Martin),
children of the late Lon
Martin. Elizabeth now
lives on Bell Street.
Another
cousin,
Dorothy
Russ
in
Boonville,
Indiana,
and I had a good chat.
Her mother was Bessie
(Martin),
another
sister to Anna Mae and
Glenna. There were ten
children in their family,
none which are still
living.
I called Jennie (Smith)
Weaver, a distant cousin
in Garfield, Kentucky.
Her parents were the
late
Hayward
and
Lorene Smith. I recall as
a child of twelve years
old picking strawberries
for the Smiths near
Bowling Green.
A truckload of pickers
from this area were
hauled by a big truck,
crossing the ferry near
Morgantown. We were
paid five cents per quart
for picking strawberries.
Merry Christmas to all
and Happy New Year!
“And suddenly there
was with the angel
a multitude of the
heavenly host, praising
God and saying, Glory to
God in the highest, and
on earth, peace, good
will toward men.” Luke
2: 13-14.
Rosine Happenings
By Frances Harvey
Deepest
sympathy
is extended to the
families of Eric Burden
and Mildred “Midge”
McDaniel, who passed
away this past week.
May God be with each of
you at this time.
The Rosine United
Methodist
and
Missionary
Baptist
churches have Sunday
worship service at 11
a.m. each week. The
Missionary Baptist also
has Sunday School at
10 a.m. each Sunday.
The
ministers
and
congregations of both
churches welcome all
who wish to worship
with them.
The Monroe Homeplace
on Jerusalem Ridge is
closed for the holidays.
It will reopen at 9 a.m.
on Monday, Jan. 5, 2015.
The Rosine Barn will
be closed until the first
Friday in March.
Uncle Pen’s Cabin is
closed for the winter. It
will reopen next spring.
Prayers
and
best
wishes go to all Rosine
area people who are sick
at this time.
This will be the last
“Happenings” until after
the new year. I’m sorry
this is so short. I hope
to have more to write
about in the January 7,
2015, issue of the TimesNews. I wish for all a
very Merry Christmas
and a Happy New Year!
May God bless you all.
SUBSCRIBE
TODAY!
OUR BRIDAL REGISTRY
Couples registered:
Jillian Fulkerson &
Brandon Embry
December 27, 2014
Hillary Hobgood & Dylan Garrett
March 7, 2015
Megan Johnson & Andrew Robbins
March 21, 2015
Jonica Chinn & Josh Lellie
March 28, 2015
GIFT GALLERY
Beaver Dam, KY 42320
Phone: (270) 274-3318
Parade
commercial:
first, J.R. Williams TV;
second, Ohio County
Circuit Clerk’s office.
Parade
noncommercial: first, New
Assembly
Church;
second,
Hartford
Masonic
Lodge;
third, New Covenant
Tabernacle.
Parade walking units:
first, Wayland Brownie
Troop;
second,
Cub
Scout Troop 273; third,
Ohio County Dance
Team.
Children’s Christmas
art contest: K-2nd grade
winner, Owen Powers,
son of Jeff and Whitney
Powers; 3rd-4th grade
winner, Arron Shephard,
son of Stacy Shephard;
5th-6th grade winner,
Emily Sisk, daughter of
READ
Those
Were
The
Days!
Brad & Pam Sisk.
Beaver Dam home
Christmas
decorating
contest winners: first,
Jason
and
Coren
McConnell, 936 Madison
Street; second, Roy and
Pam Lindsey, 1518 N.
Broad Street
(Twin
Hills
Subdivision);
third, David & Linda
Bailey, 40 Goldenrod
Lane (Green Meadows
Subdivision).
DON’T
DRINK
&
DRIVE!
It’s
the
Law!
COMMUNITY
CALENDAR
Dec. 26: “Angels
Among Us” A.A.
group meeting at
Hartford
United
Methodist Church
from 7:30-8:30.
Dec. 26: Country
Ramblers will play
at Ohio County Park
at 7 p.m. in Bldg. #1.
Dec. 27: Country
Jamboree Band will
play at Ohio County
Park at 7 p.m. in
Bldg. #1.
Dec.29:
A.A.
meets from 7:30
to 8:30 p.m. at the
Community Center
in Hartford in the
multi-purpose room.
Dec. 29: Al-Anon
will meet at the
Hartford
United
Methodist Church,
141 E. Center St.,
Hartford, at 7:30
p.m.
Please use
back entrance. For
more information,
please call 2983519.
Dec. 29: Weight
Watchers
at
Hartford
United
Methodist Church.
Weigh-in at 5 p.m.,
meeting at 5:30 p.m.
Dec.
31:
Celebrate Recovery
at Hartford United
Methodist Church,
141 E. Center St.,
Hartford. A potluck
dinner will begin
at 5:45 p.m, with
a worship service
following at 6:30
p.m. The meeting
will begin at 7:30
p.m.
For more
information, please
call 298-3519.
**The
Ohio
County Historical
Museum,
415
Mulberry
Street
(Peach Alley entry),
Hartford, is open
from 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. on Mondays,
Wednesdays,
Thursdays
and
Fridays, and on
Saturdays from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. It
will be closed on
Sundays, Tuesdays,
holidays
and
during
inclement
weather. For more
information, please
call
270-2747558. The complex
consists
of
the
Thomas Historical
Home, a rustic relics
building, the CSX
caboose,
Goshen
one-room
school,
Park
log
cabin,
Autry
General
Store and Veterans
Museum. Historical
and
genealogical
books are available
for use and sale.
Admission is $2 for
adults and 50¢ for
children.
**The
Ohio
County
Veterans
Museum,
415
Mulberry
Street,
Hartford,
honors
area veterans with
uniforms, pictures,
military items and
information. Hours
are 11 a.m. to 4
p.m. on Mondays,
Wednesdays,
Thursdays
and
Fridays, and on
Saturdays from 9
a.m.
to St.3Beaver
p.m.
250 Madison
Dam, KYIt
will be closed on
Sundays, Tuesdays,
holidays
and
Owner: Joe
during
inclement
Wood
Lic.#M03450
weather.
For
more information,
please call 270298-3062. There is
no admission, but
donations are very
much appreciated.
1209
Beaver Dam
** N. Main,Fordsville
274-3318Society
Historical
Depot Museum is
ONE HOUR PHOTO
open
Thursday
and
“Everyday
Low Prescription Prices”
Friday, 11 a.m. to 4
p.m.; Saturday, 11
a.m. to 5 p.m.; and
Sunday
through
Wednesday
by
appointment.
For
more information,
call 929-5792. Find
them on Facebook:
Fordsville
Depot
Museum.
H&W
Electric, Inc.
250
Madison St. Beaver Dam, KY
Support
(270)
274-3614
These
Sponsors
Owner: Joe
Wood
Lic.#M03450
Rice
Drugs
1209 N. Main, Beaver Dam
274-3318
ONE HOUR PHOTO
“Everyday Low Prescription Prices”
Images
Day Spa
Main Street • Hartford
270-298-9966
Monday, Wednesday,
Thursday, Friday
and Saturday
H&W
Electric, Inc.
(270) 274-3614
Rice
Drugs
HOURS:
Tues. - Fri. 9-5
Sat. 10-1
STITCHING
by VICKI
ALTERATIONS AND SEWING
270-298-0220
Vicki Alvey
Spinks Shopping Center
(Above Dollar Store)
Hartford, KY 42347
Boy Scout Caroling
at nursing homes
Boy Scout Troop 273 with leaders, family and friends walk along the halls singing carols as they go.
After caroling the Boy Scouts enjoyed a Christmas party at the VFW building.
Page A-11, December 23, 2014, Times-News
Santa visits with May Sims as she listens to the
Boy Scouts sing.
Shirley Martin and Santa listen to carols being sung by
Boy Scout Troop 273.
PHOTOS BY TREG WARD
Prime Building Lots For Sale Trap shooting places 4th
FORPRICING
SALE
CALL FORLOTS
UPDATED
•All utilities
underground
LD OLD
O
S
S SOLD SOLD
2
1
•Electric lines
underground - secure
from ice storms
•Curb & Gutter Streets
•Conveniently Located
•Country Living
in the City
0.795 ACRES
•Natural gas
•Rebates available
for new gas
appliances
4
0.659 ACRES
5
0.620 ACRES
0.900 ACRES
VICTORIA DRIVE
6
7
0.849 ACRES
0.738 ACRES
11
E
S12AL G
DIN
PEN
0.669 ACRES
0.732 ACRES
•Restricted no need to
worry that next
door neighborhood
will devalue
your home.
3
0.647 ACRES
17
18
0.760 ACRES
SOLD SOLD
9
8
0.517 ACRES
0.668 ACRES
SOLD SOLD
14
13
10
0.657 ACRES
15
0.737 ACRES
0.611 ACRES
0.689 ACRES
VIOLET LANE
16
0.818 ACRES
20
19
0.595 ACRES
0.682 ACRES
21
0.899 ACRES
0.662 ACRES
FOR
SALE
23
22
0.980 ACRES
0.871 ACRES
24
25
0.782 ACRES
0.835 ACRES
26
27
0.782 ACRES
0.835 ACRES
28
29
0.796 ACRES
0.971 ACRES
KY STATE HWY 1543
Payton Place
Payton Place
Highway 1543 • Hartford, KY
(Directly after Southdale Drive, off Hwy. 69)
COnTACT:
• All Utilities
Underground
Highway
1543
•
Hartford,
KY
• Curb and Gutter
Crawford
Located Drive, off Hwy. 69)
(Directly• Conveniently
after Southdale
• City Limits
• Restricted
CONTACT:
Contracting, Inc.
298-4884 or 256-2150
Crawford Contracting, Inc.
298-4884 or 256-2150
The Future Farmers of America trap shooting team placed fourth in the state in
competition on Oct. 25 in Cave City. The team shot a combined score of 222.
Members are Bryant Howard, Isaac Brown, Layne Midriff, John York and Clayton
Swindler.
Golf
team
honored
The
Ohio
County
golf
team honored
three seniors at
the golf banquet
in
October.
Those seniors
are
Rebecca
Robinson, Isaac
Brown
and
Hannah Cruze.
DON’T
DRINK
&
DRIVE!
It’s
the
Law!
For Sale
on Contract
3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Central heat and
air, all electric. Large covered porch.
5.8 miles out Hwy 1414
MOVE IN READY!
2500.00 down, $40000 month
Call 270-274-3645 for more details!
$
Page A-12, December 23, 2014, Times-News
Services
Offered
DUFF’S
CONSTRUCTION
Owner:
Bobby Duff
256-1054
or
274-7552
Services
Offered
Services
Offered
P I E R C E A P P L I A N C E S
UPHOLSTERY: 270- REPAIRED:
House
298-7172. tfn
calls $35, plus parts and
labor.
Call 270-275S M I L E Y ’ S 9898 or 270-314-2027.
U P H O L S T E R Y 12-23
SHOP: 318 Oakwood
Drive, Hartford. Custom
upholstery.
Serving
Ohio County since 1961.
Call 270-298-3460 or
270-298-9906. tfn
SELF STORAGE
Help
Wanted
WOODCHUCK TREE SERVICE
*** FREE ***
BEAVER DAM NURSING & REHAB CENTER, INC.
IS SEARCHING FOR FAMILY ORIENTED
• Tree Topping & Cut Trees Down • Stump Removal • Firewood for Sale
Licensed & Insured • Free Estimates • Operator Eddie Culbertson
HAVE CRANE TRUCK- 24 HOUR EMERGENCY STORM SERVICE
Now has
Portable Toilets
3
NT
VENIE
CON TIONS
A
LOC
10x20
8x15 LON
TE G
10x10 DISCOURNM
TS
5x10
ADVANCED
HEATING & COOLING
“Providing Comfort
Through Technology”
P.O. Box 355
Morgantown, KY 42261
256-2958 or
274-4636
999-4503
Phone: (270)
Fax: (270) 526-3858
License #M03021
ATTENTION!!
LAND OWNERS, FARMERS
AND CONTRACTORS!!
A&D Services offering the following at best prices!
Clearing, Drainage, Site pads - Home and Commercial;
Ponds, Lakes and Dam repair; Demolition and Hauling;
Conservation Work and MORE!!!
CONTACT A&D SERVICES
AT 270-570-4757
Licensed/Insured
oone’s
B
Building And Remodeling
FREE ESTIMATES
INSURED
• Roofs
• Room Additions
Timmy Boone
• Decks
275-4321
• Garages
mickey Boone
• Vinyl Siding
929-2713 • Replacement Windows & Doors
Fields Construction
~ Tim Fields ~
Fully Licensed & Insured • 25 Years Experience
Cell: 270-791-0348; Home: 270-274-9920
New Home Construction • Remodeling
•Roofing • Siding • Replacement Windows
•Garages and Decks
MAGANS
BACKHOE & DOZER SERVICE
Septic System Installed
Dirt Work
Firewood
Full and Part-Time
Competitive Wages
Medical, Dental, Vision, Life Insurance
Paid Time Off • Referral and Sign on Bonus Available
Please apply in person - NO PHONE CALLS ACCEPTED
BEAVER DAM NURSING & REHAB CENTER, INC.
1595 US HIGHWAY 231 SOUTH
BEAVER DAM, KY 42320
EXPERIENCED
CARPENTER
NEEDED
Mostly Interior Work
FIREWOOD
FOR SALE
270-274-3645
$45 A LOAD.
DELIVERY AVAILABLE
CALL 270-274-0025
Items
for Sale
CONSIGNMENT
CONNECTION:
We
buy and sell used
furniture. A piece or
a house full. Will do
estates.
Consignment
connection.
270274-0003
or
270792-7994.
www.
consignmentconnection.
com. tfn
THIS
AND
THAT
USED FURNITURE
AND
APPLIANCE:
Buy and sell at 123 East
Union Street, Hartford.
You deliver, we pay
more. 270-256-8018 or
270-298-7970. tfn
FOR SALE: Washers,
dryers
and
stoves
from $99; refrigerators
from $150.
Lakeside
Scratch & Dent Sales,
Morgantown. 8 a.m. to 5
p.m., Monday-Saturday.
270-526-2092 or 270999-3699. tfn
A P P L I A N C E S
REPAIRED:
House
calls
$35.
Also,
appliance parts for sale.
Call 270-314-2027 or
270-275-9898. tfn
Wanted
270-363-1818
NEW PAY SCALE
for Sale
Timber
Licensed & Insured
SRNA’S AND CMT’S
WITH SECOND AND THIRD SHIFT DIFFERENTIAL
FULL-TIME & PART-TIME * SECOND, THIRD AND WEEKEND SHIFTS
DIETARY STAFF POSITIONS AVAILABLE
270-298-9483 or 270-256-0558
Jones
septic
service
WANTED:
Standing
timber.
Certified
logger. Have references.
Satisfaction
is
our
goal. Call Eli Miller
Logging, 270-524-2967.
If no answer, we will call
back.1-31-15
Legal
Notices
Call
for more details.
Autos
for Sale
ROWE
USED CARS
50th Anniversary
1964 - 2014
BUY - SALE - TRADE
‘09 Ranger X-Cab 4x4 - 36,xxx miles..$10,995
‘08 Dodge Avenger SE............................$6,995
‘07 Fusion SE ...........................................$7,495
‘06 Chevy Aveo - 4 Door .........................$3,695
‘05 Cavalier ...............................................$3,995
‘05 SunFire................................................$3,995
‘05 Grand AM ...........................................$4,495
‘04 Focus - 4 Door ...................................$3,995
‘04 Stratus SXT ........................................$3,995
‘04 Cavalier LS .........................................$3,495
‘04 Town-Country .....................................$4,495
‘04 Taurus SES - 118,xxx miles..............$3,995
‘03 Trailblazer LS 4x4 ..............................$4,695
‘02 Ranger - 4 Cyl., Auto ........................$3,995
‘02 Montana Van - 115,xxx miles ...........$2,995
‘02 Safari SLT Van - AWD .......................$3,695
‘01 Silverado X-Cab, 4x4 ........................$6,995
‘00 F150 XLT X-Cab - 136,xxx Miles.....$4,695
‘98 F150 X-Cab, 4x4 ...............................$4,995
‘97 Ford E350 - Work Van.......................$2,995
‘95 Jeep Grand Cherokee 4x4...............$2,195
‘92 Ranger X-Cab....................................$2,195
HARLEY DAVIDSONS
‘06 1200 Custom - Black Cherry............$5,495
‘05 FXST Softail - Red.............................$7,995
‘04 Super Glide - Blue .............................$6,495
‘03 XL 1200 - Blue....................................$3,995
Warranty Available 6 Mo. to
3 Yrs. on Most Vehicles
Since 1964
6 miles west of Beaver Dam
13 miles east of Central City
On Hwy. 62
270-274-7731
800-214-8813
Wanted
to Buy
WANTED TO BUY:
Genealogy or Biblical
books, stoneware jugs,
pottery,
collectibles,
gold and silver, old
marbles. Call 270-9552101 or 270-256-3500.
12-30
Legal
Notices
Accepting Sealed Bids For
2006 Chevrolet 1500
Foster
Parents
HELP WANTED: Full
time assistant manager
position
available.
Experience
required.
Excellent
benefits.
Please apply at IGA #10,
492 South Gate Mall,
Leitchfield, KY 42754.
EOE. 12-23
HELP
WANTED:
Outside
commission
sales
representatives
for
security
system
company. Please submit
resume
to
[email protected]
ploutostechnology.com.
12-23
HELP WANTED
Cashiers - Cooks
Must be 18 or older.
No experience necessary.
Apply at W.K. Truck Stop,
Hwy 231 & WK Parkway,
Beaver Dam. Flexible Schedule
available.
E.E.O.
Professional Care Health
& Rehab Center
is looking for individuals with a generous heart, warm
spirit and genuine compassion for others.
Due to increased census we are currently seeking the
following positions:
RN’s & LPNS
CERTIFIED NURSING ASSISTANTS
ALL SHIFTS - FULL OR PART TIME
EVERY OTHER WEEKEND OFF
ALSO
FULL TIME HOUSEKEEPING AIDES
MED TECH
2ND SHIFT-FULL TIME
FULL TIME COOK
Competitive wages, excellent benefit
packages and a great place to work.
Interested candidates may bring letter
of interest and resume to: Professional
Care at 114 McMurtry Ave., Hartford,
KY or email resume and letter of
interest to:
[email protected]
or [email protected]
Equal Opportunity Employer
New Parts & A/C Service
Ohio County Water District
Foster
Parents
Help
Wanted
NOW THAT WE HAVE YOUR ATTENTION!!!
ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A FAMILY ORIENTED JOB!!!
WE HAVE THE PERFECT PLACE FOR YOU!
A&P
274-5554
Help
Wanted
Vin# 1GCEC14Z76Z238122
206,047 Miles
Bids must be in the Ohio County Water District
Office (124 East Washington St., Hartford) before
4:00 PM January 26, 2015 to be opened at the
January 26, 2015 Board Meeting. The truck is
sold as is.
For more information contact
Walt Beasley (270) 298-7704.
The OCWD reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids.
Start Your New Year Right
In A Successful Career With
SCOTT & MURPHY
INC.
Now Scheduling Interviews For Qualified Candidates
COMMERCIAL CONCRETE DIVISION
•CONCRETE FORM CARPENTERS
•RUBBER-TIRE BACKHOE OPERATOR (CASE 580)
•SLAB/CURB CONCRETE FINISHERS
•CONCRETE FOREMAN
•CURB MACHINE OPERATOR
CIVIL DIVISION
•FINISH-GRADE OPERATORS (DOZER/EXCAVATOR)
•TRI-AXLE DUMP TRUCK DRIVER/LABORER
HEAVY/HIGHWAY DIVISION
•BRIDGE FORM CARPENTERS
•LATTICE BOOM CRANE OPERATORS
(10+YEARS EXPERIENCE)
BUILDING CONSTRUCTION DIVISION
•GENERAL BUILDING SUPERINTENDENTS
•GENERAL TRADES CARPENTERS
*MUST HAVE 5 YEARS SPECIFIED EXPERIENCE
IN POSITION BEING APPLIED FOR**
Background check & drug screen performed.
Year-round work, health/life insurance,
401k/Profit Sharing Program.
Strong prior work references required.
Pre-employment physical required.
Apply in Person At:
2335 Barren River Road,
Bowling Green, KY 42101
M-F 6:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.; Sat. 7:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
Phone (270) 781-9944
-EOE-
Page A-13, December 23, 2014, Times-News
Legal
Notices
Legal
Notices
Legal
Notices
NOTICE OF INTENTION TO MINE
Pursuant to Application Number 892-7005 NW
In accordance with the provisions of KRS 350.055, notice is hereby given that Armstrong Coal Company, Inc., 407 Brown Road, Madisonville, Kentucky 42431 has applied for a surface coal mining and reclamation operation affecting 17.3 acres located
0.6 miles west of Centertown in Ohio County.
The permit area is located 0.06 miles east of the intersection of State Route 69 and
Wallace Loop Road and located 0.56 miles east of the East Fork of Williams Creek.
The proposed operation is located on the Equality U.S.G.S. 7 1/2 minute quadrangle
map. The surface area to be disturbed is owned by Western Land Company LLC, Cyprus Creek Land Company and Donald & Mimi Mabrey. The operation will involve
the construction and maintenance of a haul road. The operation will not involve closure or relocation of any public road.
The application has been filed for public inspection at the Division of Mine Reclamation and Enforcement’s Madisonville Regional Office, 625 Hospital Drive, Madisonville, KY 42431. Written comments, objections, or requests for a permit conference
must be filed with the Director, Division of Mine Permits, #2 Hudson Hollow, Frankfort, KY 40601.
CITY OF HARTFORD, KENTUCKY
ORDINANCE NO. 2014-05
AN ORDINANCE REPEALING SECTIONS OF ORDINANCE NO. 2013-06, COMMONLY REFERRED TO AS THE “OCCUPATIONAL LICENSE TAX ORDINANCE”,
APPROVED AT SECOND READING OF THE HARTFORD CITY COUNCIL ON
JUNE 27, 2013, RELATING TO THE LEVY AND COLLECTION OF THE NET
PROFITS TAX, AND AMENDING SECTION 13 OF ORDINANCE NO. 2013-06 REGARDING USE OF OCCUPATIONAL TAX FUNDS.
WHEREAS, the Hartford City Council deems it necessary and desirable to repeal
certain sections of Ordinance No. 2013-06, the “Occupational License Tax Ordinance”, which impose a net profits tax on persons and business entitites conducting
businesses, occupations, and professions within the City of Hartford, and
WHEREAS, the City Council also deems it necessary to amend the original ordinance regarding approval for use of Occupational Tax funds, and
WHEREAS, the city of Hartford desires to continue assessing and collecting an
Occupational License Tax on all wages and compensation paid or payable to the city
for work done or services rendered and intends to keep all remaining provisions of
Ordinance No. 2013-06 in full effect.
NOW THEREFORE, be it ordained by the city council of the City of Hartford, Kentucky as follows:
1. The following sections of Ordinance No. 2013-06, enacted at its second reading
on June 27, 2013 and relating to the occupational license tax on net profits are hereby
repealed in their entirety:
a) Occupational License Tax Payment Required, Section 3(1)(b), (2)(c), and (3)(a)
(d)(e) and (g).
b) Apportionment, Section 4(1) and (3).
c) Returns Required, Section 6(2) and (5).
d) Refunds, Section 8(3).
e) Federal Audit Provisions, Section 9(1)(b).
f) Penalties, Section 12(1).
2. Section 13 of Ordinance No. 2013-06 is hereby amended as follows:
“All money derived from the license taxes under the provisions of this ordinance
shall be paid to the city and placed in an occupational tax fund. Use of the occupational tax funds shall be determined by consensus of at least four (4) members of
a quorum of five (5) members of the city council, or consensus of at least five (5)
members of a quorum of six (6) members of the city council [majority consensus of
the city council].”
3. All other sections and provisions contained in Ordinance No. 2013-06 remain in
full force and effect.
This ordinance shall be in full force and effect upon adoption and publication as
according to law.
INTRODUCED AND PUBLICLY READ at first reading this 20th day of November,
2014.
PUBLICLY READ AND ADOPTED at second reading this 12th day of December,
2014.
CHARLOTTE HENDRICKS, MAYOR
ATTEST:
LISA MARTIN, CITY CLERK
NOTICE OF
MASTER COMMISSIONER SALES
JANUARY 2nd, 2015
By virtue of judgments and orders of sale rendered in the
following cases, I will on January 2nd, 2015, at 1:00 p.m.
CST., expose to sale at public auction at the Courthouse
door in Hartford, Ohio County, Kentucky, the following
properties. Buyers are responsible for reviewing the Court
records and the actual Judgment and Order of Sale entered
in each Court record to determine if there are other encumbrances associated with each property. The Commissioners Office, Circuit Court, and counsel do not warrant
title. The official Court record may be viewed at the Ohio
Circuit Court Clerk’s Office.
BID, DUE IN 30 DAYS
PROPERTY: 224 Hope Street, Beaver Dam, OHIO COUNTY, KY:
A certain tract or parcel of land lying and being in Ohio
County, Kentucky, and more particularly descried as follows. Lot 38 in Goshen Meadows Subdivision as depicted
on that plat of record in Plat Cabinet B, Slide 95 and 169, to
which plats reference is made for a more particular description of the property herein conveyed, said property being
subject to those protective covenants for Goshen Meadows
Subdivision which are of record in Miscellaneous Book
39, page 195, in the Office of the Ohio County Clerk. Including a 2000 Patriot 56’ x 28’ Manufactured Home, VIN:
LPP9862BAIN.
1. TAX EASE LIEN INVESTMENTS 1, LLC VS. CAROLYN SUE FELDMAN, ET AL; CIVIL ACTION NO. 09CI-00508
AMOUNT OF JUDGMENT: $3,487.41
TERMS OF SALE: CASH OR 10% DOWN AND GOOD
AND SUFFICIENT SURETY BOND FOR BALANCE OF
BID, DUE IN 30 DAYS
PROPERTY: 486 STATE ROUTE 54 W., FORDSVILLE,
OHIO COUNTY, KY:
Beginning at a point, a set stake located in the South right
of way of Highway 54; said point being located 450 feet east
of the Baize heirs land; thence in a Southern direction, a
new line, 216 feet to a point, a set stake; thence in an eastern direction, a new line, 100 feet to a set stake; thence in a
Northern direction, a new line 216 feet to a set stake located
in the South right of way of Highway 54; thence with the
South right of way of Highway 54, 100 feet to the point of
beginning and containing 21,600 square feet.
4. CALIBER HOME LOANS, INC. VS. MARGIE A. COTTON, ET AL; CIVIL ACTION NO. 13-CI-00064
AMOUNT OF JUDGMENT: $116,642.97
TERMS OF SALE: CASH OR 10% DOWN AND GOOD
AND SUFFICIENT SURETY BOND FOR BALANCE OF
BID, DUE IN 30 DAYS
PROPERTY: 2059 LIBERTY ROAD, Beaver Dam, KY:
A certain tract or parcel of land located near Beaver Dam,
Ohio County, Kentucky, and bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a stake on the North side of Beaver Dam
Liberty Church Road 600’ East of Cross Road, thence N. 12
degrees East 600’ to a stake; thence S. 78 degrees E. 200’ to
a stake; thence S. 12 degrees West 740’ to a stake on North
side of Beaver Dam Liberty Road, thence with said road to
the beginning, containing 3.1 acres more or less. Subject
to any and all easements, restrictions, conditions, and legal
highways of record and/or in existence.
2. CITIMORTGAGE, INC. VS. VALE RHEA MADDOX
DURHAM, ET AL; CIVIL ACTION NO. 14-CI-00133
AMOUNT OF JUDGMENT: $157,685.32
TERMS OF SALE: CASH OR 10% DOWN AND GOOD
AND SUFFICIENT SURETY BOND FOR BALANCE OF
BID, DUE IN 30 DAYS
PROPERTY: 210 SNODGRASS LANE, CENTERTOWN,
OHIO COUNTY, KY:
A tract or parcel of land lying in Ohio County, State of
Kentucky and being on the North side of Old Highway 69
(now a county road) 2 miles West of Centertown and more
particularly described as follows: Beginning at an iron pin
(#2136) 22.5 feet North of the center of Old Highway 69
(now a county road) at the Southwest corner of the parent tract; thence with the North side of said road North
65 degrees, 19 minutes and 00 seconds East for 271.61 feet
and North 62 degrees, 45 minutes and 45 seconds East for
221.72 feet to an iron pin (#2136); thence North 21 degrees,
48 minutes and 00 seconds West for 84.68 feet to an iron
pin (#2136) 33.0 feet Southeast of the center of a railroad
tract; thence South 65 degrees 57 minutes and 15 seconds
West for 495.55 feet with the Southeast side of said railroad to an iron pin (#2136); thence South 23 degrees, 37
minutes and 00 seconds East for 100.00 feet to the point
of beginning and containing 1.0778 acres. Being Tract I of
the survey of Keith L. Biggerstaff, Registered Land Surveyor
#2136, dated March 20, 1994, a copy of which is attached
marked “Exhibit A”.
5. COMMONWEALTH COMMUNITY BANK, INC. VS.
MIKE COTTON, ET AL; CIVIL ACTION NO. 14-CI00334
AMOUNT OF JUDGMENT: $17,257.93
TERMS OF SALE: CASH OR GOOD AND SUFFICIENT
SURETY BOND FOR FULL BALANCE OF BID, DUE IN
30 DAYS
PROPERTY: 5587 STATE ROUTE 764, WHITESVILLE,
OHIO COUNTY, KY:
A certain tract or parcel of land lying and being in Ohio
County, Kentucky, and on the Pleasant Ridge-Whitesville
Road, and more particularly described as follows: BEGINNING at a stone on the North side of the right-of-way line
of the Pleasant Ridge-Whitesville Road 8 feet W. of James
Bartlett line; thence running W. with the right-of-way line
of the aforesaid road 75 feet to a stone; thence N. parallel
with James Bartlett line 200 feet to a stone; thence at a right
angle to the right running 75 feet E. to a stone 8 feet W.
of James Bartlett line; thence at a right angle to the right
and running parallel with James Bartlett line 200 feet to the
point of beginning, containing less than one-half (1/2) acre.
3. TAMMAC HOLDINGS CORPORATION VS. DEAN
PHARIS, ET AL; CIVIL ACTION NO. 14-CI-00268
AMOUNT OF JUDGMENT: $76,940.57
TERMS OF SALE: CASH OR 10% DOWN AND GOOD
AND SUFFICIENT SURETY BOND FOR BALANCE OF
These properties are to be sold to satisfy judgment, interest,
attorney fees, delinquent ad valorem taxes, costs of sale, and
costs of the action. The purchaser(s) may pay cash or will
be required to give bond for amount of bid, less required
deposit, if any, and with approved surety upon the bond,
having the force and effect of a judgment and bearing
interest at the rate of 12% per annum, with balance payable in 30 days, subject to announcements day of sale.
Office of the Master Commissioner
Ohio Circuit Court
Legal
Notices
Legal
Notices
Legal
Notices
The Ohio County Water District is Accepting Sealed Bids for Carbon Replacement or
Regeneration of 60,000 LBS total, to remove the old carbon from 3 Vessels and replaced with new or regenerated carbon back into 3 Vessels (approx 20,000 LBS each)
The new Carbon must meet the minimum of the following Specifications:
SPECIFICATIONS:
Product Specification:
FILTRA 4300
Value
Iodine Number (mg/g), min.
Moisture, weight %, max.
Effective size, mm
Test Method
900
ASTM D4607
2
ASTM D2867
0.8-1.0
ASTM D2862
Uniformity Coefficient, max.
2.1
ASTM D2862
Abrasion No., min.
78
AWWA B604
Trace Capacity Number, (mg/
cc), min.
10
TM-79, TM-85 (converted to
TCN)
Screen Size (US Sieve),
weight %
*Larger than No. 8, max.
15
ASTM D2862
*Smaller than No. 30, max.
4
ASTM D2862
Typical Property
Value
Apparent Density, g/cc, min.
0.56
ASTM D2854
Ash
8%
ASTM D2866
Water Extractables
<1%
AWWA B604
Non-Wettable
<1%
AWWA B604
Product Specification;
CMR 300
Value
Test Method
Iodine Number (mg/g),
min.
a) 800 if spent is >500
b) +250 if spent is <550
a&b includes virgin GAC
make-up as required
Moisture, weight %, max.
TN-4, ASTM D4607
8
TM-1, ASTM D2867
Uniformity Coefficient, max.
2.1
TM-47, ASTM D2862
Abrasion No. Min.
70
TM-9, AWWA B604
15
TM-8, ASTM D2862
Screen Size (US Sieve),
weight %
*Larger than No. 8, max.
*Smaller than No. 30, max.
Apparent Density, g/cc, min.
4
TM-8, ASTM D2862
0.2
TM-7, ASTM D2854
The GAC must be a 100% reagglomerated bituminous coal based product, and the coal
shall be mined and the corresponding GAC manufactured in the United States of America.
The GAC product designated by the Bidder as the material to be supplied for this bid shall
have five (5) years of history of use in municipal drinking water facilities in North America.
Bidder shall submit references per Section 7.
The GAC shall be manufactured in a facility certified to conform to the Management System
Standard: ISO 9001:2000 or later quality standards and at the specific plant or site holding
such certification. A copy of the valid certificate must be submitted with bid, with the understanding by all parties that ANSI/NSF assures the GAC against toxicological hazards only.
ISO 9001:2000 or later certification assures the GAC of consistent conformance to state
product quality and standards listed in the specifications.
The GAC shall comply with AWWA B604, latest edition.
The GAC shall conform to the requirements of the NSF/ANSI 61 Drinking Water System
Components - Health Effects standard
Proof of a Minimum $1 Million Liability Insurance must be provided, all Kentucky State and
Federal Laws, that apply must be met. The OCWD reserves the right to accept or reject any
and all bids. Bids must be in the OCWD Office, (124 East Washington Street, Hartford, KY)
by January 26, 2015, Bids will be opened at 5:00 PM January 26, 2015. For more information contact Walt Beasley at [email protected] or (270) 298-7704.
CITY OF HARTFORD, KENTUCKY
ORDINANCE NO. 14-07
AN ORDINANCE TO CLOSE A PORTION OF BUFFALO ALLEY LOCATED BETWEEN
US HIGHWAY 231 AND APPLE ALLEY.
FINDINGS OF FACT
WHEREAS, at the request of Marty Shephard it has been determined that a portion of Buffalo
Alley located between U.S. Highway 231 and Apple Alley, being more particularly described below,
will serve a more useful public purpose if the herein described portion of said street is closed and
no longer used as a public right of way; and
WHEREAS, the City Council identified the property owners in or abutting the portion of Buffalo Alley to be closed to be Marty L. Shephard and Cortney R. Shephard, husband and wife; and
WHEREAS, pursuant to KRS 82.405(2)(b) and (c), written notice was provided to the property
owners and they have agreed to the road closing, as evidenced by a signed and notarized consent
attached hereto as Exhibit A.
NOW THEREFORE, IT IS HEREBY ORDAINED by the City of Hartford, Kentucky as follows:
1. The preambles to this Ordinance are found to be true and correct and are hereby incorporated
by reference.
2. The following portion of Buffalo Alley shall be hereinafter closed and discontinued as a public way, street, and/or thoroughfare, and shall no longer be maintained by the City of Hartford,
Kentucky:
A tract or parcel of land lying in Ohio County, State of Kentucky and being located in the City
of Hartford and more particularly described as follows:
BEGINNING at a P.K. Nail, said point being 40.0 feet northeast of the center of Main Street
(U.S. Highway 231) and being 239.5 feet Northwest of the center of Union Street, said P.K. Nail also
being the western most corner to Marty L. Shephard (D.B. 398, P. 349, Tract 2) (Note: All bearings
stated are based on State Plane South (NAD 83)); thence North 52 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds
East, a distance of 198.00 feet with Shephard’s Tract 2 and Tract 5 to a point in the southwest rightof-way of Apple Alley being located N 38 degrees 01 minutes 04 seconds W, a distance of 15.40
feet from reference pin (a 1/2 inch rebar (19 inches in length) (LS #2136) (s)); thence North 66
degrees 47 minutes 32 seconds West, a distance of 10.27 feet a 1/2 inch rebar (19 inches in length)
(LS #2136) (s) at the southwest corner of the City of Hartford (D.B. 186, P. 186) and the Southeast
corner of Marty Shephard (D.B. 345, P. 36); thence South 52 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds West,
a distance of 193.00 feet with said Shephard to a 1/2 inch rebar (19 inches in length) (LS #2136)
(s) 40 feet northeast of the center of Main Street; thence South 37 degrees 39 minutes 25 seconds
East, a distance of 9.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; said described tract containing 0.040
acre as per survey by Keith L. Biggerstaff, PLS #2136, field date November 18, 2014, plat signed
November 19, 2014. Said 0.040 acre tract being Buffalo Alley between Market Street (now Main
Stret) and Apple Alley as shown on the Plat of the City of Hartford in Plat Cabinet “B”, slide 254 in
the records of Ohio County Clerk.
3. The City Attorney is hereby directed to take any and all necessary, and/or all of her actions
with respect to this ordinance are hereby ratified pursuant to this ordinance to close said street and
to convey the described portion to Marty L. Shephard and Cortney R. Shephard in exchange for
releasing the City from any and all further maintenance responsibilities for the closed portion of
the street, and allowing the City to retain an easement for the maintenance and repair of any sewer,
water, or other utility lines.
4. The City Council authorizes and directs the Mayor to sign any and all documents necessary
to effectuate the intent of this ordinance.
5. This ordinance shall be effective upon its passage and publication according to law.
6. If any section, subsection, sentence, clause, or phrase, or portion of this Ordinance is for any
reason held invalid or unconstitutional by any Court of competent jurisdiction such portion shall
be deemed a separate, distinct, and independent provision and such holding shall not affect the
validity of the remaining portions. All ordinances or parts of ordinances in conflict herewith are,
to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed.
SIGNED AND APPROVED this 12th day of December, 2014
Charlotte Hendricks, Mayor
CITY OF HARTFORD, KENTUCKY
ATTEST:
Lisa Martin, Clerk
CITY OF HARTFORD, KENTUCKY
Publicly read and approved at first reading on the 20th day of November, 2014
Publicly read and adopted at second reading on the 12th day of December, 2014.
Lisa Martin, CLERK
Page A-14, December 23, 2014, Times-News
Legal
Notices
Legal
Notices
Legal
Notices
Real
Estate
Real
Estate
FOR SALE: 2 1/2 acres HOUSE FOR SALE: In
on Hwy. 629, off Hwy. McHenry. 3 bedroom, 2
54, Fordsville. $14,900. bath, dining room, large
Call 270-422-1234. tfn
living room, concrete
foundation, two car
FOUR TRACTS LEFT: detached garage. Lots
4-10 acres, Hwy. 505
of privacy, great starter
S. Water and electric
available. Owner will home. Priced to sell!
finance. Call Malcolm Asking $49,000. Call for
FOR SALE: 8 acres on Barnes, 270-274-9328. info: 270-775-5343 or
270-256-1925. 12-23
Park Ridge Road and tfn
Cecil Lane.
Stream,
pasture.
All utilities
available.
$29,700.
$1,700 down, $300 per
month. 270-422-1234.
tfn
FOR SALE: 3.4 acres.
Hwy. 340 and Dockery
Ridge Road.
Open
pasture, some trees,
pond, utilities available.
(Neafus area.) $18,900.
$1,000 down, $211 per
month. 270-422-1234.
tfn
Ohio County Water District
Accepting Sealed Bid
Engine: 28-30 HP Diesel
Drive: Traction Drive
Bucket: 24” with Teeth
Blade: Floating
Cab: Bid with and without Cab
Ohio County Water District will trade in, toward purchase price,
A Caterpillar Model 303-5
Bids must be received in the Ohio County Water District Office,
(124 East Washington Street, Hartford, Kentucky)
by 4:00 P.M. January 26, 2015. Bids will be opened at
OCWD Board Meeting at 5:00 P.M. January 26, 2015.
The Ohio County Water District reserves the right to accept or
reject any and all bids.
For more information contact Walt Beasley (270) 298-7704
ORDINANCE 2014-06
AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF HARTFORD, KENTUCKY, A MUNICIPALITY
OF THE FIFTH CLASS, ESTABLISHING A FOUR-WAY STOP AT THE INTERSECTION OF MCMURTRY AVENUE AND OLD MAIN STREET.
WHEREAS, it has been determined by the City of Hartford, Kentucky, that there is a
need for a four-way stop at the intersection of McMurtry Avenue and Old Main Street
to promote reasonable and safe conditions at said intersection; and,
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED by the City Council of Hartford, Kentucky:
SECTION 1: Stop signs shall be placed at all intersections of McMurtry Avenue
and Old Main Street in such manner as to cause all vehicular traffic entering such
intersections from any direction to come to a complete stop prior to traveling through
the intersection of said streets.
SECTION 2: Any person violating this Ordinance by failing to obey the stop signs
at the intersections of McMurtry Avenue and Old Main Street shall be fined Twenty
Dollars ($20.00) for each violation.
SECTION 3: This Ordinance shall be subject to the provisions of Title VII of the
Code of Ordinances of the City of Hartford, Kentucky.
SECTION 4: Any ordinance or part of any Ordinance in conflict herewith is hereby
repealed.
This ordinance shall become effective immediately upon passage and publication.
Introduced and publicly read on the first reading on this 20th day of November,
2014.
Publicly read and finally approved on the second reading on this the 12th day of
December, 2014.
APPROVED:
CHARLOTTE HENDRICKS, Mayor
ATTEST:
LISA MARTIN, City Clerk
Real
Estate
HOUSE FOR SALE
FOR SALE: 14.9 acres
with metal building,
30’x40’, plus lean-to.
HVAC, septic, water
and electric.
Hoover
Hill area.
270-2560030. 12-23
HOUSE FOR SALE: 3
bedrooms, 2 full baths.
Curtains
included.
Partly furnished. Movein ready. Call Cookie
Hudson, 270-256-5969.
151
Center
Drive,
off Highland Drive.
$60,000.
FOR
SALE:
40
acres off Mt. Pleasant
Road, south of Rosine,
Kentucky (PVA No. 11413).
Contact Wayne
Priest,
270-781-6500.
P.O. Box 770, Bowling
Green, KY 42102. 12-31
LANDMARK REALTY
LLC: For all your real
estate
and
auction
needs. Homes, land and
farms. Visit our website
at www.landmarkpros.
com. Call 270-999-1540
or email [email protected]
gmail.com.
Randy
Arnold, broker. tfn
Buckle
up!
CITY OF HARTFORD, KENTUCKY
ORDINANCE NO. 14-08
2 bedroom, 1 bath with huge back yard. Recently completely
updated. Small garage, very low utilities, covered deck. All appliances stay and possibly all furniture if interested. $65,000,
won’t last long.
270-775-5439
Tim Gooch, Principal Broker/Auctioneer
Kathy Gooch, GRI, Realtor
270-927-8997 Office
270-927-8997 Office
270-929-3049
Kathy
270-929-3049
Cell Cell
270-316-6257
Tim
270-927-8919
FaxCell
270-927-8919 Fax
www.hancockrealestateandauction.com
Saturday, June 25
10:00 (CST)
275 Easton Cabot Road
$149,000
Approximately 40 acres, mostly wooeded! Peaceful and scenic. Three bedrooms, 1.5 bath, 2 car detached garage
with additional bath. Beautiful hardwood floors! Screened back porch. An
unfinished cabin on property can be used
for storage or hunting retreat. Cabin has
plumbing and electricity. #56778 Call
Tim or Kathy Gooch 929-3049
Hancock County Fairgrounds
WOODWORKING TOOLS,
GUNS,
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
& MUCH MORE!
Sellers: Jeff and Jan Richardson et al
Terms and Conditions: Cash or good
check day of auction.
No Buyers Premium
www.hancockrealestateandauction.com
881 St. Rt. 54
$69,000
Neat and Clean, move-in ready! This
well-kept, Amish-built home has 6 inch
walls, insulated for Northern Indiana.
Easy to Heat and Cool. Many updated
features and fixtures. 24x24 detached
garage with shelving and 220 electric
service. Garage has A/C and heat. Better
take a look at this one. #56047 Call Tim
or Kathy Gooch 929-3049
9420 State Route 1700
$79,000
Shows like a new home! Covered front porch with beautiful
view of countryside! Spotless clean, newer manufactured home
(2010) with vinyl flooring throughout! Very attractive neutral colors. Kitchen appliances stay with home..refrigerator, dishwasher, and gas stove. Open floor plan, split bedrooms, Covered
metal carport. Amish-built storage building, with walkway from
back porch. Additional storage in second storage building. Four
and one-half miles to Hwy. 54 in Ohio County. See our website
for additional photos! MLS #64940. Call Tim/Kathy Gooch 270929-3049
AN ORDINANCE TO CLOSE A PORTION OF WHITE AVENUE LOCATED BETWEEN
GILLESPIE AVENUE AND MCMURTRY AVENUE.
FINDINGS OF FACT
ATTEST:
Lisa Martin, Clerk
CITY OF HARTFORD, KENTUCKY
Charlotte Hendricks, Mayor
CITY OF HARTFORD, KENTUCKY
Publicly read and approved at first reading on the 20th day of November, 2014
Publicly read and adopted at second reading on the 12th day of December, 2014.
Best wishes for the happiest of holidays!
Five Star
Realty
MERRY CHRISTMAS FROM OUR
HOME TO YOUR HOME
Alan Maddox 270-256-1679
Gina Bennett 270-256-1157
Sindy Hancock 270-256-4394
Ashley Maggard 270-256-4394
Website: www.maddox5star.com
PUBLIC NOTICE
Pursuant to 405 KAR
8:010, Section 16(5), the
following is a summary of
permitting decisions made
by the Department for
Natural Resources, Division of Mine Permits with
respect to applications to
conduct surface coal mining and reclamation operations in Ohio County.
ARMSTRONG
COAL
COMPANY INC 8929000
11/18/2014
Wanted
Lisa Martin, CLERK
Hay
for Sale
Hay
Wanted
Cattle
Wanted
FOR SALE:
Round
and square bales of
orchard grass, fescue
and red clover hay with
net wrapping. 270-2763209 or 270-256-8636.
tfn
WANTED TO BUY:
Hay. Delivered to my
farm, 468 Chiggerville
Lane, Beaver Dam.
Malcolm Barnes. 270274-9328. tfn
CATTLE
WANTED:
Will buy and pick up on
farm. No commission on
trucking. Call 270-5479889. tfn
For
Rent
WANTED: Want the
young man that came
with his wife and two
children that wanted to
mow grass and use my
loan to put my house
roof on and repair floors,
sheetrock, new bath and
all. Call Adah Young,
270-274-8288.
427
Neafus Road, Horse
Branch, KY 42349. 1223
CROSSROADS
WHEREAS, at the request of Ohio County Hospital, Inc., it has been determined that a portion
of White Avenue located between Gillespie Street and McMurtry Avenue, being more particularly
described below, will serve a more useful public purpose if the herein described portion of said
street is closed and no longer used as a public right of way; and
WHEREAS, the City Council identified the property owners in or abutting the portion of White
Avenue to be closed to be Ohio County Hospital Corporation; and
WHEREAS, pursuant to KRS 82.405(2)(b) and (c), written notice was provided to the property
owner and it has agreed to the road closing, as evidenced by a signed and notarized consent attached hereto as Exhibit A.
NOW THEREFORE, IT IS HEREBY ORDAINED by the City of Hartford, Kentucky as follows:
1. The preambles to this Ordinance are found to be true and correct and are hereby incorporated
by reference.
2. The following portion of White Avenue shall be hereinafter closed and discontinued as a
public way, street, and/or thoroughfare, and shall no longer be maintained by the City of Hartford,
Kentucky:
A certain tract of land located in the city of Hartford, Ohio County, Kentucky, and being 15’ to
each side of the described centerline as follows:
Beginning at point in the centerline of White Avenue, 15’ from the centerline of Gillespie Avenue. Said point also being located S 7 degrees 22’ 00” W, a distance of 114.42 feet from an iron
pin (LS #3862) (f) being the southwest corner to Ohio County Hospital, Tract 2 (0.527 acre) as depicted on plat titled, “Ohio County Hospital Consolidation, dated 8/31/10, by William T. Crume,
PLS #3862. (Note: All bearings stated are based on Kentucky State Plane South (NAD 83)). Thence
with said White Avenue centerline S 82 degrees 32’ 38” E, a distance of 313.72 feet to a point being
locaated S 62 degrees 19’ 52” E, a distance of 45.78 feet from an iron pin (LS #3862) (f) being the
southwest corner to Ohio County Hospital as depicted on plat titled, “Ohio County Hospital”,
dated 09-25-13, by William T. Crume, PLS #3862.
For clarification purposes, the portion of White Avenue herein closed to the public does not
extend all the way to McMurtry Avenue.
3. The City Attorney is hereby directed to take any and all necessary, and/or all of her actions
with respect to this ordinance are hereby ratified pursuant to this ordinance to close said street and
to convey the described portion to Ohio County Hospital Corporation in exchange for releasing
the City from any and all further maintenance responsibilities for the closed portion of the street,
and allowing the City to retain an easement for the maintenance and repair of any sewer, water, or
other utility lines.
4. The City Council authorizes and directs the Mayor to sign any and all documents necessary
to effectuate the intent of this ordinance.
5. This ordinance shall be effective upon its passage and publication according to law, or January
1, 2015, whichever is later.
6. If any section, subsection, sentence, clause, or phrase, or portion of this Ordinance is for any
reason held invalid or unconstitutional by any Court of competent jurisdiction, such portion shall
be deemed a separate, distinct, and independent provision and such holding shall not affect the
validity of the remaining portions. All ordinances or parts of ordinances in conflict herewith are,
to the extent of such conflict, hereby repealed.
SIGNED AND APPROVED this 12th day of December, 2014
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Owner financing. 270287-3301. 12-23
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today!
Page A-15, December 23, 2014, Times-News
Page A-16, December 23, 2014, Times-News
Little Bit of Everything
By: Dave McBride
[email protected]
This is for our children and anybody else
interested in reading
about the beauty and
wonder of Santa Claus.
It’s about those long,
white streaks left in our
distant skies by huge jet
aircraft flying at incredible speeds. It’s about
a delivery service that
would leave UPS and
Fed Ex in its dust.
And it’s not for anybody
who does not believe in
the magic of Christmas,
Yule trees hovering over
a plate of cookies or
Christmas wishes delivered by little minds and
not cell phones.
This old man believed
in Santa Claus as a little
boy and he still believes.
And the reason for that
is that he’s never been
allowed to forget. At
about the time some
doubts were trying to
sneak in, beautiful little
nieces and nephews beat
them to it. They brought
a revival and freshness
to what he once experienced.
And maybe - just maybe there was a Scroogelike influence messing
with his mind a few
years later but that
was beaten back by the
arrival of his own children and how they embraced Santa Claus with
a religious-like fervor.
Everything was again
okay and he marked the
Christmas season with
an energy that could
only be matched by his
responsibility and desire to support them.
And the cycle continued. One 12-month
period after another
passed right on schedule and soon there were
grandchildren - grandchildren whose love for
Santa Claus and all he
stands for blossomed
in a way that made not
believing a distant ugliness that would forever
remain distant.
Let me tell you something, little guys and
little girls. The day you
stop believing in Santa
Claus - if, sadly you
ever do - will be the day
your life will lose much
of its meaning. So why
would you even want to
think about giving up on
one of the great wonders
of this world. What is it
we’ve heard about the
seven wonders of the
world? Hey, how could
they have left Santa
out?
I earlier mentioned
those long, white streaks
left in the sky by big airplanes. Did you know
Santa and his reindeer
can move faster than
any jet or rocket? Just
think about it.
Here’s a bearded, jolly man traveling in an
open sleigh faster than
any jet-powered aircraft
and his red and white
cap never flies off. He
doesn’t rely on radar or
compasses and gets exactly where he needs to
be, exactly when he’s
supposed to be there.
And talk about a man
with a memory. My
goodness, there is not
a computer made today
that can come anywhere
close to remembering
what Santa Claud has to
handle. Do you think he
has all of those names
and addresses written
down and tells Rudolph
to follow his directions?
Not at all! Every name
of every child and where
that child lives is in his
mind before he leaves
the North Pole and he
has the ability to be in
millions of places at the
same time. No, I don’t
know how he does that,
but I‘ve got a pretty good
idea. I think it has something to do with you believing he can do it.
But there’s something
else you need to believe.
Santa Claus is not perfect. Sure, I realize
you’ve heard all of those
fantastic stories and
how some youngsters
get everything they ask
for on Christmas morning. The jolly old fellow
does his very best, but
there simply are some
requests he cannot fill.
And there are a lot of
reasons for that, but we
won’t go into that right
now. I can, however, say
that you’re partly responsible for sometimes
not getting what you
ask for.
You see - and this is
pretty difficult to explain - your mom and
dad have to have what
we call backing for everything you ask for on
Christmas. You write
letters to Santa or you
talk to one of his helpers in the shopping mall
and everything has to
come together. Mom and
dad have a fairly close
connection with Santa
and they almost always
work together. Your
mom and dad would
love for you to have everything you ask for,
but sometimes it simply
cannot happen.
What you need to do is
keep believing in Santa Claus and some day
you’ll have that great
connection with him and
...from all of us
you’ll come to underUs
stand...From
why some
things
atAll Of
happen and some
don’t.
At
AgriGro
It’s never
a lackFarm
of love
AgriGro
Farm
or caring Center
on the part of
Center
Santa or your
parents. I guess that’s about all
this old man has to say
at this time. Just remember that he’s lived
through a lot of Christmases, has made a lot
of Christmas wishes
and has felt some stinging
disappointments.
But there will be other
Christmases, other opportunities, and other
very happy times in
your life. Santa will see
to that.
OHIO COUNTY WEATHER
Last Week’s Almanac: Dec. 8 - Dec. 14
Day
Hi
Low
Precip.
Monday
53
45
0.01 in.
Tuesday
53
35
0.02 in.
Wednesday
36
30
0.0 in.
Thursday
34
30
0.0 in.
Friday
37
31
0.0 in.
Saturday
37
28
0.0 in.
Sunday
45
25
0.0 in.
Total Precip. for December 1.54 inches;
Yearly 44.56 inches.
Lake Conditions
The pool elevation at Lake Barkley is 355.1
Kentucky Lake pool elevation is 354.9 above
the dam and below is 303.1.
Extended Forecast: Dec. 24 - Dec. 30
WEDS. Dec. 24
Hi: 51
Lo: 36
Scattered
Rain
THURS: Dec. 25
SUN: Dec. 28
Hi: 43
Lo: 30
Scattered
Rain
TUES: Dec. 30
Hi: 36
Lo: 21
Partly
Cloudy
MON: Dec. 29
Hi: 44
Lo: 29
Partly
Cloudy
FRI: Dec. 26
Hi: 53
Lo: 44
Mostly
Sunny
Hi: 47
Lo: 34
Mostly
Sunny
SAT: Dec. 27
Hi: 49
Lo: 32
Mostly
Cloudy
Moon Phase:
Waxing
Crescent
3% of
Full
God Bless Your Family
at Christmas and the Coming
New Year!
...From All Of Us At
GodBless
Bless
God
this Agri InC.
er
This
t
n
Christmas and
Ce
m
Christmas
and
ar
F
Gro
coming New
Coming
Year!New
Year!
Monday - Friday 7:30 - 4:30
100 Agri Gro Drive
Hartford, KY
100 Agri Gro Drive - Hartford, KY
Monday - Friday 7:30 - 4:30
Saturday 7:30 - 12:00
270-298-3296
Saturday 7:30 - 12:00
270-298-3296
BE YOUR OWN
SECRET SANTA.
10 BEST REASONS WHY
NOT TO ADVERTISE
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8. DON’T ADVERTISE. Overlook the fact that advertising is
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9. DON’T ADVERTISE. Be sure not to provide an adequate
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