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Ames
december 2014
50010-50014
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December
TREASURES
AMES RESIDENTS SHARE THEIR
CHRISTMAS COLLECTIONS
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DECEMBER | 2014
Ames Living
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WELCOME
Collections
of memories
few decades ago I had a business partner in a local automotive
A
photo publication that is now known to many of you as Auto
Trader, or maybe better known today as autotrader.com. The
publication was packed full of cars and
trucks for sale, as well as a few oddball
items. In one of our many discussions
about the unique things that people
would advertise, my partner asked me,
“So what do you collect?” I quickly
replied, “Nothing,” and he looked back
at me in utter amazement. “You gotta
collect something; everybody collects
something,” he said. “Nope. Nothing,” I
firmly replied. That was the truth then,
and it continues to be the truth today.
Or at least I thought so.
I know there are a handful of you
out there who are like me and despise
clutter and, as such, avoid accumulating things. I also realize that we are the
minority, and that my business partner was correct in his statement that
most people do collect something, whether they want to or not.
Our cover story this month is a perfect example of collections and
how they make people happy. Those featured in the story share how
their Christmas-related collections started and how they have progressed through the years. They describe the personal meanings that
these collections have and why they make them — and the people who
surround them — feel good. Maybe more important than the collected
objects are the memories that come with them and are shared each time
they are seen.
So when it comes down to it, I guess my old business partner was
right. We do all collect something, whether we want to or not. For
those who physically acquire things, it is in the actual collections. But also
for them, and for all of us who don’t compile all the “stuff,” the memories still pile up. And at the end of the day, those are the best collections
of all.
Merry Christmas, and thanks for reading. Q
Shane Goodman
Publisher
Darren Tromblay
Editor
515-953-4822 ext. 304
[email protected]
KK O’Neill
Advertising
816-935-6566
[email protected]
Iowa
Living
magazines
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DECEMBER | 2014
Ames Living
3
FEATURE
December
TREASURES
AMES RESIDENTS SHARE THEIR
CHRISTMAS COLLECTIONS
Eileen Tramp maintains a “Christmas room,” a spare bedroom where she keeps a number of her Christmas treasures. Photo by Todd Rullestad.
By Todd Burras
“I will honor Christmas in my heart and try to keep it
all the year.” – Charles Dickens
gingerbread houses and preparing cookies and
other holiday treats.
or most Ames residents, Christmas is a
one-day event or, at most, a month-long
celebration that involves unpacking boxes
of decorations, setting up one or more trees,
stringing lights, shopping for presents, building
But at Dale and Eileen Tramp’s home in the
Stonebrook neighborhood of north Ames, every
day is Christmas.
That’s because Eileen maintains a “Christmas
room,” which is actually a spare bedroom where
she keeps oodles of holiday treasures, including
F
4
Ames Living
DECEMBER | 2014
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a Christmas tree covered with dozens of homemade family ornaments and numerous heirloom
Santas, perpetually on display for family members
and friends who visit.
“Christmas is year-round for me,” Eileen
says, laughing.
It’s been that way at the Tramp home for two
decades.
FEATURE
“I love Christmas and always dreaded
putting all those beautiful Santas and other
Christmas items to bed for the rest of the
year, so Dale and I turned a guest room
into a ‘Christmas room,’ ” Eileen says.
“That way we could enjoy Christmas all
year round.”
The Old World Santas, each representing a different country, have special
significance to Eileen. The 8- to 14-inchtall ceramic Santas were painted by her
mother, Margaret Doud, who lived in
Grand Island, Nebraska.
“I can’t remember Mom not painting,”
Eileen says. “Her brother, James, who was
an artist and a model, lived in Philadelphia,
and they would get together and enjoy
painting together. They produced some
awesome pieces. When Mom began doing
Old World Santas, I begged her to give me
one for every occasion — my birthday,
Christmas, anytime I could inherit one of
her Santas.”
Eileen says she has close to 100 of the
Santas, and in recent years she has given
away another 20 or so to friends primarily
because she doesn’t have enough space in
the Christmas room.
“Our décor has changed through the
years, and I’ve added more contemporary
Christmas glitz and bling throughout the
upstairs,” she says. “The Christmas decorations upstairs are not the traditional
colors, and I don’t think the Old World
Santas liked that.”
The Santa collection is a source of
humor in her family, including sons Tim
and Todd and their families.
“My family teases me when they come
home to stay, and they call it the room
with the thousand Christmas eyes,” she
says.
Besides the ceramic Santas, which are
displayed on bedroom furniture as well
as on several shelves Dale built for her, a
Christmas tree covered from top to bottom with homemade decorations from
some 52 years of marriage is a focal point
in the room.
“We have a tradition in our family
of giving one another a Christmas decoration that began when our boys were
young,” Eileen says. “They couldn’t come
home for Christmas if they didn’t bring
a decoration. Our granddaughters, Julie
and Jessica, got right into that tradition,
and now we have many memorable ornaments on the tree.”
The Old World Santas, each representing a different country, have special
significance for Eileen Tramp. Photo by Todd Rullestad.
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Ames Living
5
FEATURE
Eileen has another tradition that
centers around — or under, as the
case may be — the tree.
“Since I have Christmas all year
round, when family and friends come
to visit, I try to have a wrapped gift
under the tree,” she says. “It is usually something small and fun that
is styled to the person receiving it.
Tim likes gummy bears, Todd likes
sour candies, the granddaughters
— well, it depended on their age as
they grew up — from books to jewelry and make-up. If friends come
from out of state, I do something
from Iowa like key chains, coffee
mugs, decorative napkins, Iowa State
University stuff.”
As the days count down to
Christmas, Dale and Eileen have
been busy adorning the remainder
of the house with more decorations.
But it’s those ceramic jolly old Saint
Nicks that hold the most memories.
“Through the years, I’ve had so
much fun at Christmastime displaying the Santas my mom painted,”
Eileen says. “I have some other
6
Ames Living
DECEMBER | 2014
Dennis Wendell displays a portion of his Christmas card collection that now numbers
more than 1,000.
Christmas pieces Mom painted, but
Santas always reigned in our home.”
He saves his cards
Dennis Wendell has spent the better part of 50-plus years meticulously and lovingly caring for and managing innumerable collections for Iowa
State University’s Parks Library and
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the Ames Historical Society.
Therefore, it’s no surprise
that Wendell, a lifelong Ames resident, has a few of his own private
collections that he’s maintained
throughout his lifetime. The one
he will be adding to this time of
year is Christmas cards, a collection
Wendell, 73, says numbers more
than 1,000.
Wendell says he began collecting the cards rather unintentionally
in the 1950s when his parents took
in a great-uncle to care for. Before
his household goods were sold at
an auction, family members went
through his attic to see what should
be kept. Wendell, then in his early
teens, selected a stack of boxes containing early 1900s penny postcards
that represented birthdays and holidays, including Thanksgiving, Easter,
Halloween and others. But by far
the majority were Christmas cards.
“I was attracted not only to
the creative designs but rich colors achieved by chromolithography, frequently printed in Germany
or England,” Wendell says. “So I
began removing the cards from their
acid wooden boxes and transferring them into archival album pages
according to the seasons and occasions of the year.”
Around the same time period, Wendell’s family began hosting
international students who were
FEATURE
in Ames to attend college. As the
students graduated and returned to
their homelands, they kept in touch
by sending cards at Christmas. That
tradition continued when Wendell
joined the faculty at ISU’s Parks
Library in 1969 while also beginning
to serve as faculty advisor to several
international student organizations.
“Once graduated, these alums
have kept in touch with me each
Christmas,” Wendell says.
From Algeria to Yugoslavia
and dozens of nations in between,
Wendell has received cards from
students in more than 50 countries.
Unlike American or European cards
that feature themes of Christianity,
Santa and nature, many of the Asian
cards feature native themes of
elephants and Hindu and Buddhist
motifs with some painted on silk.
“A card printed in Hong Kong
depicting Santa being pulled in a
rickshaw probably takes the cake for
blending East with West,” he says.
While the majority of cards
came from family members or
friends, Wendell has, on occasion, purchased a card or smaller
collection, paying anywhere from
$1 to $25 for an individual card.
The genres include foldout, popup, musical, oversized, embossed,
antique and hand-made, among others. Themes are nativities, angels,
holly, poinsettias, bells, snowmen
and sleighs, among others. The
smallest is business-card size while
the largest, from the Netherlands,
stands 15 inches tall. The oldest is
probably from 1905. Homemade
cards or those with special messages are prized by Wendell, while
Mittet from Norway and H. George
Caspari from Italy are favorite publishers.
“The cards of the 1920s attract
me because of their merry old
England themes, quaint homes and
use of bright primary colors,” he
says. “Card designs reflect children’s
book illustrations of this period.”
Wendell says the origin of
Christmas cards supposedly dates
to 1843 when Sir Henry Cole sent
printed cards because he couldn’t
hand-write lengthy cards to each
person on a long list of friends.
Publishers soon got involved, and
the rest is history.
“Inevitably, as cards and postage became more expensive, the
typed form letter took over,”
Wendell says. “Computers, word
processing software, addition of
images and in-home color printing
soon eased the production of the
annual greeting. The current trend
offers sending email cards available
online in an endless array of still
and animated designs accompanied
by sound.”
Such technological changes
that increase the ease of sending
Christmas greetings only sweetens
the memory Wendell has of his
mother’s ritual of writing personalized cards to scores of friends and
family members.
“Starting in early December,
she would set up a card table in
her bedroom where she would
spend weeks handwriting letters
to include with the cards,” he says.
“This was her way of keeping in
touch with far-flung friends and
relatives. Throughout the year,
she would have clipped and saved
articles from the Ames Tribune
she thought specific friends would
find interesting. These would also
be included in the card along with
the letter. This ritual never failed
to amaze me since her Christmas
list included no less than 300
names.”
For his part, Wendell has tried
to follow her example but has compromised with a customized generic
printed letter.
“Arthritic fingers sometime
trump tradition,” he says. “Thus,
each time I receive through the mail
a hand-made card with hand-written
message, the experience is very special, and that card automatically goes
into my collection.” Q
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DECEMBER | 2014
Ames Living
7
HEALTH Q&A
DINING
Q: Do you have any holiday
baking suggestions for a
gluten-free diet?
A: Almond and coconut flours make a great addition to baked goods
and are perfect for your friends and family who follow a gluten-free diet.
Almond flour can be invaluable for anyone trying
to reduce the carbohydrate content in baked
goods and is a good source of protein, fiber,
vitamin E and magnesium. It is made from skinless
almonds that are finely ground. Almond meal can
give baked goods a moist texture and buttery flaPappardelle bolognese at +39 Restaurant, Market and Cantina. Photo by Todd
vor. Besides its use in baked goods, almond meal
Rullestad.
can be used in place of regular flour as a coating
for chicken and fish. Homemade meatballs can be
made using almond flour in place of bread crumbs.
Coconut flour is made from coconut solids that are ground into a
powder. It is also lower in carbohydrates and high in fiber. Coconut flour
provides sweetness and a rich texture to baked items. Due to its high- +39 offers wonderful Italian dishes
fiber and low-carbohydrate content, coconut flour is a good substitute
for regular flours for those who are living with diabetes. High-fiber foods By Ashley Rullestad
may play a role in controlling blood glucose levels.
hen two Italians For dinner we all decided pasta
This information is not intended as medical advice. Q
teamed up with two was the way to go. I ordered the
native Iowans, the rigatoni carbonara ($14), an Italian
Information provided by Amy Clark, RD, LD, Hy-Vee, 640
result has become a tasty and fun classic featuring egg, panceta, parLincoln Way, 515-450-0508.
dining experience in the Somerset mesan and romano cheese. My
neighborhood of northwest Ames husband and our friend got the
WHAT CAN A HY-VEE DIETITIAN DO FOR YOU? — +39 Restaurant, Market and pappardelle bolognese ($15), a rich
Cantina. Done in a classic Tuscan beef and pork ragu with tomato
6HUYLFHV,QFOXGH
trattoria style, the restaurant and wine over fresh-made pasta,
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‡*URXSVHPLQDUVLQRXUVWRUHDQG offers breakfast, lunch and dinner and our other friend ordered the
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daily. The menu includes season- seasonal beet risotto ($15), with
al specialties, small plates, soup, roasted beets, dried cherries, red
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salad, fresh pasta, steak, seafood wine, dill and chive.
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and traditional pizza and paninis.
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+39 Restaurant, Market &
We arrived as a foursome
West Ames HyVee
Lincoln Center HyVee
Cantina
eager for a delicious meal before
2640 Stange Road
the Saturday night showing of “Elf”
Dietitian
Dietitian
515-292-0039
at Stephens Auditorium. I’d never
3800 Lincoln Way
640 Lincoln Way
Hours: Breakfast Mon.-Fri.,
been to the restaurant before, but
(515) 292-5543
(515) 450-0508
7-11 a.m.,
I found the décor comfortable
[email protected]
[email protected]
Sunday 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
yet sophisticated. It was both a
Lunch Daily 11 a.m. - 2 p.m.
little bit modern and a little bit
Dinner Mon.-Thurs. 5-10 p.m.,
industrial, but also a lot swanky.
Fri.-Sat. 5-11 p.m.
We settled in to study the menu,
filled with Italian favorites and local
ingredients and ordered a couple
Our table offered a nice view
of glasses of pinot noir.
Despite several delicious look- of the kitchen, so it was fun watching antipasti offerings, we opted ing dishes come up to the window.
to skip the appetizers and moved It was evident that there was a big
straight to dinner offerings. Our emphasis on fresh ingredients and
Nicole Arnold, RD, LD
Amy Clark, RD, LD
friend ordered a bowl of the soup great presentation — all the dishes
special that evening, a butternut looked as good as they tasted.
squash bisque ($6), and my hus- Each of us pronounced our meal
band got a caesar salad ($10). molto buona. Q
Buon appetito
W
Making lives
easier, healthier,
happier.
8
Ames Living
DECEMBER | 2014
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HEALTH Q&A
Q: How do I stay healthy
during the holidays?
A: During this time of the year, many people find it more comforting to stay
inside and warm than go to the gym. While I share this mentality on some
days, I also realize that, especially during this time of year, we need to be
even more cautious about maintaining a healthy routine. Here are some tips.
s3TAYHYDRATED This time of year, many of us resort to hot coffees
and teas instead of water. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind is to drink
about half of your body weight in ounces of water per day. By doing so, you
will help with fatigue and hunger, as well as filtering out toxins in your body.
s$ONTSTOPEXERCISING Excuses are easy to find this time of year.
However, instead of procrastinating, find indoor activities to do. By following a regular routine, it helps your cardiovascular system, emotional state
and even your immune system.
s %AT WINTER FRUITS AND VEGETABLES This is the time of year when
our immune system is under the most strain. Eating more fruits and veggies
will give your body much needed vitamins and antioxidants. Don’t hesitate
to try something new.
s3TAYMOTIVATED No amount of indoor lighting can compete with the
sun for boosting our energy levels. Find a friend to hold each other accountable and get outside, even for a short walk.
Stay hydrated, active and healthy this holiday season. Q
)NFORMATION PROVIDED BY $R ,INDSEY "ARTHOLOMEW $#
"ARTHOLOMEW #HIROPRACTIC 3TANGE 2OAD !MES 'UV/LQGVH\DQG%UHW%DUWKRORPHZ
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Ames, Iowa
515-292-3718
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Q: How can I maximize my
insurance benefits?
A: Don’t flush your money down the drain.
As you know, time passes quickly, and the end of the year is here
again. We all use this time to prepare for the
holidays and plan our goals for the future. Your
dentist should be providing the highest quality of
care and helping you establish goals for strong
teeth and gums.
If you have dental insurance, you may want
to plan strategically to maximize your benefits.
The key is to plan for necessary maintenance and
treatment. Your insurance allows for a determined amount of coverage each year. So, why not start the new year
with a healthy smile? Your dentist can assist you in planning the best
approach for using your insurance.
Flex spending is like your own personal savings account for your
health care needs. The best part is it’s put away tax-free. However the
problem you can run into is if you don’t use it by the end of the year,
you lose that money — your money that you’ve put away.
Don’t find yourself in this situation. You only have a couple months
left to take advantage of your 2014 insurance benefits and flex spending
plan, so call your dentist and use your resources to stay healthy and
young. Q
)NFORMATION PROVIDED BY $R !MIE 2OCKOW.ELSON !MES
Center for Cosmetic and Family Dentistry, 415 S. Duff, Suite
$!MES
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DECEMBER | 2014
Ames Living
9
SENIOR LIVING
FAITH
Have a healthy winter
A: Winter can bring more than cold winds. For those older than 55, it can
pose new challenges for staying well and safe. Taking a few simple steps can
help reduce your risk and help you enjoy the season.
s7EARLAYERS This includes a hat, gloves and scarf
to prevent loss of body heat that can lead to frostbite or
hypothermia. Better yet, if it’s very cold outside, stay
indoors — let someone else do the shoveling.
s7ASHYOURHANDS Carry hand sanitizer with you
and avoid touching public items like the bank pen. Bring
your own.
s2EMEMBERYOURVITAMINSEat a healthy diet of
fruits and vegetables as always.
ISU presents “Tuba Christmas” at First United Methodist Church on Saturday, Dec. 13.
s,ETTHELIGHTIN Open your curtains or blinds and turn on indoor
lights. Winter’s darkness causes your brain to produce less melatonin,
which can make you feel lethargic and tired.
s+EEPMOVING Exercise daily, whether it’s indoor swimming, walking an indoor track or riding a stationary bike.
s 3TAY CONNECTED Connect with friends, neighbors and family to FUMC offers the sounds of the holiday seasons
avoid feeling isolated.
By Michelle Chalkey
Better yet, do all your favorite things —exercise, see friends, dine,
s Christmas nears and the University’s Jolly Old Saxophones.
enjoy your favorite hobbies and more — and do it all indoors as a resident
weather gets colder, warm The Golden K Choir will wrap it
of a continuing care retirement community. Happy winter! Q
soup, cheery music and up on Wednesday, Dec. 17.
Rev. Lewis says all friends are
a community of giving will erupt
)NFORMATIONPROVIDEDBY2OD#OPPLEEXECUTIVEDIRECTOR'REEN
at First United Methodist Church welcome to celebrate the sounds
(ILLS 2ETIREMENT #OMMUNITY (AMILTON $RIVE !MES
(FUMC) in Ames. Throughout the of the season at the FUMC lunWWWGREENHILLSRCCOM
month of December, FUMC will cheons. Warm soup and dessert
host several musical and commu- will be served from 11:45 a.m. to
nal events to celebrate the holiday 1 p.m. in the new multi-purpose
room at the church.
season.
In addition to the luncheons,
Members of United Methodist
Women and Worship Committee FUMC will host a Christmas carwill host Noel! Noel! Luncheons oling party on Wednesday, Dec.
on Advent Wednesdays. The lun- 10 at 6 p.m., beginning with a
cheons will consist of a light meal light dinner. “Tuba Christmas,” a
accompanied by holiday music musical production from ISU will
take place on Saturday, Dec. 13 at
from local musical organizations.
Reverend Fred Lewis says this noon at the church. The Chancel
is a great event for enjoying good Choir of FUMC will present a
food and beautiful music of the Christmas musical cantata on
Sunday, Dec. 21, at 8:30 a.m. and
holiday season.
“These luncheons have been 11 a.m. in the church’s historic
held for several years as a way sanctuary.
The month-long series of holifor people to pause in the midst
More private rooms in Memory Care. Plans for new
day
events will lead up to a special
of
their
work
day
for
food,
felIndependent Living apartments with sales now underway.
lowship and musical enjoyment,” night of services and music on
At Green Hills Retirement Community, we never stop
Lewis says. “It is especially a time Christmas Eve. The night will begin
building for your future—because you shouldn’t have to
for people who are serving or at 4:30 p.m. with a family-friendly
helping others during the holidays service of carols and candlelights.
settle for anything less than the best.
to have the opportunity to be Services will be held again at 7:30
Call (515) 296-5000 today.
served and to gain a bit of renewal p.m. and 10:30 p.m. Guest soloists
will be present and a special mediand revitalization.”
Local musical organizations tation on the lights of Christmas
will play Christmas songs dur- will wrap up the night.
All of these events will be
ing the lunch services. The first
Wednesday, Dec. 3, will kick off hosted at the church located at
 Hamilton Drive | Ames, Iowa 
with music by the Ames High School 516 Kellogg Ave. Check FUMC’s
Madrigal Choir. Wednesday, Dec. website, www.fumcames.org, for
GreenHillsRC.com
10 will feature music by Iowa State more details. Q
Music and luncheons
A
The Best is
Even Better
at Green Hills.
MAG/ILExpansion/12-14
10
Ames Living
DECEMBER | 2014
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WWW.GABUSFORD.COM
LIBRARY NEWS
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
Time for Myles
to retire
Full-time care for
children ages
6 WEEKS TO 2 YEARS
New Bookmobile will be unveiled on Dec. 20
By Jillian Ocken, community relations specialist
fter 12 years of sharing
stories throughout Ames
and beyond, Myles the
Bookmobile is retiring and passing the torch to a brand new
Bookmobile.
The Bookmobile acts like a
neighborhood branch, bringing a
small library to people who may
not otherwise be able to visit the
main library. Myles, the current
Bookmobile, carries more than
3,000 books, movies and other
items for all ages to six weekly
stops around town. On average, more than 1,000 items are
checked out each week.
Before Myles, Ames had a
27-foot Chevrolet recreational vehicle named Betty. Before
that was our first Bookmobile,
a custom Gerstenslager purchased for $18,000 in 1964.
Ames has had Bookmobile service
for 50 years, but Bookmobiles
have been around much longer than that. Bookmobile service in the U.S. began in 1905,
when Mary L. Titcomb sent out
the first book wagon from the
Washington County Free Library
in Hagerstown, Maryland. Before
Bookmobile, there were small
rotating collections of books
called traveling libraries, which
were housed in a post office,
store or even someone’s home.
To this day, Bookmobiles around
the world take many forms, from
boats to bicycles to camels.
While Ames Public Library’s
new Bookmobile will still have an
engine and four wheels, it will also
have a whole new look. Derek
A
Anderson, a best-selling children’s
book author and illustrator and an
Ames native, lent his artistic talent
to design the new one-of-a-kind
Bookmobile.
You can be among the
first to see Ames’ eye-catching
new Bookmobile at an unveiling Saturday, Dec. 20 at 10 a.m.
at Ames Public Library. Derek
Anderson will be there to share
his creative process in designing
the Bookmobile and point out
some of the features with special
meanings.
For more information about
the Bookmobile or the unveiling event, visit www.amespubliclibrary.org.
Ames Public Library
515 Douglas Ave.
515-239-5656
Mon. - Thur.: 9 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Fri. - Sat.: 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Sunday: 1-5 p.m.
Bookmobile schedule
Monday
Sawyer School, 4:30-8 p.m.
Tuesday
St. Cecilia School, 2-4 p.m.
Old Orchard Laundromat,
5-6:15 p.m.
Mitchell School, 6:45-8 p.m.
Wednesday
Edwards School, 1:45-3:30 p.m.
Fareway on Stange, 5-8 p.m.
The Bookmobile will be out of
service Dec. 22 - Jan. 2. Q
$OH[DQGHU$YH6WH$‡$PHV,$
ZZZSOD\DQGOHDUQDPHVFRP‡
It’s Christmas Time at
The Salvation Army of Story County!
Volunteer to ring bells at ringames.org
or call 515-233-3567.
41,313 reasons why Ames
Living advertisers get results
Ames Living magazine is
mailed to every home, every
apartment and every business
in the Ames zip code — all
27,720 addresses — which
translates to more than 41,300
readers. Mass coverage provides
mass results for your advertising
dollars. To learn about our
affordable advertising options
and how we can help your
business grow, contact
KK O’Neill at (816) 935-6566 or
[email protected]
Ames
Living
magazine
KK O’Neill
Advertising Account Executive
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/ames
DECEMBER | 2014
Ames Living
15
CALENDAR
Friday, Dec. 5
Q Concert: ISU Symphony
Orchestra, $3-$5, 7:30 p.m., Martha
Ellen Tye Recital Hall.
Q AHS 9/10/V Boys Basketball vs.
DM Hoover, 4:45/6:15/7:45 p.m.
Q AHS 9/JV/V Girls Basketball vs.
DM Hoover, 4:45/6:15/7:45 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 6
Q Free Yard Waste Days, waste can
be taken to Chamness Technologies,
Steenhoek Environmental, and
American Professional Services
Group, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.,
Q AHS JV/V Wrestling Meet, 9 a.m.
Q AHS V Boys Swimming
Invitational, 11 a.m.
Q 46th-Annual Pancake Day, $6,
hosted by Boy Scout Troop 196, benefit a local charity, 7 a.m. - 1 p.m., Elks
Lodge, 522 Douglas Ave
Q Central Iowa Symphony, $20
admission, $5 ages 13-college students,
children under 12 free, 7:30 p.m., City
Auditorium.
Q Music of the Holidays, 3 p.m.,
Ames Public Library.
Q AHS JV/V Wrestling Meet, 9 a.m.
Q AHS V Boys Swimming
Invitational, 11 a.m.
Sunday, Dec. 7
Q Ames Children’s Choirs (ACC)
Holiday Concert, program will feature
holiday music from around the world,
$8 adults, $5 students/seniors, 3 p.m.,
Bethesda Lutheran Church, 1517
Northwestern Ave
Q Plants and Animals of Iowa
Presentation, 2 p.m., Ames Public
Library.
Q ISU Womens Basketball vs.
Stoney Brook, 1 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 8
Q Welcoming Vegetables, learn
new recipes with Abby Dubisar and
Kristen Daily, 7 p.m., Wheatsfield
Co-op.
Q Historic Preservation Commission
Meeting, 7 p.m., City Hall.
Q Hour of Code, learn basics of
computer programming, 3:30 p.m.,
Ames Public Library.
Tuesday, Dec. 9
Q Exploring Art, ages 18 month 3 years, registration required, $25,
9-9:50 a.m., Octagon Center for the
Arts.
Q City Council Meeting, 7 p.m., City
Hall.
Q Book Discussion, discuss “The
Great Gatsby,” 1 p.m., Ames Public
Library.
Q Circle Time, 1 p.m., Ames Public
Library.
Q Baby Time, 1:30 p.m., Ames
Public Library.
Q ISU Mens Basketball vs. UMKC,
6 p.m.
Q AHS 9/JV/V Girls Basketball vs.
Dowling, 4:45/6/7:45 p.m.
Q AHS JV/V Boys Swimming at
Waukee, 5 p.m.
Wednesday, Dec. 10
Q Zoning Board of Adjustment
Meeting, 7 p.m., City Hall.
Q Circle Time, 10:30 a.m., Ames
Public Library.
JACKSON
CLEANING
2%3)$%.4)!,s7).$/73
'%44).'(/-%32%!$9
&/24(%-!2+%4
Insured and Bonded
References available
28 Years Experience
515-231-3649
[email protected]
16
Ames Living
DECEMBER | 2014
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/ames
Q Baby Time, 11:05 a.m., Ames
Public Library.
Q The Mothering Circle, ages 0-1,
7 p.m., Ames Public Library.
Thursday, Dec. 11
Q Celebrations Party and Rental
Ribbon Cutting, 4:30 p.m.
Q Baby Time, 6 p.m., Ames Public
Library.
Q Grand Stories, 10 a.m., Ames
Public Library.
Q Ames Public Library Foundation
Board Meeting, 4 p.m.
Q AHS JV/V Wrestling at Valley,
5:30 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 12
Q AHS 9/JV/V Girls Basketball at
Fort Dodge, 4:45/6:15/7:45 p.m.
Q AHS 9/10/V Boys Basketball at
Fort Dodge, 4:45/6:15/7:45 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 13
Q Merry Tuba Christmas Concert,
free admission, noon, First United
Methodist Church, 516 Kellog Ave
Q Holiday Gift Making Workshop,
ages 6 and up, registration required,
10 a.m.- noon, $25, Octagon Center
for the Arts.
Q Crochet and Knitting Group,
all ages, 11 a.m.- 12:30 p.m., Ames
Public Library.
Sunday, Dec. 14
Q Ames Choral Society Holiday
Concert: Sweet Singing, $12 adults,
children under 12 free, 3 p.m., St.
YOUR PET’S
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Veterinary Care
Your pet deserves
the best!
382-1444
Rebecca Madison,
DVM, MS PhD
BOOK NOW FOR
THE HOLIDAYS!
26962 Sand Hill Trail s Ames
www.jpq-horses.com
Andrew’s Lutheran Church, 209
Colorado Ave
Q Chess 101: Class and Tournament,
1-5 p.m., Ames Public Library.
Q ISU Womens Basketball vs.
Arkansas Pine-Buff, noon.
Q ISU Mens Basketball vs. Southern,
5 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 16
Q Circle Time, 1 p.m., Ames Public
Library.
Q Baby Time, 1:30 p.m., Ames
Public Library.
Q Danu-A Christmas Gathering,
fiddle, flute, accordion and percussion, 7:30 p.m., Stephens Auditorium,
Lincoln Way and University Blvd.
Q Winter Bodycare: Simple Solutions
to Keep you Healthy, with Elise Fiscus,
7 p.m., Wheatsfield Co-op.
Wednesday, Dec. 17
Q Circle Time, 10:30 a.m., Ames
Public Library.
Q Baby Time, 11:05 a.m., Ames
Public Library.
Q Planning and Zoning Commission
Meeting, 7 p.m., City Hall.
Q Books at Noon, share recent
reads, Ames Public Library.
Q Inkspots, writers group, 1:30-3 p.m.,
Ames Public Library.
Thursday, Dec. 18
Q Baby Time, 6 p.m., Ames Public
Library.
Q “Sister Act,” 7:30 p.m., Stephens
Auditorium, Lincoln Way and
University Blvd.
Q Parks and Recreation Commission
We want
your photos!
Celebrating a big
birthday, anniversary
or other milestone?
Send us your milestone
announcements with
a picture and we’ll
publish them for FREE!
Send your announcements
to [email protected]
CALENDAR
Meeting, 4 p.m., City Hall.
Q Business at Breakfast, 7:30 a.m.,
Chamber of Commerce, 304 Main St
Q The Mothering Circle, ages 0-1,
10 a.m., Ames Public Library.
Q Milk and Book-ies, 6:30 p.m.,
Ames Public Library.
Q Ames Public Library Board
Meeting, 7 p.m.
Q AHS JV/V Boys Swimming vs.
Mason City, 5 p.m.
Q AHS JV/V Wrestling vs. Johnston,
6:30/7:30 p.m.
Friday, Dec. 19
Q Early dismissal Ames Schools
Q Ames Chamber Artists Concert,
free will offering, 7:30 p.m., First
Presbyterian Church, 703 Greene St,
Boone.
Q AHS JV/V Girls Basketball vs.
Mason City, 4:45/6:15 p.m.
Q AHS 9/10/V Boys Basketball vs.
Mason City, 4:45/6:15/7:45 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 20
Q Ames Chamber Artists Concert,
$12 adults/$9 seniors and students in
advance ($15 at door), children under
12 free, 7:30 p.m., Northminster
Presbyterian Church, 1416 20th St
Q Bookmobile Unveiling, 10 a.m.noon, Ames Public Library.
Q TAG, 11 a.m., Ames Public Library.
Q Teen Roleplaying Games, 1-5 p.m.,
Ames Public Library.
Q ISU Commencement, 1:30 p.m.,
Hilton Coliseum.
Sunday, Dec. 21
Q
sics, 2 p.m., Ames Public Library.
Q ISU Womens Basketball vs.
Fairfield, 1 p.m.
Monday, Dec. 22
Q No school
Q Winter Camp, grades K-5, $30,
9 a.m. - 1 p.m., Octagon Center for
the Arts.
Tuesday, Dec. 23
Q No School
Q Winter Camp, grades K-5, $30,
9 a.m. - 1 p.m., Octagon Center for
the Arts.
Q City Council Meeting, 7 p.m., City
Hall.
Wednesday, Dec. 24
Q
Q
Q
Christmas Eve
No school
Ames Public Library closed
Thursday, Dec. 25
Q
Q
Q
Christmas Day
No school
Ames Public Library Closed
Friday, Dec. 26
Q
No school
Monday, Dec. 29
Q No school
Q ISU Womens Basketball vs.
Howard, 7:30 p.m.
Tuesday, Dec. 30
Q
No School
Wednesday, Dec. 31
Q New Year’s Eve
Q No school
Q Ames Public Library Closed
Q Ames Jaycee New Year’s Eve
Bash, live music by Burnin Sensations,
all proceeds go towards future community projects, 8:30 p.m., Gateway
Hotel, 2100 Green Hills Dr
Q ISU Mens Basketball vs. Mississippi
Valley State, 6 p.m.
Thursday, Jan. 1
Q
Q
Q
New Year’s Day
No school - Ames
Ames Public Library Closed
Friday, Jan. 2
Q No school
Q AHS 9/10/V Boys Basketball at
Waukee, 4:45/6:15/7:45 p.m.
Q AHS 9/JV/V Girls Basketball at
Waukee, 4:45/6:15/7:45 p.m.
Saturday, Dec. 27
Q Crochet and Knitting Group, all
ages, 11 a.m.- 12:30 p.m., Ames Public
Library.
Great Books, discuss literary clas-
shop AMES
GROWames
Ames Chamber of Commerce
Call
Jim Horstman, REALTOR
®
Friedrich Iowa Realty
515-720-7859
◆Helping both Buyers & Sellers
◆Providing market analysis
◆Serving Story & Boone counties
GreatIowaHomes.com
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/ames
DECEMBER | 2014
Ames Living
17
WHAT’S IN YOUR GARAGE?
RECIPE
Chocolate
1919 Model T Ford orange cake
Alan Spohnheimer’s Model T Ford rarely gets out of the garage since it can only go 15
to 17 mph. Photo by Todd Burras.
Spohnheimer’s truck has many quirks
By Todd Burras
hen
the
Ames
Historical Society was
planning its entry for
the city’s 150th anniversary to be
observed at this year’s Fourth of July
parade, it turned to one of its own
members to provide a bit of history
to the historic occasion.
“I told (curator) Dennis
(Wendell) that I wasn’t sure the
old truck was old enough for the
Sesquicentennial because it wasn’t
150 years old,” Alan Spohnheimer
said of the pickup he drove in the
parade. “It was only 95 years old.”
Joking aside, Spohnheimer’s
1919 Model T Ford, which resides
in his garage in north Ames, has a
wealth of interesting quirks.
“When a guy wanted to sell
one built the same year that my
mother was born, I looked at it,”
says Spohnheimer, who has owned
the truck for about 30 years. “It
was priced low, like a forgotten
truck that nobody needed, so I went
north, looked at it and brought it
home.”
After getting the truck,
Spohnheimer was “surprised to
hear that it was ‘always in gear,’
there were three pedals on the
floor and was told that there was no
W
clutch — no neutral.”
His mom told him one pedal is
reverse, another is the brake, and
the third one changes gears.
“To make sure you could stop
things, you could push any two pedals,” he says.
Spohnheimer says he “kept finding many little aspects that were
interesting.”
“You sit on a cushion on top
of the gas tank,” he says. “There is
no fuel pump, so Ford used gravity
to insure gas got to the engine. I’ve
heard stories that on a big hill, you
would have to drive backwards to
keep it going because when you
went back first up the hill, the tank
would be higher than the engine.
Otherwise, the engine would be
higher than the tank, and the engine
would quit running because the fuel
would be lower than the engine.”
Spohnheimer doesn’t drive the
truck often. Prior to the Ames
Sesquicentennial, it hadn’t been
driven since his son’s wedding eight
years ago.
“Because the truck can’t go very
fast (top speed is 15 to 17 mph), it
can’t go on many highways,” he says.
“It can’t do the 40 mph minimum
speed.” Q
#ONTACT $ARREN AT EXT OR DARREN DMCITYVIEW
COMTORECOMMENDSOMEONEFORANUPCOMINGISSUEOFh7HATS
)N9OUR'ARAGEv
18
Ames Living
DECEMBER | 2014
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/ames
A hint of orange adds flair to dessert
"Y-ARCHELLE7ALTER"ROWN
n a recent Sunday afternoon, knowing my father-in-law would be
visiting, I decided to try Trisha Yearwood’s “Chocolate Orange
Cake” recipe. My father-in-law is a bit of a choc-aholic and is
always appreciative of dessert. Also, I enjoy using my mom’s bundt pan
and thought that, combined with a hint of orange, would give the dessert
a bit of a flare. I was correct, and I think this recipe will be a keeper. Q
O
#HOCOLATEORANGECAKE
Cake
2 tablespoons butter, softened
1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon unsweetened
cocoa powder
3 cups flour
1-1/2 cups sugar
2 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 cups orange juice
1 tablespoons finely grated orange zest
3/4 cup mayonnaise
2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
#HOCOLATEGLAZE
1 cup powdered sugar
2 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa
powder
2 tablespoons orange juice
For the cake: Preheat the oven to
350 degrees F. Mix together the softened butter and 1 tablespoon of the
cocoa to make a thick paste. Use this
paste to paint the inside of a bundt
pan. Set aside.
Combine flour, sugar, baking
soda, salt, cinnamon and remaining
1/2 cup cocoa in a large mixing bowl
and mix until blended. Add the orange
juice, mayonnaise, vinegar and vanilla
and mix until well combined, 1 to
2 minutes. Fold in the orange zest.
Pour the batter into the prepared
bundt pan and bake until a toothpick
inserted in the cake comes out clean,
45 minutes. DO NOT UNDER BAKE.
Cool in the pan for 10 minutes, and
then turn out onto a cooling rack to
cool completely.
&OR THE CHOCOLATE GLAZE Mix the
powdered sugar and cocoa together.
Whisk in the orange juice, 1 tablespoon at a time, until it reaches a
good consistency to drizzle. Drizzle
the glaze over the cake.
Serve with whipped topping or ice
cream.
FINANCE
Share your financial
and care inventory
Make time to discuss decisions with family
Heartland Associates–Ames
Duane D. Faas, LUTCF
315 6th St, Ste 100
Ames, IA 50010
Financial Associate
515-292-7077
Toll free: 877-292-7077
Financial Associate
Kirt Till, FIC
David M. Sparrey
Financial Associate
By Duane Faas, Kirt Till and David Sparrey
ach year, thousands of
Americans are thrust into the
uncomfortable role of making
long-term care decisions for their
family members. These emotional
decisions may create stressful situations for the entire family in addition to being time-consuming and
expensive.
Fortunately, there is a way to
help reduce the stress connected
to these situations: communication.
Discussing plans for long-term care
before the need arises can greatly
reduce the stress that may arise
while dealing with an illness or disability.
Raising the subject may create some momentary awkwardness
for both parents and their adult
children. However it is far better
to discuss long-term care options
ahead of time and together decide
what makes the most sense for the
family.
Thrivent Financial recommends
that families ask certain questions
regarding a long-term care strategy:
s 7HERE AND HOW YOU WOULD
like care delivered, if you were to
need it.
s 4HE LEVEL OF INDEPENDENCE
you’d like to maintain.
s 4HEROLEYOUDLIKEYOURFAMILY
to play in your care.
s (OW YOU WANT TO FUND YOUR
care, while protecting your assets.
Clear communication can help
eliminate the problem of catching a
spouse or adult child off guard.
Licensed agent/producer of Thrivent Financial, marketing name for Thrivent Financial for
Lutherans, Appleton, WI. Registered representative of Thrivent Investment Management
Inc., Minneapolis, MN. Member FINRA and SIPC. Thrivent.com/disclosures.
E
Create a financial and care
inventory
It is also important to update family
members on the location and status
of financial and care documents.
Having an inventory of these documents provides family members
27193 R3-14
with a roadmap to critical information. This inventory should be
updated at least annually, and copies
given to family members, a lawyer
or executor or placed in a secure
location where those who might
need it can access it.
While each family’s inventory
will differ, the inventory should
include information related to
where someone can find the following:
s ,IVING WILLSHEALTH CARE DIREC
tives
s )NSURANCEANDOTHERCONTRACTS
(health, life, long-term care, annuities, auto, homeowners, etc.)
s 7ILLSTRUSTSANDDEEDS
s "ANKACCOUNTSANDINVESTMENT
accounts
s #REDIT CARD ACCOUNTS AND
other outstanding debt
s #ONTACT INFORMATION FOR LAW
yers, accountants, brokers, agents
s *EWELRYANDOTHERVALUABLES
s %SSENTIALKEYS
s )NSTRUCTIONSRELATEDTOFUNERAL
arrangements
s 0ERSONALINSTRUCTIONSORMES
sages
s ,OCATION OF BIRTH MARRIAGE
and military discharge certificates
s )NFORMATION RELATED TO CHARI
table gifts
While it may be a difficult topic,
open and honest communication
about your long-term care strategy can be one of the best ways to
prepare for a stress-free financial
future. Q
Information provided by Duane Faas, Kirt Till and David
Sparrey, Heartland Associates - Ames, Thrivent Financial, 315
3IXTH3T3UITE!MES
Have an EVENT
coming up?
Submit your calendar items online at
www.iowalivingmagazines.com
What’s In
Your
Garage?
To suggest a garage, call Darren Tromblay
at 953-4822, ext 304
or email [email protected]
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/ames
DECEMBER | 2014
Ames Living
19
NATURE’S WINDOW
EDUCATION
Oh, what fun! The gift of
bird feeding
Meet Nicole Coronado
Instructor urges student to embrace their quirks
By Jamie Steyer
J
ingle bells, chickadee tails, winter is finally here. With lots of birds to
see and feed, it is a favorite time of year! Hey!
s a young person, it can
be hard to figure out what
Jingle bells, bird seed shells, keep your feeders full. Hungry birds need
one wants to study, where
lots of food when temperatures are cool.
to live or what to do as a career.
Dashing through the snow, birds look for food
Nicole Coronado, a fourth grade
that will “do it.” So be a friend to them and offer
teacher at Sawyer Elementary, is
lots of suet.
feeling confident in her decisions
Peanuts are also great with all the fat birds
just two years in to her teaching
need. You may be surprised that they will eat it as
career.
much as seed. Oh!
Coronado attributes much of
Jingle bells, yuletide smells, get your (heated)
her career choice to the school
bath a-goin.’ It is sure to make your birds sing even
experience she had as a child.
if it is snowin’.
“I loved learning growing up,”
Jingle bells, junco males, enjoy some holiday cheer. Oh, what fun it is
Coronado says. “My teachers were
to give the gift of bird feeding this year!
amazing and they loved education
This holiday season give the gift of bird feeding and enjoying nature.
so much it was hard not to love
It can be enjoyed by anyone, anywhere, at any age and will last a lifetime.
it with them… School was amazFrom all of us to all of yours, we wish you a merry Christmas and
ing every day, and I loved being
happy New Year. Q
challenged and learning above and
beyond what was required of us.”
Information provided Linda L. Thomas, owner, Wild Birds
After moving from Houston,
Unlimited, 213 Duff Ave., Ames, (515) 956-3145.
Texas to Marshalltown for high
school, she stayed in state for college as well and had no second
thoughts as to what she wanted her
major to be.
“I received a full tuition scholarship to go to Iowa State so I
started my journey there,” she says.
“I knew right away that I wanted
to be a teacher. All throughout
elementary and middle school I
wanted to be either an engineer
or a marine biologist. My schools
really pushed me in that direction.
However, after my experience in
a school that didn’t foster learning,
I knew I needed to be a change. I
wanted students to have the love of
learning that I had growing up.”
Since graduating from ISU specializing in math, English as a Second
A
Nicole Coronado teaches fourth grade at
Sawyer Elementary.
Language and reading, Coronado
has stayed in Ames to begin her
teaching career. She has been at
Sawyer for two years and made
important contributions in that
short time. For real-world skills,
Coronado shows CNN Student
News in class and encourages students to participate in discussion
of what is going on in the world
around them.
Besides
this
awareness,
Coronado hopes to foster a sense
of belonging and individuality for all
students.
“I love seeing kids get excited
and want to learn,” she says. “I also
love seeing them be themselves and
succeed in school. Sometimes students are forced to fit into a model
when they enter schools. Students’
quirks are often muffled and students are feeling more and more
singled out for unimportant reasons. I want all students to feel like
they are unique and it is OK. I want
them to embrace their quirks!” Q
What do you like best about your teacher?
Not valid on previous purchases, gift cards, Daily Savings Club Memberships, or
specially priced items. Coupon must be presented at time of purchase.
Valid only at Wild Birds Unlimited of Ames. Offer Expires 12/31/14.
213 Duff Avenue
Ames, IA 50010
515.956.3145
20
Ames Living
DECEMBER | 2014
www.wbu.com/ames
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/ames
Abigail Cuva:
“She takes her time
to learn about us
and uses that time to
teach us.”
Ellie Lynch:
“She makes school
fun so we’re never
bored.”
Jackson Hufford:
She knows how to
correct our
behavior in a nice
way.
OUT AND ABOUT
Business
After Hours
The Ames Chamber of Commerce
Business After Hours was hosted by
Greater Iowa Credit Union on Nov. 6.
Andy Ark and Matthew Shehata
Ami Senft, Julian Stratton and Lisa Edwards
Ria Keinert, Dennis Lindeman and Ronnie Lindeman
Neal Dietz and Ron Hallenbeck
Steve Karsjen and Matt Winkleblack
Michaela Stewart and Karla Poush
Nancy and Brad Kaltenheuser
Todd Darland and Mike Phillips
Diane Borcherding, Justin Wesselmann and
Maryanna Holland
Kathy and Bob Best
Lisa Edwards and Kaelee McNeill
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/ames
DECEMBER | 2014
Ames Living
21
OUT AND ABOUT
Barb Schwarte and Jim Hutter at the Business
After Hours hosted by Greater Iowa Credit Union
on Nov. 6.
Suzanne Thompson, Beth Billings and Jim Billings at
the Business After Hours hosted by Greater Iowa
Credit Union on Nov. 6.
Dyanna Wright and Betsy Grabinski at the Business
After Hours hosted by Greater Iowa Credit Union
on Nov. 6.
Janet Borcherding, Don Borcherding and Ericka
Peterson at the Business After Hours hosted by
Greater Iowa Credit Union on Nov. 6.
Kaelee McNeill and Beatriz Spaulding at the
Business After Hours hosted by Greater Iowa Credit
Union on Nov. 6.
Jeff Lisman and Adriana Lisman at the Business
After Hours hosted by Greater Iowa Credit Union
on Nov. 6.
Michael Adams and Linda Gibbs at the Business
After Hours hosted by Greater Iowa Credit Union
on Nov. 6.
Daryl and Joyce Vegge at the Business After Hours
hosted by Greater Iowa Credit Union on Nov. 6.
Tom and Michelle Randall at the Business After
Hours hosted by Greater Iowa Credit Union on
Nov. 6.
Dan Brabec at the Business After Hours hosted by
Greater Iowa Credit Union on Nov. 6.
Steve Bensema and Brooke Bensema at the
Business After Hours hosted by Greater Iowa Credit
Union on Nov. 6.
Julie Casady, Terri Ford and Cheri Miller at the grand
opening of Pure Luxe Salon + Spa on Nov. 11.
22
Ames Living
DECEMBER | 2014
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/ames
Happy Holidays
FROM THE
P U R E L U X E S A L O N + S P A F A M I LY
HAIR CUTS
COLOR
MANICURES AND PEDICURES
WAXING AND MORE!
I N T E R N AT I O N A L
SALON
+
SPA
L
DECEMBER | 2014
Ames Living
s Tu e s d a y – T h u r s d a y 1 0 a m – 8 p m
s Friday 10am–6pm
s Saturday 9am–4pm
319 CLARK AVENUE s AMES
515.232.5100
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A PROGRAM IN PARTNERSHIP WITH UNITED WAY OF STORY COUNTY WHICH HELPS SINGLE PARENTS
IN NEED OF TRANSPORTATION TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF LIFE FOR THEIR CHILDREN.
A SAFE AND RELIABLE CAR IS ESSENTIAL TO THE SUCCESS OF MOST WORKING FAMILIES;
AMES FORD LINCOLN & UNITED WAY OF STORY COUNTY BELIEVE:
s 0ROVIDINGAN
UNDERPRIVILEGEDFAMILY
WITHACARISANACTOF
KINDNESSTHATCANBE
LIFECHANGING
s 'IVINGSINGLEPARENTSA
HELPINGHANDNOTA
HANDOUTHELPSTHEM
TOREACHTHEIR
FULLPOTENTIAL
s #HILDCAREJOBSGROCERIES
MEDICALAPPOINTMENTS
ANDMANYOTHERTASKS
AREOUTOFREACHBUTARE
MADEPOSSIBLE
WITHACAR
s &ORFAMILIESINNEED
THERECEIPTOFAVEHICLE
DONATIONCANHAVEA
PROFOUNDEFFECT
UPONTHEIROUTLOOK
ONLIFE
AN APPEAL FOR YOUR HELP
Do you have an older vehicle you are thinking about selling or trading in?
0LEASECONSIDERDONATINGYOURVEHICLETOTHE7(%%,3&/27/2+PROGRAM!TAXDEDUCTIBLEOPTIONMAKESTHE
PROCESSVERYSIMPLE4AKETHEVEHICLETO!MES&ORD,INCOLNANDVISITWITH#ASEY*OHNSONOR.ICK*OHNSONORFOR
MOREINFORMATIONONTHEPROGRAMCONTACT!MES&ORD,INCOLNATOR5NITED7AYAT
Don’t have a vehicle to donate but wish to help support the program?
3ENDCHECKTO7HEELSFOR7ORKCO5NITED7AYOF3TORY#OUNTYs#LARK!VENUE!MES)!
You could help give a family hope and a second chance!
DECEMBER | 2014
Ames Living
www.iowalivingmagazines.com/ames