D aily news

Daily news
H
84th Year, No. 188
InsideTODAY
e
NewsBriefs
2013-14 HENDERSON
HIGH SCHOOL yearbooks
can be purchased at <www.
smart-pay.com>.
RUSK COUNTY PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB meets at
6 p.m. on the fourth Monday
of the month in the community room of Henderson Federal
Savings Bank. Photographers
of all skill levels are invited.
The next meeting is Monday.
HENDERSON LIONS
FOOTBALL BOOSTERS
meeting 7 p.m. Tuesday in the
media room of the indoor facility on the campus of HHS.
STORYTIME 10 a.m.
Wednesday in the meeting
room off the children’s department at the Rusk County
Library. “Silly Munsters” is
the theme. The Friends of the
Rusk County Library are offering T-shirts to benefit the children’s department.
RUSK COUNTY BOYS
AND GIRLS CLUB and
Wesley Chapel, C.M.E. will
host a fall festival from 4-7
p.m. Wednesday at the B&GC,
located at 710 Robertson Blvd.
The public is invited to the
event, with games and food
provided.
HISD
EDUCATION
FOUNDATION is taking
orders for its annual pecan
sales now through Friday.
Mammoth pecan halves are
$12 per lb. Extra large pecan
pieces are $10 per lb. To order,
contact Terrianne Stanley at
(903) 655-5045 at the HISD
Administration Building.
d
e
Early voting turnout slow
FROM DAILY NEWS STAFF REPORTS
Through Friday, only 368 Rusk County residents had cast early voting ballots
in the Nov. 5 election, Rusk County Elections Coordinator Kathie Wittner said.
And, as of 9 a.m. Monday, only three
people had cast ballots to begin the second week of early balloting.
Council
considers
‘change
order’
I
waited patiently for the
Lord; and He inclined
to me, and heard my cry.
Psalm 40:1
MONDAY
October 28, 2013
©Copyright 2013
50 cents
Citywide clean-up
Members
of the Henderson
Rotary
Club picked
up trash
Saturday
morning
on U.S.
Highway
259 North,
doing a job
they perform several times a
year.
Staff photo by Greg Collins
Voting
changes
causing
‘hiccups’
Texas women
especially targets
of discrepancies
FROM DAILY NEWS STAFF REPORTS
FROM DAILY NEWS WIRE SERVICES
The Henderson City Council will hold a special meeting
at 5 p.m. Monday to consider
a change order to the surface
water treatment plant’s clarifier
painting project.
During the council’s June
25 meeting, council members
approved an engineer work
order with Stokes & Associates
for clarifier painting at the surface water treatment plant
At that meeting, former city
manager Mike Barrow said
pH levels inside the clarifier
dropped from seven to five —
calling for the need to paint the
inside more often.
CIty officials explained that
See COUNCIL, Page 3
DALLAS — Some voters
around the state are encountering hiccups under the
state’s new law requiring
photo identification, as early
voting continues for the Nov.
5 constitutional amendment
election.
In addition to the requirement for a government-issued
picture ID, the law states that
a voter’s name on the ID must
exactly match the name listed
in the voter registration database. Women, in particular,
have complained about additional questions because of
name discrepancies.
State and county officials
See NEW LAWS, Page 3
Staff photo by Matthew Prosser
It was a cool and foggy morning that welcomed Rusk County commuters
Monday, as the sun rose over this farm just outside of Henderson on Farmto-Market 850. For the complete local weather forecast, please see Page 8.
Large crowds come out for
ONL Chamber ‘fall fest’
State and county officials
were on hand at event, as
were Henderson businesses
By MATTHEW PROSSER
Henderson Daily News
PostSCRIPT
Bibleverse
n
City taking a closer
look at proposed
painting project
See BRIEFS, Page 8
Happy Birthday, Bon
Boatwright, Harper Finley, Harold Howard,
Buddy Rogers and Justin
Scarborough.
o
Sunrise on a new week
HILL HIGH ALUMNI
(Henderson Chapter) will have
their monthly meeting, 8 a.m.
Saturday, at the Boys and Girls
Club. Call (903) 657-2370 for
more information.
Ourtown
s
“This number is about normal or a
little less than normal,” Wittner said.
“We have not had an election on constitutional amendments only since 2009,
and that year we had 2 percent early
vote. That is about what we are expecting this year.”
Wittner said Friday was the biggest
day thus far for early voting, with 81
people coming by the Rusk County Elections Office and by the Overton ISD
administration building to cast ballots.
Other than that, the traffic has been
slow.
See VOTING, Page 3
ETMC HENDERSON
will sponsor a one-mile
walk/5K run Saturday at the
hospital. Registration will
open at 8 a.m. with the walk
and run starting at 9 a.m. Cost
is $20 per person with the
proceeds benefitting diabetes
education programs. For more
information, contact Bettye
Scarborough, (903) 658-2500,
or Ella Brock, (903) 655-3795.
Despite my irrational fear
of heights, I went up the
Gateway Arch in St. Louis
during a visit years ago. The
arch was completed on this
day in 1965 and commemorates the westward expansion across the Great Plains.
St. Louis served as the starting point for the great exploration of the Louisiana Purchase by Meriwether Lewis
and William Clark.
LL
r
Henderson, Texas • www.hendersondailynews.com
Two percent is ‘likely’
figure for county this year,
say election officials
Local
sports
results
n
Staff photo by Greg Gooding
“Hip Hop Harry” (Farrah Hale) dances with “Candy Striper”
(Micah Davidson) and “Snoop Dog” (Jordan Swinney) as Starmaker’s owner Tammy Hale looks on at the annual Overton-New
London Area Chamber “Fall Fest” Saturday.
OVERTON – Sponsored by the
Overton-New London Area Chamber of Commerce, the Fall Fest lasted
from 4-7 p.m. Saturday downtown, and
Chamber secretary Jeannie Barber was
thrilled with the participation.
“It has grown each year for the last
few years, but this year it far exceeded
our expectations,” she said. “We had
the most vendors and the biggest crowd
that I’ve ever seen [...] and the feedback
we’ve received from those in attendance has been uniformly positive.”
Overton city and law enforcement
officials blocked off a portion of East
Henderson Street for the event.
“We blocked off a substantial portion of East Henderson Street, from
Commerce down to Rusk,” said Chief
Clyde Carter, Overton Police Department. “It turned out we needed every
bit of it [...] the turnout was as big as
I’ve ever seen.”
Despite the record large crowds city
officials say everything went very well.
See ONL, Page 3
Rotarians hear from area veterans
Club members share
their own military
experiences
By GREG COLLINS
Henderson Daily News
Four members of the Henderson Rotary Club — Danny
Ryan, Michael Marshall, Richard Loughlin and Bill Preston —
shared their experiences about
military service Friday during
a program that will hopefully
cause residents to remember the
upcoming Veteran’s Day Holiday
and the sacrifice that thousands
have made for the freedoms
RotaryCLUB
Americans enjoy.
Ryan was 18 when he joined
the Air Force. He was stationed
in Alexandria, La. as well as Illinois about 100 miles from Chicago and Las Vegas, Nev.
“I am most proud to just have
served,” he said. “I served during
the Carter Administration and
had several different duties.”
Marshall was 19 when he
entered the Army Reserves. He
took a semester off of college at
Kilgore and went to Fort Leonardwood, Mo.
“The first thing I did was
shovel snow, and the last thing
I did was shovel snow,” he said.
“I didn’t get a lot of practice with
that in East Texas.”
He had an eight-year tour and
says the military did what it said
it would do — allow him to get an
education without being a financial burden on his parents and
without going into debt.
He said he made it through
his undergraduate years and had
signed up for a master’s program
when he was put on active duty.
Easter Sunday, 2003, he landed
in Kuwait and made his way into
Iraq where he spent a year.
“I drove supplies up and down
and then ran gun truck guard
duty for government contractors
as well,” he said.
See VETS, Page 3
Staff photos by Greg Collins
Four Henderson Rotary Club members, Danny
Ryan, Michael Marshall, Richard Loughlin
and Bill Preston, spoke about Veteran’s Day
during the meeting Friday.
PAGE 2 — HENDERSON DAILY NEWS — Monday, October 28, 2013
Donation
Balloon release
Courtesy photo
Courtesy photo
Bank of America Foundation representative Chris Maloney presented a check for
$2,500 to the Boys and Girls Club of Rusk County Board Member Donovan Dickeson,
left and BGCRC Director Peggy McAlister.
Read it your way! In print, online or E-edition
www.hendersondailynews.com
In honor of Breast Cancer Awareness month, Henderson Health and Rehab Center
hosted a balloon release Oct. 16. Speaking at the release was breast cancer survivor,
Cindy Griffin and Glenda Bailey, the activities director for Henderson Health who is
the daughter of a breast cancer survivor. In attendance were members of the Henderson Fire Department, District Attorney Micheal Jimerson, staff, and residents.
Pictured are, from left, Kay Endlsey, business development specialist; Larry Beltran,
administrator; Cindy Griffin, speaker; and Glenda Bailey, activities director. Henderson Health and Rehab Center will hold a health fair at 6 p.m. Oct. 29. For more
information, call (903) 657-6513.
Rusk County
Business spotlight
PUMPKINS, MUMS & MORE
OUR ASSISTCARE PROFESSIONALS
Front Row L-R: Rebekah White, Clerical; Michelle Springfield, RN, Owner/CEO; Kiffany Smith, RN. Back Row L-R: Jacki Richardson, Alt. Administrator; Scott Springfield,
Owner/CFO; Diane Starling, LVN; Ginger Forbus, RN; Ruth Hunt, LVN; DeeDee Kent,
Community Coordinator; Amanda Trubey, LVN; Elaine Jordan, LVN; Neki Smith, RN
BROOKS COUNTRY
FARM & FEED
50-LB BAGS DEER CORN
Brooks Country has DEER CORN
in 50-lb. bags to help get you ready for deer
season coming soon.
8.25 per bag or $7.95 by pallet
$
TIME TO PLANT FALL FOOD PLOTS!
Crimson Clover, Gulf Rye Grass, Winter Peas,
Fall Wildlife Mix, Oats and Wheat.
Start thinking about your fall and winter gardens!
Plants are here including Collard Greens, Kale,
Fall Tomatoes, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage,
Broccoli and Herbs. Get your garden started at
Brooks Country.
2303 Jacksonville Dr.
903-657-5300
email: [email protected]
Brooks
Country
TEXAS FRESH
PRODUCE
IT’S TIME TO HARVEST THE
SAVINGS AT TEXAS FRESH!
We have a great selection of PUMPKIN varieties
including Fairy Tale, Cushaw, pumpkins with
warts, small to extra, extra large. Also beautiful
fall mums, Indian and Strawberry Corn, Acorn
Squash and Scarecrows in assorted sizes.
Also check out our Ceramic Jack-O-Lanterns,
spooky pumpkins that will last for years.
Texas Fresh always has the Freshest Produce, Gift
Items, Custom Gift Baskets, Salsas, Chips, Jams,
Jellies, Seasonings, Gourmet Mixes and the NEW
Cool Creations Fruit Smoothie Mixes.
308 Kilgore Dr., Hwy. 259
903-657-4999
Corinthian
Bells Wind
Chimes
Farm & Feed
2303 Jacksonville Dr.
903-657-5300
[email protected]
Mon - Sat 8:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
51" length
chimes in
assorted
musical keys
SELLING AMERICA’S #1 FEED!
Peace • comfort • care
Providing Specialized End
of Life Care and Quality of Life
for Those with
Life-Limiting Illnesses.
A Medicare and Medicaid Benefit
which brings both you and your
family peace, comfort and control.
Lisa Gann, Administrator
Certified by CHAP • Locally Owned & Operated
702 Fair Park Dr, Suite 102 • Henderson
903-657-2461
ALL FALL DECORATIONS
1/2 PRICE
308 Kilgore Dr.
on Hwy. 259
903-657-4999
Mon-Fri 10 am - 6 pm
Saturday 9 am - 4 pm
Sunday 1 pm - 5 pm
ALL FRESH PUMPKINS,
CERAMIC PUMPKINS,
SCARECROWS,
MUMS & MORE
1/2 PRICE!
ASSISTCARE
HOME HEALTH CARE
PROVIDING QUALITY
IN-HOME HEALTH SERVICES
AssistCare is dedicated to providing health
care of the highest quality which is measured
by the ability to meet the individualized needs
of each client. Client satisfaction is the standard by which AssistCare operates.
Assistcare has been providing home care services to patients throughout the North East
Texas area since 1996.
To assure you the trust you deserve, all caregivers are professionally trained with many
years of experience in their respective fields.
100 Zeid Blvd. Ste B • 903-657-4413
www.assistcare.net
Providing quality
in-home health
services for your
family.
Skilled Nursing Services • Rehabilitation Services
Personal Assistance Services (PAS)
Available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
903-657-4413
100 Zeid Blvd. Ste B, Henderson
Locally owned and operated by Scott & Michelle Springfield
Spooky Shirts for a ghoulishly good time!
We have great t-shirts
and jerseys decked out
for your halloween fun.
Hairbows,
Treat Tote Bags,
Bracelets,
Leg Warmers,
Ruffled Bloomers
and more!
JEWELRY BOUTIQUE
107 E. Elk St. • 903-657-3521
Mon-Fri 10-5:30, Sat 9-3
Monday, October 28, 2013 — Henderson Daily News — PAGE 3
All smiles
Overton
Mustangs
Nick
Baker,
Brayton
Pierce, and
Damion
Dennis
celebrate
Friday
night as
time runs
out on a
42-26 victory over
Detroit.
With the
win the
Mustangs
improve
to 3-0 and
remain
tied for
first place
in District
10-1A play.
For more
local sports
action
please turn
to Page 5.
Staff photo by Ronnie Sartors
Council to talk‘change order’
Continued from Page 1
a clarifier is a device used to
treat — or “clarify” — wastewater.
During the council’s Aug.
13 meeting, council members
approved a $72,500 bid to
Cherokee Painting and Sandblasting, Inc. for the painting
project.
Public Utilities Director
Randy Boyd said $110,000
was originally budgeted for
the project.
Cherokee Sandblasting’s
base bid was $36,250 to paint
the interior of the north clarifier, and the company submitted another $36,250 alternate
bid to paint the interior of the
south clarifier.
Voting turnout remains‘slow’
Continued from Page 1
“Are we expecting a big
turnout this week?” she
asked. “We would like to see
a lot of people perform their
constitutional right to vote,
but we are expecting the
totals to remain fairly low as
far as voters are concerned.”
Wittner said her office,
and the Overton voting site,
have had zero problems with
the new law that only allows
people to vote if they have a
photo ID.
“People have come ready
to vote, and we have had no
problems from anyone as far
as showing ID or not having
ID,” she said. “So, that part
of the election has gone really
well.”
Wittner said this election,
as far as ID’s go, is a great
warmup for next year when
there will be major elections
and probably a lot of interest
in voting.
“We will have any bugs
worked out and be ready next
year when there are major
elections,” she said.
Early voting will run from
through Friday in the Rusk
County Elections Office
with voting occuring from 8
a.m. until 5 p.m. except on
Continued from Page 1
say they’ve taken steps to minimize the hassle. If the names
are “substantially similar,” a
voter can immediately sign an
affidavit to verify his or her
He said he was proud that, in and out of the military. identity and then vote as he or
while in Panama, the military He also had guard duty at a she normally would.
got together with Panamanian remote weapons cache in GerAn elections official must
authorities and treated people many, a duty he said that left approve that affidavit, but a
in remote areas with supplies him alone for four hours at a spokeswoman for the Texas
from the United Health Orga- time in foot deep snow guard- secretary of state said poll
nization. They also provided ing a lot of grenades, weapons workers are encouraged to
other humanitarian aid as and other military supplies.
“err on the side of the voter.”
well.
“It wouldn’t have taken a
Dallas County elections
He said his military experi- lot to overpower me alone in officials also are allowing
ence was a good one and was the woods with all of those voters at polling locations
something he would always weapons,” he said.
to immediately change their
remember.
Preston said he was active name in the voter registration
Preston said he didn’t for two years, in reserves for database to match their photo
enlist but instead got drafted four years and said he was ID. Elections administrator
right after graduating from called to perform a duty and Toni Pippins-Poole said poll
Texas A&M. He was put on a was proud to do so.
workers are taking extra care
bus to Shreveport in 1968 and
Rotarians were asked to to inform voters of the issue.
ended up at Fort Polk, La.
remember the upcoming Vet“We’re trying to make sure
“After that, I went to Wash- eran’s Day holiday and to find that we don’t have anyone
ington State where I spent veterans and thank them for turned away because their
time before being sent to Ger- their years of service, a ser- name is different,” she said.
many,” he said.
vice that has allowed all of us
While in Germany, he cut to enjoy freedom and a great
orders for people coming way of life.
Food stamp use becoming the‘new normal’
FROM DAILY NEWS WIRE SERVICES
BOSTON — Enrollment in
the Supplemental Nutrition
Assistance Program has more
than doubled in the past decade
even during times of economic
growth, U.S. researchers say.
SNAP enrollment in the last
10 years more than doubled
to 47 million but, for the first
time, the number of Americans receiving food stamps
increased even when the economy was growing.
During the 2003-07 expansion, the SNAP case load — in
a break with historic trends —
rose 24 percent, the Center for
Retirement Research at Boston
College reported. CRC economists Matt Rutledge and April
Yanyuan Wu said one reason
is a change in the longstanding
correlation between poverty
and the unemployment rate.
Poverty used to fall in tandem with the jobless rate,
reducing the need for food
stamps but the researchers
found poverty did not decline
as the economy grew in the
mid-2000s — and in the recovery following the Great Recession, the number of people
receiving food stamps kept rising.
The assumption has always
been a stronger labor market
would reduce the need for food
stamps, the economists said,
but the new trend suggests rising employment might no longer be enough.
The non-profit group Feeding America said 76 percent
of SNAP households included
a child, an elderly person, or a
disabled person.
These vulnerable households receive 83 percent of all
SNAP benefits, which are limited to households with gross
income of no more than 130
percent of the federal poverty
guideline.
The majority of SNAP
households have income well
below the maximum — 83 percent have gross income at or
below 100 percent of the poverty guideline, $19,530 for a
family of three in 2013.
These households receive
about 91 percent of all benefits,
Feeding America said.
New campaign to end the‘stigma’of abortion
FROM DAILY NEWS WIRE SERVICES
WASHINGTON — On
Monday, pro-abortion groups
across the country launched
an organized effort to feature
women telling uplifting stories of their abortions.
The “1 in 3” week of action
will feature 100 events in 32
states, and began in Washington D.C.
According to the Advocates for Youth, one in three
women in the United States
will at some point have an
abortion.
Advocates from Washington D.C. who will lead off the
event include Deb Hauser of
the Advocates for Youth; Ilyse
Hogue, NARAL Pro-Choice
America; Andrea Gleaves,
Women’s Information Network; and many more.
The “1 in 3” organizers will
also be handing out a book:
1 in 3: These Are Our Sto-
ries. Organizers suggest that
their goal is to keep abortion
“safe, legal, and affordable”
– a marked change from the
old pro-choice slogan from
the Clinton years, “safe, legal,
and rare.”
The organizers say they
also want to “end the stigma” surrounding abortion.
Helping to end that stigma
includes recruiting celebrities
to be part of the “1 in 3” campaign.
A&M prof says smoke detectors won’t save
FROM DAILY NEWS WIRE SERVICES
COLLEGE STATION —
Even though you change the
batteries in your smoke detectors every fall and spring,
they may not perform when
it counts.
A Texas A&M professor
who has been sounding the
alarm about smoke detectors
for years says most devices
on the market and in homes
likely won’t work fast enough
to save lives during a fire.
B. Don Russell, Distinguished Professor with the
Texas A&M Department of
Electrical and Computer
Engineering, has done experiments for news media using
the two types of smoke detectors most widely available —
those that use only ionization sensors and those that
are “dual-sensor,” employing
both ionization and photoelectric sensors.
Although more expensive,
dual-sensor smoke detectors
are quicker to detect smoke
from a smoldering fire,
according to news reports
cited in an A&M press release
earlier this year.
Russell considers his
smoke detector research as a
sideline, with his main area of
interest being electric power
systems, according to the
A&M release.
“I maintain my interest in
smoke detector performance
because of the significance
it has to public safety,” Russell said. “Hundreds of people
die or are injured each year
in residential fires, too often
because their smoke detectors did not provide a timely
alarm.”
Russell advises homeowners to scatter multiple smoke
detectors throughout the
home. Use detectors of both
types or dual-sensor devices,
he said.
ballots.
Finally, Box 8, the Henderson Civic Center, is the place
where voters in precincts 111,
201, 212, 302, 303, 314, 404
and 405 will vote.
And, Wittner said, people
can come to the Rusk County
Elections Office adjacent to
the courthouse to vote as well.
Besides the nine constitutional amendments, there are
five contested races in Rusk
County to be balloted.
Henderson City Council will see incumbent Scott
Lee facing Tommy Goode for
the District 1 seat. District
4 incumbent Melissa Morton
will face former city councilman Mike Smith.
Henderson
Independent School District will see
incumbent Jon Best facing
Jason Martin for a three-year
term in District 5.
West Rusk ISD has a contested race with incumbents
Jerry Brown and Will Sudweeks joining Iris Hammontree in a three person race for
two spots.
Overton ISD has its own
contested race with incumbent Kelvin Darden and Mary
Pat Eaves facing off for a
three year term.
New laws causing‘discrepancies’
Vets share‘war stories’with Rotary
Continued from Page 1
He finished military service in 2006 and said it gave
him a better appreciation
for family, friends, God and
country.
Loughlin was just over 16
when he entered the military
in 1953 in Compton, Calif. He
joined the Army and spent 22
years in the military.
“I got my GED and college and then, later, to college
again through the GI Bill,”
he said. “I served in Korea,
Vietnam, Panama and then
Greenland.”
He said he was a paratrooper because people in that field
got $100 extra - he was only
making $97 at the time - for
being a paratrooper. He was
also a medic in the Army and
told a number of stories about
aiding troops and civilians.
Wednesday when voting will
occur from 7 a.m. until 5 p.m.
Early voters can also cast
ballots in the Overton ISD
Administration
Building
through Friday from 8 a.m.
until 4 p.m.
On Election Day, Box 1,
the New London Community Center, will be the place
where people in precincts 112
and 114 go to vote.
Box 2, the Kilgore Substation on Peterson Road, will be
the site where precincts 113
and 123 vote.
Box 3, Tatum — the old
Justice of the Peace, Precinct
2 office, will be the polling
place for precincts 214 and
215.
Box 4 in Minden will house
the voting booths for people
in precincts 315, 316 and 317.
Box 5 is in the Mount
Enterprise Community Center and will be the place
where voters in precincts 318
and 319 cast their ballots.
Box 6 is located in the
County Barn, Precinct 4, and
will be the polling place for
voters in precinct 418.
Box 7 is located in the Rusk
County Ag Center Barn and
will be the site for voters in
precincts 416 and 417 to cast
As a last resort, a voter with
a name discrepancy could vote
provisionally and then provide
additional supporting information at a later time. Provisional ballots are held until
elections officials can verify
that they should count.
Democrats portray the
name-match issue as an
unnecessary burden, accusing Republicans of aiming to
squelch women’s votes. Since
many women change names
after getting married — and
take on their maiden name,
for instance, as a middle name
— they say women are being
intimidated at the polls.
“I’m glad that my Republican colleagues at least trust
women to state their own
identity without having to ask
their fathers or husbands to
vouch for them,” state Sen.
Leticia Van de Putte, D-San
Antonio, said last week on a
conference call to highlight
the issue.
“But unfortunately,” she
added, “women are feeling the
hardships of this voter ID law.”
Democrats have pointed to
the example of a state district
judge in Corpus Christi who
complained last week that the
ID and voter registration she
had used for years were questioned when she went to the
polls because one listed her
maiden name as her middle
name.
The secretary of state’s
office said late last week that
there haven’t been reports of
anyone having to vote provisionally because of a name
issue. Pippins-Poole said
many Dallas County voters
had to sign affidavits but said
no voters had been deterred
from casting a ballot.
The voter ID law has been
hotly contested since the Legislature and Gov. Rick Perry
approved it in 2011.
ONL‘fall fest’sees record crowds
Continued from Page 1
“There were no incidents
or problems with the crowds,”
said Overton Mayor C.R.
“Coach” Evans. “Our officers
did a fine job of keeping the
peace and I think everyone
had a real good time.”
Charlotte Raines, age 71
and a lifelong resident of the
Turnertown area, said it was
certainly the largest Overton
fall fest she’d ever seen, and
she’s seen a few.
“There might’ve been some
about this big when I was a
youngster, or when my children were babies,” she said.
“But none in recent memory
[...] there was more to do and
more of a crowd than there’s
been in a long time.”
Barber agreed.
“We’ve got some old photographs in the chamber of
commerce building that show
large crowds of people gathered along this road,” she
said. “But that was back during Christmas in the 1930s
and ‘40s, when we had dozens of businesses along main
street [...] I think it’s been a
long time since we’ve seen
downtown this packed.”
This year’s festival included costume contests, a cake
walk, a dunking booth, the
‘Hip Hop Harry’ ring toss,
trash toss, tire throw, balloon
throw, and numerous food
vendors.
Garrett said adding a few
things each year has helped
the festival improve exponentially, that combined with the
efforts of a few hearty unpaid
volunteers.
“Our volunteers really went
above and beyond this year,
and it’s something we hope to
continue to improve year-in
and year-out,” she said. “The
hard work and long hours of
[O-NL Chamber president]
Loretta Posey and chamber
members like Charles and
Sandra Jackson were vital to
pulling this off, and we hope
the success of this year’s fall
fest helps encourage others to
lend a hand.”
Garrett said while this
year’s fall fest has broken new
ground the Chamber is not
going to rest on its laurels.
“We’ve got a lot of ideas for
what we want to do for next
year,” she said. “We’d like to
bring in more vendors and
provide even more entertainment for the attendees.”
For more information
about the fall fest or other
community events contact
the Overton-New London
Area Chamber of Commerce
at (903) 834-3542.
Managing Editor Matthew Prosser
can be reached via e-mail at <[email protected]
hendersondailynews.com>.
You are Cordially Invited to
Celebrate the Release of the
DEPOT MUSEUM
SOUVENIR GUIDE
dedicated to
Susan Weaver
10:00 to 12:00, Tuesday, October 29th
514 N. High St., Henderson
Page 4 — Henderson Daily News — Monday, October 28, 2013
Girlfriend living rent-free racks up bill of resentment
DEAR ABBY: I am divorced,
successful, and the father of two
teenage girls. I have been seeing my girlfriend, “Stella,” for
a year and a half. She also has
two teenage daughters. When we
met, Stella’s divorce was becoming final, and her house was near
the tail end of a foreclosure. The
sheriff removed her from her
home a few months later.
I bought a couple of condos
and let Stella choose one she
wanted to move into. She agreed
she would pay the bills and some
rent once she settled in.
Two weeks after she moved
in, she quit her job. It has been
almost a year, and she hasn’t
gone on one job interview. I pay
all her bills now, and I’m getting
resentful.
It’s not the money (I’ve got
plenty), but I feel she contin-
ues to see me only so she can
live rent-free. Our communication isn’t the greatest, and she
gets angry if this topic is brought
up. How should I approach her
without sounding like a cheapskate? -- DON’T WANT TO BE
A SUGAR DADDY IN CHICAGO
DEAR SUGAR DADDY:
Of course she gets angry! Have
you never heard the saying, “The
best defense is a strong offense”?
If you want to resolve this,
you must be prepared for Stella to react negatively. Start the
conversation by saying, “When
you moved into my condo, you
agreed to pay your own bills and
some rent. It’s been a year, and
you haven’t even looked for a
job.” Then give her a date by
which you want her to move out.
Because she has been living
there for some time, she may
have certain tenant’s rights that
will have to be respected. It
doesn’t take a crystal ball to see
that you will probably have to
evict her -- so talk to your attorney before you discuss this with
Stella.
***
DEAR ABBY: I am the
mother of a 31-year-old son,
“Johann,” who is in the Navy. He
just posted a picture of himself in
his uniform on Facebook. I am
praying it’s not his official photo,
because he made an incredibly
stupid face on it.
He used to do this when he
was a child. Even his high school
photos look like this. It is embarrassing to me! I could never
show it to anyone and proudly
say, “This is my son.”
Johann is an accomplished
young man, a supervisor. But I
Dear Abby
can’t reconcile this picture with
the man he is. What can I do? -FREAKED OUT IN GERMANY
DEAR FREAKED OUT:
Your son is an adult. If he is
making this expression in photographs on purpose, perhaps it’s
time you asked him why. While
it may be a display of immaturity on his part, it could also be
that he is uncomfortable in front
of a camera. (Many people are.
It’s referred to as “deer-in-theheadlights” syndrome.)
Explain that you would love to
have a picture of him that depicts
how he REALLY is, and ask if he
would be willing, as a favor, to sit
for a session with a professional
photographer when he comes
home for a visit. If he isn’t, then
Follow us while we follow the Lions
theHDN on twitter and HDN Sports on Facebook
LOCKHORNS
PEANUTS
ONE BIG HAPPY
perhaps he’d be more relaxed
posing for a photo that YOU take.
***
DEAR ABBY: My fiancee,
“Tina,” and I made a resolution
to lose weight for our wedding.
Everything has been going great
except for one thing. Because
men lose weight faster than
women, I now weigh less at 6
foot 1 than she does at 5 feet 4.
Tina already has self-esteem
issues. I want to look good for
our wedding, but not at the cost
of my fiancee’s hurt feelings.
What can I do? — AT A LOSS IN
MICHIGAN
DEAR AT A LOSS: Continue being supportive and help
Tina to maintain her self-esteem.
But her weight issue is her
responsibility, not yours. If she
becomes frustrated or depressed
that she isn’t losing quickly
enough, suggest she consult her
doctor or a registered dietitian
about the reason why.
***
Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as
Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at <www.
DearAbby.com> or P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.
***
Abby shares more than 100 of
her favorite recipes in two booklets: “Abby’s Favorite Recipes”
and “More Favorite Recipes by
Dear Abby.” Send your name
and mailing address, plus check
or money order for $14 (U.S.
funds) to: Dear Abby, Cookbooklet Set, P.O. Box 447, Mount
Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and handling are included
in the price.)
DAILY NEWS
H
E
N
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E
R
S
O
N
GRIZZWELLS
BIG NATE
OVER THE HEDGE
BORN LOSER
NEA Sudoku
FRANK 'n ERNEST
HOW TO PLAY:
Each row, column
and set of 3-by-3 boxes
must contain the numbers 1 through 9 without repetition.
ARLO & JANIS
NEA Crossword Puzzle
GET FUZZY
SOUP TO NUTZ
For more puzzles, go to www.hendersondailynews.com.
sports
Daily news
Monday, October 28, 2013 page 5
Detroit scores in
final few seconds
to stop Cowboys
Associated Press
Staff photo by Les Linebarger
Henderson senior Jamal Carter brings down a Bullard runner in the backfield during the Lions’ 34-10 victory
over the Panthers Friday. Henderson held the Panthers to negative yards in the third, and the offense scored
twice as the Lions pulled away for the 24-point win. They host Kilgore at 7:30 p.m. Friday.
Winning Tri-Fecta
Lions dominant on offense, defense, special
teams in pivotal District 16-3A win over Panthers
By HUGHES ELLIS
Henderson Daily News
It’s common knowledge that if a football
team wins all three phases of the game —
offense, defense and special teams — that
team usually wins the game.
Henderson won all three phases against
Bullard Friday, and the Lions picked up a
pivotal District 16-3A victory in the process.
The 34-10 blowout win over the Panthers moves Henderson into sole possession of the fourth and final playoff spot
from the district.
“We thought this would be a dog-fight,
and the kids were ready mentally,” Henderson first-year coach Phil Castles said
after the game. “We knew our playoff
chances would come down to (tonight),
and the kids responded well.”
Quarterback Zane Boles nearly eclipsed
the school record for passing yards in
a game, Henderson’s special teams unit
accounted for 16 points and the Lions’
defense held Bullard to negative yardage in
the third quarter.
Boles completed 24 of 39 passes for 403
yards and three touchdowns. He missed
the record of 429 set by Del Barnes against
Kilgore in 2011.
Tre Hollins caught nine passes for 162
yards, and Zedrick Lister added three
grabs for 129 yards. The duo combined for
all three touchdown receptions with one of
Lister’s going for 87 yards.
Boles either ran for or completed passes
on three third-down attempts on the Lions’
scoring drive in the first quarter.
He ran for a first down on another
third-down attempt later in the first half
and completed another third-down pass
on Henderson’s first scoring drive of the
third quarter.
“For a kid who didn’t get a lot of snaps
last year, Zane has done a tremendous job
for us,” said Castles. “He’s matured well
and become a great leader for our team.
“He made plays tonight to get us out
of trouble a couple of times,” the coach
added.
Defensively, the Lions limited Bullard
to 179 total yards in the game. The Panthers averaged 3.1 yards per play.
Further, Henderson’s defense limited
Bullard to negative yardage on four drives
in the third quarter.
The Panthers had a 3-and-out drive that
gained six yards to start the second half.
They followed that with a five-play drive
that amassed three yards.
Bullard had minus-11 yards on the next
drive and minus-six on the final possession that included four positive yards and
a 10-yard holding penalty.
Jordan Dickeson and Jamal Carter
combined for a sack, with Dickeson adding
an additional tackle for loss. Jake Staneart
also had a sack in the quarter.
Henderson’s offense scored twice to up
its lead from seven at the break to 24-3
going into the fourth.
“We have a mindset (as a defense) that
the game is 0-0 at the half, said Dickeson,
who finished with four tackles for loss and
the sack.
“Coming out of halftime, it’s a new
game, and we came out and played well in
the third quarter.”
Castles echoed those comments saying
the entire unit played well.
In addition to Dickeson’s four tackles
for loss, Carter added four of his own.
Ta’Ondrick Thurkill forced and recovered
a fumble, and Seth Hensly had a pass
breakup.
“We played well defensively the entire
game,” the coach said. “The kids played
hard, and they were fired up and ready to
play.”
Then there was special teams, a phase
Henderson outscored Bullard for the entire
game.
Junior kicker Edgar Sanchez booted a
pair of field goals (40, 30) on the night and
was also 4 for 4 on PATs.
Hollins returned a kickoff 89 yards for a
touchdown in the first half.
“Our special teams was good as always,”
said Castles. “We were ready to go (tonight),
got some great leadership and played well
in every phase of the game.”
Vallier gets another INT, but SFA loses
From Daily News Staff Reports
CONWAY, Ark. — Henderson graduate Trey Vallier got
his second pick in as many
games, and his third of the season Saturday afternoon at Central Arkansas.
But it wasn’t enough as Vallier and the Stephen F. Austin
Lumberjacks suffered a 66-31
loss to the Bears.
Vallier led Stephen F. Austin
(3-5, 1-2 in Southland) with
nine tackles and also broke up
another pass.
Fellow Henderson graduate Patrick Brown registered a
tackle in the loss.
UCA quarterback Ryan
Howard threw for 403 yards
and four touchdowns, and Kelton Warren had 111 yards and
a score rushing for the No. 20
ranked Bears (5-3, 2-1).
The 70 points is the most
allowed by SFA to a Football
Championship Subdivision
team since surrendering 70 to
Montana in the 1995 national
semifinals.
Brady Attaway, a Whitehouse native, led the Lumberjacks with 442 yards and two
touchdowns passing.
Daingerfield’s Tyler Boyd
caught 10 passes for 92 yards
and two scores, D.J. Ward
added 142 yards receivin and a
score and Mike Brooks caught
seven passes for 95 yards.
The Lumberjacks meet Sam
Houston State University at
3 p.m. Saturday at Houston’s
Reliant Stadium. The game is
scheduled to be broadcast on
the Southland TV Network.
Boston 4, St. Louis 2
ST. LOUIS (AP) — Jonny
Gomes hit a tiebreaking, threerun homer off reliever Seth
Maness in the sixth inning, and
the Red Sox beat the Cardinals
4-2 Sunday night to even the
Series and ensure it will end
back at Boston’s Fenway Park.
Gomes helped Boston get
started in the fifth when he
followed David Ortiz’s leadoff
double with a 10-pitch walk
that wore down starter Lance
Lynn, who had faced the minimum 12 batters through the
first four innings.
DETROIT — Matthew Stafford’s 1-yard lunge over a pile
of linemen with 12 seconds left
and Calvin Johnson’s 329 yards
receiving lifted the Detroit Lions
to a 31-30 win over Dallas on
Sunday.
The Cowboys weren’t just
standing around letting Johnson make catch after catch, but
he made them look helpless as
he tied Hall of Famer Lance
Alworth’s mark for 220-plus
yards receiving in a game by
doing it for a fifth time.
Johnson almost broke an
NFL record, and could celebrate
the feat because of a comeback
from a 10-point, fourth-quarter
deficit that some people who
entered Ford Field didn’t see
because they had left.
Johnson’s total trails only
the 336 yards receiving Flipper
Anderson had for the Los Angeles Rams against New Orleans
on Nov. 26, 1989 in a game that
went into overtime. Anderson
had 296 yards receiving in regulation.
The Cowboys dared Detroit
to throw to Johnson with a lot of
one-on-one coverage. They usually asked cornerback Brandon
Carr to do the improbable by
defending him by himself, and
sometimes attempted to slow
him down with a zone.
The Lions (5-3) overcame
four turnovers without forcing
a turnover, becoming the first
team to do that and win since
New England did against Miami
in 2007, according to STATS.
On their last drive, Stafford
threw a 22-yard pass to Johnson to set up the winning score.
The quarterback caught at least
some Cowboys by surprise,
including linebacker Sean Lee,
who appeared to expect him to
spike the ball to stop the clock.
Dallas (4-4) seemed to set
itself up to win three straight for
the first time this year to build
a bigger lead atop the NFC East
when Tony Romo threw his second touchdown — and third of
the game — to Dez Bryant with
6:45 left to take 27-17 lead.
The Cowboys, though,
allowed Reggie Bush to cap an
80-yard drive with a 1-yard TD
with 3:33 left. They also had to
settle for Dan Bailey’s third field
goal with 1:02 left after Tyron
Smith was flagged for holding
on third down, a mistake that
stopped the clock even though
Detroit declined the penalty.
Late Friday Volleyball
Henderson 3, Bullard 0
BULLARD — Kami McCaw
had nine kills and 16 digs, Karley Free handed out 24 assists
and Henderson locked up third
place in District 16-3A with a
25-13, 25-13, 25-20 victory over
Bullard.
The Lady Lions, who are off
Tuesday, finish 8-4 in district
play.
They await to find out the
second-place representative
from District 15 for a firstround playoff match.
Jordan Boles and Codie
Whitehead had 15 digs apiece,
with Whitehead and Free adding a block apiece in the victory.
The Lady Lions’ JV earned
a 25-23, 25-16 win, and the
Henderson freshmen notched
a 25-15, 21-25, 26-24 victory.
Tatum 3, Waskom 0
WASKOM — Kayla Starling
had eight kills, and Lauren
Reeves added five as Tatum
knocked off Waskom 25-14,
25-17, 25-17 in a District 17-2A
match.
Rikkie Glezen had 27 assists
and eight digs, and Madison
Brewer and Daziah Adams
combined for 19 digs.
Tatum improves to 22-10
overall and 9-4 in district play.
The Lady Eagles visit Ore
City Tuesday in the regularseason finale. They host Beckville in a playoff warmup match
Friday.
Big Sandy 3, Carlisle 0
PRICE — Sabrah Sampson
had 21 kills, and Big Sandy
clinched the third playoff spot
out of District 20-A with a
22-25, 25-21, 25-22, 26-24 win
over Carlisle.
Suhmer Mitchell contributed 13 kills and eight blocks, and
Melea Roberts finished with 30
assists for Big Sandy (18-11,
8-3).
The loss eliminated the Lady
Indians (21-10, 6-5) from playoff contention. They close the
season Tuesday at Timpson.
Area Standings
District 16-3A
Ovr.Dist.
#Spring Hill 33-2 11-0
*Gilmer 22-11 9-2
*Henderson 29-9 8-4
*Bullard 21-15 5-6
Chapel Hill NA 3-8
Kilgore 14-17 3-8
Gladewater 6-23 0-11
# Clinched district title
* Clinched playoff berth
Friday’s Games
Henderson 3, Bullard 0
Kilgore 3, Chapel Hill 1
Spring Hill 3, Gilmer 0
Gladewater OFF
Tuesday’s Games
Gladewater at Spring Hill
Kilgore at Bullard
Chapel Hill at Gladewater
Henderson OFF
Overton 3, Timpson 0
OVERTON — Heather
Raney and Shamanna Adkins
combined for 10 kills to lift
Overton to a 25-22, 25-14,
25-18 sweep of Timpson in a
District 20-A match.
Raney had six kills, a block
and two aces, and Adkins finished with four kills, two blocks
and two aces.
Lacy Dorsey notched two
kills, Sydney Hardin had three
kills, three aces and six assists
and Kayla Phillips, Lauren
Honzell and Blair Unholz combined for 12 digs.
Overton (18-17, 3-8) closes
the season Tuesday at Leverett’s Chapel. The Lady Lions
(2-9 in district) were off Friday.
District 20-A
Ovr.Dist.
#Beckville 26-412-0
*Gary
22-118-3
*Big Sandy
18-11 8-3
Carlisle
21-106-5
Overton
18-173-8
Lev. Chapel
NA
2-9
Timpson
NA0-11
# Clinched district title
* Clinched playoff berth
Friday’s Games
Overton 3, Timpson 0
Big Sandy 3 Carlisle 1
Beckville 3, Gary 0
Leverett’s Chapel OFF
Tuesday’s Games
Overton at Leverett’s Chapel
Carlisle at Timpson
Big Sandy vs. Gary
Beckville OFF
GOT GOOD GRADES? Collector’s
Corner
Overton ISD courtesy photo
Tyler-based soldiers stopped by Overton High School last week to present the “U.S.
Army Strong Class 1A Team of the Week” award to Mustang captains Aden Williams,
Damion Dennis, Brayton Pierce, and Jamal Kelly for their District 10-1A win over
Cumby. Overton beat Detroit Friday and plays Maud this week for the district title.
Bring in your Report Card
and get $2
of Collector’s Corner Store
Credit for each A & B.
Sweet Pickins
113 S. Main St.
Henderson
903-722-0929
CORNE
R
COLLE
located inside
CTOR
’S
• Sports Card Supplies • Beckett Magazines
• Boxes and Packs
• Singles from Major Sports
Visit us at: www.facebook.com/collectorscornertx
PAGE 6 — HENDERSON DAILY NEWS — Monday, October 28, 2013
Texas
More than 100K in Houston
area lose electricity
HOUSTON (AP) — Crews worked to restore
power after storms in the Houston area knocked
out electricity to more than 100,000 CenterPoint
Energy customers.
Utility records show the number of outages
dwindled to about 6,600 by late Sunday afternoon as repairs continued.
CenterPoint spokeswoman Leticia Lowe says
the outages happened as strong storms moved
through the area early Sunday.
Storms also soaked parts of North Texas on
Saturday night. Crews worked to restore electricity to the last few hundred customers of
Dallas-based Oncor still without power Sunday
afternoon.
The Texas-TCU football game Saturday night
in Fort Worth was delayed more than three hours
due to lightning and rain. The game ended early
Sunday with the Longhorns beating TCU 30-7.
Two people fatally shot
at Texarkana ranch
TEXARKANA (AP) — Investigators say two
people have been killed at a Northeast Texas ranch
and a resident called authorities to report he shot
the pair.
The Bowie County Sheriff’s Office says the circumstances of Monday morning’s shootings near
Texarkana are under investigation.
Capt. David Grable says a man and a woman
were dead at the scene outside a house at the
Prissy Chrissy Ranch, which also serves as an events
venue. Grable says a resident called law officers to
report he shot the pair. Grable says the man apparently did not know the couple.
Grable had no information on whether the man
and the woman who died were armed. Their names
weren’t immediately released.
Grable says nobody has been charged. Further
details weren’t immediately available.
Texas elementary school
sponsors film festival
DENTON (AP) — A North Texas elementary
school has created its own film festival to raise
money to buy iPads for student use.
The Denton Record-Chronicle reported Sunday that the competition at Wilson Elementary
School in Denton runs through Dec. 31.
Each class created iPad videos that were
posted online — about 30 projects. Viewers can
vote for their favorite by making donations. The
website says the project was started so students
would not be asked to sell “a bunch of junk no
one needed.”
The school is attempting to raise $30,000 to
purchase 30 iPads that can be checked out of the
library for classroom activities.
Librarian Carol Richmond says the school’s
current two dozen iPads, which were purchased
last year in part through donations, were used
for the video project.
Texan survives being
hit by lightning twice
Tri-County
Livestock
Report
Agendas
There were 1,321 head of
livestock sold Saturday, Oct.
26, at Tri-County Livestock
Market Inc. in New Summerfield.
Prices were:
Steers: under 300 pounds,
$190-$263; 300-400 pounds,
$170-$255; 400-500 pounds,
$150-$245; 500-600 pounds,
$145-$191; 600-700 pounds,
$135-$183; 700-800 pounds,
$125-$156.
Heifers: under 300 pounds,
$150-$227; 300-400 pounds,
$135-$207; 400-500 pounds,
$125-$181; 500-600 pounds,
$120-$153; 600-700 pounds,
$110-$148; 700-800 pounds,
$105-$135.
Slaughter cows went for
$45-$83; heavy bulls, $80$97; light bulls, n/a; Stocker
cows, $950-$1,650; Top pairs,
$1,350-$1,730; low-middle,
n/a; baby calves, n/a.
Some plain cattle were
below these figures. Sale at 10
a.m. every Saturday.
SAINT JO (AP) — An off-road racing enthusiast has survived being struck by lightning twice
during the same storm in North Texas.
Casey Wagner said Sunday that doctors told
him a tingling feeling would last for about a
week.
KTVT-TV reports Wagner was at an off-road
competition in Saint Jo, 85 miles northwest of
Dallas, when storms arrived.
The 31-year-old Wagner was under a tree
when he was hit by lightning. He dropped to his
knees then he was struck again. Wagner says he
saw sparks during the strikes.
A nurse who happened to be nearby cared for Continued from Page 1
Wagner until he was taken to a hospital, where
HHS CLASS OF 1957 meeting 11:30
he was treated and released.
Wagner says he believes God kept him alive — a.m. Nov. 4 at Store & More on the
Carthage Highway.
and he plans to start going to church more.
Briefs
HHS PTO meeting noon Nov. 4 in
Room 103.
USA
CLASS OF 1963 meeting noon Nov. 5
at Fillin Station on South Main Street.
A year after Sandy, many beaten Jackson’s doctor released
homeowners clamor for buyouts from jail after two years
NEW YORK (AP) — The forces of nature had
been threatening the Staten Island’s Oakwood
Beach neighborhood for years, flooding the streets
every time it rained, sending crabs skittering into
bungalows and swamping basements so regularly
that it was just accepted as part of life.
But after Superstorm Sandy swept in with
20-foot waves that crashed over roofs and killed
three people, those who have lived here for generations decided it was time to go. Soon, the state will
buy some 400 homes, bulldoze them and never
again allow anything to be built here.
Oakwood Beach will finally surrender to the sea.
“The heartache of losing my home, the heartache of
losing my memories, the blood and sweat and tears
that I put into this home, is going to be healed by
seeing trees and nature come back to that spot right
there,” said Joe Monte, a construction worker who
had built his dream house overlooking the ocean.
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The doctor convicted
of killing Michael Jackson was released from jail
Monday after serving nearly two years of a four-year
sentence.
Conrad Murray was released from a downtown
Los Angeles jail at 12:01 a.m., according to the sheriff’s office.
A change in California law allowed his incarceration time to be significantly cut down.
The former cardiologist was convicted in 2011 of
causing Jackson’s death in June 2009 by providing the superstar with an overdose of the powerful
anesthetic propofol as a sleep aid.
Jackson was in the midst of preparations for a
series of comeback concerts and Murray was serving as his personal physician.
The former doctor is appealing his conviction, although an appeals court has questioned
whether it needs to hear the case.
ND spills went unreported;
state testing website
FDA approves more powerful,
pure hydrocodone drug
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — North Dakota, the
nation’s No. 2 oil producer behind Texas, recorded
nearly 300 oil pipeline spills in less than two years,
state documents show. None was reported to the
public, officials said.
According to records obtained by The Associated Press, the pipeline spills — many of them small
— are among some 750 “oil field incidents” that
have occurred since January 2012 without public
notification.
“That’s news to us,” said Don Morrison, director
of the Dakota Resource Council, an environmentalminded landowner group with more than 700
members in North Dakota. Dennis Fewless, director of water quality for the state Health Department,
said regulators are reviewing the state’s policies for
when to publicly report such incidents after a massive spill was discovered last month in northwestern
North Dakota by a wheat farmer.
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug
Administration has approved a stronger, singleingredient version hydrocodone, the widely-abused
prescription painkiller.
The agency said Friday it approved the extended-release pill Zohydro ER for patients with pain
that requires “daily, around-the-clock, long-term
treatment” that cannot be treated with other drugs.
Hydrocodone is currently sold in combination
pills like Vicodin to treat pain from injuries, surgery,
arthritis and migraines. The new drug from Zogenix
is the first pure hydrocodone drug approved in the
U.S. The approval came as a surprise since the agency’s own panel of outside advisers gave the drug an
overwhelmingly negative review last year. The panel
of pain specialists voted 11-2, with one abstention,
against approving the drug, questioning the need
for a new form of one of most widely-abused prescription drugs in U.S.
HendersonDailyNews
classifieds
VFW & LADIES AUXILIARY meeting
6:30 p.m. Nov. 5 at VFW Hall, 1515
Whippoorwill.
GENEALOGY SHAREGROUP meeting
10 a.m. Nov. 6 at the Rusk County
Library. Gary L. Pinkerton will talk
about his work reconstructing the
route of Trammel’s Trace.
SYRUP FESTIVAL BATTLE ROYALS
Nov. 9. (seven men, three women per
team co-ed) softball cash tournament
at Fair Park and Yates Park. Entry fee
$250. Plus youth softball tournament
at Rusk County Recreation complex.
Entry Fee $250. For information, contact Bob at (903) 617-3495. E-mail
<[email protected]>.
HHS CLASS of 1950 quarterly luncheon 1 p.m. Nov. 11, at the Fillin’
Station.
RUSK COUNTY LIBRARY to host a
group of local authors on Nov. 12.
RUSK COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS to present a program on “Blue
Birds” Nov. 18 at the Rusk County
Library.
Editor’s note: “News Briefs” items
are restricted to non-profit and civic
organizations that serve Henderson
and Rusk County. These event notices
should be no more than 50 words and
should be faxed to (903) 657-0056,
mailed (Henderson Daily News, P.O.
Box 30, Henderson, Texas 75653) or
e-mailed <[email protected]> with the contact person’s telephone number included. All
items are subject to editing and will
be printed as space allows.
HENDERSON CITY COUNCIL special
meeting, 5 p.m. Oct. 28, at City Hall,
400 W. Main St.
• Consider and act upon Change Order
No. 1 to the Surface Water Treatment
Plant – Clarifier Painting Project.
• Adjourn.
WEST RUSK CCISD Board of Trustees
special meeting, 7 p.m. Oct. 28, in the
Board conference room of the West
Rusk CCISD, 10705 Main St., Texas
Hwy. 42 in New London.
• Report
a. Enrollment 2013-14
• Discussion and action agenda:
a. Discussion and possible approval
of four class size exceptions for the
second grades
b. Discussion and possible approval
of Letter of Resolution in support of
Rusk County Refining LLC
• Adjourn.
RUSK COUNTY RURAL RAIL DISTRICT Board of Directors regular
meeting, 3 p.m. Oct. 29, at the Chamber of Commerce, 201 N. Main St.
• Review and approve minutes from
Board of Directors meetings of May 7.
• Consider and act upon Rail District
financial report.
• Discuss and possibly approve final
right-of-way release on Mill Street to
the City of Henderson.
• Discuss and possibly approve permission for Henderson Aggregates to
clear right-of-way in front of their
business.
• Discuss Blacklands operations.
• Executive session:
a. Negotiations (Project 30811)
• Reconvene in open session and, if
necessary, take appropriate action as
a result of executive session.
• Determine date, time and place for
the next meeting.
• Adjourn.
HENDERSON CEMETERY BOARD
regular meeting, 10 a.m. Oct. 30, at
City Hall, 400 W. Main St.
• Consider and act upon minutes
from Aug. 28 and Sept. 18 meetings.
• Discuss, consider and act upon any
Lakewood Cemetery projects.
• Discuss, consider and act upon any
Old City Cemetery projects.
• Adjourn.
MOUNT ENTERPRISE CITY COUNCIL
regular meeting, 4:30 p.m. Oct. 30,
in the City Hall Council Chamber, 103
W. Gregg St.
• Consent agenda:
a. Approval of minutes for the regular
meeting of Sept. 25
b. Approval of monthly reports (September) for Court, Clerks, Police,
Wastewater and Financials
c. Approval of moving Nov. 27 regular
Council meeting to Nov. 20
• Regular agenda:
a. Discussion and consideration of
acting upon awarding bid for the
Texas Department of Agriculture Contract No. 712440 Street Improvements (HLG)
• Convene into Executive Session
• Discussion and consideration of
City Marshal’s vacation
• Reconvene into regular session
and consider action, if any, on items
discussed during Executive Session
• Discussion items
• Adjourn.
FDA proposes rules to
make animal food safer
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Amid
incidents of pets dying from
dog treats, the Food and Drug
Administration is proposing
long-awaited rules to make pet
food and animal feed safer.
The rules stem from a sweeping food safety law passed by
Congress almost three years ago.
Like rules proposed earlier this
year for human food, they would
focus on preventing contamination before it begins.
The announcement comes as
the FDA says it hasn’t yet deter-
Henderson
Daily News
Serving Henderson and
Rusk County 84 years
Published afternoons and Sunday
morning, except Saturday and the following holidays: Christmas Day, New
Year’s Day, Fourth of July, Labor
Day and Memorial Day. Published by
Henderson Newspapers Inc. Entered
second-class matter at Henderson,
Texas, Post Office on March 20, 1930.
Subscription rates: by mail in Rusk
County, $25.50 three months; by mail
outside county $40.50 three months.
POSTMASTER, Send address changes to HENDERSON DAILY NEWS,
business offices located at 1711 Hwy.
79 South, P.O. Box 30, Henderson,
Texas 75653. Phone (903) 657-2501.
USPS No. 239-960.
The entire contents of each issue of
the Henderson Daily News are protected under the copyright laws of the
United States. No reproduction of any
of the contents is permitted without
the express written permission of the
Henderson Daily News.
mined a cause of almost 600 dog
deaths believed to be linked to pet
jerky treats imported from China.
The agency has been trying for six
years to determine what exactly is
causing those illnesses.
The proposed rules would
require those who sell pet food
and animal feed in the United
States — including importers —
to follow certain sanitation practices and have detailed food safety plans. All of the manufacturers would have to put individual
procedures in place to prevent
their food from becoming contaminated.
The rules would also help
human health by aiming to prevent foodborne illnesses in pet
food that can be transferred to
humans. People can become sick
by handling contaminated pet
food or animal feed.
Oil Prices
Friday’s
Close
$97.85
Down $2.96
West Texas Intermediate crude
a n d o n t h e w o r l d w i d e w e b a t w w w. h e n d e r s o n d a i l y n e w s . c o m
903-657-2501
e-mail at [email protected]
Office open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday-Friday, DEADLINE: 10 a.m. day before publication
Sunday DEADLINE: 10 a.m. Friday
BUY IT. SELL IT. FIND A JOB. MAKE THE PERFECT HIRE.
Visit Us on the Web at www.hendersondailynews.com
Send your ad by email at
[email protected]
or call SHERRI today! 903-657-2501
Help Wanted
Autumn Leaves
Nursing Rehab
C.N.A.’s 6-2 and 2-10
Apply in person at
321 Kilgore Dr.
Henderson
No phone calls please
E.O.E.
Computer technician
wanted. Full or
part-time. Send
resume to:
[email protected]
Help Wanted
Work Wanted
Work Wanted
Services
For Sale
For Sale
For Sale
For Sale
COOK POSITION
Seeking cook for
residential treatment
center in Overton, Tx.
Benefits: Medical,
401(K) and vacation.
Good working
conditions. Prefer
experience cooking for
70+ but will train.
Call Susan at
903-834-6102.
Website: nttcrusk.org.
Get Ready for Fall! Dependable, honest
housekeeping. Angela
(903)556-6425.
LOOKING FOR
WORK. Angelia
Dunams,
903-392-1865. Sitting
services. 19 years
experience.
IF YOU need someone
to do your ironing
call JoAnn Foster @
903-655-2085 or
903-399-9679.
2 electronic cigarettes.
Everything included.
$40. each.
903-331-1721.
Adult Michael Jackson
costume. Mask,
hat/wig, glove, T-shirt.
$40. 903-658-0909.
Christmas items: Paper, boxes, bags, bows,
name
tags,
stand.903-854-2199.
Four ladies belts.
Small. Reversible
Brighton, Fossil. $40.00
for set. 214-952-8657.
Beautiful 7 foot ficus
tree in brass planter.
$25.00. 903-658-0909.
Day bed with newer
matress and sheets.
$75. 903-392-2196.
Pole lamp. Each light is
a flower. Unusual. $20.
903-643-7292.
Body by Jake exerciser
for ABS and back.
$15.00. 903-854-2546.
Diamond plate truck
toolbox,, 60” long,
13.5” deep. $100.
214-952-8657.
Christmas items:
twinkle lights, 2-large
boxes ornaments.
903-854-2199.
ENTERTAINMENT
CENTER w/36 inch
T.V. not a flat screen
$100 (903)657-8761
KADDEN,
318-936-1088.
WILL CLEAN YOUR
HOME! References
available.
LOOKING FOR
WORK. ARLENE
WHITE, 903-918-7222.
Caregiver looking for
night work with elderly
or sick. 20+ years
experience.
Peggy 903-392-5195.
Tidy up your home with
Christian lady
housekeeping.
TERESA GARRISON,
903-658-7169. House
cleaning,
weekly/bi-weekly.
Dependable
References avail.
Please leave msg.
Call An Expert
HARRIS GLASS
Vinyl Replacement
Windows and Doors
903-663-3687 or
903-657-7163
20ʼ Bennington barge
w/50 hp Force motor.
New tires, many extras.
Excellent condition.
$5,400.00.
903-657-4966 or
903-649-2028.
Round back wicker
chair. Round seat. $15.
903-643-7292.
TAN MASSAGE couch
in Great condition for
$100. (903)657-8761
Used dishwasher. $30.
903-646-2317.
Monday, October 28, 2013 — HENDERSON DAILY NEWS — PAGE 7
Storage
Houses for Rent
A-1 SELF-STORAGE
2/1, CH/A. $500./rent,
$350./dep.
903-649-2371.
Help Wanted
10X10 CLIMATE
CONTROL UNITS
$60/MONTH OR
2 FOR $100.00
(next to police station)
& 1604 N Frisco. Units
903-655-1243
Now Hiring
Satellite Installation and Repair Technicians
in
Henderson Wise Shoppers
Look in the
Classifieds.
and the surrounding area +--),,# % !+./-­‐+//%) !'## ( WISE Shoppers know a bargain
when they see one. In the Classifieds,
you can track down deals on everything
from out-of-town excursions to ottomans. It’s easy to place an ad or
find the items you want, and it’s used
by hundreds of area shoppers every day.
$$$)'($ $
" & ! $ "% $$$)# ) NOW
$10.50
buys 4 lines for 1-3 days
Go with you instincts and use the
Classifieds today.
The Henderson Daily News
CLASSIFIEDS
657-2501
CALL 903-657-2501
TO GET YOUR AD
STARTED TODAY!
For Sale
Rent or Lease
Help Wanted
Wood curio cabinet 3
glass shelves, 2
drawers. $100.
903-392-2196.
FOR RENT OR
LEASE!
Livestock
FISH DAY! STOCK NOW!
CARRIERS NEEDED
Henderson Daily News is seeking a
Part-time Independent Carrier for the
Henderson in-town route.
Route approx. 1 hour per day, 6 days a week.
Must have reliable transportation, telephone,
current TX. driver's license and proof of
auto insurance. NO PHONE CALLS!!
Apply in person only at the
Henderson Daily News,
1711 Hwy. 79 South ,
Henderson TX 75653-0030
Circulation Department
Channel Catfish,
Minnows, Bass, Bluegill (Coppernose & Hybrid) Redear,Koi, Black
Crappie (if avail).
Hybrid Catfish,
4BR/2BA house on
3.22 acres, near
Lake Striker.
$1,000/mo.,
$800/dep.
Available Dec. 1.
Call 903-646-7391
for details.
Lone Star Farm & Home
Henderson, TX
Mon., Nov. 4
1-2 pm
Arkansas Pondstockers
1-800-843-4748
Apts-Unfurnished
Apartments &
Townhome available in
Henderson. $500
MOVE-IN
903-987-5744
Storage
A SPARE CLOSET
SELF STORAGE
903-657-2662
conveniently located
.5 mi. from Star on Hwy
43. Security fence &
coded gate!
** 10x10's Only $40!!**
Hwy. 64
Self-­Stor
(Hwy. 64 next to the
High School)
903-­657-­2516
SUPER C SELF
STORAGE
"Climate Control
Available"
1111 West Main
903-657-2516
WEST SIDE
SELF STORAGE
*TWO Great Locations
Loop 571, Hwy. 13 and
Jacksonville Dr.
(near McDonald’s)
*Covered & outdoor
RV Parking
903-657-2411
Houses for Rent
1302 JONES ST.
3BR/1.5BA. CH/A.
Laundry room & appliances. No smokers or
pets. Non-Subsidised.
$850/mo., dep. $600
903-646-0625.
2BR HOUSE in
Kilgore.
$565 a month
903-330-4003
Move in today
3/2 doublewide
1 mi out of Mt.
Enterprise toward
Timpson. $4550/mth.
$200 dep. References
req. 936-254-2924
3BR/2BA Mble Home
$400 mo Near
Henderson.
Call 936-347-2656
ALL BILLS PAID!
Clean 2/1 w/yard.
$875/mo., $875 dep.
Call J.P. 903-932-7184.
Repo house for sale
3 BR/1BA on 4 acres
1134sq. 13411 W FM
1662 Lanvielle, TX low
down payment, owner
fiancé Call Ken
1-855-847-6806
FREE ADS!!
WANTED
Quiet, settled, clean
couple to rent a 2b/1ba
hm on cattle ranch.
Garden, fen yrd,well
wtr. $550 mo. Call before 5p (903) 836-2271.
Houses for Sale
NEWLY REMODELED
home with a great open
floor plan and a fenced
backyard. 3BR/2BA
for $119,000
OWNER FINANCED.
1520 Peterson Lane.
Call and ask us today
936-559-7304.
Repo house for sale.
569 CR 3210
Mt Enterprise, TX 3
BR/2 BA 1152sq ft, low
down payment, easy
fiancé. Call Ken
1-855-847-6806
Land
3 ACRES, 3 miles out
on Hwy 840.
903-646-3328
Farm And Ranch
32-ft. flatbed gooseneck trailer, $4,500.
Shop built, metal floor,
adjustable hitch, new
tires, triple axle. Perfect
hay trailer or for hot
shot. 903-452-1790.
Clean Out Your Garage, Closets, Jewelry Box
and Turn the Items You’ve Forgotten Into Cash!!
For a limited Time we are offering FREE classified
ads for items $100 and under!!
PRIVATE PARTY ADS ONLY
• Limit 2 ads per week, per family.
One price, one item per ad.
• NO pets, firewood, want-to-buy, sports cards, guns, tickets
(i.e. concert, movie, etc.) or businesses.
• YOU MUST state your price, no OBO, BEST OFFER,
TRADE, MAKE OFFER OR NEGOTIABLE. • NO
ABBREVIATIONS, only 9 WORDS & phone #
Example:
1. Tennis 2. Racket 3. Barely
4. Used
5. Great 6. For
7. Young 8. Player 9. $75
Phone Number: 000-000-0000
Office Rentals
OFFICE FOR RENT.
Located at
110 Hwy. 79 N. Call
903-646-3600 or
903-930-5119.
Office space for lease
on Hwy. 79.
903-646-3152.
Up to 2,000 s.f. Can be
sub-divided. Will finish
to suit. All bills paid.
1305 S. Main.
903-983-9315.
Mobile Homes
FOR RENT NEW
SALEM AREA.
3BR/1BA & 1BR/1BA.
$450/Mo., $300 dep.
Water, trash & lawn
care pd. 903-722-4161.
FOR SALE. Single
wide MH to be moved.
$3,000 . 903-393-1211
or 903-722-1661.
Full Name:
1.
2.
4.
5.
7.
8.
Phone Number:
3.
6.
9.
The Henderson Daily News reserves the right to restrict items in this category.
Bring, mail, e-mail ([email protected])
or fax your completed form to:
Henderson Daily News Classifieds
P.O. Box 30 • Henderson, Texas 75653
Fax 903-657-2452
**Ads will run for 1 week at the discretion of the Henderson Daily News
BUSINESS & SERVICES
DIRECTORY
TAKING RESERVATIONS DAILY! CALL 903-­657-­2501
BUSH HOGGING
WEATHERTON
BUSH HOGGING
Lots & Pasture Mowing
Prompt & Dependable
PH: 903-657-2370
Cell: 903-646-0244
CARPENTRY
GENERAL
CARPENTRY
Small jobs to complete remodeling!
Reasonable prices,
40 yrs. exp., Ref.
903-­399-­6889
CLEANING
HURRY-DON'T MISS OUT!
GIT-­R-­DONE
Carpet Cleaning
SPECIALS!
Call for details
903-­657-­1080 or
903-­392-­1876
CONCRETE
DAVENPORT
CONCRETE
Patios, driveways, house
slabs. 23 Years of Local
Service! Free Estimates.
903-658-6280
DIRT WORK
FENCING
LAWN SERVICES
PAINTING
DIRT
WORK
Pond, Lakes,
RAMIREZ
FENCING
Jose’s Lawn Care
ROLL & TIPP
Roads & Pads! Rock,
Sand & Gravel
Call Scott Crawford
903-646-0365 day
903-657-8659 night
DOZER/BACKHOE
SHELTON BACKHOE
SERVICE
All types of dirt work:
dozer backhoe, dump
truck, crushed concrete
& crushed asphalt.
903-658-8576
References
Building Fences
[email protected]
903-722-5848
903-646-5506
FOUNDATION
JACKSON’S
FOUNDATION REPAIR
0IER "EAM s #ONCRETE 3LABS
Johnny Jackson
903-861-3617
Insured
FARM EQUIPMENT
LAWN SERVICES
ROLLINS FARM
EQUIPMENT
CHILO’S LAWN
SERVICE
Need Tractor Parts?
Baler belts, Rollers,
Bearings,, Hydraulic hoses
& Hydraulic Oil, Farm
implements, Low prices on
high quality parts.
rollinsfarmequipment.com
903-889-2162
TRIMMING, MOWING,
LANDSCAPING, TREE
LIMB REMOVAL.
INSURED!!
903-657-7755
903-722-5767
*MOWING
*HEDGE TRIMMING
*YARD MAINTENANCE
903-­646-­0935
903-­847-­2174
Eliseo Jose, owner
LOGGING
JOEL CORONA
LOGGING
Buying Hardwood or Pine.
Small or Large Tracts.
903-238-6164
or 903-646-3816
PAINTING
DL PAINTING &
CONSTRUCTION
2ESIDENTIAL s #OMMERCIAL
)NTERIOR s %XTERIOR
%XCELLENT WORK GUARANTEED
9RS %XP
Free Estimate, Ref. Avail.
Interior/Exterior
Painting
Quality Work!
25 Yrs. Exp.
FREE ESTIMATES!
Marc Mitchell
903-­736-­1467
This
Space
Reserved for
Your
Business!
REMODELING
A-­1
Remodeling/
Metal Buildings
903-­657-­5126
*Home Improvements
*Carports *Decks *Siding
*Windows *Painting
*Drywall *Metal Buildings
*Additions
*Etc.
ROOFING
SCRAP METAL SVCS
SEPTIC/BACKHOE
You Call,
We Haul!
Henderson’s
Oldest Roofing
Company!
A-­1
Contractors
*Voted Henderson’s
Best*
*Carpentry *Siding
*Remodeling
903-­657-­5126
A to Z ROOFING
FREE Scrap metal
Removal/Clean Up
Washers, Dryers, Refrigerators, etc.I buy
old cars, trucks.
936-553-8795
SEPTIC/BACKHOE
FERRELL’S SEPTIC
SYSTEMS
Aerobic and
Conventional Systems
7ATER LINES"ACK HOE SERVICE
Call 903-643-9445
903-576-6115
2//&).' s
REMODELING
0!).4).' s .%7 ADD-ONS
SEPTIC SYSTEMS
INSTALLED
903-646-4764
Bruce Gasaway
903-646-3380
/VER YRS %XP s "ONDED
LUIS LUNA
ROOFING
Chimneys.
903-­722-­4672
903-­646-­2848
FREE ESTIMATES
Aerobic or
Conventional Systems
AEROBICS
GRAVEL SYSTEMS
Free estimates
Ronald Ellis
office 657-5790
mobile 738-9897
Call today!!
TREE SERVICES
Experienced
Insured
Ruben Mata
R.M. Tree
Services
Septic Boss!!
Tanks pumped, aerobic
& conventional systems
installed.
FREE troublshooting
problem systems!
903/898-2812
SERVICE & REPAIR
UNITED
SERVICE & REPAIR
Prompt & Dependable
Service. Reasonable Rates.
Locally Owned & Operated.
Gyp & Wayne Hampton
657-3503
TREE SERVICES
JACKSON’S
TREE SERVICE
Trimming & Removal
YRS EXPERIENCE
903-861-3617
Insured
Free Estimates
903-­576-­6887
903-­353-­7150
PONDER TREE
SERVICE
Serving Henderson
area since 1974.
For all your needs
Fully Insured!!
903-658-2033,
903-898-2695
LUIS LUNA
TREE SERVICE
Insured & Bonded
FREE ESTIMATES
Tree Cutting
903-646-2848
903-504-4809
9664 SH 64 W, Overton
SEE WHAT ALL THE EXCITEMENT IS ABOUT....
GET YOUR BUSINESS/SERVICE NOTICED TODAY!! FOR ONLY $79.95 PER MONTH, YOUR BUSINESS AD IS SEEN EVERY DAY!! PLACE YOUR AD BY
CALLING THE HENDERSON DAILY NEWS CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT TODAY @ 903-657-2501.
SHELTON BACKHOE
SERVICE
All types of dirt work: dozer,
backhoe, dump truck,
crushed concrete & crushed asphalt.
CALL ANdy SHELTON
903-658-8576
REfERENCES
Jackson's
Foundation Repair
Pier & Beam
Concrete Slabs
Johnny Jackson
903-861-3617 Insured
Luis Luna Tree Service
Insured & Bonded
•Tree Cutting
FREE
•General Clean up
ESTIMATES
•Fence cleaning
Luis Luna Roofing Service
Metal Roofing,
Repairs, Leaks
and Chimneys!
9664 SH 64W, Overton
18 Years Experience!!
903-646-2848
903-504-4809
Jackson's Foundation Repair
Pier & Beam • Concrete slabs
Johnny Jackson
903-861-3617
Jackson's Tree Service
Trimming & Removal
20 years experience
903-861-3617
PAGE 8 — HENDERSON DAILY NEWS — Monday, October 28, 2013
Pink Out
Obituaries
Police Report
June Gibson Dobbs
• 33-year-old, arrested for
RUSK COUNTY
forgery financial instrument;
SHERIFF’S
• 28-year-old, arrested for
OFFICE
• Responded to 201 calls, driving while intoxicated;
• 43-year-old, arrested for
including 61 9-1-1 calls, in the
72-hour period ending at 5 a.m. driving while intoxicated;
• 35-year-old, arrested for
today.
theft of property greater than
or equal to $50 and less than
Arrests
• 40-year-old, arrested for $500, possession of marijuana,
parole violation, interfering less than 2 ounces and fictitious
with emergency call and forg- or counterfeit inspection/insurery;
ance document for display;
• 46-year-old, arrested for
• 28-year-old, arrested for
theft of property greater than public intoxication; and
or equal to $50 and less than
• 21-year-old, arrested for
theft of property greater than
$500 and public intoxication;
• 57-year-old, arrested for or equal to $50 and less than
driving while intoxicated/open $500.
container of alcohol and posMisdemeanors
• Five counts of criminal
session of marijuana, less than
2 ounces;
mischief;
• 41-year-old, arrested for
• Seven counts of miscellaevading arrest detention/work neous theft;
• One count of disorderly
release;
• 27-year-old, arrested for conduct;
• Four counts of criminal
possession of marijuana, less
trespass;
than 2 ounces;
• Seven counts of reckless
• 25-year-old, arrested for
possession of marijuana, less driver;
• Three counts of misdethan 2 ounces;
• 26-year-old, arrested for meanor arrest;
• One count of terroristic
child support, no valid driver’s
license and contempt of court; threat;
• One count of animal cru• 39-year-old, arrested for
burglary of a habitation and elty;
• One count of harassment;
possession of marijuana, less
• Three counts of simple
than 2 ounces;
• 21-year-old, arrested for assault;
• One count of burglary of a
possession of a controlled substance, Penalty Group 2-A, less vehicle; and
• One count of deadly conthan or equal to 2 ounces;
Graveside services for Mrs.
June Gibson Dobbs, 66, of the
Stewart Community, will be
held at 10 a.m. Tuesday, Oct.
29, 2013 at Stewart Cemetery
with Rev. Tommy Ferrel officiating. Interment will follow
under the direction of Crawford-A. Crim Funeral Home.
The family will receive
friends from 5-7 p.m. Monday,
Oct. 28, 2013, at the funeral
home.
Mrs. Dobbs passed from
this life on Oct. 25, 2013 in
Longview. She was born Feb.
9, 1947 in Rusk County, to the
late Dozer and Ella Bird Gibson. Mrs. Dobbs was a housewife and a member of Tatum
Wholeness Church.
She was preceded in death
by her parents, Dozer and Ella
Gibson.
Survivors include her husband, Phillip Dobbs of the
Stewart Community.
Words of comfort may
be shared with the family at
<www.crawfordacrim.com>.
Courtesy photo
Friday was Henderson Pink Out Day and teachers at
First Baptist Church Preschool thought it would be fun
to dress in pink also.
Food stamps, milk prices
on table in farm talks
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The fight
over renewing the nation’s farm
bill has centered on cuts to the
$80 billion-a-year food stamp
program. But there could be
unintended consequences if no
agreement is reached: higher
milk prices.
Members of the House and
Senate are scheduled to begin
long-awaited negotiations on the
five-year, roughly $500 billion
bill this week. If they don’t finish
it, dairy supports could expire at
the end of the year and send the
price of a gallon of milk skyward.
There could be political ramifications, too. The House and
Senate are far apart on the sensitive issue of how much money
to cut from food stamps, and
lawmakers are hoping to resolve
that debate before election-year
politics set in.
Minnesota Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a Democrat who is one of
the negotiators on the bill, says
the legislation could also be a rare
opportunity for the two chambers
to show they can get along.
“In the middle of the chaos of
the last month comes opportunity,” Klobuchar says of the farm
legislation. “This will really be a
test of the House of whether they
are willing to work with us.”
The farm bill, which sets policy for farm subsidies, the food
stamps and other rural development projects, has moved slowly
through Congress in the last two
years as lawmakers have focused
on higher-profile priorities, like
budget negotiations, health care
and immigration legislation.
But farm-state lawmakers
are appealing to their colleagues
to harken back to more bipartisan times and do something
Congress hasn’t done very much
lately — pass a major piece of
legislation.
Even President Barack
Obama, who has been largely
silent on the farm bill as it has
wound through Congress, said
as the government reopened earlier this month that the farm bill
“would make a huge difference in
our economy right now.”
“What are we waiting for?”
Obama said. “Let’s get this done.”
The main challenge in getting
the bill done will be the differences on food stamps, officially
called the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or
SNAP. The House has passed legislation to cut around $4 billion
annually, or around 5 percent,
including changes in eligibility
and work requirements. The Senate has proposed a cut of around a
tenth of that amount, and Senate
Democrats and President Obama
have strongly opposed any major
changes to the program.
The cost of SNAP has more
than doubled over the last five
years as the economy struggled,
and Republicans say it should
be more focused on the neediest
people. Democrats say it is working as it should, providing food
to those in need when times are
tough.
Crawford-a. Crim
funeral Home
The Crawford Family
1414 SoutH main, HenderSon
903-657-2562
Libbie S. Reddic
Funeral arrangements for
Mrs. Libbie S. Reddic, 67, of
Overton, are pending with Garmon Funeral Home.
Mrs. Reddic passed away
Monday, Oct. 28, 2013, at Hospice of East Texas.
Online condolences can be
made at <www.garmonfuneralhome.com>.
Georgia Hazlewood
Funeral services for Georgia
Hazlewood, 82, of Pine Hill,
are pending at Crawford-A.
Crim Funeral Home.
Mrs. Hazlewood died this
morning in Tyler.
Investigators: Pilot dies in
plane crash near Boerne
ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOERNE — Investigators
say a pilot has died after a small
plane clipped some trees and a
power line before crashing and
bursting into flames in Central
Texas.
The Texas Department of
Public Safety says the accident happened late Sunday
afternoon just east of Boerne,
about 25 miles northwest of
San Antonio.
Trooper Deon Cockrell says
the plane was flying low when
it crashed along State Highway
46. Cockrell on Monday did not
immediately release the name
of the victim, who was alone on
the homebuilt aircraft.
Authorities are trying to
determine what caused the
crash.
1200 HWY. 259 N
HENDERSON
903-657-8683
Michelle Means
Administrator
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Sunday’s
weather
High:70
Low:58
Source: National Weather Service
Arraignments
According to the office of
Rusk County Pct. No. 5 Justice of the Peace Judge Joe
Sorrells, the following persons
were arraigned on Oct. 25:
• Sheldon Ramon Starling,
35, Mount Enterprise, Shelby
County: theft by check, Class
B misdemeanor, bond denied;
burglary of habitation, 2nd
Degree felony, bond denied;
• Jose Perez Ruiz, 20, Ben
Wheeler, driving while intoxicated, Class B misdemeanor,
bond denied;
• Juan Dolores Hernandez,
59, Price, intoxication assault
with vehicle, serious bodily injury, 3rd Degree felony,
$30,000 bond; and
• Nichalos Christin Shirley,
27, Henderson, sexual assault
of child, 2nd Degree felony,
$25,000 bond with conditions.
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Online and in print
903-657-2501
duct.
Felonies
• Burglary of a habitation
reported at 12:51 p.m. Friday
near 2561 Farm-to-Market
Road 3310 South;
• Burglary of a habitation
reported at 2:51 p.m. Friday
near Farm-to-Market Road
1797;
• Burglary of a habitation
reported at 4:40 p.m. Friday near 300 Polk Street in
Longview;
• Burglary of a habitation
reported at 2:51 p.m. Saturday
near 9366 North Texas Highway 42;
• Narcotics reported at 7:44
p.m. Saturday near a location
unknown;
• Aggravated assault reported at 10:52 a.m. Sunday near
10299 County Road 144; and
• Burglary of a building
reported at 5:48 p.m. Sunday
near 8500 Farm-to-Market
Road 1251 in Henderson.
Jail Population
• As of 5 a.m. today, there
were 116 inmates housed in the
Rusk County Justice Center.
If you have information that
might lead to the solving of a
crime, call Crime Stoppers at
(903) 655-TIPS or (903) 6558477. You will remain anonymous, will not have to testify
in court and could receive a
reward up to $1,000.
NYPD: Cousin fatally stabs NY mom, 4 kids
Associated Press
NEW YORK — When relatives of a Chinese immigrant
mother of four young children
banged on the family’s door, it
opened to a grisly sight: a man
dripping with human blood who
is now charged with stabbing
the five to death with a butcher
knife.
Mingdong Chen, 25, faced
five counts of murder Sunday,
a day after the brutal killings of
his cousin’s wife and her four
children in Brooklyn’s Sunset
Park neighborhood.
Two girls, 9-year-old Linda
Zhuo and 7-year-old Amy Zhuo,
were pronounced dead at the
scene, along with the youngest child, 18-month-old William
Zhuo — all found in a back bedroom, police said. Their brother, 5-year-old Kevin Zhuo, and
37-year-old mother, Qiao Zhen
Li, were found in the kitchen
and taken to hospitals, where
they also were pronounced
dead.
The five “were cut and butchered with a kitchen knife,” said
Chief of Department Philip
Banks III, the New York Police
Department’s highest-ranking
uniformed member.
The victims died of stab
wounds to their necks and torsos, and Chen has implicated
himself in the killings, Banks
said.
“It’s a scene you’ll never forget,” he said.
Chen had been staying with
the family on the first floor of
the two-story brick house for
about a week.
He was unemployed after
being fired from a string of restaurant jobs he couldn’t hold
down for more than a few weeks
at a time, according to neigh-
bors and relatives in the working-class neighborhood dominated by a large community of
immigrants from China.
Almost a decade after coming
to the United States as a teenager, he still was fluent only in
Mandarin Chinese, Banks said.
Chen apparently was jealous
of fellow immigrants’ successes
in America.
“He made a very soft comment that since he came to this
country, everybody seems to be
doing better than him,” Banks
said.
The children’s father, his
cousin, was not home late Saturday evening; he was working
at a Long Island restaurant, one
neighbor said.
The mother tried to call him
because she was alarmed about
Chen’s “suspicious” behavior
earlier in the evening, Banks
said.
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