Wisconsin Farmers Union News

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NEW FEATURE!
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WFU State Convention
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Wood/Portage County
launches youth group
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Wisconsin Farmers Union News
December 2014
United to grow family agriculture
Volume 71 | No. 10
Joining the ‘Big Tent’
Beginning Farmers Institute opens participant’s eyes to ag diversity
By Kriss Marion
WFU member
a teeny tiny farmer gratefully
I am
taking shelter in the “Big Tent” of the
U.S. Postage
Paid
Permit No. 203
Eau Claire, WI
Wisconsin Farmers Union
117 W. Spring St.
Chippewa Falls, WI 54729
Return Service Requested
NON-PROFIT
Wisconsin Farmers Union. I steward
20 pretty acres of river-bottom land
in the Driftless Area. My tractor is an
IH 544, just powerful enough to pull
a three-bottom moldboard plow and a
five-foot Rotovator through our sandy
soil. I cultivate my organic vegetable
crops with a 1944 Farmall A, the same
model my father-in-law used to weed
his sweet corn as a boy. Two beautiful
old sandstone-foundation barns shelter
my lambs and store my hay and house
my vegetable packing operation. I
raise livestock: four steers, eight goats,
10 hogs, 25 ducks, 30 sheep and 50
chickens. And I’m involved in the
great Wisconsin agritourism industry –
I’ve got two bed-and-breakfast rooms!
Like I said, I’m a tiny farmer.
I have a hard time even taking
myself seriously sometimes. But
the Wisconsin Farmers Union has
taken me seriously and given me a
home in which to grow and to learn
about building a healthy future for all
agriculture, from homesteads like mine
to robust commodity operations and
everything in between.
I’ve only been farming for eight
years and joined WFU a year ago.
I confess that as a woman, a firstgeneration farmer and a small organic
producer, I expected to feel a little
bit out of place here. But at the
very first meeting I attended, several
older, bigger, more traditional and
experienced farmers reached out in
welcome – seeking me out after lunch,
extending warm handshakes, offering
to help me navigate government
programs and mentor me in lobbying.
That was my first real introduction to
the WFU “Big Tent.” I realized then
that the farmers in this organization,
as diverse as they are and as different
as they may be from me, value my
contribution to Farmers Union and to
agriculture as a whole.
Above: Kriss Marion of Circle M Market Farm in Blanchardville (front row, fourth
from left) and Chris Holman of Nami Moons Farm in Custer (back row, second from
left) represented Wisconsin Farmers Union at Beginning Farmers Institute activities in
Minnesota in November.
So I applied for the National
Farmers Union’s Beginning Farmers
Institute. I entered the program wanting
to become a better business person and
I’ve received excellent teaching.
But by far the most important
thing I’ve done as part of BFI is eat
breakfast, lunch and dinner with fellow
farmers from across the country and
the farming spectrum. In the current
BFI group there are 14 of us from
10 states: two small organic farmers,
a dairy farmer, an ice-cream maker,
two ranchers, several corn-and-soy
producers, some small grains growers
and an orchardist. Sitting around
the table with these folks, talking
deeply, sharing honestly and listening
respectfully has convinced me to be
as committed to the “Big Tent” of
agriculture as I am committed to my
own farm. I am boundlessly thankful to
NFU for the opportunity to get to know
these talented, bright people.
I hope to pay back your investment
in me with grateful enthusiasm. In
addition to participating in the Lobby
Day this past spring, I have started a
WFU chapter with some friends in
South Central Wisconsin, in which I
serve as president. With BFI, I lobbied
in Washington, D.C. this September
and studied co-ops in Minneapolis
this November. In January I’ll serve,
along with six others from my chapter,
as a delegate to the State Convention.
Continued on p.2
Page 22
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Wisconsin Farmers Union News
A publication of
Wisconsin Farmers Union
117 W. Spring St.
Chippewa Falls, WI 54729
ph: 715-723-5561 • 800-272-5531 • fx: 715-723-7011
www.wisconsinfarmersunion.com
WFU Board of Directors
Darin Von Ruden
President
District 5
608-634-4695
Craig Myhre
Vice President
District 4
715-983-2167
Dennis Rosen
Secretary
District 2
715-265-4519
Mark Liebaert
Treasurer
At-Large
715-398-5234
Janet Nelson
District 1
715-455-1755
Ed Gorell
District 3
715-287-3383
Patty Edelburg
District 6
715-445-2003
Tina Hinchley
District 7
608-764-5090
W. Michael Slattery
District 8
920-863-2996
WFU State Office Staff
Tom Quinn
Executive Director
715-723-5561 • [email protected]
Diane Tiry
Administrative Assistant
715-723-5561 • [email protected]
Cathy Statz
Education Director
715-723-5561 • [email protected]
Amanda Kollwitz
Accounting/Member Services
715-723-5561 • [email protected]
Danielle Endvick
Communications Director
715-471-0398 • [email protected]
Deb Jakubek
Regional Membership Coordinator
715-590-2130 • [email protected]
Sarah Lloyd
Special Projects & Membership
608-844-3758 • [email protected]
Kara O’Connor
Government Relations Director
608-514-4541 • [email protected]
Zach Herrnstadt
Government Relations Associate
608-234-3741 • [email protected]
David Wright-Racette
Policy Organizer
608-514-2031 • [email protected]
Julie Burgess
Kamp Kenwood Caretaker
715-723-6137 • [email protected]
Newsletter Editor, Layout & Design: Danielle Endvick
Printed by: Leader Printing, Eau Claire, WI
Bulk Rate postage paid in Eau Claire, WI
wisconsinfarmersunion.com
Farmers Union News
WFUWFU
NewsNews
• December
| Fall 2014
2010
BIG TENT Continued from p.1
I’ll be teaching at the NFU Women’s Conference in
Florida the week before and also attending the NFU
Convention in Kansas in March.
My purpose in listing these activities is not to boast.
I’ve already been around WFU long enough to be in
awe of the investment in decades that many of you
have made toward the betterment of agriculture. I
simply want to urge you to keep reaching out to folks
like me, and folks like you, and all the folks you meet
who have a passion for farming, for land stewardship,
for rural communities, for food! After all, our mission
is to be a “member-driven organization committed to
enhancing the quality of life for family farmers, rural
communities, and all people.” We are a “Big Tent”
organization with a big calling and you never know
who might become a strong ally, able leader or willing
volunteer.
The truth is that we can’t allow any farmer or farm
ally to fall through the cracks – they must all be invited
into the “Big Tent.” In America, we are losing one acre
of fertile farmland per minute to development. Here in
Wisconsin, we continue to lose farms, farmland and
farmers. According to the USDA census, Wisconsin
lost more than 8,700 farms from 2007 to 2012.
Farmland declined by more than 620,000 acres. As an
organization we must build our membership to stay
relevant and keep doing the good work of supporting
“educational opportunities, cooperative endeavors, and
civic engagement,” as our mission states.
As a state, a country and a world we can’t afford
to let anyone interested in farming go unsupported.
We need to keep reaching out, as Farmers Union
members did to me, to cultivate new farmers, young
farmers, transitioning farmers, experienced farmers
and retiring farmers. We can’t afford to ignore any
Above: Beginning Farmer Institute participants toured
Whistling Wells, a family-run orchard near Hastings, Minn.
last month. Organized by the National Farmers Union,
the BFI concentrates on building confidence in beginning
farmers and farm couples, while also encouraging them to
learn about other ag sectors and apply leadership abilities
to become actively involved in community organizations.
farmer – whether organic, conventional, big or small.
We need to join together with all farmers as grassroots
collaborators meeting together in the “Big Tent” of
mixed agriculture, listening deeply to one another’s
dreams and struggles with the goal of forwarding each
other’s success and building an agricultural future that
can feed us all.
Kriss Marion and her husband, Shannon, run Circle M
Market Farm, a small family homestead in rural Blanchardville,
40 minutes southwest of Madison. Kriss is an East-coast native,
former Chicago newspaper journalist, previous homeschool mom
of four, current shepherd of 30 sheep, woolcraft artist/educator
and the farm manager.
Learn more about the Beginning Farmers Institute at
www.nfu.org/education/beginning-farmer-institute.
Mahnomin Porridge | Shared by Kriss Marion
During a stop to Hell’s Kitchen on the Beginning Farmers Institute trip to Minneapolis last month, participants
were introduced to Mahnomin porridge. Chef Mitch Omer got the idea for the porridge by reading journals
of 19th century fur traders, who described a meal eaten by Cree Indians. It is hearty and healthful but also
extremely luxurious, thanks to the added cream.
Recipe Source: Hell’s Kitchen
Preparation Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Servings: 4
Ingredients:
4 cups cooked wild rice
1/2 cup roasted hazelnuts, cracked
1 cup dried blueberries
1/2 cup sweetened dried cranberries (Craisins)
1/4 cup pure maple syrup
1 cup heavy whipping cream
Directions:
1. In a heavy, non-stick or enameled cast iron sauce pan, mix together everything but the cream. Stir constantly
over medium heat for about 3 minutes.
2. Add heavy cream and, continuing to stir, heat through, about 2 minutes.
3. Serve immediately.
WFUNews
News •| December
2014
WFU
Fall
November
20102011
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Farmers Union News
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Faith in Farming
Chris Holman
WFU member
W
hen we are
confronted
with difficult questions
about the Earth, our
existence upon it and
other similarly deep
inquiries about the human condition,
we often turn to faith to help us make
some sort of sense of it all. A loyal
companion on our life’s path, it is in
all of us; the essence of what makes us
human.
Occasionally, faith is confused for
something else altogether though, and
some allow themselves to slip into
something more comfortable and more
reassuring. This illusion of knowledge
leads to a lack of humility, and it’s at
this point that we’ve lost our footing
upon the earth. This is where farmers
are lucky, as our lives are quite literally
grounded by the hidden intelligence
in the order of things. No matter what
you call this phenomenon, it requires
us to be humble in the face of so much
that is out of our control. That essential
part of farming is what’s providing the
opportunity for us to come together,
work together on the issues of the day
and to find a way forward.
That, as they say, is the tip of the
iceberg.
At the start of November, I was asked
to be one of WFU’s representatives at
a conference held by the University
of St. Thomas titled, “Faith, Food &
The Environment,” where I along with
around 80 other people contemplated
the ways in which these three things
are interwoven in our lives. We were
a small group, but we represented the
full spectrum of farming, agribusiness
and a large variety of faith traditions
including representatives from the
Vatican. The intimate setting allowed
us to have deep, profound and openminded conversations about how faith
plays a part in the world at large, and
more specifically in the world(s) of
agriculture.
At one point in the conference, a
Lakota elder—Dr. Clifford Canku—told
us how, in his community, “We have
no atheists.” The same can be said
of farmers because, like many have
pointedly noted before, our actions as
farmers are predicated on faith and we
put a sort of deferential trust into what
we do in our fields and on our farms. In
agriculture, we are stripped bare of any
pretentiousness and in order to succeed,
we are asked to blend our world with
one that is built not as much upon
relationships as it is built upon the cold,
impersonal logic of the marketplace.
This is why farmers need to lead the
way and to incorporate more people
into this conversation. We are uniquely
suited to do so, having been tempered
by the demands and multi-faceted
nature of our livelihood. The “Big
Tent” philosophy that comes with being
a member of the Farmers Union is the
example that can be projected elsewhere.
All we need is to find the people of good
will who want to participate with us and
to explore the unique angle of faith as a
motivation for changing our behaviors,
economic or otherwise.
It would be difficult to summarize
the entirety of the conference in this
short article, but to give you an idea of
what it was like, the sorts of questions
we grappled with were like this one,
posed by Dr. Christopher Thompson,
“What’s happening in our culture
when entire generations of the best
and brightest seem oblivious to their
natural surroundings, especially when
it comes to their food and the earth that
sustains them? And how are we going
to develop a responsible human ecology
in these circumstances?” Wendell
Berry—who is often cited these days,
but indulge me this brief example—said
that “Eating is an Agricultural act.”
That is, one of our basic needs is a
driving force and rationalization behind
how modern agriculture has developed.
At the conference, this connection was
extended when it was said by Father
Michael Czerny that “Eating is a moral
act because it is a human act, and human
acts can be morally evaluated.”
Father Czerny’s implication, of
course, is that eating can be an immoral
act. While that is true, the reasons one
might view it that way are going to vary.
Plus, the act of eating is so far removed
from everything that occurs between the
field and the table; it’s not hard to see
how people give little-to-no thought to
such things. Ultimately though, we’re
talking about what sustains us, and
it’s a large part of what keeps us alive.
Few people would find such things to
be trivial, and the same should be said
about scrutinizing our food system(s).
What’s most important here is that
the mere contemplation of what one
eats, where the food came from, how
it came to be our food and so on, are
all questions that we need people to be
asking. We constantly hear about how
we lack a connection to our food in this
society. Even farmers—who exhaust
themselves to bring food to the table for
others—are often fueling their efforts
with cheap, unhealthy food. If only
irony was an essential mineral! So how
can faith help? Faith comes into play
because it’s bigger than us, and that
sets it apart from things like religion or
politics—which we’re usually told to
avoid so that we can enjoy more fragile,
personal perspectives about our life and
the lives of others. These things must
be discussed, with respect and kindness,
because it’s through these things that we
bring more people to the table. If done
right, this is the sort of thing that leads to
major shifts in the popular narratives of
the day, and those narratives will drive
change.
Why is that important? Simple.
policy and economics have brought
us to where we are, and despite
everything I’ve said here, all of the
faith in the world can’t tackle these
issues alone. Still, why not appeal
to our faith to help find the solutions
that serve the greater good? We can
address complex issues together, with
our faith to guide us and our humility
as farmers to keep us going in the
face of adversity. Then, as we change
policy to reflect a better version of
ourselves and to build a resilient
economy together, we can look in the
mirror and know what we’ve led the
way in serving the Earth and each
other while building a better, longterm future for agriculture.
Page 44
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WFU
News
• |December
WFUWFU
News
News
November
| Fall 2014
2010
2011
Expanding Statewide School Vouchers:
A Step Backward for Education in Wisconsin
Zachary Herrnstadt
Government Relations Associate
n October, Assembly Republicans
released their agenda for the next
legislative session. Entitled “Forward
for Wisconsin’s Future,” the agenda
identifies improving education as
a top priority, declaring in bold print that “a better
Wisconsin begins in the classroom.”
Unfortunately, Governor Walker and the Republican
leadership have stated in recent weeks that they hope to
expand Wisconsin’s taxpayer-funded school voucher
program by increasing or removing altogether its existing
cap of 1,000 students. This would be a step backward for
education in Wisconsin.
Proponents claim that expanding the statewide school
voucher program, known as the Wisconsin Parental
Choice Program (WPCP) is one way to improve the
state’s K-12 educational system — despite that it will
cost taxpayers $7.4 million during the 2014-15 school
year and is entirely funded by general purpose revenue.
I
“
The legislature shall provide by law for the establishment of
district schools, which shall be as nearly uniform as practicable.
-Article X, Section 3 of the Wisconsin Constitution
In reality, expanding the statewide school voucher
program will divert even more tax dollars away from
public schools while continuing the state’s disturbing
trend of underfunding not one, but two separate school
systems. This would be especially harmful to our rural
schools, many of which are in desperate need of
additional funding.
It’s no secret that Wisconsin’s rural schools are
struggling. Rural schools face a unique set of challenges
as they work to provide nearly 44 percent of Wisconsin’s
PreK-12th grade students with a high quality education.
Transportation funding has become a perennial issue
for rural school districts. Providing children transport
to and from school takes up an enormous portion of
rural district budgets. With state transportation aids no
longer keeping up with the rising costs associated with
”
this essential service, rural districts are often unable to
offer teaching positions with competitive wages. This
wage discrepancy makes it difficult to attract and retain
teachers, many of whom choose to take higher-paying
positions in urban districts. Other issues challenging rural
schools, such as slow, unreliable Internet connections and
a lack of funding for foreign language and art programs,
do little to entice new teachers as well.
While there is nothing inherently wrong with private
schools, they should not receive tax dollars — especially
not when Wisconsin’s rural schools continue to suffer
from chronic underfunding. Unfortunately, this is exactly
what is happening. In many cases, the only way for rural
communities to make up for fewer state dollars is to
increase local property taxes. One need not look far for
examples of school districts affected by decreases in state
funding. The communities of Black River Falls, Altoona
and Mondovi all voted on referenda this past November
to raise property taxes in order to help fund improvements
to their public schools. Expanding the statewide school
voucher program will force even more communities to
make a difficult choice: increase property taxes to fund
needed improvements to their schools or continue to
make do with schools that lack essential resources and, in
some cases, are literally beginning to fall apart.
There are other reasons for concern as well. In certain
cases, rural children are not provided the same opportunity
to attend voucher schools under WPCP as children living
in metropolitan areas. This is because in its current form,
the statewide school voucher program does not cover the
costs of transporting a child to a participating voucher
school, nor does it require those schools to provide that
transportation. In other words, even if awarded a voucher,
a child living in a rural district may be unable to use it if
his or her parents cannot arrange transportation.
Supporters argue that one advantage of the voucher
program is that it gives parents the option to send their
children to the school (public or private) that they believe
is the best fit for their child. Currently, the program is not
being used in such a manner. According to Department
Continued on page 5
▶
WFUNews
News •| December
2014
WFU
Fall
November
20102011
wisconsinfarmersunion.com
Farmers Union News
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VOUCHERS from p.4
Farmer’s Share of Retail Food Dollar
Did you know that farmers and ranchers receive only 15.8* cents of every food dollar that consumers spend on
food at home and away from home?
According to USDA, off farm costs including marketing, processing, wholesaling, distribution and retailing
account for more than 80 cents of every food dollar spent in the United States.
Above: The vast majority of vouchers are going to children
who already attend private schools.
of Public Instruction enrollment information, a mere 19.2 percent
of the 538 students new to the program in the 2014-15 school
year were enrolled in a public school the year prior.
Senator Luther Olsen (R – Ripon) pretty much summed it
up in the following statement printed in The Milwaukee Journal
Sentinel: “The question is, what is the purpose of this program?
Is it a program to help poor kids get out of public schools, or is it
a program to pay for the tuition of kids who are already in private
schools? It’s pretty obvious from the last two go-rounds (of
applications) that it’s the latter.”
So, what can be done to put Wisconsin back on the right track
when it comes to school funding? Instituting “Fair Funding for
Our Future,” a plan put forward by State Superintendent Tony
Evers, would be a significant step in the right direction. This
program would not only revamp Wisconsin’s broken school
funding formula so that rural school districts receive the increased
state aid that they deserve, it would begin the journey towards
two-thirds state funding of costs associated with public education.
It is also essential for the Wisconsin Legislature to implement the
recommendations of the bipartisan Rural Schools Task Force,
which include logical ideas such as increasing categorical aids
(especially sparcity aids) to rural school districts and instituting a
student loan forgiveness program for new teachers who choose to
teach in rural school districts.
In a recent statement, Assembly Speaker Vos (R-Rochester)
and Joint Finance Committee Assembly Co-Chair Nygren
(R–Marinette) stated that they “have a responsibility to provide
a great education to every child in Wisconsin and protect the
interests of the taxpayer.” It is my hope that in the coming year,
all members of the state legislature take these responsibilities
seriously. A good first step in doing so would be to recognize that
expanding the statewide school voucher program would do far
more harm to the children of Wisconsin than good.
Bacon
1 Pound
Top Sirloin Steak
1 Pound
Bread
2 Pounds
Fresh Carrots
5 Pounds
Wheat Bagel
1 - 4 oz. bagel
Retail: $3.99
Farmer: $1.09
Retail: $8.79
Farmer: $2.56
Retail: $2.29
Farmer: $0.13
Retail: $4.39
Farmer: $1.31
Retail: $0.86
Farmer: $0.01
Cereal
18 Ounce Box
Tomatoes
1 Pound
Eggs
1 Dozen
Flour
5 Pounds
Boneless Ham
Price per Pound
Retail: $2.99
Farmer: $0.05
Retail: $1.99
Farmer: $0.46
Retail: $2.19
Farmer: $1.14
Retail: $1.88
Farmer: $0.67
Retail: $4.39
Farmer: $1.09
Lettuce
1 Head (2 Pounds)
Milk
1 Gallon, Fat Free
Potato Chips
Lays Classic, 10.5 oz
Fresh Potatoes
Russet, 5 Pounds
Soda
Two Liter Bottle
Retail: $2.19
Farmer: $0.58
Retail: $3.49
Farmer: $2.18
Retail: $3.00
Farmer: $0.20**
Retail: $4.99
Farmer: $0.42**
Retail: $1.49
Farmer: $0.05
Farmer’s share derived from USDA, NASS “Agricultural Prices,” 2014.
Retail based on Safeway (SE) brand except where noted.
*Figure according to U.S. Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service
**Reflects September 2014 price.
www.wisconsinfarmersunion.com
October 31, 2014
Farm Shop Safety | Brought to you by Hastings Mutual
A well-organized shop is essential to any agricultural operation. Make sure everything
has a designated place. Maintain walkways to reduce trips and falls. When working on
agricultural equipment, make sure that the equipment is turned off, all rotating parts
have stopped moving and safety locks put in place. Keep all guards and shields in
place on power equipment. Use hand tools only for their intended purpose. Shop
should be equipped with GFCI’s to help prevent electrical shock. You should have
at least one 10-pound ABC fire extinguisher. Keep your shop well lit. If the shop is
heated, ensure that it is properly vented. Personal protective equipment should be
worn when performing repair jobs.
Farmers Union members,
Hastings Mutual has you covered!
Now, with your Farmers Union membership, you
will receive a 9% special group discount on your
Hastings Mutual Farmowners policy premium!
Wisconsin Farmers Union
117 W Spring St., Chippewa Falls, WI 54729
1-800-272-5531 • [email protected]
Page 66
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Farmers Union News
WFU
News
• |December
WFUWFU
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News
November
| Fall 2014
2010
2011
The Elections that Never Happened
David Wright-Racette
Policy Organizer
O
RUSSELL
Bayfield
BAYFIELD
CLOVER
BELL
BAYVIEW
OULU
PARKLAND
Senate Districts
TRIPP
MAPLE
AMNICON
Washburn
WASHBURN
LAKESIDE
Superior
Oliver
SUPERIOR
BARKSDALE
Poplar
BRULE
IRON RIVER
EILEEN
GINGLES
HUGHES
Lake
Nebagamon
HAWTHORNE
SANBORN
KEYSTONE
Senate Districts
Bayfield
Douglas
2011 Wisconsin Act 43
Ashland
PILSEN
STATE OF WISCONSIN
STATE OF WISCONSIN
LA POINTE
PORT WING
ORIENTA
CLOVERLAND
Superior
OAKLAND
SAXON
KIMBALL
GURNEY
DELTA
MASON
KELLY
BENNETT
SUMMIT
Hurley
Montreal
Mason
HIGHLAND
SOLON SPRINGS
BAYFIELD
Solon Springs
DOUGLAS
Iron
ASHLAND
LINCOLN
PENCE
MARENGO
ANDERSON
Mellen
DRUMMOND
BARNES
Michigan
CAREY
GRANDVIEW
GORDON
OMA
MORSE
KNIGHT
DAIRYLAND
25
MINONG
ASHLAND
JACOBS
MERCER
LAND O'LAKES
FROG CREEK
Minong
SPIDER LAKE
LENROOT
SHANAGOLDEN
Washburn
BOULDER JUNCTION
CHICOG
SHERMAN
GULL LAKE
STINNETT
ROUND LAKE
BROOKLYN
Hayward
Burnett
PHELPS
CONOVER
PLUM LAKE
CHIPPEWA
HAYWARD
VILAS
Butternut
SCOTT
CASEY
TREGO
SPRINGBROOK
TIPLER
BASS LAKE
SAWYER
BASS LAKE
WASHBURN
Webster
LINCOLN
Florence
ALVIN
HUNTER
WEST MARSHLAND
Sawyer
JACKSON
BURNETT
MEENON
SAND LAKE
ARBOR VITAE
LAC DU FLAMBEAU
EISENSTEIN
Park Falls
WASHINGTON
CLOVERLAND
ST. GERMAIN
Eagle River
LAKE
Price
COMMONWEALTH
POPPLE RIVER
OJIBWA
SAND LAKE
FERN
LONG LAKE
WOODRUFF
FIFIELD
CRYSTAL
Spooner
Winter
MINOCQUA
Siren
SIREN
LA FOLLETTE
BASHAW
DEWEY
PRICE
FLAMBEAU
MADGE
Radisson
COUDERAY
WINTER
LAKE
TOMAHAWK
HAZELHURST
EDGEWATER
LORAIN
ROOSEVELT
BARRONETT
MCKINLEY
MAPLE PLAIN
LAKELAND
29
WEIRGOR
LONG LAKE
SARONA
METEOR
MEADOWBROOK
Exeland
Birchwood
EMERY
WILSON
MURRY
BIG FALLS
HUBBARD
CEDAR RAPIDS
SOUTH FORK
12
PIEHL
PELICAN
MONICO
MILLTOWN
JOHNSTOWN
CUMBERLAND
STANFOLD
FLAMBEAU
Rice Lake
DOYLE
WILKINSON
DEWEY
TRUE
Glen Flora
BEAVER
BRADLEY
NASHVILLE
LINCOLN
CLAYTON
RICHLAND
CATAWBA
Tomahawk
OSCEOLA
Weyerhaeuser
GROW
GRANT
THORNAPPLE
STRICKLAND
BARRON
TURTLE LAKE
Clayton
ARLAND
Amery
OGEMA
LAWRENCE
ALDEN
MAPLE GROVE
PRAIRIE FARM
BLACK BROOK
CLEAR LAKE
Clear Lake
VANCE CREEK
RUSK
DOVRE
BIG BEND
WASHINGTON
SAMPSON
WILLARD
MARSHALL
MCKINLEY
PERSHING
CLEVELAND
UPHAM
SCHLEY
SHERIDAN
SAND CREEK
BLOOMER
CLEVELAND
Cornell
TIFFANY
GLENWOOD
ST. CROIX
HAY RIVER
OTTER CREEK
GRANT
COOKS VALLEY
Glenwood City
Downing
Wheeler
TAFT
Lublin
ARTHUR
MAPLEHURST
BERN
DEER CREEK
LITTLE BLACK
HOLWAY
HALSEY
BALDWIN
SHERMAN
STANTON
SPRINGFIELD
Hammond
Baldwin
Wilson
Woodville
EAU GALLE
RUSH
RIVER
HOWARD
ANSON
TILDEN
THORP
HIXON
WITHEE
HOLTON
HOARD
Stanley
Boyd
Cadott
LUCAS
SIGEL
EDSON
WORDEN
PLOVER
RINGLE
NORRIE
WILSON
LUDINGTON
LONGWOOD
GREEN GROVE
COLBY
CLARK
BUTLER
MEAD
WARNER
HENDREN
EATON
Fall Creek
FRANKFORT
HULL
WIEN
CASSEL
MARATHON
MOSINEE
Stratford
EMMET
Weston
Plum City
PEPIN
Durand
DURAND
DRAMMEN
PLEASANT
VALLEY
CLEAR CREEK
OTTER CREEK
23
FAIRCHILD
Fairchild
MAXVILLE
CANTON
MONDOVI
NAPLES
ALBION
Strum
GILMANTON
NELSON
GARFIELD
CLEVELAND
NORTHFIELD
GARDEN VALLEY
SEIF
FREMONT
WESTON
MILLADORE
WASHINGTON
DEWHURST
ALMA
MONTANA
LINCOLN
BURNSIDE
Independence
LINCOLN
PIGEON
ROCK
CARY
WYOMING
Manawa
WAUPACA
ROYALTON
FARMINGTON
LANARK
GRAND
RAPIDS
CROSS
PINE GROVE
FRANKLIN
IRVING
FINLEY
ROME
NEW LYME
GRANT
LAFAYETTE
GREENFIELD
JUNEAU
SCOTT
LITTLE FALLS
LINCOLN
SPRINGWATER
ROSE
OASIS
PLAINFIELD
SAXEVILLE
BLOOMFIELD
LEON
POYSIPPI
WAUTOMA
DEERFIELD
LA CROSSE
Bangor
GERMANTOWN
Camp Douglas
WELLS
WILTON
RIDGEVILLE
CLIFTON
NEW CHESTER
EASTON
SENECA
NEPEUSKUN
BERLIN
ST. MARIE
SHIELDS
HARRIS
WESTFIELD
LISBON
GREENFIELD
WASHINGTON
PORTLAND
SHELDON
PLYMOUTH
Montello
SPRINGVILLE
LINDINA
GREEN LAKE
MONTELLO
Elroy
KILDARE
WONEWOC
HAMBURG
CHRISTIANA
COON
CLINTON
WHITESTOWN
FOREST
HILLSBORO
STARK
UNION
GREENWOOD
SEVEN
MILE
CREEK
Union Center
Stoddard
Chaseburg
JEFFERSON
DELL PRAIRIE
Hillsboro
KINGSTON
MANCHESTER
ALTO
FOX LAKE
TRENTON
IRONTON
HENRIETTA
BLOOM
FOREST
Wyocena
Rock Springs
West Baraboo
DEKORRA
MERRIMAC
BEAR CREEK
RICHLAND
FRANKLIN
SAUK
ORION
EAGLE
RICHWOOD
Lodi
Bayside
8
IOWA
MOUNT IDA
PATCH GROVE
DODGEVILLE
WINGVILLE
Fennimore
Mount Hope
CROSS PLAINS
SPRINGDALE
Cobb
Dodgeville
BRIGHAM
LITTLE GRANT
NORTH
LANCASTER
Lancaster
CLIFTON
17
SOUTH
LANCASTER
LINDEN
PERRY
MIFFLIN
27
Blanchardville
Cassville
GRANT
WATERLOO
POTOSI
DUNN
New Glarus
Oregon
ADAMS
Argyle
GREEN
15
JORDAN
WIOTA
Waterford
JANESVILLE
JOHNSTOWN
MONROE
SYLVESTER
DECATUR
JEFFERSON
SPRING GROVE
SUGAR CREEK
BRADFORD
LA PRAIRIE
DARIEN
PLYMOUTH
Darien
ROCK
CLARNO
AVON
NEWARK
BELOIT
ROCHESTER
Cudahy
7
South
Milwaukee
Oak Creek
11
CLINTON
BRIGHTON
Twin Lakes
LINN
Genoa City
PARIS
Racine
Sturtevant
Elmwood Park
SOMERS
Projection: All data is projected
in Wisconsin Transverse Mercator
(WTM 83/91)
22
5
Kenosha
WHEATLAND
BLOOMFIELD
Walworth
WALWORTH
YORKVILLE
KENOSHA
LYONS
DELAVAN
Fontana-on-Geneva Lake
SHARON
Wind Point
North Bay
Union Grove
BURLINGTON
GENEVA
Delavan
Lake Geneva
TURTLE
Beloit
CALEDONIA
MOUNT PLEASANT
21
SPRING PRAIRIE
Paddock Lake
Williams Bay
Clinton
CADIZ
WAYNE
MONTICELLO
LAFAYETTE
Burlington
Elkhorn
ROCK
Orfordville
SPRING VALLEY
Browntown
South Wayne
GRATIOT
St. Francis
Greendale
RAYMOND
RACINE
Silver Lake
BRISTOL
Pleasant Prairie
SALEM
Sharon
Columbia
Sheboygan
Ozaukee
Dodge
27
22 00
11
0
12.5
25
Iowa
22 66
Dane
Grant
Iowa
DOVER
WALWORTH
RICHMOND
Janesville
Brodhead
Shullsburg
WHITE
OAK
SPRINGS
17
MILWAUKEE
East Troy
Fond du Lac
Green Lake
9
Washington
88
66
6
3
Franklin
Muskego
NORWAY
WATERFORD
TROY
LA GRANGE
11 88
Crawford
West
Milwaukee
Rochester
CENTER
MAGNOLIA
WHITEWATER
HARMONY
Albany
Monroe
Gratiot
NEW
DIGGINGS
Richland
Greenfield
28
Mukwonago
EAST TROY
LIMA
Milton
Footville
DARLINGTON
Benton
Hazel Green
VERNON
Eagle
Whitewater
MILTON
SEYMOUR
BENTON
HAZEL GREEN
Big Bend
MUKWONAGO
Hales
Corners
New Berlin
WAUKESHA
North Prairie
EAGLE
Palmyra
Wauwatosa
West Allis
GENESEE
OTTAWA
HEBRON
COLD SPRING
KOSHKONONG
Sauk
Milwaukee
Elm
Grove
5
14
Juneau
Shorewood
Fort Atkinson
SUMNER
ALBION
PORTER
UNION
BROOKLYN
ALBANY
ARGYLE
SHULLSBURG
Wauwatosa
DUNKIRK
Fox
Point
Marquette
Manitowoc
Calumet
Vernon
Whitefish
Bay
BROOKFIELD
WAUKESHA
SULLIVAN
JEFFERSON
OAKLAND
PALMYRA
RUTLAND
Bayside
River
Hills
Adams
Monroe
Glendale
Brookfield
Pewaukee
Waukesha
Wales
Rockdale
CHRISTIANA
Stoughton
OREGON
Brown
Deer
Pewaukee
33
DELAFIELD
Dousman
Sullivan
Mequon
4
Butler
Hartland
Delafield
SUMMIT
FARMINGTON
Thiensville
Menomonee
Falls
Lannon
Sussex
Chenequa
Oconomowoc LakeNashotah
CONCORD
FULTON
Cuba City
JAMESTOWN
Milwaukee
8
Germantown
LISBON
Jefferson
Edgerton
EXETER
Evansville
LAMONT
Darlington
SMELSER
Dickeyville
Shorewood
Elm Grove
16
DANE
MONTROSE
NEW GLARUS
YORK
FAYETTE
LAFAYETTE
ELK GROVE
PARIS
Whitefish
Bay
WILLOW SPRINGS
Belmont
Platteville
HARRISON
PLATTEVILLE
Butler
KENDALL
MOUNT
WASHINGTON Monticello PLEASANT
Potosi Tennyson
5
La Crosse
Minnesota
Brooklyn
MOSCOW
BELMONT
Glendale
RICHFIELD
ERIN
MERTON
Merton
Oconomowoc
Johnson Creek
AZTALAN
LAKE MILLS
Cambridge
Belleville
WALDWICK
LIMA
BLANCHARD
4
ASHIPPUN
Lac La Belle
WATERTOWN
JEFFERSON
Lake Mills
Deerfield
PLEASANT
SPRINGS
PRIMROSE
Hollandale
Mineral Point
Rewey
ELLENBORO
DEERFIELD
COTTAGE GROVE
MINERAL POINT
BEETOWN
Cedarburg
GERMANTOWN
LEBANON
OCONOMOWOC
McFarland
Verona
VERONA
Linden
Livingston
Cottage Grove
BLOOMING
GROVE
Madison Monona
BLUE MOUNDS
RIDGEWAY
LIBERTY
Bloomington
CASSVILLE
Grafton
Watertown
MILFORD
WATERLOO
GRAFTON
Jackson
POLK
13
SHIELDS
Waterloo
Marshall
MADISON
Fitchburg
Patch Grove
BLOOMINGTON
26
Shorewood Hills
Mount Horeb
Ridgeway
EDEN
Montfort
WYALUSING
GLEN HAVEN
Slinger
Hartford
Neosho
IXONIA
Blue Mounds
Barneveld
FENNIMORE
MIDDLETON
Middleton
Bagley
Reeseville
YORK
SUN PRAIRIE
Maple Bluff
Cross Plains
VERMONT
CASTLE ROCK
Highland
Milwaukee County Inset
Fox Point
BRISTOL
Sun Prairie
MEDINA
WYOMING
HICKORY GROVE
WOODMAN
PORT
WASHINGTON
Port
Washington
Saukville
CEDARBURG
JACKSON
EMMET
DeForest
BURKE
HIGHLAND
MARION
Brown Deer River Hills
VIENNA
Waunakee
WESTPORT
Black Earth
Woodman
Wauzeka
MILLVILLE
MOUNT HOPE
Menomonee Falls
Dane
DANE
BERRY
Fredonia
SAUKVILLE
TRENTON
WEST BEND
HARTFORD
SPRINGFIELD
BLACK EARTH
Belgium
OZAUKEE
Newburg
West Bend
HERMAN
RUBICON
HUSTISFORD
MAZOMANIE
Mazomanie
Arena
ARENA
CLYDE
BOSCOBEL
WAUZEKA
BARTON
Iron Ridge
Hustisford
CLYMAN
Clyman
Sauk City
ROXBURY
FARMINGTON
KEWASKUM
WASHINGTON
ADDISON
HUBBARD
Juneau
Lowell
ELBA
COLUMBUS
PRAIRIE DU SAC
Lone Rock
PULASKI
MUSCODA
PRAIRIE DU CHIEN
BRIDGEPORT
WAYNE
THERESA
Horicon
OAK GROVE
BEAVER DAM
LOWELL
Columbus
PORTLAND
WATTERSTOWN
Prairie du Chien
BELGIUM
FREDONIA
Kewaskum
Theresa
Mayville
WILLIAMSTOWN
Beaver Dam
CALAMUS
Cedar Grove
HOLLAND
Fall River
HAMPDEN
LEEDS
WINDSOR
Avoca
Spring Green
MARIETTA
Boscobel
Miles
40
Random Lake
Kekoskee
BURNETT
WESTFORD
FOUNTAIN
PRAIRIE
Arlington
TROY
BUENA VISTA
SPRING GREEN
Muscoda
Blue River
Steuben
Oostburg
Adell
AUBURN
LOMIRA
DODGE
Randolph
COURTLAND
Doylestown
OTSEGO
ARLINGTON
WEST POINT
Prairie du Sac
Plain
SCOTT
HANEY
CRAWFORD
Eastman
Cambria
Rio
LOWVILLE
Poynette
LIMA
LYNDON
SHERMAN
SCOTT
Merrimac
SUMPTER
LODI
ITHACA
WILSON
Waldo
Cascade
MITCHELL
Lomira
ASHFORD
SPRINGVALE
COLUMBIA
BARABOO
FREEDOM
WESTFIELD
HONEY CREEK
Richland Center
Bell Center
SENECA
Lynxville
20
EDEN
BYRON
LEROY
CHESTER
CALEDONIA
GREENFIELD
Baraboo
North Freedom
Loganville
WASHINGTON
WILLOW
DAYTON
EASTMAN
20
WYOCENA
PACIFIC
REEDSBURG
Lime Ridge
ROCKBRIDGE
MARSHALL
Boaz
14
Pardeeville
FAIRFIELD
EXCELSIOR
WESTFORD
RICHLAND
SYLVAN
AKAN
®
SHEBOYGAN
OSCEOLA
Eden
Campbellsport
Fox Lake
Portage
DELTON
Reedsburg
Cazenovia
Viola
CLAYTON
Gays Mills
Sheboygan
Sheboygan Falls Kohler
Brownsville
Friesland
Ironton
Yuba
LIBERTY
KICKAPOO
Readstown
Soldiers Grove
UTICA
Mount Sterling
OAKFIELD
SCOTT
MARCELLON
Viroqua
FRANKLIN
STERLING
De Soto
FREEMAN
SHEBOYGAN
Waupun
FORT WINNEBAGO
LEWISTON
Lake Delton
La Valle
WHEATLAND
Ferryville
WAUPUN
MOSEL
Howards Grove
SHEBOYGAN
FALLS
EMPIRE
Oakfield
MACKFORD
Cleveland
HERMAN
RHINE
Elkhart Lake
Glenbeulah
Plymouth
RANDOLPH
NEWPORT
DELLONA
CENTERVILLE
MEEME
SCHLESWIG
Kiel
RUSSELL
MARSHFIELD
PLYMOUTH
FOND DU LAC
MOUNDVILLE
Wisconsin Dells
WINFIELD
WOODLAND
La Farge
9
New Holstein
NEW HOLSTEIN
CALUMET
GREENBUSH
FOND DU LAC
Kingston
BUFFALO
CHARLESTOWN
NEWTON
LIBERTY
St. Nazianz
FOREST
Brandon
Manitowoc
Valders
EATON
BROTHERTOWN
Wonewoc
LA VALLE
WEBSTER
VIROQUA
32
GENOA
Projection: All data is projected in Wisconsin Transverse Mercator,
referenced to the North American Datum of 1983, 1991 adjustment.
Fairwater
Markesan
DOUGLAS
NEW HAVEN
LYNDON
SUMMIT
Westby
VERNON
HARMONY
Genoa
Endeavor
Lyndon Station
CATO
ROCKLAND
MANITOWOC
TAYCHEEDAH Mount Calvary
St. Cloud
Marquette
Ontario
Coon Valley
MANITOWOC
RAPIDS
Potter
Chilton
LAMARTINE
SPRINGVALE
METOMEN
MANITOWOC
Whitelaw
RANTOUL
Hilbert
CHILTON
STOCKBRIDGE
Fond du Lac
MARQUETTE
PACKWAUKEE
Two Rivers
Reedsville
WOODVILLE
Stockbridge
North
Fond du Lac
GREEN LAKE
MECAN
Oxford
JACKSON
LEMONWEIR
OXFORD
Cashton
BERGEN
BLACK
WOLF
ELDORADO
Rosendale
GLENDALE
WELLINGTON
KOSSUTH
Brillion
Sherwood
CALUMET
FRIENDSHIP
ROSENDALE
Ripon
Green Lake
Mauston
JEFFERSON
NEKIMI
UTICA
RIPON
BROOKLYN
Princeton
PRINCETON
MARION
Wilton
Kendall
Source: U.S. Census Bureau's TIGER 2010 data was used in the creation of these districts.
The districts were used for the fall 2012 elections.
18
Berlin
Neshkoro
NESHKORO
Westfield
New Lisbon
FOUNTAIN
Norwalk
Melvina
SHELBY
Oshkosh
OMRO
RUSHFORD
DAKOTA
CRYSTAL LAKE
MARQUETTE
ADAMS
QUINCY
Hustler
LEON
NEWTON
LINCOLN
CLEARFIELD
OAKDALE
BANGOR
BARRE
AURORA
WARREN
COLOMA
SPRINGFIELD
Adams
ORANGE
TOMAH
MONROE
Rockland
West Salem
Friendship
Oakdale
ADRIAN
Sparta
HAMILTON
Onalaska
ALGOMA
Omro
Lohrville
MARION
RICHFORD
ADAMS
Tomah
ANGELO
ONALASKA
RICHFIELD
Coloma
Necedah
SPARTA
BURNS
Holmen
CAMPBELL
MEDARY
10
OSHKOSH
WINNECONNE
POYGAN
PRESTON
STRONGS PRAIRIE
CUTLER
Francis Creek
FRANKLIN
MAPLE GROVE
BRILLION
Neenah
NEENAH
VINLAND
Winneconne
MOUNT MORRIS
Wautoma
Redgranite
BYRON
Wyeville
La Crosse
0
CLAYTON
WINNEBAGO
Wild Rose
WAUSHARA
Hancock
HANCOCK
COLBURN
BIG FLATS
MONROE
NECEDAH
LA GRANGE
32
TWO
CREEKS
Mishicot
HARRISON
Menasha
LEOLA
ARMENIA
KINGSTON
Warrens
MELROSE
FARMINGTON
HOLLAND
Winnebago
MISHICOT
GIBSON
Maribel
Kellnersville
WINCHESTER
Waushara
Denmark
COOPERSTOWN
MORRISON
HOLLAND
MENASHA
MANCHESTER
Melrose
NORTH BEND
GALE
Minnesota
CARLTON
FRANKLIN
BROWN
WRIGHTSTOWN
Wrightstown
Appleton
Fremont
WOLF RIVER
Galesville
CALEDONIA
Trempealeau
ROCKLAND
LAWRENCE
KAUKAUNA
Little Chute Kaukauna
BUCHANAN
Kimberly Combined Locks
GREENVILLE
DALE
FREMONT
Plainfield
Ettrick
DODGE
TREMPEALEAU
FREEDOM
VANDENBROEK
19
CALEDONIA
DAYTON
BELMONT
Almond
TWO RIVERS
BUFFALO
Website: http://www.legis.wisconsin.gov/redistricting
CENTER
GRAND CHUTE
WEYAUWEGA
ALMOND
BEAR BLUFF
TREMPEALEAU
ARCADIA
Fountain City
Legislative Technology Services Bureau
17 West Main Street, Suite 200
Madison, WI 53703-3305
(608) 266-6640 Ext. 1
OUTAGAMIE
Hortonville
Weyauwega
NEW DENMARK
LIND
24
SARATOGA
ETTRICK
Brown
11 99
Trempealeau
WEST KEWAUNEE
GLENMORE
2
Jackson
Kewaunee
MONTPELIER
EATON
LEDGEVIEW
HORTONIA
Waupaca
GRANT
Nekoosa
MUKWA
ELLINGTON
BUENA VISTA
Port Edwards
CRANMOOR
PORT EDWARDS
Buffalo
HUMBOLDT
BELLEVUE
Outagamie
Portage
Wood
Algoma
CASCO
LUXEMBURG
Green Bay
Allouez
De Pere
BLACK CREEK
LITTLE WOLF
LIBERTY
Kewaunee
Waupaca
24
Ashwaubenon
ONEIDA
Shiocton
PIERCE
Casco
Luxemburg
HOBART
Seymour
Black Creek
BOVINA
MAPLE
CREEK
LEBANON
Ogdensburg
New London
DEXTER
KNAPP
SEYMOUR
CICERO
MAINE
Bear Creek
OSBORN
ST. LAWRENCE
KEWAUNEE
GREEN
BAY
SCOTT
Howard
Nichols
BEAR CREEK
WAUPACA
SCANDINAVIA
REMINGTON
MILLSTON
RED RIVER
SUAMICO
PITTSFIELD
MAPLE GROVE
LESSOR
UNION
DEER CREEK
Iola
Scandinavia
Amherst
AMHERST
PLOVER
Wisconsin Rapids
HILES
CITY POINT
KOMENSKY
JACKSON
BROCKWAY
Arcadia
Buffalo City
MILTON
31
AHNAPEE
LINCOLN
1
Door
30
STURGEON
BAY
FORESTVILLE
BRUSSELS
UNION
LITTLE SUAMICO
Oconto
Shawano
Clark
Pepin
Sturgeon Bay
CLAY
BANKS
2
NAVARINO
MATTESON
Clintonville
DUPONT
Big Falls
HELVETIA
IOLA
Amherst Junction
Plover
Biron
ADAMS
Black River Falls
ALBION
1
GARDNER
PENSAUKEE
ABRAMS
CHASE
Pulaski
Nelsonville
STOCKTON
Whiting
LINWOOD
RUDOLPH
SIGEL
HIXTON
SPRINGFIELD
HARRISON
NEW HOPE
Stevens
Point Park Ridge
Rudolph
WOOD
SENECA
Hixton
CURRAN
Blair
MORGAN
ANGELICA
HARTLAND
Forestville
ALBAN
Rosholt
HULL
CARSON
SHERRY
RICHFIELD
WOOD
HANSEN
Taylor
PRESTON
GREEN VALLEY
Cecil
Bonduel
WAUKECHON
Embarrass
LARRABEE
Junction City
LYNN
SHERWOOD
Pittsville
Whitehall
31
GLENCOE
WAUMANDEE
Cochrane
WESCOTT
Shawano
BELLE PLAINE
PELLA
FAIRBANKS
Arpin
LEVIS
Merrillan
Alma Center
ALMA
BELVIDERE
GERMANIA
PORTAGE
Milladore
ARPIN
GRANT
WASHBURN
Vesper
HALE
Pigeon Falls
Alma
RICHMOND
HERMAN
SHAWANO
GRANT
FRANZEN
SHARON
DEWEY
EAU PLEINE
Auburndale
CAMERON
Neillsville
HEWETT
PINE VALLEY
CHIMNEY ROCK
Pierce
SEVASTOPOL
NASEWAUPEE
Gresham
SENECA
MORRIS
Elderon
AUBURNDALE
Hewitt
LINCOLN
YORK
MENTOR
DOVER
BUFFALO
Nelson
OCONTO
Bowler
Wittenberg
WITTENBERG
ELDERON
BEVENT
Marion
Granton
SUMNER
UNITY
MODENA
PEPIN
STILES
Gillett
Oconto Falls
Eland
REID
GUENTHER
KNOWLTON
BERGEN
Marshfield
Stockholm
Pepin
GREEN VALLEY
DAY
Oconto
Marshfield
Osseo
Eleva
Mondovi
FRANKFORT
MCMILLAN
SPENCER
MARSHFIELD
ALBANY
LIMA
MAIDEN ROCK
DOOR
OCONTO FALLS
Hatley
KRONENWETTER
Mosinee
Tigerton
SHERMAN
LOYAL
FOSTER
ISABELLE
STOCKHOLM
UNDERHILL
RED SPRINGS
BARTELME
ALMON
BIRNAMWOOD
RIB MOUNTAIN
MARATHON
CLEVELAND
EAU PLEINE
BRIGHTON
UNITY
BEAVER
Loyal
BRIDGE CREEK
Augusta
Bay City
Maiden Rock
Lena
GILLETT
Spencer
EAU CLAIRE
Eau Claire
EGG
HARBOR
Menominee
29
JACKSONPORT
LITTLE RIVER
Greenwood
LINCOLN
BRUNSWICK
ROCK CREEK
PERU
WAUBEEK
WATERVILLE
30
PESHTIGO
LENA
SPRUCE
MAPLE VALLEY
HUTCHINS
Rothschild
Altoona
WASHINGTON
EAU GALLE
UNION
SALEM
Marathon
Dunn
Egg Harbor
Peshtigo
GROVER
Suring
MENOMINEE
Mattoon
Birnamwood
Schofield
Unity
SEYMOUR
Eau Claire
UNION
SPRING BROOK
DUNN
ROCK ELM
HARTLAND
BAILEYS
HARBOR
Marinette
Coleman
BRAZEAU
POUND
HOW
WESTON
Marathon City
Elk Mound
WESTON
Elmwood
Ellsworth
PIERCE
TRENTON
GIBRALTAR
BAGLEY
ANIWA
Fenwood
SPRING LAKE
EL PASO
TRIMBELLE
DIAMOND
BLUFF
St. Croix
PORTERFIELD
Curtiss
Owen
Colby
RESEBURG
HALLIE
RED CEDAR
MENOMONIE
GILMAN
EASTON
ELLSWORTH
OAK GROVE
BREED
NORWOOD
ROLLING
HARRISON
MENOMINEE
WAUSAU
STETTIN
Edgar
LAFAYETTE
BEAVER
Wausau
Withee
Abbotsford
WHEATON
ELK MOUND
Menomonie
MARTELL
HEWITT
TEXAS
Brokaw
RIB FALLS
RIETBROCK
Thorp
Chippewa
Falls
CADY
JOHNSON
MAYVILLE
Spring Valley
RIVER FALLS
MAINE
Dorchester
DELMAR
GOETZ
COLFAX
River Falls
CLIFTON
Prescott
BERLIN
HAMBURG
Aniwa
Colfax
DUNN
Knapp
PLEASANT
VALLEY
KINNICKINNIC
TAINTER
OCONTO
White Lake
EVERGREEN
POLAR
Antigo
Athens
HAMMOND
Hudson
ANTIGO
ACKLEY
ROOSEVELT
WARREN
Roberts
Sister Bay
Ephraim
PINE RIVER
SCOTT
COLBURN
WOODMOHR
Boyceville
GOODRICH
Pound
EAGLE POINT
HUDSON
Chippewa
LIBERTY
GROVE
Crivitz
DOTY
BROWNING
HAMMEL
FORD
Medford
CHIPPEWA
Bloomer
Merrill
MEDFORD
Gilman
AURORA
ESTELLA
North Hudson
WAGNER
RIVERVIEW
WOLF RIVER
CORNING
LAKE
WILSON
Langlade
Taylor
MIDDLE INLET
STEPHENSON
LANGLADE
PRICE
NEVA
PECK
VILAS
MERRILL
LAKEWOOD
TOWNSEND
LANGLADE
ROCK FALLS
HARDING
GREENWOOD
GROVER
MOUNTAIN
NEW HAVEN
AUBURN
ST. JOSEPH
RIB LAKE
Rib Lake
CHELSEA
MOLITOR
SUMMIT
RUSSELL
BIRCH
JUMP RIVER
TAYLOR
LAKE
HOLCOMBE
BIRCH CREEK
RUBY
FOREST
EMERALD
ERIN PRAIRIE
23
WASHINGTON
Wausaukee
AINSWORTH
WESTBORO
CHETEK
SIOUX CREEK
New Auburn
CYLON
New Richmond
RICHMOND
Marinette
Lincoln
WAUSAUKEE
FREEDOM
ELCHO
Ridgeland
Deer Park
STANTON
PARRISH
SKANAWAN
TOMAHAWK
LINCOLN
PRAIRIE LAKE Chetek
Dallas
DALLAS
Prairie Farm
Star Prairie
STAR PRAIRIE
Somerset
TROY
SILVER CLIFF
SPIRIT
HILL
STUBBS
Sheldon
FARMINGTON
SOMERSET
Rusk
Barron
HARRISON
KENNAN
HAWKINS
SUMNER
Cameron
Barron
AMBERG
ATHELSTANE
WABENO
CLINTON
Almena
Conrath
GARFIELD
SCHOEPKE
ENTERPRISE
Polk
MARINETTE
LINCOLN
KING
WILSON
SOMO
10
BLACKWELL
KNOX
PRENTICE
PEMBINE
DUNBAR
BEECHER
LAONA
Forest
12
NIAGARA
Crandon
STANLEY
BARRON
ALMENA
Turtle Lake
Prentice
Catawba
Hawkins
Ingram
Ladysmith
Bruce
APPLE RIVER
Dresser
Osceola
Kennan
RUSK
ATLANTA
Tony
BALSAM LAKE
POLK
St. Croix Falls
CRYSTAL LAKE
Balsam Lake
Centuria
ST. CROIX FALLS
GEORGETOWN
Niagara
AURORA
ARMSTRONG CREEK
FOREST
CRANDON
o
EUREKA
RICE LAKE
CASWELL
GOODMAN
WOODBORO
NOKOMIS
HARMONY
CRESCENT
Cumberland
HOMESTEAD
ROSS
STELLA
Rhinelander
HACKETT
GEORGETOWN
CEDAR LAKE
PINE LAKE
CASSIAN
LITTLE RICE
LYNNE
Haugen
OAK GROVE
Luck
ARGONNE
ONEIDA
WORCESTER
Phillips
ELK
BEAR LAKE
LUCK
NEWBOLD
FENCE
BIRCHWOOD
CLAM FALLS
BONE LAKE
Frederic
Milltown
FLORENCE
RADISSON
BEAVER BROOK
Shell Lake
WEST SWEDEN
LAKETOWN
Lake Mic
higan
DANIELS
TRADE LAKE
10
HILES
THREE LAKES
Lake Win
nebag
WOOD RIVER
SUGAR CAMP
Couderay
GRANTSBURG
ANDERSON
STERLING
Oneida
LINCOLN
STONE LAKE
SPOONER
FLORENCE
DRAPER
RUSK
EVERGREEN
Grantsburg
Vilas
MANITOWISH
WATERS
PEEKSVILLE
AGENDA
WEBB LAKE
SWISS
OAKLAND
UNION
Ashland
25
PRESQUE ISLE
50 Miles
Lafayette
15
Green
16
Jefferson
Rock
44
22 88
Waukesha
33 33
55
33
Milwaukee
13
Walworth
Lake Mic
higan
BLAINE
NAMAKAGON
WINCHESTER
IRON
GORDON
CABLE
Lake Win
nebago
WASCOTT
Michigan
WHITE RIVER
RANDALL
n Tuesday,
Nov. 4, voters
had the opportunity
to exercise their
right to vote for
the people they thought would best
represent their district and the state
of Wisconsin. Or did they?
This election featured an
unprecedented number of
uncontested races, leaving voters
without a legitimate choice to
make at the polls. Fifty-two of the
99 state Assembly races featured
candidates running without any
major party opposition, and 47 of
those faced no opposition at all. On
the state Senate side, only three of
the races resulted in candidates that
were separated by 10 percentage
points or less when the final votes
were tallied.
This lack of competition
and choice across the state
disenfranchises voters and is bad
for democracy.
So how did Wisconsin, a purple
state that almost always features
competitive elections for governor
and president, become a place
where only a handful of state
Assembly and state Senate races
are competitive or even contested?
Every 10 years state Senate,
Assembly, and Congressional
district lines are redrawn to ensure
districts contain approximately
the same number of people. This
process, called redistricting, is
performed by state legislatures
unless they delegate the power to
another entity.
Redistricting has become an
increasingly political process as
the parties work to pack voters
of the opposite party into as few
districts as possible to maximize
the number of potential victories
in the next election. As a result,
districts become less competitive
which discourages candidates from
running for office.
Both Democrats and
Republicans are guilty of drawing
district lines to their own advantage
and contributing to this problem.
Lake Superior
Lake Superior
77
22 11
Racine
22 22
Kenosha
Illinois
6
Lake
Michigan
2 0 1 3
-
2 0 1 4
W I S C O N S I N
S E N A T O R S
Illinois
w a the left shows Wisconsin’s current State Senate districts. The map on the right shows
Above: 3The mapI oon
hypothetical districts drawn by the non-partisan Legislative Reference Bureau. Below: The 21st and 22nd
Senate
districts
provide a stark example of the how politically driven redistricting.
28
7
In Wisconsin, the Democrats
The maps shown above are
have accused the Republicans of
hypothetical districts drawn by
gerrymandering the districts to
the non-partisan Legislative
their own advantage in 2011 and
Reference Bureau, which took a
are now calling for redistricting
similar approach to Iowa’s model
reform. Just across the border in
for redistricting for this exercise.
Illinois, however, the roles are
Notice how the non-partisan map
reversed. Republicans argue that the follows county lines much more
Democrats unfairly drew the district than our current map. Also notice
lines, and Illinois Republican State
how the districts in the non-partisan
Senate Leader Christine Radogno
map are compact and do not branch
Some say that they do not want
stated, “The single most important
off into parts of the state to avoid
to transfer redistricting power
reform that we could do in this state or pick up voting blocks. The 17th to an unelected commission
is one we have not done yet; that is district is a great example of this.
or agency because it would be
changing the mapping process.”
According to a Milwaukee
unaccountable. However, under
This is not solely a Democratic or Journal Sentinel article, had the
current redistricting it is impossible
Republican issue. Wisconsin should hypothetical maps been in place
to hold elected officials accountable
take a lesson from our neighbors
for the 2012 elections, there
when so many of our elections are
in Iowa, who have been using a
would have been 28 Assembly
uncontested or uncompetitive. This
non-partisan redistricting process
seats that were toss-ups. However, also leads to more partisanship and
since 1981. In Iowa, a non-partisan the legislatively drawn districts
polarization, as candidates who do
agency draws district lines for state resulted in only 11 toss-up seats in not fear electoral retribution move
and federal office without looking
the 2012 election.
to the extremes and bipartisanship
at any political data, such as past
The 21st and 22nd Senate
and compromise are exchanged for
election results. This has resulted
district map provides a stark
toeing the party line. Wisconsinites
in districts that are more compact,
example of how politically driven
deserve a non-partisan redistricting
follow county and municipal
redistricting creates odd shaped
system. As many have said, voters
lines more closely, and have more
districts that ignore county and
should be choosing their legislators,
competitive elections.
municipal lines.
not the other way around.
Brookfield
West
Milwaukee
West Allis
St. Francis
New Berlin
Greenfield
Frank Lasee (1)
Bob Cowles (2)
Tim Carpenter (3)
Lena Taylor (4)
Leah Vukmir (5)
Nikiya Harris (6)
Chris Larson (7)
Alberta Darling (8)
Joe Liebham (9)
Sheila Harsdorf (10)
Neal Kedzie (11)
Tom Tiffany (12)
Scott Fitzgerald (13)
Luther Olsen (14)
Tim Cullen (15)
Mark Miller (16)
Dale Schultz (17)
Rick Gudex (18)
Mike Ellis (19)
Glenn Grothman (20)
John Lehman (21)
Bob Wirch (22)
Terry Moulton (23)
Julie Lassa (24)
Bob Jauch (25)
Fred Risser (26)
Jon Erpenbach (27)
Mary Lazich (28)
Jerry Petrowski (29)
Dave Hansen (30)
Kathleen Vinehout (31)
Jennifer Shilling (32)
Paul Farrow (33)
Cudahy
Hales
Corners
Greendale
South
Milwaukee
Muskego
Franklin
Oak Creek
** Senate Districts are formed from three consecutive Assembly Districts. For example,
Senate District 1 is comprised of Assembly Districts 1, 2, and 3. Senate District 2 is comprised of Assembly Districts 4, 5 and 6,
and so on.
WFUNews
News •| December
2014
WFU
Fall
November
20102011
wisconsinfarmersunion.com
Farmers Union News
wisconsinfarmersunion.com
Page 77
Page
Election ‘coincidences’ the big winners
Alan Guebert
hile Republicans, Democrats and Independents
voted nationwide Nov. 4, coincidence, irony and
“Huh?” were the big winners Nov. 5.
For example, nationally, according to early numbers
from the Center for Responsive Politics, candidates
spent $3.7 billion on 2014 elections, the most in U.S. history, to get
Americans to vote for them. (http://farmandfoodfile.com/in-the-news/)
The money, however, according to data released by the University of
Florida, bought neither love nor votes. Only 36.4 percent of all eligible
voters went to the polls Nov. 4, the lowest percentage since 1942.
Money did play the key role in turning back the green tide of GMO
labeling initiatives in Colorado and Oregon.
Oregon’s labeling idea, Measure 92, lost 51-to-49 percent as Big
Food outspent pro-labelers $20 million to $8 million. Colorado’s labeling
measure was convincingly crushed 2-to-1 by voters after Big Food
poured another $12 million into that race.
Coincidentally (Ironically?), Maui County, Hawaii voters narrowly
agreed to ban the planting of GMO crops in their backyards. Big Seed,
including Syngenta, Monsanto, Pioneer and BASF, all maintain large
operations in the state because its climate allows three, sometimes four,
growth cycles per year.
The defeat, by a slim 1,007 votes out of nearly 45,000, was particularly
painful because the big firms outspent anti-GMO forces 87-to-1 ($12
million to about $140,000) and got still got beat. The companies quickly
promised legal action to have the pending ban declared unconstitutional.
Despite the decidedly mixed GMO election results, the U.S. Department
of Agriculture had no case of GMO dithers. On Friday, Nov. 7, it approved
for use a genetically modified potato and, later that same day, a new
variety of GMO alfalfa.
Coincidence? Irony? Coincidental irony?
Maybe the biggest Election Day “Huh?” arrived courtesy of Republican
Kansas where rock-ribbed Republican Sen. Pat Roberts beat his Independent
Party opponent, Greg Orman, by a rock-solid 10 points. Forecasters had
pegged the race whisker-close and some saw Roberts losing.
In his victory speech, Roberts, never one to be uncertain, claimed he
“always had confidence we would win.”
His Republican colleagues were far less sure. In the campaign’s
closing weeks the national GOP dropped an unprecedented $10 million
into his stumbling campaign and sent their biggest guns past, present and
future — Bob Dole, Mitt Romney, Sarah Palin, John McCain and Rand
Paul — to the Land of Ahs to pound Orman. It worked.
The victory puts Roberts in the rarest of ag air; the former House Ag
Committee chairman is now poised to become Senate Ag Committee chairman.
The seat, however, is already hot. No sooner had he claimed victory than
an old farm program nemesis, House Ag Committee’s ranking Democrat,
Collin Peterson, publicly warned him not to touch the 2014 Farm Bill
which Roberts so disliked that he voted against it. (On Nov. 11, Roberts
promised to leave the bill alone.)
W
Two more coincidences will dog Roberts as he reaches for the
committee gavel.
First, as boss of the House Ag Committee in 1996 the Kansan was the
principle force behind Freedom to Farm, that year’s Farm Bill designed
to decouple farm program payments from production controls. Its
estimated cost was $35.6 billion.
The decoupled idea, however, went south fast and F2F’s actual cost
from 1996 through 2002 (when a new Farm Bill replaced most of it) was
north of $120 billion.
Second, Roberts’ Wikipedia page—evidently not curated by the
Senator or his staff—notes that “During his tenure in the Senate, Roberts
missed 130 (65%) of his Agriculture Committee meetings.”
So the person who needed massive party help to get re-elected, has
missed the majority of Senate Ag Committee hearings and served as
principal author of a Farm Bill that cost four times its estimated price is
now poised to chair of the Senate Ag Committee.
That’s neither irony nor coincidence. That’s just politics today.
© 2014 ag comm
The Farm and Food File is published weekly through the U.S. and Canada. Past columns, events and contact information are posted atwww.
farmandfoodfile.com.
National Farmers Union
113th Anniversary Convention
Wichita, Kansas
March 14-17, 2015
www.nfu.org/convention
Page 88
Page
wisconsinfarmersunion.com
WFU
WFU News
News• |December
November2014
2011
Co-ops band together to educate youth for Co-op Career Day
Cathy Statz
the 1,001-panel Solar Farm is
Education Director the first community-owned solar
facility in the state.
tudents from
Through CEC’s model, any
Westby High member of the cooperative can
School learned
purchase panels from the shared
about the rich
farm — as few as one or enough
history and social to completely offset the energy
and economic impact of cooperatives
demands of a home or business.
Oct. 29 during the Vernon County
Credit for the power produced is
Co-op Career Day at Vernon Electric provided directly on members’
Cooperative.
monthly utility bills.
The event was coordinated by
The Solar Farm became
Wisconsin Farmers Union on
operational in June. Sheep are
behalf of the Vernon County
used to graze the area around the
Cooperative Association.
panels, keeping vegetation at bay
Westby Agriculture Instructor
in an eco-friendly way.
Erica Hoven brought 25 students to
The career day was one of a
meet with representatives from 13
number of special events WFU
local cooperatives. The students were attended during October Co-op
given an introduction to cooperatives Month.
and learned about each co-op’s
Summit Credit Union brought
mission, history and membership.
together co-ops for a Co-op
The students also learned
Connection event Oct. 4 in Madison,
about scholarship and internship
which showcased cooperatives to
opportunities with the cooperatives nearly 3,000 attendees. Barron
and were offered short-term and
and Dunn County cooperative
long-term goals for preparing for
communities co-hosted October
potential co-op related careers.
Co-op Month meals in Barron
The presentations at the career
and Menomonie, respectively;
day are personal and professional
each event traditionally reaches
snapshots of the incredible
over 1,000 cooperative owners
diversity of cooperatives in Vernon and community members. WFU
County. Students are introduced to
had booth representation at all
opportunities ranging from that first of these great events, as well as
job to a lifelong career that could
the Haunted Hustle fun run in
feature national — or even
Eau Claire, organized by Group
international — influence.
Health Cooperative of Eau Claire.
Viroqua Food Co-op and Westby
While October Co-op month is
Co-op Creamery graciously
an ideal time to spread the good
contributed to a lunch and snacks
word about cooperatives, WFU
for the youth.
continues carrying the message of
The students also toured the
the value of cooperatives yearVernon Electric Community Solar
round.
Farm, a 305-kilowatt clean power
Groups interested in hosting an
facility that was built this spring at educational session on co-ops are
the co-op’s headquarters in Westby. urged to contact WFU Education
Developed in partnership with
Director Cathy Statz at 715-723the national community solar
5561 or [email protected] Clean Energy Collective, sunion.com.
S
Above: Dave Maxwell, Vernon
Electric Cooperative marketing
and communications director,
chatted with Westby High School
students about the co-op’s
Community Solar Farm.
Right: Westby High School
students fed grain to the sheep
that graze the area around the
solar panels at Vernon Electric
Cooperative’s Community Solar
Farm, the state’s first communityowned solar project, during a
visit there for the Vernon County
Co-op Career Day Oct. 29.
Lessons Learned
In anonymous follow-up evaluations, the students who participated
in the Vernon County Co-op Career Day expressed surprise at what
they had learned:
• “[The most important thing I learned was] all the neat ways co-ops
have an impact on our town, and our world.”
• “I was surprised that co-ops around here reach out to other countries
around the world.”
• “[Co-ops are] very large influences in our community.”
• “There are so many cooperatives in the US, and that surprises me.”
• “I learned that all the money that goes into a cooperative stays within
the members and the community.”
• “I liked hearing about the make-up of cooperatives because I didn’t
know a lot about them.”
• “I was surprised to learn that cooperatives are everywhere — big
and small!”
WFUNews
News •| December
2014
WFU
Fall
November
20102011
wisconsinfarmersunion.com
Farmers Union News
SENIOR YOUTH:
CATCH UP WITH YOUR WFU
FRIENDS AT CONVENTION!
WHO: Grades 7-12 (younger youth welcome if accompanied)
WHAT: WFU Youth Co-op Convention
WHEN: January 23-25, 2015
(Official youth activities begin Saturday morning)
WHERE: The Plaza Hotel, 1202 W. Clairemont Ave, Eau Claire
(Reservations: 800-482-7829 - www.plazaeauclaire.com)
HOW: Talk with a youth leader or contact Cathy at 800-272-5531 or
[email protected]
Farmers Union youth from around the state are invited to attend
this weekend program featuring cooperative speakers and activities,
free time with friends, and the opportunity to learn more about the
Farmers Union, all at a great hotel with swimming pool!
NOTE FOR PARENTS: $30 early bird registration fee to WFU will
cover all meals for youth of all ages. Activities are geared to 7-12th
graders, though younger children are welcome to participate with an
adult or older sibling. Lodging costs are your own responsibility (or
contact your youth leader or county treasurer for funding availability). Go to www.plazaeauclaire.com for hotel information.
TO REGISTER for the program, contact Cathy at the WFU state
office or register online at www.wisconsinfarmersunion.com. A
signed consent form and on-site adult contact person is required for
all youth in attendance; contact Cathy for more information. A late
fee will be added to convention registrations received at the WFU
Office after the early bird deadline. Cancellations must be received
in writing or email by the final registration deadline in order to
receive a refund.
FOR ROOM RESERVATIONS, call the Plaza Hotel & Suites at
800-482-7829 and be sure to mention you are with the Wisconsin
Farmers Union group (block number 8325). Special room rate is
$83 (plus tax); reserve rooms no later than December 30, 2014.
wisconsinfarmersunion.com
Page 9
Page
Kamp Kenwood
Chippewa Falls, WI
2015 Summer Camp Information
W
isconsin Farmers Union sponsors overnight camps at WFU
Kamp Kenwood on Lake Wissota for young people from rural
and urban areas alike to enjoy a summer camp program with a
focus on cooperation and leadership.
Activities include:
hiking & campfires • swimming & sports
singing & drama • speakers & workshops
co-op games & theme nights • arts & crafts
2015 Camp Dates To Be Announced
Junior Camp • Junior High Camp • Combined Session • Senior Camp
(Junior and Senior camp prices range from $85-95)
For younger children & families:
Acorn Day Camp
(Ages 7 and up) $15 per child
Family Camp
(All Ages) $65 for 1 adult and up to 2 children
$25 each add’l adult; $15 each add’l child
Note: Non-members also must include $30 for a WFU family membership.
For more information:
Call: 800.272.5531 • Visit: www.wisconsinfarmersunion.com
Email: [email protected]
is a proud sponsor of
W
isconsin Farmers Union is
proud to sponsor this gem
of a television program. We value
Inga’s gift for presenting personal
stories in a way that connects
consumers to farmers and deepens
our shared appreciation for the core values of farming
and rural life.
Episodes of Around the Farm Table can be viewed
online at www.aroundthefarmtable.com.
Page 1010
Page
wisconsinfarmersunion.com
wisconsinfarmersunion.com
Farmers Union News
WFU
News
• |December
WFUWFU
News
News
November
| Fall 2014
2010
2011
Renewable Fuel Standard:
New Hope for Rural America
Darin Von Ruden
President
W
hen Congress
develops a
public policy that
yields several
different benefits,
it might be called a
“two-fer.” But when Congress passed
the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), a
law that mandated a minimum amount of
biofuels be blended into the nation’s fuel
supply, so many benefits spun out of that
one public policy that it would need to be
called a “five-fer.”
Clearly, one of the main arguments
behind the RFS was to help wean this
nation from expensive foreign oil – which
it has – but it has also boosted the farm
economy, provided more affordable
fuel to consumers, created new jobs in
rural America and helped improve the
environment.
The RFS mandated that 36 billion
gallons of ethanol, most of which
initially comes from corn, be blended
into the U.S. gasoline supply by 2022.
Almost overnight, a new domestic
market for U.S. corn was created,
boosting commodity prices for not
only corn farmers, but those who raised
other commodities as well. And when
farmers have more money, they spend
more money in rural areas, investing
in infrastructure and other farm-related
improvements that need to be made.
Every dollar that a farmer makes in a
given year generates seven dollars in the
local communities.
With home-grown biofuels, we are
not only being forced to purchase less
petroleum products from countries who
are not always our friends, but we’re
actually saving consumers money in the
process. A recent study from Iowa State
University showed that domestic ethanol
saved consumers an average of $1.09
per gallon of gasoline in 2011. Money
that once went up in smoke out of their
tailpipes can now be spent on durable
goods or food for their families. Money
that once flowed to the Middle East is
now staying in Wisconsin.
The passage of the RFS also sparked
a surge of investment in rural America,
primarily in building new ethanol plants
to produce enough biofuels to meet the
mandate. There are around ten ethanol
plants currently in Wisconsin, some of
which are owned by farmers. Those
plants not only create jobs in rural areas
that once held little opportunity for its
residents, but also provide a dependable,
alternative market for farmers to sell
their corn.
There is no doubt that Americanmade, farm-raised biofuels are also
much friendlier to the environment.
A recent study by Argonne National
Laboratory finds that corn ethanol reduces
greenhouse gas emissions by 34 percent
compared to gasoline.
The RFS has also provided a new
feed source for dairy farmers like me,
as well as the state’s cattle industry. One
mistaken notion about ethanol is that the
corn is used up, and in reality it’s not at
all. In fact, what is left after the sugars
are extracted from corn for the ethanol
process is an excellent feed source known
as dry distiller’s grains (DDGs). DDGs
are actually more digestible to many
ruminants than the corn itself because
the ethanol process breaks down the
starches and the animals actually get more
immediate use out of the grain.
One critic of the RFS is the food
industry, which has spent millions of
dollars on a misinformation campaign
to try and convince consumers that
diverting a portion of our corn crop to
ethanol is raising their food prices. That’s
a laughable argument, because when
you look at what percentage of a food
dollar actually goes back to farmers, it’s
miniscule.
Take a box of cereal, for example.
While consumers are paying nearly $4.69
for a box of corn flakes, farmers get about
one nickel. The biggest portion of the cost
of the food you buy is transportation and
advertising. And corn-based ethanol has
helped decrease the cost of fuel, so the
food industry’s argument really holds zero
validity.
Unfortunately, the U.S.
Environmental Protection Agency
(EPA) has proposed lowering the
renewable fuel requirement for 2014
by roughly 1.3 billion gallons and
slashing the overall RFS by roughly 3
billion gallons, a move that would have
dire consequences for both farmers
and the ethanol industry. EPA lacks the
authority to issue such a waiver unless
the domestic supply is insufficient or
severe economic harm would occur, so
allowing the proposal to stand means
bad results beyond this year.
The RFS has been good for family
farmers, good for consumers, good for
the environment and good for rural
America. Congress should renew its
commitment to renewable fuels and
stay the course on the RFS.
Kamp Kenwood
Cabin on Lake Wissota
Winter Fun
Business Retreats
Family Get-Togethers
Friends’ Night Out
Poker Parties
Youth Group Gatherings
Birthday & Holiday Parties
WFU Kamp Kenwood’s cozy cabin is
nestled on the shore of Lake
Wissota, adjacent to the scenic trails
of Lake Wissota State Park.
Available to rent from mid-October
through the end of April, our cabin
comfortably sleeps up to twelve
guests and features a full kitchen and two
bathrooms. This is the perfect destination
for smaller retreats or for people who
love outdoor recreation in all seasons.
Contact the Kamp Kenwood Caretaker at
715-214-7244 for rates and to reserve.
• 4 bedrooms
• Kitchen
• Living Room
• 2 bathrooms
• Stone fireplace
• Sleeps 10-12 people
Cabin comes equipped with bedding,
dishes, towels, and firewood.
WFU Kamp Kenwood
19161 79th Avenue • Chippewa Falls, WI 54729
Phone: 715.723.6137 • Fax: 715.723.6385
www.kampkenwood.com
www.wisconsinfarmersunion.com
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Meet the Farmers Union Family
Craig Myhre • WFU Vice President • Osseo, WI
T
hey say farming runs in the blood. If that’s the case, you might say Wisconsin
Farmers Union runs in Trempealeau County farmer Craig Myhre’s veins, too.
Myhre’s father, Ernest Myhre, was a long-time member of WFU, and Craig got
his first taste of the organization by tagging along with his dad to county meetings.
Craig has been on the WFU Board of Directors since 1997 and currently serves as
Vice President of the Executive Committee. He also represents Farmers Union on the
Wisconsin Agricultural Producer Security Council and Discovery Farms Steering
Committee and sits on the Wisconsin Farmers Union Foundation Board.
As District 4 Director, Craig is a voice for WFU members in Buffalo, Jackson, La
Crosse, Monroe and Trempealeau counties.
Craig grew up on a small dairy farm near Osseo, which, after attending short course
at UW-Madison, he ran in partnership with his sister. The family sold the cows in 2000,
turning to cash cropping. Craig continues to crop 400 acres and some additional rented
acreage and also does custom harvesting under his family farm name, Myville Farms.
This year, he combined around 1,200 acres on farms from Pigeon Falls to Osseo.
Craig worked in grain merchandising for more than a decade and has carried that
knowledge to the table, helping to form North Country Growers, a fledgling project of
Wisconsin Farmers Union that would facilitate sales of non-GMO soybeans grown in
western Wisconsin to Japanese food processors. Growers are expected to receive a $2
premium for the beans. WFU is in the process of securing both growers and buyers.
“I’m always thinking outside the box — some say too far outside the box,” Craig
joked from the seat of his combine as he harvested soybeans on a sunny November
afternoon. In all seriousness, though, he believes in the alternative market. “Non-GMO
is what the Japanese market wants; they’re very conscious of what they consume. We
all knew prices here were going to dive sooner or later; well, here we are.”
Myhre said he values Farmers Union for the opportunities it provides to further such
cooperative projects
“I started getting more involved in Farmers Union in the early 1990s,” he said,
noting he served on the NFU Policy Committee in 1992. “I’ve met a lot of people and
made a lot of friends through the years.”
He urges beginning farmers and other young people to step up in leadership roles
in their county chapters. “Farmers Union starts at that local level, teaching you the ins
and outs of the how the organization operates but also giving you a look at some of the
internal workings of farm policy and all that goes on,” he said. “It grows your mind.”
Watch for a feature on another Farmers Union member or family in next month’s
edition of Wisconsin Farmers Union News!
Member Moments
Sophia Elizabeth O’Connor
Introducing
Congratulations to WFU Government Relations Director Kara O’Connor and
her husband, Ryan, who welcomed a beautiful 8 lb. 9 oz. and 21-inch long
baby girl, Sophia Elizabeth O’Connor, at 5:30 a.m. on Wednesday, November
12th. Kara reports that mommy, daddy and baby are all doing well!
Sophia means Wisdom. In addition to liking the name, Kara and Ryan were
inspired after traveling through Turkey while expecting. There they visited a
famous 5th Century church in Istanbul called Hagia (Prounced Aya) Sophia, or
Church of Holy Widom. Sophia also turned up as one of the four statues at the
entrance to the Celsus Library, along with Arete (Virtue), Ennoia (Intelligence)
and Episteme (Knowledge).
The name Elizabeth comes from a favorite Bible story, the story of the
Visitation, in which Mary, who is pregnant with Jesus, visits her elderly relative
Elizabeth, who is pregnant with John the Baptist.
Congratulations Ryan and Kara!
Long-time WFU board member
Craig Myhre harvested soybeans
on a November afternoon.
Myhre, who farms near Osseo,
does custom harvesting.
Photos & story by Danielle Endvick
WFU Communications Director
Individual WFU members or families to feature in
the new monthly “Meet the Farmers Union Family”
section of Wisconsin Farmers Union News.
Doing great things on your farm or in your
community? Share it with the WFU family!
Also seeking fun “Member Moments” photos of
your family or critters around the farm or showing off your efforts in renewable energy, co-ops,
local foods or other areas vital to WFU!
Contact Communications Director Danielle
Endvick to be a part of these fun new features!
g g g 715-471-0398 g g g
[email protected]
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2011
United to
Grow Family
Agriculture
84th Annual State Convention
January 23-25, 2015
The Plaza • 1202 W. Clairemont Avenue • Eau Claire
Hotel Info: 800.482.7829 • www.plazaeauclaire.com
Convention Info: 715.723.5561 • www.wisconsinfarmersunion.com
FRIDAY January 23
Pre-Convention Conference —
“Moving Solar Energy Forward”
Join us for an update on the state of solar energy in
Wisconsin. Track 1 will cover the details of on-farm
and household solar installations and what you
need to do to take action on your own plans. Track
2 will feature a round-table discussion of opportunities and obstacles to financing and implementing
community and group solar projects in the state.
The two Tracks will start and wrap-up the day as we
envision a solar Wisconsin together. The cost will be
$30/nonmembers and $15/members.
Friday Night WFU Foundation Fundraiser
Plan to join in the fun as we raise money to support
WFU Kamp Kenwood. Tickets are $30 each or $50 for
a pair. Join us for food, socializing and a chance to win
great prizes! Visit www.wisconsinfarmersunion.com
to register and for more information.
SATURDAY January 24
Sessions throughout our 84th annual Wisconsin
Farmers Union State Convention will build upon
our motto of being “United to Grow Family Agriculture,” with morning topics touching on rural schools,
broadband access and high-capacity wells. An
afternoon panel, including stakeholders from both
sides of the issue, will address GMO labeling and
other emerging ag technologies.
Our keynote speakers this year will be National Farmers
Union President Roger Johnson and Frances Thicke,
well-known ‘agtivist,’ author and Iowa dairy farmer.
SUNDAY January 25
Our final day will include a morning worship service,
wrap-up of WFU resolutions and policy discussions,
and workshops on cover crops, checkoff programs, risk
management for dairy farms, hedging, and agritourism.
We hope you will join us for a great weekend!
EARLY BIRD REGISTRATION ENDS JANUARY 9th
Registration available online at www.wisconsinfarmersunion.com
Youth Convention • Daycare Available • Workshops • Entertainment • Local Food • Fellowship
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Please note the following before
mailing the registration form:
Wisconsin Farmers Union
84th annual State Convention
Registration and payment must be
mailed by Friday, Jan. 9, 2015 to receive
the early bird rate.
January 23-25, 2015
The Plaza • 1202 W. Clairemont Avenue • Eau Claire
800-482-7829 • www.plazaeauclaire.com
All delegates and voting individuals are
required to purchase the convention
registration and meals, which include
Saturday and Sunday meals. Delegates REGISTRATION FORM
who are also youth/youth leaders must
purchase a delegate registration and
meal package. Individual meal tickets
ATTENDEE INFORMATION
are available.
Indicate names with your package
and/or individual meal orders so we
can prepare tickets in advance for ease
during registration. Registration table
opens at 4:30 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 23
and will continue on Saturday, Jan.
24 at 7:30 a.m. Convention officially
opens at 9 a.m. Saturday.
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Please PRINT CLEARLY all information as you would like it to appear on your name
badge. Include a list of additional attendees and youth on a separate sheet.
Name(s)_______________________________________&___________________________________________
Address_______________________________________ City/State/Zip________________________________
County/Local___________________________________Phone_______________________________________
Email_________________________________________Cell_________________________________________
CIRCLE: Vegetarian Gluten-Free Other:______________________________________________________
Affiliation/Organization (guests/sponsors/exhibitors)______________________________________________
Payment contact, other than attendee (where applicable)__________________________________________
LODGING
The Plaza Hotel & Suites
202 W. Clairemont Avenue
REGISTRATION OPTIONS
Eau Claire, WI
for $83 (plus tax) per night. Guaranteed REGISTRATION & MEAL PACKAGE PLEASE NOTE THAT PACKAGE RATES INCLUDE ALL MEALS: Saturday lunch and banquet,
block rate ends Dec. 30! To reserve,
call 800-482-7829 and ask for the Sunday breakfast and lunch. Use Separate Meal Tickets area below for non-delegate guests who need an individual meal only.
Wisconsin Farmers Union group block
Type of Registrant
Early Bird Price on Regular Price after
# of Packages
Total
number 8325.
or before 1/9/15
The Convention Agenda is available at
www.wisconsinfarmersunion.com.
PRE-CONFERENCE SESSIONS
Arrive early to attend the special
Friday afternoon sessions, “Moving
Solar Energy Forward.” Join us from
noon to 4:15 for two special tracks,
“On-Farm and Household Solar”
or “Opportunities for Group and
Community Solar Projects.” The cost
is $30 for nonmembers and $15 for
members, including lunch. Please preregister by Jan. 9 as seating is limited.
WFU FOUNDATION FUNDRAISER
The WFU Foundation Fundraiser will
be held Friday, Jan. 23 from 6 to 9 p.m.
Tickets are $30/single or $50/couple
and can be purchased via the form at
www.wisconsinfarmersunion.com.
CHILD CARE & YOUTH CONVENTION
Child care will again be offered this
year during select times. Please note
names, ages and any special dietary
needs or care considerations for
your children and include with your
registration. Youth registration is $30.
For youth convention info, see page 9.
Cancellation Policy: Any cancellations
must be reported to the WFU State
Office by Friday, Jan. 16 (a week prior to
the event) in order to receive a refund.
Please call Diane at 800-272-5531.
1/9/15
DELEGATE Member
$60
$80
$
ADULT Member
$60
$80
$
NON-Member
$80
$100
$
YOUTH or YOUTH LEADER (Member)
(Please include a list of names)
$30
$50
$
Annual Membership (I wish to join WFU)
$30
$30
$
PRE-CONVENTION WORKSHOP “Moving Solar Energy Forward” — Friday afternoon track options (check one)
� TRACK 1: On-Farm and Household Solar
OR
� TRACK 2: Opportunities for Community and Group Solar Projects
Solar Workshop Registration (12-4:30 p.m.; includes lunch)
Nonmember
Member
Total
$30 x #_____
$15 x #_____
$
SEPARATE MEAL TICKETS Tickets available for non-delegate individuals who want to join us for meals only — includes programs.
Meal
(List attendee name after each meal)
Early Bird Member
Price on or before
1/9/15
Regular Member
Price after
1/9/15
NON-MEMBER
Rate
ONLY
# of
Tickets
Total
Saturday Lunch
$15
$19
$20
$
Saturday Banquet
$30
$35
$40
$
Sunday Breakfast
$13
$17
$20
$
Sunday Lunch
$12
$16
$20
$
REGISTRATION TOTAL $
MAIL REGISTRATION FORM WITH CHECK PAYABLE TO:
WISCONSIN FARMERS UNION, 117 W. Spring St., Chippewa Falls, WI 54729
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What’s on Your Table?
with Diane Tiry
Fresh from the D’Huyvetter Family Farm
I want to thank Donna and Pascal D’Huyvetter for sharing two
of their family’s favorite recipes for something special to add
to your holiday season. If you can tell a hint of French in the
recipes, it is because Pascal was born in Normandy, France.
He immigrated to the United States with his parents and four
siblings in 1969. Pascal’s parents first lived in Illinois and
farmed with a relative until 1971 when they purchased a farm by Humbird. They have dairy cows and grow crops.
In 1988, Pascal, Donna, and their oldest son moved to their own farm near
Fairchild. The family now includes seven more children, including three sons and
five daughters: Nickolas, 28; Pascale, 25; Caroline, 23; Lorelei, 21; Dominique, 18;
Remi, 17; Antonia, 14; and Lucca, 10. Two children have graduated college and
three are currently in college, two are in high school and the youngest is in elementary school. Three are majoring in an agricultural field. They have all helped
on the farm in one form or another, and we are hopeful that some of them will
continue the family farming tradition.
“The Christmas Yule log or Buche de Noel is a Christmas cake that Pascal’s
mother would make every Christmas,” Donna said. “Her recipe was a lot more
complicated. We found this recipe several years ago and now I make it with our
children and they even make it on their own.”
CHRISTMAS YULE LOG
Donna D’Huyvetter
Ingredients:
5 eggs, separated
1 cup sugar, divided
¾ cup cake flour
1/4teaspoon of salt
½ teaspoon cream of tartar
Mocha Cream Filling:
1 cup heavy whipping cream
½ cup confectioners’ sugar
1-1/2 teaspoon instant coffee granules
Mocha Buttercream Frosting:
1/3 cup butter, softened
1/3 cup baking cocoa
2 cups confectioners’ sugar
1-1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 tablespoon brewed coffee
2 to 3 tablespoons of whipping cream
Directions:
1. Line a 15 in. x 1 in. baking pan with parchment paper; grease the paper.
2. Place egg whites in a small bowl and let stand at room temperature for 30
minutes.
3. In a large bowl, beat egg yolks on high until light and fluffy. Gradually add ½
cup sugar, beating until thick and lemon-colored.
4. Combine flour and salt; gradually add to egg yolk mixture until blended.
5. Beat egg whites on medium until foamy. Add cream of tartar; beating on high
until stiff peaks form. Gradually add remaining sugar, beating on high until stiff
peaks form.
6. Stir a fourth into cake mixture. Fold in remaining egg whites.
7. Spread batter evenly in prepared pan.
8. Bake at 350 degrees for 12-15 minutes, until cake springs back (Don’t overbake).
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9. Cool for 5 minutes; invert by placing a linen towel dusted with confectioners’
sugar over the original pan and if you have a large cutting board use this so the
cake doesn’t fall onto the towel. Take off the pan and peel off parchment paper.
Roll up in the towel, starting with a short side. Cool on a wire rack.
10. In a bowl, beat cream until it begins to thicken. Add sugar and coffee granules.
Beat until stiff peaks form; chill.
11. Unroll cooled cake, spread filling to within ½ in. of edges. Roll up again.
Place on serving platter; chill.
12. In a bowl, beat frosting ingredients until smooth. Frost cake. Using a fork,
make lines resembling tree bark. Yield 12 servings.
GUMBO
Donna D’Huyvetter
This is a family favorite during the winter months. More spice can be added
depending on preference.
Ingredients:
1 cup flour
¾ cup bacon drippings
1 cup chopped celery
1 large onion, chopped
1 large green bell pepper, chopped
2 cloves of minced garlic
1 lb. Andouille sausage, sliced
3 quarts of beef broth
1 tablespoon sugar
salt to taste
2 tablespoons hot pepper sauce
1 teaspoon Cajun seasoning blend (or to taste)
4 bay leaves
1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
29 oz. stewed tomatoes
29 oz. tomato sauce
2 tablespoons bacon drippings
2 (10 oz.) packages of frozen cut okra
2 tablespoons white vinegar
1 lb. lump crabmeat
3 lbs. medium shrimp
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
Directions:
1 Make a roux by whisking the flour and ¾ cup bacon drippings together in a
large soup pot over medium-low heat to form a smooth mixture. Cook the roux
until it turns slightly brown. Make sure to whisk constantly. Remove from heat.
2. Place the celery, onion, pepper, and garlic into the roux. Mix in the sausage.
Bring the mixture to a simmer. Add the beef broth stir to mix well, heat to boiling.
Reduce to a simmer. Mix in the sugar, salt, hot pepper sauce, Cajun seasoning,
bay leaves, thyme, stewed tomatoes, and tomato sauce. Simmer on low heat for
an hour.
3. Meanwhile, melt 2 tablespoons of bacon drippings in a skillet and cook the
okra with vinegar over medium heat for 15 minutes. Remove the okra with a
slotted spoon and stir into gumbo. Mix the crabmeat, shrimp, and Worcestershire
sauce into the gumbo. Simmer about 30 minutes. Serve.
Thank you Pascal and Donna for sharing about your family and your favorite
recipes; I can’t wait to try the Yule Log for Christmas this year.
May your holidays be filled with great fun and festivities!
Diane Tiry
P.S. If you have favorite recipes that you would like to share with our Farmers
Union family, please feel free to email me, [email protected]
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Associate Members
Barron Veterinary Clinic, LTD
Cooperative Network
County of Marathon
Dallman Insurance Agency, LLC
Douglas County Land & Water Conservation Dept.
Farley Center for Peace, Justice & Sustainability
Hay River Pumpkin Seed Oil
Michael Fields Agricultural Institute
Midwest Renewable Energy Association
North Wind Renewable Energy, LLC
Oconto Electric Co-op
People’s Food Co-op
Statz Brothers Inc.
United Cooperative
Vernon Electric Co-op
Viroqua Food Cooperative
Thank you for your continued support!
©2011 • Eric C. Snowdeal III • Organic Valley
Give a Stronger Voice to Rural America
Join Wisconsin Farmers Union and
help preserve the economic health and
sustainability of our rural communities.
Membership Application
Name: ____________________________________
Spouse’s Name: ____________________________
# of Children under 21: _____
Address:___________________________________
City: _________________ State: ____ Zip: _______
Email: _____________________________
Phone: _________________________
Household Type:
o Farm o Rural o Small Town
o Urban
Type of Farm: Check all that apply.
o Dairy o Poultryo Vegetables or Fruit
o Beef o Crops o Organic
o Hogs o Horses o Other ______________
Membership: Fee includes family unless student or
organization is checked.
o New Member
o Renewing Member
o 1 Year ($30)
o 4 Years ($100)
o Student ($15)
o 2 Years ($55)
o Lifetime ($2000)
o Organization ($50)
Join us today!
Mail this card to:
Wisconsin Farmers Union
117 W. Spring St. • Chippewa Falls, WI • 54729
Or sign up online:
www.wisconsinfarmersunion.com
For more information, call 800-272-5531
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Wood/Portage County launches youth group
Deb Jakubek
Membership Coordinator
The Wood/Portage County Chapter of Wisconsin
Farmers Union is excited to announce the formation of a
WFU Youth Group!
On November 4th, six kids joined youth leaders Dave
Mangin, Tommy Enright, Lisa Shirek, Alicia Razvi and
Deb Jakubek at the Tomorrow River Community Charter
School, located at the Central Wisconsin Environmental
Station outside of Amherst Junction.
The focus of this first meeting was “knowing where
your food comes from” and the children were all able to
make their own ‘shoebox farm’ and report to the group what they produced on their farms. Once everyone was done, the
farms were all put together to show how having a number of small, diverse farms makes a community strong.
The group also toured Whitefeather Organics, the
farm of WFU members Tony and Laura Miller, and
was able to see how a turkey is butchered for a delicious
Thanksgiving dinner.
The group plans to continue to meet twice a month,
with one meeting focusing on the NFU curriculum and
activity and the second meeting being a tour to a local
farm or business in the area. The founding group is
very excited to engage more children in the community
Left: Isis Beacom gave two-thumbs up to the shoebox farm activity at the to join us and learn more about how they can make a
difference in their community! For more information
first Wood/Portage County Youth Group meeeting. Right: Llyas Razvi
on the Youth Program, please contact Dave Mangin at
showed off his farm — complete with puffy white clouds.
[email protected]
Friday Night Fundraiser
Wisconsin Farmers Union Foundation
Kicking off the 84th annual WFU State Convention
6-9 p.m., Friday, Jan. 23, 2015
the
The Plaza ♦ Eau Claire
Tickets: $30/person or $50/couple
Live Auction & Raffle, Food, Entertainment,
Free Caricatures and more!
nefit
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B
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Proce
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WFU K de Fund!
Upgra
Further details to be announced. Register and find more convention information at
www.wisconsinfarmersunion.com.
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• |December
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2011
IT’S BEGINNING TO LOOK
♫♪A LOT LIKE CO-OPS ♪♫
Written by Cathy Statz
Editors’s Note: For the past 14
years, our talented WFU Education
Director Cathy Statz has written
a cooperative-themed ditty for the
Cooperative Network Annual Meeting.
Here’s this year’s version, set to the
tune of “It’s Beginning to Look a Lot
Like Christmas,” which she sang at
the “Innovate Cooperatively” themed
meeting in La Crosse in November.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
It’s beginning to look a lot like co-ops
Everywhere you go.
Take a look at the current trend,
Developing once again,
With worker co-ops poised to steal
the show.
It’s beginning to look a lot like co-ops
Groceries, hubs and more…
But the prettiest sight to see
Is the dividend that will be
At your own front door.
It’s the annual meeting, the people are
seating,
And now it’s time to begin.
Leaders will talk, We’ll take time to
take stock
Of the year – through thick and
through thin.
And everyone can hardly wait ‘til
coffee starts again….
It’s beginning to look a lot like co-ops
Everywhere you go.
There’s a story we’ve got to tell:
co-ops have done so well;
A business form we want the world
to know.
It’s beginning to look a lot like co-ops.
Now – it’s not too late:
For the thing that has made us strong
is the fact that we belong.
So, let’s innovate…
make our co-ops great!
HAPPY HOLIDAYS
From Wisconsin Farmers Union!