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Times Leader
Leader
SKYBOX
HEADLINE
Skybox text
goes here. —
See 1B
SERVING
Serving WEST
West POINT
Point & CLAY
Clay COUNTY
County SINCE
Since 1867
SUNDAY,
Sunday,December
December 8,8,2013
2013
www.dailytimesleader.com
75 cents
Pit bull attacks West Point child
BY
BY MARY
MARY GARRISON
GARRISON
[email protected]
[email protected]
A
A West
West Point
Point toddler
toddler is
is recovering
recovering
from
from injuries
injuries suffered
suffered during
during aa pit
pit bull
bull
attack
attack on
on Thursday.
Thursday.
According
According to
to aa statement
statement issued
issued by
by
West
West Point
Point Police
Police Department,
Department, at
at
about
about 55 p.m.
p.m. Thursday
Thursday officers
officers were
were
dispatched
dispatched to
to aa residence
residence on
on Clay
Clay Street
Street
regarding
regarding aa possible
possible dog
dog attack.
attack. Upon
Upon
arrival,
arrival, encountered
encountered evidence
evidence to
to suggest
suggest
the
the child,
child, aa 3-year-old
3-year-old boy
boy whose
whose name
name
has
has not
not been
been released,
released, had
had been
been attacked
attacked
by
by aa pit
pit bull
bull chained
chained up
up on
on the
the outside
outside
of
of the
the residence
residence in
in which
which he
he was
was
staying.
staying.
While
While several
several adults
adults were
were present
present in
in
the
the home,
home, the
the child
child reportedly
reportedly slipped
slipped
outside
outside unsupervised.
unsupervised. Neighbors
Neighbors heard
heard
the
the attack
attack and
and alerted
alerted those
those in
in the
the
home.
home.
According
According to
to West
West Point
Point Police
Police
Chief
Chief Tim
Tim Brinkley,
Brinkley, an
an adult
adult in
in the
the
home
home struck
struck the
the dog
dog with
with aa baseball
baseball bat
bat
to
to free
free the
the child.
child. An
An adult
adult on
on scene
scene
took
took the
the him
him to
to North
North Mississippi
Mississippi
Medical
Medical Center
Center in
in West
West Point
Point prior
prior to
to
officers’
officers’ arrival.
arrival. He
He was
was treated
treated for
for bite
bite
wounds
wounds to
to the
the head,
head, shoulders,
shoulders, neck
neck
and
and lower
lower extremities,
extremities, in
in addition
addition to
to
several
several deep
deep lacerations.
lacerations. The
The injuries
injuries
were
were not
not considered
considered life-threatening,
life-threatening,
but
but Brinkley
Brinkley said
said itit could
could have
have been
been far
far
worse.
worse.
“We
“We feel
feel confident
confident that
that ifif neighbors
neighbors
hadn’t
hadn’t witnessed
witnessed the
the attack
attack and
and brought
brought
itit to
to the
the attention
attention of
of adults
adults in
in the
the home,
home,
See ATTACK || Page 5A
Yokohama
Boulevard
bids begin
Out with the old
BY
BY JUSTIN
JUSTIN MINYARD
MINYARD
[email protected]
[email protected]
—
— Justin
Justin Minyard/Daily
Minyard/DailyTimes
Times Leader
Leader
Pictured is the post- and
pre-demolition of what was
the old Trailway Bus Station
located on Brame Avenue.
The site is the future
location of a brand new
District 5 voting precinct
which is not only expected
to serve the function of
citizen electoral voting, but
also harbor space that can
be utilized for recreational
purposes such as a wedding
reception, family reunion
and the like.
Parker unveils first novel
at Luncheon with Books
BY
BY DONNA
DONNA SUMMERALL
SUMMERALL
[email protected]
[email protected]
Starkville
Starkville author
author Laurie
Laurie Parker
Parker
is
is making
making an
an appearance
appearance at
at noon
noon
Dec.
Dec. 11,
11, during
during Luncheon
Luncheon with
with
Books
Books at
at the
the Bryan
Bryan Public
Public Library.
Library.
She
She will
will be
be discussing
discussing her
her first
first
novel
novel Matchstick
Matchstick Cross.
Cross.
Southern
Southern sentiment,
sentiment, nostalgia
nostalgia
and
and conversations
conversations about
about the
the
insignificant
insignificant with
with her
her gay
gay best
best
friend
friend help
help flavor
flavor this
this saga
saga of
of aa
single
single woman’s
woman’s sorrows,
sorrows, successes
successes
and
and spiritual
spiritual seeking.
seeking. The
The
Matchstick
Matchstick Cross
Cross is
is aa tale
tale of
of
journeying
journeying back,
back, of
of sorting
sorting
through
through memories,
memories, of
of unboxing
unboxing
things
things long-stored,
long-stored, and
and of
of trying
trying
Vol. 146, Issue No. 283
to
to make
make sense
sense of
of it
it all.
all.
“I’ve
“I’ve written
written 13
13 books,
books, yet
yet II
feel
feel aa bit
bit like
like aa first-time
first-time author
author
now
now that
that I’m
I’m releasing
releasing aa novel.
novel.
Which
Which II did
did completely
completely as
as aa way
way
to
to get
get back
back at
at people
people for
for not
not liking
liking
to
to read,”
read,” said
said Parker.
Parker. “Seriously,
“Seriously, it
it
was
was inspired
inspired by
by aa disheartening
disheartening
trend
trend I’ve
I’ve been
been witnessing
witnessing in
in
recent
recent years
years as
as aa children’s
children’s book
book
author.
author. Folks
Folks don’t
don’t read
read like
like they
they
used
used to.
to. People
People come
come into
into my
my
booth
booth at
at events
events where
where II am
am selling
selling
my
my artwork
artwork and
and books,
books, they
they pick
pick
up
up my
my children’s
children’s books,
books, open
open
them,
them, and
and immediately
immediately upon
upon
seeing
seeing that
that they
they have
have more
more than
than
See LUNCHEON || Page 5A
ON THE INSIDE
Daily
Daily 75¢
75¢ See YOKOHAMA || Page 5A
Clay County residents earn GEDs
—
— Mary
Mary Garrison/Daily
Garrison/DailyTimes
Times Leader
Leader
Graduates from East Mississippi Community College listen to speakers during the winter
commencement ceremony Thursday night on the Golden Triangle campus just outside of West
Point. Of those completing the course curriculum were 16 Clay County residents. See Tuesday’s
edition of Daily Times Leader for details and a complete listing.
1. South Side Elementary announces its Fire Department coloring contest
6A
winners.
2. With farm bill talks
© 2013
Momentum
Momentum is
is steadily
steadily gaining
gaining speed
speed in
in the
the
construction
construction of
of the
the much-anticipated
much-anticipated
Yokohama
Yokohama Tire
Tire Company
Company Manufacturing
Manufacturing
Plant.
Plant. Beginning
Beginning today
today and
and ending
ending at
at 10
10
a.m.
a.m. Dec.
Dec. 19,
19, the
the Clay
Clay County
County Board
Board of
of
Supervisors
Supervisors will
will be
be accepting
accepting bids
bids on
on the
the
construction
construction of
of state-aid
state-aid roads
roads for
for the
the
Yokohama
Yokohama Boulevard
Boulevard project.
project.
Robert
Robert Calvert,
Calvert, president
president of
of CalvertCalvertSpradling
Spradling Engineers
Engineers Inc.,
Inc., said
said the
the project
project
will
will consist
consist of
of laying
laying four
four miles
miles of
of road
road
stretching
stretching from
from Hwy.
Hwy. 45
45 to
to Barton
Barton Ferry
Ferry
Road
Road In
In addition
addition to
to constructing
constructing the
the twotwolane
lane road,
road, Calvert
Calvert said
said the
the contractor
contractor
awarded
awarded the
the bid
bid will
will be
be tasked
tasked with
with erecting
erecting
four
four bridges
bridges throughout
throughout the
the stretch
stretch of
of road.
road.
The
The construction
construction of
of Yokohama
Yokohama Boulevard
Boulevard
is
is essential
essential in
in that
that itit creates
creates aa direct
direct route
route to
to
the
the plant
plant site,
site, according
according to
to West
West Point
Point Chief
Chief
Administrator
Administrator Randy
Randy Jones.
Jones. The
The current
current
route,
route, Jones
Jones said,
said, is
is inauspicious
inauspicious for
for the
the
sizable
sizable quantity
quantity of
of vehicles
vehicles that
that will
will be
be
traveling
traveling to
to and
and fro
fro during
during the
the construction
construction
of
of the
the plant.
plant.
And
And the
the deadline
deadline for
for completion
completion of
of
Yokohama
Yokohama Boulevard
Boulevard is
is nothing
nothing short
short of
of aa
feat
feat that
that will
will keep
keep construction
construction workers
workers on
on
their
their toes.
toes. Upon
Upon arrival
arrival of
of the
the bidding
bidding
deadline,
deadline, the
the respective
respective contractor
contractor will
will be
be
looming, milk prices across
the country could see a
3A
dramatic increase.
Today’s...
News
..
Today’s News
Tomorrow’s
Trends
GOOD
Good
MORNING
Morning
TO our
OUR LOYAL
to
loyal
SUBSCRIBER
subscriber
JOHN
john BENNETT
bennett
Tomorrow’s Trends
Index
Index
Business
.......
Business...........3A
....... 3A
3A
Business.
Calendar
......
Calendar
...... 2A
2A
Calendar..........2A
Classifieds
....5B
Classifieds.......5B
....5B
Classifieds.
Comics
Comics ..........4B
..........4B
Comics..............4B
Lifestyles
Lifestyles......
...... 6A
6A
Deaths..............6A
Local
Local...............
.............. 5A
5A
Food.
..................1B
Opinion
Opinion.........
........ 4A
4A
Opinion.
..........4A
Sports
Sports............1B
............1B
Sports...............5A
Weather
Weather.......
....... 3A
3A
Weather..........3A
Newsroom:
Newsroom: 494-1422
494-1422
When you buy at
home, you help your
neighbors & our town.
2A
Sunday, December 8, 2013 | Daily Times Leader
dailytimesleader.com
Community
ChurchCalendar
CHURCH ANNOUNCEMENT POLICIES
All “Church Announcements” are published as a community service on a
first-come, first-served basis and as space allows. Announcements must be
60 words or less, written in complete sentences and submitted in writing
at least five days prior to the requested dates of publication. No announcements will be taken over the telephone. Announcements submitted after
noon will not be published for the next day’s paper. To submit announcements, email [email protected]
Ongoing
u Feed the Hungry — Holy Temple Holiness Church
Women’s Ministries deliver meals to Feed the Hungry the second Saturday of each month at 10 a.m. If you or someone you
know is elderly or shut-in, and could benefit from this free delivery service, call 494-3322 before 8 a.m. the morning of the
deliveries.
u Town Creek Bible Study — Minister Lester Moore will be
holding Bible Study at Town Creek Apartments in the Laundry
Room each Tuesday night from 6 p.m. until 7 p.m. The current
13-week less is titled “How to be a Christian.” u Noonday Prayer Service — Strong Hill M.B. Church is having a prayer service from noon – 1:30 p.m. every Wednesday.
Inviting everyone seeking the power of prayer. Ministers, evangelists and pastors are welcome.
u Computer Classes — Pilgrim Grove M.B. Church is offering free computer classes for senior citizens age 60 and over
from 6 – 7 p.m. each Tuesday. Classes will teach basic beginner
computer skills. Don’t let technology pass you by.
SUNDAY, DEC. 8
u Pre-Christmas Program — Greenwood M.B. Church is having its annual pre – Christmas program at 6 p.m. Everyone is
welcome to come and sing, perform a skit, read a poem or do a
mime troop presentation.
FRIDAY, DEC. 13
u Women’s Discipleship Service — Progress Street Church
of God wishes to invite everyone to their women’s discipleship
service at 7 p.m. Guest speaker is Evangelist Virginia Ivy of New
Greater St. Mark Holiness Outreach Ministry. Her church family
are special guests.
SUNDAY, DEC. 15
u Christmas Musical — The combined adult choirs of Mt.
Hermon and Pilgrim Grove M.B. Churches will present traditional and nontraditional songs of the season at their Eighth
Christmas musical at 6 p.m. Pilgrim Grove will serve as this year’s
host church. The Interpretive Praise Dance Team of Greenwood
M.B. Church will be their special guests. u Christmas Concert — Mt. Zion M.B. Church in White
Station wishes to invite everyone to their Christmas concert at
5 p.m. Special guests are the church family of Kyle Chapel of
Vardaman. All who with to sing, dance or read a poem are welcome to participate.
Thanks for reading
Daily Times Leader! To
subscribe, call 494-1422
CommunityCalendar
COMMUNITY
ANNOUNCEMENT
POLICIES
All “Community Announcements”
are published as a community service
on a first-come, first-served basis
and as space allows. Announcements
must be 60 words or less, written in
complete sentences and submitted
in writing at least five days prior to
the requested dates of publication.
No announcements will be taken
over the telephone. Announcements
submitted after noon will not be
published for the next day’s paper. To
submit announcements, email [email protected]
dailytimesleader.com.
Monthly
u Civitan meetings — The
West Point Civitan Club meets
on the first and third
Wednesdays of each month at
noon in the Training Room of
NMMC-West Point. All interested persons are cordially
invited to attend.
u West Point Alumni
Chapter Meetings — The West
Point Alumni Chapter Meets on
the second Saturday of each
month at the Northside School
building on Fifth St. at noon. All
members and interested persons are invited to attend.
u City Board Meetings —
The City Board of West Point
holds its meetings the second
Tuesday of each month at City
Hall at 5:30 p.m. Work Sessions
are held every Thursday prior
to the board meeting at City
Hall at 5:30 p.m.
u American Legion Meeting
— American Legion Post 212
will meet every third Sunday of
the month at 3 p.m. at their
headquarters on Morrow St. All
members are urged to attend.
u AARP Meeting — The
Clay County AARP will meet
every third Thursday, at 5:30
p.m. at the Henry Clay
Retirement Center. All members and those interested in
AARP are urged to attend. For
more information call Ella Seay
494-8323 or Dorothy Landon
494-3577.
u Lodge Breakfast — West
Point Masonic Lodge No. 40,
sponsors a breakfast the first
Saturday of each month from
5:30 – 8:30 a.m. The public is
welcome to attend.
Ongoing
u Basic Skills Class — Free
Basic Skills class at the EMCC
West Point Center, Hwy. 45
North, Monday thru Thursday
each week, 11:30-1:30 p.m. The
Basic Skills class will prepare
you to take the WorkKeys test
and receive a Career Readiness
Certificate. WorkKeys® is a
job skills assessment that helps
employers select, hire, train,
develop, and retain a high-performance workforce. These
classes are sponsored by EMCC
Workforce Services. Please call
Mitzi Thompson at 243-2647,
to register for free classes.
u Lodge Meeting — West
Point Masonic Lodge No. 40,
will have its regularly stated
communication the third
Monday of each month. All
Master Masons are urged to
attend.
WEDNESDAY,
DEC. 11
u Welding and Carpentry
Classes — EMCC Workforce
Services is offering Welding and
Carpentry classes two nights a
week from 5 – 9 p.m. Please
contact Mitzi Thompson at 2432647.
u Luncheon with Books —
Laurie Parker of Starkville will
return to Luncheon with Books
at noon in the Esther Pippen
Meeting Room at the Bryan
Public Library. The author of 13
previous books for adults and
children, “The Matchstick Cross”
is her first novel. She will talk
about her new book. copies will
be available for $25 including
tax. Friends of the Library
invites everyone to attend.
Lunch is available for a $6 donation to Friends of the Library.
For more information, call 4944872.
u Grief Support Group —
Christ United Methodist
Church is providing support for
grieving families with a Grief
Support Group who will meet
Mondays at 6:30 p.m.
u GED Classes — EMCC
West Point Center, if offering
free GED classes at EMCC
West Point Center, Monday
thru Thursday, from 8 am – 1:30
p.m. These classes are sponsored by the Adult Basic
Education department of East
MS
Community
College. Please contact Cynthia McCrary
or Jessica Flynt at 492-8857 for
additional information.
u C2C Info — Need work
skills to get a job? EMCC
Workforce
offers
the
Counseling 2 Career program
to assist in gaining work experience. C2C classes are available
for residents of Clay, Lowndes,
and
Noxubee
counties,
Monday-Thursday from 8 a.m.3 p.m. If you are 18-21, please
contact Sha’Carla Petty at 662243-1930 or Chrystal Newman
at 662-243-1941 for more
information.
u Animal shelter help —
The West Point Clay County
Animal shelter needs foster
families for several puppies who
have been selected to go on
the next Homeward Bound
rescue.You would need to keep
the pup for two weeks, until
the day of transport. If you are
interested, please call the shelter at 524-4430.
u Ladies Auxiliary — The
American Legion Post 212
Ladies Auxiliary meet the second Thursday of each month at
6 p.m.
Through
DEC. 16
u DHS Gifts for Foster
Children — Clay County Dept.
of Human Services Division of
Family and Children Services
are now accepting gift donations for children in the foster
care system. If you would like to
adopt a child or children for
Christmas, or for more information call 494-8987 or come by
DHS office 360 Washington
Street.
Through
Dec. 19
u Decorating contest —
Daily Times Leader, in conjunction with the West Point
Growth Alliance, Hometown
Realty,
Coldwell
Banker,
Anthony’s and the Ritz Cafe, is
hosting a holiday decorating
contest for residents of Clay
County. Residents can submit
their name, number and address
to P.O. Box 1176 in West Point
for consideration. Staff will photograph participating homes to
be featured in a holiday spread
on Sunday, Dec. 22. Entries
must be received by Dec. 19.
Winners could receive a $50
gift certificate to Anthony’s, a
$25 gift card to the Ritz Cafe or
a free three-month subscription
to DTL. All Clay County residents are eligible to participate.
For more information, email
[email protected]
3A
Daily Times Leader | Sunday, December 8, 2013
dailytimesleader.com
Business
Today's Weather
Local 5-Day Forecast
Sun
Mon
12/8
48/45
Tue
12/9
50/37
Wed
12/10
44/30
Thu
12/11
12/12
53/32
50/32
Showers
early, becoming a
steady rain
later in the
day. High
48F.
Mainly
cloudy and
rainy. Highs
in the low
50s and
lows in the
upper 30s.
Partly
cloudy.
Highs in the
mid 40s and
lows in the
low 30s.
Plenty of
sun. Highs in
the low 50s
and lows in
the low 30s.
Times of sun
and clouds.
Highs in the
low 50s and
lows in the
low 30s.
Sunrise:
6:47 AM
Sunset:
4:48 PM
Sunrise:
6:48 AM
Sunset:
4:48 PM
Sunrise:
6:49 AM
Sunset:
4:48 PM
Sunrise:
6:49 AM
Sunset:
4:48 PM
Sunrise:
6:50 AM
Sunset:
4:48 PM
Mississippi At A Glance
Tupelo
45/41
— Associated Press
(From left) Senate Agriculture Committee Chair Den. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich., House Agriculture Committee Chairman Rep. Frank
Lucas, R-Okla., and Rep. Collin Peterson, D-Minn., ranking Democrat on the House Agriculture Committee, are intercepted by reporters
after negations on the Farm Bill wrapped up Wednesday on Capitol Hill in Washington.There is agreement on many parts of the legislation
but significant differences remain over funding for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, more commonly known as food stamps.
Greenville
43/38
Starkville
48/45
Milk prices could rise if farm bill looms
BY MARY CLARE JALONICK
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — A New Year's deadline that could send the price of milk skyward looms over congressional negotiators
as they try to reach agreement on a five-year
farm bill. They've been tripped up by differences over the nation's food stamp program
and how to restructure farm subsidies.
The two chambers have been far apart
on both issues for more than two years. But
the leaders of the House and Senate Agriculture committees expressed optimism after a private meeting Wednesday that they
may be able to find resolution in time to
narrowly avert the expiration of dairy subsidies on Jan. 1. If those subsidies expire,
new laws will kick in that could result in
decreased dairy supply on the commercial
market and higher prices for a gallon of
milk.
Rep. Mike Conaway of Texas, a Republican on the House-Senate farm bill conference committee, said negotiators could
possibly hold a public meeting next week
for the conference committee to settle some
of the remaining issues before the House
leaves for the year on Dec. 13. But with a
final deal still elusive, it seems unlikely that
Congress will finish the bill before the end
of the year.
On Thursday, House Speaker John
Boehner said the bill should be extended
through January while negotiators work
out their differences. Boehner also contradicted the optimism of House Agriculture
Committee Chairman Frank Lucas, R-Okla., who said Wednesday that the two sides
had made "great progress."
"You know, I've not seen any real progress on the farm bill," Boehner said. "And so
if we've got to pass a one-month extension
of the farm bill, I think we ought to be prepared to do that."
An extension is not certain, however.
Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, DNev., has said he doesn't want to extend the
bill again after Congress already extended
the bill at the beginning of this year.
Finding a compromise on cuts to the
nation's $80 billion-a-year food stamp program has been the toughest obstacle over
the last two years. The House passed a bill
this summer that would cut $4 billion from
food stamps — now known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or
SNAP — annually and allow states to create new work requirements for some recipients. The Democratic Senate, backed by
President Barack Obama, passed a farm bill
with $400 million annual cut, or a tenth of
the House cut.
Negotiators have discussed as a possibility cracking down further on a practice
in some states of giving low-income people as little as $1 a year in home heating
assistance, even when they don't have heating bills, in order to make them eligible for
increased food stamp benefits. The Senate
found its $400 million in annual cuts by
requiring that recipients receive at least
$10 in assistance to make them eligible,
while the House doubled that cut by requiring that recipients receive $20 annually — bringing the savings to around $800
million a year.
It's unclear whether a compromise
would include the new work requirements
passed by the House, but the Senate is
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unlikely to go along with those proposals. The Senate has also balked at a House
provision to end government waivers that
have allowed able-bodied adults without
dependents to receive food stamps indefinitely. That proposal has been particularly
important to House Majority Leader Eric
Cantor, R-Va.
White House spokesman Jay Carney
reiterated Obama's support for the Senate version of the bill Thursday, calling the
House SNAP cuts "unconscionable" and
harmful to families across the country.
"The president has mentioned and made
clear that there is an opportunity for bipartisan cooperation on a comprehensive farm
bill," Carney said. "And he hopes and expects that that can be achieved before the
end of the year."
Negotiators are also working out how
farm subsidies should be restructured in the
absence of a traditional subsidy called direct
payments, which are paid to farmer regardless of crop price or crop yield. Both chambers' bills would eliminate this $5 billion
annual subsidy in response to critics who
say it pays farmers not to farm. But they
have argued over how to replace those payments, with major farm groups squabbling
over whether subsidies should kick in based
on crop prices or farmer revenue, and how
to count the acreage on which the subsidies
are based.
Minnesota Rep. Collin Peterson, the
top Democrat on the House Agriculture
Committee, said negotiators had tentatively
resolved some of those subsidy issues. But
they are still waiting for analysis of how
much their proposals would cost, a process
that could take until next week.
Jackson
50/44
Rose Drug Company
137 Commerce • West Point, MS • 494-3341
2013 Bridal Registry
October 19, 2013
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45
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62
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56
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50
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53
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Mc Comb
53
Lo Cond.
51 rain
61 rain
51 rain
46 rain
36 rain
46 rain
38 rain
38 rain
37 rain
61 rain
53 rain
44 rain
49 rain
28 pt sunny
48 rain
National Cities
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Atlanta
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Dallas
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Miami
Hi
47
34
28
39
16
50
58
82
Lo Cond.
43 rain
28 cloudy
22 sn shower
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-2 pt sunny
46 cloudy
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37
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50
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64
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50
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47 rain
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City
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0 sn shower
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16
35
52
48
33
31
32
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539 East Main Street • West Point
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4A
Sunday, December 8, 2013 | Daily Times Leader
dailytimesleader.com
Opinion
Sid
SALTER
· Syndicated Columnist·
Daily Times Leader
Don Norman, publisher
The Times Herald, 1867 • Clay County Leader, 1882
Consolidated 1928
USPS 146-580
Published Tuesday - Friday and Sunday Mornings
221 East Main Street • P.O. Box 1176
West Point, MS 39773
Phone (662) 494-1422 • Fax (662) 494-1414
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EDITORIAL POLICY: This page is intended to provide
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Local
Daily Times Leader | Sunday, December 8, 2013
5A
Fashioncorner
Christmas gift ideas for her
It is December, and
Christmas is right around
the corner. Everyone is
out shopping for gifts for
their special loved ones, or
looking online for special
deals. We all want to wow
that special someone with
a gift from the heart, especially the female. What exactly do you buy for that
special lady? I will give
you a list of gift ideas that
she will appreciate.
Clothes
Women love new clothing, so an addition to her
FRIED CHICKEN
FRESH DAILY AT 5PM
8pc mixed
12pc mixed
16pc mixed
2pc Dark, fries, roll
2pc White, fries, roll
539 East Main Street • West Point
$7.99
$11.99
$15.99
$2.49
$2.99
Ashley
LOVE
· Fashion Columnist ·
wardrobe would be excellent. Because the weather
is getting colder, sweaters would be the perfect
choice as a gift. Other garment ideas may be a statement trench coat, wool
blazer or a cute striped
shirt.
Accessories
Shoes
Scarves, gloves and hats
are great gifts for that special female in your life.
Depending on the print,
these
accessories
add
warmth and vibrancy to
your wardrobe. Besides
shoes, jewelry is another excellent accessory of
choice. Gold or platinum
jewelry, as well as vintage
jewelry are perfect choices
for Christmas gifts.
Shoes are the number
one accessory that women
cannot live without. If
you look in any woman’s
closet, you will see tons of
shoes. Fuzzy snow boots
such as UGGS, combat
boots and fashionable
booties will make any
woman happy, and if you
create the dream closet,
you will make her even
happier.
See FASHION | Page 6A
6A
Sunday, December 8, 2013 | Daily Times Leader
dailytimesleader.com
Lifestyles
anniversaries
FASHION
From page 5A
Perfume
What woman does
not want perfume for
Christmas?
Not
only
does it come in a beautiful bottle, but its exotic
scent lasts throughout the
whole day. Perfumes of
choice would be J’Adore
and Miss Dior by Dior,
Cashmere Mist by Donna
Karan, Honey by Marc
Jacobs, and Endless Euphoria by Calvin Klein.
Technology
Dwight and Sandra Burchfield
Pete and Ruth Walls
Charles and Rose Smith
Three couples celebrate Golden Anniversary
Dwight and Sandra Smith Burchfield of Ridgeland, Pete and Ruth
Smith Walls of Vardaman and Charles
and Rose Smith McDaniel of Lou-
isville, are all celebrating 50 years of
marriage. Sandra, Ruth and Rose are
sisters, formerly of West Point, married within six weeks of each other. The
three couples request your presence to
celebrate this special occasion 1 p.m.
Sunday, Dec. 22, at the Sparta Opry
House in Sparta.
Women love clothing and accessories, but
what about technology?
Tablets like the iPad Air,
Samsung Galaxy Tab and
Google Nexus would be
a perfect stocking stuffer.
If she is hinting about
a new phone, of course
you cannot go wrong
with the iPhone 5S by
Apple, Moto X by Motorola, and the Nokia
Lumia 1020.
You can find these items
at your local boutiques
such as Rose’s Corner, The
Studio Salon and Boutique
and West Point Jewelry
and Gift Shop, all located
on Commerce Street, as
well as department store,
Belk, and discount store,
TJ Maxx in Columbus. If
you do not want to leave
your home, online shopping would be a better
choice. Nomorerack.com
has everything from clothing to the latest technology, at a very affordable
price. Have a great day,
and happy shopping.
Ashley Love is a fashion designer/illustrator in
West Point. You may view
her website, http://www.
behance.net/ashleylove and
her fashion blog, All About
Fashion, http://www.irrhoplaceable.blogspot.com and
contact her through email,
[email protected]
South Side coloring contest winners
Donna Summerall/Daily Times Leader
First place winners (above) rode the fire truck during the Christmas parade. Pictured (from left) are Kamdon Tyler, Latroyias Wylie,
Tytiuona Cooperwood, Jada Baker, Roy’shuna Robinson, McKenzie Taylor, Nakerricka Ewing, Ahlarious Ware, and LaDestinee Thomas.
The overall winner of the third - grade coloring contest is LaDestinee
Thomas. She was presented with a trophy and a gift card from West
Point Fire Chief Johnny Littlefield.
Third place winners are (from left) Daijah Cox, Ellia Walker,
Dimarquez Ewing, Cortez Gibson, Josie Facella, DChristopher
Cannon, Katelyn Keenum, Jonathon Edwards, and Kolban Hogan.
Second place winners are (from left) Nicholas Sanders, Zion Reeves, Monte Gardner, Tyler Staten, Jada
Pernell, Destiny Neal, Bella Livingston,Victoria Jeffers, and Paola Garcia.
“Mary,
did you know?”
by Russell Mauldin, Sue C. Smith
and Jonathan Grumpton
Sunday, December 8th • 6pm
Reception afterwards in the
Fellowship Hall
First Christian ChurCh
located on the corner of East Broad and Court St.
494-2391
S
ports
SUNDAY, December 8, 2013
www.dailytimesleader.com
Section
B
Hebron too
much for
Central
Lady Eagles, Eagles score
second district wins
By Will Nations
[email protected]
LADY EAGLES 53,
LADY VIKINGS
32
MACON — Rebekah Falkner left the
game after a head-to-head collision with
a Central player in the second quarter,
and Holly Hudson fouled out with seven minutes remaining in the game, leaving Hebron Christian without its leading scorers. The Lady Eagles also lost
its starting center as Victoria Ferguson
battled foul trouble the whole game.
Hebron needed people to step up in a
district contest — it found the assistance
off the bench.
Freshmen Millie Hudson, Jana White
and Brooke Griffin came off the bench
and combined for 17 points to help the
Lady Eagles get over the second half
hump as Hebron defeated the Central
Lady Vikings, 53-32, in a MAIS District 3-A game Thursday.
"Central was a physical team, and we
had to keep our compusure," Hebron
Head Coach Bruce Franks said. "We had
some people foul out and some young
girls stepped up and made big plays."
Senior Alaina Hill led Hebron in
double figures with 11 points. Blake
Rigdon led Central with 11 points, as
well.
After leading the first quarter 10-5,
the Lady Eagles began to expand their
advantage during the second quarter.
Falkner led the charge with seven of her
nine points during an 8-2 run giving
Hebron a 22-9 cushion before exiting
the game with her injury. Hebron ended the first half of action with a 15-point
lead, 30-15.
Hebron outscored Central in the
third quarter, 13-8, giving the Lady
Eagles a 20-point cushion. Hill knocked
down a 23-foot three-pointer as time
expired in the quarter, closing the period at 43-23 for Hebron.
Central was able to bring its deficit
under 20 points, 43-26, in the fourth
quarter, but Hebron was able to pull
away, outpacing the Lady Vikings 10-7
for the remainder of the final six minutes of the contest.
The game paced slowly as both
teams combined for 43 personal fouls.
Hebron had 23 total personal fouls —
three more than Central.
Franks appluaded the efforts of his
senior starters, Subrina Oswalt and Hill,
See EAGLES | Page 2B
— Submitted photo
East Mississippi sophomore runningback LaKendrick Thomas runs through a pack of Coahoma Community College defenders during a MACJC game at
William-Sullivan Field in Scooba. EMCC plays against the No. 1 Georgia Military College at 2 p.m. Today at the Mississippi Bowl in Biloxi.
No. 2 EMCC Lions set to meet
No. 1 Georgia Military in bowl
For Daily Times Leader
SCOOBA — Football champions of the Mississippi Association of Community and Junior
Colleges and NJCAA Region 23 for the third
time in five years, the second-ranked Lions of
East Mississippi Community College will vie
for their second NJCAA National Championship in three years when they battle top-ranked
Georgia Military College this Sunday (Dec. 8)
in Mississippi Bowl VI. Kickoff for the 2013
NJCAA National Championship Game is set
for 2 p.m. at Biloxi Indian Stadium.
This year's NJCAA National Championship
Football Game, featuring the NJCAA's only
two remaining unbeaten (11-0) teams in No.
2 EMCC and top-ranked GMC, will be video-streamed live at http://www.njcaatv.com/
bowlgames/. The live video-stream broadcast
will also be available online at www.mississippibowl.com.
In addition, the national championship
match-up, pitting the 2011 NJCAA Champion
EMCC Lions and the 2001 NJCAA Champion GMC Bulldogs, will be broadcast live on
WFCA FM 108, out of French Camp, with
Jason Crowder and Glen Beard describing the
play-by-play action, and John Lyle Briggs serving as the Lions’ sideline reporter. The game’s
radio broadcast will also be carried live by Me-
ridian’s WKZB FM 95.1.
Owning a six-year composite record of 5510 (.846) under the guidance of head football
coach Buddy Stephens, the 11-0 EMCC Lions
captured their third MACJC State/NJCAA Region 23 football championship in three years
by claiming a 61-24 victory over then-No. 4
Jones County Junior College in this year's state
title game played Nov. 9 on EMCC's Scooba
campus. The week prior on Nov. 2, the Lions
bested then-No. 5 Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College, 45-28, in the state semifinals
also contested in Scooba. With a 33-3 collective division mark under Stephens' direction,
this year's EMCC squad also claimed the program’s fifth MACJC North Division regularseason title in the past six years dating back to
the 2008 campaign.
Previously claiming state football titles during prior odd-numbered years in 2011 and
2009, East Mississippi earned the school's firstever national football championship two years
ago with a 55-47 triumph over then-No. 1 Arizona Western College during the 2011 El Toro
Bowl/NJCAA Championship Game played in
Yuma, Ariz. Led by current Ole Miss starting quarterback Bo Wallace, the 2011 NJCAA
Offensive Player of the Year, the then-second
ranked EMCC Lions capped their perfect 12-0
campaign in 2011 with the eight-point road
win over then-No. 1 AWC after knocking off
Hinds (55-24) and Mississippi Gulf Coast (4217) during state playoff games held in Scooba.
This weekend will mark the second Mississippi Bowl appearance for Coach Stephens’
EMCC football program. In 2009 after earning the school’s first-ever MACJC State/NJCAA Region 23 football championship with
playoff wins over Jones County (26-16) and
Mississippi Gulf Coast (75-71) in Scooba, the
Randall Mackey-led Lions capped an 11-1
campaign four years ago by posting a 27-24
victory over their future 2011 NJCAA Championship Game opponent, Arizona Western,
in Mississippi Bowl II also contested at Biloxi
Indian Stadium.
As the NJCAA’s sixth-winningest football
program over the last six years, EMCC is bidding to become the third MACJC school to
earn multiple national football championships.
Mississippi Gulf Coast (2007, 1984 & 1971)
and Northwest Mississippi (1992 & 1982)
have each claimed more than one national title
on the gridiron, while MACJC foes Pearl River and Mississippi Delta won NJCAA football
championships in 2004 and 1993, respectively.
EMCC’s Stephens was an assistant coach on
PRCC’s 2004 national championship team.
See LIONS | Page 2B
Missouri upsets No. 18 UCLA 80-71 Mais All-Star game:
Associated Press
COLUMBIA, Mo. — Missouri guard Earnest Ross
thinks it's "pretty cool" when he makes 3-pointers.
His teammates agree, especially when they're dropping in big games.
Ross scored 20 points and finished 5 of 11 from
beyond the arc to help Missouri upset No. 18 UCLA
80-71 on Saturday.
His third 3-pointer with 14:46 remaining gave
the Tigers their first lead in more than 16 minutes.
The shot bounced off the front of the rim before
going in, helping Missouri (9-0) overcome an eightpoint halftime deficit.
"As I continue to shoot and see shots go in, it
makes the basket get a little bit bigger," Ross said.
"When I'm in a rhythm, I just think I'm in a pretty
good groove and I just continue to keep shooting."
Sometimes that thinking gets Ross into trouble
with coach Frank Haith, who prefers to see him use
his 6-foot-5, 228-pound frame to drive the lane and
score in the paint.
"I'm pretty liberal with our guys taking shots,"
Haith said, "but I want them to understand we were
much better shooting the ball because we ran our offense in the second half."
The win extended Missouri's NCAA-best, homecourt winning streak to 24 games and the Tigers'
run of 79 consecutive wins against non-conference
opponents at Mizzou Arena. The victory was the first
in that stretch against a nationally ranked team.
— Associated Press
Jordan Adams scored 22 points and had 10 rebounds and Kyle Anderson and Zach LaVine each Missouri's Jordan Clarkson, left, shoots as he drives past UCLA's Travis
Wear, right, during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game
See HOOPS | Page 2B Saturday, Dec. 7 in Columbia, Mo.
South defeats North
DTL staff
CLINTON — In sub-40 degree temperatures and first half rain
showers, the MAIS South All-Stars
defeated the North All-Stars, 3-2,
Friday evening at Robinson-Hale
Stadium on the campus of Mississippi College.
Troy Waites of Presbyterian
Christian School knocked through a
21-yard field goal, giving the South
All-Stars a 3-0 lead with three minutes, 23 seconds left in the first half.
The field goal capped a five-minute
offensive series that was started following a Matt Rymer of Adams
County Christian School fumble
recovery at the North 30-yard line.
The North closed the deficit
within one point with 54 seconds
left in the third quarter after a bad
snap placed the ball across the goal
line, forcing Brady Lea of Parklane
Academy to dive on the football.
The South All-Stars claimed its
23rd victory of the 42-game series between the two sides. The South victory was the first win since 2010 after
two straight victories by the North.
The South now leads the series between the two opponents 23-19.
Both sides had missed oppor-
tunities and multiple turnovers
throughout the contest. The South
though were able to capitalize on
one of its forced turnovers.
North All-Star most valuable
players were Sam Rayburn of Jackson Academy (Defensive) and Ashton Knight of Indianola Academy
(Offensive). Josh Samander of Jackson Academy and Kody Bieniemy
of Cenla Christian took home the
defensive and offensive awards, respectively, for the South All-Stars.
West Point natives Troy Arnold
of Hebron Christian and Joseph
Caskey of Oak Hill were participants on the North All-Star teams.
Arnold and Caskey shared time on
the defensive line in their final contests as high school athletes. Arnold
tallied two tackles, one for a loss.
Caskey also collected two tackles for
the North squad.
An altercation between both
sidelines marred the low-scoring
affair after the North recovered a
South fumble with 10 minutes, 32
seconds remaining in the game. The
majority of both sidelines spilled
onto the field for a minute long
scuffle that was finally broken up by
officials and coaches — no punches
were thrown by either side.
2B
Sunday, December 8, 2013 | Daily Times Leader
dailytimesleader.com
Sports
EAGLES
From page 1B
added 13 points for UCLA
(8-1), which lost in its first
game on an opponent's
court this season.
"I think a couple guys,
including
myself,
took
some tough shots, which is
not fair to our teammates,"
Anderson said. "It made it
much easier on our opponents. That's not the basketball we play. We've played
though big games and
we've just got to get better
at that."
Jabari Brown scored 22
points and Jordan Clarkson added 21 for Missouri.
Johnathan Williams III
grabbed 15 rebounds to
help the Tigers gain a 4730 advantage on the boards
and remain the only unbeaten team in the Southeastern
Conference. The team is off
to its best start since the
2006-07 season.
Missouri trailed 43-35 at
halftime after committing
12 turnovers and shoot-
“They just beat us there first.
We tried our best to get every rebound. Some didn’t bounce our way.
Hopefully with practice, we will continue to get better with that.”
Jordan Adams
ing 41.7 percent from the
field. Back-to-back fastbreak
dunks by Ross and Brown
brought the Tigers within
49-45 with 16:44 remaining. After UCLA's Tony
Parker converted a free
throw, Ross hit consecutive 3-pointers to give the
Tigers their first lead since
11:20 left in the first half.
Brown's 3-pointer about
5 minutes later expanded
Missouri's lead to 67-62,
and UCLA couldn't get any
closer the rest of the way.
"They just beat us there
first," Adams said. "We tried
our best to get every re-
bound. Some didn't bounce
our way. Hopefully with
practice, we will continue
to get better with that."
UCLA entered the game
averaging a Pac-12-leading
90.6 points, including 98.8
in its last four contests. The
Bruins made 15 of 30 attempts in the first half, but
only converted 8 of 31 attempts — including 0-for-8
from behind the arc — after
the break.
"Our offense just didn't
move," first-year UCLA
coach Steve Alford said.
"The ball stopped a lot.
We were in a pretty good
rhythm in the first half, and
for whatever reason, we
stopped moving the ball offensively in the second half."
The teams traded baskets
for the first 10 minutes before a 3-pointer by Bryce
Alford sparked a 14-0 run
that gave the Bruins a 30-17
lead with 6:47 left before the
break. Missouri scored the
next 11 points, but UCLA
countered with eight for a
38-28 lead. LaVine finished
the run with a thunderous
windmill dunk.
Both schools played in
the Las Vegas Invitational
last week and were selected
co-champions after defeating Nevada and Northwestern in Nevada. UCLA and
Missouri agreed to not play
each other ahead of Saturday's matchup.
The game ended a
home-and-home series after
UCLA defeated the Tigers
97-94 in overtime at Pauley
Pavilion last Dec. 28.
EAGLES
From page 1B
for keeping the game under control
for the Lady Eagles after the game.
The Hebron first year head coach
was extremely pleased by the play of
Millie, Griffin and White.
EAGLES 61,
VIKINGS 23
Senior Hayden Carty scored a
game-high 25 points, and the Hebron Christian Eagles (4-1; 2-0 District 3-A) defeated the Central Vikings in a MAIS District 3-A game
Thursday night.
"We really got it going in the first
quarter when the pressure got to
them," Franks said. "I still like the
way we played with the up-tempo.
We have to have an advantage to
make it work."
Drew Myatt scored 10 points,
and Channing Tapley notched nine
points in the Eagles' fourth consecutive win after falling to Victory
Christian Nov. in Columbus.
Nelson Robbins led the Vikings
with 11 points during the losing effort.
Hebron jumped out early in the
first quarter as Myatt scored a jumper inside the paint to give the Eagles
a 10-point advantage with two minutes left in the quarter, 17-7. Carty
scored 15 points during the first
eight minutes, capping the quarter
with a fast break lay-up, expanding
the Hebron lead to 20 points, 27-7.
The Eagles outpaced the Vikings
by halftime, 46-9, instituting a running clock for the remainder of the
game.
The Eagles scored 18 points off
of 18 Viking turnovers with a strong
pressing defense. Carty contributed
to the strong defensive performance
with five steals, which he converted
into ten transition points.
Hebron defeated both of its opponents this week by a combined score
of 137-46.
Vols roll in 2nd
half to defeat
Tennessee Tech
BY STEVE MEGARGEE
Associated Press
KNOXVILLE,Tenn. — Jarnell
Stokes had 19 points and 13
rebounds for his fourth consecutive double-double Saturday as Tennessee pulled away
in the second half for an 84-63
victory over Tennessee Tech.
After trailing 42-41 early in
the second half, Tennessee (62) went on a 22-1 run to seize
control of the game.
Jordan McRae scored 16
points and Josh Richardson
and Jeronne Maymon each
added 13 for Tennessee. Jordan Johnson scored 15 points,
Ty Allen had 14 and Jeremiah Samarrippas added 10 for
Tennessee Tech (5-6).
Tennessee Tech shot 10 of
20 from 3-point range but was
only 3 of 12 on free throws.
Tennessee has won 21 of its
22 meetings with Tennessee
Tech, which got its only victory over the Volunteers on Dec.
4, 1996. The two schools, located about 100 miles apart,
were meeting for the first time
since Dec. 28, 2006.
Tennessee coach Cuonzo
Martin had spent the week
emphasizing the importance of
working the ball to Stokes and
Maymon. Stokes, a 6-foot-8,
260-pound junior, has averaged 8.5 points in Tennessee's
two losses and 17 points per
game in the Vols' six wins.
During this current stretch
of four straight double doubles, Stokes has averaged 18.3
points and 11.8 rebounds per
game.
This was Tennessee's first
game since a Thanksgiving
week trip to the Battle 4 Atlantis in the Bahamas, and the
Vols' defense showed plenty of
rust in the early going.
Tennessee Tech led by as
many as seven points in the
first half as it capitalized on
sizzling outside shooting. The
Golden Eagles made seven
of their first eight 3-point attempts and were 8 of 11 from
beyond the arc in the first half.
The Golden Eagles had
entered the day shooting just
30.3 percent from 3-point
range this season. Johnson,
who was averaging just 3.8
points per game, had a careerhigh 15 points by halftime
after shooting 4 of 4 from
3-point range in the first 20
minutes. Samarrippas was 2 of
3 from beyond the arc in the
first half.
Samarrippas' driving basket
with 5:25 left in the first half
gave Tennessee Tech a 34-27
advantage. Tennessee responded with a 10-0 run, but the
Golden Eagles fought back and
regained the lead on Johnson's
three-point play with 1:19 left.
McRae's jumper with 1:04 remaining gave Tennessee a 4140 halftime lead.
Tennessee Tech pulled back
ahead 42-41 on Dwan Campbell's basket with 18:57 left in
the game, but Tennessee responded with its 22-1 run.
McRae tied the game 42-42
by making the first of two free
throws with 18:01 remaining.
LIONS
From page 1B
Hey Kids!
Send your letters now!
On Tuesday, December 24th,
The Daily Times Leader
will publish a special section full of Christmas
wishes and letters to Santa. Send your letter
to the address below and we’ll make sure that
Santa sees it!
Mail your letter to: Mr. S. Claus
c/o Daily Times Leader
P.O. Box 1176
West Point, MS 39773
Or drop it off at:
Daily Times Leader
221 E. Main Street
Be sure to mail it in time to get here before December 16th!
Kids are invited to also draw on their letters to Santa. The best drawings
will be scanned and printed with the letters.
The Daily Times Leader will print as many letters as space allows.
Heading into the NJCAA’s slate of postseason bowl games,
the EMCC Lions continue to be the dominant team nationally
on both sides of the football. Along with leading all NJCAA
teams in scoring offense (63.2 pts/gm), touchdowns scored (97)
and total offense (611.1 yds/gm), East Mississippi tops the national team leaders in scoring defense (7.7 pts/gm) and rushing
defense as well as with 29 pass interceptions and 61 sacks on the
year.
Having scored 45 or more points in every game this season
under the command of NJCAA All-American quarterback candidate Dontreal Pruitt, including a 90-point effort against Coahoma and two other outings with 70+ points (79 vs. Northwest Mississippi & 70 vs. Mississippi Delta), the Lions' 97 total
touchdowns this season are 28 more than second-place Iowa
Western's 69 scores on the year. Just as dominant on defense in
2013, EMCC allowed just 33 total points during the team’s nine
regular-season outings, including five shutout victories during a
six-week span. The Lions have held the opposition scoreless in
34 of 44 quarters played this year.
In addition to leading the NJCAA with 41 rushing touchdowns and tied nationally (with Scottsdale) with 44 passing
touchdowns this season, the 2013 EMCC Lions are also tied
for the national lead among junior college teams with eight defensive touchdowns. East Mississippi's eight defensive scores include seven pick-six pass interceptions, all by different players,
and a fumble return for a touchdown by NJCAA All-Region
23 linebacker Christian Russell. The Lions have also produced
four touchdowns via special teams on two punt return scores
by all-region wide receiver C.J. Bates and another by all-region
defensive back A.J. Stamps as well as an onside kickoff return by
freshman speedster Kameron Myers.
Headquartered in Milledgeville, Ga., the unbeaten (11-0) and
top-ranked Bulldogs of Georgia Military College are guided by
2010 NJCAA Football Coaches Association Hall of Fame inductee Bert Williams, who also serves as the school's athletic
director. Under his leadership, the GMC Bulldogs were 2001
NJCAA National Champions while also claiming subsequent national runner-up finishes in both 2002 and 2005.
This season, Georgia Military ranks as the nation's No. 1
rushing team on the strength of freshman running back Jovon
Robinson from Wooddale High School in Memphis, Tenn. The
former Auburn University signee averages an NJCAA-leading
195.4 yards per game on the ground, including a 313-yard rushing effort against Snow College (Utah), while also topping the
national junior college ranks with 31 rushing touchdowns on the
year. As a team, the GMC Bulldogs own NJCAA-best averages
of 7.0 yards per rushing attempt and 293.5 rushing yards per
contest. Georgia Military also rates fourth nationally scoring an
average of 46.5 points per game for the season.
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Daily Times Leader | Sunday, December 8, 2013
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Sports
3B
Green leads LPGA Tour Q-school Coach: Winston
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP)
— Jaye Marie Green pushed
her lead to seven strokes Friday in the LPGA Tour qualifying tournament and Mi Rim
Lee jumped to second with a
course-record round.
The 19-year-old Green,
from Boca Raton, birdied
the final two holes for a bogey-free 6-under 66 in windy
conditions on LPGA International's Jones Course. She had
a 20-under 196 total, a record
for three rounds since the
event became a 90-hole event.
"I think being where I was
at 14 under to start the day,
I was like, 'OK, just make it
through the day. Let's put that
behind you,'" Green said. "My
goal was to get to 20 under
before Sunday and it was cool
that I did that today. So, that
was nice."
The 23-year-old Lee, from
South Korea, had a 61 to
break the Jones Course record
of 62 that Green set Wednesday. Tied for 25th entering
the day, Lee had an eagle, 10
birdies and a bogey.
"Putter was good today,"
said Lee, a regular on the
Korean LPGA who won the
2012 Korean Women's Open.
"First day and second day, not
so much. I hit some really
close for tap-ins. It was nice."
The top 20 after the final
round Sunday will earn Category 12 status, Nos. 21-45
and ties will receive membership in Category 17, and the
other players who make the
72-hole cut will get Symetra
Tour status.
Green was 29th on the
Symetra Tour money list this
year.
Tiffany Joh was third at 10
under after a 70 on the Jones
Course.
"One of my first Q-schools
I think it was sleeting in the final round," Joh said. "You just
never know what you're going
to get this week. You just kind
of have to go out there and
not put too many expectations
on yourself as far as numbers
go and just try to do the best
you can."
Amy
Anderson,
the
21-year-old former North
Dakota State star who won a
record 20 college titles, was 9
under after a 70 on the Jones
Course.
South Korea's Seon Hwa
Lee, a four-time winner on
the LPGA Tour, and Kathleen
Ekey were 8 under. Lee had a
72, and Ekey shot 69 — both
on the Jones Course.
Lorie Kane, the 48-yearold Canadian who has four
LPGA Tour victories, was tied
for 58th at 2 over after a 73
on the Jones Course. Cheyenne Woods, Tiger Woods'
niece, also shot a 73 on the
Jones Course. She was tied for
107th at 7 over.
showed no stress
from investigation
BY RALPH D. RUSSO
Associated Press
— Associated Press
Shanshan Feng chips the ball on the 13th hole during the final round
of the CME Group Titleholders golf tournament Nov. 24 at Tiburon
Golf Club in Naples, Fla. Two shots behind going into the final round,
Feng, the 24-year-old from China ran off four birdies in the opening
six holes to seize control, and she closed with a 6-under 66 to win
by one shot and claim the richest prize in women's golf.
Manning meets Titans with a chill in the air
BY EDDIE PELLS
Associated Press
DENVER — When Peyton
Manning lines up against the
Tennessee Titans, he'll be keeping his eye on a handful of numbers:
n '99' is defensive tackle and
sack specialist Jurrell Casey;
n '53' is the all-important
'Mike' linebacker, Moise Fokou;
n and '20' is cornerback Alterraun Verner, who leads the
Titans with five interceptions.
But Manning's biggest challenge Sunday is overcoming
another number: '14,' as in, the
forecast high in Denver on Sunday.
"We'll handle it just like any
other team has to," Manning
said.
If only it were that simple.
Manning's less-than-stellar
record in the cold — he's 8-11
when game-time temperature is
40 or below — has been Topic
No. 1 in Denver this week. The
Broncos (10-2) are heading
into the homestretch of the season with the best record in the
AFC, positioned for home-field
advantage through the playoffs,
with the Super Bowl in potentially frigid New York.
Granted, these icy temperatures in Denver aren't all that
common — a point John Elway
went out of his way to make
when he was recruiting Manning to the Mile High City. In
54 seasons of pro football in
Denver, only eight games have
started with the temperature in
the teens or below. One of them,
of course, was last year's 13-degree playoff contest against Baltimore. A loss.
More recently, Manning and
the Broncos fell at New England, where the wind chill was 6.
Manning was something less
than his usual, impeccable self
in both those games. His quarterback rating of 83.1 in the 19
cold-weather games he's played
is about 14 points lower than in
the other 237.
In preparation for the cold
weather, Manning started experimenting with wearing gloves
last season. The cold weather,
combined with his multiple
neck surgeries, causes a loss of
feeling in his hands.
"It's part of the adjustment
that I've made and tried to adjust and still working through it,
kind of, each time that I wear it,"
he said.
Here are five things to look
for when the Titans (5-7) visit
chilly Denver:
COLD WEATHER: Manning threw for 304 yards and
three touchdowns against a
woeful Kansas City team to
close last season in his only other
cold-weather game in Denver,
proving that, indeed, he can
produce, especially when the opponent doesn't put up much resistance. He's had the advantage
of throwing in frigid practice
conditions this week. The temperature won't crack 20 until
next week. And he'll get another
chance next Thursday, when
the Broncos play their regularseason home finale against San
Diego, with nighttime temperatures expected in the low 20s.
CLINGING TO HOPE: It
figures one team with a record
around .500 will grab the AFC's
final playoff spot. The Titans
are in that mix. They would
be in better shape, of course, if
they hadn't lost five games by
a touchdown or less. "I feel like
we've been given a lot of chances," running back Chris Johnson
said. "I feel like we're working
hard right now as a team and
just trying to stick together and
just trying to squeeze in."
FOX RETURNS: The
Broncos welcomed back coach
John Fox this week, four weeks
after his surgery for aortic valve
replacement. He said he's feeling fine and actually wanted to
come back to work sooner. He
was striding around the practice field, as usual, in the cold
weather Thursday, and on Friday, said he would coach from
the sideline.
PUNCHING IT IN: About
the best thing that could be said
about Denver's 27th-ranked defense last week in a 35-28 win
over the Chiefs is that it held
them out of the end zone when
it mattered most. Trailing by a
touchdown, Kansas City drove
83 yards late in the fourth quarter and came up empty. The
Chiefs also got shut out after a
77-yard drive in the first quarter.
Led by quarterback Ryan
Fitzpatrick, the Titans are not
a big-play offense. Johnson is
their most consistent threat,
though he averages only 3.8
yards a carry. In theory, grinding out first downs and chewing
up the clock works well against
Manning. But for Tennessee to
have any chance of winning, it
will have to improve on its 53.8
percent rate of scoring touchdowns when it gets inside the
20.
WHO'S THE RUNNER:
Rookie Montee Ball had his
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breakout game for the Broncos last week: 13 carries, 117
yards and, most importantly, no
fumbles. He still hasn't budged
Knowshon Moreno — he of the
emotional, pregame crying outburst — from the starting lineup
and Moreno hasn't done anything to lose the job. While being held to only 15 yards rushing last week, he caught four
passes for 72 yards.
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Jameis Winston quickly emerged as one
of college football's biggest stars because of his brilliant play, while
also charming Florida State fans with his smile and natural charisma.
The 19-year-old redshirt freshman seemed poised and mature
beyond his years, whether he was throwing touchdown passes
after shedding a defensive lineman or answering questions from
reporters about what it took to be the leader of one of the best
teams in the country.
Three weeks ago the story changed. A year-old sexual assault
complaint against him was given by Tallahassee police to the
state's attorney office to be investigated. For three weeks, Winston
faced the possibility of serious criminal charges. He was accused
of rape by a female Florida State student. His lawyer said the sex
was consensual.
Winston continued to play spectacularly. While he was shielded from answering direct questions about the investigation, he
gave his routine interviews leading up to and after games. If the
investigation was stressing him out, he wasn't showing it publicly.
And according to coach Jimbo Fisher, he wasn't showing it
privately either.
"He's been the same guy, and like I said, he believed in the
process, and he believed in himself, and he's been the same guy,"
Fisher said Friday at a news conference at Bank of America Stadium for the Atlantic Coast Conference championship game against
Duke, about 24 hours after prosecutors in Florida announced
Winston would not be charged.
"It's been a remarkable maturity level presented by him to be
able to compartmentalize and handle things he can control and
not that anything was (taken) lightly or he didn't take it seriously,
but like I say, in our life everybody has issues or something going
on in your life, and the ones that can compartmentalize and function and handle them when they have to handle them are the ones
that are very successful, and he's very mature like that," Fisher said.
No. 1 Florida State played three games from the time news
broke about the complaint until the time the case was closed.
There were certainly no signs of distraction from the Seminoles,
though this team is so talented that rolling Syracuse, Idaho and
Florida by a combined 176-24 could have been accomplished
with less-than-full attention.
Winston completed 67 percent of his passes in those three
games for 829 yards, with nine touchdown passes and one interception. He appeared to be the same jovial guy on the sideline,
joking with teammates and interacting with fans after games.
When it was time to answer the at-times awkwardly worded
questions about dealing with "distractions," he deftly managed to
swing it back toward talking about the team and the game.
Fisher said he has seen no change in his team's mood or demeanor since the decision not to charge Winston was announced.
4B
Sunday, December 8, 2013 | Daily Times Leader
CrossworD
dailytimesleader.com
COMICS
Horoscope
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
At some point today, you will want to join
a friend for some fun, whether it’s a treedecorating party or simply coming up with
gift ideas for a difficult person. Be careful
with a temperamental partner who has very
different ideas.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20)
Take a stand. You will want to finish a project before you relax. For some of you, this
responsibility could involve an older friend
or relative. For others, it might involve
work from your job.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20)
Make phone calls to loved ones at a distance. You might want to discuss their gift
preferences, as you are not with them every
day. On the other hand, they might prefer
getting together for a visit.
CANCER (June 21-July 22)
A partner might be controlling. You could
experience some uproar on the homefront,
which might just be dragging in the tree
to decorate it. Make an effort to allow others to have their say. You tend to dominate
family matters.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
You’ll want to be more convivial and go
along with others’ wishes. Make time for
just you and the apple of your eye. Feelings flow, whether you’re under mistletoe
or just relaxing at home together.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Learn to juggle your busy schedule. Avoid
doing any impulse shopping. If you do,
hold on to the receipts, just in case you
change your mind. Go for a walk, get into
the mood of the season, but avoid the
stores. Center yourself.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Mars enters your sign and creates a likelihood that diplomacy will fly out of the window in the next few weeks. You are likely
to express your feelings, which could shock
some people who think they know you. Get
in some exercise to lessen your stress.
s uDoku
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
You easily could wonder what is going on
with an older friend, relative or someone
you have put on a pedestal. You might see
how much this person is passionate about
the holidays, as he or she barks out orders.
Be polite.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Someone at a distance will reach out to
you and demonstrate his or her caring. You
might beam from ear to ear, which could
draw others to you. You have a lot of energy; direct it toward getting some of your
holiday errands or projects done.
To solve a sudoku, the numbers
1 through 9 must fill each row,
column and box. Each number
can appear only once in each
row, column and box.
CRYPTOQUIP
December 8, 1973
STATISTICIANS PREDICT JOBLESS
INCREASE ONLY JUST BEGINNING
Unemployment rose in November 0.2 percent to 4.7 percent, the biggest
increase in 21 months, and is expected to go even higher this winter as the fuel
shortage causes more layoffs, the government said today.
Officials said they did not believe last month’s employment statistics, gathered during the week of Nov. 11-17 had yet reflected much joblessness resulting from oil shortages caused by the Arab oil boycott.
Spokesmen for the Labor Department’s Bureau of Labor Statistics said layoffs caused by the fuel shortage should start showing up to some degree in the
December employment reports, which will be released in January, and to a
large degree in the January report.
The number of workers holding jobs showed little actual change in November. the total fell by 7,000 to 85.7 million.
However, the number of unemployed increased by 195,000 because about
that many additional workers joined the labor force.
The jobs report followed by a day other gloomy economic news in the form
of a report showing an increase last month in wholesale prices of almost 2
percent, caused by zooming fuel costs running close to four times the biggest
pervious one-month rises.
The wholesale fuel price increases - ranging from close to 7 percent for coal,
nearly 35 percent for gasoline and 45 percent for diesel fuel- more than offset a
decline in wholesale food prices.
Herbert L. Stein, chairman of President Nixon’s Council of Economic Advisors said today he felt food prices would continue to register favorable trends,
and possibly might even decline by the end of 1974. But he foresaw further
fuel increases.
Stein maintained that favorable food price trends would far exceed the negative effect on the average worker’s paycheck of increase in fuel prices.
Gasoline, he said, accounts for only about 3 percent of the worker’s budget
as compared to up to 25 percent by food.
The BLS said the increased unemployment was almost entirely among adult
women and adult men ages 16 and 24.
The unemployment increase from 4.5 in October to 4.7 percent was the largest for one month since March, 1972, when the rate also increased 0.2 percent from 5.7 up to 5.9. There had not been a larger increase since December 1970.
BLS officials said today they now believe a 0.3 percent dip in October from
the 4.8 percent unemployment level in September may have been what some
statisticians call an aberration.
THE LOGIC PUZZLE THAT
MAKES YOU SMARTER.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
You might choose to suppress your feelings
in order to maintain a more even-tempered
mood. Understand what is happening between you and someone else. Be careful, as
holding in hurt feelings could turn you into
a volcano when you finally let go.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
You are likely to say and do what you want.
Don’t be surprised if a close friend turns
your day upside down with plans that he or
she has for you. Why have words when you
could choose to be flattered? Clear out an
errand or two if possible.
Here’s How It Works:
on This Day...
by Jacqueline Bigar
BeeTle Bailey
popeye
BlonDie
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20)
Know that you might need some time just
for yourself. Explaining that to a loved one
could take talent, but know that it is necessary. Take some time to clear up a problem.
At the same time, try to get through some
personal matters.
Dennis The Menace
hagar The horriBle
Barney google & snuffy sMiTh
Rules:
1. Each row and column must contain
the numbers 1 through 7 without repeating.
2. The numbers within the heavily outlined set of squares, called cages, must
combine (in any order) to produce the
target number in the top corner of the
cage using the mathematical operation indicated.
3. Cages with just one box should be
filled in with the
target number
in the top corner. A number
can be repeated within a cage
as long as it is
not in the same
row or column.
dailytimesleader.com
Daily Times Leader | Sunday, December 8, 2013
5B
6B
Sunday, December 8, 2013 | Daily Times Leader
Outdoors
KEEP
OUT
W
hen you catch someone
on your property during
hunting season who isn’t
supposed to be there, what do they
always tell you?
“I’m tracking a wounded deer.”
They say this because in most
states it is legal to follow a wounded
animal across a property border to
try and recover it. The problem is
that habitual trespassers have learned
this defense and use it for an excuse
to go wherever they please. The first
step is to debunk the claim. But once
they’re exposed what should you do?
Besides land-mines, booby-traps or
mortars (which I must admit, sound
appealing at times) what can we do
that won’t also land us in prison?
Protect yourself from this and prevent trespassing from ever happening
in the first place.
If I catch someone I’m usually so
angry that the “intelligence center”
in my brain just shuts off — I want
to tell the trespassers what I think of
their unethical actions and get them
off the property as fast as possible. I
get more caught up in verbally lambasting the perpetrators than thinking ahead about what should be done
to prosecute. Use phone cameras or
write things down and get vehicle descriptions and license plate numbers.
Calling the DNR or police is also an
option if you have a signal and aren’t
Trespasser-proof your property
By Todd Amenrud
Mossy Oak Biologic, Gamekeepers
pends upon your time horizon and
budget, but I like to use a combination of trees, shrubs and warm season perennial grasses. It’s important
to put some thought behind this because certain plants lose their foliage
during various times of the year, and
as trees grow they may elevate tall
enough so they are no longer a barrier after a few years. So make sure
that you consider both seasonally
and for the long term. Mossy Oak’s
Native Nursery can be helpful in designing a visual screen to meet your
needs.
Native warm season grasses are
one of my favorite fixes. Different varieties like Big Bluestem, Little Bluestem and Indian grass can grow 6 to
10 feet tall and stand up well to the
elements. I like to plant these grasses
in addition to various trees and bushes. Stimulating the native seed-bank
by mowing, fire or turning the soil
can also create a regenerating native
barrier.
Trees are a must for permanent
barriers. Conifers are my favorite for
several reasons. Obviously they are
thick and green all of the time, hence
the reason they are often referred to
as “evergreens.” I also like them because only a few varieties are attractive to whitetails, so if you choose
the proper varieties they really don’t
provide much for food value. The
— Bruce Macqueen/Submitted photo
Native warn season grasses, like those seen in the background here, make
excellent visual screens along property borders.
miles away from a station. Rather
than thinking about evacuation you
need to think about prosecution.
n Sign, signs,
everywhere a sign
Our properties are clearly, legally
posted with signs every 50 yards
along our borders, which are also
(most of the time) fenced. Make
sure there is no excuse. Every once
in a while you’ll get obtuse offenders
that are bold enough to violate your
markers regardless, but that’s why
it’s important to prosecute when you
catch someone.
n Out of sight, out
of mind
Plant borders so people cannot
see into your property. This all de-
dailytimesleader.com
last thing that I want to do is plant
a variety that is attractive to whitetail
on my property border.
Plant a combination of evergreens
and deciduous trees. Configure your
barrier keeping in mind both horizontal and vertical growth properties.
Remember a few years from now
your barrier may be 10 feet above
the ground and no longer serving as
a visual screen. Stagger your plantings so people traveling along your
border can’t see into your property
from any angle. I suggest traveling
your borders yourself with a friend
and flag the vulnerable areas.
n Keep your mouth
shut
Everyone likes to brag about harvesting a nice buck or all the deer
feeding in one of their food plots.
Be careful who you boast in front
— Bruce Macqueen/Submitted photo
Catching a license number on a vehicle is usually easier to trace than trying to find
someone who recognizes a face in a low-res photo. A bridge at a creek crossing
makes a great spot for a camera-trap for trespassers. It restricts their movement
to a smaller zone and their attention is on the bridge and not the surrounding
area where your camera might be.
of. Word of a huge buck travels fast.
For some reason “antlers” can make
normally principled people do stupid
things. The enticement to harvest a
big, mature whitetail buck can trigger certain people to break the law,
so the less people who know, the
better.
n Smile — you’re
on my camera!
To prosecute a trespasser all you
need is a clear, identifiable photo of
the trespasser in the act. The problem
is coming up with an “identifiable”
photo. Most trail cameras will take
a clear photo during daylight hours
if a person will stand still and pose
for it. To take a clear photo of a person that means you need to mount
the camera in a spot to see their face.
That usually means if the camera can
easily see them, they can clearly see
the camera. Who wants to lose their
$400 trail camera to a trespasser who
just got their photo taken?
A tactic that I have had limited
success with is using an old decoy
camera as the bait and then set the
true trap with another working camera trained on the decoy camera. I
make sure the working camera is camouflaged very well. If they mess with
your decoy camera you now have
them for vandalism or theft, which
typically carries a much harsher penalty than trespassing. When they find
your decoy camera it usually satisfies
them and they think they’ve won this
battle — but on the contrary. The
toughest detail is getting a positive
ID on the person/people in the photos. If it’s not a local person it may be
difficult to identify them.
For that reason I have started using more cameras on the trails and
access points. Concentrate on the
obvious parking spots, creek crossings and pinch-points along trails or
gates that people use with vehicles. A
license plate is easy to see and trace
— Bruce Macqueen/Submitted photo
The author has had limited success with a “decoy camera” catching trespassers.
In fact, in one case it lead to the more serious charges of theft and vandalism.
If the person has the gall to trespass they likely won’t bat an eye at stealing or
vandalizing your camera.The “real” camera trained on the decoy camera needs to
be fairly close and hidden very well.
as opposed to trying to make out a
face in a blurry, low-resolution photo. Make sure to set your camera on
its highest resolution so when you
zoom in on the license plate you can
easily read the numbers.
n Hi, how’s it going?
Carry a disposable camera in
your pack. Your trail cameras are
stationary monitors, but what happens when you run into someone
in person? Walk straight up to them
and say “hello” and snap their photo. Now you have proof. This and
name or license plate is all you need
to prosecute. If they won’t give up a
name follow them to their vehicle to
get the license plate. Find their vehicles and take photos of them also.
Gather and document as much information as feasible. Then, prosecute
them. No excuses, no exceptions.
What’s right is right and what’s
wrong should be stopped.