James Whitcomb Riley Indiana's Poet

James Whitcomb Riley
Indiana's Poet
A curriculum and suggested classroom ideas aligned with
Indiana Academic Standards for Fourth Grade
Developed in conjunction with Indiana Department of Education,
Office of Program Development 1999, 2006
Riley Children's Foundation
Kids Caring and Sharing Program
30 S. Meridian Street, Suite 200
Indianapolis, IN 46204-3509
1-877-867-4539 toll-free
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The Riley Children’s Foundation would like to thank the following educators who
assisted in producing this curriculum by incorporating Indiana state standards, activities,
and going through extensive revisions.
Cathy Fishel
Meadowlawn Elementary School
Twin Lakes School Corporation
Fourth Grade teacher
Vince Hollingsworth
Arthur Campbell Education Center
Jennifer Laman
North Vernon Elementary School
Jennings County Schools
Third Grade teacher
* Permission was granted by the Indiana University Press, Bloomington and
Indianapolis, Indiana to publish the poems written by James Whitcomb Riley which are
included in this document. The book, The Best of James Whitcomb Riley, was edited by
Donald C. Manlove and has a copyright of 1982. The poems can be located on the
following pages of the book: 54, 71, 88, 110, 137, 146, and 151.
-2-
Table of Contents
A Biography........................................................................................ 6
A Call to Community Service ............................................................ 7
Social Studies 4.5.4............................................................................ 8
Fact sheet............................................................................. 10
Worksheets .......................................................................... 13
Riley and His Time .............................................................. 19
A Dream House on Lockerbie Street ................................. 20
Lockerbie Street Fieldtrip ................................................... 21
Language Arts 4.3.5 ......................................................................... 22
Poetry Fest!.......................................................................... 24
Teacher Notes on the Poems ............................................. 25
Language Arts 4.4.1 ......................................................................... 28
Suggested Poems ............................................................... 30
Language Arts 4.7.3 ......................................................................... 31
Scavenger Hunt ................................................................... 33
Suggested Activities on Dialect ......................................... 34
Language Arts 4.7.14 ....................................................................... 35
Rileyspeak............................................................................ 37
The Life of Riley................................................................... 38
James Whitcomb Riley Picture Album........................................... 39
Celebrations ..................................................................................... 50
Coffee, Tea or Riley?........................................................... 50
Happy Birthday, Mr. Riley!.................................................. 51
Snickerdoodles Recipe....................................................... 52
Literary Excerpts and Poetry .......................................................... 53
If You Grew Up With James Whitcomb Riley.................... 53
Lockerbie Street .................................................................. 55
When the Frost is on the Punkin........................................ 56
The Old Swimmin' Hole....................................................... 57
Little Orphant Annie ............................................................ 58
When the Green Gits Back in the Trees ............................ 59
Our Hired Girl....................................................................... 60
The Raggedy Man................................................................ 61
Resources and Bibliography .......................................................... 62
Sources of Information ....................................................... 62
Bibliography ........................................................................ 63
Poems and Writings by James Whitcomb Riley............... 64
Collections ........................................................................... 68
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James Whitcomb Riley
Indiana's Poet
-4-
INTRODUCTION
Indiana boasts a great number of both famous and infamous personalities. One in
particular, James Whitcomb Riley, could spin a fast yarn in both poetry and prose a lot
quicker than catchin' a cat on a hot tin roof. Riley not only wrote in his own natural,
captivating and dialectic style; but he loved to tell his stories and recite his poetry in a
humorous act. He was actually one of the greatest comic actors of his time, was world
famous and highly sought after as a performer.
The legacy of James Whitcomb Riley and his personal dedication to his fellow man lives
on through Riley Hospital for Children and the Riley Children's Foundation, supported in
part by the Kids Caring and Sharing program, which is endorsed by the Indiana
Association of School Principals. The purposes of this curriculum guide and suggested
classroom activities are:
! To encourage Indiana teachers to familiarize students with the poetry of James
Whitcomb Riley so that Riley and his poetry will be remembered
! To help students discover that James Whitcomb Riley was a visionary character
whose stories and poetry teach children about the magic of just being a child
! To familiarize teachers, students and the general public about the important lifesaving work at Riley Hospital for Children and
! To encourage participation in Kids Caring and Sharing and the Riley Children's
Foundation as a community service educational program
Through the vivid and lively descriptions of his words, Riley teaches us to enjoy the
beauty of nature and how to communicate the feeling within our hearts and souls.
James Whitcomb Riley is Indiana's Poet and is deserving of attention and celebration
within the school curriculum.
Included in this guide are curriculum guidelines that are correlated with fourth grade
Indiana Academic Standards. Biographical information, standards justifications, key
teaching concepts, suggested activities and assessments, as well as supplementary
materials are included. It is our hope that these materials will serve as a useful resource
and are practical and useful for classroom use. Suggestions for future updates,
additional activities or resources are encouraged and should be forwarded to Riley
Children's Foundation, attention Kids Caring and Sharing.
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JAMES WHITCOMB RILEY
A BIOGRAPHY
On October 7, 1849, James Whitcomb Riley entered the world as one of six children
born into the Reuben and Elizabeth Riley family. James was a rambunctious fella who
learned to read before he went to school. He loved to read, but didn't particularly care
for school. He did most of his reading outside of school. He had a hard time coping with
the strict discipline observed in the schools of his day, so he decided to quit school at
the ripe young age of sixteen. James figured it was about time he had a little fun in life,
and besides, he wanted to pursue acting, writing, and the graphic arts- things he had
always wanted to do. He wandered the state holding various jobs until he finally struck
a chord with the "Kokomo Dispatch" when he submitted an original poem called
"Leonainie." He ran into trouble, however, because he led the newspaper to believe
that "Leonainie" was actually a long-lost Edgar Allen Poe poem. He was forced to leave
his position with the newspaper, but launched a career in writing poetry and prose that
sent him traveling across the country on the lecture circuit for several years. His acting
ability, oratorical talents and ability to imitate various dialects of rural Indiana earned him
great fame in very short order. In his performances, he related well with his audiences
and mesmerized them with his wit and recollections of his childhood using both poetry
and prose. Riley's poetry remains popular today among children and adults alike. His
poetry and whimsical style of writing is enjoyable to read and listen to.
James Whitcomb Riley was born in Greenfield, Indiana, but was attracted to a home on
Lockerbie Street in Indianapolis. This is where he lived when he was not traveling on
the speaking circuit. Riley loved this house so much that he both wrote a poem about it
and named his Miniature French Poodle after it as well. Riley lived in the Lockerbie
Street until his death on July 22, 1916. Thousands of his followers grieved on that grim
day as they passed his casket that was placed under the dome in the Indiana State
Capital Building. James Whitcomb Riley was buried on the crest of a hill at Crown Hill
Cemetery north of downtown Indianapolis.
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A CALL TO COMMUNITY SERVICE
James Whitcomb Riley loved young people and sympathized with children in need. This
is one of the reasons Riley Hospital for Children was named after him. One way for
students to remember Riley is to develop their own service learning projects. Riley
Hospital for Children provides medical services for children and opportunities for various
forms of volunteer work. Additionally, local hospitals, nursing homes and other facilities
provide opportunities for students to assist their fellow man through volunteering and
service learning projects.
Riley related service learning and community service projects that individual students,
classrooms or entire schools may wish to become involved in include:
! Kids Caring and Sharing
30 South Meridian Street
Indianapolis, IN 46204-3509
317-634-4474 or toll-free 877-867-4539
RileyKids.org/kcs
! Students may research Camp Riley and the work with disabled children and
develop a community awareness program.
-7-
Indiana Academic
Standards
Social Studies 4.5.4
Describe the role of Indiana Artists in
American visuals arts, literature, music,
dance and theatre
-8-
James Whitcomb Riley
Indiana Standard(s):
SS- 4.5.4- Describe the role of Indiana Artists in American visual arts, literature, music, dance and theatre.
Understanding(s):
Students will understand that …
James Whitcomb Riley had a love for mankind. He
was a national figure (very popular- like a rock star
of his era). He was not only a poet, but also a
highly sought after singer and storyteller.
New York and Hollywood are not the only sources
of entertainment or entertainers.
Essential Question(s):
Who are the notable Indiana Artists?
What made James Whitcomb Riley so popular in his
time?
How does James Whitcomb Riley qualify as an artist?
Is his poetry still considered "artful" today? Why/why not?
Why is James Whitcomb Riley important to Indiana
today?
Indiana has been responsible for producing some
of the world's greatest artistic talents.
Students will know… and/or Students will be able to…
! Identify James Whitcomb Riley as one of Indiana's famous artists
! Be able to defend poetry and the writings of James Whitcomb Riley as a valid art form
! Understand the personal qualities of James Whitcomb Riley and how those are instilled into the day-to
day operations of Riley Children's Hospital
! Aware of the Kids Caring and Sharing for Riley Hospital project and how they can become involved in
community service for others
Assessment Evidence
Performance Task(s)
Students will compile a listing of the positive
personal attributes of James Whitcomb
Riley.
Students will identify how these attributes
are important today and how they propose
integrating them into their classroom and/or
personal lives.
Other Evidence:
Students will create an original visual art project based on one or
more of James Whitcomb Riley's poems.
Students will gather evidence of Indiana artistic talents and/or
productions (i.e.- Hoosiers, Heartland Film Festival, Indianapolis
Symphony Orchestra, Indianapolis Motor Speedway, etc.)
Students will create a game show based on the life and poems
of James Whitcomb Riley.
Learning Plan
Suggested learning activities and/or methodologies
! Plan a field trip to the James Whitcomb Riley Lockerbie Street Home
! Investigate Indiana legends- (could include, but not limited to: Red Skelton, Florence Henderson,
Hoagie Carmichael, Axel Rose, Larry Bird, Tony Hulman, Orville Redenbacher, Mel Kenyon, James
Whitcomb Riley, etc.)
! Stage a living wax museum night and invite parents and community members (could even accept
donations for Kids Caring and Sharing)
! Riley and His Time- Students construct a historical timeline aligned with the lifespan of Riley Write a
play or series or actable scenes based on the poetry of James Whitcomb Riley. Hold a public
performance (again, this could be used as a Kids Caring and Sharing fundraiser)
! Design a T-Shirt to honor James Whitcomb Riley
! Make a James Whitcomb Riley Crest
Bake Snickerdoodles- James Whitcomb Riley's favorite cookie
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FACTSHEET
James Whitcomb Riley
James Whitcomb Riley was born on October 7, 1849 in a log cabin in Greenfield,
Indiana. His parents were Reuben Alexander (1819-1893) and Elizabeth Marine
(1823-1870) Riley. He was the third of six Riley children. James Whitcomb Riley
was named after his father's good friend. James Whitcomb, Governor of the
State of Indiana. The Riley siblings included:
! John Andrew- married to Julia Wilson and had no children
! Martha Celeste- she died at age five
! Elva Mae- Married Henry Eitel and had two children- Edmund and
Elizabeth
! Humbolt Alexander- died as a young man
! Mary Elizabeth- Married Frank Payne and had one daughter- Lesley
! James Whitcomb- who never married
Parents- Ruben Alexander and Elizabeth Marine Riley
Ruben and Elizabeth were married in 1844. Ruben Riley was a lawyer in
Greenfield and was elected to the Indiana State Legislature as the representative
from his district. He attended the Republican Chicago convention that nominated
Abraham Lincoln to the presidency of the United States. Ruben also served as a
captain in the Civil War for four years. Elizabeth was a poet in her own right.
Some of her works were published in the Greenfield newspaper. She shared her
special feelings for nature with her son, James. When she died in August 1870,
James was heart broken.
Childhood
James Whitcomb Riley, called "Bud" by his family, enjoyed swimming and fishing
in Brandywine Creek. He also enjoyed watching travelers on the Old National
Road (U.S. 40). He attended school in Greenfield where he enjoyed reading and
writing as his favorite subjects. One of his very favorite books was Arabian
Nights.
Middle Years
James left Greenfield as a young man and never returned to live there. He spent
time traveling around the country doing a variety of things. He painted signs and
performed in traveling medicine shows. He traveled and performed with two
different medicine shows- "Dr. S. B. McCrillus Standard Remedies" and "The
Wizard Oil Company" where he entertained the crowds and audiences with his
poetry and music. His first salaried position was working for the Anderson
Democrat newspaper where her earned $40.00 per month.
Prosperous Years
James Whitcomb Riley's first book The Old Swimmin' Hole was published in
1883. Additionally, his works were published in newspapers and magazines all
over the country. Riley had 1,044 poems published during his lifetime and
became a very wealthy man. He was also a dynamic public speaker. He was
highly sought after and in high demand, frequently giving speeches and lectures
to packed houses.
- 10 -
Mr. Riley's brother-in-law, Henry Eitel, and his nephew, Edmund Eitel, became
his advisors. They recommended that James stop touring full time and begin
working on manuscripts for publication. Upon accepting their advice, James
Whitcomb Riley settled in Indianapolis where he lived for some time in a hotel
room.
John and Charlotte Nickum
John Nickum (1821-1902), a local businessman, and his wife, Charlotte (18221904), built a home at 528 Lockerbie Street in 1872. The Nickum's were originally
form Cincinnati, Ohio, where they had owned a baking company. In Indianapolis,
their baking company became very successful and during the Civil war had a
contract to make hard tack (a cracker with no yeast) for the Union Army. After
undergoing a series of name changes, Nickum's company finally became known
as the Continental Baking Company. The Nickums had one daughter,
Magdalena, who survived infancy.
Charles and Magdalene Holstein
Magdalena {Nickum} (1845-1916) and her husband, Charles Holstein (18431901), lived with her parents in the Lockerbie Street home. Charles, also a poet,
served as a Major during the Civil War. Following the war, he became a
successful lawyer. In 1880, President Hayes appointed him United States
Attorney General.
On Lockerbie Street
In 1893, James Whitcomb Riley became a permanent house of the Nickums and
Holsteins and moved into the house on Lockerbie Street in Indianapolis. Instead
of paying rent, he paid his 'fair share" of the household expenses. That same
year, Riley purchased his homestead in Greenfield for his sister Elva Mae Eitel.
Timeline of Significant Events
! 1911
o James suffered a stroke
o Indianapolis Public Schools became the first to celebrate Riley's
birthday
! 1915
o The National Commissioner of Education declared October 7 as Riley
Day
o Riley's birthday was celebrated throughout in schools throughout the
United States
! 1916
o July 22- Riley suffered a massive stroke and passed away
o He was 66 years old
- 11 -
The James Whitcomb Riley Memorial Association
Magdalena Holstein died in October of 1916, just three months after James
Whitcomb Riley. In her will, all of the household goods, including the books,
jewelry and clothes were given to the long-time housekeeper, Katie Kindell. The
house was ordered to be sold. A group of Mr. Riley's friends purchased the
house from the estate and bought all of the household goods back from Katie
Kindell. The house was placed into a trust and they established the James
Whitcomb Riley Memorial Association. In 1922, the house was opened as a
museum honoring the life and times of James Whitcomb Riley. The house has
been maintained in its original state and is an excellent example of late Victorian
preservation. The house appears exactly as it did when Riley lived there. Visitors
to the museum experience a virtually Victorian living experience
The Riley Memorial Association- now the Riley Children's Foundation- has
continued to grow and is responsible for the building of both Riley Hospital for
Children and Camp Riley for Youth with Physical Disabilities.
Lockerbie Square
Thomas McOuat owned the land that Lockerbie Square sits on. After his death,
his wife, Janet Lockerbie McOuat, developed the land and named Lockerbie
Street in honor of her father, George Murray Lockerbie, who was born in
Glasgow, Scotland.
- 12 -
MR. RILEY'S LOCKERBIE STREET HOME
See if you can recall what you learned when you toured MR. Riley's home. Place the
correct word(s) from the WORD LIST into the blanks in each sentence. When you have
completed the sentences, place the letters from each numbered blank into the
corresponding blanks in the SECRET MESSAGE.
WORD LIST:
butler's pantry
copper
gas
gravity
Greenfield
guitar
hall tree
housekeeper
ice box
indoor
Lockerbie
orange cups
reading
sitting room
telephone
1.
Mr. Riley was born in ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___, Indiana, on
October 7, 1849.
1
2
2.
Standing in the front hallway is a tall ___ ___ ___ ___
___ ___ ___ ___.
3
3.
4
The ___ ___ ___-fueled chandelier in the drawing room was made in France and
5
dates to the 1840's Mr. Riley gave it to the family as a gift.
4.
Mr. Riley's ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___, which he liked to play when he sang, can
6
be seen in the drawing room.
5.
In the library, hanging from the chandelier above Mr. Riley's chair, is a
___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ light.
7
6.
The orange was considered a delicacy by the family. The six sliver cups in the
China cabinet in the formal dining room, called ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
8
___ ___ ___ ___, held orange halves for eating.
7.
The sink in the guest bedroom had running water. The water came down from
the third floor with the help of ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___.
9
8.
10
The ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ hanging on the wall in the Holstein
11
12
Bedroom was the only one in the house.
- 13 -
9.
A ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ with a desk, chair, and
13
needlepoint couch forms part of the Holstein bedroom.
10.
Hanging over the fireplace in Mr. Riley's bedroom is a painting of Mr. Riley's
Poodle, named ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___.
14
11.
The bathroom was one of the first ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ bathrooms in the
15
city of Indianapolis. The bathtub is made of ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___.
16
12.
Katie Kindell performed many duties in the house as the
___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___. She oversaw such things as the
17
ordering of the groceries, lighting of the fires, and setting of the table.
13.
Two or more servants used this small room to pass food from the kitchen to
the dining room. This was the ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___.
18
19
14.
ice.
20
The ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ in the kitchen could hold a 100-pound block of
21
SECRET MESSAGE:
___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ was known as ___ ___ ___
___
13
6
1
15
11
7
20
10
12
18
___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
3
9
___ ___ ___ ___ for his use of the Hoosier dialect in his poems.
19
17
2
4
- 14 -
8
14
5
21
16
MR. RILEY'S LOCKERBIE STREET HOME
See if you can recall what you learned when you toured MR. Riley's home. Place the
correct word(s) from the WORD LIST into the blanks in each sentence. When you have
completed the sentences, place the letters from each numbered blank into the
corresponding blanks in the SECRET MESSAGE.
WORD LIST:
butler's pantry
copper
gas
gravity
Greenfield
guitar
hall tree
housekeeper
ice box
indoor
Lockerbie
orange cups
reading
sitting room
telephone
1.
Mr. Riley was born in ___
G ___
r ___
e ___
e ___
n ___
f ___
i ___
e ___
l ___,
d Indiana, on
October 7, 1849.
1
2
2.
h ___
a ___
l ___
l
Standing in the front hallway is a tall ___
t ___
r ___
e ___.
e
___
3
3.
4
g ___
a s___-fueled chandelier in the drawing room was made in France and
The ___
5
dates to the 1840's Mr. Riley gave it to the family as a gift.
4.
g ___
u ___
i ___
t ___
a ___,
r which he liked to play when he sang, can
Mr. Riley's ___
6
be seen in the drawing room.
5.
In the library, hanging from the chandelier above Mr. Riley's chair, is a
r ___
e ___
a ___
d ___
i ___
n ___
g
___
light.
7
6.
The orange was considered a delicacy by the family. The six sliver cups in the
o ___
r ___
a ___
n ___
g ___
e
China cabinet in the formal dining room, called ___
8
___
c ___
u ___
p ___,
s held orange halves for eating.
7.
The sink in the guest bedroom had running water. The water came down from
the third floor with the help of ___
g ___
r ___
a ___
v ___
i ___
t ___.
y
9
8.
10
T ___
e ___
l ___
e ___
p ___
h ___
o ___
n ___
e hanging on the wall in the Holstein
The ___
11
12
Bedroom was the only one in the house.
- 15 -
s i
t t
i
n g
r o o m
A ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ with a desk, chair, and
9.
13
needlepoint couch forms part of the Holstein bedroom.
10.
Hanging over the fireplace in Mr. Riley's bedroom is a painting of Mr. Riley's
L o c k e r b i e
Poodle, named ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___.
14
i ___
n ___
d ___
o ___
o ___
r bathrooms in the
The bathroom was one of the first ___
11.
15
c ___
o ___
p ___
p ___
e ___.
r
city of Indianapolis. The bathtub is made of ___
16
12.
Katie Kindell performed many duties in the house as the
h ___
o ___
u ___
s ___
e ___
k ___
e ___
e ___
p ___
e ___.
r
___
She oversaw such things as the
17
ordering of the groceries, lighting of the fires, and setting of the table.
13.
Two or more servants used this small room to pass food from the kitchen to
b ___
u ___
t ___
l ___
e ___
r ___
's
the dining room. This was the ___
18
___
p ___
a ___
n ___
t ___
r ___.
y
19
20
i ___
c ___
e
b ___
o ___
x in the kitchen could hold a 100-pound block of
The ___
___
14.
ice.
21
SECRET MESSAGE:
M r.
R i
l e y
T h e
___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ was known as ___ ___ ___
___
13
6
1
15
11
7
20
10
12
18
H o o s
i
e r
___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___
3
9
P ___
o ___
e ___
t for his use of the Hoosier dialect in his poems.
___
19
17
2
4
- 16 -
8
14
5
21
16
WORD PUZZLES
THE HOOSIER POET
mwibtohc_________________________
James Whitcomb Riles is known as the
Hoosier Poet. He wrote many well-known
poems about his childhood on the farm.
James was born in 1849 in Greenfield,
Indiana. He went to school until he was 16
years of age and reading was his favorite
subject. After James left school, he worked
for two summers as a sign painter. He later
traveled with a medicine show as a singer
and storyteller.
adlnipisoian_______________________
tlcnclooie_________________________
evafroti___________________________
tsbcuej___________________________
omfuas___________________________
legerfedni_________________________
Returning to his hometown, Riley began
working for the local newspaper. In 1877,
he started writing for the Indianapolis
newspaper. It was while living in the state
capital that Riley became well known for
his poems about rural Indiana. The Old
Swimmin' Hole, a collection of poems, and
Little Orphant Annie are two of his bestknown writings. Within a few years, Riley
was asked to give readings all over the
country. Many children went to bed at night
after hearing, "An' the Goblilns a' git you Ef
you Don't Watch Out!"
raulr_____________________________
nptohra___________________________
DO YOU KNOW?
1.
James Whitcomb Riley is best known as a _________________________.
(singer poet soldier)
2.
_________________________ was Riley's favorite subject in school.
(reading spelling arithmetic)
3.
One of Riley's best-known writings is _______________________________________.
(The Tall One The Old Swimmin' Hole Back on the Farm)
4.
_______________________________ is the capital of Indiana.
(Indianapolis Greenfield Anderson)
- 17 -
WORD PUZZLES
THE HOOSIER POET
mwibtohc____Whitcomb
_____________________
James Whitcomb Riles is known as the
Hoosier Poet. He wrote many well-known
poems about his childhood on the farm.
James was born in 1849 in Greenfield,
Indiana. He went to school until he was 16
years of age and reading was his favorite
subject. After James left school, he worked
for two summers as a sign painter. He later
traveled with a medicine show as a singer
and storyteller.
Returning to his hometown, Riley began
working for the local newspaper. In 1877,
he started writing for the Indianapolis
newspaper. It was while living in the state
capital that Riley became well known for
his poems about rural Indiana. The Old
Swimmin' Hole, a collection of poems, and
Little Orphant Annie are two of his bestknown writings. Within a few years, Riley
was asked to give readings all over the
country. Many children went to bed at night
after hearing, "An' the Goblilns a' git you Ef
you Don't Watch Out!"
adlnipisoian__Indianapolis
_____________________
collection
tlcnclooie_________________________
favorite
evafroti___________________________
subject _______________
tsbcuej____________
omfuas_____famous
______________________
legerfedni___Greenfield
______________________
rural
raulr_____________________________
nptohra_____orphant
______________________
DO YOU KNOW?
1.
James Whitcomb Riley is best known as a _______________
__________.
Poet
(singer poet soldier)
2.
____________
Reading _____________ was Riley's favorite subject in school.
(reading spelling arithmetic)
3.
One of Riley's best-known writings is ______________________________
_________.
The Old Swimmin' Hole
(The Tall One The Old Swimmin' Hole Back on the Farm)
4.
_______________________________
is the capital of Indiana.
Indianapolis
(Indianapolis Greenfield Anderson)
- 18 -
Riley and His TimeRiley lived in a period of great change in the United States and the world. The last part
of the nineteenth century and the early twentieth century were filled with scientific
discoveries and great technological progress. This activity may be expanded to address
Indiana Science standards as well as the stated Social Studies standard. Students may
be encouraged to investigate major innovations and technological advances made
during this time period.
Using James Whitcomb Riley's biography, have students identity events in Riley's life
and develop a timeline of these events. Have students leave plenty of room to add more
information. An Indiana History textbook and a fifth grade textbook would serve as
excellent resources to begin this timeline. Expand the timeline to include world events
as well. Have students select the events they believe to be most important and place
them on the timeline.
- 19 -
A Dream House on Lockerbie Street
James Whitcomb Riley had great affection for the home on Lockerbie Street in
Indianapolis where he lived with a family that befriended him most of his adult life. His
poem "Lockerbie Street" speaks of his love of the neighborhood and the home that was
a refuge for him. A visit to the Riley home can provide students with great insight into
Riley's life and times. Students may benefit most during a visit if they are prepared to
use all of their senses to appreciate their surroundings. Students might come prepared
to record journal entries of the things they see, hear, feel and smell. Outside of the
home, have students make note of the impressions they have of the neighborhood and
street. Do they feel the coolness of the shade trees? What sounds do they hear inside
the house? How does it smell? How would these sensations have been different when
the house was new and people lived there? What colors do they see and what kinds of
decorations are visible? What do these things indicate about the people who lived
there? Does the house seem like a sad or a happy place? If it could talk, what stories
might it have to tell?
In many respects the Riley Home, in its time, was a "Dream House." It was built with a
number of special features for the comfort and pleasure of its owners. It was intended to
be an expression of beauty and hospitality. What were some of these special features?
How was the home heated and cooled? What is the lighting like? What special and
practical features can be found in the bathrooms and the kitchen? What features were
included simply for their beauty? What features were both beautiful and useful? Is it
likely that everyone in Riley's time had a house like this? How would you know? What
were the other types of housing like? How can you find out?
After the visit, students may use their personal observations as the basis for writing
poems about the Lockerbie Street Riley Home. They could also create and tell a story in
which the house is the central character or narrator. Students could also write a
newspaper account of the visit for submission to your local paper.
For more in-depth studies, students could research the history of various technologies,
such as lighting, heating, cooling, plumbing, etc. utilized at the Lockerbie Street house.
Students could then identify what would be included in their own dream house and draw
up plans for its construction.
If your class is not able to visit the Lockerbie Street home in person, a virtual tour is
available on the Internet at www.rileykids.org/museum/tour/entrance.asp.
A field experience to additional houses of the Victorian period would also provide insight
and useful information to the life and times of James Whitcomb Riley. Historic homes,
buildings and museums can be found in many communities throughout the state.
Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana also has a number of resources, including
"On the Street Where You Live" and "Stories Buildings Tell" that can help students
investigate local history through architecture.
- 20 -
Lockerbie Street Field Trip
Preparing for the Trip
1.
2.
3.
4.
Create a bulletin board display highlighting James Whitcomb Riley and his poetry
Hold a poetry reading of some of Riley's works
Study an overview of Victorian architecture
Study the geographic location of Lockerbie Street in Indiana utilizing map
reading skills
Field Trip Day
1. Take the guided tour of the home
2. Take a walk in both directions from the Riley home on Lockerbie Street
Follow-Up Activities
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Debriefing discussion of the sites visited and their significances
Have students make journal entries
Make Snickerdoodles (Cookie Recipe included)
Complete the "Mr. Riley's Lockerbie Street Home" activity sheet
Read more James Whitcomb Riley poetry to the class
Duplicate coloring pages of Victorian styles homes and have students
complete them
- 21 -
Indiana Academic
Standards
Language Arts 4.3.5
Define figurative languages, such as
similes, metaphors, hyperbole, or
personification and identify its use in
literary works
- 22 -
James Whitcomb Riley
Indiana Standard(s):
LA- 4.3.5- Define figurative language, such as similes, metaphors, hyperbole, or personification and
identify its use in literary works.
Understanding(s):
Students will understand that …
James Whitcomb Riley used figurative
language tools in his poetry writing.
Essential Question(s):
What is a simile?
What is a metaphor?
What is personification?
What is hyperbole?
How did James Whitcomb Riley use each of these in his
writing of poetry?
Students will know… and/or Students will be able to…
! Identify figurative language tools utilized by James Whitcomb Riley
! Utilize figurative language tools in personal writings
Assessment Evidence
Performance Task(s)
Given a selected poem written by
James Whitcomb Riley, students will
identify figurative language tools and
explain how they are used.
Students will write their own poetry
based on personal Indiana experiences
utilizing one or more of the figurative
language tools.
Other Evidence and deepened understanding:
Students will choose poetry by an author or their choice. They
will find evidence of the use of figurative language tools within
this poetry.
Students will search for evidence of figurative language tool
usage in other styles of writing. This could be found in
textbooks, free-reading books or other materials assigned by the
teacher.
Students will document the use of figurative language tool
usage in non-written forms. These could include, but are not
limited to: the classroom teacher, parents, siblings, friends,
neighbors, television, movies, music, visual art, etc.
Learning Plan
Suggested learning activities and/or methodologies
! Poetry Fest! Construct a new poem line by line as a group
! Student should be exposed to a wide variety of poems written by James Whitcomb Riley
! Students should be exposed to poetry by other authors as well
! The difference in the style of the English Language used during the life of James Whitcomb Riley
and that which we use to speak and write today needs to be compared. (Possible use if Venn
Diagram for this activity)
! This should be a good way to not only encourage extra free reading, but a way to encourage a
deeper thought process and interpretative understanding by the students
- 23 -
Poetry Fest!
Use the poetry of James Whitcomb Riley to inspire students to write poems of their own.
After reading and discussing one or more of Riley's poems, help students compose a
group poem using visual aids. Ask students to suggest a topic and a first line of the
poem. (Riley often wrote about the time of year, special places or people) Use student
contributions to add lines to the poem until it is complete. Students might build on the
experience by developing small group or individual poems as well. Poems could then be
written on construction paper or entered into a computer with graphics for a bulletin
board display or compiled into a book. Some students may also elect to illustrate the
poetry or set it to music.
- 24 -
Teacher Notes on the Poems
Who is Little Orphant Annie and why does she talk like that?
Many of James Whitcomb Riley’s poems are based on his experiences and people he
knew as a child. “Annie” in Little Orphant Annie was probably inspired by Mary Alice
Smith, an orphan girl who came to live with Riley’s family in Greenfield, Indiana, when
he was a boy.
Children will enjoy the unique language and fun in Little Orphant Annie. The poem also
has a number of clues about life in the mid nineteenth century. The first clue is in the
title itself. The word “orphan” may be unfamiliar to children since it is less common for
children to become orphaned now than it was then. The meaning of the word should be
explored to help children understand who Annie is and to feel more secure about their
own circumstances.
It will be more important to explain that in Riley’s lifetime medical science had not
advanced to the level that it has reached today. Many of the vaccines and antibiotics
that we use to fight illness did not exist in Riley’s time. As a result, people died early in
life more frequently than they do today. It was not unusual for children to become
orphans. Large, institutional homes for orphans were established by charitable
organizations. Another common way of providing for children who were orphaned was
for them to live with relatives, close friends of their families, or other community
members. Older children helped out with household or farm chores to “earn their keep.”
This seems to be the case with Annie in the poem. One of her responsibilities is to help
take care of and entertain the younger children in the family. Can your students tell from
the poem how the children feel about her?
One of Annie’s talents that make her especially popular with the younger children is her
ability to spin a good yarn. Story telling was an important form of entertainment in
Riley’s time and a good yarn spinner, like Riley himself, was much admired. People in
Riley’s day, even the children, probably did not believe in ghosts and goblins. Even
though they know that Annie is just telling tall tales, the children in the poem enjoy a
good, scary story. Annie’s stories also attempt to teach the younger children a lesson.
Ask your students to identify the moral in Annie’s yarns.
In Riley’s time, many older children worked in jobs or on farms and it was common for
most children to have chores at home, such as looking after younger children and doing
housework. Your students may want to compare their responsibilities at home with the
chores that Annie has. Today, due to medical advances, few children in the United
States become orphans. Children who are not able to live with their own families for
different reasons are provided for through foster families. Because getting an education
is important, young people do not hold jobs outside of their homes until they are sixteen
years old. It is still important for children to help their families and to have
responsibilities and chores at home and school. Many kids enjoy carrying out volunteer
service projects that help people in their communities.
- 25 -
The Raggedy Man Meets Our Hired Girl
Although Riley also wrote on lofty subjects, he is best remembered as the poet of
Indiana’s ordinary people. Two such people are the Raggedy Man and ‘Lizabuth Ann,
the hired girl. Unlike Little Orphan Annie, who is working for her keep, the hired hand
and the hired girl are working for a busy farm family and receiving wages. The Raggedy
Man was a real person that Riley knew as a boy. As in many of Riley’s poems, we see
the hired hand and ‘Lizabuth Ann from the perspective of the child who narrates the
poems. Both The Raggedy Man and Our Hired Girl offer insight to the type of work done
on farms and in farm households during Riley’s youth. Although they are humble
people, it is clear that they are kind, good humored, and willing to take time out from
their work to pay attention to the children. They are people who will shake a crunchy
apple down from the apple tree or offer a child a slice of warm custard pie.
Riley: A Man For All Seasons
Riley’s love of nature can been seen in two seasonal poems, When the Green Gits
Back in the Trees and When the Frost is on the Punkin. Like many other Riley poems,
they are written from the perspective of rural people who know how to appreciate the
beauty around them. Both poems give plentiful information about rural life and the kinds
of seasonal work done on farms in Riley’s day. In addition to using dialectical spellings,
like “crick” for “creek,” Riley also makes references to many words that will be new to
students. Students can carry out word searches for references to “fodder in the shock”,
“guineys”, “mince”, and “souse”. All of these terms were easily understood by readers in
Riley’s time because most were not far removed from country life. These poems make a
good springboard for student writing activities, such as seasonal poems and stories,
and fine arts projects.
From the Old Swimmin’ Hole to Lockerbie Street
The Old Swimmin’ Hole reflects Riley’s nostalgia for his childhood and one of his
favorite spots, the swimming hole on Brandywine Creek near Riley’s family home in
Greenfield, Indiana. It is filled with a sense of loss and a yearning for the past.
The last half of the nineteenth century, from the time Riley was child until he was an
older man, was a period of rapid change in Indiana and in the world. It was a time
marked by the exponential growth of technology. Modern devices such as electricity, the
telegraph, telephone, railroads, streetcars, and even the automobile were becoming
widely used, especially in the cities.
The United States was becoming a world power and American cities, like Indianapolis,
were changing from quiet towns to bustling urban areas. People were moving rapidly
from rural areas into the cities where work was plentiful. As the industrial population
grew, the agricultural population began to shrink.
Riley’s poems do not deal with any of these changes, but they may deal with people’s
reaction to them. For many people, the rate of change taking place during this time must
have been disconcerting. Like Riley, they yearned for the simpler life of the past. This
- 26 -
may be one of the reasons for the popularity of Riley’s poems in his own time. The
poems provided people with a respite from the demands of the present and celebrated
a time in the past that people recognized. The folksy language, humor, and colorful
characters seemed to be drawn from a common memory. In the poem Lockerbie Street,
Riley regains some of the tranquility that had been lost in becoming a citizen of a
growing industrial city. In reading this poem, students can pick out a number of details
that make Lockerbie a refuge for Riley and other residents.
As a follow up to reading the poem, students may enjoy writing or telling about their
favorite place to go when they want peace and quiet. For a more extensive project, they
might help plan such a place in the classroom or school, such as a reading corner in the
media center, or an outdoor area on the school grounds. The poem also makes an
excellent introduction to a real life or virtual field trip to the Riley home on Lockerbie
Street, which is still like a tree-filled island in the middle of a busy city.
Because Riley’s poetry has so many visual images, students may also enjoy creating a
“rebus”. Have students choose a poem or a stanza from a poem and substitute an
image or picture for words in the poem. For example:
In cool shady coverts of whispering
with their
lifted up to shake hands with the breeze.
- 27 -
Indiana Academic
Standards
Language Arts 4.4.1
Discuss ideas for writing. Find ideas for
writing in conversations with others and
in books, magazines, newspapers,
school textbooks, or on the Internet.
Keep a list or notebook of ideas.
- 28 -
James Whitcomb Riley
Indiana Standard(s):
LA- 4.4.1- Discuss ideas for writing. Find ideas for writing in conversations with others and in books,
magazines, newspapers, school textbooks, or on the Internet. Keep a list or notebook of ideas.
Understanding(s):
Students will understand that …
Ideas for writing are all around them in all walks of
life and in all experiences
James Whitcomb Riley became famous by writing
about his childhood experiences
Essential Question(s):
How does one recognize potential ideas for writing?
How did James Whitcomb Riley utilize everyday
experiences for ideas for his writing?
How can or does poetry reflect the writer's life and
experiences?
Students will know… and/or Students will be able to…
! Gather ideas from the different activities of the everyday life as potential topics for various forms of
writing
! Journal thoughts and ideas every day
Assessment Evidence
Performance Task(s)
Using ideas from a variety of sources,
students will create their own personal
poetry.
Other Evidence:
Using cuttings from printed materials, students will construct a
poetic collage to convey a personal story or feelings.
Students will create visual aids to enhance their original poetry.
Using the poetry of James Whitcomb Riley,
students will write new poetry based on the
same or similar themes/topics.
Learning Plan
Suggested learning activities and/or methodologies
! Design a magazine cover honoring childhood experiences of James Whitcomb Riley
! Use students' personal experiences for creative writing of various types beyond poetry
! Have students plan a social event for community members based on the theme from one of James
Whitcomb Riley's poems
! Publish a book of student written poetry that is based on their own personal "childhood experiences"
- 29 -
James Whitcomb Riley Suggested Poems
The Bear Story: W'y, wunst they wuz a Little Boy went out In the woods to shoot
a Bear.
Little Orphant Annie: Little Orphant Annie’s come to our house to stay
Lockerbie Street: Such a dear little street it is, nestled away
The Raggedy Man: O the Raggedy Man! He works fer Pa
When the Frost is on the Pumpkin: When the frost is on the punkin and the
fodder’s in the shock
The Nine Little Goblins: They all climbed up on a high board-fence
Wet-Weather Talk: It hain't no use to grumble and complane
The Man in the Moon: Said the Raggedy Man, on a hot afternoon:
"My! Sakes! What a lot o' mistakes Some little folks makes on The Man in the Moon!
Wortermelon Time
Out to Old Aunt Mary's: In those old days of the lost sunshine Of youth
Our Hired Girl: Our hired girl, she’s ‘Lizabuth Ann
The Runaway Boy
'Lizabuth-Ann on Bakin'-Day
The Bumblebee: You better not fool with a Bumblebee!
The Old Swimmin'-Hole: Oh! the old swimmin’-hole! whare the crick so still
and deep
Granny: Granny's come to our house, And ho! my lawzy-daisy!
Jack the Giant-Killer
The Circus-Day Parade: Oh the Circus-Day parade! How the Bugles played
and played!
- 30 -
Indiana Academic
Standards
Language Arts 4.7.3
Identify how language usage (sayings
and expressions) reflects regions and
cultures.
- 31 -
James Whitcomb Riley
Indiana Standard(s):
LA- 4.7.3- Identify how language usage (sayings and expressions) reflects regions and cultures.
Understanding(s):
Students will understand …
Mid-West/Indiana dialect and how James
Whitcomb Riley utilized it in his writing.
Dialects vary by geographical region both within
the United States and around the globe
Essential Question(s):
What is dialect?
What are Mid-Western/Indiana "Hoosier" dialect, sayings
and expressions that identify this region?
What are the positive attributes or regional dialect? The
negative?
How is language used to communicate emotion,
feelings, folklore, legend, factual information, etc.?
Students will know… and/or Students will be able to…
! Identify "typical" Mid-Western/Indiana "Hoosier" dialect
! Effectively use standard English and regional dialect appropriately
! Use examples of regional dialect in given written examples
Assessment Evidence
Performance Task(s)
After reading poetry by James Whitcomb
Riley, students will identify specific dialect
usages. They will compare and contrast
the dialect to standard English standards.
Students will choose a regional dialect
and write an original poem correctly using
the selected dialect.
Given a literary work that utilized regional
dialect and/or jargon, students will
translate a selection into standard English.
Other Evidence:
Students will read selected short stories by various authors and
identify use of regional dialects that are used.
Students will write in their personal journals using the "dialect of
the day" as selected by the teacher.
Scavenger Hunt- Students will gather from family and friends a
list of commonly used sayings and expressions then analyze
each for dialect usages and cultural jargon.
Learning Plan
Suggested learning activities and/or methodologies
! Play taped selections of various regional dialects and have students identify the region of origin (See
attachment for more detailed suggestions)
! Have students write a newspaper article imagining that they have interviewed James Whitcomb Riley
(utilizing sayings and dialect within the article)
! Design book covers that utilize appropriate regional dialect which would encourage someone to pick
up and read that particular book
! Have students read aloud poetry and/or literary excerpts placing emphasis on regional dialect used
within the passage
! Have students research to discover and come to a consensus regarding the word "Hoosier" in the
Indiana dialect
! Discuss what "Indiana Bananas" are then learn the Paw-Paw Patch song
! Help students learn to write in certain dialects using apostrophes, etc to make words "sound" like the
dialect
! Design a quilt depicting the cultural influences and childhood experiences of James Whitcomb Riley
- 32 -
Scavenger HuntHave students gather a list of commonly used sayings and expressions from family and
friends. Then have them analyze each for dialect usages and cultural jargon.
Using additional poems and/or literary works, have students work in teams to search for
and identify dialectical, regional, cultural specific or "old fashioned" words or phrases.
Make a chart of the words or phrases and find the correct form, as we would use them
today.
- 33 -
Suggested Activities on Dialect
-
Students could read a poem by James Whitcomb Riley, such as Little Orphant
Annie or The Bear Story. Let students identify words and phrases written in
dialect.
-
Students could translate a section of a James Whitcomb Riley poem into modern
standard English.
-
Play taped selections of dialects from different regions of the country and from
speakers of different ages to see if students can identify their origins. Some
suggested dialects are:
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
-
Appalachian
New England
African-American
Southern
Modern standard English
Young child
High school or college student
Elderly person
Help students learn to write words in dialect. Certain letters will be replaced by
apostrophes in writing words exactly as they sound. Students can use these
words to write a poem or short story in dialect.
- 34 -
Indiana Academic
Standards
Language Arts 4.7.14
Recite brief poems, soliloquies, or
dramatic dialogues, clearly stating
words and using appropriate timing,
volume and phrasing.
- 35 -
James Whitcomb Riley
Indiana Standard(s):
LA- 4.7.14- Recite brief poems, soliloquies, or dramatic dialogues, clearly stating words and using
appropriate timing, volume and phrasing.
Understanding(s):
Students will understand that …
Literary works can "come to life" through
performance
Fears of speaking or performing in front of
others can be overcome
Essential Question(s):
What is the difference between a poem, soliloquy and a
dramatic dialogue?
How does verbalization and aural presentation enhance
the understanding of literary passages?
How does one appropriately use timing, volume and
inflection to communicate understanding when performing
a literary work for an audience?
Students will know… and/or Students will be able to…
! Recite and/or perform poetry excerpts of James Whitcomb Riley
! Give short performance in front of an audience
Assessment Evidence
Performance Task(s)
Given selected poetry of James
Whitcomb Riley, students will recite
a minimum of one stanza for their
peers.
Other Evidence:
Students will be organized into small groups and assigned a James
Whitcomb Riley poem. They will share lines between the group and
present and oral interpretation presentation of the poem for peer
and/or public performance.
Students will select poetry or literary works of their own choosing
and prepare a short oral presentation of the poem or literary
excerpt for peer and/or public performance
Learning Plan
Suggested learning activities and/or methodologies
! Write and produce a series of television commercials promoting the poetry, life and qualities of
James Whitcomb Riley
! Rileyspeak- An evening of public performance of James Whitcomb Riley poems and other works
could be planned for parents and the local community, This would serve as an excellent
opportunity to accept donations for the Kids Caring and Sharing program
! Life of Riley- student produced biographical sketch performed for peers and/or public performance
(Could also be used as Kids Caring and Sharing donations program)
! Have staff and/or community volunteers put together a program of James Whitcomb Riley poem
recitations and perform for the students (Could also be combined with students performances and
used as a community service project for Kids Caring and Sharing)
! Workshops with professional performers could be scheduled to help and encourage students in
developing their performing skills. (A Couple of possible sources are: Bob Sanders- Storytelling
program and workshop through Young Audiences of Indiana; Milicent Wright- Indiana Repertory
Theatre, Indianapolis- workshops in person or through distance learning technology)
- 36 -
RileyspeakOne of the most enjoyable aspects of James Whitcomb Riley's poetry is the way it
sounds when recited or performed. Read selected poems to students or have them
listen to taped readings so that they can hear the sound of the language. Explain that
many of Riley's poems were written in "dialect." He had great fun imitating the way
some people of his day talked, but he wasn't making fun of them. He enjoyed the way
ordinary people, especially children, expressed themselves. Look at how the poems are
written and discuss the meanings of unfamiliar words and phrases. Look for and identify
words with dialectical spellings ("orpahnt" for "orphan").
Plan a public performance of several of James Whitcomb Riley's poems. Students could
both perform the poetry and explain the use of dialect as part of the program.
- 37 -
The Life of Riley
Have students read the student version of the biographical sketch of James Whitcomb
Riley and assist the student in understanding the difference between the works
"biography" and "autobiography." Ask students to speculate about Riley's personality
based on the information in the biography. Have students generate words that they
believe describe Riley and write them down. Students may suggest words like
"talented," "adventurous," "good humored," "friendly," "fun loving," etc. Have students
develop a profile of Riley and/or a poem about him based on the words they have
generated. Some students may want to illustrate the profiles with their own drawings or
create an original song to be performed. Students might also develop job descriptions
that match Riley's talents and interests.
! Reading Riley's biography can provide an introduction to other historical figures.
Students can use library and Internet resources to find biographical entries for
other historical figures.
! Students may also want to develop a scrapbook or bulletin board of historical
figures
Deepening Understanding
After completing the profiles, have students interview each other and write biographies
of their classmates. Work with students in advance to develop an interview form with the
types of questions that an interviewer might ask. Questions could include: When and
where were you born? What are your favorite hobbies? What are your special skills and
talents? Tell me about the funniest thing that ever happened to you. What kind of job
would you like to have? What is something that probably nobody knows about you? etc.
Allow students plenty of time to develop and edit the peer biographies. Once they have
been edited and corrected, the class might consider putting together a classroom book.
Before this final stage, however, students should read the biography they wrote to the
person it is about and insure accuracy.
Thinking Questions! What are the problems in writing a biography about a person from the past?
! How do historians and authors check on the facts about the life of an historical
figure?
! Is an autobiography likely to be more accurate than a biography? Why or Why
not?
! How can this be checked out?
- 38 -
James Whitcomb Riley
Picture Album
- 39 -
When historians try to learn about the past, they examine primary documents. Primary
documents are letters, journals, newspaper accounts, drawings, photographs, and other
records made during the time period being studied. These documents provide useful
evidence and clues about the past.
Have students examine the “Riley Picture Album” provided in these materials. Students
might work individually or on teams to record the clues they find in each photograph or
picture. Students should look carefully at each picture and the details it provides.
Encourage students to think like “history detectives” and ask themselves questions like
the ones below.
- 40 -
1. & 2. Riley’s Youth- These two portraits are of James Whitcomb Riley as a little boy
(age 6) and as a young adult with his four siblings seated in front.
-
Are these portrait drawings or photographs? Do you think photography had
been invented by the time the first photograph was taken? How can you find
out? Why might the Riley family have drawings made?
-
These pictures do not have dates. Can you determine when they were made?
What clues can you find? How are Riley and his siblings dressed? When was
Riley born? How old would he have been when the portrait with his siblings
was made?
3. Riley as a Painter- James Whitcomb Riley poses in front of his booth for Hawk’s Art
Gallery. By the end of the 19th century, Riley had become known as a “Poet of the
People,” but few are aware of his unusual talents as an actor, performer, and painter.
-
This photograph is undated. Can you guess approximately when it was taken?
What kind of information would help you make a good guess? What part of
Riley’s outfit (shown in the photo) did he later become known for?
-
What can you learn about James Whitcomb Riley from the way he is dressed in
the photograph? What were some of the fashions of the day? Why do you think
this photograph might have been made?
4. Riley: A Room of His Own- This photograph of Riley’s bedroom at his home on
Lockerbie Street was made near the time of his death in 1916.
-
What can you tell about James Whitcomb Riley from looking at his room? How
do you think he may have spent his free time? What objects do you see in the
room? How is it heated? What kind of lighting did it have? What pictures are on
the wall?
-
Can you make any guesses about the things that were important to Riley from
looking at his surrounding?
-
As a follow up to viewing this photograph, students might want to take a
snapshot of the classroom or draw a picture of their own room at home and
create their own “primary document” for discussion.
- 41 -
5. Riley, the Children’s Poet- This photograph of Riley, surrounded by children and
with his little dog, Lockerbie, on his lap, was taken in June 1916 at his home. The
photograph was taken during the celebration of Indiana’s statehood centennial in that
year. Riley died soon after on July 22, 1916.
-
What are some things that you can tell about Riley in this photograph?
What kind of clothes are the children wearing? Why is Riley dressed so
differently?
What items of “dress up” clothing seem to be common for children in 1916? Do
children wear similar things today?
6. Funeral Ceremonies for Riley, July 1916- This undated photograph shows Riley’s
coffin being moved from the house on Lockerbie Street. Very probably, it was taken on
July 23 or July 25, 1916. On July 23, Riley’s body was carried from his home to the
Indiana Capitol where it lay in state for six hours with 35,000 mourners paying respects.
Riley’s coffin was returned to the Lockerbie Street home on July 25 for a funeral service.
He was buried at Crown Hill Cemetery.
-
Can you find clues about how people in Riley’s time may have felt about him in
this photograph? What other information about Riley’s times can you find in this
photograph?
- 42 -
1. James Whitcomb Riley at age 6
- 43 -
2. James Whitcomb Riley (back, standing)
with four of his five siblings
- 44 -
3. Riley as a painter – an early profession
- 45 -
4. Riley: a room of his own on Lockerbie Street
- 46 -
5. Riley, the Children’s Poet, surrounded
by local youth and accompanied by beloved
dog, Lockerbie
- 47 -
6. Funeral Ceremonies for James Whitcomb Riley,
July 1916
- 48 -
Mrs. Holstein, close friend to Mr. Riley and
daughter of the Lockerbie Street home’s original owners,
holding “Lockerbie,” Riley’s dog
- 49 -
CELEBRATIONS
Coffee, Tea, or Riley
In order to help students become immersed in the times of Riley, plan a Victorian tea
party with James Whitcomb Riley as the guest of honor. Students can prepare
illustrated invitations for parents, school administrators, community leaders, etc. They
will need to carry out research on etiquette, dress, and the types of foods that might
have been served at a tea during Riley's time. Utilize community resources (community
theatre groups, good will stores, antique dealers, etc.) to borrow appropriate costumes
and props for the event. Poetry readings, which were a popular form of entertainment in
Victorian times, should be integrated into the tea. Seek out help from parent volunteers,
grandparents, interested community members, local historical societies, etc. in planning
and putting on a "proper tea."
- 50 -
Happy Birthday, Mr. Riley
Plan a birthday party for James Whitcomb Riley on October 7 of each year! (1999 was
the 150th anniversary of his birth). Make a math lesson out of the event and have the
student determine which anniversary is being celebrated. Then have students calculate
in what year they will personally celebrate the same anniversary of their own birth.
It is hoped that schools across the State of Indiana will hold birthday celebrations
annually on this date. Special invitations, birthday cake(s), dramatizations, poetry
readings, and presentations of student produced work related to the life and times of
James Whitcomb Riley could all be included in the celebration. Students should be
utilized in the planning and execution of all aspects of planning and putting on the
celebration. This may be celebrated in one classroom, or an event involving the entire
school and/or community may be held. Local new media is sure to be interested in your
school's observation and celebration of James Whitcomb Riley's birthday anniversary!
Don't forget that a community-wide celebration is an excellent opportunity for your
school to participate in community service by including special events in conjunction
with your birthday celebration that raise funds for the Riley Kids Caring and Sharing
program.
- 51 -
SNICKERDOODLES
James Whitcomb Riley’s favorite cookie was
the Snickerdoodle. On his birthday each year,
they are served to all visitors who come to his
Lockerbie Street home. He would have liked this
recipe shared with you:
!
1 cup soft shortening or margarine
!
1-1/2 cups granulated sugar
!
2 eggs
!
2-3/4 cups sifted flour
!
2 teaspoons cream of tarter
!
1 teaspoon baking soda
!
½ teaspoon salt
Cream shortening or margarine, slowly add sugar, then eggs. Mix together dry
ingredients and add to creamed mixture. Chill the dough. When ready to bake, shape
into balls the size of small walnuts and roll in a mixture of 2 tablespoons granulated
sugar and 2 teaspoons cinnamon. Place 2 inches apart on an ungreased baking sheet.
Bake at 400 degrees until lightly browned, but still soft (about 8-10 minutes). These
cookies puff up at first, then flatten out with crinkled tops. Yields about 5 dozen 2-inch
cookies.
- 52 -
Literary Excerpts and Poetry
IF YOU GREW UP WITH JAMES WHITCOMB RILEY
by Elizabeth J. Van Allen
(abbreviated version used with permission of the author)
James Whitcomb Riley was born in 1849 in a small
cabin. He lived with his mother and father in the small
town of Greenfield, Indiana. Nearby, there were woods
full of lots of animals, but there weren’t many people.
James loved being with his mother, Elizabeth Riley. She
was pretty with light brown hair and blue eyes. She was kind and patient, and she loved
telling stories and making up rhymes. James’s father, Reuben Riley, was a respected
lawyer. He was also a captain in the Civil War. James learned how to tell stories in front
of lots of people from his father. Reuben Riley was good at giving speeches. They made
people laugh and laugh.
James had five brothers and sister, John, Martha, Elva May, Humboldt, and Mary.
Martha and Humboldt died when they were very young. James stayed very close to
John, Elva May, and Mary. His little sister Mary was his favorite.
As James’s father could, he built on to the cabin. The Riley family was very proud of
their new house. It was much bigger than the cabin, but there was no running water or
electricity.
During lazy summer days, the Riley children went to play by the “Old Swimmin’ Hole.”
James climbed the trees and ran on it banks. He loved the way the water “Sounded like
the laugh of something we onc’t used to know” and the way it reflected his “face in its
warm sunny tide.”
The rag man used to come to Greenfield when James was a boy. He would work for his
father chopping wood, feeding the horses, milking the cow, and spading the garden.
James called him the “Raggedy Man.” He knew “most rhymes” and told them to James
if he was good.
James moved to Indianapolis in the fall of 1879 to write articles, stories, and poetry for a
newspaper. Indianapolis was growing quickly at the end of the nineteenth century. The
streets were bustling with activity.
- 53 -
After moving from place to place, all over Indianapolis, James came to live with some
friends in this big house on a little road called Lockerbie Street. It was a friendly, quiet
neighborhood where the doors were always open and everyone knew each other.
James Whitcomb Riley was beloved by people all across the country. After he died, his
friends came together and founded the James Whitcomb Riley Memorial Association in
his memory. The Riley Memorial Association- now the Riley Children's Foundationsupports Riley Hospital for Children, Camp Riley for youth with disabilities, and the
James Whitcomb Riley museum home on Lockerbie Street. Through the Foundation,
the hospital, the camp, and the home, James Whitcomb Riley lives on.
- 54 -
LOCKERBIE STREET
(1880)
Such a dear little street it is, nestled away
From the noise of the city and heat of the day,
In cool shady coverts of whispering trees,
With their leaves lifted up to shake hands with the breeze
Which in all its wide wanderings never may meet
With a resting-place fairer than Lockerbie Street!
There is such a relief, from the clangor and din
Of the heart of the town, to go loitering in
Through the dim, narrow walks, with the sheltering shade
Of the trees waving over the long promenade,
And littering lightly the ways of our feet
With the fold of the sunshine of Lockerbie Street.
And the nights that come down the dark pathways of dusk,
With the starts in their tresses, and odors of musk
In their moon-woven raiments, bespangled with dews,
And looped up with lilies for lovers to use
In the songs that they sing to the tinkle and beat
Of their sweet serenadings through Lockerbie Street.
O my Lockerbie Street! You are fair to be seenBe it noon of the day, or the rare and serene
Afternoon of the night—you are one to my heart,
And I love you above all the phrases of art,
For no language could frame and no lips could repeat
My rhyme-haunted raptures of Lockerbie Street.
- 55 -
WHEN THE FROST IS ON THE PUNKIN
(1882)
When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock,
And you hear the kyouck and the gobble of the struttin’ turkey-cock
And the clackin’ of the guineys, and the cluckin’ of the hens,
And the rooster’s hallylooyer as he tiptoes on the fence;
O, it’s then’s the times a feller is a-feelin’ at his best,
With the risin’ sun to greet him from a night of peaceful rest,
As he leaves the house, barehanded, and goes out to feed the stock,
When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock.
They’s something kindo’ harty-like about the atmusfere
When the heat of summer’s over and the coolin’ fall is here—
Of course we miss the flowers, and the blossums on the trees,
And the mumble of the hummin’-birds and buzzin’ of the bees;
But the air’s so appetizin’; and the landscape through the haze
Of a crisp and sunny morning of the airly autumn days
Is a pictur’ that no painter has the colorin’ to mock—
When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock.
The husky, rusty Russell of the tossels of the corn,
And the raspin’ of the tangled leaves, as golden as the morn;
The stubble in the furries—kindo’ lonesome-like, but still
A-preachin’ sermons to us of the bans they growed to fill;
The strawstack in the medder, and the reaper in the shed;
The hosses in theyr stalls below—the clover overhead!—
O’ it sets my hart a-clickin’ like the tickin’ of a clock,
When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock!
Then your apples all is gethered, and the ones a feller keeps
Is poured around the celler-floor in red and yeller heaps;
And your cider-makin’ ‘s over, and your wimmern-folks is through
With their mince and apple-butter, and theyr souse and sausage too!...
I don’t know how to tell it—but ef sich a thing could be
As the Angels wantin’ boardin’, and they’d call around on me—
I’d want to ‘commodate ‘em—all the whole-indurin’ flock—
When the frost is on the punkin and the fodder’s in the shock!
- 56 -
THE OLD SWIMMIN’-HOLE
(1883)
Oh! the old swimmin’-hole! whare the crick so still and deep
Looked like a baby-river that was laying half asleep,
And the gurgle of the worter round the drift jest below
Sounded like the laugh of something we onc’t ust to know
Before we could remember anything but the eyes
Of the angels lookin’ out as we left Paradise;
But the merry days of youth is beyond our controle,
And it’s hard to part forever with the old swimmin’-hole.
Oh! the old swimmin’-hole! in the happy days of yore,
When I ust to lean above it on the old sickamore,
Oh! it showed me a face in its warm sunny tide
That gazed back at me so gay and glorified,
It made me love myself, as I leaped to caress
My shadder smilin’ up at me with sich tenderness.
But them days is past and gone, and old Time’s tuck his toll
From the old man come back to the old swimmin’-hole.
Oh! the old swimmin’-hole! in the long, lazy days
When the humdrum of school made so many run-a-ways,
How plesant was the jurney down the old dusty lane,
Whare the tracks of our bare feet was all printed so plane
You could tell by the dent of the heel and the sole
They was lots o’ fun on hands at the old swimmin’-hole.
But the lost joys is past! Let your tears in sorrow roll
Like the rain that ust to dapple up the old swimmin’-hole.
There the bullrushes growed, and the cattails so tall,
And the sunshine and shadder fell over it all;
And it mottled the worter with amber and gold
Tel the glad lilies rocked in the ripples that rolled;
And the snake-feeder’s four gauzy wings fluttered by
Like the ghost of a daisy dropped out of the sky,
Or a wownded apple-blossom in the breeze’s controle
As it cut acrost some orchurd to’rds the old swimmin’-hole.
Oh! the old swimmin’-hole! when I last saw the place,
The scenes was all changed, like the change in my face;
The bridge of the railroad now crosses the spot
Whare the old divin’-log lays sunk and fergot.
And I stray down the banks whare the trees ust to be—
But never again will theyr shade shelter me.
And I wish in my sorrow I could strip to the soul,
And dive off in my grave like the old swimmin’-hole.
- 57 -
LITTLE ORPHANT ANNIE
(1885)
Little Orphant Annie’s come to our house to stay,
An’ wash the cups an’ saucers up, an’ brush the crumbs away,
An’ shoo the chickens off the porch, an’ dust the hearth, an’ sweep,
An’ make the fire, an’ bake the bread, an’ earn her board-an’-keep;
An’ all us other children, when the supper-things is done,
We set around the kitchen fire an’ has the mostest fun
A-list’nin’ to the witch-tales ‘at Annie tells about,
An’ the Gobble-uns’ at gets you—Ef you Don’t
Watch
Out!
Wunst they wuz a little boy wouldn’t say his prayers,-An when he went to bed at night, away up stairs,
His Mammy heerd him holler, an’ his Daddy heerd him bawl,
An’ when they turn’t the kivvers down, he wuzn’t there at all!
An’ they seeked him in the rafter-room, an’ cubby hole, an’ press,
An’ seeked him up the chimbley-flue, an’ ever’wheres, I guess;
But all they ever found wuz thist his pants an’ roundabout:-An’ the Gobble-uns’ at gets you—Ef you Don’t
Watch
Out!
An’ one time a little girl ‘ud allus laugh an’ grin,
An’ make fun of ever’one, an’ all her blood an’ kin;
An’ wunst, when they was “company”, an’ old folks wuz there,
She mocked ‘em an’ shocked ‘em, an’ said she didn’t care!
An’ thist as she kicked her heels, an’ turn’t to run an’ hide,
They wuz two great big Black Things a-standin’ by her side,
An’ they snatched her through the ceilin’ ‘fore she knowed what she’s about!
An’ the Gobble-uns’ at gets you—Ef you Don’t
Watch
Out!
An’ Little Orphant Annie says, when the blaze is blue,
An’ the lamp-wick sputters, an’ the wind goes woo-oo!
An’ you hear the crickets quit, an’ the moon is gray,
An’ the lighnin’-bugs in dew is all squenched away,-You better mind yer parunts an’ yer teachers fond an’ dear,
An’ churish them ‘at loves you, an’ dry the orphant’s tear,
An’ he’p the pore an’ needy ones ‘at clusters all about,
An’ the Gobble-uns’ at gets you—Ef you Don’t
Watch
- 58 -
Out!
WHEN THE GREEN GITS BACK IN THE TREES
(1888)
In Spring, when the green gits back in the trees,
And the sun comes out and stays,
And yer boots pulls on with a good tight squeeze,
And you think of yer bare-foot days;
When you ort to work and you want to not,
And you and yer wife agrees
It’s time to spade up the garden-lot,
When the green gits back in the trees
Well! work is the least o’ my ideas
When the green, you know, gets back in the trees!
When the green gets back in the trees, and bees
Is a-buzzing’ aroun’ ag’in
In that kind of a lazy go-as-you-please
Old gait they bum roun’ in;
When the groun’s all bald whare the hay-rick stood,
And the crick’s riz, and the breeze
Coaxes the bloom in the old dogwood,
And the green gits back in the trees,-I like, as I say, in sich scenes as these,
The time when the green gits back in the trees!
When the whole tail-fethers o’ Wintertime
Is all pulled out and gone!
And the sap it thaws and begins to climb,
And the swet it starts out on
A feller’s forred, a-gitten’ down
At the old spring on his knees—
I kindo’ like jest a-loaferin’ roun’
When the green gits back in the trees—
Jest a-potterin’ roun’ as I—durn—please—
When the green, you know, gits back in the trees!
- 59 -
OUR HIRED GIRL
(1890)
Our hired girl, she’s ‘Lizabuth Ann;
An’ she can cook best things to eat!
She ist puts dough in our pie-pan,
An’ pours in somepin’ ‘at’s good and sweet,
An’ nen she salts it all on top
With cinnamon; an’ nen she’ll stop
An’ stoop an’ slide it, ist as slow,
In th’ old cook-stove, so’s ‘twon’t slop
An’ git all spilled; nen bakes it, so
It’s custard pie, first thing you know!
An’ nen she’ll say:
“Clear out o’ my way!
They’s time fer work, an’ time fer play!—
Take yer dough, an’ run, Child; run!
Er I cain’t get no cookin’ done!”
When our hired girl ‘tends like she’s mad,
An’ says folks got to walk the chalk
When she’s around, er wisht they had,
I play out on our porch an’ talk
To th’ Raggedy Man ‘at mows our lawn;
An’ he say “Whew!” an ‘nen leans on
His old crook-scythe, and blinks his eyes
An’ sniffs all around an’ says,-- “I swawn!
Ef my old nose don’t tell me lies,
It ‘pears like I smell custard-pies!”
An’ nen he’ll say,-“ ‘Clear out o’ my way!
They’s time fer work an’ time fer play!
Take yer dough, an’ run, Child; run!
Er she cain’t get no cookin’ done!’ ”
Wunst our hired girl, when she
Got the supper, an’ we all et,
An’ it wuz night, an’ Ma an’ me
An’ Pa went wher’ the “Social” met,-An’ nen when we come home, an’ see
A light in the kitchen-door, an’ we
Heerd a maccordeun, Pa says “Lan’O’-Gracious! who can her beau be?”
An’ I marched in, an’ ‘Lizabuth Ann
Wuz parchin’ corn fer the Raggedy Man!
Better say
“Clear out o’ the way!
They’s time fer work, an’ time fer play!
Take the hint, an’ run, Child; run!
Er we cain’t git no courtin’ done!”
- 60 -
THE RAGGEDY MAN
(1890)
O the Raggedy Man! He works fer Pa;
An’ he’s the goodest man ever you saw!
He comes to our house every day,
An’ waters the horses, an’ feeds ‘em hay;
‘An’ he opens the shed—an’ we all ist laugh
When he drives out our little old wobble-ly calf;
An’ nen—ef our hired girl says he can—
He milks the cow fer ‘Lizabuth Ann—
Ain’t he a’ awful good Raggedy Man?
Raggedy! Raggedy! Raggedy Man!
W’y, The Raggedy Man—he’s ist so good,
He splits the kindlin’ an’ chops the wood;
An’ nen he spades in our garden, too,
An’ does most things ‘at boys can’t do!—
He clumbed clean up in our big tree
An’ shooked a’ apple down her me—
An’ nother’n, too, fer ‘Lizabuth Ann—
An’ nother’n, too, fer The Raggedy Man—
Ain’t he a’ awful kind Raggedy Man?
Raggedy! Raggedy! Raggedy Man!
An’ The Raggedy Man one time say he
Pick’ roast’ rambos from a’ orchurd-tree,
An’ et em—all ist roast’ an’ hot!—
An’ it’s so, too!—‘cause a corn-crib got
Afire one time an’ all burn’ down
On “The Smoot Farm,” ‘bout four mile from town—
On “The Smoot Farm”! Yes—an’ the hired han’
‘At worked there nen ‘uz The Raggedy Man!—
Ain’t he the beatin’est Raggedy Man?
Raggedy! Raggedy! Raggedy Man!
- 61 -
Resources and Bibliography
SOURCES OF INFORMATION
!
The James Whitcomb Riley Lockerbie Street Home, 528 Lockerbie Street,
Indianapolis, IN 46202. 317-631-5885.
!
James Whitcomb Riley Birthplace and Museum, 250 W. Main Street, Greenfield,
IN 46140. 317-462-8539.
!
James Whitcomb Riley: A Life. Biography of James Whitcomb Riley by Elizabeth
Van Allen, published by Indiana University Press, 1999.
!
Indiana Historical Bureau. 140 North Senate Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 46202.
317-232-2535. email: [email protected]
!
Indiana Historical Society. 450 West Ohio Street, Indianapolis, IN 46202.
317.232.1882. www.indianahistory.org
!
Historical Landmarks Foundation of Indiana, 340 West Michigan Street,
Indianapolis, IN 46202. 317-639-4534, 800-450-4534.
www.historiclandmarks.org. email: [email protected]
!
Riley burial site: Crown Hill Cemetery, 700 West 38th Street, Indianapolis, IN.
800-809-3366. www.crownhill.org
- 62 -
BIBLIOGRAPHY
“Riley on Riley.” The Indiana Historian. Indiana Historical Bureau, April 1995.
Dickey, Marcus. The Maturity of James Whitcomb Riley. Indianapolis, Indiana: The
Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1922.
Manlove, Donald C., ed. The Best of James Whitcomb Riley. Bloomington, Indiana:
Indiana University Press, 1982.
Morgan, John H., ed. Riley in Memoriam: A Celebration Anthology by the Poets of
Indiana: James Whitcomb Riley. Bristol, Indiana: Wyndham Hall Press, 1989.
Nolan, Jeanette C. James Whitcomb Riley: Hoosier Poet. New York, New York:
Julian Messner, Inc., 1941.
Phelps, William Lyon. Letters of James Whitcomb Riley. Indianapolis, Indiana: The
Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1930.
Riley, James Whitcomb. Complete Works. Memorial Edition. Indianapolis, Indiana:
The Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1916.
Russo, Anthony J., and Dorothy R. Russon. A Bibliography of James Whitcomb
Riley. Indianapolis, Indiana: Indiana Historical Society, 1944.
Stevenson, Burton Egbert. The Home Book of Verse. Chicago, Illinois: Holt, Rinehart
and Winston, 1965.
Vawter, Will. Riley Child-Rhymes. Indianapolis, Indiana: The Bobbs-Merrill
Company, 1992.
Williams, Thomas Earl. James Whitcomb Riley: The Poet as Flying Islands of the
Night. Greenfield, Indiana: Coiny Publishing Company, 1992.
Author Unknown. The Youth of James Whitcomb Riley. Indianapolis, Indiana: The
Bobbs-Merrill Company, 1919.
* Please go to an online bookstore (amazon.com, ebay.com, etc.) for availability
of materials if your local library does not have the above resources.
- 63 -
POEMS AND OTHER WRITINGS BY JAMES WHITCOMB RILEY
!
Child-Rhymes, Bowen-Merrill, 1899.
!
Love-Lyrics, illustrated by William B. Dyer, Bowen-Merrill, 1899, illustrated by
Vawter, Bobbs-Merrill, 1920.
!
Farm-Rhymes, Bowen-Merrill, 1901.
!
The Book of Joyous Children, Scribner, Old Tappan, New Jersey, 1902.
!
His Pa’s Romance, Bobbs-Merrill, 1903.
!
A Defective Santa Claus, illustrated by Vawter and C.M. Relyea, BobbsMerrill, 1904.
!
Songs O’ Cheer, Bobbs-Merrill, Old Tappan, New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 1905.
!
Songs of Summer, Bobbs-Merrill, 1908.
!
Songs of Home, Bobbs-Merrill, 1910.
!
When the Frost Is on the Pumpkin, and Other Poems, Bobbs-Merrill, 1911.
!
A Summer’s Day, and Other Poems, Bobbs-Merrill, 1911.
!
Down around the River, Bobbs-Merrill, 1911.
!
The Prayer Perfect, and Other Poems, Bobbs-Merrill, 1912.
!
Knee-deep in June, and Other Poems, Bobbs-Merrill, 1912.
!
Away, Bobbs-Merrill, 1913.
!
Songs of Friendship, Bobbs-Merrill, 1915.
!
Hoosier Stories, Bobbs-Merrill, 1917.
!
Fairy Tales, Bobbs-Merrill, 1923.
!
Home Again with Me, Bobbs-Merrill, 1908.
!
Roses, Bobbs- Merrill, 1909.
!
The Girl I Loved, Bobbs-Merrill, 1910.
!
When She Was About Sixteen, Bobbs-Merrill, 1911.
- 64 -
!
Good-bye, Jim, Bobbs-Merrill, 1913.
!
A Discouraging Model, Bobbs-Merrill, 1914.
!
The Runaway Boy, Bobbs-Merrill, 1906.
!
The Raggedy Man, Bobbs-Merrill, 1907.
!
Child Verse, Bobbs-Merrill, 1908.
!
A Host of Children, Bobbs-Merrill, 1920.
!
(Under pseudonym Benjamin F. Johnson, of
Boone) “The Old Swimming’ Hole,” and
‘Leven More Poems, Merrill, Meigs, 1883.
!
The Boss Girl: A Christmas Story, and Other Sketches, Bowen-Merrill, 1886.
!
Afterwhiles, Bowen-Merrill, 1887.
!
Old-fashioned Roses, Bowen-Merrill, 1888.
!
Pipes O’Pan at Zekesbury, Bowen-Merrill, 1889.
!
(With Edgar Wilson Nye) Fun, Wit, and Humor, Bowen-Merrill, 1890.
!
Sketches in Prose, and Occasional Verses, Bowen-Merrill, 1891.
!
An Old Sweetheart, Bowen-Merrill, 1891, reprinted as An Old Sweetheart of
Mine, 1902.
!
Neighborly Poems, Bowen-Merrill, 1891.
!
Rhymes of Childhood, [Indianapolis], 1891.
!
The Flying Islands of Night, Bowen-Merrill, 1892, illustrated by Franklin Booth,
Bobbs-Merrill, 1913.
!
Green Fields and Running Brooks, Bowen-Merrill, 1893.
!
(With Nye) Poems and Yarns, Neely, 1893.
!
Poems Here at Home, illustrated by E. W. Kemble, Century, 1893.
!
Armanzindy, Bowen-Merrill, 1894.
- 65 -
!
The Days Gone By, and other Poems, E. A. Weeks, 1895.
!
A Tinkle of Bells, and other Poems, E. A. Weeks, 1895.
!
A Child-World, Bowen-Merrill, 1987.
!
Rubaiyat of Doc Sifers, illustrated by C. M. Relyea, Century, 1897.
!
Home-Folks, Bowen-Merrill, 1900.
!
Out to Old Aunt Mary’s, Bobbs-Merrill, 1903.
!
Gems from Riley, De Wolfe, Fiske, 1904.
!
Morning, Bobbs-Merrill, 1907.
!
The Boys of the Old Glee Club, Bobbs-Merrill,
1907.
!
The Orphant Annie Book, [Indianapolis], 1908.
!
Old School Day Romances, illustrated by E.
Stetson Crawford, Bobbs-Merrill, 1909.
!
A Hoosier Romance, 1868, illustrated by John W. Adams, Century, 1910.
!
The Lockerbie Book, edited by Hewitt H. Howland, Bobbs-Merrill, 1911.
!
Mrs. Miller, Bobbs-Merrill, 1912.
!
All the Year Round, illustrated by Gustave Baumann, Bobbs-Merrill, 1912.
!
A Song of Long Ago, Bobbs-Merrill, 1913.
!
Her Beautiful Eyes, Bobbs-Merrill, 1913.
!
He and I, Bobbs-Merrill, 1913.
!
Do They Miss Me, Bobbs-Merrill, 1913.
!
When My Dreams Come True, Bobbs-Merrill, 1913.
!
The Riley Baby Book, illustrated by William Cotton, Bobbs-Merrill, 1913.
!
The Rose, Bobbs-Merrill, 1913.
- 66 -
!
When She Comes Home, Bobbs-Merrill, 1914.
!
To My Friend, Bobbs-Merrill, 1914.
!
Just Be Glad, Bobbs-Merrill, 1914.
!
The Glad Sweet Face of Her, Bobbs-Merrill,
1914.
!
Contentment, Bobbs-Merrill, 1914.
!
The Old Times, Bobbs-Merrill, 1915.
!
The Old Soldier’s Story, Bobbs-Merrill, 1915.
!
The Hoosier Book, edited by Howland, BobbsMerrill, 1915.
!
The Name of Glory, Bobbs-Merrill, 1917.
!
Little Orphant Annie, illustrated by Diane Stanley, New York, NY, Putnam,
1983.
- 67 -
COLLECTIONS
The Poems and Prose Sketches of James Whitcomb Riley, sixteen volumes, Scribner,
1897-1914.
The Complete Works of James Whitcomb Riley, six volumes, Bobbs-Merrill, 1913.
The Best of James Whitcomb Riley, Indiana University Press, 1982.
Riley in Memoriam: A Celebrative Anthology by the Poets of Indiana, Wyndham Press
(Bristol, Indiana) 1989.
The Complete Poetical Works of James Whitcomb Riley, Indiana University Press
(Bloomington, Indiana) 1993.
Little Orphant Annie, and Other Poems, Dover Publications (New York City) 1994.
(Riley bookplate)
- 68 -