Mendip Times - Worldwide Media

Mendip
Times
Front cover designs:Layout 1
20/11/14
VOLUME 10 ISSUE 7
14:05
Page 1
FREE
Celebrating life on
the Mendips and
surrounding areas
DECEMBER 2014
S E A S O N ’ S G R E E T I N G S T O A LL O U R R E A D E R S !
Local people, local history, local places, local events and local news
Page 2 December:Layout 1
20/11/14
15:58
Page 1
HANDMADE ARTISAN RUGS THAT MAKE A DIFFERENCE
£1 books and massive online selection!
Family friendly with Children's area
Free spacious parking and Free WiFi
www.bookbarninternational.com
[email protected]
01761 451 333
The Full Stop Café
offers delicious, original
locally sourced
home-made food, and
fresh coffee.
A
G R E AT
at Bookbarn International, Wells Road,
Hallatrow, Bristol BS39 6EX
01761 451 764
www.orientalrugsofbath.com
C L E A N I N G • R E S TO R AT I O N • VA L U AT I O N
DAY
O U T, A L L
IN
ONE
L O C AT I O N !
Contents page:Layout 1
20/11/14
15:56
Page 1
MENDIP TIMES
CONTENTS
Welcome
MAY we wish all of our readers,
advertisers and contributors a very
Happy Christmas and a peaceful and
prosperous New Year!
This month we’ve been out on the
carnival circuit and also preview the
festive celebrations planned in some of
our towns and villages.
June MacFarlane offers some tempting
seasonal recipes and Sue Gearing gives
us a walk around Axbridge to counter
any seasonal excesses. Les Davies recalls
how nuts, dates and tangerines were once
the highlight of Christmas, while Mary
Payne gives us a definitive guide to holly
and ivy.
We’ve been riding on model trains
down at the Royal Bath and West
showground and hearing how Black
Down was made to resemble Bristol
during the second world war.
When we launched the magazine
nearly ten years ago Acker Bilk was one
of our earliest contributors, recounting
his early life in Pensford, before his rise
to international stardom. Following his
death on November 2nd we reprint some
of those articles as our own tribute to the
great man.
In those days Mendip Times was a
fairly skinny 36 pages – we’ve grown
quite a bit since then. As an independent,
free magazine we rely totally on the
support of our advertisers and we have
another record number this month.
Our thanks to them – and to you – for
your continuing support.
January 2015 deadline:
Friday, 6th December 2014.
Published: Tuesday, 16th December
2014.
Editorial:
Steve Egginton [email protected]
Mark Adler [email protected]
Advertising:
Ann Quinn [email protected]
Rachael Abbott [email protected]
Publisher: Mendip Times Limited
Coombe Lodge, Blagdon, Somerset BS40 7RG
Contacts: For all enquiries, telephone:
01761 463888
or: email [email protected]
or: [email protected]
www.mendiptimes.co.uk
Design and origination by:
Steve Henderson
Printed by:
Precision Colour Printing, Haldane,
Halesfield 1, Telford, Shropshire TF7 4QQ
Copyright of editorial content held by Mendip Times Ltd. and its
contributors. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a
retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic,
mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise without the express
permission of the Publisher. The views expressed in this publication do
not necessarily represent those of the publisher or its associates.
Front cover: Revellers Carnival Club in Shepton Mallet (see page 12).
Photo by Mark Adler.
12
Circus comes to town –
carnivals light up the county
32
All aboard – Shepton rail
show is a model of success
68
Acker in his own words – our
tribute to a jazz legend
97
Prepare to be bowled over –
club starts new league
Plus all our regular features
Environment...................................6
Farming Mary James MBE..........10
Food & Drink...............................18
Internet and Crossword..............30
Arts & Antiques ...........................34
Business ........................................38
Wildlife Chris Sperring MBE .......53
Walking Sue Gearing....................54
Outdoors Les Davies MBE ..........56
Gardening Mary Payne MBE ......58
Property........................................63
Health Dr Phil Hammond.............70
Community Simon Selby .............74
Charities .......................................79
Motoring .......................................86
Homes and Interiors....................87
Riding Celia Gadd ........................94
Caving Phil Hendy........................96
Sport..............................................97
What’s On ..................................104
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 3
PENNY
Page 4 December:Layout 1
R
M
20/11/14
16:01
Page 1
TOPSOIL
(PLANT HIRE &
DEMOLITION) LTD
Ston Easton
High quality dry screened or plain
CRUSHED CONCRETE
All sizes graded and single size
ROAD PLANINGS
LIAS STONE
Hand dressed for house building
Large or small quantities supplied
Delivered or collected
01761 241387 www.pennyplant.com
QUALITY
NORDMANN
AND SPRUCE
CHRISTMAS
TREES
FOR SALE
EX-DISPLAY
SHEDS FOR
SALE
ROCKSALT
AVAILABLE
News page 5:Layout 1
20/11/14
16:03
Page 1
MENDIP TIMES
The crafty monk
Dom Michael (right) with Philip Blatchford
A BEAUTIFULLY handcrafted new English oak gate welcomes
visitors to Holy Trinity Church in Binegar but few people may
realise that it was made by a monk at Downside Abbey.
Dom Michael Clothier – the sub prior at the Benedictine abbey
– is a skilled craftsman whose love of woodwork began as a child
when encouraged by his father, a lawyer who also had a passion
for carpentry.
Dom Michael runs the workshops at Downside School and,
together with pupils, has been involved in many projects for
churches in the Mendip area and further afield. He’s often helped
by local craftsmen such as Philip Blatchford, a member of Binegar
Parish Council which commissioned the new gate to replace a
broken one first donated more than 50 years ago in the memory of
a former rector of Binegar.
Dom Michael, who is also a parish priest in Radstock, charges
for materials but not labour as the projects are an opportunity for
students to learn new skills. Previous commissions have ranged
from lecterns to pews – and even a pizza oven!
He said: “With the gate in Binegar, we tried to be faithful to the
original.”
Cadets taste success
AXBRIDGE and Cheddar Valley Sea Cadet Unit was rewarded
for its hard work and development when cadets and volunteer
staff from across Somerset and Dorset gathered in Taunton to
celebrate Trafalgar Day.
After a parade through the town, a number of trophies and
certificates were handed out by the Lord Lieutenant of
Somerset, Lady Gass, and Commodore Tim Hare, South West
chairman of the Marine Society and Sea Cadets.
The fledgling Axbridge unit was presented with the Ian
Macdonald Trophy and a certificate for being the most improved
unit in Somerset and Dorset. The Axbridge based unit is the
youngest and smallest in the two counties, having only been
formed in April 2013.
It currently has 16 cadets aged between 12 and 15 years and
five volunteer staff. Petty Officer Claire Peck and her husband
Petty Officer Adrian Peck are pictured with seven of their cadets
Rotary visit to France
NEWS
The market place in Libourne Saint Emilion
Two new Rotarians are inducted into
Norton’s link club. Norton would
especially welcome younger women to
its club
MEMBERS of the
Rotary Club of
Midsomer Norton and
Radstock enjoyed a long
weekend with their
counterparts in the south
west French town of
Libourne Saint Emilion.
The clubs have been
linked for the past 32
years and try to visit
each other most years,
staying with host club
families.
Jean Cambar, district
governor for Norton’s
link club, inducted two
new members and
presented several
Rotarians with Paul
Harris Fellowship
Awards.
after receiving
the award.
Claire said: “I
was totally
shocked. There
are some very
big and well
established units
across the district. To be formally recognised for the efforts that
the staff, committee, parents and cadets themselves have put in,
is fantastic. We are hoping that the next 12 months will be just
as good and that we can keep going from strength to strength."
Axbridge and Cheddar Valley Sea Cadets meet on a Tuesday
and Thursday evening at the Old Railway Station on Station
Road in Axbridge. New Cadets and new staff members are
always welcome.
Details: 01934 733601 at [email protected]
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 5
Environment section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:09
Page 6
MENDIP TIMES
New rivers authority for Somerset?
PROPOSALS for a new authority to oversee Somerset’s Flood
Action Plan have been backed by Somerset County Council.
The Somerset Rivers Authority would take over the work
initiated by the plan’s Leaders Implementation Group, which
includes the district councils and drainage boards, the
Environment Agency, government departments, and other
relevant organisations.
The SRA’s vision would be to reduce the likelihood, duration
and impact of flooding in the county. Somerset County Council
leader John Osman is now seeking a joint meeting with
Environment Secretary of State, Elizabeth Truss and Eric
Pickles, Secretary of State for Communities and Local
Government, to finally resolve the Somerset Rivers Authority
funding question.
The body is a key feature of the 20 Year Flood Action Plan
which was prepared after the extreme floods last winter at the
Government’s request. All organisations involved in the 20 Year
Flood Action Plan are urging a clear-cut commitment from the
Government to give the £2.7m of funding needed in order to get
a “shadow” Somerset Rivers Authority up and running in 2015.
However the Country Land and Business Association has
come out strongly against the proposal. The CLA, which
represents landowners, farmers and rural businesses, says the
creation of the new Somerset Rivers Authority is founded on
political expediency and will require new legislation to pass
through Parliament.
CLA members are also angry that they have been effectively
excluded from the consultation process. The organisation argues
that the existing Internal Drainage Board should have been used
as the model with an expanded remit, area and fund raising
powers which, it says, could have been achieved far more
quickly than the model the Council is proposing.
CLA South Director John Mortimer, who is also contacting
the Secretary of State to outline the organisation’s anger, said:
“Our concern is that riparian owners have rights and duties in
relation to river management and that appears to have been
forgotten. Over time, those responsibilities have been absorbed
into the immense bureaucracy of the Environment Agency
which also took control of all operations on the main rivers – in
particular control over the dredging and subsequent
maintenance on the main river channels.”
The future SRA’s proposed plan is to raise funds locally
through a countywide levy from 2016. The government would
also have to support legislation to enable the Somerset Rivers
Authority to levy funding, like the Fire and Rescue Service.
If established, the SRA’s work would focus on enhanced
maintenance of river channels, important ordinary watercourses,
and river flood banks Somerset-wide, to reduce flood risk.
Dredging, and maintenance of dredged profiles, would also be
included.
Cllr Osman said: “All of us involved in the 20 Year Flood
Action Plan are adamant that an independent, transparent and
accountable Somerset Rivers Authority is essential if we are to
reduce the likelihood and impact of future flooding in
Somerset.”
He added: “Until we get their absolute assurance that the
Government will commit to the vital funding we need to set up
this key authority for Somerset, we will continue banging the
drum for the investment our county’s flood-affected
communities deserve.”
The Somerset floods in photographs
TWO Mendip photographers – Laura Zaky and Jason Bryant – have won praise for a new book documenting last
winter’s floods which devastated the Somerset Levels and Moors.
Laura, who lives in Street, became a volunteer coordinator in the flood rescue operation after friends in Fordgate were
badly affected by the deluge, but managed to find time to record the extraordinary efforts of local people and those from
across the country who came to help.
Jason, who lives in Shepton Mallet, covered the floods from the outset and also found himself involved the dramatic
evacuation of cattle at James Winslade’s West Yeo Farm in Moorland.
Together they have compiled a book of more than 300 images from the emergency, beginning from the time in
February when Prince Charles visited Muchelney and the situation finally came to nationwide attention.
G The 2014 Somerset Floods is published by Halsgrove and costs £14.99.
Moorland village underwater: a year on, some
residents are still unable to return home
PAGE 6 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Prince Charles during his visit to the Somerset Levels
Environment section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:10
Page 7
ENVIRONMENT
Giving a hoot for wildlife
A NEW fundraising group has been launched on Mendip to help
owls and other birds of prey survive and thrive.
Give2Hoots was founded by Teresa Day, from Meare, and Jan
Osborne, from Castle Cary, who met through an internet forum set
up as part of the successful Somerset Community Barn Owl
Project, which provided a free barn owl nest box to every parish
in Somerset.
The project has now ended but Teresa and Jan contacted Mendip
Times contributor Chris Sperring to see if there was a way to carry
on the good work.
Various events, including an owl prowl and a visit to Cotleigh
Brewery at Wiveliscombe, one of the supporters of the original
project, have been held so far and Jan and Teresa are now
planning an afternoon of activities on Saturday, January 17th at
Caryford Community Hall in Castle Cary. For more information,
e-mail: [email protected]
Chris Sperring (left) is joined by Teresa Day and Jan Osborne,
Ruby the retriever, and Linda and Keith Hall, from Specialised
Nestboxes at Charterhouse at the launch of Give2Hoots
Jan and Teresa stencil the G2H logo on the first of ten boxes which
have been donated to the project
The G2H logo – campaigners hope it will become a familiar sight
around Somerset
Read more about the Give2Hoots project in Wildlife. See page 53
Village rallies to clear churchyard
VOLUNTEERS rallied to help with the annual clear-up of the
churchyard at St. Nicholas Church, Stowey, organised by
Derek Maltby.
Parishioner John Baker was the first into action at 8.15am,
followed by John Baker, and by 10am there were 17
volunteers hard at work.
The youngest helper was Henry, aged three, and the oldest
Derek’s mum, who was busy clearing ivy from the walls.
Church warden, Jill Nicol, said: “The result is superb and
we're thankful that Derek has so willingly taken on this task
each year. It makes such a difference.”
She also thanked the refreshment ladies and the rector, the
Rev. Mark Cregan, for their help.
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 7
20/11/14
17:10
Page 8
MENDIP TIMES
ENVIRONMENT
Black Down’s
secret war
LOCAL history researchers from
Blagdon and Shipham are working with
the Discovering Black Down project to
explore the fascinating WW11 decoy
town built to replicate Bristol and lure
enemy aircraft from their true target.
The research will be gathered together
on the Discovering Black Down website
and will include a film telling the decoy
town’s fascinating story – made with help
from a local primary school. A walk and
event to share findings is being planned
for next year.
The decoy on Black Down was one of
many ingenious devices brought in to
defend Britain. Covering a huge area, it
aimed to replicate a poorly blacked-out
Bristol at night. The site was lit up so that
it appeared to have a decoy station,
marshalling yards and railway sidings.
When special fires were introduced to
enhance the decoy’s effect, this type of
site received the code-name Starfish.
This was one of the first of hundreds
Do you recognise anyone in this picture taken on Black Down around 1940? If so, the
Mendip Hills AONB’s Discovering Black Down project would like to hear from you.
of Starfish sites around the country.
There were 12 around Bristol alone! The
decoy lighting and fires probably came
later than the tumps seen in the picture.
The idea of the tumps was to build
defences across level land to stop
airborne troops landing or taking off
again. The defences were built in lines on
a grid originally created by people such
as the volunteers from walking clubs who
went up every weekend in a bus to build
them using any available local materials.
These may have formed the foundation
of the tumps that can still be seen there
today.
They were constructed in secrecy by
Cowlins, a Bristol building contractor.
Operations on Black Down were so
secret and punishments so severe that old
photos are very rare. If you have any, or a
story or memorabilia about Black Down,
the team would like to hear from you.
M E N D I P
W E A T H E R
S C E N E
Details: http://www.discoveringblackdown.org.uk/contact 01761 462338.
A Merry Christmas to you all
LAST Christmas I prepared a little
meteorological quiz of 20 different
questions on the subject.
From the response I got afterwards
there was a fair amount of interest, but I
only spoke to one person who had
actually got all the questions right! No
with DAVID
quiz this time, but there are plenty of
MAINE
signs out there, while you are
wandering around during the pre-Christmas rush, to give
an idea of what is going on in the atmosphere.
And, should you find yourself taking part in some sort
of festive quiz over the mince pies and sherry, here are
some weather-related tips you might want to remember!
For instance, a well-known one is that if you stand with
your back to the wind then the lowest pressure is always on
your left. This is simply because the wind always blows
anticlockwise around a depression, and the opposite for an
area of high pressure.
Then there is the way to tell how far away a
thunderstorm is taking place. Simply time the interval
between the lightning flash and rumble of thunder. Sound
travels at roughly a mile in five seconds, so if there is a 15second delay between the flash and rumble of thunder, the
storm is three miles away, and so on. Given some of the
overheard storms we had in October, there was no time to
count!
PAGE 8 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
The weather stayed unseasonably warm and dry for the
Halloween Party in Shepton Mallet's Collett Park
If you are climbing a mountain – or even just a hill –
then you can usually tell what the temperature is on the top
as it generally falls off at a rate of roughly two degrees
Celsius per 1000 feet of height. This is even noticeable if
you drive from Chew Valley Lake to the top of Mendip
near the Pen Hill mast. Check your car thermometers next
time!
No doubt some wag will come up with the old chestnut
which says that if you can see the Quantock hills from the
top of the Mendips it is a sign that rain is on the way. If
you can’t see them, then it is already raining! I hear they
say that in Priddy about Glastonbury Tor!
Seasons greetings and bye for now.
(Photograph courtesy of Addicott's Archive/Blagdon Local History Society)
Environment section:Layout 1
Page 9 December:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:12
HIRE
Page 1
Plant &
Tools Hire
& Sales
• HIRE
• SALES
• REPAIR
Huge stocks of
Tools & Equipment
• Compactors • Drills • Cultivators
• Angle Grinders • Breakers
• Hedge Trimmers • Saws
• Ladders • Rotavators • Hoists
• Tile Cutters • Scarifiers
• Scaffold Towers • Chain Saws
• Carpet Cleaners
Open Hours:
Mon-Fri 7:30-5:00 • Sat 8:00-12:00
Long or Day Hire
Delivery & Collection Service
Trade & DIY
01934 743543
www.cheddarhire.co.uk
Wideatts Road, Cheddar BS27 3AP
Our Services Include:
Commercial and Residential Property
Wills and Probate
Litigation and Personal Injury
Criminal and Family Law
Agricultural, Business and Commercial
Employment
Shepton Mallet: 57 High Street,
Shepton Mallet, Somerset, BA4 5AQ.
Tel: 01749 330330
Glastonbury: 11 Chilkwell Street,
Glastonbury, Somerset, BA6 8DL.
Tel: 01458 832510
Tel: 0800 097 8611
www.johnhodge.co.uk | e-mail: [email protected]
WESTON-SUPER-MARE | BRISTOL | CLEVEDON | YATTON | WEDMORE
ere have been changes in the law
regarding intestacy i.e. when someone
dies without leaving a will.
In the case of married couples, the
whole of the estate will now pass to the
surviving spouse where there are no
children or descendants instead of only
the first £450k and half of the residue
previously. However, matters should not reach that stage; make
sure you have an adequate will now to cover all your wishes. It is
wise to check your will every five years or when big changes occur
in your life. Don’t put it off!
We hope you have all been enjoying carnival season, as usual
some of the Partners have been organising and collecting at the
Shepton Mallet event.
We have celebrated a Partner’s birthday recently and enjoyed
the cake complete with effigy of the victim on top made by our
multi-talented Libby Rae; who is the birthday boy?
Castle Cary: Old Bank House,
High Street, Castle Cary, Somerset,
BA7 7AW. Tel: 01963 350888
Cheddar: Roley House, Church Street,
Cheddar, Somerset, BS27 3RA.
Tel: 01934 745400
Website: www.bgw-solicitors.co.uk
Farming section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:14
Page 10
MENDIP TIMES
Teaching our children about the countryside
THE Prince of Wales has warned that the
majority of the population has “lost any
real connection with the land” as he
outlined his concerns about the future of
the countryside in an article published in
the Country Life magazine.
I entirely agree with him but perhaps
With MARY
we have a better chance in the Mendip
JAMES MBE
Times area to see and hear what is
happening in the farming world. Go further into our nearby
cities and there is only a vague understanding of what
farming is or does and yet at the same time people treasure
the countryside.
TV programmes are very good at showing how beautiful
our countryside is but only Countryfile sometimes gives a
real look at farming issues, thanks mainly to Adam Henson.
There is Farming Today at 5.45am on radio 4 but how many
listen to that?
The Archers is a help sometimes. The countryside does not
“happen” by itself. If there were no farmers there would be
no beautiful landscapes with hedgerows and stone walls, no
thriving rural communities, no villages or village pubs, no
local markets and no distinctive local foods. “Somehow,” says
the Prince, “we need to find a way to put a value on our
countryside with all its facets.”
One of the most important ways is through education,
teaching children to have a real understanding of farming and
PAGE 10 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
the countryside. The farming industry itself has to instigate
this; it is not a school subject.
In our area it is FarmLink (a classroom in the countryside)
that has been leading the way. Founded by John Alvis MBE,
of Lyecross Farm, Redhill, FarmLink has other partners in
Somerset namely Yeo Valley, Bridgwater College (Rodway
Farm), Greenslade Taylor Hunt (Sedgemoor Auction Centre).
Annually these partners provide the opportunity (working
with teachers) for 20.000 children to enhance their knowledge
of farming within the core curriculum. This is led by
experienced farmers, teachers and countrymen and women. I
suspect readers will know our two star farmer/teachers
namely Farmer Nick Baker and Les Davies. Great progress
has been made but there is still a long way to go. Visit
www.farmlink.org.uk
Still on the education theme we had a FarmLink AGM at
the fantastic new building at Rodway Farm, Cannington
which houses classrooms complete with every modern
technology, laboratory, conference rooms, offices etc. right
beside the cow barns. An agricultural student’s dream!
Finally, for this month, the Royal Bath and West Show have
announced a new chief executive, Rupert Cox, who will start
at the beginning of January. Rupert has been chief executive
of Somerset Chamber of Commerce for nine years and he
comes from a family with a long background in farming.
A very Happy Christmas to all readers and the staff of
Mendip Times.
Farming section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:14
Page 11
FarmLink’s award
THE North Somerset based charity FarmLink has been
awarded a £9,000 grant from the national education charity,
the Ernest Cook Trust.
It will help pay the salary of a part-time educator who will
deliver lessons and farm visits for around 4,000 children a
year.
A FarmLink spokesman said: “Our vision is for all school
children in the UK to be able to meet farmers and farm staff,
to visit working farms, and to understand what they’re
eating, how it’s grown and produced and how their
purchasing decisions affect the environment.”
The Ernest Cook Trust, one of the UK's leading
educational charities, is rooted in the conservation and
management of the countryside. It owns and manages 22,000
acres of landed estates across five counties in England.
The trust was founded in 1952 by the philanthropist Ernest
Cook, grandson of Thomas Cook, founder of the famous
travel agency. Each year it distributes £1.8m in educational
grants to benefit children and young people.
Details: www.ernestcooktrust.org.uk www.farmlink.org.uk
Land deal
benefits Frome
Cheese Show
THE organisers of the annual Frome
Cheese Show have agreed to sell the
major part of the Old Frome Showfield
in the town and reinvest the proceeds in
improving facilities at the current site of
their celebration of agriculture at West
Woodlands.
Frome Town Council has agreed to
buy the land from Frome and District
Agricultural Society for the sum of
£125,000 for community use. At
present, the show society leases the
field to Mendip District Council. Frome
Town Council says the community has
long been concerned that the site –
adjacent to Frome Medical Practice and
Frome Hospital – is poorly managed
The old showfield site
Aid for flood victims
FARMING
THE fodder bank set up to help farmers recover from the
devastating floods on the Somerset Levels has closed its doors to
new donations, though it will continue to be available to help
those in need.
It’s nearly a year since local volunteers started the Somerset
Fodder Bank at the height of the emergency to provide essential
supplies to farms which had lost hay, silage and straw. There was
an overwhelming response to appeals for help with farmers and
businesses from across the country making generous donations,
offering grass seed, labour, animal housing and the use of
machinery as well as fodder.
More than 800 pledges of support have been recorded and at
least 200 different farmers arranged for fodder to be delivered.
Some 50 different hauliers offered support to the relief operation
with many loads being brought down to Somerset free of charge.
Abigail Vickery, who has been managing the fodder bank as
part of the Somerset Levels Flood Recovery Project (SLFRP) said:
“We would like to publicly thank all those who offered support
during the flooding crisis, including the volunteers both local and
further afield who gave up so much of their time, and everyone
nationwide who offered pledges of support including fodder,
haulage, personal items and money.”
Proceeds from the sale will be reinvested in the West Woodlands showground site
and does not provide what the
community wants. There is a second
part of the land that the town council
has agreed to lease.
Martyn Brake, chairman show society
said: “This is a win-win situation. The
field will now be managed by the
community for the community and the
Frome and District Agricultural Society
can invest in our core function which is
to put on the Frome Cheese Show every
year. The money will be used to further
improve the facilities at the new
showfield.”
Councillor Peter Macfadyen, the
Independent mayor of Frome said: “By
owning this open space for the
community we are not only protecting it
for future generations, but will also be
able to work with local people to
manage it in ways that they want.
Having carried out an in depth
consultation exercise two years ago, we
are pretty clear about what is needed but
we will of course just check with local
people.
“Top of the list remains the urgent
need to fence the play park, install some
more seating and get some of the grass
cut shorter. This is a very popular place
for people of all ages and we can now
give them the showfield they want.”
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 11
Carnival DPS:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:15
Page 12
MENDIP TIMES
N
I
G
H
T
S
T
Departing Midnight, by Globe Carnival Club,
from Wells and … (inset) Nicky Phipps
Wick CC on the streets of Bridgwater
Photography by
Mark Adler.
Gemini CC’s Transformers … The Cube was one of the biggest carts to
go through Midsomer Norton on the new route
PAGE 12 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Coleford’s Huckyduck CC swept the
board with their tableau feature In
Flanders Fields
O
Carnival DPS:Layout 1
R
20/11/14
17:15
Page 13
SOMERSET CARNIVALS 2014
E
M
E
M
B
E
R
Carnival in Bridgwater ends with the
traditional squibbing ceremony
Eager carnival-goers in Midsomer Norton
Crowds pack Midsomer Norton town
centre for their carnival night
Charity collectors on the streets of Shepton Mallet
Marketeers CC used pioneering LED
technology for their Battle of Atlantis cart
Tractor driver Barry Dennett from
Bridgwater-based Renegades CC. Drivers
compete for the best dressed award at each
procession
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 13
Christmas feature:Layout 1
20/11/14
MENDIP TIMES
17:25
Page 14
Buy British in Winscombe
THE Country House Gift
Company in Winscombe is
pursuing a positive Buy British
campaign, adding
Street-based Owen
Barry leather
goods to its
range.
Adding
another local
British
company to
their list of
suppliers puts
them one
step closer to
becoming a
completely
British retailer.
Owen Barry have been producing
sheepskin and leather products from their traditional workshops
in Street, since 1948. Still, today, each item is lovingly cut and
made by British craftsmen, using the finest British and
European skins.
Country House Gifts is the perfect place for Christmas
shopping and will be open late for Winscombe’s Christmas
Shopping Night on December 2nd.
17-19 Woodborough Road, Winscombe, North Somerset BS25 1AB
T: 01934 842125
E: [email protected] • www.countryhousegiftcompany.co.uk
PAGE 14 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Christmas feature:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:25
Page 15
Reindeer on their
way to Wells
PREPARATIONS are well
underway for the annual
Reindeer Parade through
Wells which attracts
thousands of visitors to the
city for a day of events.
Taking place on Sunday,
December 7th and once
again organised by the
Rotary Club of Wells, it will
be the eighth time the parade
has been held.
Father Christmas on his way
through Wells
Scrooge’s day off
FREE festive parking will come into effect next month, as
Mendip District Council has agreed to support Small
Business Saturday by providing free all-day car parking at
the following car parks on Saturday December 6th: Cranhill
Road, Street, St John’s, Glastonbury, Union Street, Wells,
Great Ostry, Shepton Mallet and Cattle Market, Frome.
CHRISTMAS IDEAS 2014
Brook Bank
Shooting Ground
Rodney Stoke, Cheddar BS27 3UJ
BEGINNERS CLAY
SHOOTING PACKAGE
(variety of targets) from £31.00
Gift Vouchers available
OPEN PRACTICE,
5 DAYS A WEEK
See website for opening times
Gunsmith on site
No membership scheme – open to all!
Tel. 01749 871055
www.brookbankshooting.co.uk
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 15
Christmas feature:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:25
Page 16
MENDIP TIMES
CHRISTMAS IS COMING!
Wells Winter Wonderland
Visit Santa in his grotto at the hotel on
Sunday 7 December from 11am-4pm.
Tickets are just £5 on the day and include a
present.
e Wells Reindeer Rotary Parade takes
place on the same day from 11am- 2.30pm
– a great day out for all the family.
Accommodation at Christmas
Bed and Breakfast available from 24 to 26
December with no minimum stay. Standard
rooms from £147 per room per night, based
on 2 sharing. Subject to availability.
Call 01749 836300
New Year’s Eve Dinner
3 course gala dinner with Champagne and
canape reception and disco until early hours.
£60 per person.
Tel : 01749 836300
BEST WESTERN PLUS Swan Hotel
Sadler Street, Wells, Somerset BA5 2RX
Tel: 01749 836300 • www.swanhotelwells.co.uk
PAGE 16 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Christmas feature:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:26
Page 17
CHRISTMAS IDEAS 2014
Give a unique gift
this Christmas!
Gift Vouchers for
Wild Food Forays
With Adrian Boots
Join me next year on a fantastic
wild food foray. Enjoy the best
wild edibles the spring, summer
and autumn seasons have to
offer!
Please call 01761 462162 to
book your voucher or for
more info visit:
www.gowildactivities.co.uk
Award winning Children’s Day Nursery
Next Steps
Childcare Centre
Baby room - Nursery - Pre-school - Forest School
Highly qualified team. Excellent
secure rural location.
Funding available for
2-3-4 year olds
Gardening, Yoga, Music
& Dance, Cookery
01749 346808
www.nextstepschildcare.com
The Royal Bath & West Showground
Shepton Mallet BA4 6QL
Ofsted 2009 “Outstanding partnership with parents”.
“Children have great fun freedom exploring the world
outside in the fresh air, Excellent organised activities.”
THE
IDEAL
GIFT!
llllllllllllllllllllllllll
Crataegus Monogyna Biflora –
It’s The Real Thing!!!
Available from
Malcolm Slocombe
Four Seasons
16 High Street, Glastonbury,
Somerset BA6 9DU
Telephone No: 01458 832061
Now available in Patio size
lllllllllllllllllll
100,000 potential
customers just a
few miles from
your business
A GLASTONBURY
HOLY THORN
TREE
llllllllllllllllllllllllll
Mendip Times
reduces travel
costs
lllllllllllllllllll
THE IDEAL
CHRISTMAS PRESENT
An exclusive Children’s Day Nursery
delivering exceptional care & education
in an award winning environment
Babyroom
Nursery
Preschool
Forest
School
Ofsted 2010 “Children have developed good
language and number skills and show a passion
for exploring and investigating their world.”
“These skills will help support their future
learning”
Funding now available for
2-3-4 year olds
Wells Road Latcham Wedmore BS28 4SA
01934 713527
www.littleowlschildcare.com
FLY A GLIDER!
Mendip Gliding Club is located near Cheddar and offers a variety
of Glider Flying packages including Trial Lesson Vouchers (from
£35), or regular membership and “Fixed Price To Solo” options.
Club is open all year on Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays.
Suitable for aged 12 upwards – no upper limit! Fly with BGA-rated
instructors in dual control gliders.
For further information please visit our website at:
www.mendipgliderclub.co.uk or contact Club Secretary on 01761 232080
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 17
Food & Drink section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:33
Page 18
MENDIP TIMES
And for a slightly less rowdy Christmas . . .
DESPITE what the media and the
Victorians would have you believe, not
everyone will be spending Christmas Day
with loads of people.
It’s all very well having an enormous
turkey if you have eight to eat it, but what
if there’s just the two of you, or if you are
With JUNE
dining alone? You still deserve something
MACFARLANE
special and luxurious. My suggestion is an
elegant celebratory meal with delicious leftovers that don’t take
up the entire fridge. And a really good bottle of wine.
Cured salmon with crème
fraîche and horseradish
CURED SALMON WITH CRÈME
FRAÎCHE AND HORSERADISH
INGREDIENTS
A simple and very pretty dish that can be made in advance and just needs assembling at
the last minute.
METHOD
Run your fingers gently over the salmon. If you feel any little pin bones remove them with
tweezers. Mix the next five ingredients together, spread over the salmon and wrap in cling
film or in a freezer bag. Refrigerate for 24 hours. Rinse thoroughly under cold running
water and refrigerate until needed.
Mix the crème fraîche with the rest of the ingredients, taste for seasoning and
refrigerate until needed. Slice the salmon as thinly as possible and serve with a scoop or
two of the crème fraîche.
SLOW BRAISED PHEASANT
IN CIDER WITH APPLES
If you buy an oven ready pheasant you will have no idea how old it
is, or even if it is a cock or a hen, so the best way to cook it is a slow,
lazy braise with vegetables and sweet cider. The whole bird will just
cook gently until you are ready to eat it and timing is not critical,
which can be useful on Christmas Day.
METHOD
In a flameproof casserole with a lid brown the pheasant gently in
butter. Remove the pheasant to a dish. Brown the lardons, the onion
and the celery. Replace the pheasant, add the bay leaves and season
well. Add the cider and enough
chicken stock to almost cover the bird.
INGREDIENTS
Bring to a simmer, then turn heat right
One oven ready pheasant
down, cover, and cook very gently for
200g smoked bacon lardons
about 1½hrs.
One medium onion, roughly
Turn the bird over and cook for a
chopped
further 20 mins. Add a big splash of
One stick celery, chopped
brandy and cook for 10 mins more
50g butter
with the lid off. Check the bird is
Two bay leaves
completely tender and turn off the
salt, pepper
heat.
One bottle sweet cider
Core and quarter the apples but do
300ml chicken stock
not peel. Squeeze lemon juice over
Two tbsp brandy
them to stop them browning. Fry the
Two dessert apples – Cox is
apple quarters in butter until softened
a good choice
and lightly caramelised.
1/2 lemon
This is very good served with
50g butter
celeriac and potato mash.
PAGE 18 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
One mid-section fillet of
salmon, skin on, pin bones
removed
100g coarse sea salt
100g sugar
Zest and juice of one lime
Six juniper berries, crushed
Six tbsp gin
Four tbsp crème fraîche
One tsp horseradish
1/4 tsp salt
One tsp lemon juice
CLEMENTINE AND GRAND
MARNIER TRIFLE
“Trifle?” I hear you cry.
“Isn’t that a bit retro?”
Well, yes and so what?
What could be nicer on
Christmas Day than a
lovely, squidgy, creamy,
boozy trifle? You don’t
have to go to work
afterwards do you? And
the remains will be great
for Boxing Day
breakfast!
METHOD
INGREDIENTS
Three madeleine sponges
Three tbsp Grand
Marnier
Four-six clementines
300ml double cream
150ml Dulce de Leche
300ml vanilla custard
Walnuts to decorate
Halve sponges lengthways and lay in bottom of a
serving bowl. Drench in Grand Marnier. Peel the
clementines and slice thinly horizontally. Make one
overlapping layer over the sponge, reserve the rest.
Whip the cream to soft peaks and add 100 ml of the
Dulce de Leche. Spread half of the mixture over the
oranges. Spread the rest of the Dulce de Leche on top.
Follow with a layer of
custard, then another
layer of clementine slices
and the rest of the
caramel mixture.
Decorate with nuts.
Refrigerate until needed.
Food & Drink section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:33
Page 19
FOOD & DRINK
Country shopping at its best
New Manor Farm Shop,
North Widcombe, West Harptree, Bristol BS40 6HW
CELEBRATE CHRISTMAS WITH US!
MEAT
SUPPLIED
FROM OUR
OWN FARM
CHRISTMAS
TREES
AND
HYACINTHS
Feast with us
this Christmas
Geoff’s fresh fish
every Friday and
Saturday
Centred around a traditional farm courtyard near Chew
Valley Lake – the very best in local produce and gift ideas
TEA ROOMS
Hot & cold meals • Delicious cream teas
Full English breakfasts • Come and
enjoy our lovely Sunday roast lunches
NEW
FUNCTION
ROOM NOW
AVAILABLE FOR
PRIVATE
HIRE
Opening times:
Farm shop: Monday to Friday 9am - 5.30pm
Saturday 8.30am - 5.30pm • Sunday 10am - 5pm
Tea Room: Monday to Sunday 9.30am - 4.30pm
Wheelchair access, children welcome, free parking, coaches by appointment
Farm Shop: 01761 220067
Tea Rooms: 01761 220172
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 19
Food & Drink section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:33
Page 20
MENDIP TIMES
A healthy start
Healthy eating has been firmly on the menu at Weare School,
where a Healthy Lifestyles week culminated in a Healthy Harvest
at St. Gregory’s Church.
After the service pupils and staff had the option to enjoy a
Healthy Hot Dinner, prepared in the school’s ultra-smart newly
refurbished kitchen. Headteacher, Denise Mawdsley, said: “We
are delighted to be able to provide for our own school and
Axbridge First School Academy with this essential part of the
school day.”
Governor, Margaret Jordan, said: “The messages taught about
healthy eating in school are echoed and reinforced by the type of
food and drink provided throughout the school, including
Breakfast Club and After School club.”
Beautiful Christmas Trees await in the Swinging
Forest of Enchantment!
Win your Christmas Order Prize Draw in the Farm
Shop and explore our Shopping Village with 9 very
individual shops.
Open 7 days a week.
Find us just off the A362 (BS39 6UB).
PAGE 20 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
New name, new look for
popular restaurant
Claire and Mark are flanked by (left) Kirsty LangfordYoung and Carly Milsom, two of the front-of-house team
THE former Cubros Restaurant at the Centurion Hotel near
Midsomer Norton has undergone a complete makeover –
thanks to one of its staff with a passion for interior design.
Claire Williams, the head housekeeper, was inspired by the
views of the golf course and its trees from the restaurant
windows to give the restaurant – now known as The
Restaurant @Centurion – a country club feel. Claire has also
been responsible for redesigning some of the hotel’s rooms.
She said: “Interior design is something I really enjoy and I
was lucky enough to be given the chance to oversee the
makeover.”
The restaurant and bar is open every day to hotel guests,
members of the golf club and leisure centre and the public.
Claire’s clever use of design
has allowed the team to
increase the number of
covers to 60. The menu has
also been redesigned by
executive chef Sean
Horwood.
Mark Manley, general
manager of the hotel which is
part of the Best Western Plus
group, said: “Other parts of
the hotel have enjoyed
extensive investment but we
haven’t changed the
Brightly-coloured upholstery restaurant for seven years.
We hope guests, members
in the sunny conservatory is
and the local community will
set off by the tree-themed
enjoy the changes.”
wallpaper
Food & Drink section:Layout 1
20/11/14
Thatchers hat-trick
17:34
Page 21
THATCHERS
Cider has
scooped the
Food and
Drink
Company of
the Year prize
at this year’s
Made in South
West Awards.
This is the
third year
running that
Thatchers has
been
recognised in
these awards –named Food and Drink Company of the Year in
2012, and in 2013 presented with the night’s top prize,
Manufacturer of the Year.
The awards are a celebration of the best companies designing,
developing and making products here in the South West.
Martin Thatcher, managing director of Thatchers said: “The
Food and Drink category is always hotly contested – which is
no surprise as the South West is gaining such a reputation both
nationally and internationally for the quality of its produce. We
are absolutely thrilled that the judges selected Thatchers from
such a prestigious shortlist.”
FOOD & DRINK
Christmas 2014 at
BEAH
English & Mediterranean
Restaurant, Wells
From Monday December 1 – 24th
Christmas Shoppers Turkey
Lunch Special
Christmas Day Lunch Menu
5 courses £70 per person
Back by popular demand!
NEW YEARS EVE
BIG QUIZ NIGHT!
£10 per person (tables of 6)
Limited space available – see
website for more details
For more information
and menus either
call 01749 678111
email [email protected]
visit www.beah.co.uk
or pop in to Union Street, Wells,
Somerset BA5 2PU
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 21
Food & Drink section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:34
Page 22
MENDIP TIMES
THE
QUEEN
ADELAIDE
BLAGDON
01761 463926
Travelling through, walking
local trails, or living in the
village, if the doors are open
– come in and enjoy what
Blagdon’s little country pub
has to offer.
Booking highly recommended
BOOKING NOW FOR CHRISTMAS!
GOOD FOOD, LAGER, ALES AND LOCAL CIDER
GLUTEN-FREE ON WEDNESDAYS
EW
E
YTHING W
V
ER
BR
IN E
PRIDE
There is something for everyone this
Christmas at the Butcombe Brewery shop in
Wrington, just off the A38, 20 minutes South of
Bristol. We have great beers in a variety of
sizes and containers including our beautiful
Christmas beer, the 4.2% ‘Christmas Steps’.
We have great gifts in the form of clothing
including branded fleeces, T-shirts and
hoodies as well as gift packs, key rings,
pickles and our new ‘Cooking with beer and
cider’ Butcombe cookbook
Shop opening hours:
• Sat 13th: 9am-2pm • Fri 26th: 9am-3pm
• Sat 20th: 9am-3pm • Sat 27th: 9am-2pm
• Wed 24th: 9am-3pm • Mon 29th-Tues 31st:
9am-3pm • Thurs 25th-Fri 26th: CLOSED
All other days: Normal working hours
(9am-5pm Mon-fri; 9am-12pm Sat; CLOSED Sun)
PAGE 22 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Food & Drink section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:34
Page 23
GARDEN FOOD
The snowdrop tree
THE snowdrop tree, Halesia carolina, is
another one of those ornamentals that we
Brits don't generally realise is edible as
well as decorative. Also known as little
silverbells, this tree is native to the southeastern U.S. but seems oddly at home
here, though it grows fairly slowly,
With JAKE
ultimately reaching a maximum height of
WHITSON
around six metres.
It seems unfussy as to soil and exposure, growing well in
part shade. In the April it is covered in a profusion of
snowbell-like white flowers and provided the weather is
decent these are followed in July by pear-shaped, four-winged
fruits which are edible and crunchy with a nice pea-like
flavour.
Since learning about this tree I have noticed it in several
people's gardens and wondered if they are aware that the
strange winged fruits that appear on their trees every summer
are a delicious, free vegetable crop. I have just bought a few
trees and if you are interested winter is the time to buy and
plant them.
I enjoy snowdrop tree fruits in stir-fries and simply steamed
as a vegetable. They are borne in such profusion that it is well
worth pickling a few – they retain a nice crunch and are great
with ham or cheese. My recipe is adapted from Caroline
Aitken and Martin Crawford's in “Food from Your Forest
Garden”.
Take around 500g of snowbell tree fruits, picked nice and
young and green, and combine a bowl with some dill leaves
and heads, a few peeled garlic cloves and some whole black
peppercorns. Combine 50g of salt with one litre of water,
stirring until the salt is dissolved, submerge the snowbell tree
fruits in the brine and weight down with a plate so that they
remain submerged.
Cover the bowl with a cloth – like sauerkraut, the fruits will
gradually sour, and will be ready to eat within one to four
weeks, depending on how sour you like them. Spoon the
fruits and brine into clean jars, where they will keep for
several months.
Jacob Whitson is a chef and food writer who has
worked in many of the West Country’s most prestigious
restaurants. He is currently working on his first book, a
travelogue detailing the regional foods of Japan.
FOOD & DRINK
WILD FOOD
Cheers and Christmas beers!
My good friend Dave called the other day
and asked me to guess what he’d found in his
garden? I suggested gold! The answer was no
– but something nearly as good. He had
found a profusion of hops growing up the
hedge behind the greenhouse.
We could make our own BEER! Now as it
With ADRIAN
turns out making beer from scratch takes
BOOTS
quite some time and a fair amount of
resources. So we decided to cheat a little and used a good quality
beer kit and added in our fresh hops to flavour it.
Hops are native plants of this country which have been growing
up hedges long before they were ever used in beer making. Hops
began to be used by the end of the Middle Ages so there is a
historical difference between ale and beer – ale was made without
hops, beer was made them.
Previously ales were flavoured with plants such as Bog Myrtle,
Yarrow and Ground Ivy to give bitterness to the drink. The
practice of flavouring and
preserving beer with hops
was acquired from the
Netherlands, so we really
should thank our Dutch
cousins profusely for that.
The Latin name is somewhat
hybridised from the Old
English or Saxon word for
hops which was ‘humele’.
Hops (Humulus lupulus) are long, climbing perennials from 2m
to over 6m high in some case. The mature leaves are palmate
(hand-like) with serrated edges similar to strawberry or nettle
leaves. They are quite common and I have seen them many times
in Somerset and Dorset hedges. September/October is the best
time for the flowers.
To create our beer we followed the normal recipe but with the
addition of a tea brewed from our hops. The volume of this liquor
replaces the same amount of water which would normally be
added. We used 250grams of fresh hop flowers simmered for 10
minutes in 1 litre of water to create a zingy tea to add to our beer.
If you want to create a more Christmassy flavour, why not add
some mulling spices to the hop tea to give it a warming spicy
boost. After two weeks the brew was then decanted from the
bucket and bottled up ready for the festive season.
So what did we end up calling our beer? Well, Dave made the
fantastic suggestion of Blagdon Bedwetter, which sounds about
right to me. We couldn’t resist a sneaky taste and I can tell you it
is a wonderfully rich, hoppy beer with a clean bitter finish.
We are really happy with the brew and content in the
knowledge that the flavour is as local as it gets, from the hedge in
Dave’s garden. I only hope it doesn’t live up to its name too well!
We’ll have to wait and see. For now I wish you all good cheers
and Christmas beers!
Adrian Boots is a Landscape Ecologist, Wild Food
Forager and Adventure Activity provider. You can visit his
web site www.gowildactivities.co.uk to learn more about
wild food foraging and activities you can do with him on
the Mendip Hills.
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 23
Food & Drink section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:34
Page 24
MENDIP TIMES
Our exciting Christmas menu is now available.
Christmas Dinner from £18.95
Sumptuous Christmas Day Lunch £75.00
Boxing Day feast £30.00
New Year’s Eve Party
New Year’s Day Pork Pie Buffet
Now open on Mondays
Coffee from 8.30am weekdays
and 10am weekends
PAGE 24 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Raising a glass
ROSĖ wines from both sides of the
Channel stole the show at the Wrington
Wine Fair organised by the village’s
Twinning Association.
Around 120 people attended and there
were 18 wines for tasting, four of them
grown within two miles of Wrington!
The event, in aid of the association’s activities with its twin
town of Villeneuve-les-Beziers, was held at Aldwick Court
Farm and Vineyard and also raised funds for The Gurkha
Welfare Trust. In all, the event raised more than £1,250.
Food & Drink section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:34
Page 25
FOOD & DRINK
George & Dragon
has a new lease
of life
THE George and Dragon in Pensford
has undergone a transformation, thanks
to new landlords Barry and Niki
Horwood, who took over just a couple
of months ago.
The original flagstone floors are
restored, the pub has been restored
inside and out, and the welcome mat is
firmly out for all. There’s a roaring fire
in the bar, beloved by locals, a cosy
dining area, beer garden and function
room.
They have an extensive all-day menu,
plus popular Sunday lunches at £6.95,
and the pub is both children and dog
friendly.
Barry and Niki spent 15 years in
Spain working in property and
construction before coming home to find
their perfect pub. Barry formerly kept
the Queen’s Head in Willsbridge and the
couple ran the Kellaway Arms, Horfield,
in Bristol before moving to Pensford.
Niki said: “It’s been really good.
We’ve kept open every day while all the
work has been going on and have had a
really good welcome.”
The pub is just down the hill from the
home of jazz legend Acker Bilk, who
died on November 2nd, and used to have
its own Acker’s Corner, decorated with
clarinet and top hat. Barry and Niki plan
to restore that.
THE GEORGE AND DRAGON
Barry and Niki Horwood welcome you to their
newly refurbished village pub.
BEER GARDEN
Children and
dog friendly
Open Monday to Saturday
11am – 11pm
Sunday 11.30am – 10.30pm
Traditional food served all day,
Sunday lunch £6.95
FUNCTION ROOM
AVAILABLE
FOR HIRE
Christmas lunches £16.95 per person – booking advisable
High Street, Pensford BS39 4BH. Telephone: 01761 490156
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 25
Food & Drink section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:34
Page 26
MENDIP TIMES
Season’s Greetings from
Somerset Farmers Markets
Wells done to producers as
markets get festive!
DECEMBER 2014 DATES
Wells: every Wednesday 9am-2.30pm at the Market Place
including Wednesday 24th – Christmas Eve (9am-2pm)*
Wednesday 31st – New Year’s Eve (9am-2pm)*
All other markets 9am-1pm unless otherwise marked*
Saturday 6th
Sunday 7th
Saturday 13th
Friday 19th
Saturday 20th
Saturday 20th
Sunday 21st
Sunday 21st
Tuesday 23rd
Axbridge & Midsomer Norton
[email protected] The Frome Independent (10am-3pm)*
Frome & Keynsham
Burnham-on-Sea
Crewkerne
Glastonbury (9am-2pm)*
Yeovil (10am-2pm)*
Axbridge (10am-1.30pm)*
Frome (5pm-7.30pm)*
follow us @SFMMarkets For more information phone
01373 814646 or visit www.SomersetFarmersMarkets.co.uk
Powering Farming’s Future
Tel: 01225 667151
Web: www.yourpoweruk.com
ROLL OUT THE BARREL!
New Years Eve – ‘The War Years’ Fancy Dress Party
Wednesday 31st December 2014
THE NATTERJACK INN, EVERCREECH
We will take you on a nostalgic journey through World War II, with music by
Kayleigh & Fireworks at Midnight. Rations from 6.30pm till 8.30pm. The menu
below is only available on the 31st December 2014
The Natterjack Inn
Nr Evercreech Junction,
Evercreech
Somerset BA4 6NA
Telephone: 01749 860253
STARTERS
• Bubble & Squeek Soup £6.00
• Chicken Liver & French Bean Salad in a Shallot & White Wine
Reduction £6.00
• Gin Cured Salmon with Buttermilk Pancakes £6.00
• St. George’s Mushrooms, Garlic & Parsley on Sourdough Toast £6.00
• Crab Fritters with Lime & Garlic Aioli £6.00
MAIN COURSE
• Pan Fried Sea Bream, Roasted Winter Vegetables, Pea Puree & Balsamic
Glaze £13.00
• Braised Blade of Beef in Red Wine, Suet Dumplings & Glazed Carrots £16.00
• Slow Roasted Pork Belly, Fillet of Pork filled with Black Pudding, Apple
Mash, Buttered Green Beans & Creamy Cider Sauce £13.00
• Roast Duck Breast, Cherry Compote Dressing, Fonant Potato, Buttered
Greens £15.00
• Beetroot & Ricotta Ravioli, Sage Butter & Rocket, Pinenut & Sun Blush Tomato
Salad with Herb Croutons £12.00
PUDDINGS
• White Chocolate & Pear Trifle £6.00
• Salted Caramel Cheesecake with Homemade Lime Syrup Ice cream £6.00
• Panettone & Chocolate Bread Pudding £6.00
• Homemade Toffee Apple Icecream with a shot of Burrow Hill Cider
Brandy £6.00
• Selection Of Local Cheeses, Biscuits, Damson chutney £6.00
WE’LL HAVE A BARREL OF FUN!
John Sheaves (centre) presents the certificate to Janet (left) and
the trophy to Donna, watched by some of the other traders
JOHN Sheaves, chief executive of Taste of the West, visited
Wells Farmers’ Market to present traders with an award for
being named Best South West Farmers’ Market 2014.
During the past year, more than 300 markets and retail
establishments in the category from Cornwall to Wiltshire
were visited.
Market day manager Donna Lucking, of Ellises Farm, and
founder member and previous day manager Janet Wood, of
Mere Fish Farm, were joined by other producers for the
presentation during the weekly market.
A spokeswoman for Somerset Farmers’ Market said:
“The award is a well-deserved tribute to the skills, hard
work and commitment of the loyal group of producers
who attend all year round and put on such a great show
every Wednesday.”
Meanwhile, Somerset Farmers’ Markets are again offering
some extra markets in the run-up to the festive season.
As well as its usual market on Saturday, December 6th,
Axbridge will host an additional event on Sunday,
December 21st from 10am until 1.30pm. This will be an
opportunity to purchase Christmas birds or special cuts of
beef, pork or game. To be on the safe side, the market
organisers recommend shoppers place their orders at the
earlier market or contact the producer directly. There will
be festive songs from the Axbridge Singers and customers
are invited to take part in a Christmas Draw for a market
bag full of goodies donated by the stallholders.
The Cheese & Grain in Frome once more hosts its now
traditional evening Christmas Farmers’ Market on Tuesday,
December 23rd, from 5-7.30pm and on Wednesday,
December 24th Wells Farmers’ Market, recently crowned
the best farmers’ market in the South West, will be hosting a
Christmas Eve Market from 9am until 2pm. A New Year’s
Eve market will also be held in Wells on Wednesday,
December 31st.
For more information about the market visit
www.somersetfarmersmarkets.co.uk/markets/wells/
PAGE 26 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Food & Drink section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:34
Page 27
Spreading the word about Indian food
AWARD-WINNING chef, Bini Ludlow, is inviting you to share
her passion for Indian cooking and culture and she’s spreading her
enthusiasm across the UK.
Over the last 12 months, Bini has embarked on a culinary
journey demonstrating her mouth-watering Indian recipes from
Devon to Kent and north to Nottingham.
She has become a bit of a regular with local radio stations and
can often be heard live on BBC Radio Bristol where she gives an
unusual twist to their Cake o’ Clock feature.
Bini set up her company, Sweet Cumin, in 2011, to pass on her
knowledge and enthusiasm for Indian cuisine. She regularly runs
highly successful cookery classes from her home kitchen in
Somerset, where she introduces small groups to the joys and
versatility of spices, encouraging them to try new flavour
combinations and to create and develop their own dishes as well
as mastering popular Indian dishes.
Understandably Bini also produces outstanding, award-winning
ready meals using locally-sourced produce, this year winning two
Guild of Fine Food (Great Taste) awards and extending her Taste
of the West gold awards. This has made her brand new Supper
Club so popular that there’s already a waiting list.
Her abilities have been known for a while which is why her
unbeatable blend of inspirational ideas combined with a
straightforward approach persuaded local cider company,
Thatchers, to ask her to develop a range of recipes for customers
to make, to accompany its ever-popular drink.
When Prince Edward and the Countess of Wessex visited
FOOD & DRINK
Thatchers, they tasted Bini’s dishes and cleared their plates.
Says Bini: “Indian cooking is at its best when you love the
ingredients and are willing to put in a little time and effort. If you
give flavours time to develop and don’t rush the process, you’ll be
amazed by the results you can achieve.”
After one of her primary school visits one mother wrote: “I just
wanted to let you know that my daughter Jane was really inspired
by her cooking lesson with you. She has brought your recipe
home and we are going to make it again this weekend, as she has
now decided that she loves curry.
“I have tried to get her to taste my veg curry for years without
success, but now I think she will try it and be more adventurous
generally. Thank you for giving her a brilliant experience.”
Indian Cookery School
Unique Christmas Gift Idea
Authen!c Indian Cookery Classes
EGi vouchers are available to the value of your choice
EHalf & Full day cookery classes for all ages and abili!es
EEnjoy learning in small class sizes (4 max)
EDiscover new skills and hidden desires
EYour local and friendly cookery school
“A fantasc learning experience very inspiraonal”
“I loved every minute” “brilliant day – fab lesson”
www.sweetcumin.co.uk
Follow us
Tel: 07961 320 193 | Email: [email protected] | Clapton | Somerset | BA3 4EB
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 27
Food & Drink section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:34
Page 28
MENDIP TIMES
Christmas
food, drink
and gifts
Christmas treats
Now
taking
orders for
Christmas
THE Comfort Kitchen does
exactly what it says – owner
Colleen Benzie makes a whole
range of delicious cakes,
including wedding cakes and
favours, birthday cakes and
other celebratory cakes, cream
teas to serve in your own
home, biscuits and teatime
treats, with the emphasis at this
time of the year on Christmas
A FESTIVE EVENING!
Monday December 1st from 5pm
Come and join us for hot beef and turkey
rolls • Mulled wine and Cider
• Mince Pies • Cheese & Pickles
We have been
rearing turkeys for
35 years. All of
our quality meats
are home-grown
or locally sourced.
[email protected]
07792 299949
See ‘The Comfort Kitchen’ on Facebook
Our meats are
traditionally handprepared and
hung to develop
their tenderness
and flavour.
Fresh fruit,
vegetables,
ciders, wines
Open: Tues–Sat 9.30am–5.30pm
Sun 10am–4pm
Extended opening hours for Christmas
THE PLOUGHMAN'S FARM SHOP
MANOR FARM, TARNOCK BS26 2SL
01934 750615
PAGE 28 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Call now to order
your Christmas
cake, Christmas
cupcakes and
mince pies
cakes, mince pies and
cupcakes.
Baking has always been her
passion and in May she
decided to make it her full time
business, based at her home
near Oakhill. For 12 years
before that she had been Head
of Care at a residential
specialist college for young
people.
As well as baking she runs
workshops either at her home
or party venues for adults and
children. She makes the
specialist cake every week for
the charity Swallow at St
Nicholas’ Church café in
Radstock.
Food & Drink section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:34
Page 29
FOOD & DRINK
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 29
Crossword page:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:37
Page 1
INTERNET
Using the Sleep and Home
buttons of your iOS device
APPLE products are referred to as an iOS
Device – i for Apple (don’t ask me why!)
and OS for Operating System, as they are
quite different to all other devices. Seems to
me they should be iDevices!
Your iDevice has two buttons – the home
button at the base of the front and the sleep
(or wake) button near the top right-hand corner. Here are a few
notes on how to use them.
Sleep/Wake button
You can lock iPad and put it to sleep when you’re not using it.
Locking iPad puts the display to sleep, saves the battery, and
prevents anything from happening if you touch the screen. You
still get FaceTime calls, text messages, alarms, and notifications,
and can listen to music and adjust the volume.
Home button
The Home button takes you back to the Home screen at any
time. It also provides other convenient shortcuts, some of which
we’ve covered in previous issues. To find back issues of these
articles, go to our website – address below.
1. How to put your iDevice to Sleep
When you are done working, you can press the sleep button to
quickly to put the iDevice in Stand By or Hibernation mode.
Press the sleep button again to wake up the device and resume
working almost instantaneously.
So if there are any apps running in the background – such as
playing music – they will continue to run as before even while
your iDevice is sleeping and the screen is off, so wasting battery.
2. How to turn off the iPhone/iPad completely
If you don’t plan to use your iDevice for a long period of time, it
might be worth turning off the device completely.
Just press and hold the Sleep/wake button for about four
seconds until a slider appears that reads “slide to power off.”
Drag the slider to the right to completely turn off the device.
3. How to close an unresponsive app
If an app freezes, you will need to close it, so press and hold the
Sleep button for about four seconds until the red slider appears.
The screen goes dim but the open app is still visible. Now press
and hold the Home button until the app is closed and you’ll be
back on the home screen.
More next month.
Submitted by IT for the Terrified :
The Old Cowshed, Station Road, Cheddar BS27 3AG
01934 741751 • www.itfortheterrified.co.uk
[email protected]
We also run a COMPUTER DROP IN session 1.30-2.00 Thursday
afternoons. Call in for a quick word of advice/help/info.
Followed by; INTRO TO IPAD COMPUTING on 4th December 2.15-3.30.
£3.00
Followed by; INTRO TO TABLET COMPUTING on 11th December
2.15.-3.30. £3.00
Both of these workshops must be pre-booked.
This article is for guidance only, and the opinion of the writer. For more in
depth information, please contact us. We offer individual training, at a pace to
suit you; a session lasts 2 hours and costs £10. We can cover a range of
subjects – including absolute basics; photo management; shopping online;
emailing; Word processing, spreadsheets; basic web design; etc. on a range of
devices, including Windows XP/Vista/W7/W8: Macs: Tablets: iPads:
smartphones. See our website or contact us for further details.
Or if you can spare two hours a week and have skills on any level with any
type of computer that you would like to share with others, please get in touch.
PAGE 30 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
CROSSWORD
The Mendip Mindbender
ACROSS
7. Front garden in need of
TLC? (7)
8. Teachers in difficulty
without a pass for art
students (7)
10. Carry out each favoured
measure (10)
11. Thread in pillow is pulled
out (4)
12. A copper trapped between
rock and a place (8)
14. Sets up steps (6)
15. How team play in drubbing
after calamitous sendings
off of goalie, centre-half
and centre-forward! (11)
19. Copy rock-rap back track
(6)
20. New York sonnet reworked
by English poet (8)
22. Centrepiece adjusted to be
French (4)
23. National team is even after
tactical change (10)
25. Battered tome men keep for
old times sake (7)
26. Keep teasing council HQ
(7)
DOWN
1. No-one in old age crisis
was beyond the pale (7)
2. I go into troubled firm,
make cuts and hold things
together (4)
3. In extreme humidity can
bring rot to small room
(possibly wooden framed)
(6)
4. In denial at robberies (8)
5. Commissioners insane
whale levy where river
flows (4,6)
6. Emphasises lack of strength
in locks (7)
9. Wake dressed and eject
from nudist colony (11)
13. Sounds like healthier bread
took over! (10)
16. Re-enactment activity
begins nicely but loses
cohesion (8)
17. Big Lear performance
delivers captivating speech
(7)
18. Aimed loosely at cauldron
(7)
21. Don’t want you choosing
any font simply because it’s
lighter (6)
24. Ulrika is after guys that
offer choice (4)
Compiled by Felkov
Answers on Page 105
News page 31:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:38
Page 1
Show society’s new head
SOMERSET business leader Rupert Cox has been named as the
new chief executive of the Royal Bath and West Society.
Rupert enjoyed a 20-year career in farming before joining the
Federation of Small Business and then became CEO at the
Somerset Chamber of Commerce. He will take up his new post
at the society in January as the organisation prepares to celebrate
the 50th anniversary of being based at the showground near
Shepton Mallet.
Rupert, who lives in Long Sutton with wife Angie, succeeds
Jane Guise. He said: “I am honoured to have been appointed the
chief executive of the Royal Bath & West of England Society.
Who would have thought that when I started stewarding in the
sheep section of the Bath & West Show as a teenager some 35
years ago, that I would return to lead this iconic and highly
regarded institution?”
Rupert added: “There is a huge amount of untapped potential
in the breadth of activities that the society is involved with and
as such I look forward to leading the dedicated team at the
showground through the next stage of the society’s evolution –
starting of course with a successful 50th Bath & West Show on
this site from 27th May 2015.”
Robert Drewett, the chairman of the society, said: “After a
very robust recruitment process we are delighted to have
captured the services of Rupert Cox as our new chief executive
and look forward to him joining the society at a time of great
opportunity. Rupert has a strong affinity with agriculture, food
production and the countryside as well as experience of the
flagship Royal Bath & West Show, ranging from being a
livestock steward in his teenage years through to a commercial
exhibitor later in his career.”
Lions spotted in
Midsomer Norton
JUNIOR school children in Midsomer Norton were set a
challenge to spot small cuddly lions in windows dotted around
Midsomer Norton High Street. Midsomer Norton Lions
organised the event for Lions awareness week.
The winner, spotting 28 of the 30 lions placed, was Alexis
from Welton Primary, winning a £25 book token. She’s shown
with organiser, Lion Derek Livsey, president, Margaret Small,
and headteacher, John Snell.
Cadets earn praise
NEWS
MEMBERS of the Paulton Army Cadet Platoon received
thanks and a cheque for £100 from Peasedown Party in the
Park organisers Cat Savage and Jo Davis for their help at
this year’s festival.
The cadets spent seven hours supervising road closures at
this year’s event.
Paying their respects
The end of the Armistice Day service
THESE are the scenes at Sainsbury’s store in Frome when war
veterans, serving personnel and civic dignitaries joined shoppers
and staff to mark Armistice Day.
The
supermarket fell
silent at 11am as
standards carried
by members of
the Frome
branch of the
Royal British
Legion and the
Bath and West
Wiltshire branch
of the Royal
Engineers Old
Comrades
Association
were lowered in
respect.
See our
World War
Len Taylor from the Frome RBL and Terry
Davis from the Bath branch of the ROA during One feature,
page 71.
the two minutes’ silence
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 31
Events feature:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:39
Page 29
MENDIP TIMES
EVENTS
The train now standing . . .
By Mark Adler
MEMBERS of a worldwide model railway society which held its
annual meeting at the Bath and West Showground have praised
the organisation, facilities and – above all – the welcome they
received.
Flags of all the nations which attended the 7 ¼” Rail Society
AGM flew above the Bath and West Railway, which is run by
the East Somerset Society of Model and Experimental Engineers
and which hosted the gathering for the first time. Dozens of
railway enthusiasts attended the weekend, bringing their own
rolling stock to run on the line.
The Edmund Rack Pavilion – which just days before had
housed trade stands at The Dairy Show – was transformed into a
traditional railway “roundhouse” complete with turntable to
move the locomotives into position.
Brian Reading, president of the society which has around
1,200 members, said: “I cannot praise the Bath and West
Railway enough. The facilities are excellent and we have all
been made very, very welcome.”
It took ESSMEE a year to prepare for the gathering. Its
president, Rev. Canon Roger Davis, said: “It’s taken a lot of hard
work by our members, but it has been worth every moment. At
the end of the day we’re all kids at heart and love playing with
trains!”
Geoff Clarke, from Porthmadog, brought two hand-built locos
which took part in a rare double-header on the line. Afon Glaslyn
and Tarn Bech earned Geoff the society’s top award for the best
examples built by a member
One man and his shed: Colin Edmonson with
his hand-built Colin’s Shed. Colin is about to
install an engine which will make it a selfcontained locomotive.
PAGE 32 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Volunteers marshalling the roundhouse in the Edmund Rack
Pavilion
Trains queue to reach the
station after a locomotive
further ahead suffered a
breakdown
Simon Bowditch, of Frome, is a member of the Guild of Railway
Artists and exhibited some of his work at the event. In the
background are illustrations showing the former stations at
Masbury and Witham Friary
Vera 7 ¼” society president Brian Reading
(left) with ESSMEE president Roger Davis
Some genuine youngsters! We’re all kids at
heart, says Roger Davis
Page 33 December:Layout 1
20/11/14
> Very competitive labour
rates £45 per hour plus VAT
> Highly trained and qualified
17:40
Page 1
> Collection and drop off
service available for local
areas
mechanic with over 16 years
> Diagnostic checks available
main dealer experience
> MOT’S arranged
> All makes and models
worked on
> Alloy Wheel Refurbishment
> Fully insured
> Professional Valeting
including Machine Polishing
Arts & Antiques section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:44
Page 34
MENDIP TIMES
Charcoal veg for Christmas?
LOOKING for that perfect gift at Christmas? Why not buy your
loved one a picture of their favourite vegetable! Perhaps a bunch
of carrots, a collection of pumpkins or some plain, old, dirty roots.
Alternatively why not book a workshop with Natasha
Clutterbuck at the Yeo Valley Organic garden where you can
spend the day drawing what’s best in season.
You may have seen Natasha’s vibrant, earthy vegetable
drawings exhibited at the Pelican Inn during the Chew Valley
Arts Trail in October. Natasha uses local charcoal, mud, rocks,
oak and other ingredients to colour her work giving it a natural
look.
Artists launch shop
NORTH Somerset Arts have launched a new pop-up shop in
Clevedon, featuring 20 local artists and designers, giving a
tempting taster of their next Arts Week in May. The band After
Hours entertained large crowds at the opening.
Entries for Arts Week, a bi-annual event, must be in by
December 5th. The event, which was launched in 2003, runs for
ten days from May 1st.
Natasha
Clutterbuck
Charcoal Veg Drawings.
Originals, bespoke
commissions and a selection
of prints available.
Drawing workshops at the
Yeo valley Organic Garden.
Telephone: 01275 331528
e-mail:
[email protected]
Web:
www.natashaclutterbuck.com
Details: www.northsomersetarts.org or contact Fiona
Davies [email protected]
A vintage festive season
A FASHION SHOW with a
difference could be just the
answer for people looking for
an unusual present or wanting
to find the ideal outfit for the
festive season.
Wells Trading Post and Han
Made will be running the
evening at The Sheppey Inn
at Godney, on Monday,
December 15th. Lois Wickett,
the Trading Post’s own
vintage expert, will be
featuring a collection of
vintage fashion to cater for all
shapes, sizes and pockets.
Tickets – costing £10 – are now available for the show which
follows hot on the heels of a sell-out show at The Sheppey held
earlier this year.
People travel from all over the West Country to see Lois, who
works as a vintage stylist at Wells Trading Post each Saturday.
Owners Tanith and Robin Tothill also offer a personalised
shopping service throughout the emporium.
The shop itself will remain open until Tuesday, December
23rd and this year is also offering gift vouchers.
Tanith and Robin say they can look back on a fantastic 2014
and already have plans for the coming year to make the former
mill an even more attractive destination for shoppers.
Tanith said: “If the event on the 15th is anything like the last
one, then tickets will sell out very quickly and people might
want to think about booking taxis!”
Lois will present
the fashion show
Old Priory Mill, West St, Wells, BA5 2HG. Tel: 01749 671454
www.wellstradingpost.co.uk • email:[email protected]
PAGE 34 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Arts & Antiques section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:44
Page 35
Cloisonné collection in Clevedon
THE Oriental market continues apace and
although it may seem a long way off,
Clevedon Salerooms are already looking to
their next quarterly specialist sale in March.
This will include the second part of a
collection of more than 100 lots of cloisonné
and Japanese works of art, amassed over the
past couple of decades by a local collector.
With live on-line bidding the salerooms
expect the same global demand to that of the
first part of the collection offered in
September. Anyone with Oriental works of
art or any other items they may be thinking
of selling is welcome to attend the
salerooms forthcoming valuation days.
These are being held for the entire week,
December 8th – 12th, 9.30 – 1pm and 2pm –
5pm. To speak to a valuer contact the
Salerooms 01934 830111.
ARTS AND ANTIQUES
Mendip Times
reduces travel
costs
100,000 potential
customers just a
few miles
from
your
business
Clevedon Salerooms wish their customers a
Merry Christmas
Fine Art Auctioneers & Valuers
FREE ANTIQUE
VALUATION DAYS
8 9 10 11 12 December
9.30am–1pm and 2pm–5pm
Held at the salerooms – ample free parking
no appointment necessary
Looking for that unique present?
Come to our final auction before Christmas
Tel: 01934 830111
or 0117 325 6789
The Auction Centre, Kenn Road, Kenn,
Clevedon, Bristol BS21 6TT
www.clevedon-salerooms.com
Thursday 4th December 10am
Viewing: Wed 3rd December 10am – 7.30pm,
Sale day from 9am
Catalogue on-line: Tuesday 2nd December
www.clevedon-salerooms.com
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 35
Arts & Antiques section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:44
Page 36
MENDIP TIMES
Strong interest in latest Mendip sale
MENDIP Auction Rooms’ antiques sale on November 15th was
well attended with items including jewellery, silver and ceramics
selling well. The continued interest in vintage and retro items is
strong with an Ercol refectory table and chairs selling for £270
well above the £100-£150 estimate.
With Christmas less than five weeks away both jewellery and
silver sold very well. Highlights included an Art Deco style ring
that sold for £640; a silver helmet shaped jug selling above
estimate at £120 and a silver swing handled bon-bon basket
selling at £250.
Whilst the market for Royal Worcester has been down in the last
PAGE 36 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
few years Mendip Auction Rooms sold a set of six coffee cups
and saucers, each painted with a different wild bird, for £900 to an
internet bidder in the Midlands.
A nice collection of postcards, many with local interest, sold in
the room to a local collector for £230 against an auction estimate
of £40 to £60.
Whilst the brown furniture market has generally been difficult in
the last ten years a mahogany hall table sold for £200 and an early
19th century mahogany bureau sold for £500.
Entries for the December antiques sale close on the November
28th. Highlights for this auction already include a private
collection of military and civilian medals, a Minton Secessionist
vase, a Clarice Cliff jug and a British Impressionist oil on canvas
by P. W. Gibbs from a house clearance in Axbridge.
Arts & Antiques section:Layout 1
20/11/14
Moorcroft sells well
17:44
Page 37
ARTS & ANTIQUES
A COLLECTION of modern Moorcroft pottery totalled over £8,200 at
Tamlyns’ recent auction of antiques and decorative items in Bridgwater.
Unusually this sale contained two collections of modern Moorcroft – there
were a total of 107 lots and every single one sold! The highest price in this
section was for a trio of vases by Paul Hilditch which made £450 and all lots
exceeded their estimates – there are many keen collectors for this pottery
which is encouraging at a time when ceramics are not selling as well as they
were.
In the jewellery section a string of amber beads sold for £1,700; a black opal
dress ring £700; a diamond set dragonfly brooch £400 and an opal necklace
£300.
A large Victorian oak extending table with a magnificent pedestal which
pulled apart when the table extended, sold for £900; an eight-day longcase
clock by Abraham Bernard, Bristol, which needed extensive repair, sold for
£900 and another longcase clock by Ralph Banks, Plymouth made £680.
A silver shooting butt marker dated for London 1910 made £450; a small
Russian snuff box £200; a gents Cartier wrist watch in box £950; four Liberty
& Co “Cymric” enamelled coffee spoons £380 and a small oil on board of the
Ship Inn, Porlock by Alexander Carruthers Gould £300.
These specialist sales are proving to be very popular, because all lots are
illustrated online and “live” bidding is available on sale day buyers can access
the sales from wherever they are in the world – and Tamlyns now regularly sell
to buyers from the USA, Australia, China, Russia and all over Europe, a true
“World” market.
The next similar sale will be in the spring next year and entries are already
being accepted. Contact the auctioneers on 01278 445251 for further
information.
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 37
Business section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:46
Page 38
MENDIP TIMES
Taking the pain out of tax
AHB Accountants specialise in taxation with combined
expertise of over 60 years. They say it’s easy to make
mistakes or errors of judgement in dealing with tax, but the
consequences can be considerable.
They have also come across many cases where people do
not claim all of their entitlement to property enhancements,
repairs, capital expenditure and make errors with second
homes and lose
reliefs for holiday
homes.
HMRC are
clamping down on
private residence
relief and even
trying to get
landlords to pay
National
Insurance.
Mistakes on your company regarding statutory minutes for
dividends may incur the wrath of HMRC, penalties and
interest. Why not let them help?
Why make the mistake of being a sole trader or
partnership when a limited company carries so many tax
benefits?
They also carry investigation insurance for HMRC
enquiries. Contact them for a free initial consultation on
01275 333623 or email [email protected]
Investing in people
Pictured (l to r) Leslie Rowlands, Kat Field, Jacqui Dennis and Sam
Norris with chief executive, Don Morris
RADSTOCK Co-operative
Society has retained its
Investor in People Silver
Award for a second year after
a tough week of assessment.
We are a local company in the Chew
Valley with easy access to Bristol and
Bath and we specialise in:
• Account Preparation
• Book-keeping
• Payroll
• Company Secretarial
• Inheritance Tax Planning
• Personal Tax Planning
• VAT
• Tax Investigations
• Tax Returns and Self Assessments
• New Business Start Up
FREE INITIAL MEETING
T 01275 333623 F 01275 333253
W www.ahbaccountants.com
The Tannery, Westway Farm, Bishop Sutton, BS39 5XP
Contact [email protected]
PAGE 38 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Chief executive, Don
Morris, said: “I am extremely
proud that we have gone from
strength to strength on our IIP
journey demonstrating our
commitment to continually
improve and develop the
business for our membership.”
Paul Devoy, Head of
Investors in People, said
“Achieving the Investors in
People Silver standard is
something any organisation
should be truly proud of. It is
the sign of a company which
is very committed to good
people management practice
and we’d like to congratulate
the Radstock Co-operative
Society on their
achievement.”
ECATCHER
MOL
CAMELEY LODGE LAUNDRY
Duvets & Bedspreads washed & dried
Sheets and Duvet covers
washed and pressed
Professional efficient service
Collection & delivery service in the
Chew Valley
Tel 01761 451787
www.cameleylodgelaundry.co.uk
NO MOLE
NO FEE
Telephone
01275 332966
mendipmolecatcher.co.uk
20/11/14
17:46
Page 39
Don’t forget the taxman’s gift
IT is said that Christmas comes but once a year, but I'm not
entirely sure that's the case, as time is flying so rapidly that I
seem to have enjoyed about three in the last six months.
However, as we are rattling along towards the 2014 Festive
Season it is time to think once again about tax Returns. Oh
joy!
If you are efficient, or if your accountant is on the case, then
you may already have filed yours and know what you are due
to pay in January next year. This is obviously the best
situation to be in as you can budget well ahead for paying the
tax man. Best of all, if you are in business for yourself, is to
have regularly produced financial records which allow you to
put money aside in preparation for the tax man.
Some of us find it hard to make time to keep such accurate
records, and it's worth mentioning that it is possible to have
assistance from your accountant these days with some secure
and confidential software enabling your bookkeeping to be
managed jointly by you both.
So, there are many ways to ensure a good Christmas:
Order a good turkey (obviously a local one!); buy or make a
gift for everyone you should; get the tree up and make it
beautiful; sing carols loudly and, if possible, in tune; get
together with friends and family and – Oh, I feel a real killjoy
now – Get your tax return done before December 25th. Sorry!
But it will lead to a happier January. Honestly!
Happy Christmas one and all, from all of us at Probusiness.
Jane Bowe
BUSINESS
Photo by Ignyte Limited, Radstock.
Business section:Layout 1
Get your Se
lf
Assessmen
t
submitted b
efore
Christmas –
From £100
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 39
Business section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:46
Page 40
MENDIP TIMES
QUALITY MARQUEES FOR
YOUR SPECIAL EVENT
Why do I find working from
home so difficult?
WITH 20 years’ experience of running small businesses, I have
come to the conclusion that for me, working from home is one of
the biggest challenges.
I believe that, had I moved my businesses to commercial
premises earlier, I would have been more successful, happier and
have created more local jobs earlier in the business cycle.
So why is working from home so difficult? Well firstly there is
the isolation. Some days you don’t see anyone at all; it is all very
well speaking to people on the phone and exchanging emails, but
as a human being I soon crave intelligent company with people
who share my interests, and this social aspect is for me the most
difficult to fulfil
working from
home. It is the
everyday business
progress, little bits
of good news and
occasional
triumphs that I want to share with colleagues, not easy in an
empty room!
Secondly, I found I fell out of love with my house. No longer a
sanctuary for relaxation, work and home became intertwined, my
house increasingly unloved as it had to accommodate the demands
of business visitors and my team rather than just my family and
friends. When I moved the business out of the house the change in
the atmosphere was immediate and so noticeable visitors
immediately commented upon the change. The house came back
to life happy that it was a home, not a home pretending to be an
office.
Thirdly there is the issue of space and light. I have become
convinced that a business in a small space will struggle to “think
big”, it is as if the environment you are in puts tight constraints
around your ambitions. We need space for our thoughts and plans
to reach outside of our walls.
When I first walked into the space that is now the Mendip Hub,
my first impression was of space and light. I felt sure that if I
could feel the difference others would too and the Hub now has
more than a dozen members who use our state of the art facilities
at times to suit – achieving a work/life balance massively
improved by working away from your home.
By Judith Ludovino, The Mendip Hub
JG MARQUEES HAS A VERY
BUSY 2015 – STAFF REQUIRED
Must enjoy working outdoors, physically fit.
We are looking for
FULL TIME MARQUEE ERECTOR/RIGGER (no experience required, will train
for an excellent long-term future). To work in a small team, erecting marquees and
installing furnishings. During the winter, assisting with minor duties on the farm.
Monday – Friday 8.30- 5.30. Must have driving licence, ideally with 7.5t lorry
licence, if not we will get you trained.
FULL TIME FOR SPRING/SUMMER (6 + months)
Helping with marquees, must have a car driving licence.
STUDENTS FOR SUMMER – some keen, able bodies home from University,
own transport to get to work is important.
Will be looking to fill these vacancies in the spring.
Pay will depend upon experience etc.
CV to: Jeremy Griffin, [email protected]
JG Marquees, Nettwood Farm, East Harptree, Bristol BS40 6DA.
Tel 01761 221366
PAGE 40 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
• Accounts preparation for sole traders, partnerships and small
companies
• Business taxation and self-assessment returns
• Payroll services
• Small business start-up advice
• Free initial consultation
Business section:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:47
Page 41
E f f e c t i v e re cy c l i n g
from Towens
BUSINESS
TOWENS Construction and Environmental Services is a wellestablished local family business covering the entire country, with
waste transfer stations in Clutton, Bridgwater and Weston-superMare.
They have experienced and helpful drivers operating a modern
and well-maintained fleet of lorries, monitored by a state-of-theart tracking system, ensuring a comprehensive service second-tonone.
They provide all sizes of skips and roll-on-off containers for all
household and commercial requirements, including wait and load,
with discounts for single and green waste streams i.e. timber,
hardcore, soils and plasterboard.
With 98% of segregated and reusable arisings staying in
Somerset, they believe it’s important to their customers to know
that their waste is being recycled effectively, legally and in a safe
environment.
TOWENS are now offering Skip hire and Waste management services from their new facility at Clutton
Extensive range of competitively priced skips and containers
Experienced and helpful drivers
Permanently sited skips and containers
Wait and loads
Discounts available on pre-sorted waste e.g. all hardcore or inert
soil etc sorted into one skip or container
SKIP THE REST – HIRE THE BEST
Towens Waste Management Ltd | The Old Coal Yard | Marsh Lane | Clutton BS39 5ST
T 01761 453200 | M 07872 489335 | Website: www.towens.co.uk
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 41
Wedmore feature:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:52
Page 42
MENDIP TIMES
Perfect start to Christmas
10
December
WEDMORE by Lamplight is a magical
event and the perfect way to start the
festive season. After a service in the
village church and carols around the
Christmas tree in the churchyard,
children carry their lanterns in
procession down to the village.
The Borough is closed for the evening for a range of stalls
to be set up. The village’s various shops and business are
open late offering hospitality and Christmas gifts and there’s
a range of music and entertainment. For the first time this
year the event will feature an ice rink.
PISCES
FISHMONGER
& GREENGROCER
Direct supply of Cornish Sea Food.
Loch Fyne Smokehouse stockist.
Northern Water and Continental seafood
specialists.
Fruit and vegetables personally selected at market,
exotics and the unusual, fresh herbs and the best
local produce.
Selection of culinary ingredients.
Open all day Tuesday to Friday plus Monday
and Saturday mornings.
5 The Borough Mall, The Borough
Wedmore, Somerset BS28 4EB
Tel: 01934 710318
Traditional home-made
sausages from our
Gloucester Old Spot pigs
www.thesomersetsausagecompany.co.uk
Tel:- 01934 712311
PAGE 42 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Time for wine
A WINE tasting extravaganza in Wedmore raised £1,000 for
Wedmore in Bloom and Wedmore Play Area.
It was the third year that Sophie and Mark Walker of The
Village Stores had held the event. They are pictured (with baby
Woody) with Neil Ellis from Wedmore Play Area and Brenda
Squires from Wedmore in Bloom.
Order early from Pisces
PISCES in Wedmore is looking forward to another busy festive
period. With all of their usual seasonal specialities, customers are
always amazed and complimentary about the varied and eclectic
range of goods on offer.
And with a little notice they are able to do their best to source
your requirements from their supply partners both here in the UK
and the continent. Orders are now been taken for the Christmas
and New Year festivities – remember there are no fish markets
between Christmas and New Year so place your order early!
Top quality sausages
THE Somerset Sausage Company in Wedmore produces all of its
own pork at Orchard Farm, Cocklake. Jim Baker and his team
farm pure breed Gloucester Old Spots, fed on rolled barley, cider
apples, waste beer and pig nuts to give them a very distinctive
flavour.
Someone once said to them: “Your pork is just like my granny
used to cook.” Well funnily enough it is what granny used to
cook! Their sausages have won awards with Taste of the West and
they have made the final of British Sausage Week on two
occasions. Their sausages are delivered all over the UK by courier
and are available at: www.thesomersetsausagecompany.co.uk
Christmas at Nanny Ida’s
NANNY Ida’s Family Restaurant and Tea Garden has now
enjoyed two years serving the local community and visitors to
the beautiful village of Wedmore.
Customers in the licenced restaurant can enjoy coffee, meals
and snacks in the relaxed atmosphere in this listed building
within the Saxon Square. A take-away menu is also available,
now including fish and chips and pizzas.
Three-course Christmas parties are available at a cost of £22
per person.
Wedmore feature:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:52
Page 43
FOCUS ON WEDMORE
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 43
Wedmore feature:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:53
Page 44
MENDIP TIMES
Counselling
I am an experienced accredited counsellor
offering therapeuc help in a range of situaons.
Relaonships, Abuse, Conflict Resoluon, Bereavement, Loss and
Trauma Problems that stem from childhood
Please Contact Wendy Haslam
Accredited Counsellor, Trainer and Supervisor
Tel: 01934 710515
Email: [email protected] • www.sllwaters.gb.net
A LO
V
A
N SWEEP
S
Fully insured chimney
sweeping service for all flues,
wood and solid fuel burners.
01934 710218
07500 955000
UNDER NEW
OWNERSHIP
[email protected]
BOOKING NOW FOR:
Candlelight Supper
Wednesday 10th December
Christmas Lunches
15th & 16th December
Christmas Party bookings now being
taken
Delicious food at reasonable prices.
Open for home cooked lunches and
snacks, teas and coffees.
Open 9.30 to 5.00 Mon to Sat,
Sunday 12.00pm.
The Borough, Wedmore
01934 710080
PAGE 44 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
The season to be jolly?
THE festive season is upon us, bringing a sense of anticipation
and excitement as we look forward to spending time with loved
ones and sharing gifts.
However it does not always quite work in this way. Family
tensions, relationship difficulties, loneliness and grief may
snowball into an overwhelming sense of anxiety and dread. It is
important to care for your own emotional wellbeing at this time of
year. Christmas can unwrap all sorts of emotions.
Wendy Haslam of Still Waters in Wedmore has listened to and
worked with many people in past years. She says Christmas so
often brings to a head what is brewing all year round. She can find
the trigger points that cause you to stumble. Then find a better
way.
What a gift to give yourself. Do contact her if you would like to
explore this further.
The Dining Room has
new owners
KATE Isgar and Will Stitch
have recently taken over The
Dining Room, Wedmore. Both
Kate and Will are from farming
backgrounds, running a beef
and sheep farm not far from
Wedmore.
Kate has had her own outside
catering business and has been
baking for farmers markets for the last eight years, so when the
Dining Room came up for sale, they both thought it was an
opportunity not to be missed.
They use their own pork, lamb and chicken and eventually
will have their own beef. All the other meat is sourced next
door from Hectors Farm Shop. All the food is homemade and
fresh every day.
They have a comprehensive menu together with a daily
specials board, so if you are just wanting a coffee and cake or a
three-course meal, they can provide this. They are open seven
days a week, from 9:30am until 4pm Monday-Saturday and
12pm Sundays for Sunday Lunch.
They also open for special theme evenings once a month on a
Saturday for which booking is essential.
Bronze and Traditional Turkeys
All types of poultry, meats, games and
Christmas Fayre
Produced on our own farm
or supplied locally
Orders taken for Christmas now!!
Orders, telephone or email:–
01934 712384 Shop
Alan, James and Lloyd would like to thank all our
customers who have supported us through 2014
9–10 e Borough Mall, e Borough,
Wedmore, Somerset BS28 4EB
For an appointment, telephone
01934 713513
Wedmore feature:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:53
Page 45
FOCUS ON WEDMORE
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 45
Wedmore feature:Layout 1
20/11/14
MENDIP TIMES
NEW
SHOPS IN THE
BOROUGH MALL
ONLY ONE LEFT
New Fashion Shop
opening in the New Year
17:53
Page 46
Mendip Times
reduces
travel costs
Call Ian Leavey
on 01934 712081
Email:
Borough [email protected]
THE BOROUGH MALL CO LTD
Live, work and shop locally
See our selection of beautiful
Christmas goodies
Call in for mulled cider
during Wedmore by
Lamplight
Open: Monday-Saturday 8.30am-5.00pm
01934 713289
www.pumpkinwedmore.co.uk
[email protected]
1 e Borough Mall, Wedmore,
Somerset BS28 4EB
100,000 potential
customers within a
short distance of
your business
Wedmore remembers
MORE than 500
people attended
an exhibition in
Wedmore
commemorating
the centenary of
the outbreak of
World War One.
The project,
The Isle of Wedmore Remembers, has been running since 2012,
organised by Dr Tim Moreman.
When Wedmore went to war – see page 76.
Learn to save a life
WITH the festive season nearly upon us, would you know what to
do if someone collapsed at your Christmas party or choked on
their turkey lunch? It will never happen to us – that’s what we all
think!
Reflex First Aid Training will help you recognise problems and
act quickly. With a little training YOU could help – don’t turn
away! Although companies are under an obligation to provide this
training, we should all realise that in our daily lives a little
knowledge could save our nearest and dearest or the person who
collapses in the street.
Based in Wedmore, Reflex deliver Ofqual regulated first aid
courses for the general public and businesses throughout the South
West. Their courses are conducted in a relaxed, no pressure,
friendly environment and will give you the knowledge to keep
your casualty safe until the professionals arrive.
New collection from
Erica Sharpe
A NEW collection,
Searching for You, has been
launched by Erica Sharpe.
The enigmatic hare, an
animal more commonly
seen in Somerset in the
spring, is available now to
view at her gallery in
Wedmore.
Hares have been
embraced by cultures throughout the world – in myth and
folklore they have become symbols of love and bravery and
legend has it became the emblems of Venus, Cupid and
Aphrodite.
Erica said: “I have really enjoyed the process of crafting
these beautiful and spirited animals into elegant and distinctive
new jewellery, from a torc bangle to skipping, frolicking
cufflinks! A very special commissioned ring has already gone
to its new owner, complete with two hares leaping above a
heart-shaped ruby – a thoroughly delightful piece to work on.”
If you would like to see the new collection or enquire about
commissions, please visit Erica's Wedmore showroom,
www.ericasharpe.co.uk or search for Erica Sharpe Fine
Jewellery on Facebook.
PAGE 46 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Wedmore feature:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:53
Page 47
FOCUS ON WEDMORE
Smiles all round as Wedmore
Dental team excel
The team from Wedmore Dental Practice are
celebrating after being recognised for their
outstanding customer care and clinical
excellence.
Principal dentist Mr Peter Sedgwick has
gained the prestigious Denplan Excel
accreditation – the UK's only fully validated
quality assurance programme for primary
dental care.
Mr Sedgwick, who has been the practice
principal at Wedmore since 1995, said:
PETER SEDGWICK
“It's a real
achievement for
all of us at
Wedmore and
recognises our determination to provide the
highest standards of service for our patients.”
Wedmore Dental Practice is a family
friendly practice, and focuses on providing
excellent dental health care through private
preventative dentistry in a caring
environment.
B.D.S. (U.Brist) D.P.D.S. (U.Brist) L.F Hom (Dent) GDC 55821
TIM COATES B.D.S. BSc (Hons) Ph.D GDC 78105
SALLY CANTWELL Hygienist RDH GDC 2213
JANE FELLOWS Hygienist RDH GDC 3540
JENNY MURRAY Hygienist RDH RDT GDC 3693
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 47
Wedmore feature:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:53
Page 48
MENDIP TIMES
Celebrate and fundraise
with Beauty by Emma
BEAUTY by Emma
will be at the centre
of celebrations for
Wedmore by
Lamplight. Go
along to enjoy
mulled wine and
festive food and see
lots of gift ideas
from Dermalogica,
kissed by Mii,
Jessica Nails, Mii
Cosmetics and
special offers on
treatments and
vouchers too!
They are also
fundraising throughout the evening for Wedmore First
School, with festive file and paint, children’s glitter tattoos,
mulled wine, hot chocolate, mince pies and cookies, vintage
sweet cart, ice cones, glow sticks, raffle prizes and much
more!
Help them raise as much money as they can for Wedmore
First School! And don’t miss the ice skating rink in their car
park from 2pm.
FOCUS ON WEDMORE
Creative gardening
JANE Hicks says there are
many reasons that she is asked
to help a client; they may feel
at a loss about what to do in
their garden; it just does not
quite work or fit; they may be
nervous about what to prune
and when to do it; asking why
there is always a space in that
border or why a plant does not
grow properly.
She has been helping her
clients to create gardens for
eight years and still loves
every aspect of her job from
surveying to CAD drawing
right through to the planting.
Quite often new clients will
have lived in their house for
years, the children have now
grown too big for the
trampoline and swings, or they
may have recently moved to a
new house, the builders may
have just finished the
alterations, and she will be
asked to look at the garden.
Her job can range from a
small border right up to a
large garden – she listens to
what her clients want.
Special Offer
for December:
Spray Tan for £15
Kissed by Mii is a tanning range that offers a
flawless, conditioning tan
Why not treat yourself to a luxurious spray tan
and show off your gorgeous bronze glow to friends
and family this Christmas
Join us for Wedmore by Lamplight
Raising funds for Wedmore First School
Telephone: 01934 709878
2, King Alfred Mews, Church Street,
Wedmore, Somerset, BS28 4AB
PAGE 48 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Events feature:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:56
Page 28
Cross Halloween Party
THE White Hart in Cross held a Charity Halloween Party with
live music and prizes for the best dressed entries. Proceeds
from the night went to Breast Cancer Awareness.
Christmas crafts
at Ston Easton
EVENTS
Pat Harper (left) with Caroline
Lane and her Emborough Farm
House preserves
CRAFTY villagers in Ston Easton have held their fifth
Christmas Fayre to showcase their skills and raise funds for
local projects.
The 22 stall holders sold items ranging from patchwork crafts
and handbags to homemade jams and sweets, Christmas
decorations and even goat’s milk soap.
Organiser Pat Harper said it was the biggest turnout to date
and thanked her team of helpers. Proceeds will be divided
between Ston Easton Church and the village hall, which both
require fabric and maintenance work.
Lyn Ringrose (left) and Jill Jestico have worked throughout the
year on their crafts
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 49
Rookery Farm pages:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:58
Page 50
MENDIP TIMES
BUSINESSES at Rookery Farm at Binegar are
joining forces for their first Christmas Fayre to
kick of the festive season in style.
With Santa’s Grotto, face painting – and some
real donkeys – to keep youngsters amused, the
traders are planning an afternoon of fun events
on Saturday, December 6th.
Some businesses will be offering 10% off their
stock, whilst others will be running events.
Somer Craft Addix will be holding polystyrene
ribbon and bauble demonstrations as well as a
gift tag making session. There will also be the
opportunity to win a hamper including vouchers
for many of the businesses taking part.
Emma Green who runs Paws to Claws, a
grooming, pet food and accessory shop, has
worked with Victoria Marcangelo-Lyons, from
Angel-Oh Therapies, to plan the day. Emma will
be offering 10% off pet food and accessories on
the day and said: “We got together and thought
it would be great to promote Rookery Farm as a
place to visit. We want to put it on the Christmas
map because we have such a great range of
businesses on one site.”
The fayre itself will run from midday until
2pm but Emma added: “As long as people are
here I am sure some of the events will continue
until later in the afternoon.”
Victoria will be offering mini spa treats
including manicures and hand and feet
massages as well as an aloe vera stand. She
added: “The proceeds from the raffle will go to
Eady’s Journey which is a cause I am very close
to.”
Eady’s Journey is a campaign to raise funds
for Eady Body, a young girl from Shepton
Mallet with a life-affecting disorder.
Glastonbury time
at Somerset Clocks
AN UNUSUAL eightday longcase clock by
a maker from
Glastonbury has left
Rik Lowe at Somerset
Clocks with a mystery
on his hands: who was
Richard Woollan?
The cottage-style
clock with brass dial
is engraved with R.
Woollan, of
Glastonbury, but Rik
says very little is
known about him.
Rik said: “It is also
The history of the Glastonbury clock
an unusual clock
maker is something of a mystery to Rik
because, at six feet six
Lowe
inches tall, it is not
very tall by comparison with other longcase clocks.”
Rik added: “I’ve had many clocks here by makers from
Mendip and the surrounding areas, but this is the first
Glastonbury clock I’ve ever had.”
Paws for presents
Paws to Claws, run by Emma Green, will be one of the businesses
offering a 10% discount off merchandise to visitors to the
Christmas Fayre
Free Collection and Delivery Service
Somerset Clocks
Specialists in the full restoration and repair of all types of Antique Clocks
Contact Rik Lowe for a FREE no obligation estimate
Many different types of Antique Clocks in stock, fully
restored and guaranteed.
Phone for details or to arrange to
visit our Showroom
Unit 5, Rookery Farm, Binegar, BA3 4UL
PAGEP??
AGE
•M
50ENDIP
• MENDIP
TIMES
TIMES
• DECEMBER
• DECEMBER
2011 2014
01749 841114
All work fully guaranteed
Unit 3, Rookery Farm, Binegar, Nr. Radstock, Somerset BA3 4UL
www.somersetclocks.co.uk
Rookery Farm pages:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:58
Page 51
The joy of six at Hartleys
THEY said it would never last
but after six years on the
Mendips, Hartleys Café Bistro
is going from strength to
strength.
Run by Paul and Linda
Hartley, the café bistro opened
in December 2008 and is now
well-known for a superb choice
of locally sourced breakfast,
great coffee and an always
changing, never boring, forever
seasonal lunchtime menu.
Some guests say they come for
the freshly cooked dishes, some
for the local ciders, beers and
international wines, some for
the friendly welcome and great
ambience, some even because
it’s so easy to park and then
there are some who come for
the cabaret!
Not only is Hartleys a great
eatery but also somewhere to
buy Foodshoots. Foodshoots is
a range they have created of
wacky, thought-provoking food
images printed onto canvas,
framed prints, black and white
aprons, table mats and coasters,
greetings cards, classic white
mugs, trays and chopping
boards. Christmas wouldn’t be
Christmas without a trip to
Hartleys, hot mince pies,
mulled wine, three-bird roast
and beware the girls singing
carols!
Hartleys
cafe bistro
Yum, yum, yum
In my tum, tum, tum
Hartleys is the place to
go, go, go
For a real Christmas
ho! ho! ho!
Rookery Farm, Binegar BA3 4UL
Tel 01749 841718
CHRISTMAS AT ROOKERY FARM
Eady’s journey
PROCEEDS from the raffle
at Rookery Farm’s
Christmas Fayre will go to
the Eady’s Journey charity.
Set up in 2013, Eady’s
Journey offers small grants
to disabled children in
Mendip. It is named after
Eady Body. Eady lives in
Cranmore with her parents Matt and Charly and suffers
from a severe neurodevelopment disorder.
Eady was born in May 2011 with an undiagnosed
condition. Eady struggled with every single aspect of daily
life needing 24 hour care. After struggling to get the right
therapy and equipment on the NHS, Matt and Charly
decided to start fundraising initially for Eady and now for
other children.
Victoria Marcangelo-Lyons, who runs Angel-Oh
Therapies, is good friends with Matt and Charly and
regularly fundraises for the charity. A spa day at Rookery
Farm raised almost £400 for Eady’s Journey. Visitors
enjoyed Indian Head Massage, Reflexology, Manicures,
Pedicures, Cupping and Massage.
For more information about the charity, visit:
https://www.facebook.com/EadysJourney
Rookery Farm is hosting its first Christmas Fayre – it may
hold another event in the summer.
. . . the Mendip’s best kept secret
SOMER CRAFT ADDIX
For all your paper crafting needs!
Open: Tues 6.30-9pm • Wed-Fri 10-4pm • Sat 10-2pm
WEEKLY WORKSHOPS
and craft clubs
25% Off all Treatments booked
in January and February 2015 –
Just Quote: Mendip Times Offer
Cuttlebug, Marianne/Diesire dies, Embossing folders,
Stamps/stencils/inks and much more
Unit 6, Rookery Farm, Binegar, Radstock BA3 4UL
01749 840567 • 07739 048679
www.somercraftaddix.com
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 51
News page 52:Layout 1
20/11/14
17:59
Page 1
MENDIP TIMES
Top accolade for college
STRODE College in Street has been judged “outstanding” by
Ofsted becoming the only provider of sixth form education in
Somerset to win the award. This exceptional achievement
further supports the positive picture that has emerged in recent
years as the college has gone from strength to strength.
The 2014 government league tables ranked Strode College as
the best school or college in Somerset for student progress at A
Level and the second best college in the South West for both A
Level and advanced vocational courses. Strode has also been
placed in the top 5% of all state schools and colleges nationally
for improving student progress or “adding-value” after GCSEs
over the last three years.
Principal, James Staniforth, said: “Those who work in
education know that an ‘outstanding’ grade is not easily
achieved. Our college specialises in education for 16-18 year
olds and our teachers and support staff are among the most
talented, experienced and dedicated that I have ever known.
“I am thrilled that, following an intense and forensic
inspection, Ofsted were able to see this and have now reported
on the outstanding and positive difference this makes to our
students’ lives.”
Giants in East Harptree
THE annual
pumpkin night at
East Harptree
Village Club
produced a giant
this year. Rob
Stenner won with
a 418lb pumpkin,
140lbs heavier
than the club’s
previous record.
Bill Maggs had
the biggest onion
at 4lb 10oz, and
Steve Thomas
won the conkers
game. The annual
competition, now
in its 25th year,
starts in the spring, with the sale of plants at £1 each. Call
01761 221754 and ask for Brenda.
PAGE 52 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Somerset on the map
for tour operators
NEWS
Wells town crier Len Sweales talks to visitors in the Market
Square
TOUR operators from Europe, China and the United States
were wooed by some of Somerset’s biggest attractions during
the first-ever countywide tourism expo held in Wells.
The Royal Bath and West Show, West Somerset Railway
and the Fleet Air Arm Museum at Yeovilton were amongst the
destinations promoted during the weekend event hosted by the
Best Western Plus Swan Hotel and supported by Wells Civic
Society.
Keynote speakers at the welcome dinner were Mark Tobin,
general manager at the Swan Hotel (who spent almost a year
planning the weekend), John Turner, CEO of Visit Somerset
and James Berresford, CEO of Visit England. John said:
“Somerset is possibly the greatest untold story in the UK.”
James told guests: “London often overshadows the rest of
the country, but there is so much more to England than
London. This is a chance to shine a light on other parts of the
country.”
Peter Wheelhouse, head of economic development at Frome
Town Council which had a stand at the expo, said: “It has
been a great opportunity to promote the town and its
attractions.”
Visitors were welcomed on a tour of Wells by town crier
Len Sweales who said: “I can remember coaches dropping off
visitors for just a few minutes to take a photo of the outside of
Wells Cathedral then making them get back on to go to the
next destination. I spoke to them and now people stay for a
day and more to enjoy the city.”
Plans are already in place for a similar event to be held next
October.
Peter Wheelhouse, from Frome Town Council (left), with
Charlie Shen from Hello-Hi Travel
Wildlife page:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:00
Page 1
WILDLIFE
COMMUNITYbased wildlife
projects are certainly
the way forward for
nature conservation
in this country.
Putting local
By CHRIS
people
at the
SPERRING
forefront of nature
MBE
conservation gives a
real sense of ownership and the ability
to make a difference with observable
results. The Somerset Community Barn
Owl Project, a joint project between the
Hawk and Owl Trust and the Somerset
Wildlife Trust, has now finished, and
the target to put one new barn owl box
in every parish in Somerset has been
accomplished, but there is so much
more we need to do.
Therefore, HOT has launched a new
Community Owls Project which will
build on what has been achieved so far,
with more free boxes for landowners,
more school visits, more research and
ultimately more barn owls for everyone
to enjoy.
We won’t just be helping barn owls
this time though, we will now be
focusing on other species too, including
the ever-rarer little owl, and the
struggling kestrel.
As always, funds are limited but we
have managed to secure enough to
continue for the time being, so any
farmers wanting free nest boxes and/or
advice about how they can help owls,
kestrels and other wildlife on their land
should please get in touch.
We are no longer limited to giving
just one free box per parish, we just ask
that landowners give an area of their
land to create rough habitat for all
grassland species – this can be in the
form of field margins, or even edges to
tracks, which can be cut or grazed just
once a year in late summer.
Communities across Somerset can still do their bit to help owls and other birds of prey
Photography by Chris Sperring
The work continues
A tawny owl
This timing allows flowers to seed
and ground-nesting birds to fledge,
whilst also giving enough time for
some re-growth before the winter. This
rough grassland habitat helps an
enormous array of wildlife, from
butterflies and bees, to kestrels and
barn owls. We know how hard it can be
for farmers today, with the demand for
cheap food squeezing profits, but any
small amount of ground can make a
huge difference, and it doesn’t have to
be taken out of production altogether.
Smallholders can also help, in fact so
too can anyone with who owns or
manages land and has a desire to help
wildlife.
We are very grateful to students of
Bridgwater College who built and
donated 12 boxes to the new project,
and to the Give2Hoots fundraising
group who have funded another ten. We
plan to get an extra 50 boxes up in the
coming months, as well as monitoring
and maintaining the 400 we have
already put up across the county.
With 75% of barn owls now nesting in
man-made nest boxes these really are vital
to the future of this threatened species.
We are also offering free school visits and
talks, accompanied by live owls, as well
as nestbox-building workshops for
children’s groups and schools.
Barn owls had two disastrously poor
breeding seasons in 2012 and 2013, but
2014 has, thankfully, been a good one.
More than 200 barn owl chicks have
been reared in our nest boxes this year,
in 2013 the figure was just 11! Thanks
to the generosity of the farming
community, without whom barn owls
just wouldn’t have a secure future.
Chris Sperring is Conservation Officer for the Hawk and Owl Trust
Contact him on 07799 413 918 or via [email protected]
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 53
Walking DPS:Layout 1
20/11/14
19:48
Page 54
MENDIP TIMES
A festive stroll around Axbridge
HERE’S a recipe for a great and easy
Christmas and New Year walk, a short
circle, which enjoys the open views and
amazing bird life from the edge of
Cheddar Reservoir and calls in to historic
Axbridge, looking particularly attractive
over the festive season. After a walk
along a good track, continue on round
the reservoir to the start.
Try and go on a sunny clear day, and
wrap up warmly as it can be quite
exposed. The views to Mendip and down
across the Levels are magnificent and
take binoculars to watch the great variety
of water birds enjoying the shelter of this
inland lake. In Axbridge there is a good
variety of refreshment options, ranging
from breakfast, through snacks, lunches
and afternoon teas, as well as drinks, of
course.
Walking is mainly completely on the
dry. There are two or three stiles and a
short steep scramble up the grassy
reservoir bank towards the end. It’s a
good dog walk, too.
PARK: In the free car park for Cheddar
Reservoir. From the A371 Axbridge to
Wells road, in Cheddar (on the west side)
turn on the B3151 Wedmore road, over a
bridge (crossing the Strawberry Line).
Immediately turn right on Sharpham
Road, No Through Road. At the end of
the lane, continue on the track and go
through green metal gates to the free
public parking for the reservoir under the
Intake Tower.
START: This wonderful leisure area and
wildlife sanctuary, is an artificial
With Sue Gearing
PAGE 54 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
reservoir operated by Bristol Water
dating back to the 1930s. Its water comes
from the Cheddar Yeo river in Cheddar
Gorge.
Go up on to the edge and turn right
past the intake tower immediately getting
wonderful views across the Mendip
ridge, including Crook Peak, and also to
Cheddar Gorge and the quarrying on the
south side.
The birdlife in winter on the reservoir
is amazing and on a sunny day it is easy
to spend a long time just observing them.
I spent time watching a tiff between a
crow and a tern, and also following the
antics of diving birds.
There is a great range of wildfowl
particularly in winter, some of which are
rare and scarce. As it is close to the
Bristol Channel, storm-blown seabirds
such as shag and grebes are sometimes
seen. The reservoir is a Site of Special
Scientific Interest due to its wintering
waterfowl.
Continue round, and pass the Bristol
Corinthians Sailing Club. Cheddar was
the first British reservoir to permit
sailing.
1. GATE
At a gate across the wall, turn down right
towards the parking for the sailing club
and entrance drive. Go through a metal
gate and then turn left on a track under
Walking DPS:Layout 1
20/11/14
19:49
Page 55
WALKING
trees (parallel with the parking). Pass
through a grove of trees and cross a stile
ahead into a field. Bear right to a stile.
Go up the left side of this field, and
through an improvised gate and up the
path to the road in Axbridge.
2. ROAD
Turn left on the pavement. After a few
minutes come into the older part of
Axbridge with the narrow main street
lined with interesting houses. Pass the
Crown Inn, a cottage style pub on the
right. Then go by the impressive Court
on the left.
Axbridge was granted a Royal Charter
in 1202, and grew in the Tudor period as
a centre for cloth manufacture. It held
markets, fairs and became a royal
borough. It even had its own mint, with
coins showing the town's symbol: the
Lamb and Flag. Trade was possible as
the River Axe was navigable to wharves
at Axbridge. In contrast to the much
larger settlement of Cheddar, Axbridge is
a town. This strange situation is due to
the relative importance of the two places
in historic times. While Axbridge grew in
importance as a centre for cloth
manufacture in the Tudor period and
gained a charter from King John,
Cheddar remained a more dispersed
dairy-farming village until the advent of
tourism and the arrival of the railway in
Victorian times.
3. THE SQUARE
Reach the square with the Town Hall
left, the black and white timbered King
John’s Hunting Lodge and the Lamb Inn,
an old coaching inn ahead. To visit the
church, turn right up the old steps made
OS Explorer 141 Cheddar Gorge & Mendip Hills West, grid ref: 446 534
3.2 miles, about two hours walking.
of pudding stone (Dolomitic
conglomerate).
At the foot of the church steps notice
the Axbridge Church Wells, one of the
public water supplies for the old village.
The church’s modern glass entrance
door, inside the sturdy ancient door,
provides the church with great light.
There are a number of interesting
monuments and plaques in the church.
I was taken by the glass-fronted
breadbox on the wall just inside the main
door showing replica loaves of bread and
details of Spearings Gift of 1690. The
‘second poor’ were those who, although
poor, were not quite poor enough to be
‘on the parish’.
Notice also the embroidered altar
frontal which took Abigail Prowse ten
years to work in the early 18th century
and is now housed in a glass case to the
left of the pulpit
In the square, The Oak House and the
Lamb, both offer good refreshment. The
highlight of the square is King John’s
Hunting Lodge, a half-timbered wool
merchant's building, dating from around
1500, housing a local history museum,
which includes exhibits relating to local
geology and history from the Neolithic to
World War II. It is closed during the
winter.
Turn left in the square in Moorland
Street, passing the 15th century
almshouse, now a restaurant/tea shop.
4. TRACK
Carry on the No Through road, joining a
track which is, in fact, a drove across the
Levels, and then bend left at Moorland
farmshop. Alongside is a small stream.
Stay on this track which soon bends right
with the grassy reservoir bank up left. At
the end go through into a field and
follow the track towards the reservoir.
Then go over a stile and scramble steeply
up to the reservoir wall again.
5. RESERVOIR WALL
Turn right and continue round to the inlet
tower and the start. On a clear day notice
the great view you have of the two rocks
guarding the entrance to Cheddar Gorge.
In Axbridge:
The Crown Inn, 01934) 732518
The Lamb Inn, 01934 732253
The Oak House, 01934 732444
The Almshouse Tea Shop,
01934 733720
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 55
Outdoors page:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:05
Page 56
MENDIP TIMES
OUTDOORS
West Countryman’s Diary
CAN you remember a Christmas stocking
that had an orange or tangerine stuffed into
the toe? Do you recall finding some nuts in
there as well? If you do, the chances are you
are of that age when Christmas was more
about the food treats and one main Christmas
present than it is today.
With LES
It was the day when I remember having
DAVIES MBE
ham for breakfast, chicken for dinner and
Christmas pudding for tea. For many people things have moved
on since those days, including me, and our expectations have
grown in proportion to our waistlines. Dinner has become lunch
which (with any luck) can go on all afternoon.
Afternoon tea has become supper, with a table groaning under
the weight of all those goodies that I can safely load onto it. No
sitting down at the table here, just grab a plate and get back to the
fireside where (again with any luck) there is this year’s airing of
that famous Christmas Bank Holiday television film – Zulu.
Still some simple pleasures remain, such as cracking open the
walnuts and extracting the ‘brain’-like kernel from within. There
are ‘exploding’ Brazil nuts. Almonds that refuse to be broken and
fly from the jaws of the nut crackers with the velocity of a rifle
bullet. Hazel nuts that disintegrate into a mush of shell and kernel
when you use the pliers on them instead of the nutcrackers that
you couldn’t find from last year.
Even worse if you can’t find the pliers either and resorted to a
hammer or the poker handle.
Christmas also brought with it food that you wouldn’t normally
eat, such as dates. These came in a thin wooden box with rounded
ends. Inside were the dates, all sugary and shining with the stone
still in them. There would also be a bowl of fruit, apples, grapes,
tangerines and bananas. It was all quite special and not on
‘everyday ration’.
Meltis fruits were a strange sugary concoction, shaped as per the
fruits they represented, but with a hard interior containing juice.
Then there was the very ‘grown up’ sweet of chocolate liqueurs;
dark chocolate bottle-shaped sweets that contained a minute ration
of alcoholic spirit. My recollections are they didn’t taste of
anything much, the chocolate masked the taste of the spirit and the
spirit destroyed the taste of the chocolate. Like so many things in
adolescent life, they were a bit of a disappointment when you got
there.
Now sprouts are one of those vegetables, like Marmite and
garlic, that you either love or hate with a vengeance. The poor old
Brussels sprout has been vilified beyond belief, but for me it’s one
of the few ‘greens’ that I enjoy. They must however be cooked to
the stage where they are soft and can be mixed in with the rich
chicken gravy.
Bullet hard Brussels are not for me and crunchy carrots a
definite NO. I have often been told that all the goodness has been
cooked out of these vegetables this way, so I eat extra to make up
for it! Sprouts had to have some frost on them before they
acquired the right taste, but that taste came at a cost as I can
testify.
At Hales Farm field scale vegetables were part of the farming
rotation and most went to shops in Bristol to supply households of
Bedminster, Stokes Croft and Hotwells with fresh food. Savoy
cabbage, Swedish turnips (Swedes), potatoes and Brussels sprouts
were the mainstays. Picking sprouts was a very wet and, at times,
painful job.
There was no mechanisation in any of this harvesting and
picking sprouts meant walking through the soaking wet and often
ice-covered plants. Then, placing your backside against the top of
the plant to bend it backwards, you pushed down on the sprouts to
break them away from the stem. Waterproof trousers were a must
and you didn’t want a pair with a hole in the seat.
Gloves were not considered a requirement, so your hands got
wet and cold, cold to the point of being painful. I only hope that
those Bristolians knew just how much I suffered so that they
should have their Christmas sprouts that were taken by the
wooden boxful into ‘town’.
It was always chicken for dinner (not lunch) for as long as I can
remember. Back then chicken was a treat and wasn’t complete
without the home-made stuffing made by my grandmother. No
packet mix for her. She made hers with bread which had been
crumbled up in a big mixing bowl and mixed with the leaves of
thyme, each leaf of which had been plucked from the stem by
hand so that no ‘stick bits’ would get in.
My mother tells me that before there was thyme in the garden,
they had to pick it from a wild colony growing on the rocky soil
of the right-hand steep ground. This disappeared during the war
when this precipitous field was ploughed up under orders from the
government, through the wartime agricultural committee
(WARAG).
Potatoes were a must, roasted until the outside became crusty
and full of fat. These came from my grandfather’s crop that were
field grown. He always had a couple of rows at the end of the
farm crop. He bought the seed potatoes and would lift and pick
them up after his daytime work was complete.
This gave the family a store of around 30 cwt, (around 1.5
tonnes) of tubers to see us through the winter. The variety was
invariably ‘Majestic’ which would give a heavy crop, with huge
tubers and some very funny shapes. Grading didn’t exist, it was
quantity that was all important.
Of white Christmases, I can only remember a few. In the Giles
cartoons (a book of which was always a Christmas present)
Christmases were always white. The seemingly chaotic Giles
family would be tripping over decorations and precariously
balancing on chairs. Mother would be up to her elbows in cooking
and a hapless turkey would be attempting to escape from the fate
that we all hoped it would not meet. Thankfully I don’t think that
this is a true and accurate picture (?) of today’s family Christmas.
Whichever way you spend yours, have a great time and enjoy a
little time off if you can. The picture is my seasonal greeting to
you all, with my thanks to you all.
You can always contact me through my website: Westcountryman.co.uk
PAGE 56 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Yeo Valley page:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:06
Page 1
YEO VALLEY
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 57
Gardening section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:08
Page 58
MENDIP TIMES
The holly and the ivy – when they are both full grown
With MARY
PAYNE MBE
BOTH these plants,
epitomised in the
popular Christmas
carol, are British
natives and very
familiar to us all,
perhaps far too
familiar, such that we
overlook their value
as garden plants.
Our native holly (Ilex aquifolium) can
be found growing almost anywhere. The
dark green leaves make holly extremely
tolerant of shady positions where the
shiny foliage reflects the light. The
berries, much loved and scattered by
birds in their droppings, germinate freely
leading to “weed” trees appearing on any
uncultivated land.
Male and female flowers occur on
separate trees, so it is pot luck if seedling
trees are grown on. There are many named
varieties, selected for their coloured
foliage, or berries. Ilex aquifolium ‘J C
van Tol’ is a useful hermaphrodite
selection, having male and female flowers
on the same plant, and thus a good crop of
berries is common.
This variety also has the added bonus of
very few prickles on its leaves. Ilex
aquifolium ‘Bacciflava’ has yellow berries
while ‘Amber’ has bronze-yellow fruits.
Ilex aquifolium ‘Pendula’ makes a small,
elegant tree with weeping stems clad with
spiny green leaves and red berries if a
male holly is in the vicinity.
Some of the most attractive hollies have
variegated foliage and are endlessly useful
for brightening up a shady position in the
garden. ‘Golden King’ is a popular yellow
and green form, with almost spineless
leaves, which in, spite of its name, is
female and bears red berries. ‘Silver
Queen’, ironically, is a male with cream
and green foliage.
‘Handsworth New Silver’ has attractive
dark purple twigs bearing cream and green
foliage with a tinge of pink, and bright red
berries. Ilex aquifolium ‘Ferox Argentea’ is
often called the silver hedgehog holly as
its smaller leaves are completely covered
in spines. On any variegated holly take
care to remove any shoots that are plain
green.
The evergreen Japanese Holly (Ilex
crenata) is slow growing and has tiny
spineless leaves. It is sometimes
recommended for use as a dwarf hedge
where box has succumbed to box blight.
My personal experience is that it is far
PAGE 58 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Ilex x altaclerensis 'Golden King'
from satisfactory and has very little will to
live.
I would love to be able to grow
Winterberry (Ilex verticillata), a deciduous
holly, which looks striking when the
leaves have fallen leaving a mass of twigs
smothered in bright red berries that hang
on for months. Alas, this plant requires an
acidic soil to thrive.
Hollies can make a fine, if somewhat
prickly, hedge that only needs cutting once
a year. They also respond well to clipping
into simple topiary shapes such as balls,
cubes or pyramids. The future shape of a
young holly bush can be improved by
pinching back the side shoots to encourage
a denser habit.
Ivy is often seen as the enemy,
especially when climbing trees, but it does
have its uses and as a native plant is a
valuable source of nectar for bees and
butterflies when it is flowering in the
autumn. Most ivies have two different
form of growth. When juvenile they
produce their characteristic long climbing
shoots which cling to any surface with
aerial roots. When the plant matures its
leaf shape changes to a more rounded
shape, it stops “climbing”, and develops
flowers in early autumn followed by black
fruits.
The humble ivy does have its uses in the
garden, especially its variegated foliage
forms. The small leaved Hedera helix
varieties such as the golden variegated
‘Gold Child’ or white and green ‘Kalibri’
make an excellent evergreen climber for
the pillars of a pergola. ‘Buttercup’ is the
best golden leaved form and is slower
growing. In the spring trim the old growth
back to the pillar to encourage fresh new
growth. In dense shade the same forms can
be used as ground cover to pools of
“light”. They are also ideal for trailing
over the edge of containers filled with
spring flowering bulbs and bedding plants.
The larger leaved types such as the
Persian Ivy (Hedera colchica) can also be
used as effective ground cover but will
also cover an unsightly panel fence or if
allowed scramble through chain link
fencing. ‘Sulphur Heart’ has a yellow
splash on the leaf while H. colchica
‘Dentata Variegata’ has green/grey leaves
edged with cream.
The Irish Ivy, (Hedera hibernica) is the
common ivy to be found in the west of
England and the only species native to
Ireland. It has larger plain green leaves
than our traditional native species and
makes excellent ground cover in really
shady places. For some inexplicable
reason deer like the taste of the Irish Ivy,
whilst leaving the English Ivy alone.
Less hardy is the ivy often referred to as
‘Gloire de Marengo’, an attractive
green/grey/white form of the Algerian ivy,
which is ideal for a sheltered position, or
can often be used as a house plant.
To remove unwanted ivy from a wall or
tree trunk, cut through the stems at ground
level and wait for the ivy to die. It is then
much easier to pull the dead strands away,
as the aerial roots lose their grip a bit.
There is much debate as to whether ivy is
bad for trees and should be removed, or
left for its wildlife benefits.
I take the view that if the tree is a valued
specimen then the ivy should be removed,
but if the tree is part of a copse of natural
woodland, then the ivy can be left for the
wildlife it supports.
Gardening section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:08
Page 59
DECEMBER GARDEN TIPS
GARDENING
G Move pots of tender plants inside or close to the house
walls. The shelter of the house wall can make a big
difference!
G Dead-head pansies, violas and cyclamen to encourage
more flowers.
G Dormant trees and shrubs can be moved now. Minimise
root disturbance to increase chance of success and rapid
re-establishment.
G Prune out old wood to rejuvenate shrubs. Wisteria
pruning can be completed now along with vines.
G Move potted 'prepared' Hyacinths into warmer rooms to
gradually force them into flower in time for Christmas. If
they are coming on too fast move them back into the cool
again.
G Plant up Amaryllis bulbs inside. Use a soil based
compost and water very sparingly to start with. As
flowers and leaves appear, give more water.
G Prune apples and pears to improve their shape, encourage
younger growth, remove disease and control the amount
of fruit bud they have. Don't prune fan, espalier and
cordon trained trees as these should be pruned in
summer.
G Vines should be pruned before Christmas if possible. If
pruned late the sap will often be running and they will
'bleed'. Magnolia, Japanese maples, walnuts, hornbeams,
mulberries and laburnums may bleed too if pruned late in
winter.
Courtesy Cleeve Nursery
Christmas gifts for gardeners
‘Getting Ready
For Christmas’
An evening of seasonal
ideas and decorations at
Cleeve Nursery with
Felicity Down.
On Thursday 11th
December at 7.30pm.
Tickets in advance £5 for
Cancer Research UK
To include wine and
nibbles.
Cleeve Nursery, Cleeve, Bristol BS49 4PW
Fantastic Fresh
Tel 01934 832134
Email [email protected]
Christmas Trees
cleevenursery.co.uk/blog/
www.cleevenursery.co.uk
Beautiful Houseplants
National Garden Gift Vouchers and much more!
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 59
Gardening section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:08
Page 60
MENDIP TIMES
Bulbs for spring
Sarah and the giant radish
PEOPLE living in Peasedown St. John planted bulbs to
celebrate the resident association’s first birthday. They
were planted on The Green, which has been at the heart of
the Frederick and Albert Avenue estates for more than 50
years.
Joy Gosz, chairman of the association, said: “It was great
to see many people, especially young children, come along
and get stuck in. In all, 20 of us took part and planted the
bulbs in just under three hours.”
Sarah with Raquel – all the other radishes she planted grew as
normal
Garden Design • Planting Schemes • Horticultural Consultancy
Courses in Gardening and Garden Design
www.christinepritchard.co.uk • [email protected]
tel: 01761 221166 • mobile: 07966 172282
LIKE many gardeners, Sarah Fox enjoys growing salad
vegetables so thought nothing more when she sowed radish
seeds in her garden from a packet bought at her local
supermarket.
All the other radishes grew as normal except for one –
which has turned into a bit of a monster! The giant specimen
is currently nine inches tall and is still growing in the mild
weather. Some of the leaves are more than two feet long.
The radish has been nicknamed Raquel because Sarah, who
lives near Wells, thinks the plant is a dominant female. Sarah
said: “I thought something was odd when it started pushing
up the decking around it and it’s just kept on growing. All
the others grew as normal.”
Sarah, an artist, believes in growing things as naturally as
possible, She said: “All I have been putting on the garden is
blood, fish and bone.
“I’ve become quite fond of her and will let it carry on
growing as she obviously likes the conditions here!”
BROWNES GARDEN CENTRE
Come and relax and enjoy a coffee and cake in
our coffee shop, then wander through our indoor
display area where we have a colourful display of
cyclamen, poinsettia, jasmine and mixed bowls.
Large selection of trees, shrubs and roses plus all
your garden sundry requirements
National Garden gift vouchers
Nordmann & Norway Spruce Christmas trees,
Christmas Wreaths and Garlands hand-made on
the premises. Also snow sledges and rock salt
Delivery service available
O pe n 9 – 5p m M o n– S a t 1 0– 5 pm S un
C o f f ee S ho p 10 .3 0-4 pm Tue s — S un
Artisan Christmas Market on
Saturday 13th December
GLASTONBURY ROAD, WELLS. TEL 01749 673050
Email: [email protected]
PAGE 60 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
How’s that for size! Sarah’s dog Pixie is almost dwarfed by the
monster veg
Gardening section:Layout 1
20/11/14
Route to success
18:10
Page 61
REDUNDANCY proved to be the spur to success for Shaun
Clements, who set up South Coast Fencing & Fabrications in
Bedminster, Bristol, in 2008.
He’d previously spent 25 years in ornate steel fabrication and
decided to go back to it, since winning awards and a visit from the
Queen and Prince Philip during their last visit to Bristol.
The company specialises in the manufacture and installation of
ornate steel products, including gates, railings, curtain poles and
security grilles. They also offer gate automation and welding
services and cater for both domestic and commercial customers,
with all products made to measure and professionally finished.
Welcome to
GARDENING
South Coast Fencing
& Fabrications Ltd.
ORNATE • COMMERCIAL • GATES & RAILINGS
We specialise in the manufacture and installation of ornate steel
products including: Gates, Railings, Curtain Poles, and
Security Grills.
Gate automation and site welding services.
We are based in South Bristol and manufacture and install
bespoke made to measure ornate steel products including Gates,
Railings, Security Grills, and Curtain Poles to both domestic and
commercial customers. We take great pride in our work and
receive frequent recommendations.
Please browse the galleries on our website to get an idea of what
we can do.
Please contact us to discuss your requirements.
0 77 6 9 90 5 19 9
Unit 18, Honeyfield Business Park,
Hartcliffe way, Bedminster, Bristol BS3 5RN.
www.artisticfabricationssouthwest.co.uk
ROCKY MOUNTAIN NURSERY
MASBURY, NR. WELLS, SOMERSET BA5 3HA • TEL: 01749 841014 • FAX: 01749 841055
www.rockymountainnursery.co.uk
COME AND SEE OUR FINE RANGE OF HOUSE PLANTS,
SHRUBS, PERENNIALS AND CLIMBERS
Fresh Cut Christmas Trees from £15.00 – Pot Grown Christmas Trees from £3.50
Lots of Christmas Plants & Gifts, AVAILABLE NOW
Visit our ROCK CAKE CAFE
Full menu of home cooked food available, 7 days a week Breakfast, Lunch & Afternoon Tea and
Traditional Sunday Roast – NOW FULLY LICENSED
See our website for more details www.rockymountainnursery.co.uk
ALL YOUR GARDENING NEEDS – SET IN 12 WONDERFUL ACRES
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 61
Gardening section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:10
Page 62
MENDIP TIMES
GARDENING
Timberwork Buildings
Bespoke buildings to suit you
We specialise in the manufacture of quality standard and bespoke garden buildings
to suit your individual needs including:-
WORKSHOPS/GARAGES
GARDEN SHEDS
SHELTERS & STABLES
PLAYHOUSES
Let our dedicated team assist you in your choice whatever your budget . . . Full design,
installation and delivery service available – customise your shed to suit your needs
We also do: Chicken Houses • Dog Kennels • Bin & Log Stores
YOU ARE WELCOME TO VISIT US AND SEE OUR SHOW MODELS – OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK
THE TIMBERYARD • SHUTE SHELVE • CROSS • NEAR AXBRIDGE
Tel: 01934 732 396 • www.timberworkbuildings.co.uk • e.mail: [email protected]
Garden nominated for award
A GARDENING scheme in Wells for people suffering from
mental ill health has been chosen as one of the finalists in a
national competition run by The Conservation Foundation
charity.
The Heads Up Healing Garden in South Horrington is on the
shortlist for the Gardening Against The Odds Awards which
honour those who garden in the face of physical, mental and
environmental “odds” and bring beauty to their own and the
lives of others.
For further information and to vote for Heads Up Healing
Garden visit www.gardeningagainsttheodds.com
Stump Grinding and Tree Services, throughout the South West
SHOWROOM NOW OPEN
Opening 8.00am – 5.00pm Mon – Fri. 8.00am – 12.00pm Sat
We’ve got it covered
See our website at www.groundlevelcontractors.co.uk
or e-mail us at [email protected]
Prefer to talk to us?
Tel: 01934 710135 • Mob: 07941 908832
Mendip Times Distribution Points
Mendip Times is available from over 800 outlets across the Mendips
from superstores to village stores and post offices, farm shops,
supermarkets, garden centres, pubs, inns, hotels and restaurants,
doctors’ surgeries, libraries and tourist information centres.
ALHAMPTON
AXBRIDGE
BALTONSBOROUGH
BACKWELL
BANWELL
BARROW GURNEY
BARTON ST. DAVID
BECKINGTON
BISHOP SUTTON
BLACKFORD
BLAGDON
BLEADON
BRENT KNOLL
BRISTOL
INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT
BROCKLEY
BRUTON
BUCKLAND DINHAM
BURCOTT
BURRINGTON
BUTLEIGH
CAMERTON
CASTLE CARY
CHARTERHOUSE
CHEDDAR
CHELYNCH
CHEW MAGNA
CHEW STOKE
CHEWTON MENDIP
CHILCOMPTON
CHURCHILL
CLANDOWN
CLEEVE
CLUTTON
COCKLAKE
COLEFORD
COMPTON DANDO
COMPTON MARTIN
CONGRESBURY
COXLEY
CRANMORE
CROSCOMBE
CROSS
DITCHEAT
DOULTING
DRAYCOTT
DUNDRY
EAST HARPTREE
EASTON
EMBOROUGH
EVERCREECH
FARMBOROUGH
FARRINGTON GURNEY
FAULKLAND
FELTON
FROME
GLASTONBURY
GREEN ORE
PAGE 62 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
GURNEY SLADE
HALLATROW
HIGH LITTLETON
HINTON BLEWETT
HOLCOMBE
HUNSTRETE
HUTTON
KEINTON MANDEVILLE
KILMERSDON
LANGFORD
LEIGH on MENDIP
LITTON
LONG ASHTON
LYDFORD ON FOSSE
LYMPSHAM
MARK
MARKSBURY
MASBURY
MELLS
MIDSOMER NORTON
NAILSEA
NETTLEBRIDGE
NORTON MALREWARD
NORTON ST PHILIP
NUNNEY
NYLAND
OAKHILL
PAULTON
PENSFORD
= Mendip Times
Distribution area
PILTON
POLSHAM
PRIDDY
PYLLE
RADSTOCK
REDHILL
REGIL
RICKFORD
RODE
RODNEY STOKE
ROOKSBRIDGE
ROWBERROW
SANDFORD
SHEPTON MALLET
SHIPHAM
SOMERTON
STANTON DREW
STANTON WICK
STOKE ST MICHAEL
STON EASTON
STRATTON ON THE FOSSE
STREET
TARNOCK
TEMPLE CLOUD
TIMSBURY
TRUDOXHILL
TYTHERINGTON
UBLEY
UPHILL
VOBSTER
WALTON
WANSTROW
WEDMORE
WELLS
WEST HARPTREE
WEST PENNARD
WESTBURY SUB MENDIP
WINFORD
WINSCOMBE
WOOKEY
WOOKEY HOLE
WRAXALL
WRINGTON
WRITHLINGTON
YATTON
Property section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:20
Page 1
Flatter picture in the
run-up to Christmas
HOUSE prices continued to rise in the South West, but at a slower
pace, according to the latest residential market survey by the
Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors.
In line with slowing momentum, surveyors are now anticipating
a much flatter price outlook until the end of the year, but over the
course of the next 12 months they remain quite positive.
The level of sales activity was more or less unchanged on the
previous month, but surveyors are still expecting transactions to
hold up in the near term.
As the market stabilises in the region 17% more chartered
surveyors saw a fall in new buyer enquiries over the last month.
Nationally, new buyer demand slipped for the fourth consecutive
month with 18% more chartered surveyors seeing a fall – in
London the figure was higher with 62% more surveyors reporting
a fall in new buyer demand.
Meanwhile, stock coming on to the market in the region also
dipped with 22% more chartered surveyors seeing a fall over the
last month in the South West – nationally this figure remained
virtually unchanged in October (a net balance of -2%) continuing
the trend which has been in place for much of the past year.
As a result, even with the dip in demand, much anecdotal
evidence from surveyors points to an ongoing challenge in
securing adequate new instructions nationally. At a national level,
the slow-down in buyer activity in the sales market stands in
marked contrast to the lettings market, where tenant demand
continues to grow strongly.
Energy saving
scheme expands
NEW energy saving measures
are being offered to residents
in the Mendip District Council
area.
The second part of a new
domestic energy saving
scheme is being introduced
across Mendip targetting
Street, Wells and the rural
villages thanks to close
working between the council
and The Mark Group.
The first stage was rolled
out in Shepton Mallet, Frome
and Glastonbury in November.
A mail out to all households
will be followed up by visits
to see if residents want to
know more about the scheme
and, if appropriate, energy
saving measures can be
installed by approved
contractors, often at no cost to
the householder.
The council’s home energy
efficiency officer Andy
Eisenhauer said: “We are
PROPERTY
LOWER LANGFORD – P.O.A
AN EXCEPTIONAL AND SUBSTANTIAL PERIOD HOUSE
LOCATED IN THE CENTRE OF THE VILLAGE AND
OFFERING SECLUDED GROUNDS WITH SOUTH
FACING VIEWS TO THE MENDIPS HILLS WITH SOME
8600 SQ FOOT OF FAMILY ACCOMMODATION
Entrance Porch, Reception Hall, Inner halls to west and east
wing.
Drawing Room, Dining Room, Sitting Room, Study/Snug
Kitchen with Aga, Scullery, Cloakroom, Bootroom.
Five Double bedrooms on first floor, two en suite bedrooms,
family bathroom and two cloakrooms
Four further double bedrooms on second floor and bathroom.
Former Squash Court (requires renovation)
Private drive, formal gardens, paddock.
Swimming Pool & Tennis court (requires modernisation)
Pool House
In all 2.07 Acres (.83 hectares)
helping to promote the scheme
as we think that there will be
benefits to local householders
and with the weather turning
colder everyone needs to stay
warm and save energy. After
the success of the scheme in
the three Mendip pilot towns,
we’re now rolling the scheme
out across Mendip.”
ARIMIS
ARCHITECTURAL
DESIGN SERVICES
Planning Applications
Listed Building
Building Regulations
Care & Repair
New Houses – Extensions
Conversions & Refurbishments
For a free consultation,
please contact Rob
Tel: 0800 458 4283
Mob: 07818 212 532
Email:
[email protected]
Wrington Tel: 01934 864300
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 63
Wrington pages:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:25
Page 64
MENDIP TIMES
Rebecca’s award
REBECCA Millard, of
Debbie fortune Estate
Agents, in Wrington has
successfully passed an
NFoPP Level 3 Technical
Award in the Sale of
Residential Property.
This well-respected
award is not only a
nationally-recognised
industry qualification but
is also an entry
requirement of the
National Association of
Estate Agents, which is
the UK’s leading
professional body for estate agents which regulates, guides and
assists property sales professionals.
Rebecca, who started her career as an apprentice, has been
working in estate agency in North Somerset for two years. A
former pupil of Churchill School, Becky studied for her Level 2
Estate Agency with a Weston-super-Mare firm, joining Debbie
Fortune Estate Agents in 2013.
Debbie Fortune said: “Her achievement cannot be
underestimated, she has worked hard to achieve this accolade
and much of her study has been self motivated and ‘on the
job’.”
PAGEP??
AGE
•M
64ENDIP
• MENDIP
TIMES
TIMES
• DECEMBER
• DECEMBER
2011 2014
Christmas comes
to Wrington
12
December
THE Wrington Dickensian Fayre will
take place on Friday December 12th and
will be featuring a wide range of stalls to
enable everyone to enjoy the evening and
stock up for the Christmas festivities.
As usual there will be a Christmas tree
and lights outside the Plough Inn and the
Plough will be providing mulled wine and cider together with
the usual delights inside the pub.
So plenty of liquid then, to accompany the traditional hog
roast which has been a perennial favourite.
Various local businesses will be represented and the evening
starts at 6.30pm when the
Christmas tree lights will be
lit.
Entertainment will be
provided by local children
culminating in the usual
lively performance by Joyful
Spirit Gospel Choir, who will
finish the outdoor
proceedings, while the
evening ends with carols and
a sing-a-long inside The
Plough.
Wrington pages:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:25
Page 65
FOCUS ON WRINGTON
) " &'
$
&!# ($#
OFF LICENCE
NEWSAGENT
MAGAZINES
GROCERIES
TOBACCO
FROZEN FOOD
CONFECTIONERY
SOFT DRINKS
DVD RENTAL
PET FOOD
OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK FROM 5:30am
unl 9pm Mon-Sat, 7pm on Sun
" % $#
GOLDEN LION
We look
forward to
seeing you
during this
year’s Festive Season
TEL: (01934) 862205 • Email: [email protected] • www.goldenlionwrington.co.uk
• Sight Tests
• Glasses
• Contact Lenses
Mendip Times
reduces
travel costs
Home visits available
by appointment
100,000 potential
customers within a
short distance of
your business
Come and celebrate Christmas
and New Year with us!
Here are some reasons to see us
New Lunch & Evening Menus
prepared by our team of top chefs
Friday December 12th – e annual Dickensian Fayre
from 6pm, featuring Live Entertainment, fantastic
Christmas stalls, Carol Singing and our delicious Mulled
Cider and Wine
Friday December 19th – e Plough Xmas Party with
Live Music, Free Nibbles and our huge Christmas Raffle
New Year’s Eve – A Black Adder themed Medieval
Banquet (come dressed up if you want!), featuring a
Delicious ree Course Menu; Fire Eating, Juggling,
Acrobatics and much more from the Court Jester;
Medieval Entertainment; Free Bubbles on arrival; and
Fireworks at Midnight. All for just £49.50 per Head
e Plough Inn, High Street, Wrington,
North Somerset, BS40 5QA
Tel : 01934 862871
www.theploughatwrington.co.uk
We look forward to seeing you down here, and
would like to wish everyone a Merry
Christmas and Happy New Year
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 65
Wrington pages:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:25
MENDIP TIMES
Page 66
FOCUS ON WRINGTON
Probate – start with
the end in mind
ALANBROOKES, The Family Accountant, is licensed to
handle probate and the administration of estates. Probate can
be an unnecessarily complex, bewildering and stressful
process to handle and getting it wrong can be expensive –
very expensive.
You might not be running down the High Street shouting
for joy, but having them on your side should relieve you of a
lot of worry and pressure. They are already at the heart of
hundreds of local family firms, which employ more than
3,500 people.
Becoming part of their family means you will have a lot of
experience and great allies on your side. They go to great
lengths to understand you and your business; they make sure
they are available at all hours; and they take the opportunity
wherever possible to explain the story behind the numbers.
To find out what it might feel like to be an Alanbrookes
client, reserve a place on one of their seminars in 2015. They
are starting with Probate and Inheritance Tax Planning.
An American lawyer
in Wrington
THOSE looking to buy a Florida villa, emigrate to the USA,
or who need US legal assistance, must often travel to London
or the USA to find a lawyer. Unfortunately for Londoners,
they must travel to Wrington to see Kevin Burke, a Florida
and Ohio “attorney-at-law".
Some might find it unusual that a U.S. lawyer would be
practising in a picturesque English village in North Somerset.
Kevin certainly finds it to be a big change, but is delighted to
have the opportunity to experience British hospitality, pubs,
and social life first-hand, and of course to have the
opportunity to practise in his profession here.
In 1999 Kevin moved to England where he became a
solicitor (1999 to 2010) and later a notary public. Kevin's 22
years of experience in international matters and practice as a
lawyer in both nations allows his clients to avoid pitfalls
typically arising in U.S. matters.
PAGE 66 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Wrington pages:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:25
Page 67
Acker Bilk DPS:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:27
Page 68
MENDIP TIMES
Acker Bilk – tribute to a jazz legend
ACKER Bilk, who died on
November 2nd, aged 85,
never forgot his roots in
Pensford, where he was born
on January 28th, 1929. After
a glittering career that took
him all over the world, he
returned to live there with his
wife Jean, building a home
above the cottage where he
was born. He was one of
Mendip Times’ first
columnists, back in 2005,
recounting his early days and
the launch of his musical
career. As our own tribute we
reproduce some of those
memories here.
EARLY DAYS
“I was born at Egypt House, by the Post
Office, in Pensford and, when father
died, we had to get out, I was seven or
eight at the time. We moved up to the
council houses at Hillcrest and lived in
Policeman’s Lane, next door to Tony
Thompson.
“We had the biggest garden in
Pensford and I hated it as we had to
help. We grew all our own vegetables
which was good when the war was on.
Mother was good at bottling and
making rhubarb jam, which I suppose
you could call healthy eating.
“Pensford was a great place to grow
up in for kids… we’d go swimming in
the Pensford weirs, Bymills and at
Publow Bridge.”
Both of his parents were musical and
played the organ. His mother Lily was
the organist at Pensford Methodist
Church, where his father, William John
Bilk was a preacher.
“I had piano lessons at five or six
from Ella Penny, who was married to a
bus driver. I never practised as I wasn’t
interested. I had to have lessons on a
Saturday morning and all the other kids
were going out poaching and I hated
them.
PAGE 68 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
“I’d much rather have been out
playing football or poaching with my
mates in Lords Wood. It was always a
great place to roam about. We’d get
chestnuts and all sorts, with wild
daffodils in the spring, and we’d climb
trees. In the evening we would go down
the Sun or the George, then go to
dances at the Miners Welfare Club,
where we also played snooker.”
Acker’s mum (right) with her aunt and her
husband.
STARTING WORK
“After I left school I went to work at
Wills Tobacco Factory, shoving trays
of tobacco through a machine. It was
OK as there wasn’t a lot of tobacco
because the ships were busy bringing
in food for the starving Britons – this
was 1943.
“I stayed there nearly three years
and, when the war ended I got the
bullet. I wasn’t a very good servant. I
wasn’t a rebel really.”
His uncle, Arthur Penney, who had a
building business in Stanton Drew,
offered him a job.
“Uncle Arthur said ‘Let’s give the
boy a chance’. I was 16 or 17 then.
‘Let’s get the boy painting and
decorating,’ he said, then gave me my
first job – he handed me some draining
rods and said to clear the toilets.
“I said if this was painting and
decorating then I didn’t want to know
and Uncle Arthur said ‘It’s only
chewed bread.’
“It wasn’t a bad job and a lot
different to Wills. We worked out
Stowey Quarry where we built a new
kiln for burning lime. It was freezing
cold working there in the winter but
we were young and didn’t care.”
Acker Bilk DPS:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:27
Page 69
TRIBUTE
SUEZ AND HIS FIRST CLARINET
The Chew Valley Stompers.
Picture courtesy of Brian Walker
“A lot of people died or were injured but, in a way, it was a very
fortunate time for me. I joined a band in the camp and began to
learn to play a borrowed clarinet. The bloke had an e-flat
marching clarinet and he hadn’t got on very well with it, so I
borrowed it permanently!
“I was bitten by the music bug and jazz in particular and it led
to the life I have enjoyed ever since. For me it was bittersweet.
“I was the tenth person caught for sleeping on guard that week
and got a court martial. My punishment was to spend 84 days in
nick. I didn’t have any lessons and it was learning mostly by trial
and error.
“I played so badly I even had boots thrown at me in the tent.
The bloke who gave me the clarinet was John Britton. I went to
see him after the war. He lived in Warrington and used to come
along and follow the band around.
“He was a good mate and we used to call him Elsie in the
army as he had shorts down to his knees.”
It was in Egypt that he set up his first band the Original
Egyptian Stompers. On his return he started the Chew Valley
Stompers including John Skuse, Keith Parsons, Roy King and
Brian Walker. Their first public performance was at a Labour
party meeting at Stanton Drew village hall on November 28th,
1950. Their last public performance was in Chew Magna church
hall on December 6th, 1952, before Acker went on to find fame
and fortune in London.
ACKER THE ARTIST
“I USED to do a lot of drawing with crayons at school and
our teacher, Mr Bowen, was keen on art and encouraged us
to paint posters such as ‘Wings for Victory’ or ‘Buy a
Spitfire’. When I left London I didn’t have time to do any
painting as I was playing too much but when we returned to
Pensford 14 years ago I became more interested again.”
He said he took it up seriously when he was stopped from
playing his clarinet while having treatment for throat cancer.
“It was a Godsend and I painted for seven months then
carried on when the treatment had finished. I like oils best.
I’ve tried pastels and also tried acrylic but it dries so fast that
the brush sticks to the canvas! I like the impressionists,
MARRIAGE
Acker and Jean
were married on
October 23rd,
1954. Jean said:
“We went to
school together and
were in the same
classes. I always
had a soft spot for
Ack and thought he was great.
“After doing his national service Ack came back but I
didn’t bother with him. Then one day I was going up the
Gaiety with Julie Primrose and got to the top of Knowle
when I saw him in his uniform going home.
“I left Julie and jumped off the bus and caught the bus
home. I got to Pensford and he was in the snooker hall. He
asked me out and it went on from there. I was waiting for
him to propose but he didn’t, so I decided to arrange it
myself.
“I went to the registry office at Temple Cloud and fixed it
up for us to get married. He came home from London one
weekend and I told him we were going to get married. All
he said was ‘Are we? Alright then. That’s fine’.”
They emerged from the register office to find the band
playing Who’s Sorry Now and went to the Temple Inn to
celebrate.
especially Monet, but I suppose if I had to pick a favourite it
would be Alfred Sisley, who was an English impressionist.”
At that time he went out on weekly painting expeditions
around Pensford with former band members Roy Smith, Jay
Hawkins and Dave Collett.
(L to r: Roy Smith, Jay Hawkins, Acker and Dave Collett enjoying a
day out painting.
Acker Bilk was in conversation with Ros Anstey
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 69
Health section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:31
Page 70
MENDIP TIMES
What doctors really think
WHAT do doctors really think? It’s a great question and one I
attempt to answer in my new book, coincidentally called What
Doctors Really Think. In a profession that prides itself on
telling the truth, there’s plenty we still hide from you,
particularly when it comes to how we feel about our jobs or
working for the NHS.
Doctors may look cool and composed on the outside, but
By Dr PHIL
we’re often as anxious as you are during consultations. We’re
HAMMOND
worried about missing an important diagnosis, not being able to
give you the time you need and not being able to cope safely with the demands
placed on us.
Just as we shouldn't blame people for being ill or old or overweight, we shouldn't
blame NHS staff for not being able to always provide the highest standards of care
in a chaotic system that’s creaking at the seams.
You might think your doctor is all-powerful and running the NHS, but many feel
powerless when faced with a tidal wave of management “wonk”. It used to be
doctors who held all the aces with our secret language. We used to be able to baffle
you with silly Greek words – we spoke of menorrhagia, rather than heavy periods,
or dysmenorrhoea not painful periods.
And let’s not forget
oligomenorrhoea
(infrequent periods),
amenorrhoea (absent
periods) and – wait for it –
polymenometrorrhagia
(frequent, heavy, irregular
periods). Travel an inch or
so upwards and you can
have dysuria (painful wee),
haematuria (bloody wee)
and polyuria (lots of wee).
But thanks to the
Internet, you can have
instant access to a medical dictionary to demystify your doctor. The power has
shifted to managers who may speak in ways that no dictionary can help you
understand. Of all the examples of NHS “wonk” I’ve collected over the years, my
favourite is this advertisement:
“Applications are invited to become a Blue Sky Practitioner reporting to the Blue
Sky Lead in the New NHS Modernisation Agency. The workstreams will work to a
generic cycle based on a hypothesis driven, creative problem-solving process to
create improvement products...You will undertake horizon scanning and futures
research…creating curve leverage systems for rapid diffusion…helping customers
articulate and understand mess.” How have we evolved to speak such drivel?
Doctors hate this new corporate language in the NHS but are generally too fearful
to shout it out loudly. Turning healthcare into a market puts targets and profits above
patients. A friend of mine who resigned as Clinical Director of a mental health
service when he was told that the “core purpose of your role is to drive the business
development strategy, in line with the Business Proposition, scanning the mental
health environment for new opportunities and identifying and stimulating new
business solutions that fit with the corporate vision.” He said, rather wearily: “All I
want to do is help the mentally ill.”
The NHS is facing a £30 billion black hole in its finances in the next five years,
and keeping it on the rails won’t be easy. We all need to take as much responsibility
as we can for staying well, and to pleasure ourselves sensibly over Christmas. And
when you do use the NHS, try to suck out the fear and stuff back the fun. I’ve had
enough top down reform of the NHS. We need a bidet revolution. From the bottom
up. More details in the book.
Dr Phil’s book and e book are available from www.mgp.ltd.uk/wdrt. With
cartoons by Fran Orton
PAGE 70 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Stocking fillers
WE are all fortunate enough to be overindulged each Christmas with gifts that might
satisfy our wants but have little to do with
our needs. I have attempted over the years to
enable the children to see the value in what
they receive and give and broaden that out to
beyond material gifts.
After all, Christmas offers families the
opportunity to enjoy spending time together
freed from their usual routine.
From this freedom was born the concept of
“tunch” in our household. “Tunch” is the
teatime equivalent of brunch where two
meals “tea” and “lunch” roll into one as a
result of late morning breakfasts, long walks
and lazy afternoons by the fire enjoying our
gifts.
In all honesty though, while we are grateful
for most of our presents some don’t satisfy
our wants or our needs. Let me share with
you a few examples. The brown polo-neck
insert, hand-knitted by an aunt to enable my
friend to keep her neck and chest warm
without having to resort to wearing a scarf or
an extra jumper.
This monstrosity literally consisted of a
polo neck without arms which didn’t extend
beyond the chest.
Number one child was in tears as she
opened her digital camera three years ago.
This stunning display of ingratitude was
rectified a few days later in John Lewis. An
additional contribution of Christmas money
allowed her to purchase the higher-spec
camera she actually wanted.
Needless to say she sold it on EBay this
summer to fund her post-GCSE social-life.
The camera was redundant, replaced by the
smart phone constantly in hand.
I was the one in tears when a friend
thought it a good idea to buy eldest child,
who was four-years-old at the time, a music
set. The set consisted of a large plastic drum
(portable thanks to an integrated carry-strap)
which was filled with other noisy instruments
such as a recorder, castanets and a kazoo (a
buzzy whistle).
This all would have been great fun were
we not living in a two-up, two-down cottage
with the baby that never slept. Peace and
goodwill evaded us that year.
However, it was tears of laughter that
greeted Mendip Dad last year as he modelled
his new lycra-wear, brought by myself, to
help him get the most from his gym
membership. Looking horrified youngest son
said: “I think that’s what you call a mid-life
crisis!”
Happy Christmas Everyone!
MENDIP MUM
Health section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:31
Page 71
Think warmth to save
lives this winter
OLDER people, their families, friends and neighbours need to
think WARMTH in Mendip this winter to save lives, according to
leading home care provider Bluebird Care Mendip.
Last winter was one of the coldest on record with 31,000
additional deaths, two-thirds accounted for by over-75s, according
to the Office of National Statistics.
The threat of another severe winter has led Bluebird Care to
issue a reminder for people to prepare for the cold weather – think
WARMTH this winter.
Wrap up indoors and outdoors.
Alert – keep an eye on the weather forecast and stock up with
nutritious food and speak to your GP about medicine in advance
of a cold snap. Keep an eye on vulnerable neighbours.
Risk – minimise the risk of falls or becoming ill by taking the
weather into account when you plan activity when severe weather
is forecast.
Money – winter bills can be very expensive. Make sure that
you’re receiving all of the benefits you’re eligible for.
Temperature – keep your bedroom heated to 18°C (64°F) and
your living room around 21°C (70°F).
Hot Meals – one hot meal a day, and hot drinks throughout the
day can help to keep you warm.
Director, Masen Naidoo, said: “We love to talk about the
weather in this country, but we are often unaware of the real threat
to life that our winters can cause for older and vulnerable people.”
C a l l o ur pr o f e s s i o na l t e a m o n
01 37 3 46 3 83 8
E m a il: m e nd ip @b lue bi rdc a re.c o .u k
HEALTH & FAMILY
Happier holidays
CHRISTMAS
is
approaching –
along with
increased
expenditure,
socialising
and family
gatherings. In
an ideal
world this is a
happy time.
However for
many it’s a
test of
emotional
endurance as
they find themselves in the midst of old familial ways of
relating that can cause misunderstandings, frustration
and arguments.
Wells-based Counsellor and Emotional Freedom
Technique Practitioner, Jane Ross-Wheatley, offers tools
and techniques to increase self-expression and
harmonious interactions and to help combat stress and
social anxiety.
Jane is offering a free 50-minute session of Emotional
Freedom Technique to readers.
Emotional
Well-Being Clinic
Help with:
● Anxiety ● Depression ● Lack of confidence ● Relationships
● Trauma ● Low self-esteem ● Indecision ● Stress ● Life Changes
● Negative beliefs ● Anger Management ● Painful memories
● Self-defeating/harming behaviour ● Low self-esteem ● Loss
Introducing . . . Emotional Freedom Technique
Helping to ease emotional discomfort by focussing on the here and now
effects of frustration, hurt, sadness, misunderstandings, trauma etc., as well as
reducing fears such as phobias, public speaking, interviews etc.
B eautifully
BALANCED
De-stress, Relax, Revitalise
with Holistic Massage
Therapies
Phone Sheena IhBC
01761 410079
Fabulous
Christmas Gift
(Ladies only please)
Singles
Social Group
(Not a dating agency – est. 1979)
Weekly Bar Night
Events include:
walks, dances, parties,
meals out, theatre,
cinema etc.
For further details call
01749 330455
01278 788077
01458 840958
01934 743139
www.singleprofessionalassociation.co.uk
Sample a 50 minute session
of Emotional Freedom Technique
without obligation
Helps to increase:
● Emotional Vitality ● Motivation ● Harmonious Relationships
● Positive beliefs and attitudes ● Self-expression ● Empowerment
● Optimism ● Confidence ● Rational-thinking ● Self-belief ● Courage
● Coping-capabilities ● Management of physical illness
Jane Ross-Wheatley
BACP ACCREDITED COUNSELLOR
AAMET CERTIFIED EMOTIONAL FREEDOM TECHNIQUE PRACTITIONER
evening and weekend appointments available
Introductory rate available – Complimentary initial half hour session
Visit janeross-wheatley.com or call 07731 937293
e Remedy Centre, 23 Cuthbert Street, Wells
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 71
Health section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:31
Page 72
MENDIP TIMES
How to improve
BEING a parent is one of the
most difficult jobs for which
there is little preparation.
Whilst there are many
rewarding times, children and
teenagers can easily wear their
parents down with a range of
behaviours, such as: constantly
demanding; answering back;
having outbursts; bickering
with siblings or a
Do you have one or more MISSING or
BROKEN teeth?
Do you have a LOOSE or
UNCOMFORTABLE denture?
Don’t want to wait 3 months to have teeth
fitted?
Don’t want to wear PLASTIC removable
DENTURES?
Single tooth or full-arch implant teeth
Your NEW teeth fitted in ONLY ONE DAY
Expert care from an Award winning Team
25% OFF FOR ALL
NEW CLIENTS
Keestone House, School Hill,
Westbury sub Mendip BA5 1HL
01749 870900
www.westburyhairsalon.co.uk
Sandra suffered with problem teeth for years. She
was amazed that Dr. andrew Denny at twenty2
Dental gave her fixed, natural looking and stable
teeth in One Day. Sandra is now delighted with
her new teeth, she can now eat and speak normally
again. “if you’re thinking of having Same Day
teeth at twenty2 Dental, i would say ‘Go for it’,
you won’t regret it . . . andy and his team have
been superb.”
Dr Andrew Denny is one the most experienced
cosmetic and implant dentists in the South
West, having studied extensively in the USA,
Europe and the UK. He is a Full member of e
British Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, the
International Team for Implantology and the
Association of Dental Implantology.
Talk to the Same Day Teeth Professionals
CALL NOW for A FREE INITIAL CONSULTATION
Take Your first step towards a new smile and
a new YOU!
CAN’T SLEEP?
AWAKE AT 4am?
ANXIOUS?
DEPRESSED?
NOT COPING?
HYPNOTHERAPY
CAN HELP!
Initial consultation
and relaxation CD
MIRANDA ROBARTS-ARNOLD
BA (Hons) HPD DHP SFBT (HYP)
MNCH (Req) AfSFH CNHC
CLINICAL HYPNOTHERAPIST and
PSYCHOTHERAPIST
Come and have a talk to see how I can
help you get back on track,
call 07717 170 865 to book
an initial consultation or visit
www.mirandahypnotherapy.com
Clinics held at:
Wells Chiropractic & Osteopathy
Centre BA5 1XJ
Chew Medical Centre BS40 8UE
PAGE 72 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
£30
beh
ve
Health section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:31
Page 73
behaviour at home
reluctance/inability to follow instructions.
There may be conflict at home about morning or bedtime
routines, homework, putting toys away and, for older children,
coming home at the agreed time or helping out in the house; the
list could be endless.
Mandy Stopard, a teacher and behaviour specialist, is offering a
new service to parents who would like some support to gain a
calmer home environment. She will work with parents to teach
their children to behave more co-operatively and/or manage their
emotions more effectively.
Providing choice and comfort
COURT House is a family-run business and has been since it
started 28 years ago. The aim was to create somewhere with a
homely atmosphere and everyone who visits agrees that this is
still the case. Residents all bring their own furniture, staff don’t
wear uniforms and the walls are not covered in notice boards.
There are activities laid on such as a pianist who plays
weekly, themed suppers and visits to the local pub for lunch.
Residents are by no means expected to join in; they have the
choice which is also the case with all aspects of their daily
living.
The superb location of Court House in Cheddar means that
residents have wonderful views over the Mendip Hills and are
also able to enjoy its village location meaning that they can
continue to be part of the local community.
HEALTH & FAMILY
COURT HOUSE
R E TI R E M E N T H O M E C H E D D A R
Accommodation available now with full en-suite
Court House is a very special place to live, the very fact that it is made up of different
areas of accommodation adds to its attraction.
e Main House with gracious large rooms with full en-suite looking out onto
different aspects and personalized with Resident’s own furniture and pictures etc. A
spacious Drawing Room with doors to a covered veranda and patio area leading onto
lawns and flower beds.
e Courtyard which has lovely vaulted accommodation with full en-suite and
cleverly concealed kitchenettes where Residents can make a cup of tea or a snack for
themselves or their guests and small raised gardens so that the people living there may,
if they so wish plant and tend their own flowers.
e lovely cottage accommodation full of character with a large Victorian style
conservatory looking towards St. Andrews Church and doors opening out from a
lovely sitting room to a tranquil garden.
Putting all of this together with the very special care given by dedicated staff that
respect and give privacy and dignity to all who live here, you can see why people who
come to live at Court House are so happy to have found this very special place.
Respite Care also available
“One of the most
beautiful and well
kept retirement
homes I’ve ever
seen”.
– e Photographer
Please contact Chris Dando
01934 742131
Website: www.courthouseretirementhome.co.uk
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 73
Community DPS:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:33
Page 74
MENDIP TIMES
Caring behind the scenes
YOU will read elsewhere in this issue of
Mendip Times about the situation on the
Somerset Levels as the first anniversary
approaches of last winter’s floods.
It is very hard to find “positives” from
such a situation, however the incredible way
the community has responded is very much
By SIMON
one of them. As I mentioned last month, the
SELBY
Somerset Community Foundation was one of
the driving forces behind a fundraising campaign to help families
and farmers stricken by the flooding – its CEO, Justin Sargent,
was presented with a High Sheriff’s Award in recognition of
their work.
Many other community groups also contributed and this
month, I’d like to tell you a little more about another
organisation with which I am personally involved: Somerset
Freemasons, who raised more than £200,000, specifically for a
“Somerset Masonic Flood Recovery Fund”, managed through
the foundation.
Many may know that charity and helping the disadvantaged
has long been a primary function of this organisation, although
generally it is done quietly with the minimum of fuss.
Reportedly it gives to needy causes on a scale that is second only
to the National Lottery. I certainly believe this to be quite
plausible given my observations as a mason, originally from
Wells and latterly from Bath and Frome.
You will often find that your local masonic lodge will be
actively assisting hospitals, schools, medical research, air
ambulances and, of course, now flood victims. Just recently
representatives from the Provincial Grand Lodge of Somerset
and Somerset Community Foundation visited the charity
Openstorytellers at their weekly meeting at Wells Town Hall.
Openstorytellers was recently awarded a £2,000 grant which
was made possible by the Somerset Masonic Fund. Mary
Hancock, deputy chief executive of Somerset Community
Foundation, said: “Managing the Somerset Masonic Fund is a
pleasure, as is working so closely with Freemasons who are
keen to fund a wide variety of local projects that help
vulnerable and isolated members of our community.”
Openstorytellers was created to enrich the lives of children
and adults with learning and communication difficulties by
using traditional stories and personal narrative. Barry Scott of
the Somerset Freemasons said: “We are delighted to support
this important initiative, which increases confidence,
independence and self-advocacy in young people.”
I have always been proud to associate myself with Somerset
Freemasons and this is just another example of why that is the
case. For more information about their work, visit:
www.somersetfreemasons.org/ or to find out about the
Somerset Community Foundation go to:
www.somersetcf.org.uk/
In the meanwhile I’m sure all the readers will want to join
me in wishing those in danger of flooding, or any other issues
within our caring community, a safe and happy Christmas.
Lasting legacies across Mendip
LOCAL community projects on
Mendip are to receive almost
£200,000 in funding from the district
council’s Local Legacy Fund.
The fund was launched by the
council in 2013 and last year saw nine
community projects share of slice of
£250,000. Community groups
throughout Mendip were invited to bid
for funding for specific projects which
would provide a lasting legacy in the
district by:
• Adding to the health and well-being
of the local community
• Creating educational, training or
work opportunities for the local
community
• Improving the quality of life of the
local community
The 12 projects that will receive
funding include:
• Frome Selwood Tennis Club –
£10,000 towards three new tennis
courts to replace the existing
deteriorating courts.
• Frome St John The Baptist PCC –
£5,000 to install new windows as
part of improvements to a
community activities venue.
PAGE 74 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
• Frome Town Football Club –
£28,000 for a new spectator stand
with solar panels, to be installed by
a local social enterprise (subject to
planning permission).
• Red Brick Building Centre,
Glastonbury – £15,000 towards the
installation of accessible lifts to
enable wider participation at the
Frome Town Football Club is to
recieve a grant towards a new
stand
community and business hub.
• Shepton Mallet United Charities –
£25,000 for the renovation of eight
almshouses for vulnerable elderly
residents.
• Robert Glanville Playing Field,
Westbury-sub-Mendip – £20,000
towards installing an all-weather
multi-use sports surface.
• Church Mead Recreation Ground
Management Committee, Norton St
Philip – £22,000 for a sports storage
pavilion and cricket nets at the
recreation ground.
Councillor Harvey Siggs, leader of
Mendip District Council, said: “The
Local Legacy Fund has already had a
very positive impact on a range of
community projects across Mendip
and this latest round of funding will
ensure a further 12 very worthwhile
projects are supported.
“I know there will be many
community groups disappointed that
we have been unable to give them
funding. I would like to reassure them
that we used a strict set of criteria to
judge each application to ensure the
process was completely fair.”
Community DPS:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:33
Page 75
They’re all kids
in Kilmersdon
Time to celebrate
YOUNGSTERS and adults in Kilmersdon have been
celebrating the official opening of a new playground.
A committee of young mums have been fund raising for the
last three years to replace the play park and create a community
garden in the village. They were helped by a £10,000 grant
from the Big Lottery Fund.
The project came to an end when villagers gathered for a fun
day to celebrate and to say a big thank you to everyone who has
helped along the way. Management of the park has also been
handed back to the parish council.
The multi-purpose climbing frame has been a popular addition to
the park
COMMUNITY
Group wins support
MESSY Tots in Paulton is busy fundraising to keep the
group going following funding cuts by B&NES and
recently held an event at the Red Lion in the village,
including an auction of promises, supported by local
businesses.
The group is based at Paulton Scouts and Guides Hall.
Details: [email protected]
A scary idea – but it’s working
CHATTING with other parents in Collett Park in Shepton
Mallet on a chilly day whilst their children enjoyed the play
equipment gave Jo Murray and her husband Ian an idea: what
about a café?
Jo, an accountant and Ian, a teacher, approached Shepton
Mallet town council with the idea and they were given a lease
on a piece of spare land.
That was back in August and now the Collett Park Café is
proving popular with families every day of the week. So
popular, that some of the mums are now working in the café,
either full or part-time.
Dozens of families enjoyed a Halloween party in the park to
celebrate the café’s success. Jo said: “It’s very much a sideline
but we really feel we are putting something back into the
community both in terms of employment and giving families
something extra to enjoy in the park.
“The park itself is a wonderful asset for Shepton and it’s
lovely to see so many people using it.”
A halloween party-goer
Kelly Green and son Chester
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 75
History feature:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:34
Page 76
MENDIP TIMES
When Wedmore went to war
HUNDREDS of people visited a special
exhibition in Wedmore to mark the
centenary of the outbreak of World War
One.
The Isle of Wedmore Remembers
featured displays of photographs,
mementos, original artefacts and medals,
collected from all over the United
Emily and Lorna practice some tunes
popular during the war
One of the banner created by local pupils
The service at the
war memorial
PAGE 76 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Kingdom and as far afield as Australia,
Canada and New Zealand, relating to life
in Wedmore and the surrounding area,
featuring the military career of local
servicemen, from those who died to a
selection of the men who returned to
rebuild their lives.
Among the most poignant exhibits were
displays by pupils from Hugh Sexey
Middle School and Wedmore First School
Academy who spent months researching
the war and preparing project work
ranging from models of trenches and
trench food – including a typical trench
cake – to images of pigeons and horses
which were used on the front line and a
banner woven with the names of former
Hugh Sexey pupils who were killed in the
war.
The project has been running since
2012 and was the brainchild of
professional military historian Dr Tim
Moreman. It was funded by the Heritage
Lottery Fund, Wedmore Parish Council,
Wedmore Beer Festival and various other
local groups.
Tim and his team said they were
Paul Bailey, from Blackford (left), wears
typical webbing and holds a deactived WWI
rifle. He’s pictured with Tim Moreman,
holding a section of a German Howitzer
shell inscribed in memory of Samuel Sawley
from Wedmore’s Wesleyan Chapel. The
shell was recovered from Vimy Ridge in
1917 and presented to the chapel by
Samuel’s son Captain H. Smith
overwhelmed by the response with more
than 500 people visiting the exhibition
with some bringing in new artefacts.
They will now begin work on a book
about the area’s involvement in the war.
Tom, Jess, Lorna and Emily, from Hugh Sexey’s school, in front of
the banner honouring the school’s war dead
Shipham honours its lost
RESIDENTS in Shipham turned out in
force to commemorate the fallen from the
parish.
There was standing room only in St
Leonards Church for the dedication of a
Book of Remembrance donated by the
parish council detailing the life and service
by the eight men from the First World War
and five from WW2 who lost their lives.
Following a service at the nearby war
memorial, scouts, guides, cubs and
History feature:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:34
Page 77
WORLD WAR I
Scouts honour the fallen
Scouts gather at the village war memorial with ex-serviceman John
Mole
MEMBERS of the 1st Mells (St Andrews) Scout Group have
paid their own tribute to villagers who were killed in World War
One.
After taking part in the annual Remembrance Day service and
parade in Mells, the children made their way to a field behind
the church where a walnut tree – donated by Lord Oxford
(Raymond Asquith) – was planted to make the 100th
anniversary of the outbreak of the war.
The group offers scouting for around 70 local children and
currently has 29 youngsters on its books.
Paul Clark (with the spade), a former scout leader who returned
from his home in Cornwall for the event, carried out the planting
ost villagers
brownies paraded to the village hall where
the council had organised a Remembrance
Day Centenary lunch.
An exhibition in the hall by the History
Society detailed life in the parish during
the wars and how life has changed since.
There was also a collection of information
sheets organised by Justin Vallance on all
the men and women who served from the
village, and were fortunate enough to
return.
The procession leaves the church
Shane Bridle, leader of the beaver group, told the children and
villagers who gathered for the ceremony: “We hope that in 100
years time, this tree will continue to remind people about World
War One.”
Mendip
remembers
T H E G R E AT
WA R 1 9 1 4 - 1 8
The church was packed
for the service
The book of remembrance
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 77
History feature:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:35
Page 78
MENDIP TIMES
WORLD WAR I
Frome’s artistic tribute
SONGS and drama played a major part in Frome’s First World
War commemorations and the impact of the war on people’s
lives.
Hayesdown School Choir performed their WWI-inspired
songs written with Petra Schofield, from Magic Penny
Productions. They also used research from the Frome on the
Frontline exhibition at Frome Museum. Petra has been working
with the pupils all term on their First World War project and all
of the school visited the museum during September.
As Mendip Times went to press, the school was due to stage
a special performance at the town’s Memorial Theatre as a
culmination of the work they’ve been doing with Petra.
Meanwhile, The Little Victory Ball theatre group opened the
doors of its Great War Museum to the public for the first time
at the Frome Independent market. The museum has been
created inside a restored 1950’s Bluebird caravan and features
domestic artefacts of the early post-war years, including a
The inside of the museum created in a restored caravan
Chilcompton remembers
Pupils from Hayesdown School sing at Frome Museum
collection of souvenirs and memorabilia, some of it made by
soldiers and sent back to loved ones at home.
The Frome-based theatre group gave three performances of
their Remembrance play based on researched fragments from
diaries, letters, poems, and newspapers. The show tells the real
story of the public’s response to Armistice Day and explores
the origins of Remembrance, the Cenotaph and the Great
Silence.
G Initially funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund and The
Western Front Association, The Little Victory Ball is now
seeking bookings and further support to enable them to tour
more venues to bring educational displays and social history to
communities who may not otherwise have access to museums
and theatres. They are also seeking more volunteers,
particularly actors. More information can be found at:
www.thelittlevictoryball.com
VETERANS, villagers and local dignitaries gathered at Chilcompton’s war memorial
after a service in the nearby Catholic church to mark Remembrance Day.
Mendip
remembers
T H E G R E A T WA R 1 9 1 4 - 1 8
Wells MP Tessa Munt chats to war veterans
Joe Vango and Bert Williams. The pair had
never met until they became neighbours in
the village
PAGE 78 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Ron Strawbridge, Bert Williams and Joe
Vango chat on the bench in front of the
village war memorial
Jim Perkins and Phil Emery, from Mendip
Brass Band, played the Last Post and
Reveille at the ceremony
Charity section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:36
Page 79
Eddy’s Kilimanjaro
challenge . . .
EDDY Hicks,
aged 68,
formerly from
Burrington but
now a resident
in Cheddar,
took on the
challenge of a
lifetime when
he trekked to
the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro for Weston Hospicecare.
The trek was undertaken as a tribute to his wife’s friend,
Kathy Ellis, who passed away from bladder cancer at the
hospice in May, aged just 62.
Kathy, from Wrington, was popular in her local
community. She was group secretary and a frequent walker
with the Woodspring Ramblers and a keen English country
dancer both locally, nationally and abroad.
Eddy said: “I wanted to emphasise how physically active
Kathy had been prior to contracting cancer. She had
formerly been a competitive horse woman and life long
teacher. Knowing what Kathy had been and seeing how
different she had become through her illness, I knew I had
to do something.
“She received tremendously sympathetic care from the
nurses on the in-patient unit at the hospice. They were so
caring and thoughtful, not only with Kathy but with
everybody that visited her, including myself and my wife,
Pat. It was then that I decided to climb Mount Kilimanjaro
in her memory and raise funds for the hospice.”
Bishop backs winter
fuel campaign
CHARITIES
THE Bishop of Bath and
Wells, the Rt Revd Peter
Hancock, is backing this
year’s Surviving Winter
Campaign, first launched
five years ago by Somerset
Community Foundation. It
appeals to people who can
live without their Winter
Fuel Payment to donate it
to help pensioners
struggling with the cost of
staying warm.
Bishop Peter, who is a
vice president of Somerset
Community Foundation
and patron of Age UK Somerset, said: “Every so often a
campaign comes along that just makes sense. The Surviving
Winter Campaign is one of those.”
Across Somerset it is estimated there are almost 5,000
pensioner households living in fuel poverty. On average there
are around 300 winter-related deaths in Somerset each year, the
majority are people over 65 years old.
Details: www.somersetcf.org.uk
Keeping the RNLI afloat
. . . whilst WI has a ball
BLEADON Women’s Institute raised £10,000 for Weston
Hospicecare with a charity ball and auction attended by
300 local people. The auction had over 170 prizes donated
by large and small businesses from the Weston-super-Mare
and Burnham on Sea area.
The organising committee were Karen Orme,
Chris Codd, Eilish
Hastie, Michelle
Harper, Tracy
Heppenstall,
Kate James, Bev
Holtby, Aline
Bennett and
Heather Gay.
ONE of Chew Valley RNLI’s longest-serving collectors, Carol
Bryan, has decided to hang up her collecting tin after 30 years
and is pictured receiving a certificate of thanks from branch
chair, Gillie Slater.
Carol’s late husband, Hugh, was branch chairman for many
years and her four sons are all keen sailors – one needed a tow
from the RNLI earlier this year when his boat’s engine failed.
The branch’s house-to-house collection raised £3,500 in June
and its popular curry lunch held in Ubley village hall on
November 7th raised a record £1,870. Its next event will be a
magic show in Ubley on March 28th.
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 79
Charity section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:36
Page 80
MENDIP TIMES
Zombies unleashed in
Members of Tor Dance Group, who led the Zombie walk
Health and Safety gone
mad? Glastonbury’s
undead wear hi-vis jackets
The Zombies are unleashed
CROWDS of onlookers braved
Glastonbury when dozens of zombies
were freed to roam the streets.
The annual Zombie Walk was held to
raise money for the Martha Care Trust
and raised more than £1,000 for the
charity. Organised by the trust and the
Somerset Volunteer Network, the walk
attracted people of all ages and from
across the country.
Martha Care helps families of children
who are admitted to hospital in an
emergency. It provides a specialist
Martha Care family support worker to
Bristol Royal Hospital for Children and
aims to provide similar workers to
hospitals across the South West. The
charity was founded in 2007 by Maggie
Siviter in memory of her late daughter
Martha. Martha was just eight months old
when she was diagnosed with a brain
tumour. For the next seven years, she
spent much of her life in hospital. Martha
died in May 2006.
Emma Crosweller, the charity’s Project
Support Manager, said: “On behalf of
Martha Care I would like to thank
everyone who made Glastonbury Zombie
Walk such a fantastic event this year. We
couldn’t have put on this spectacular
event without our generous volunteers or
donations from so many local businesses.
“We had a large Zombie turn out this
year, with some extremely creative and
wonderfully artistic costumes which
helped us to raise just over £1,000! This
will fund our Family Support Worker for
a month, helping more than 12 families in
that time.”
Time for a selfie – even Zombies have
friends on social media
PAGE 80 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Charity section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:37
Page 81
CHARITIES
town for charity
Jay and Ricky Bee
Charity founder Maggie Siviter finds herself the centre of attention
Simon, Arthur
and Molly-Boo
Time for walkies, says Leah but Bobby takes it all his stride
The Somerset Volunteer
Network supported the event
To find out more about the charity’s work, visit: www.marthacare.org.uk
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 81
Charity section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:37
Page 82
MENDIP TIMES
Santa dash
DOROTHY House
Hospice Care is inviting
registrations for its
fourth annual 6km Santa
Dash on Sunday
December 7th.
It’s hoped the event,
which attracted almost
154 runners last year,
will see a record number of entrants complete an all-terrain
course to and from the Winsley-based hospice grounds.
Emily Knight, Dorothy House Community Fundraiser, said
it’s an event for all levels of ability: “We welcome serious
runners as well as people who are just giving this distance a go
to help raise funds for Dorothy House.
“As part of the registration fee Dorothy House gives you an
early Christmas gift – a Santa outfit which you will be expected
to wear!”
Registration is £15 and it’s hoped all runners will collect a
minimum of £25 in sponsor money.
Among the runners will be Gary Dowden who will have
completed the Santa Dash three years running. Gary, who lives
in Frome, said: “I really enjoy getting involved in the event, it is
quite a spectacle seeing all the Santas running across the
countryside.
“I will be running, walking and possibly even crawling
around the course and doing it in memory of my wife, who
passed away at Dorothy House in November 2010.”
Details: www.dhsantadash.co.uk
Rotarians to the rescue
MEMBERS of the Rotary Club of Mendip volunteered to help
the Somerset Emergency Volunteers (SEV) who assist people
still being affected by the 2013 floods.
In the morning the Rotarians dug over a garden vegetable plot
and then repaired a greenhouse for a female resident on the
levels. In the afternoon they went to the Hope Dartmoorhill
Pony Rescue charity to repair damaged fences.
Mendip Rotarians president, Mike Hiles, said: “We were
delighted to be able to help with these two worthwhile projects.
Rotary is not just about raising money for charity; often it is a
case of rolling up our sleeves and doing a worthwhile job for
the community.”
Remembering family at Christmas
FACING your first Christmas alone is
never an easy experience and for local
man Geoff Walford it will be just that,
having lost his wife Sheila to cancer in
March, after over 60 years of marriage.
Since Sheila’s death, Geoff, aged 85,
from Yatton, has become committed to
fundraising for Weston Hospicecare,
Geoff and Sheila
who looked after Sheila, through the day
hospice and during her stay in the inpatient unit.
Geoff is now supporting the charity’s
Light up a Life Appeal, which gives him
and his family a chance to come
together and remember Sheila.
Geoff said: “As the cancer progressed,
Sheila spent a week in the in-patient
unit and really enjoyed her time there,
overlooking the beautiful hospice
garden. She said she wanted to spend
her final days at the hospice. I think she
enjoyed the fact that when we were at
the hospice together, we could just
spend time being ‘us’.
“That’s why I’m so grateful for
Weston Hospicecare’s Light up a Life
event. It’s a way to help me remember
Sheila and to feel close to her again. It
will help me take a little step forward. I
know Sheila would have loved it. It’s a
chance to celebrate a life and join with
others who, despite their heavy hearts,
want to do the same.”
Families can place a private
dedication in Weston Hospicecare’s
Book of Remembrance or take part in
their lantern ceremony on Sunday
December 14th.
Details: Weston Hospicecare shops at www.westonlightupalife.org.uk or by calling 01934 423960.
PAGE 82 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Charity section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:37
Page 83
Celebration cards and cake
THE charity Cards for Good Causes, which is celebrating 30
years of trading in St John’s Church, Frome, had a double
reason to celebrate when shop manager, Renée Cole, and her
husband Mike also celebrated their Golden Wedding
anniversary on Halloween. They celebrated with volunteers,
with a cake made by Renee.
Get knitting!
These boots are
made for charity
CHARITIES
Ben (centre) with Ted and and fellow pupils
A PUPIL at Leigh On Mendip First School has walked away
with the top prize after taking part in a competition for a local
charity.
Ben Proctor was chosen as the winner from more than 400
entries across the region after coming up with a design for
“wacky” wellies for Ted, the mascot from the Royal United
Hospital’s Forever Friends Appeal.
Ted visited the school to meet Ben and his fellow pupils,
who took part in a “Funky Footwear” day in October to raise
money for the appeal. Staff from Mogers Drewett, the law firm
who are corporate partners of the Forever Friends Appeal,
presented Ben with his prize, a £50 Odeon cinema gift card
and also £100 in book vouchers for the school. Ben said: “I am
not sure what I am going to watch yet but I am hoping to take
some friends along with me.”
Chairman backs rescue boat
KNIT and Chat, which began on November 1st, 2008, has raised
nearly £5,000 for charities since then as well as providing
friendship and companionship for members at its weekly meetings
in Shepton Mallet.
It’s helped various causes including Water Aid with its Knit a
River campaign, Age UK, the Sailors Society and by knitting
premature baby hats for the RUH, shoulder capes for orthopaedic
patients and blankets of squares to keep the elderly warm.
This year the group was asked to knit poppies for the Royal
British Legion Never Forget commemoration. Sales took place at
the end of July in Tesco, Shepton Mallet and at Collett Park on
August 4th. Demand was so high that supplies could not be
knitted fast enough and £750 was collected.
Following that success Tesco offered to pay for more materials
and allowed the group to have a venue again in advance of
Remembrance Day, raising a further £1,100.
Their next sale is on Friday November 28th at the Market Cross,
Shepton, during the switching on of the Christmas lights, raising
money for Heads Up in Wells.
The group is now working on a Christmas tree which will be on
display in the Baptist Church at the beginning of December and
then work will begin in earnest to make hearts for sale in Tesco in
January to raise money for the British Heart Foundation.
COUNCILLOR Peter Downing, chairman of Sedgemoor District
Council, has announced that the Burnham Area Rescue Boat will
be the charity to benefit from any civic fund-raising or donations
during his time in office.
He said: “I have long been aware of the reassuring presence
and help that BARB gives the residents and visitors to Burnham
on Sea and nearby coastal resorts, particularly during the summer
season.
“The value of BARB is also felt more widely across Sedgemoor
District, a good example being the tremendous response by BARB
to last winter’s flooding which was invaluable to residents across
the Somerset Levels and Moors. We at SDC are very grateful to
them and all their volunteers and I should like to recognise their
efforts and commitment with some practical encouragement.”
Trust on track
THE Somer-rail Trust, which hopes to restore the line from
Radstock to Frome, has been granted charitable status by the
Charity Commission.
It hopes this will encourage more people to join the current
group, which includes local business people and enthusiasts.
Membership is £10 a year.
Details: www.somer-rail.co.uk
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 83
Congresbury feature:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:42
Page 84
MENDIP TIMES
Outdoor Clothing, Footwear and Accessories
1 Broad Street, Congresbury, BS49 5DG
01934 877333 www.countryinnovation.com
Shop locally
COUNTRY Innovation, based in Broad Street, Congresbury is
celebrating the festive season with a Christmas Shopping Event
by offering a full 20% off any full-priced product on Saturday
December 6th.
For almost 20 years Country Innovation has been kitting
people out to keep them warm and dry when the good old
British weather takes a turn for the worse, and this Christmas is
no exception.
There’s gift ideas for all the family. So don’t battle with The
Mall, shop in a stress-free environment with friendly and
helpful staff!
Now selling fresh fruit and vegetables
Mendip Times
reduces travel costs
100,000 potential customers within
a short distance of your business
Open: Monday – Saturday 8am-8pm, Sunday 9am-5pm
The Precinct, Brinsea Road, Congresbury BS49 5JG.
01934 838020
ottage Loaf
C
Bakery & Sandwich Bar
Craftsman baked bread and
Confectionery from your
local Master Baker
Hot and cold filled
sandwiches and rolls
Open 7am–5pm Monday–Friday
7am–1pm Saturday
2 The Precinct, Brinsea Road,
Congresbury, Bristol BS49 5JG
01934 876969
Keith and Sally
Westlake
HODDERS
HIGH CLASS FAMILY BUTCHERS
Family butcher
Local meat and poultry
Booking now
for Christmas
The Precinct, Brinsea Road,
Congresbury, BS49 5JG
01934 838844
Morgans Local Shop
The local superstore!
Open:
Monday-Friday
7am-10pm
Saturday 7.30am10pm Sunday
8am-9pm
[email protected]
FREE CASH
MACHINE
morganslocal
PAGE 84 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Staon Road
Congresbury BS49 5DX
01934 832234
Congresbury feature:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:43
Page 85
Transform your kitchen
WHEN we plan a kitchen project we
often do not realise there is an
alternative to complete replacement
kitchens. We are perfectly happy with
the layout of our kitchen but would like
to freshen up the look.
This is now achievable through
kitchen transformation specialists
Dream Doors. The North Somerset
franchise of the UK's largest kitchen
facelift company now has a portfolio
bulging with satisfied customers.
Run from their showroom in
Congresbury by husband and wife
team, Colin and Camilla Abbiss, the
business supplies a cost and timesaving kitchen door replacement
service.
A new kitchen can be achieved by
replacing the doors, drawers, and
worktops. New appliances and
accessories such as plinths, cornice and
pelmet can also be added for that extra
special finishing touch.
Why not transform your old or dated
kitchen into something fresh and
attractive. Whether you are looking for
contemporary, traditional, or a country
kitchen it can be carried out in only a
couple of days and without the usual
hassle, disruption and upheaval.
Visit their showroom to see what’s
possible and view the extensive range
FOCUS ON CONGRESBURY
of styles and finishes, worktop choices,
the range of NEFF appliances and
Franke sinks and taps.
Alternatively ring Colin or Camilla
on 01934 832361 to arrange a free noobligation home survey.
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 85
Motoring page:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:45
Page 1
MENDIP TIMES
MOTORING
Ask the expert
DUNCAN Wood has turned his
passion for motoring into a
respected business, Bristol Car
Consultant, sourcing the best
cars for customers at the best
possible prices.
Through specialist car
websites and at dealerships, he
has built up an extensive
knowledge of car and associated
markets and continues his
research on a daily basis.
Independent Advice, Practical
Assistance, Buying, Selling,
Maintenance, Repairs
LET ME HELP YOU SAVE
MONEY ON YOUR CAR
Duncan Wood
Tel: 07983 262310
Email:
[email protected]
Website:
www.bristolcarconsultant.co.uk
SHIPHAM MOTOR GROUP
Turnpike Road, Shipham, Winscombe BS25 1TX
•
•
•
•
•
Volvo Warranty Compliant
Independent
Servicing on New Cars
Volvo Accredited Master Technician
Specialist
Volvo Diagnostics and Software
Downloads
01934 842350
Air Conditioning
www.shipham.co.uk
MOT Testing
Volvo Parts & Accessories
VOLVO
With a vast experience of old and new
models, you can be sure that your
Volvo will receive the highest quality
service but without Main Dealer prices!
co FR
u E
ca rte E
rs sy
•
For servicing, repairs and sales of all
makes of caravans and motorhomes
UBLEY MOTOR SERVICES
MG Rover Land Rover Specialists
Sales – Service – Parts – Repairs
Bailey approved body shop
and workshop
G Caravan Servicing
G Annual Habitation Checks
G Alu-Tech Bailey Approved Repairers
G Warranty Maintained
G Damp Repairs
G Accident Repairs
G Insurance Repairs
G Accessory Fitting
Our shop stocks a full range of
accessories and equipment
ALL MAKES SERVICING – VEHICLE
DIAGNOSTICS, AIR CONDITIONING,
MECHANICAL & BODY REPAIRS
Collection/Loan Car by arrangement
MOT TESTING STATION
COMPETITIVE PRICES ON TYRES, BATTERIES AND EXHAUSTS
ACCIDENT REPAIR CENTRE
BREAKDOWN & RECOVERY SERVICE
QUALITY USED CARS
Your peace of mind is our priority
CLEEVE HILL, UBLEY. TEL: 01761 462275 (24hrs)
www.ubleymotors.co.uk
Open Monday - Friday 9am–5pm;
Saturday 9am–1pm
Marchants Hill,
Gurney Slade BA3 4TY
Call: 01749 841051
Mob: 07778 465520
Email: [email protected]
PAGE 86 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Homes section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:54
Page 87
Consult the specialists
FIRENZA Kitchens and Bathrooms are a local
independent retailer based in Midsomer Norton. They
design, supply and install kitchens and bathrooms to a
high quality finish.
The Firenza Kitchen and Bathroom Showroom is
completely different to any other in the area. Not only
do they have a wide range of kitchens on display, but
many of their appliances are working and they are happy
to demonstrate these for their customers. The boiling
water tap and coffee machine are always on, so
customers are very welcome to pop in for a cuppa.
The company was set up by local businessman,
Andrew Stock, who has worked for many years
designing and fitting kitchens and bathrooms within the
local area.
Whether you have one room or several that require
completely remodelling, or you would just like to make
a few simple changes to an existing room, they can
design either. If you would like a design and supply only
quote they are happy to do this too.
Firenza are also pleased to announce they have a new
tile showroom. Whether you want tiles for a kitchen, wet
room, bathroom or just some new floor tiles, they have a
good range for you to look at.
There is plenty of free parking. Why not pay them a
visit to find out about their services and how they can
create your dream kitchen or bathroom.
HOMES & INTERIORS
Tel: 01749 677299
[email protected]
Win a classic Fortnum & Mason
Christmas hamper worth £150! To
celebrate our first anniversary in Wells,
every time you spend a minimum of £50
in-store, you can enter our draw. The
draw will be held on Saturday, December
20th.
Plus, for youngsters, there’s a chance to
win one of two remote controlled models
of BMW’s hybrid i8 sports coupe!
Stockists of Little Greene, Mylands and
Farrow & Ball paints. Paint mixed on the
premises – any amount, any finish.
Expert advice on products for
conservation and restoration work.
Everything you need under one roof.
Open: Monday – Friday: 9am-6pm,
Saturday: 9am-4pm
No.1 The Old Chapel,
Union Street Car Park,
Wells, Somerset BA5 2PU
Q U A L I T Y PA I N T & WA L L PA P E R
Look ou
t
for New
Year of
fers!
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 87
Homes section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:54
Page 88
MENDIP TIMES
Weston Garden Machinery
Garden Machinery Specialist
W e st o n G a r d e n M a c h i n e r y
w i s h a l l th e i r c u s to m e rs a
M e r r y C h ri s tm a s a n d a
Happy New Year and thank
yo u f o r yo u r co n t i n u ed
s u p p o r t.
Firing the imagination
FLAMING Furniture
is a new business with
original designs and
new ideas that you
definitely won’t see
on the High Street.
They take their classy
designs and customise
them to suit your
home.
They use a blend of
powder-coated metal
frames and chunky wooden table tops to create a classic looking
piece of furniture that looks great in all houses, old or new.
They let you choose the colour of the table base so that it
matches your kitchen or dining room and make it to the size
that you need it, for inside or outside of the house.
Owner James Brooking Clark used to run a tipi company and
designed a range of tables and matching benches to go in them.
He followed it up with a design for his own kitchen table,
coloured it to match the walls, and all their friends loved it. So
he kept the tables and designs coming.
They specialise in tables and matching benches but have some
other interesting items as well so please check out the website.
They are very creative so if you have any unusual furniture
ideas that you want making up they will be very happy to help
you create it.
Love this table?
Now make it perfect for your home . . .
Would you like
it bigger, or
smaller, made
of Oak or Ash,
Granite or
Glass?
Now select the colour of the metal
work to complement your kitchen or
dining room
Do you need some matching benches as well?
Customise this table and our other furniture to suit your home.
Hutton Garden Centre,
Banwell Road, Hutton, Weston-super-Mare,
North Somerset BS24 9UB
Tel: 01934 813261
www.westongarden.co.uk
PAGE 88 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
All of our furniture is made here in
Somerset with locally, and sustainably
sourced mber.
www.lamingfurniture.co.uk • 07919 993174
01934 743183 • [email protected]
Homes section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:55
Page 89
HOMES & INTERIORS
Telephone: 01761 417654
www.techniglaze.co.uk
Facsimile: 01761 417207
email: [email protected]
ALUMINIUM WINDOWS, DOORS
CURTAINWALL ATRIUMS
PVCU WINDOWS
DOORS AND CONSERVATORIES
Offering the complete
service for 30 years
Merry Christmas and a
Happy New Year from the
Techniglaze Team
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 89
Homes section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:55
Page 90
MENDIP TIMES
Tony Hucker TV
Service – Sales – Rental
•
•
•
•
•
•
Wishing all our customers
a Merry Christmas and a
Happy New Year
FAMILY BUSINESS BASED IN THE
CHEW VALLEY FOR OVER 100 YEARS
Stovax, Hunter, Yeoman
Woodburning, Multi-Fuel, LPG & Natural Gas
available from stock or can be ordered
PAGE 90 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Satellite Installations
Aerial Systems
TV wall mounting
Custom Installations
Networking
Signal Solutions
01275
332888
www.tonyhuckertv.co.uk
Unit 4, Fairseat Workshops, Chew Stoke BS40 8XF
Open: Mon-Fri 9am-6pm and Sat 9am-12 noon
• Staircases • Doors
• Windows • Porches • Gates
• Decorave Timbers • Car Ports
• Juliee Balconies
• CNC Work
• Bespoke Joinery
• Free Quotaon Service
Homes section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:55
Page 91
JACKSONS
Jacksons Fencing –
news, topical treats
and more . . .
Deck the halls with
boughs of holly . . .
‘TIS the season to be . . . now try as I
might I can’t remember whether the next
bit is jolly or merry, which is a shame, as
it is one of the Christmas carols that I
find really ‘harks’ to the need for us to
get into the spirit of the festive season.
It’s a bit more upbeat, rather than some of
the slower “dirge-y” ones, that I have to
be honest, can leave me a bit low.
I had to smile a bit when I read that last
paragraph back, to see I have used a word
like hark, I must’ve dredged that one up
from the subconscious because I’m
forcing myself to think of carols, not a
usual activity for me, and Hark the
Herald Angels Sing, is another one of the
cheerier ones. The reason I’m wandering
along this Christmas carol cul-de-sac, is I
am trying to get into the mood to write
the page that some of you may glance
over in December.
When you think about it, entering in to
the celebratory spirit is pretty much what
the majority of us do, isn’t it? As the
nights draw in and the weather gets
worse, we take a collective leap and
launch ourselves into the swing of the
festive season – by distracting ourselves
with parties, chasing the darkness and
bad weather away by “decking the halls
with boughs of holly” – which translates
into Christmas trees, tinsel and glittering
The Log Store has a Featherboard pale roof
to protect from rain, with slatted sides and
rear to allow for ventilation to encourage
log drying. The timber slatted floor is raised
up from ground level to encourage airing.
Seasonal Savers offer 15% off!
Increase the safety or welcome visitors at the front of your property after dark by simply
installing these verge protection marker posts from Jacksons. They define the edges of
drives and lawns, and help keep everyone on the straight and narrow by showing up with
the aid of their handy reflectors. Seasonal Savers offer 15% off!
WIN
A PA I R O F R A I S E D B E D K I T S
Enter the free prize
draw and be in with a
chance to win a pair of
Jacksons raised bed kits.
Simply log on to your
local page, address
below and follow the
easy instructions on
how to enter. The draw
closes 31.01.15. To
enter go to:
up anything that stays still long enough
for a sprinkling!
We’ve been doing it for centuries,
mid-winter festivities were prevalent in
Europe prior to Christianity becoming
widespread, so early Christians wanting
to convert pagans adopted many of the
celebrations recognising the importance
of cheering everyone up with light,
feasts and decorations.
In our own small way we tip our hat
to encouraging bonhomie and the feel
good factor at Jacksons. Without being
too OTT or glitzy, we have our
Seasonal Savers offer which has
become something of a tradition now.
The products collected together for
this offer are: raised bed kits (like the
ones you can enter our free prize draw
www.jacksonsfencing.co.uk/bathlocal
to win), Sissinghurst planters, verge
protection marker posts, log stores,
wheelie bin stores and metal wall trellis
– for the whole of December and
January we are offering 15% off. You
can check all the details out on your
local page, www.jacksonsfencing.co.uk/bathlocal which gives
you links to the products and how to
take advantage of the discount.
You can also find out about Jacksons
vouchers on there too. We’ve had a
spate of people buying our vouchers as
wedding presents recently, so we
thought why not make sure people are
aware they can get £10 and £50
vouchers to give as Christmas presents
too.
[email protected]
Seasons greetings to everyone!
www.jacksons-fencing.co.uk/bathlocal
or call 0800 408 4754 to talk to your local Jacksons Fencing Centre.
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 91
Homes section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:55
Page 92
MENDIP TIMES
RH
Windows
THE CHEW VALLEY’S LONGEST ESTABLISHED
WINDOW COMPANY WITH A REPUTATION
BUILT ON QUALITY AND SERVICE
FOR CONSERVATORIES, WINDOWS AND
DOORS IN HARDWOOD OR UPVC
MERRY CHRISTMAS!
HARDWOOD JOINERY SPECIALISTS
www.rhwindowsltd.co.uk
Telephone: 01761 452171
Fax: 01761 453342
PAGE 92 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Homes section:Layout 1
20/11/14
18:55
Page 93
Hedgerows
small pets
hotel
HOMES & INTERIORS
D.R. CARPETS
Carpets Vinyls Wood Flooring
Safety flooring specialist
Natural flooring Bespoke rugs
Mix and match designer range
Domestic and commercial
supplied and fitted
We happily board
Rabbits, Guinea Pigs,
Chinchillas, Degus,
Rats, Hamsters,
Gerbils, Mice, Birds &
Fish but just ask as we
may be able to
accommodate your
loved one!
All dogs stay in my
house with me and
have a completely
separate garden.
PROFESSIONAL
DOG GROOMING
25 years experience in
companion animal care
The Groom Shed
Upton Lane, Dundry
Somerset BS41 8NR
07917 809289
[email protected]
Showroom 1, Evercreech Junction,
Shepton Mallet, Somerset BA4 6NA
T: 01749 831578 • www.dr-carpets.co.uk
Enquiries regarding
viewings, boardings
or any questions,
please call us on
0796 691 6110
Warren Bates
Carpentry
Regular visits
Holiday cover
Exercising
Services to suit all needs
Reliable and
trustworthy
Any animals
considered
With over 30 years
in the business
1 Bloomfield Cottage
Wells Road
Hallatrow
Bristol BS39 6EP
07833 325858
01761 453432
We carefully dismantle your oven and cleanse it in our
specially designed, heated dip tank.
From top to bottom, inside and out.
As good as new, with a no mess guarantee.
www.oven-clean-express.co.uk
[email protected]
Mendip
Times
FREE
on
Celebrating life
the Mendips ands
surrounding area
OCTOBER 2014
I SSU E 5
VOLUME 10
Mendip
Times
I SSU E 6
VOLUME 10
Local people,
local history, local
IN THIS ISSUE:
E N DI P
AU T U M N O N M
ORIES
MINERS’ MEM
F O O D & D R IN K
WHAT’S ON
FREE
g life on
Celebratin
the Mendips ands
surrounding area
NO VEM BE R
2014
s and local news
places, local event
GUARANTEE YOUR COPY –
SUBSCRIBE TODAY!
SUBSCRIPTION FORM
Please complete and return payment to:
Mendip Times, Coombe Lodge, Blagdon, Somerset BS40 7RG.
Telephone: 01761 463888 • www.mendiptimes.co.uk
Your Details:
Mendip
Times
Local people,
I SSU E 7
VOLUME 10
local history, local
Title:
FREE
INSIDE:
CARNIVALS
APPLE DAYS
E FO CU S
ILLAGon
Vlife
g
atin
Celebr
ARTS & ANTIQUES
and EAS
the Mendips
C H R I S T MA S I D
s
ding area
surrounevent
s and local news
places, local
DE CEM BE R
2014
(Complete in clear capital letters please)
First name:
If a gift, recipient details:
Title:
Name:
Address:
Surname:
Address:
Postcode:
Title:
Postcode:
Name:
Address:
Postcode:
Telephone (in case of query):
!
O U R R EA DE RS
E T I N G S T O A LL
news
S EA S O N ’S G RE
events and local
local places, local
Local people,
local history,
IDEAL
GIFT!
£25
for 12 issues
delivered to
your door
Email address (in case of query):
Signature:
I enclose a cheque (made payable to Mendip Times Limited) to
the value of:
Date:
£
for
subscriptions @ £25.00 each.
Please telephone to pay by credit card.
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 93
Riding section:Layout 1
20/11/14
19:00
Page 94
MENDIP TIMES
A colourful success story
FOR many years Appleacre Farm at
Crickham near Wedmore has been the home
of Richard Nicholls, former Master of
Foxhounds with the Banwell and Harriers
Hunt and still an avid hunt supporter.
Richard has been involved with horses all
of his life and had a reputation in the hunting
With CELIA
field for his fearless riding and his love of the
GADD
“slightly quirky” horse. I remember nearly 30
years ago when I worked for Eric Winter we had a particularly
difficult horse in the yard called Swift who we were unable to sell
because he was extremely sharp and sensitive.
He eventually ended up with Richard who successfully hunted
him for many years and it was lovely to see the talented horse find
a job that suited him so well.
Now his 24-year-old daughter, Sarah, is definitely following in
his footsteps. Horses are “in the blood” for sure and Sarah is now
establishing herself locally as another very talented, fearless and
determined rider. The facilities at Appleacre are very good for
breaking and schooling horses, with 18 stables, some in a
traditional courtyard style, and some in a new American barn, a
large outdoor school and horse walker. There are also some XC
style fences around the grounds.
Sarah welcomes horses on full or DIY livery, and is happy to
tackle “problem” horses too.
This has been a very good year for Sarah in the show ring and
she has qualified two horses for the Royal International Horse
Show at Hickstead. Coloured horses have always been a favourite
of the family and Richard’s coloured stallion St Ives was very
popular until he unfortunately passed away last year at the grand
age of 27.
One of the horses that Sarah qualified was a small mare, out of a
coloured mare they bought at the Stow-on-the-Wold horse sale, by
General
Gamble
which is a TB
stallion. Filly
as she is
known has
been very
successful in
the under 15
hands high
coloured
horse
showing
classes this
year and will
continue her
career next
year.
Sarah’s
mum,
Annette
Sarah Nicholls
Gibson, has
and Filly
always
PAGE 94 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Sally Denbee’s horse ridden by Sarah Nicholls
supported Sarah 100% in all her equestrian activities and Filly is
her pride and joy. Sarah’s sister Lisa Nicholls is also very
supportive so it is a real family affair.
Another stunning little horse called Jambalaya, owned by Sally
Denbee, also qualified for the RIHS in the coloured horse classes
and will carry on next year too. He has just started doing some
jumping and it is hoped he will compete in Working Hunter
classes next year.
Sarah likes to produce her horses as really good all-rounders;
they are all taken out hunting, hacking and do show jumping and
XC as well as having good manners in the show ring too.
A more unusual occupant will also take Sarah into the eventing
world next year. Mr Spot is a six-year-old Knubstrupper which is
an unusual breed but he is proving to be very talented both over
the fences and on the flat as well.
Sarah is now also working at Sidcot Equestrian Centre part
time, doing some teaching and riding there as well as running her
increasingly busy yard at home. She is willing to act in a freelance
capacity for clipping, grooming, show turnout etc and is an
extremely hard working and determined young lady.
I am sure we will be writing about more success from Appleacre
over the coming months. If you want to discuss livery or
schooling then please ring Sarah on 07778 612142.
Riding high
CHRIS Cole, from Woolverton, near Frome, was successful
at the Western Equestrian Society’s annual championship
show.
He and Buttoned started the day by becoming British
champions in Western Riding, which involves riding a set
pattern containing many flying changes, judged on constant
tempo, rhythm and accuracy.
They ended it by winning the Western Horsemanship
class, having been reserve champions last year. Overall they
were reserve high point champions, which follows their
success in July when they won the South West regional
high point trophy for the second year running.
Details: www.cctraining.biz
Riding section:Layout 1
20/11/14
19:00
Page 95
Success for Georgina
GEORGINA Gibbs and her husband
Martin bought Tiffany five years
ago and keep her at Ebborlands
Riding Centre, Wookey Hole, where
Georgina works.
Tiffany immediately showed a
talent for dressage. They competed
unaffiliated and had some success
competing at The Royal Windsor
Horse Show and at the Badminton
dressage Championships in 2013.
Jennifer Ham, Georgina’s
instructor, persuaded Georgina to
become a member of British Dressage and compete at an
affiliated level, which they did this year in June. In a short time
they qualified for the area Pet Plan festival in October at Duchy
College in Cornwall, along with 29 competitors in the Novice
Restricted class.
Georgina and Lover’s Tiff finished in fourth place and have
qualified for the Pet Plan Area Festival Championships, which
is to be held next year. Georgina said she would like to thank
Jenny for all her help as they would not have achieved this
without her.
C J PUDDY SADDLERY
Telephone: 01761 479600
RIDING
National title for Chew Valley
CHEW Valley School’s equestrian teams were triumphant at
the NSEA Championships in Buckingham winning the County
Challenge show jumping.
The winning team consisted of Hannah Bishop riding Green
Gem Coco, Charlotte Bishop riding Gaelic Prince, Jessica
Wyatt on Farscope and Abigail Wyatt on Monaghans Town
Earl. The Jumping With Style team comprising Abigail Wyatt,
Jessica Wyatt, Isobel Twiggs and Charlie Padfield finished
eighth out of 26 teams. The teams have had an extremely
successful year, winning no less than seven major schools
titles and qualifiers, with a further six individual wins and
numerous top placings in all equestrian disciplines.
PEAR TREE FARM LIVERY
Ashton, Near Wedmore, Somerset
ANNUAL DISCOUNT DAY
LATE NIGHT OPENING ON
FRIDAY 28TH NOVEMBER TIL 8.00pm
Merry Christmas and
Happy New Year to all
our customers
www.cjpuddysaddlery.co.uk
Ebborlands
Riding Centre
Wookey Hole, Wells BA5 1AY.
Tel: 01749 672550
# LESSONS: Beginners upwards.
# LIVERY: Full, part, working or
D.I.Y. Indoor and outdoor
schools, c/c fences.
# HACKING: Farm fields on
southern slopes of Mendip
Hills, nearby moor roads.
B.H.S. Approved Livery
Yard & Riding Centre
Small friendly yard based near Wedmore Somerset
currently has vacancies for Part/Full Livery. Good hacking
on quiet country lanes. Close to Badgworth Arena and 10
minutes from M5.
N Excellent facilities for the first time owner to the
seasoned competitor
N Secure tackroom with client facilities
N Holiday cover/Rehabilitation/Short/Long stay
N 60 x 20 arena with regular lessons/clinics for all abilities
N Trailer/box parking
N Good turnout
N Tailored Livery package to meet individual requirements
N Owners live on site
For more details please contact us on
01934 713086/07773 788246
fi[email protected]
find us on facebook
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 95
20/11/14
19:01
Page 78
MENDIP TIMES
CAVING
Unintentional discoveries
IT was fairly common for miners seeking lead
or ochre to occasionally break into open cave
passages, although they did not welcome their
discoveries. This was because, with very few
exceptions, caves do not contain valuable
mineral deposits.
Consequently most of them were
With PHILIP
abandoned and lost, but occasionally records
HENDY
survive which have spurred present-day
cavers to try to relocate them. Now and again, caves were useful
to the miners, because they could be used to dispose of used water
from the leadworks, where the ore was washed, and then sorted
using buddles.
These were circular stone-lined pits, set in series, with a central
vertical shaft from which hung brushes or sweeps. Crushed ore,
mixed with water, was fed into a perforated hopper set around the
shaft, which was rotated by water or horse power. The slurry then
dropped down into the buddle and the sweeps levelled the gravel.
Lead ore or galena, being heavy, settled at the centre of the
buddle, while the lighter rock was swept to the perimeter. This
process was repeated several times, until high-quality ore could be
sold and the waste disposed of. Used water could be led
underground into swallets.
Piles of waste gravel and lines of buddle pits can be seen at the
Priddy and Charterhouse Mineries, and swallets such as Five
Buddles Sink at Priddy and Waterwheel Swallet at Charterhouse
have been excavated by cavers, who proved that such dirty water
was led underground.
The spoil from these digs can therefore be high in galena dust.
This can be dangerous if inhaled, so the cavers were careful to
wash their kit after digging sessions, although the wet mud is
harmless.
Five Buddles Sink on the Waldegrave Minery at Priddy is a
natural rift, although it was heavily modified by miners, either to
facilitate the passage of water or in the hope of discovering a
deposit of galena. During the first part of the excavation, the
remains of a waterwheel were found; this evidently provided
power to drive the nearby buddles.
Entry now is made in the forest on the other side of the road, via
a 20-metre ‘Cornish’ shaft, which is large and rectangular, as
opposed to the Mendip shafts, which tend to follow the vertical
crack in the rock and were only made large enough for men and
skips (ore
Five Buddies Sink
buckets) to pass.
This may be
the ‘Wheel Pit’
known to exist in
this part of the
Minery, but the
name has for a
long time been
given to another
depression a few
metres to the
north. As the
passage here runs
under an
Stainsby’s Shaft
embankment supporting the road above, it has never been fully
investigated.
Water from the adjacent St. Cuthbert’s Leadworks sank
naturally into St. Cuthbert’s Swallet or was led through a leat into
Plantation Swallet, which connected with St. Cuthbert’s. There
was no evidence that either of these caves had been entered by
miners.
The Waterwheel Swallet at Charterhouse is similar to Five
Buddles Swallet, although it is unlikely that miners ever entered
most of the cave, which is entirely natural. The main digger,
Willie Stanton, thought that there were not enough wet caves on
Mendip, so he built dams to retain the stream, providing some low
wet crawls for cavers.
Near the end, a ladder pitch drops into a dammed pool.
Although this offers a sporting climb ending in a swim, the main
purpose was to allow flood pulses through the narrow end rift, in
the hope of flushing away the sediment infill. Current diggers
have since resorted to more dynamic techniques for pushing the
passage.
A short way down the Blackmoor Valley lies a steep depression
at the bottom of which is the entrance to Grebe Swallet. There is
no evidence that this was used to dispose of water, although the
team that dug it open found that miners had entered the cave by a
different route.
Unusually, the cave deposits were rich in galena, and it appears
that in the 18th century local farmers and miners by the names of
Young and Clark started to exploit this bonanza. We know this
because they wrote their names in the mud with straw stalactites,
and dated them. It appears that the shaft collapsed, preventing the
complete removal of the ore, because much galena remains.
Nearby is the open Blackmoor Swallet or Stainsby’s Shaft, a
Cornish shaft with evidence of earlier workings and some natural
passage. The Cornish miners dug down 32 metres in the 1840s
and then drove horizontally, reportedly discovering a natural
cavern which was since lost.
Cavers have cleared the shaft to the Eighteen Fathom Level, but
this is blocked with lead tailings, known as ‘slimes’. If this could
be passed, it might offer a second entrance to the nearby Upper
Flood Swallet, beyond a large and fairly unstable boulder ruckle.
All of these sites are gated and locked because they are in areas
frequented by the public and they are entered by deep shafts.
Some are easier to find than others, but just walking around,
locating the buddle pits and trying to work out how they operated
can be a rewarding way of spending an afternoon. I will describe
some of the other caves discovered by miners in a future article.
Phil has been caving for more than 47 years and is a member of the Wessex Cave Club. He has been involved in
producing several caving publications and is a caving instructor in Cheddar. His main interest is digging for new caves.
PAGE 96 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Photograph by Phil Hendy
Caving page:Layout 1
Sport section:Layout 1
20/11/14
19:03
Page 97
SPORT
Would you like to learn to play bowls?
P u rn el l w o o d l o v e t o s ee y o u!
MEMBERS of sports clubs across Mendip are being invited to
try their hand at a different activity this winter – thanks to an
initiative by Purnell Bowling Club at Paulton.
The club is exploring plans to launch a friendly indoor league
in January to attract new players to the game and hope it will
appeal to everyone from cricketers and golfers to fair-weather
sportspeople. The invitation is also being extended to members
of organisations such as rotary clubs and women’s institutes.
Club coaches will be on hand to provide expert tuition.
Purnell opened its two-rink indoor centre in 2006 and it is
regarded as one of the best facilities of its kind in the Mendip
area. As well as complementing its outside green, the indoor
facility has its own dedicated players. On some days it attracts
80 bowlers, whether for in-house leagues or competitions
involving other teams from across the region.
Although Purnell currently has around 200 members, officials
are conscious of the fact that, like many other clubs, they need
to attract younger people to take up the sport and – hopefully –
become involved in the running of the centre.
Club chairman Don Dart said: “We hope the sports league
will appeal to sportspeople who are still active but want to try
their hands at something different, especially at this time of the
year.”
Club president Bryn Hawkins added: “The beauty about
bowls is that in fact it is a young person’s game which can be
Youngsters at a Saturday morning coaching session – more are
always welcome
enjoyed by older people. At the highest level players need to
have great mental strength and be physically fit, but it’s also a
great sport for all ages.”
To find out more about Purnell Bowling Club, visit:
http://purnellbowls.wordpress.com/
Calling all
organisations, clubs or
groups of any age:
How about trying
a new sport?
Don Dart offers advice to some of the young bowlers
Here at Purnell Indoor Bowling Club we are starting a new
league for new bowlers which will run on
Wednesday/Thursday evenings from January to March.
NO membership fees to pay.
The number of people required to play is four and these
can be any four from your organisation, group or club. It
doesn’t have to be the same four every week.
Initial free coaching will be given to all players and
experienced members will be in attendance on league
nights for advice on play and rules.
Interested? We would love to hear from you.
Please phone Don on 01761 471019.
Purnell Bowling Club,
Purnell Sports Ground,
Old Bristol Road,
Paulton,
Bristol BS39 7NX
Purnell members from one of the in-house indoor leagues
www.purnellbowls.wordpress.com
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 97
Sport section:Layout 1
20/11/14
19:03
Page 98
MENDIP TIMES
A year of living actively
NEW Year’s Eve will see the
end of a remarkable
challenge to encourage as
many people as possible to
do something physically
active every day during
2014.
The 2014Kx365
Challenge is an online
initiative. Since the
beginning of the year, more
than 100 people from the
West of England and beyond
have participated, attempting
to run or walk or cycle or
swim every day for each day
of 2014. On New Year’s Eve, many of these participants
will be celebrating the successful completion of their
challenge for the year.
The initiative was started by Mendip-based Jim PlunkettCole and Neil Taylor as they successfully ran at least 10k
every day in 2013 to raise money for charitable causes.
Their 2013 challenge ended with the Green Man
Ultramarathon, circumnavigating Bristol on New Year’s
Eve. Jim and Neil were accompanied by many other runners
for some, or all, of the route. The last day was followed by
thousands on social media.
Once again, the pair are inviting as many people as
possible to join them for some – or all – of the route, which
is expected to begin at 6am from Long Ashton or Ashton
Court and will take in Dundry and Pensford. They say the
day is intended to be about friendly fun and participation,
group endeavour and personal achievement.
The 2014kx365 participants will be broadcasting their
progress around the route on several mobile and web-based
apps on the day, allowing others to join in as appropriate, or
simply give “virtual” support on the challenge’s Facebook
page.
Jim said: “The event is essentially a large group walk/run
taking place in and around Bristol and so should be viewed
as such by all who take part. The event is entirely free to
join in, though all participants and supporters are advised
that they have full responsibility for the safety of
themselves and their family should they join in and/or
support.”
Frome Running Club, Cheddar Running Club, Somer
AC, Mendip Hills Hash House Harriers and the Burnhamon-Sea Harriers are amongst the clubs expected to take part.
Mike Karthäuser, the organiser, said: “We’re really looking
forward to what should be an amazing day and a fitting end
to everyone’s daily endeavours for the whole of 2014. We
look forward to being joined by folks and their families
from all over the South West of England, if not from much
further afield!”
Jim Plunkett-Cole
Details regarding the Last Day, including the schedule
and meeting points, will be published on the dedicated
Last Day Facebook Page:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/2014Kx365-The-LastDay
PAGE 98 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
The art of the turf
Martin and Will at Wincanton racecourse
ARTIST Martin Alford, from Shepton Mallet, is among a group
of painters and sculptors invited to take part in a unique
exhibition at Wincanton Racecourse.
Martin specialises in equestrian paintings and has worked
closely with champion trainer Paul Nicholls, based at Ditcheat.
He’ll be showing his work in the Directors’ Box at Wincanton
as part of a rotating exhibition by five other artists, including
his friend, renowned equestrian sculptor Will Newton, who lives
near the track.
A bronze by Will of Kauto Star, one of Nicholls’s most
successful horses, sits outside the trainer’s home. A half-size
bronze of Kauto also sits at the Haydock Park racecourse. Will
and Martin trained together at Yeovil College before Will went
to work for a racehorse trainer in Wiltshire and eventually took
out a professional license – riding a handful of winners each
season. Will still rides out at Nicholls’s yard.
This season will also see an artist in residence at Wincanton,
with Hannah Fowler capturing the atmosphere. Hannah has also
been commissioned to create four bespoke paintings for
winning connections of the Badger Ales Trophy, the Stan James
Elite Hurdle, the
The sculpture of
Rising Stars
Kauto Star in
Novices Chase and
Ditcheat
the Bathwick Tyres
Kingwell Hurdle.
Hannah said:
“Inside Wincanton
is a dynamic yet
daunting task, at
which I will sketch
racing’s finest from
jockeys, trainers to
celebrity owners
and on-course staff
within a 15-minute
window. The
images will be
auctioned at the
end of the season in
aid of Racing
Welfare.”
Sport section:Layout 1
20/11/14
19:03
Page 99
SPORT
Somervale scores
with 3G pitch
STUDENT Jordan Edwards made history
when she scored the first-ever goal on a
new £528,000 all-weather sports pitch at
Somervale School in Midsomer Norton.
Not only that, the youngster – cheered
on by the entire school – netted the ball
past former Bristol City and Bristol
Rovers goalkeeper Steve Phillips, who
was the guest of honour at the opening
ceremony and went between the posts!
Jordan and fellow student Ted
Slocombe won a story-writing
competition to earn the right to face
Steve, who made 257 appearances
between 1997 and 2006 for Bristol City
before playing 136 times for Bristol
Rovers from 2006-2010. Steve, 37,
recently hung up his gloves after a 20year career – he last played for Crewe
Alexandra – and is now a qualified
goalkeeping coach in the Midsomer
Norton area.
The 3G facility will eventually be hired
out to the community to give a massive
boost to local clubs, with demand
expected to be high. Somervale says the
nearest pitch of similar quality is in
World Cup coming
to Cary?
Steve Phillips cuts the ribbon with Somervale head teacher Alun Williams as competition
winners Ted and Jordan look on
Swindon and it won praise from Steve,
who said it was as good a surface as any
he had seen at training grounds of
professional clubs. He said: “We have an
indoor 3G pitch at Crewe and my lad
played on one at Liverpool when he
joined their academy.”
Steve told guests: “When I was a kid
we trained on surfaces which were a lot
harder. This is huge for the community as
it will allow you to improve your skills
because it can be used in all weathers.”
A spokesman for Somervale said: “The
use of this amazing sporting facility will
CASTLE Cary Rugby Club is keeping its fingers
crossed for an early Christmas present – a visit from
the Women’s Rugby World Cup trophy.
The RFU has told Cary that the trophy will be
making a visit on the morning of Sunday, December
21st unless there are unforeseen circumstances.
Cary hope that one or more of England’s
victorious squad – including Yeovil-born flanker
Marlie Packer – will join in the celebrations. Cary
was chosen because of its strong links with women’s
rugby through its support of the annual Kays 7s
charity tournament.
Jordan scores the opening goal
allow Somervale PE staff to offer a more
diverse and expansive extra-curricular
programme. The facility has been
installed with floodlights to allow for
outdoor clubs in winter, and for
Somervale to play host to school league
football matches, despite the darkening
evenings.”
Steve and Alun present competition winners
Ted and Jordan with certificates and
footballs
Colin does the double
THE summer skittles
league at Midsomer
Norton Social Club
turned into a family
celebration as Colin
Taylor lead his team to
victory.
Hilary’s Six, named
after his late wife,
included his two
daughters and both
sons-in-law. Colin’s team not only romped away with the league, but
also won the knock-out cup, The Tiger Horler Memorial Trophy, named
after one of the town’s best-loved characters.
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 99
20/11/14
19:03
Page 100
MENDIP TIMES
SPORT
Riders rewarded
THE curtain finally come down on the 2014 season for all
connected with the ‘Cases’ Somerset Rebels when they staged
their presentation night.
The three main awards – as voted for by the fans – went to
Olly Allen (rider of the year), Charles Wright (most improved
rider of the year) and Brady Kurtz (most entertaining rider of
the year), while Pontus Aspgren was voted as the riders’ rider of
the year.
Somerset Promoter Debbie Hancock said: “Despite just losing
out in the Championship Final to Edinburgh we still had a great
season and have ended the year with two trophies to our name
which sit proudly here in the Oaktree.”
A special award was also made to Somerset mascot Henry
Atkins after the 13-year-old won the British Intermediate 250cc
British Grasstrack Championship in his debut year in the 250cc
class, in addition to which he also won two area grasstrack
titles.
Olly Allen being presented with his Rider of the Year Award
NOMINATIONS have opened for the 10th annual Bath and North
East Somerset Council Sports Awards.
The awards recognise the achievements and dedication of local
sports people, volunteers and coaches across the area. Individuals,
sports clubs, schools, colleges and community groups are invited
to submit nominations in the following categories:
*Young Volunteer in Sport
*Volunteer in Sport
*Young Achiever in Sport (12 – 18 years)
*Achiever in Sport with a learning/physical disability
*Contribution to Inclusive Sport
*Participation Coach of the Year
*Performance Coach of the Year
*Official of the Year
*Sports Club of the Year
*Contribution to Sport in Education
*Promoting Lifelong Participation Award
*Healthy Lifestyles Award
Council chairman Martin Veal said: “My theme for my year is
‘Health through Sport’ so I am very proud to be able to support
these awards and excited to see the nominations received for the
Promoting Lifelong Participation Award, which is new for this
year. This award is in recognition of an individual or
club/organisation that has made a significant contribution to
getting and keeping people activity through their whole life.”
Visit www.bathnes.gov.uk/CSA Alternatively, call Bath & North
East Somerset Council’s Active Lifestyles and Health
Improvement Team on 01225 396429 or email
[email protected] The deadline for nominations is
midday on March 2nd.
Sports awards nominations
Ski racing success
A NATIONAL skiing event has been
held for the first time at the Mendip
Snowsports Centre in Churchill, hosted
by Avon Ski Club and Western
Counties SC.
The Snowsport England Excel event
attracted competitors from London, the
Midlands and North Wales and took
place after improvement work at the
centre made it eligible to hold national
competitions.
Jolie Hoffman-Little, who trains with
both Gloucester and Avon clubs, won
the under-10s girls’ competition; the
under-12 event for boys was won by
Avon SC’s Callum Black with Harry
Read from Thursk second with another
Avon skier, William Milkins, in third. In
the senior section, Maddy Brown (ASC)
won the girls’ race with Kirsty
McKenzie (ASC/Priory) in sixth. In the
PAGE 100 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Competitors, organisers and members of
Weston Lions at the national event
boys section Western Counties’ Henry
Richmond set the fastest times of the
day and he was closely followed by
Oliver Mathew and Callum Bannister
(both ASC) with less than a quarter of a
second separating the first three.
The race was used as a dress rehearsal
for a Club National Race next year, part
of a country wide series that will see up
to 150 racers taking part as they look to
score points for both individual prizes
and also team prizes. Organisers also
invited members of the Weston Lions
club, who were instrumental in
awarding Avon Ski Club a grant through
the “Go Kids” scheme.
(Photograph courtesy of Colin Burnett)
Sport section:Layout 1
Music DPS:Layout 1
20/11/14
19:05
Page 101
Glastonbury prepares for Christmas
THE festive season is a busy time of year for Glastonbury Male Voice Choir. Their
first Christmas concert is at St. John’s Church, Glastonbury on Wednesday December
10th at 8pm.
The choir are also performing at Cossington Village Hall on December 12th and
Clarks Village, Street on Sunday December 14th helping Somerset Multiple Sclerosis
Society’s Christmas collection.
The choir was founded in 1903 and has provided local towns and villages with some
spine tingling harmonies featuring classic, sacred and popular songs for over 90 years.
At one time the choir was down to only 20 members with a high average age. Now,
however, membership is up to 40 strong, and the average age is much reduced.
No longer does the choir go into “con belto” as though they were relying upon
volume alone. These days each chorister is kept on his musical toes, both at rehearsals
and concerts by their musical director, Tracey Hansford.
January marks the start of their rehearsals for their main concert season through the
spring and summer, which makes it an excellent time for anyone interested in joining
the choir.
Details: Tuesday rehearsals Glastonbury Town Hall, 7.45pm.
www.glastonburymalevoicechoir.co.uk
From evening classes to choir
IN a story that could have been written for Gareth Malone and
his series The Choir, the Somerset Singers have evolved from
evening classes in Cheddar to an 80-strong oratorio choir
which performs twice a year.
Members are drawn from the Mendip and Sedgemoor
districts of Somerset and parts of North Somerset and gave
their first performance in 1987. Since its early days the
rehearsal venue changed from Cheddar to the Friends Meeting
House at Sidcot in order to accommodate the increased
numbers.
Jonathan Vaughn, assistant organist at Wells Cathedral and
organ teacher at Wells Cathedral School, was appointed their
Musical Director in 2009. He has extended their range of
music to include works from early composers such as Gabrieli
and Purcell, through Bach, Haydn and Elgar to contemporary
pieces by John Rutter and Howard Goodall.
Their next performance will have a distinctly festive feel
when the choir performs Bach’s Christmas Oratorio, sung in
German. Weekly rehearsals started in September and continue
until their concert in St Cuthbert’s Church, Wells at 7:30pm
on Saturday, December 13th. The orchestra will be provided
by the Lochrian Ensemble and soloists will be Christina
Rotary music
competition
winner
MUSIC
(l:r): Adjudicator Lyndy Bishop, rotary vice
rresident Patrick Cusworth, winner Lucy
Little and Kerry Bishop, the second
adjudicator
CELLOIST Lucy Little has been judged
the winner of the Rotary Club of
Frome’s Young Musician of the Year
competition.
A total of 13 musicians competed for
the honour. Trumpet player Eliza
Talman was named runner-up. Lucy
now goes forward to the District
competition to be held in March next
year.
Birchall-Sampson (soprano), Alexander Simpson (alto)
Richard Rowntree (tenor) and James Birchall (bass).
G Tickets are available from Wells Tourist Information Centre
or from 01934 842353. The Somerset Singers always
welcome new members and rehearsals for their summer
concert in May will begin on Wednesday, January 14th at
7:30pm at Sidcot.
The Somerset Singers in rehearsal
For more information, visit: www.somersetsingers.co.uk
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 101
Music DPS:Layout 1
20/11/14
19:05
Page 102
Croscombe Village Orchestra celebrates 40 years
Photography by David Burden
A VILLAGE orchestra, founded with just 15 members, will
celebrate its 40th anniversary on January 10th. In 1975 Jo
Sackett and her son, Jonathan, teamed up with village friends
and family to make music for the sheer joy of it.
Initially there were no plans to perform publicly, although this
changed when they agreed to play at a Mendip Hospital carol
concert. In its infancy the group was conducted by two Jos - Jo
Sackett and Joseph Bevan.
But in 1976 an ex-army musician arrived in Croscombe and
took on the task of developing the small band into a larger
orchestra, recruiting new members from a wider area. Two years
later, and now with 30 members, the orchestra gave its first
performance.
This was in the Merlin Theatre, Frome, led by Anthony
Bevan, who then took over the baton, and has remained its
conductor ever since.
The orchestra's enduring aim has been to offer children and
young people the opportunity to develop their musical and
orchestral skills in a friendly and supportive environment and to
welcome adults who have not been able to continue with their
playing while caught up in the maelstrom of work and family
commitments.
The result of this policy has been that, on occasion, several
members of one family, both young and adult, have joined
together in playing. This is always a great joy to the group.
Modest in its
beginnings, the
orchestra's repertoire
has become ever
more wide-ranging
and bold.
From the
seemingly effortless
and delightful
compositions of
Joseph Haydn to the
darker complexities
of Brahms and
Sibelius, the
orchestra takes on
the challenges
posed by music
from across the
eras, from classical via Romantic to 20th century and
contemporary composers; in music for solo instruments, small
ensembles and full-strength orchestral works.
The younger musicians are encouraged to feature as soloists,
sometimes in performances for A level, and the group has
performed pieces composed by
members for their public exams. It is a source of pride for the
orchestra that several former players have gone on to forge
professional careers in music, and many of them will be joining
the group to play in its anniversary concert.
The orchestra performs two concerts each year, in January and
May. The winter concert tends to include rather meatier works
while the later concert reflects the lighter evenings and happy
anticipation of early spring. Although most performances have
taken place in the familiar setting of Croscombe Village Hall,
the ensemble has ventured outside the village to play in venues
such as St Cuthbert’s Church in Wells, Strode Theatre, Street,
the Bishop’s Palace Gardens and the Bath and West Show.
They have also appeared on Songs of Praise. In all these
forays they have been accompanied by a loyal and growing
number of audience members.
The celebratory concert in January will take place in
Croscombe Village Hall at 7pm and will feature an eclectic
range of works, including the unveiling of a fanfare composed
specially for the orchestra by one of its former players, now a
well-known composer, Elizabeth Lane, and a setting of some
loved BBC signature tunes by a member of the Bevan family,
Francis, eldest son of conductor, Anthony.
In tune with the long-held aim of encouraging children to
experience the wonders of live orchestral music, tickets for
children will cost £1, while those for adults are £5 and include
refreshments.
Ruth Hudson
Details: Anthony Bevan, 01749 344180 or Ruth Hudson, 01749 673648.
PAGE 102 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Music DPS:Layout 1
20/11/14
19:05
Tribute to Adge
Page 103
THE life of
Wurzels’
founder Adge
Cutler is to be
celebrated in a
new play with
music at the
Curzon
Cinema,
Clevedon, in
March next
year.
Scrumpy
and Western
has been
written by
collaborating
playwrights
Tom Henry
and Shaun
McCarthy
and, in a first
for the Curzon, will be performed as a rehearsed reading for
one night only at the 80-year-old cinema on Friday, March 6th.
The play goes back to 1966 and the recording of the band’s
first album. Turning down the chance to record at EMI’s famed
Abbey Road studios in London, at a time when the Beatles
were holding court there, Adge and the Wurzels decided
instead to capture their live sound at the Royal Oak pub in
Nailsea.
For Adge, this was a chance to step back into his past and
relive the times he worked on building sites around North
Somerset and beyond, writing his ‘agricultural arias’ on scraps
of paper and cigarette packets.
Although Adge Cutler was killed in a car crash 40 years ago,
the Wurzels remain hugely popular around the South West and
beyond, and no summer is complete without appearances from
the band in a variety of venues.
Arts Council funding has provided the springboard to launch
the play, and Tom and Shaun are now beginning the process of
casting actors and employing a director.
Tom said: “Shaun and I found it odd that Adge’s life and
songs hadn’t been given any theatrical treatment, especially in
North Somerset and Bristol, so we set out to rectify that.
Adge’s stepchildren have given us the rights to use the songs
from that legendary first album, and I hope we’ve paid a fitting
tribute to the Bard of Somerset.”
Shaun added: “The Arts Council funding means that we can
afford to pay professional actors, plus a director and a musical
director, to deliver a ‘rehearsed reading’ version of the show
which we hope will attract extra funding and be able to go into
full production later in 2015.
“Ideally, we’d love to take this show on tour and we’re
hoping that if we can attract as much support as possible, in
terms of a packed house on the night of the rehearsed reading,
we will be able to do just that.”
The show features a whole host of Cutler classics, including
Twice Daily, All Over Mendip, When the Common Market
Comes to Stanton Drew and of course, the ‘national anthem of
North Somerset’, Drink Up Thy Zyder.
MUSIC
Choir’s marathon challenge
SOME 40 members and friends of the choir of St John
the Baptist Church, Keynsham successfully completed an
ambitious fundraising challenge, singing at 509 churches
in five days.
Starting at Wells Cathedral on October 29th, the choir
then split into teams to visit as many of the diocese’s
567 churches as possible, arriving back at their home
church on the Sunday.
Director of Music, Roger Peach said: “It was a real
challenge and there were times when some wondered if
it was possible, but the warm welcome we received at so
many of the churches encouraged us all hugely. It was a
real privilege to sing and pray at churches across our
diocese.”
Money raised will subsidise the cost of children
attending the choir’s 2015 tour to Holland and also
support the Fund for Church Growth which provides
support for a range of projects across the diocese.
Choir aids hospice
WINSCOMBE
Community Choir
are getting ready
for their very busy
Christmas
programme, which
will raise money
for Weston
Hospicecare, which
is planning to
move its
headquarters to the
village.
Its Christmas
concert, also
featuring
Winscombe School’s children’s choir, will be held at The
Friends Meeting Room, Sidcot on Saturday December 13th at
7.30pm.
Local music producer and director Robbie Burns will be
acting as MC for the evening, which will include a variety of
Christmas music, solos and readings. He’s pictured with choir
director, Em Worthy.
Tickets priced at £8 are available from Cleopatra’s Wardrobe
in Woodborough Road or from Winscombe School.
MENDIP
ENDIP TIMES
IMES • N
DOVEMBER
ECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 103
What's On section:Layout 1
20/11/14
MENDIP TIMES
T h e
19:07
Page 104
M e n d i p
Please send entries for these listings as a
single paragraph of approximately 25
words. We’re happy to list entries for
charities and voluntary groups free of
charge – but please submit them in the
format below. Commercial entries cost £25.
Wednesday, November 26th
Huish & Langport Cricket Club’s
Christmas Prize Bingo night. Langport
Arms, Langport, 7pm for 7.30 start.
Thursday November 27th
West Mendip Walkers: a circular walk of six
miles to Theale. OS Explorer 141. Grid:
ST482452. Start 12.30pm from The Batch
Bleadney. Park at Lane End Farm BA5 1PG.
Irish Set Dance classes at Dinder Village
Hall near Wells every Thurs 8.30-10.30pm.
Beginners welcome & you don't need a
partner! Tel: 01458 210051.
Chew Valley Wildlife Group: Somerset’s
Butterflies & Day Flying Moths, a talk by
Les Cloutman, Chew Magna Millennium
Hall, 7.45pm. Visitors £2.50.
Friday November 28th – Saturday
November 29th
Brent Knoll’s got Talent? – BAD (Brent
Amateur Dramatics) at 7.30pm at the parish
hall. Ticket £8 (children £4) from village
shop or 01278 760308. In aid of hall funds.
Friday, November 28th
Guitarist Richard Durrant in concert at
Holy Trinity Church, Chantry, Frome,
7.30pm. Adults £12, U-12’s £6, from local
shops, www.chantryandwhatley.webs.com or
[email protected]
“Twinheads” – annual fun quiz night of
Midsomer Norton & District Twinning
Association at Welton Rovers Club, North
Rd, 7.30pm. Teams of 4; £5pp incl supper.
All welcome. Details: 01761 412130.
Saturday November 29th – Sunday
November 30th
Sale of pottery, silver & enamelled
jewellery, 10% of sales, refreshments &
Christmas cards in aid of Save the Children.
Purely Probate, Lower Farm Offices, West
Bradley, Glastonbury BA6 8LT. Sat: 10am7pm; Sun: 10am-5pm.
Saturday, November 29th
Mendip Society walk – a mod 5 miles with
10 stiles around Brimscombe Hill. Meet
1.30pm at Chapel Allerton church, BS26
2PQ. Contact: Richard 01275 852786.
Frome Society for Local Study buildings
conservationist Jeremy Sampson on The
Medieval Benchends of Somerset, Assembly
Rooms, 2.30.
Christmas Market, Cranmore Village Hall,
10am onwards, craft stalls, refreshments,
games, raffle. All proceeds to Eady’s Journey
– details on Facebook or email
[email protected]
Christmas Fayre at The Riverside, Cheddar.
PAGE 104 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
T i m e s
10-12 noon. Lots of Christmas gifts, cakes
etc. In aid of church funds.
St Andrew’s Blagdon Christmas Fair, 1012noon, Blagdon Village Club. £1 includes
coffee and mince pie. Come and meet Father
Christmas.
Cheddar Male Choir joint Concert with
Mendip Male Choir, Traditional & modern
popular songs, St. Cuthbert’s Church, Wells,
BA5 2AW. Tickets £8 from choir members or
on the door-7 for 7:30pm.
Chew Valley Choral Society – concert
includes Vaughan Williams’ Fantasia on
Christmas Carols, at St Andrew’s Church,
Chew Magna at 7.30pm. Ticket £10 (students
£5) from members, 01275 333014 or on the
door.
Dance, the Friends of Berrow Village Hall.
‘60s, ‘70s & ‘80s music from Boogie Avenue.
7.30pm –late.Tickets £5 from 01278 792401.
Redhill Village Club Quiz Night – 8pm.
Teams of six max or individuals. £1 pp & the
winning team takes the prize money! Bar &
refreshments. Church Road, BS40 5SG. Tel:
01934 862619.
Christmas Lights-on celebrations Paulton
Parish Council, from 4.30pm with Bath
Community Gospel Choir, Father Christmas,
carol singing and stalls, BBQ and
refreshments. BS39 7QQ.
Sunday November 30th
Christmas Craft Fair, 10am-1pm, Stratton
on the Fosse Village Hall in aid of Dorothy
House and SANDS. 17 stalls, Amazing Raffle
& refreshments. Details: 01761 233651.
Syrinx Cafe Concert, wind & piano
ensemble, music by Bach, Handel, Loeillet.
Henton Village Hall, on B3139 Nr Wells.
Tickets £15 from 01749 670303 or 07595
671116 include a cheese & wine supper.
Monday December 1st
Compass Carers drop-in session at
Glastonbury Health Centre, Wells Road. 1012.30pm. Find out about the support, advice
and training available to unpaid carers across
Somerset.
Tuesday December 2nd
Irish Set Dance classes at Shoscombe
Village Hall near Peasedown St John first &
third Tues each month 7.30-10pm. Beginners
welcome & you don't need a partner! Tel:
01761 435204.
Winscombe Late Night Shopping Christmas
shopping night in Winscombe, from 5pm,
involving most of the village’s shops and
businesses, with attractions and
entertainment.
The Bayeux Tapestry: The World’s Oldest
Comic Strip. A talk by Eveline Eaton for
Mendip DFAS, 10.30 for 11am, Westex Suite,
Bath & West Show Ground, Shepton Mallet,
BA4 6QN. Details: www.mdfas.org.uk Guests
welcome- contact 01749 670652.
W h a t ’ s
Thursday December 4th
Wells Evening Society composer Liz Lane
with two new works commemorating the 1st
WW, Wells Town Hall, 7.30pm.
West Mendip Walkers: a mod circular walk of
10.6 miles in the Blackdown Hills. OS
Explorer 128. Grid:ST183172. Start 10am
from car park at Forches Corner.
The Friends of Weston-super-Mare
Museum Christmas Evening – Quizzes,
nibbles & punch from 7pm then at 8pm ‘A
Christmas Evening with Charles Dickens’ by
the Travelling Light Magic Lantern Company.
Weston Museum, Burlington St.
Paradis Palm Court Trio concert: Sleigh
Ride. Midsomer Norton Town Hall. 12.301.30pm. Admission by donation. Home-made
cakes, tea & coffee. Ffi: 01761 419133.
Friday December 5th
Cheddar Festive Night, civic service 5.30pm
in St. Andrew’s Church, after which a rocket
will be launched to start the fun throughout
the village and gorge.
Open Mic Night at Redhill Club, BS40 5SG,
from 8pm. Hosted by Jerry Blythe. Free. All
welcome, singers, musicians and spectators.
Tel: 01934 862619.
Saturday December 6th
Wells Artisan Quarter Christmas Fair, 104pm, The Courtyard, Market Street
(downtown Wells), BA5 2DS. Handmade
vintage & retro stalls. Festive food, drinks &
frivolities. Up pops Christmas! Tel: 01749
678778.
Mendip Society walk – five miles around
Wrington. Meet 1.30pm outside The Golden
Lion, BS40 5LA. Contact, John 01934
842868.
Radstock Museum Christmas Fair – 35
stalls, entertainment all day, raffle,
competitions. Free entry. All welcome to this
popular event.
Bleadon Village Christmas Market 9-12.30
at the village halls Bleadon, BS24 0PG. Over
30 stalls with crafts, collectables, local
produce etc. Refreshments.
www.bleadon.org.uk/market
Staunton & Curry Rival Music Makers
Christmas charity concert, 7-9pm at Street
United Reformed Church, £5 on the door, in
aid of St Margaret’s Hospice.
The Oakfield Choir singing Purcell &
Mozart at Christ Church, Frome, 7.30pm.
Tickets £10 from Hunting Raven bookshop or
on the door. Details: www.Gerontius.net
Graffiti Classics: strings, singers & dance
make classical music wickedly funny. 7.30pm
Churchill Academy Hall, BS25 5QN. Tickets
£14.50 (£10.50; U- 18s £4.00) from 01934
852919 or at the door.
[email protected]
Fun singing event at The Sound Centre,
Tytherington, Frome. 2-4pm -please arrive by
1.50pm. All welcome but children but must
O n
What's On section:Layout 1
O n
20/11/14
G u i d e
19:07
Page 105
f o r
be accompanied. Booking essential: 07867
940911.
[email protected]
Wells Cathedral Oratorio Society perform
The Messiah, Wells Cathedral, 7pm, details
01749 672773.
Sunday December 7th
Wells Rotary Reindeer Parade, Wells
Market Place, featuring real reindeer, bands,
choirs, pony and trap rides and numerous
stalls. Details: www.wellsrotaryclub.org
Tuesday December 9th
Sing we Yule. NADFAS illustrated lectures,
11am, Caryford Hall, Castle Cary, BA7 7J.
Free parking. £6. Information 01963 350 527.
Wednesday December 10th
Wedmore by Lamplight – see page 42.
Wells Civic Society evening of cider tasting
and celebration with Orchard Pig and special
guest, the Bishop of Bath and Wells, the Rt
Rev Peter Hancock, Wells and Mendip
Museum, 7.30pm.
Congresbury Christmas Fair, 6-9pm at War
Memorial Hall. Tables £5 each. Details:
01934 832004.
Age UK Somerset – Annual Carol Service at
Wells Cathedral, with pupils from St Mark’s
primary school, Worle and a Salvation Army
band. 11am. Entry free, collection in aid of
Age UK: www.ageUKsomerset.co.uk
Thursday December 11th
Chew Magna Christmas Street Party, from
4.30pm in the village car park.
West Mendip Walkers: a mod circular walk
of 5-6 miles from Wells to Wookey Hole and
Ebbor Gorge. OS Explorer 141.
Grid:ST544464. Start 12.30pm. Park: Ash
Lane close to Blue School.
Warmer Improved Somerset Homes (WISH
project) drop-in at Glastonbury Health
Centre, Wells Road. 10-12.30pm. Find out
how to make your homes warmer, reduce
energy bills and improve your health.
Friday December 12th
Wrington Dickensian Night – see page 64.
Phoenix Singers Concert. 7.30pm Stoke St.
Michael Church. BA3 5JS. Tickets £8 inc.
glass of wine and canapes, from 01749
840660 or 01749 840475 or at the door.
Free Health Walks – easy, mostly level
walks of about 1.5 miles around Glastonbury.
Meet 10am at the Health Centre, Wells Road.
Optional café stop at the end. Details:
[email protected]
Saturday December 13th
Mendip Society walk – Meet 1.30pm,
Shipham Village Hall, BS25 1SG. A mod five
miles on the hills around Shipham. Contact:
Mary 01934 843789.
Congresbury Book Sale, 9am-1pm at War
Memorial Hall. Good quality books, jigsaw
puzzles, dvds, cds and talking books.
Brent Knoll Christmas Bazaar & Farmers’
Market, 10-12.30pm, Brent Knoll Parish
D e c e m b e r
Hall. Free Admission.Details 01278 760308.
Vox in Frox Christmas Celebration –
women’s chamber choir at St Margaret’s
Church, Hinton Blewett, BS39 5AN. 7.30 8.30pm. Tickets £8, include mulled wine,
from 01761 452664. www.voxinfrox.co.uk
Frome Society for Local Study Bob and Gill
Berry from Devizes with traditional songs
and music from Wiltshire and Somerset,
Assembly Rooms, 2.30.
Annual Sing for Somerset Carol Service,
7pm Wells Cathedral. Mid-Somerset
Orchestra & Somerset Voices. Admission
free. Doors open 6.15pm. Ffi: 01749 344949.
Croscombe Christmas Charter Market, 1012 noon, Croscombe Village Hall BA5 3QJ
with Santa, handmade gifts, local produce,
vintage stalls and much more. Contact: 01749
939457.
Thursday December 18th
West Mendip Walkers – a mod circular walk
of 7.7 miles from Dunster. Explorer map:
OL9. Grid:ST994438. Park: Dunster village
car park, off A396. Details:
www.mendipramblers.co.uk or
[email protected]
Friday December 19th
Wrington Friendship Club Christmas
Party 2.30pm, Wrington Memorial Hall,
Silver Street. New members welcome. Details
of 2015 programme: Fred Parsons 01934
863562.
Saturday December 20th
Christmas In The Park, Beacon Hall,
Peasedown St. John, 6.30-8.30pm, details Joy
Fraser 07811 424272 or Mike Auton 07862
253514.
Monday, December 22nd
Choral Concert, Wells Bach Singers, with
Bach’s Mass in B minor. St Cuthbert’s
church, Wells, 7.30pm. Tickets £10 from the
church office, [email protected] or
on the door.
Sunday December 28th
Classic Car & Motorcycle Breakfast
Gathering, 9- 12noon, Redhill Club, Church
Rd, BS40 5SG. All welcome – bring your
interesting vehicles or just come along to see
those on show. Free entry, ample parking.
Coffee and breakfast. Just off A38 south of
Bristol Airport.
Wednesday December 31st
New Year’s Eve party at Coxley Village Hall,
nr Wells,£10 per person includes buffet, raffle,
bar, children free, playing the New Year in
with vinyl from 60s, 70s, 80s,in aid of cancer
research, details 01749679138.
New Year’s Eve Posh Frock Party 8 til late.
Sit-down dinner, guitarist/singer John Marcus
with popular hits. Tickets £10 – Tel: 01934
862619. All welcome.
Friday January 2nd
Free Health Walks – easy, mostly level
walks of about 1.5 miles around Glastonbury.
WHAT’S ON
2 0 1 4
Meet 10am at the Health Centre, Wells Road.
Optional café stop at the end. Details:
[email protected]
Monday January 5th
Weight management drop-in session at
Glastonbury Health Centre, Wells Road. 1012.30pm. Come and meet a health trainer,
have a health MOT, get advice and support,
get motivated!
Tuesday January 6th
Ivories a talk by Maggie Campbell-Pederson
for Mendip DFAS, 10.30 for 11am, Westex
Suite, Bath & West Show Ground, Shepton
Mallet, BA4 6QN.
Details:www.mdfas.org.uk. Guests welcome.
Thursday January 8th
Wells Evening Society architect Geoff Rich
on conservation challenges and solutions in
Bath, Wells Town Hall, 7.30pm.
Warmer Improved Somerset Homes (WISH
project) drop-in at Glastonbury Health
Centre, Wells Road. 10-12.30pm. Find out
how to make your homes warmer, reduce
energy bills and improve your health.
Friday January 9th
Free Health Walks – easy, mostly level
walks of about 1.5 miles around Glastonbury.
Meet 10am at the Health Centre, Wells Road.
Optional café stop at the end. Details:
[email protected]
Saturday January 10th
Frome Society for Local Study buildings
historian, Kay Ross, on Bath’s pleasure
gardens, Assembly Rooms, 2.30pm.
ANSWERS TO THE MENDIP
MINDBENDER
MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014 • PAGE 105
What's On section:Layout 1
20/11/14
19:08
Page 106
MENDIP TIMES
WHAT’S ON
Santa to visit Hullabaloo
Details: www.hullabaloosoftplay.co.uk
The Blue Tower
Townsend
Shepton Mallet
BA4 5SB
Softplay # Kids parties # Café
Tel: 01749 344433 | [email protected]
Facebook.com/hullabaloosoplay
www.hullabaloosoplay.co.uk
(Photograph courtesy of Tracey Rawlins)
AN amazing grotto
with a special visit
by Father Christmas
is amongst the
attractions at a
Christmas party at
the Hullabaloo soft
play centre in
Shepton Mallet.
Tickets are now on
sale for the party on
Friday, December
19th from
4.30–6.30pm. Every
child will enjoy
unlimited play, party
bag and squash.
The soft play
centre has
A festive theme for Christmas
established itself as
an ideal party venue, whether for private events or its
hugely successful Halloween party. It has a café where
grown-ups can relax and also has free wi-fi. Pat Litrico, who
runs Hullabaloo, said: “The Halloween party went really
well; a lot of people complimented us on the event.”
National role for Martin
THE Frome Festival is celebrating
national recognition following the
election of Martin Dimery, its creative
director, to the executive board of the
British Arts and Science Festivals
Association.
BAFA represents, serves and supports
nearly 100 arts festivals throughout the
UK, including some of the country’s
Martin Dimery
best known and longest established
festivals such as Edinburgh, Brighton,
Buxton and the BBC Proms.
Dr. Bob Morris, chairman of Frome Festival, said: “This is an
enormous vote of confidence, not only in Martin personally, who
has brilliantly organised seven Frome Festivals, but also in the
outcome of all his inspired and inspiring work, which BAFA has
described as ‘a fantastic example of a largely volunteer-run
operation which has achieved considerable scale and success’.”
The festival will celebrate its 15th year in 2015. Martin said:
“Frome is an amazingly creative community. More and more
performers, writers and artists seem to be moving to the town, and
much of our programme is inspired or promoted by many of these
individuals. Before the Frome Festival however, the town was
establishing itself as an important regional centre for the arts.”
Martin added: “I think Frome is a role model of good practice in
the arts despite very limited funding. It is that unique experience I
will be taking with me to BAFA meetings and conferences in the
future.”
Festive fun at film centre
CHRISTMAS is in the air at Wells Film Centre which is
delighted to announce early booking for some of its 2015
screenings.
Testament of Youth (certificate 12A) starts Friday, January
16th whilst Fifty Shades Of Grey (Cert. 18) starts Friday,
February 13th.
During December, all afternoon tea matinees include mince
pies with complementary tea or coffee. Look out for the centre’s
Christmas prize draw in the foyer!
And Saturday morning club is back. No membership is
required for the Saturday screenings at 11am (doors open
10.30am). Tickets are only £5 each. Visit the centre’s web site –
www.wellsfilmcentre.co.uk – for each week’s choice.
Princes Road, Wells, BA5 1TD
COMING UP:
NOW SHOWING
Mendip Times
reduces travel costs
100,000 potential customers within
a short distance of your business
PAGE 106 • MENDIP TIMES • DECEMBER 2014
Start Friday
5th December
EVENT Cinema
for December
Mr Turner (12A)
The Imitation Game (12A)
Interstellar (12A) Paddington
St Vincent (12A)
Penguins of Madagascar (U)
4th & 14th The Old Vic's The Crucible (12A)
9th
NT John (18)
16th
ROH Alice’s Adventures In
Wonderland (12A)
21st
Bolshoi Nutcracker (12A)
G Book in person G Online 24/7 @www.wellsfilmcentre.co.uk G Over the ’phone: 01749 673195
What's On section:Layout 1
20/11/14
16:22
Page 107
DECEMBER AT THE
CHEESE & GRAIN
Friday 5th: 8pm LIMEHOUSE LIZZY £14 adv
Saturday 6th: 8pm LES MCKEOWN’S BAY CITY ROLLERS
£18 adv/£21 door
Friday 12th: 8pm T-REXTASY £16 adv/£18 door
Saturday 13th: 9am-1pm FROME FARMERS’ MARKET
Thursday 18th: 8pm THE BLOCKHEADS £18 adv/£20 door
Friday 19th 7:30pm FUNERAL FOR A FRIEND £12 adv/£15 door
Saturday 20th: 8pm LETS DANCE CHRISTMAS PARTY
£8 adv/£10 door
Tuesday 23rd: 5pm-7.30pm CHRISTMAS FARMERS’ MARKET
Wednesday 31st: 8pm SGT PEPPERS ONLY DART BOARD BAND
£15 adult/£8 child/£40 family
Market Yard, Frome, Somerset, BA11 1BE
To Book call 01373 455 420
www.cheeseandgrain.com
(Monday – Saturday: 9am–8pm Sundays: event days only)
December back cover:Layout 1
20/11/14
16:14
Page 1