Document 65439

“Domestic violence is a crime that can
be stopped, and there are things that
each and every one of us can do to help.
Support those you know or suspect are
facing violence at home, raise your
children to not accept violence in relationships, raise awareness about domestic violence in your community, encourage people who work in the field,
and take domestic violence seriously.”
Governor Jeb Bush
Jerry Regier
Secretary
Jeb Bush
Governor
Florida Department of Children & Families
Office of the Secretary
Dear Friends:
It is my pleasure to present our 2002-2003 Domestic Violence Annual Report
as mandated by Florida Statutes section 39.904. Thanks to the commitment of
Governor Bush, the support of the Florida Legislature, and the work of many
dedicated individuals across the state, this has been a year of notable achievements in response to domestic violence.
This Annual Report highlights the best efforts of the Department of Children
and Families and our state and community partners to effectively prevent domestic violence during this past year. Through these efforts, we were able to assist
Florida’s certified domestic violence centers with providing emergency shelter to
13,887 clients, providing counseling to 209,550 people, answering 128,462
hotline calls, and assisting with 89,864 safety plans. Additionally, 82 percent of
the Domestic Violence Program’s budget was used for community-based and
statewide programs to support the provision of temporary emergency shelter,
and related services to domestic violence victims and their dependents. Funding
was also provided to law enforcement agencies, prosecutors, courts, and victim
service providers in an effort to prevent or remediate the effects of domestic
violence.
The Department has focused our resources on ending violence in the home,
assisting victims, and holding perpetrators accountable. It is our commitment to
continue to do our part in making sure that victims of domestic violence are
provided with the support and resources needed to help rebuild their lives.
Sincerely,
Jerry Regier
Secretary
1317 Winewood Boulevard, Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0700
Table of Contents
Executive Summary ............................................................................................ 1
Legislative Update .............................................................................................. 3
Florida’s Domestic Violence Laws ............................................................................................................................. 6
Domestic Violence Centers .............................................................................. 11
Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence ........................................................................................................... 13
Batterers Intervention Programs .................................................................... 19
Fatality Review Teams ...................................................................................... 27
Community Education and Public Awareness ................................................. 29
Governor’s Violence Free Florida! Campaign .......................................................................................................... 29
Governor’s Peace at Home Awards: Stopping Domestic Violence ......................................................................... 30
Domestic Violence Training ...................................................................................................................................... 31
Grant Programs ................................................................................................ 33
Capital Improvement Program ................................................................................................................................ 33
Family Violence Prevention and Services Act .......................................................................................................... 33
TANF Domestic Violence Diversion Program ......................................................................................................... 33
Violence Against Women Act ................................................................................................................................... 34
Grants to Encourage Arrest Policies and Enforcement of Protection Orders...................................................... 34
STOP Violence Against Women Grant ................................................................................................................. 34
Other Statewide Programs .............................................................................. 35
Attorney General’s Office ........................................................................................................................................ 35
Address Confidentiality Program .......................................................................................................................... 35
Relocation Assistance ............................................................................................................................................ 35
Florida Council Against Sexual Violence .................................................................................................................. 35
Florida Prosecuting Attorney’s Association ............................................................................................................. 36
National Health Care Standards Campaign ............................................................................................................. 37
Financial Highlights ........................................................................................... 39
Funding of STOP Violence Against Women Grant Programs .................................................................................. 40
Funding of Domestic Violence Centers ................................................................................................................... 48
Appendices ........................................................................................................ 54
FDLE Total Domestic Violence for Florida, 1993-2002 ........................................................................................... 54
FDLE 2002 Domestic Violence Crime Report ......................................................................................................... 55
FDLE 2002 Total Domestic Violence Offenses for Florida by County .............................................................. 56-57
FDLE January-June 2003 Domestic Violence Crime Report ................................................................................... 58
Office of Domestic Violence Program Staff .................................................................................Inside Back Cover
The Department of Children and Families operates
the statewide domestic violence program, which
provides supervision, direction, coordination, and
administration of activities related to domestic violence
intervention and prevention services. Historically, the
domestic violence program was administered through
the Office of Family Safety; however, during Fiscal Year
2002-2003 the Department of Children and Families
established the Domestic Violence Program Office.
Services were also provided to
perpetrators of domestic violence
crimes by the state’s certified
batterers intervention programs.
During the year, 75 percent of the
programs reported that there
were 4,376 participants enrolled
with 38 percent completing the
program.
Fiscal Year 2002-2003 was a year of many accomplishments in the state’s response to domestic violence.
According to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE), after years of steady increases in total
domestic violence numbers, the number of reported
domestic violence offenses has been declining since
1998 and was down again in 2002 from 2001 by 1.8
percent. Arrests for these crimes have been steadily
increasing as well and were up 4.3 percent compared to
last year. Domestic violence crimes include murder,
manslaughter, forcible rape, forcible sodomy, forcible
fondling, aggravated assault, aggravated stalking, simple
assault, simple stalking, threat,
intimidation and arson.
The Domestic Violence Office launched a series of
continuing education courses for staff of the intervention programs at its annual meeting and training for
batterers intervention programs in October. Initial
certification was provided to 11 programs and 27
assessors for a cumulative total of 137 certified programs and 340 certified assessors in Florida.
Governor Bush signed several pieces of legislation
during the 2002 and 2003 legislatures that enhanced
victims’ rights and safety; including dating relationships
of at least six months in the list of those relationships
eligible for an injunction for
protection against violence;
eliminated the filing fee for protective orders; and made it a crime
“The 194 deaths
for a batterer to go within 500 feet
and 121,834 other
of the victim’s residence or within
100 feet of their car. Additionally,
domestic violence
he signed legislation that transfers
crimes reported in
the responsibility for the administration of funds for certified
the state during 2002
domestic violence centers from
do not begin to tell
the Department of Children and
Families to the Florida Coalition
us the enormity of
Against Domestic Violence.
More than one-fifth (21 percent)
of all murders in the state were
domestic violence related. In the
quest to better understand, intervene, and prevent domestic
violence homicides, many communities throughout the state have
developed Domestic Violence
Fatality Review Teams. FDLE
released its report in June 2003
with data and recommendations
the
compiled from 12 participating
teams. Of the domestic violence
fatalities reviewed by the teams,
the spouse or live-in partner was
the victim in 52 percent, children accounted for 16
percent of the victims and in 63 percent of the cases a
firearm was involved in the fatality.
problem.”
An abundance of services was provided to domestic
violence victims and their children during the year by
various private and public organizations. Florida’s
certified domestic violence centers sheltered over
13,880 people, counseled over 209,500 people, assisted
with over 89,800 safety plans, and answered over
128,400 hotline calls. The Florida Coalition Against
Domestic Violence and area Legal Service Offices
provided countless hours of pro bono legal assistance to
over 3,600 victims.
In October, Governor Bush
unveiled his new domestic violence health care program, Volunteer for Ending Abuse, Improving
Lives, an initiative of the Governor’s Violence Free
Florida! domestic violence public awareness and education campaign.
As part of the Violence Free Florida! campaign, Governor Bush held his annual Peace at Home Awards: Stopping
Domestic Violence ceremony in April. This event
provides Governor Bush an opportunity to annually
recognize the outstanding accomplishments in domestic
violence prevention and intervention. Awards were
given in the areas of services to children, survivor
support, justice system programs, health care, public
education and awareness, and an overall category.
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
Executive Summary
1
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
To assist with efforts for a Violence Free Florida!, the
2002 Legislature appropriated over $28 million for FY
2002-2003 including $4 million in state funding for
capital improvements to domestic violence centers.
Sixty-four percent of the funding was through federal
programs such as the Family Violence Prevention and
Services Act (FVPSA), Temporary Assistance for Needy
Families (TANF), and Violence Against Women Act
(VAWA). State funding accounted for 36 percent of the
budget, with fees and fines providing for most of the
revenue.
You may wonder why domestic violence has received
so much attention from the Governor, the Legislature,
law enforcement agencies, prosecutors, victim advocates, and many public and private organizations
throughout the state. While domestic violence may
appear to be personal, private, and removed from the
lives of most Floridians, in reality it is a serious criminal
justice and public health concern. The 194 deaths and
121,834 other domestic violence crimes reported in the
state during 2002 do not begin to tell us the enormity of
the problem.
According to The National Violence Against Women
Survey, most domestic violence incidences are not
reported to the police. Only one-fifth of all rapes, onequarter of all physical assaults, and one-half of all
stalkings perpetrated against female respondents by
intimates were reported to the police.
2
The Survey found that intimate partner violence is
pervasive in U.S. society and accounted for nearly 25
percent of women reporting they were raped and/or
physically assaulted by a current or former spouse,
cohabiting partner, or date at some time in their lifetime. According to this estimate, approximately 1.5
million women are raped and/or physically assaulted by
an intimate partner annually in the United States.
The US Department of Justice reports that 37 percent of all women who sought hospital emergency
medical care for violence related injuries were injured
by a current or former spouse, or intimate partner. In
addition to the long-term physical harm that may be
caused by violence, there is a growing body of research
linking domestic violence with a wide range of emotional and behavioral effects.
Children are also profoundly affected by violence in
the home. Numerous studies on the overlap of domestic violence and child abuse indicate that approximately
50 percent of the men who assault their wives or
partners also abuse their children. Childhood exposure
to domestic violence is associated with increased
aggression, depression and anxiety, lower levels of social
competence, and poorer academic functioning. “Family
violence threatens child” is the alleged maltreatment
most reported to the Florida Abuse Hotline every year.
Childhood exposure to family violence also significantly increases the likelihood of either perpetrating or
being the victim of violence as an adult.
Not only does domestic violence carry over from
youth to adulthood, but from home to neighborhood,
and community to state. The effects of this violence are
seen in the burdens placed upon our criminal justice,
health care, educational, social service, and child welfare
systems. Family violence touches each of us, and this
report highlights the best efforts of the Department of
Children and Families with state and community partners to effectively intervene in and, ultimately, provide
for a Violence Free Florida!
“Childhood
exposure to
domestic violence
is associated with
increased
aggression,
depression and
anxiety, lower
levels of social
competence, and
poorer academic
functioning.”
Florida has some of the most progressive domestic
violence laws in the country. With the commitment of
Governor Bush and the support of the Legislature,
Florida continues to lead the way in addressing domestic violence. During FY 2002-2003, significant initiatives
from the 2002 legislative session became effective as
well as several new measures were passed by the 2003
Legislature.
2002 Legislature
Domestic Violence, Senate Bill 716 (Chapter
2002-55, Laws of Florida) sponsored by Senator
Durell Peaden of Crestview
• clarifies that people who have a child in common,
or who are in a dating relationship, are not
required to have resided together to be eligible
for an injunction for protection against violence;
• defines dating relationship;
• eliminates the filing fee for protective orders;
• clarifies current law regarding the court’s role
over pretrial diversion programs for batterers;
• provides that venue is proper where the respondent or petitioner resides (permanently or
temporarily), or where the act of domestic
violence occurred;
• creates a checklist for petitioners to consider
when completing the petition;
• amends statutes to make the definition of domestic violence consistent;
• provides a checklist for the court to consider
prior to issuing an order;
• allows certified domestic violence center advocates, prosecution, or law enforcement advocates
to be present during injunction hearings;
• makes it a crime for a respondent to go within
500 feet of the petitioner’s residence or within
100 feet of the petitioner’s motor vehicle;
• mandates that all injunction hearings be recorded;
and
• effective January 1, 2003.
Florida Access to Civil Legal Assistance Act,
House Bill 491 (Chapter 2002-288, Laws of
Florida) by Rep. Goodlette of Naples
• creates Florida Access to Civil Legal Assistance
Act;
• requires Department of Community Affairs to
contract for delivery of civil legal assistance to the
poor through not-for-profit legal aid organizations; and
• effective May 30, 2002.
Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction and Enforcement Act, House Bill 549 (Chapter 2002-65, Laws
of Florida) sponsored by Rep. Gaston Cantens of
Miami
• creates the Uniform Child Custody Jurisdiction
and Enforcement Act;
• provides specific support and assistance to victims
of domestic violence that go from one jurisdiction
to another and wish to fight for custody of their
children;
• creates a provision for parents to post bonds in
child custody cases when a parent abducts or
conceals a child, which exempts victims of
domestic violence;
• continues to require domestic violence victims
and others to comply with s. 787.03, F.S., regarding parental kidnapping; and
• effective October 1, 2002.
Appropriations
$4,000,000 was appropriated from non-recurring
administrative trust funds for the construction, renovation, and maintenance of certified domestic violence
centers in accordance with the provisions of section
39.9055, F. S. The Department of Children and Families
administered the funds under the Capital Improvement
Program. See the Grants Program section on page 33
for further explanation of the program.
Governor Jeb Bush signs Senate Bill 716 in a ceremony held at
the Leon County Courthouse in Tallahassee on April 22, 2002.
LEGISLATIVE UPDATE
Legislative Update
3
LEGISLATIVE UPDATE
2003 Legislature
Address Confidentiality Program for Domestic
Violence Victims, House Bill 1763 (Chapter 2003185 Laws of Florida) sponsored by House State
Administration Committee
• reenacts the public records exemption for the
Address Confidentiality Program for Victims of
Domestic Violence (ACP);
• repeals the section of law prohibiting the Attorney General from disclosing the name, address, or
telephone number of a participant in the ACP;
• provides that the Office of the Attorney General
is the custodian of the exempt information;
• repeals the section of law prohibiting the supervisor of elections from disclosing a participant’s
name, address, or telephone number;
• recreates the public records exemption for the
name, address, or telephone number of an ACP
participant held by the supervisor of elections;
• provides for retroactive application and future
review and repeal of the exemption;
• provides a statement of public necessity; and
• effective upon becoming law, June 23, 2003.
Cyberstalking, House Bill 479 (Chapter 2003 –23
Laws of Florida) sponsored by Rep. John Stargel of
Lakeland
4
• expands current law relating to the offense of
stalking to include cyberstalking;
• expands the scope of aggravated stalking to
including threats made against the child, sibling,
spouse, parent or dependent of he person to
whom the harassment is directed; and
• effective October 1, 2003.
Confidentiality of Reports and Records in Cases of
Child Abuse, CS/CS/Senate Bill 1454 (Chapter
2003-146, Laws of Florida) sponsored by Senator
Jeff Atwater of Palm Beach Gardens
• expands access to confidential reports and
records in cases of child abuse and neglect to
include certified domestic violence centers when
working at the Department of Children and
Families’ request as case consultants or with
shared clients;
• effective July 1, 2003.
At a Mother’s Day luncheon for single mothers at the Governor’s
Mansion, Governor Bush signed House Bill 1099. Also present
were Secretary Jerry Regier, Tiffany Carr, Executive Director of
FCADV, First Lady Columba Bush, Lt. Governor Toni Jennings and
Melane Byrd, wife of Rep. Johnnie Byrd, Speaker of the House of
Representatives.
Domestic Violence Center Funding and Evaluation, House Bill 1099 (Chapter 2003-11 Laws of
Florida) sponsored by Rep. Littlefield of
Zephyrhills
• provides that the Department of Children and
Families will continue to receive and approve or
reject the certification of domestic violence
centers;
• transfers the responsibility for the administration
of funds for certified domestic violence centers
from the Department of Children and Families to
the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence,
which includes the approval or rejection of
funding requests from certified domestic violence
centers;
• provides that the Department of Children and
Families approves the funding distribution formula
for state funds provided to certified domestic
violence centers;
• requires FCADV to perform an evaluation of the
services provided by the certified domestic
violence centers; and
• effective on January 1, 2004.
• creates the Commission on Marriage and Family
Support Initiatives to replace the Commission on
Responsible Fatherhood within the Department
of Children & Families;
• specifies that public policy should not operate to
force people to get married, should not withdraw
or diminish benefits to single mothers merely
because they are not married, and should not
keep people in abusive relationships;
• directs commission to coordinate its work with
community-based organizations, including, among
others, certified domestic violence centers; and
• effective July 1, 2003.
Rape Crisis Program Trust Fund, Senate Bill 146
(Chapter 2003-114 Laws of Florida) sponsored by
Senator Anna Cowin of Leesburg
• creates the Rape Crisis Program Trust Fund for
the purpose of providing funds to rape crisis
centers for victims of sexual assault;
• establishes the Trust Fund within the Department
of Health;
• provides that the source of funds credited to the
Trust Fund are from court assessments collected
from offenders who are guilty of an act of sexual
battery;
• provides for the termination of the Trust Fund on
July 1, 2007; and
• effective July 1, 2003.
Sexual Battery Victims Access to Services Act,
Senate Bill 144 (Chapter 2003-114 Laws of
Florida) sponsored by Senator Anna Cowin of
Leesburg
• provides an additional $151 surcharge against
offenders who violate specified statutes concerning assault, battery stalking or sexual battery;
• requires the Department of Health to contract
with the Florida Coalition Against Sexual Violence;
• requires the Department of Health to submit an
annual report to the Legislature;
• appropriates $917,000 from the Trust Fund to the
Department of Health for the implementation of
the act; and
• effective July 1, 2003.
Victims’ Freedom Act, House Bill 561 (Chapter
2003-117) sponsored by Representative Bruce
Kyle of Ft. Myers
• expands current law that relates to injunctions
against repeat violence and dating violence to
create a new category of protective injunctive
relief against sexual violence;
• prohibits the assessment of filing fees for injunctions against repeat violence, dating violence and
sexual violence;
• shifts authority to serve an injunction against
sexual violence upon a state prisoner from a law
enforcement officer to a correctional officer at
the state prison;
• sets the period of effect for an ex parte temporary injunction against sexual violence to be based
on the expiration of an offenders’ state prison
term at 15 days from the day the offender is
released, rather than 15 days from the date of
issuance;
• redesignates the statewide injunction verification
system as the “Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Sexual Violence and Repeat Violence
Injunction Statewide Verification System;” and
• effective on July 1, 2003.
LEGISLATIVE UPDATE
Marriage and Family Support Initiatives Commission, Senate Bill 480 (Chapter 2003-122 Laws of
Florida) sponsored by Senator Evelyn Lynn of
Ormond Beach
5
LEGISLATIVE UPDATE
Florida’s Domestic Violence Laws
SUBJECT .................................................................................................... FLORIDA STATUTES
Advocate, Victim Privilege ........................................................................................................ 90.5036(b)
Address Confidentiality Program .........................................................................................741.401, .465
Aggravated Assault ........................................................................................................................ 784.021
Aggravated Battery ........................................................................................................................ 784.045
Arrest Without Warrant ............................................................................................ 741.2902, 901.15(7)
Assault ........................................................................................................................................... 784.011
Batterers Intervention Programs
Certification ......................................................................................................................... 741.32
Court Ordered Attendance ............................................................................................... 741.281
Fees .................................................................................................................................... 741.327
Guidelines ........................................................................................................................... 741.325
Probation, Condition of ................................................................................................ 948.03(12)
Battery, Felony ................................................................................................................ 984.03(2)
Centers, Domestic Violence
Advocate, Victim Privilege ................................................................................................. 90.5036
Capital Improvement Grant Program ................................................................................ 39.9055
6
Certification ......................................................................................................................... 39.905
Confidential Victim/Client Information ................................................................................ 39.908
Children
In the Presence of a Child ................................................................................................ 921.0014
Rebuttable Presumption of Detriment to the Child .................................................. 61.13(2)(b)2
Children & Families, Department of
Annual Report to Legislature ............................................................................................... 39.904
Batterers Intervention Programs, Certification of ............................................................... 741.32
Capital Improvement Grant Program ................................................................................ 39.9055
Confidential Victim/Client Information ................................................................................ 39.908
Duties and Functions ............................................................................................................ 39.903
Domestic Violence Centers, Certification of ....................................................................... 39.905
Domestic Violence Trust Fund ................................................................................741.01, 938.01
Cyberstalking ................................................................................................................................. 784.048
Aggravated Assault ............................................................................................................. 784.021
Aggravated Battery ............................................................................................................ 784.045
Assault ................................................................................................................................ 784.011
Battery ...................................................................................................................... 784.03 & .041
Dating Violence ......................................................................................................... 784.046(1)(c)
Domestic Violence .......................................................................................................... 741.28(2)
Family or Household Members ...................................................................................... 741.28(3)
Repeat Violence ....................................................................................................... 784.046(1)(b)
Sexual Violence ......................................................................................................... 784.046(1)(c)
LEGISLATIVE UPDATE
Definitions
Stalking ............................................................................................................................... 784.048
Violence ..................................................................................................................... 784.046(1)(a)
Education/Training
Child Protective Investigators ......................................................................................39.301(9)(f)
Health Care ........................................................................................................................ 456.031
Law Enforcement ............................................................................................................... 943.171
Public Awareness Campaign ........................................................................................... 741.01(2)
Fatality Review Teams .................................................................................................................... 741.316
Fees
Clerk of Court ...................................................................................................................... 741.01
Batterers’ Intervention Program ........................................................................................ 741.327
Injunction for Protection ...................................................................................................... 741.30
Marriage License ............................................................................................................. 741.01(2)
Trust Fund, Domestic Violence ............................................................................ 741.01 & 938.08
Firearms, Possession of ................................................................................................................. 790.233
Foreign Protection Orders ............................................................................................................ 741.315
Grant
Capital Improvement Program .......................................................................................... 39.9055
Health Care Licensure/Training ..................................................................................................... 456.031
7
LEGISLATIVE UPDATE
Imprisonment, Minimum Term ...................................................................................................... 741.283
Injunctions for Protection ................................................................................................................ 741.30
Arrest Without Warrant .............................................................................. 741.2902 & 901.15(7)
Clerk’s Duties ...................................................................................................................... 741.30
Fees, Prohibited .................................................................................................... 741.30(2)(a), (i)
Foreign Protection Orders ................................................................................................ 741.315
Law Enforcement Arrest Powers to Enforce ....................................... 741.30 6(d) 2 & 901.15(6)
Mutual Orders, Prohibited ................................................................................................... 741.30
Penalties for Violating ......................................................................................................... 784.047
Violation ............................................................................................................................... 741.31
Insurance, Discrimination ....................................................................................................... 626.9541(3)
Law Enforcement
Arrests Without Warrant ..................................................................................................... 901.15
Investigation of Incidents ...................................................................................................... 741.29
Notice of Legal Rights ........................................................................................................ 746.327
Primary Aggressor ...................................................................................................... 741.29(4)(b)
Training ............................................................................................................... 741.29 & 943.171
Uniform Statewide Policies and Procedures .................................................................... 943.1701
Victim Referral & Rights ...................................................................................................... 39.906
Law Enforcement, FL Department of
Fatality Review Teams ........................................................................................................ 741.316
8
Statistics............................................................................................................................ 943.1702
Training ............................................................................................................................... 943.171
Uniform Statewide Policies & Procedures ....................................................................... 943.1701
Primary Aggressor ................................................................................................................. 741.29(4)(b)
Prosecutor Duties ....................................................................................................................... 741.2901
Protection Orders ........................................................................................................................... 741.30
Relocation Assistance .................................................................................................................... 960.198
Repeat Violence ................................................................................................................... 784.046(1)(b)
Reports
Department of Children & Families ..................................................................................... 39.904
Florida Department of Law Enforcement ......................................................................... 741.316
Sexual Violence ..................................................................................................................... 784.046(1)(c)
Stalking ........................................................................................................................................... 784.048
State Attorney Duties .................................................................................................................. 741.2901
Training – See Education
Trust Fund, Domestic Violence ....................................................................................................... 741.01
Victim
Address Confidentiality .................................................................................... 408.465 & 741.401
LEGISLATIVE UPDATE
Sentence ........................................................................................................................................ 741.283
Advocate ....................................................................................................................... 90.5036(b)
Assistance .................................................................................................................................. 960
Confidentiality ...................................................................................................................... 39.908
Notice of Legal Rights .......................................................................................................... 741.29
Privilege .............................................................................................................................. 90.5036
Relocation Assistance ......................................................................................................... 960.198
Voting ................................................................................................................................. 741.406
Welfare
Child Support Enforcement Disclosure, Exemption ............................................. 414.095(15)(d)
Diversion Program ............................................................................................................. 414.157
Hardship Extension ....................................................................................................... 414.105(5)
Relocation Program ............................................................................................................ 445.021
Right to Receive Information ................................................................................... 414.095(10)(g)
Work Requirement Exemption ........................................................................... 414.065(4)(b)-(c)
9
In FY 2002-2003
there were 6,980
children 17 years
old and younger
who accompanied a
parent or guardian
and were served in
the state’s domestic
violence centers.
The Domestic Violence Program Office has oversight
for the certification and re-certification of domestic
violence centers, the primary providers of services to
domestic violence victims in Florida. During the fiscal
year, two centers received initial certification and the 38
existing centers’ were re-certified. The list is provided
in this report on page 15.
Certified domestic violence centers are typically
community-based not-for-profit programs that provide
a wide range of services dependent on state, federal,
and local resources. While the adult domestic violence
victim is the primary client, several centers have on-site
day care and schooling, and most have additional
specialized services for children beyond the required
child needs assessment. Annual service reports completed by each individual center are compiled in the
Annual Report of Domestic Violence Center Services
published by the Department and provide a detailed
picture of service provision by each center. A copy of
the report may be obtained by contacting the
Department’s Domestic Violence Program Office.
Centers are involved in a wide range of activities that
vary by community. Section 39.905, F.S. mandates
centers provide a minimum of nine services including
emergency shelter for more than 24 hours, counseling,
case management, child assessments, information and
referral, 24-hour hotline, safety planning, community
education, and professional training. Services are
accessed through a 24-hour hotline maintained by each
program or the toll-free statewide hotline number, 1800-500-1119, maintained by the Florida Coalition
Against Domestic Violence. Data submitted by the
centers reflects statewide provision of the minimum
services during the fiscal year.
The data demonstrates a slight decrease in the
number of individuals seeking shelter over the past
three years, however, there are noticeable increases in
the number of individuals seeking face-to-face outreach
services. For FY 2002-2003, 13,887 individuals were
sheltered compared to 13,925 in FY 2001-2002, a
difference of less than one percent. Individuals seeking
face-to-face outreach services continue to increase
from 110,473 clients in FY 2001-2002 to 116,215 in FY
2002-2003, an increase of five percent. Several factors
may be responsible for this upward trend. Anecdotally,
it is believed that the increase in demand for outreach
services is due in part to the success of the Governor’s
domestic violence public education campaign promoting
a Violence Free Florida, which provides information on
assessing domestic violence services. Additionally,
increases in individuals who select face-to-face outreach
SERVICE PROVIDED
FY 02-03
UNITS
Emergency Shelter
Clients Served .......................................... 13,887
Days of Shelter ....................................... 347,040
Counseling
Clients Served by Telephone .................... 93,335
Clients Served Face to Face ................... 116,215
Counseling Hours ................................... 502,789
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE CENTERS
Domestic Violence Centers
Case Management ..................................... 27,291
Child Assessments ....................................... 8,366
Information & Referral ........................ 1,042,396
Hotline Calls ............................................. 128,462
Safety Planning .......................................... 89,864
Community Education
Units ........................................................... 8,105
Attendance ............................................. 267,172
11
Professional Training
Units ........................................................... 2,225
Attendance ............................................... 43,642
services may be a result of domestic violence centers
providing an array of community-based services aimed
at educating and assisting victims and their children, as
well as advocates from law enforcement agencies, state
attorneys and judges who continue to provide victim
support.
Community education is considered a viable component in the centers efforts to assist the public in understanding the dynamics of domestic violence. This fiscal
year domestic violence centers conducted 8,105
presentations on domestic violence compared to 7,626
presentations in FY 2001-2002, an increase of six
percent. Furthermore, there were 267,172 attendees
for this year’s presentations compared to 244,330 who
attended last year, an increase of nine percent. This
increase may be attributed to the domestic violence
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE CENTERS
12
centers commitment to provide training and technical
assistance to community partners.
In FY 2002-2003 there were 6,980 children 17 years
old and younger who accompanied a parent or guardian
and were served in the state’s domestic violence
centers. Data continues to be consistent with the 6,993
served during FY 2001-2002. Additionally, current data
reflects a continuing trend from the previous year with
the majority of adult clients served being between the
ages of 30-44 and Caucasian as the most common
ethnicity.
The ethnicity of clients served in shelter has changed
over the previous fiscal year with overall underserved
populations experiencing an increase. Hispanic women
served in shelter for FY 2002-2003 increased by nine
percent, Asian-American women increased by seven
percent and Native American women by two percent
from last year’s data, however, there was a five percent
decrease for African-American women served in shelter
during the previous fiscal year. The overall focus on
reaching underserved populations with funds provided
through the Violence Against Women Act may be responsible for the all-inclusive increase in services to
underserved populations. The ethnicity of clients
served in outreach programs has also increased in all
categories except for Asian-American clients who
decreased in FY 2002-2003 by four percent.
In addition to client services, the Department continues to collect data for performance evaluation. The
legislature established a performance measure for
certified centers to implement a family safety and
security plan for each adult and child victim in shelter
for more than 72 hours. For FY 2002-2003, 98 percent
of adult and child victims served in shelter for more
than 72 hours received a safety plan compared to 97
percent the previous year. The measure demonstrates
the centers continued efforts to assist victims in planning how to remain safe once they leave shelter services. Successful safety planning is based on a variety of
factors that involve education on the dynamics of
domestic violence, knowledge and availability of community resources, and assistance in exercising the plan.
The centers continue to exceed the 97 percent goal
established by the legislature for safety planning.
CLIENT DEMOGRAPHICS
FOR FY 02-03
NUMBER
Age of Clients Served in Shelter
0-17 years ................................................... 6,980
18-29 years ................................................. 2,718
30-44 years ................................................. 3,176
45-59 years .................................................... 884
60 years and older ........................................... 81
Age of Clients Served in Outreach
0-17 years ................................................... 8,346
18-29 years ............................................... 18,343
30-44 years ............................................... 24,326
45-59 years ................................................. 7,278
60 years and older ...................................... 1,741
Ethnicity of Clients Served in Shelter
Caucasian ................................................... 6,458
African-American ....................................... 4,093
Hispanic ...................................................... 2,663
Asian American ............................................. 148
Native American ............................................. 77
Other ............................................................. 448
Ethnicity of Clients Served in Outreach
Caucasian ................................................. 37,852
African-American ..................................... 10,860
Hispanic ...................................................... 9,112
Asian American ............................................. 434
Native American ........................................... 266
Other .......................................................... 1,762
The Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence
(FCADV) is the professional organization for the state’s
certified domestic violence centers. Their mission is “to
create a violence-free world by empowering women
and children through the elimination of personal and
institutional violence and oppression against all people.”
FCADV’s primary function is to provide educational
services to the centers; to assist centers resolve problematic agency challenges; to maintain the privilege
communications database; and, to oversee the statewide domestic violence hotline. FCADV also provides
leadership, advocacy, education, and public policy
development on domestic violence and related issues to
private and public organizations.
The Department contracts with FCADV to provide
technical assistance and training to the certified domestic violence centers and expand and enhance services to
victims of domestic violence. During FY 2002-2003,
FCADV received $2,514,924 through state and federal
funding. The following highlights their activities for FY
2002-2003.
Community Education and Technical Assistance:
A total of 20,898 calls for information and assistance
were forwarded to domestic violence centers via the
FCADV toll-free statewide domestic violence hotline.
In addition, 1,892 technical assistance calls and electronic contacts were received. Topics of inquiry included information on Florida Statutes, statistics, library
resources, information on becoming a certified
FCADV’s primary
center, setting up
function is to
meetings and
conferences and
provide educational
other related
services to the
issues. FCADV
conducted 14
centers; to assist
technical assiscenters resolve
tance visits to
domestic violence
problematic agency
centers and
challenges; to
partnering agenmaintain the
cies, and conducted 26
privilege communitrainings to
cations database;
centers and allied
agencies. Training
and, to oversee the
institutes offered
statewide domestic
information on a
variety of topics
violence hotline.
including faith-
based initiatives, child welfare and advocacy training.
Also during the year, a statewide conference provided
insight on the topic of Mental Health and Substance
Abuse as Impacts Domestic Violence. It featured
presentations to an audience of 230 participants by
recognized experts in their respective fields.
Statewide Rural Initiative: A focus on increased
rural services resulted in the competitive distribution of
funds in rural communities. Successful applicants
provided a total of 53 domestic and/or sexual violence
trainings for law enforcement, health departments, civic
organizations and local businesses. As a result of this
funding, 882 victims received services, including injunction assistance, crisis intervention and advocacy.
FCADV offered additional training which addressed
domestic violence and/or sexual violence issues in rural
communities. Focus was placed on specific
underserved populations including Latino women,
migrant farm workers and the elderly. Technical assistance was provided to private, public and local community organizations regarding shelter programs and other
related topics.
Statewide Legal Initiative and Legal Hotline:
FCADV provided 2,651 individual legal consultations to
victims of domestic violence and sexual assault, during
the 2002-2003 fiscal year. Two thousand seventy-six
representations were provided in injunction hearings as
well as technical assistance for filed appeals. Legal
training targeted civil and criminal justice system professionals to expand their knowledge of domestic violence
legal issues. Domestic violence advocates received
training on courtroom decorum, preparing for crossexamination, the unlicensed practice of law, and other
topics necessary to ensure the professionalism of the
domestic violence advocate in the courtroom. Statewide Legal Hotline staff responded to a total of 3,228
requests for legal advice and/or information. Services
specific to Spanish and Creole-speaking callers were
also available through the domestic violence hotline.
Statewide Clemency Project: Twenty-one onsite
interviews were conducted for individuals that currently
have clemency cases filed. In addition, a statewide
needs assessment was conducted to report on specific
criminal justice issues. The goal of this assessment was
the prevention of future clemency cases.
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE CENTERS
Florida Coalition Against
Domestic Violence
13
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE CENTERS
14
Certified Domestic Violence Centers
23
16
07
10
03
14
30
37
08
02
39
01
28
35
22
32
06
17
15
13
38
09
20
34
21
19
24
12
18
33
31
11
04
26
27
28
05
25
36
40
Bartow .............................. Peace River Center Domestic Violence Shelter
Bradenton ......................... Hope Family Services, Inc.
Brooksville ........................ Dawn Center of Hernando County
Burnell .............................. Family Life Center/SafeHouse Women’s Center
Chiefland .......................... Another Way, Inc.
Clearwater ....................... The Haven of R.C.S.
Cocoa ............................... Salvation Army Domestic Violence Program of Brevard County
Dade City ......................... Sunrise of Pasco County, Inc.
Daytona Beach ................. Domestic Abuse Council, Inc.
Delray Beach .................... Aid to Victims of Domestic Abuse, Inc.
Fort Lauderdale ................ Women in Distress of Broward County, Inc.
Fort Myers ........................ Abuse Counseling & Treatment (ACT)
Fort Pierce ....................... Safespace, Inc.
Fort Walton Beach ........... Shelter House
Gainesville ........................ Peaceful Parts
Hudson ............................. Salvation Army Domestic Violence Program of West Pasco
Inverness .......................... Citrus County Abuse Shelter Association (CASA)
Jacksonville ....................... Hubbard House, Inc..
Kissimmee ........................ Help Now, Inc.
Leesburg ........................... Haven of Lake & Sumter Counties
Live Oak ........................... Vivid Visions
Marathon Shores .............. Domestic Abuse Shelter
Miami ................................ Metro-Dade Advocates for Victims, Safespace (North)
Naples .............................. Shelter for Abused Women
Ocala ................................ Ocala Rape Crisis - Domestic Violence Center/Creative Services, Inc..
Ockeechobee ................... Martha’s House, Inc.
Orange Park ..................... Quigley House, Inc.
Orlando ............................ Harbor House, Orange County Center Against Domestic Abuse
Palatka .............................. Lee Conlee House
Palm Bay ........................... Serene Harbor, Inc.
Panama City ..................... Salvation Army Domestic Violence and Rape Crisis Program og Panama City
Pensacola .......................... Favorhouse of Northwest Florida, Inc.
Punta Gorda ..................... Center for Abuse and Rape Emergencies
Sanford ............................. SafeHouse of Seminole
Sarasota ............................ Safe Place and Rape Crisis Center (SPARCC)
St. Augustine .................... Safety Shelter of St. Johns County, Inc. (dba Betty Griffin House)
St. Petersburg ................... CASA (Center Against Spouse Abuse)
Tallahassee ........................ Refuge House, Inc..
Tampa ............................... The Spring of Tampa Bay, Inc.
West Palm Beach .............. YWCA Harmony House
Abuse Counseling &
Treatment, Inc.
ED: Jennifer Benton
PO Box 60401
Ft. Myers, FL 33906
ADM: (239) 939-2553
FAX (239) 939-4741
CRISIS: (239) 939-3112
[email protected]
Aid to Victims of Domestic Abuse
ED: Pam O’ Brien
PO Box 667
Delray Beach, FL 33447
ADM: (561) 265-3797 or
(800) 355-8547
FAX: (561) 265-2102
CRISIS: (561) 265-2900
Po’[email protected]
Another Way, Inc.
ED: Donna Fagan
PO Box 1028
Lake City, FL 32056-1028
ADM: (386) 719-2757
ADM FAX: (386) 719-2758
CRISIS: (352) 493-6743
[email protected]
[email protected]
C.A.R.E. of Charlotte County, Inc.
ED: Kay Tvaroch
PO Box 510234
Punta Gorda, FL 33951
ADM: (941) 639-5499
FAX: (941) 639-7079
CRISIS: (941) 627-6000
[email protected]
CASA
ED: Linda Osmundson
PO Box 414
St Petersburg, FL 33731
ADM: (727) 895-4912 x111
FAX: (727) 821-7101
CRISIS: (727) 898-3671
www.casa-stpete.org
[email protected]
Citrus County Abuse Shelter,
Assoc.
ED: Diana McIntosh
PO Box 205
Inverness, FL 34451
ADM: (352) 344-8111
FAX: (352) 344-0548
CRISIS: (352) 344-8111
[email protected]
Dawn Center of Hernando Co.
ED: Stephanie Walley
PO Box 6179
Springhill, FL 34611
ADM (352) 686-8759
FAX: (352)684-0348
CRISIS: (352) 799-0657
[email protected]
Haven of Lake and Sumter Co.
ED: Ruth Harvey Gilligan
PO Box 492335
Leesburg, FL 34749-2335
ADM: (352) 787-5889
FAX: (352) 787-4125
CRISIS: (352) 753-5800
[email protected]
Domestic Abuse Council, Inc.
ED: M.F. Warren
PO Box 142
Daytona Beach, FL 32115
ADM: (386) 257-2297
FAX: (386) 248-1985
CRISIS: (386) 255-2102
DeLand: (386) 738-4080
[email protected]
Help Now
ED: Lisa Swaine
PO Box 420370
Kissimmee, FL 34742
ADM: (407) 847-3260
FAX (407) 847-8121
CRISIS: (407) 847-8562
[email protected]
Domestic Abuse Shelter
ED: Venita Garvin Valdez
PO Box 522696
Marathon Shores, FL 33052
ADM: (305) 743-5452
FAX: (305) 289-1589
CRISIS: (305) 743-4440
[email protected]
Family Life Center
ED: Diana Christen
PO Box 2058
Bunnell, FL 32110
ADM: (386) 437-7610
FAX: (386) 437-1243
CRISIS (386) 437-3505
[email protected]
FavorHouse of NW Florida, Inc.
ED: Sue Hand
2001 W. Blount Street
Pensacola, FL 32501
ADM: (850) 434-1177
FAX: (850) 434-9987
CRISIS: (850) 434-6600
[email protected]
[email protected]
Harbor House
ED: Margaret Anglin
PO Box 680748
Orlando, FL 32868-0748
ADM: (407) 886-2244
FAX: (407) 886-0006
CRISIS: (407) 886-2856
[email protected]
Hope Family Services, Inc.
ED: Laurel Lynch
PO Box 1624
Bradenton, FL 34206
ADM: (941) 747-8499
FAX: (941) 749-1796
CRISIS: (941) 755-6805
[email protected]
Hubbard House
ED: Ellen Siler
PO Box 4909
Jacksonville, FL 32201
ADM: (904) 354-0076 x300
FAX: (904) 354-1342
CRISIS: (904) 354-3114
[email protected]
Lee Conlee House
ED: Shandra Riffey
PO Box 2558
Palatka, FL 32177
ADM: (386) 325-4447
FAX: (386) 328-9499
SHELTER: (386) 325-3120
CRISIS: (386) 325-3141
[email protected]
Martha’s House
ED: Stephanie Locke
PO Box 727
Okeechobee, FL 34973
ADM: (863) 763-2893
FAX: (863) 763-6712
CRISIS: (863) 763-0202
[email protected]
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE CENTERS
Certified Domestic Violence Centers
15
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE CENTERS
16
Metro-Dade Advocates for
Victims, Safespace (North)
ED: Pat Sims
7831 NE Miami Court
Miami, FL 33138
ADM: (305) 758-2804
FAX: (305) 756-1347
CRISIS: (305) 758-2546
CRISIS (305) 247-4249 in Homestead
[email protected]
Ocala Rape Crisis-Domestic
Violence Center/Creative
Services, Inc.
ED: Judy Wilson
PO Box 2193
Ocala, FL 34478
ADM: (352) 622-5919
FAX: (352) 351-9455
CRISIS: (352) 622-8495
[email protected]
Safe House of Seminole
ED: Jeanne Gold
PO Box 2921
Sanford, FL 32772
ADM: (407) 302-5220
ADM: (407) 302-5219
FAX: (407) 302-5218
CRISIS: (407) 330-3933
[email protected]
Safe Space Domestic
Violence Services
ED: Hylan Bryan
PO Box 4075
Ft Pierce, FL 34948
ADM: (772) 595-0042
FAX: (772) 595-0367
Martin CRISIS: 772-288-7023
St. Lucie CRISIS: (772) 464-4555
Indian River CRISIS: (772) 569-7233
[email protected]
Peaceful Paths
ED: Theresa Harrison
PO Box 5099
Gainesville, FL 32627-5099
ADM: (352) 377-5690
FAX: (352) 378-9033
CRISIS:800-393-7233 352-377-8255
[email protected]
Safety Shelter of St Johns County
dba Betty Griffin House
ED: Beth Hughes
PO Box 3319
St Augustine, FL 32085
ADM: (904) 808-8544
FAX: (904) 808-8338
CRISIS: (904) 824-1555
[email protected]
Peace River Center - Domestic
Violence Shelter
Program Manager: Joy Kruppa
PO Box 1559
Bartow, FL 33831-1559
ADM: (863) 413-2708
FAX: (863) 582-7280
CRISIS: (863) 413-2700
Sebring: (863) 386-1167
[email protected]
Salvation Army Domestic Violence
& Rape Crisis Program
ED: Kimberly Swanson
651 W. 14th St., Unit-C
Panama City, FL 32401
ADM: (850) 769-7989
FAX: (850) 769-2183
CRISIS: 1-800-252-2597
Quigley House, Inc.
ED: Sharon Youngerman
PO Box 142
Orange Park, FL 32067-0142
ADM: (904) 284-0340
FAX: (904) 284-5407
CRISIS: 1-800-339-5017 or 284-0061
[email protected]
Salvation Army Brevard Co.
Domestic Violence Program
ED: Cindy Flachmeier
PO Box 1540
Cocoa, FL 32923-1540
ADM: (321) 631-2766 x18
FAX: (321) 631-7914
CRISIS: (321) 631-2764
[email protected]
Refuge House, Inc.
ED: Kelly Otte
PO Box 20910
Tallahassee, FL 32316-0910
ADM: (850) 922-6062
FAX: (850) 922-5611
CRISIS: (850) 681-2111
[email protected]
Salvation Army Domestic Violence
Program of W. Pasco
ED: Michele Anderson
PO Box 5517
Hudson, FL 34674-5517
ADM: (727) 856-6498
FAX: (727) 857-1907
CRISIS: (727) 856-5797
Serene Harbor, Inc.
ED: Melody Keeth
PO Box 100039
Palm Bay, FL 32910-0039
ADM: (321) 726-8282
FAX: (321) 726-8588
CRISIS: (321) 726-8282
[email protected]
Shelter for Abused Women &
Children
CEO: Kathy Herrmann
PO Box 10102
Naples, FL 34101
ADM (239) 775-3862
FAX: (239) 775-3061
CRISIS: (239) 775-1101
[email protected]
[email protected]
http://www.naplesshelter.org
Shelter House, Inc.
ED: Elizabeth Risch
PO Box 220
Ft Walton Beach, FL 32549-0220
ADM: (850) 243-1201
FAX (850) 243-6756
CRISIS: (850) 863-4777
800-44-ABUSE
[email protected]
SPARCC
ED: Stephanie Woods
2139 Main Street
Sarasota, FL 34234
ADM: (941) 365-1976
FAX: (941) 365-4919
CRISIS: (941) 365-1976
[email protected]
Sunrise of Pasco Co., Inc.
ED: Penny Morrill
PO Box 928
Dade City, FL 33526
ADM: (352) 521-3358
FAX: (352) 521-3099
CRISIS: (352) 521-3120
[email protected]
The Haven of R.C.S.
ED: Linda Amidei
PO Box 10594
Clearwater, FL 33757
ADM: (727) 443-6148
FAX: (727) 461-5057
CRISIS: (727) 442-4128
Outreach (727) 441-2029
[email protected]
Vivid Visions
ED: Jennie Lyons
PO Box 882
Live Oak, FL 32064
ADM: (386) 364-5957
FAX: (386) 364-1732
CRISIS: (386) 364-2100
[email protected]
Women in Distress
ED: Christine Thrower
PO Box 676
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33302
ADM: (954) 760-9800
FAX: (954) 687-0733
CRISIS: (954) 761-1133
[email protected]
DOMESTIC VIOLENCE CENTERS
The Spring of Tampa Bay
ED: Sue Spitz
PO Box 4772
Tampa, FL 33677
ADM: (813) 247-5433
FAX: (813) 247-2930
CRISIS: (813) 247-7233
[email protected]
YWCA Harmony House
ED: Liz Foxall
2200 N Florida Mango Road
Suite 102
West Palm Beach, FL 33409
ADM: (561) 640-0050
FAX: (561) 640-9155
CRISIS: (561) 640-9844
For Additional
Information:
Florida Coalition Against Domestic
Violence
ED: Tiffany Carr
425 Office Plaza Drive
Tallahassee, FL 32301
ADM: (850) 425-2749
FAX: (850) 425-3091
HOTLINE: 800-500-1119
TDD 800-621-4202
[email protected]
17
The premise of the intervention
program model is that violence is a
learned and chosen tactic to control
and can be ‘unlearned’ through
education and intervention.
Batterers intervention programs provide direct
services to perpetrators of domestic violence and are
used as a tool by the criminal justice system to hold
perpetrators of domestic violence accountable for their
actions, to deter re-offense, and protect victims.
Participants of batterers intervention programs are
referred from the civil courts through the injunction
process or through the criminal courts as the result of
arrests culminating in misdemeanor or felony probation.
Programs may also receive referrals from pre-trial or
diversion programs at the State Attorney’s Office,
through the Department of Children and Families, or
through self-referral.
To assist the courts and referring agencies in identifying appropriate programs and to provide guidance to
programs and assessors for maintaining the quality and
integrity of their programs, Florida has established
minimum standards. The Department of Children and
Families is responsible for the promulgation of these
guidelines and the certification and monitoring of both
programs and personnel. (See ss. 741.32 and 325, F. S.)
Programs and assessors are monitored annually for
both administrative functions and group observation.
Certified programs must be 26 weeks in length, including 24 weekly sessions, plus appropriate intake, assessment, orientation and enrollment. Programs must use a
model that employs a program content based on tactics
of power and control by one person over another. (See
s. 741.325, F. S.) The premise of the model is that
violence is a learned and chosen tactic to control and
can be “unlearned” through education and intervention.
The Certification Procedures and Minimum Standards for
Assessors and Batterers Intervention Programs (January
2000) can be found on the following web site:
http://www5.myflorida.com/cf_web/myflorida2/
healthhuman/domesticviolence/
During FY 2002-2003, the Department contracted
with a private provider, ENSYNC Diversified Management Services, Inc., to conduct on-site monitoring of
batterers intervention programs, of which 118 programs and 180 assessors were successfully completed.
Additionally, 11 programs and 27 assessors received
initial certification, and four programs that applied for
certification were denied. At the end of the fiscal year
there were 137 certified programs and 340 certified
assessors in Florida. The list is updated frequently and
can be found on the above web site, as well as in this
report.
Training
The Department of Children and Families completed
its first year of providing continuing education for staff
of certified batterers intervention programs during FY
2002-2003. The Domestic Violence Program Office in
partnership with the Department’s Education and
Training Office offered training on the co-occurrence of
domestic violence and child abuse. The newly offered
continuing education course was provided regionally
and launched at the Annual Meeting of Batterers
Intervention Programs in October 2002. At the annual
meeting, courses on learning principles and diversity
within batterers intervention programs were also
provided. The Domestic Violence Program Office is
committed to not only meeting the educational needs of
the program staff, but making it convenient as well.
After numerous requests, an additional curriculum
was developed for victim liaisons and added to the
training. Two courses have been offered in partnership
with the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence.
Participants have commented that the class has provided them with the victim perspective as well as a
reminder that their goal is to increase victim safety.
BATTERERS INTERVENTION PROGRAMS
Batterers Intervention Programs
Enrollment
The Department requests that all certified programs
provide demographic, enrollment, and discharge
information on court-ordered perpetrators of domestic
violence. The data on page 20 reflects statewide
enrollment as reported from 75 percent of the state’s
certified programs during the fiscal year.
During the fiscal year, 4,376 participants were enrolled with 38 percent completing the program and 62
percent were terminated from the program for
nonparticipation. The median age of participants was
34 years, with the youngest at 17 years of age and the
oldest at 84 years of age. The greatest number of
participants was 31 years of age. Please note that the
entry of “unknown” on the following table is due to
incomplete responses to survey questions, which are
filled out by program participants.
19
BATTERERS INTERVENTION PROGRAMS
PARTICIPANT DEMOGRAPHICS
Demographic
%
Demographic
#
%
ENROLLED
4376
Terminated
2706
62%
Married
1013
23%
Completed
1670
38%
Divorced
386
9%
MARITAL STATUS
1246
28%
Living Together
434
10%
Single
EDUCATION
1st - 8th Grade
329
8%
Separated
655
15%
9th - 11th Grade
1103
25%
Unknown
642
15%
12th Grade or GED
1665
38%
Some College
835
19%
College Graduate
274
6%
White
1960
45%
49
1%
African American
1274
29%
121
3%
Hispanic
869
20%
Asian
26
1%
Other
142
3%
Unknown
105
2%
Post Graduate
Unknown
EMPLOYMENT
RACE
Full-time
2319
53%
Part-time
472
11%
53
1%
Unemployed
969
22%
Disabled
191
4%
Nonparticipation
Other
117
3%
Unknown
255
6%
Retired
20
#
INCOME
REASONS FOR TERMINATION
Recurrence/Arrest
86
3%
1676
62%
Noncompliance
85
3%
Drug/Alcohol Use
23
1%
Other
55
2%
781
29%
Unknown
$0 - $5K
904
21%
$5K - $10K
485
11%
$10K - $15K
618
14%
$15K - $20K
504
12%
$20K - $25K
407
9%
$25K - $30K
206
5%
$30K - $35K
141
3%
$35K +
191
4%
Unknown
920
21%
Data reported by 75% of the certified
batterers intervention programs.
DEFINITIONS:
• Recurrence/Arrest – violence against their
partner that may have culminated in an arrest.
• Nonparticipation - excess absences.
• Noncompliance - failure to follow program
rules.
• Drug/Alcohol Use - attending group while
intoxicated; failure to attend court-ordered
treatment (if applicable); or positive drug/
alcohol screening (if applicable).
• Other - discharge for other reasons, i.e.,
relocation, transfer to another program,
charges/injunction dropped, etc.
• Unknown – survey question was not
completed.
Choices
7880 W. Dunnellon Rd.
(CR 488)
Dunnellon, FL 34433
(352) 563-1600
Circuit 1
Circuit 4
Bridgeway Center
137 Hospital Drive
Ft. Walton Bch, FL 32548-5015
(850) 833-7500
Salvation Army
328 North Ocean Street
Jacksonville, FL 32202
(904) 301-4834
Cordova Counseling Center
4400 Bayou Blvd., Suite 8-D
Pensacola, FL 32503
(850) 474-9882
First Step, Hubbard House, Inc.
P. O. Box 4909
Jacksonville, FL 32201
(904) 354-0076
Baycare Inverness
103 West Dampier Street
Inverness, FL 34450
(352) 341-4545 or
(877) 894-4906
Pattison Professional Counseling
Center
7 Vine Avenue NE
Ft. Walton Beach, FL 32548
(850) 863-2873
Quigley House, Inc.
P.O. Box 142
Orange Park, FL 32067
(904) 284-0340
Court Educational Programs
220 E. Main Street
Tavares, FL 32778
(352) 343-9399
Salvation Army
191 Nassau Place
Yulee, Fl 32041
(904) 301-4834
Growing Center Counseling
275 West Jefferson Street
Brooksville, FL 34601
(352) 544-5833
Circuit 5
Circuit 6
Western Judicial Services, Inc.
807 S.W. 3rd Avenue, Suite B
Ocala, FL 34474
(352) 622-9006
Alpha Counseling Services
10730 U. S. Highway 19 N
Suite 4
Port Richey, FL 34668
(813) 862-0111
Marion-Citrus Mental Health
Center
5664 S.W. 60th Avenue
Ocala, FL 34474
(352) 291-5440
Glover and Associates
7017 Central Avenue
St. Petersburg, FL 33710
(727) 343-5158
Benjamin Keyes, Ph.D.
947 Candlelight Boulevard
Brooksville, FL 34601
(800) 983-8368 or (352) 797-5559
Wellness Center
8800 49th Street, North
Suite 102, Room 5
Pinellas Park, FL 34666
(727) 544-3352
Mid-Florida Counseling &
Consulting Services
401 NW 3rd Avenue
Ocala, FL 34475
(352) 620-0900
Mac Associates
1501 ALT 19 South, Suite A
Tarpon Springs, FL 34689
(813) 937-7900
Hurlburt Field Family Advocacy
Program
16 MDOS/ SGOHF
Hurlburt Field, FL 32544
(850) 884-5061
C.O.P.E. Center
3686 US Highway 331 South
DeFuniak Springs, FL 32433
(850) 892-8045
Favorhouse of NW Florida, Inc.
2001 W. Blount Street
Pensacola, FL 32501
(850) 434-1177
Mental Health Associates
14 West Jordan Street
Pensacola, FL 32501
(850) 469-0128
Circuit 2
New Hope
1589-A Metropolitan Blvd.
Tallahassee, FL 32308
(850) 386-9313
Creative Counseling Services of
Florida
1106 Thomasville Road, Suite K
Tallahassee, FL 32303
(850) 510-5133
Circuit 3
Diversified Human Services
Praxis Network Office
212 N. Marion Street
Lake City, FL 32055
(386) 752-9937
Western Judicial Services, Inc.
1113 Lake Harris Drive
Tavares, FL 32778
(352) 742-9317
Choices
108 N. Magnolia Avenue
Suite 219
Ocala, FL 34475
(352) 622-0062
A Better Solution
5247 Park Street
St. Petersburg, FL 33709
(727) 458-7775
David Swindall, LMFT
5580 Park Blvd., Suite 6
Pinellas Park, FL 33781
(727) 544-9305
Western Judicial Services
6420 Ridge Road
New Port Richey, FL 34668
(800) 430-0503
BATTERERS INTERVENTION PROGRAMS
Certified Batterers Intervention Programs
21
BATTERERS INTERVENTION PROGRAMS
Prevention Projects, Inc.
13743 US 98 Bypass
Dade City, FL 33525
(352) 523-0024
Dept of Veterans Affairs Medical
Center
Veterans DVIP-SATP 116A2
P. O. Box 5005
Bay Pines, FL 33744
(727) 398-6661, ext. 5750
New Horizons Domestic Violence
Program
4550 S. Clyde Morris Blvd.
Suite C
Port Orange, FL 32119
(386) 767-4826
Circuit 9
A No Abuse Program
706 East Colonial Drive
Orlando, FL 32803
(407) 999-9703
Families Against Abuse
427 N. Primrose Drive
Orlando, FL 32803
(407) 260-6343
Benjamin Keyes, Ph.D.
New Port Square
4625 E. Bay Drive, Suite 301
Clearwater, FL 33764
(727) 572-0059
Newman Counseling Alternatives
1240 Mason Avenue
Daytona Beach, FL 32117
(386) 253-4559
Psychological Management Group
7621 Little Road, Suite 100
New Port Richey, FL
(813) 996-0646
Deltona Counseling Associates
766-B Deltona Blvd.
Deltona, FL 32725
(407) 574-5148
Clinicians Group, P.A., d/b/a
Batterers’ Intervention Project
1661 East Bay Drive
Largo FL 33771
(727) 582-8000
Responsible Choices
P.O. Box 10482
Daytona Beach, FL 32120
(386) 248-2272
Family Court Education
& Mediation Services, Inc.
3 South Bermuda Ave., Suite 13
Kissimmee, FL 34741
(407) 931-1778
Positive Changes
2001 S. Ridgewood Ave.
South Daytona, FL 32118
(386) 767-0523
Beltran Behavioral Health
201 Ruby Avenue, Suite A
Kissimmee, FL 34741
(407) 518-9161
Preventive Abuse Counseling
122 Amelia Avenue
Deland, FL 32721
(386) 738-7594
Circuit 10
Barbara Chism, LMHC
8383 Seminole Blvd., Suite B
Seminole, FL 33772
(727) 393-8702
22
Joe Whitenton, Ph.D.
Family Counseling
600 Tenth Street
Holly Hill, FL 32117
(386) 255-6845
Nautilus Counseling Center
1950 First Avenue North
Suite 217
St. Petersburg, FL 33713-8998
(727) 488-6366
Men’s Work
7901 4th Street North, Suite 3232
St. Petersburg, FL 33702
(727) 515-8482
Douglas J. Summers, LMHC
3000 Gulf to Bay, Suite 209
Clearwater, FL 33759
(727) 541-2233 or 647-2581
Circuit 7
Domestic Abuse Council, Inc.
Family Intervention Program
P.O. Box 142
Daytona Beach, FL 32115
(386) 257-2297
Change/Safety Shelter of St. Johns
County, Inc.
P. O. Box 3319
St. Augustine, FL 32085
(904) 808-8544
Circuit 8
Diversified Human Services, Inc.
16 E. University Avenue
Gainesville, FL 32604
(352) 335-1880
Peaceful Paths
P. O. Box 5099
Gainesville, FL 32627-5099
(352) 377-5690
Creative Counseling Services
4001 Newberry Road, D-4
Gainesville, FL 32607
(352) 373-1218
First Step/Hubbard House, Inc.
The Family Service Center
418 8th Street South
Macclenny, FL 32063
(904) 354-0076
Abolish Abuse
4851 S. Apopka-Vineland Rd.
Orlando, FL 32819
(407) 876-7757
New Options, Inc.
3203 Lawton Road, Suite 150
Orlando, FL 32803
(407) 894-8410
Adjustment & Awareness
Counseling Services, Inc.
301 3rd Street NW, Suite 204A
Winter Haven, FL 33881
(863) 291-3155
Social Solutions, Inc.
906 SE Lakeview Drive
Sebring, FL 33870
(863) 402-1088
BayCare Health Management
101 West Main Street, Suite 170
Lakeland, FL 33815
(863) 688-6262
Circuit 12
Circuit 13
Families in Action, Inc.
2734 N.W. 183rd Street
Coral City, Fl 33054
(305) 621-6160
Domestic Abuse Intervention
Project
1901 Manatee Ave. W
Bradenton, FL 34205
(941) 746-6778
MacDill Air Force Base
Family Advocacy Program
8415 Bayshore Boulevard
Tampa, FL 33621
(813) 828-5315
Domestic Violence Intervention
Project
200 S. Washington Blvd.
Suite 7-A
Sarasota, FL 34236
(941) 957-1416
Interventions Enterprises, Inc.
1502 West Busch Blvd., Suite E
Tampa, FL 33612
(813) 933-8865
Metro-Dade Family and Victim
Services
2125 Biscayne Boulevard
Suite 400
Miami, FL 33137
(305) 571-7750
Alliance for Psychological Services
1570 Madruga Avenue, Suite 309
Coral Gables, FL 33146
(305) 663-6540
The Recovery Project
10300 Sunset Drive, Suite 160
Miami, FL 33173
(305) 271-5500
Perspectives in Mental Health
7344 S. W. 48th Street, Suite 302
Miami, FL 33155
(305) 663-0013
Miami Behavioral Health Center
1401 S.W. 1st Street, Suite 204
Miami, FL 33135
(305) 649-0017
Dade Family Counseling, Inc.
1490 West 49th Place, Suite 410
Hialeah, FL 33012
(305) 827-3252
Full Circle Counseling, Inc.
220 71st Street, Suite 218
Miami Beach, FL 33141
(305) 867-3330
Lifeline of Miami, Inc.
9745 Sunset Drive, Suite 109
Miami, FL 33173
(305) 270-0400
New Era Health Center, Inc.
9600 SW 8th Street, Suite 1
Miami, FL 33174
(305) 559-8838
Behavior Management Services
200 S. Washington Blvd., Suite 9
Sarasota, FL 34236
(941) 954-1105
Anger Alternatives
544 12th Street, West
Bradenton, FL 34205
(941) 750-0430
The Halcyon Group
2021 Englewood Road, Suite D
Englewood, FL 34223
(941) 475-7337
C & C Family Services of
Manatee, Inc.
4230 26th Street West, Suite 8
Bradenton, FL 34205-3516
(941) 755-9947
Cambridge Health Assoc.
Domestic Abuse Program
333 Tamiami Trail South
Suite 203
Venice, FL 34285
(941) 486-1990
Mayra Cestero Counseling
Services, Inc.
4301 32nd Street West
Suite E-27
Bradenton, FL 34205
(941) 545-6511
Life Counseling
1400 Colonial Blvd., Suite 253
Ft. Myers, FL 33907
(239) 939-4566
Veteran’s DVIP
James A. Haley VA Hospital
13000 Bruce B. Downs Blvd.
Tampa, FL 33612
(813) 972-2000, Ext. 6647
Brandon Psychiatric Associates
407 N. Parsons Ave., Suite 102-B
Brandon, FL 33510
(813) 684-7627
The Spring of Tampa Bay, Inc.
5118 N. 56th Street, Suite 225
Tampa, FL 33610
(813) 621-7233
BATTERERS INTERVENTION PROGRAMS
Circuit 11
Psychological Management Group
15436 N. Florida Ave., Suite 102
Tampa, FL 33613
(813) 963-1016
Western Judicial Services, Inc.
8001 N. Dale Mabry, Suite 801C
Tampa, FL 33614
(813) 930-9595
Joni Stewart
Domestic Violence Intervention
Program
310 E. Oak Ave
Tampa, FL 33602
(813) 277-0080
Circuit 14
The Unlimited Path, Inc.
1159 Jenks Ave.
Panama City, FL 32401
(850) 872-0222
23
BATTERERS INTERVENTION PROGRAMS
Circuit 15
Circuit 16
Circuit 18
D.A.R.T.
185 East Indiantown Road
Suite #108
Jupiter, FL 33477
(561) 743-2797
Perspectives on Mental Health dba
Domestic Safety Program
11400 Overseas Highway
Town Hall Square #203
Marathon, FL 33050
(305) 743-9588
Families Against Abuse
282 Short Avenue, Suite 106
Longwood, FL 32750
(407) 260-6343
FA/CTS
3175 S. Congress Avenue
Suite 106
Lake Worth, FL 33461
(561) 968-2370
Abusive Partners of Palm Beach
County
399 Camino Gardens Blvd.
Suite 307
Boca Raton, FL 33433
(561) 750-9710
Parent-Child Center, Inc.
4802 East Avenue
West Palm Beach, FL 33407
(561) 844-3531 x68
Alternative/Relapse Treatment
Services
2994 Jog Road
Lake Worth, FL 33467
(561) 434-4410 or 451-4037
Let’s Grow Together
33 SE 1st Avenue
Delray Beach, FL 33444
(561) 279-2080
24
New Options of Royal Palm Beach
1402 Royal Palm Beach Blvd.
# 400B
Royal Palm Beach, FL 33411
(561) 792-9242
Atlantic Coast Counseling
4047 Okeechobee Blvd., #225
West Palm Beach, FL 33409
(561) 242-9287
Family Health Counseling Center
2677 Forest Hill Blvd., Suite 102
West Palm Beach, FL 33406
(561) 433-0123
Lake Worth Counseling Center
416 N. Dixie Highway
Lake Worth, FL 33460
(561) 547-0303
Florida Family Care
350 CaminoGardens Blvd.
Suite 301
Boca Raton, FL 33432
(561) 447-9121
Alliance for Psychological Services
1570 Madruga Avenue
Suite 309
Coral Gables, FL 33146
(305) 663-6540
Circuit 17
Families in Action, Inc.
160 N. W. 176th St., Suite 302-4
Miami, FL 33169
(954) 433-8520
Professional Counseling
& Consulting Group
400 N. Andrews Ave., Suite #201
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301
(954) 761-9333
Women in Distress of Broward
County
P.O. Box 676
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33302
(954) 760-9800
Family Service Agency, Inc.
3347 N. University Dr.
Davie, FL 33024
(954) 587-7880
The Glass House
5255 NW 33rd Avenue
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309
(954) 938-0055
Family Counseling Center
220 Coral Sands Road
Rockledge, FL 32955
(407) 632-5792
New Options, Inc.
254 Wilshire Blvd.
P.O. Box 180957
Casselberry, FL 32718
(407) 830-1662
Abolish Abuse/Resolution
Counseling
377 E. State Road 434
Longwood, FL 32750
(407) 876-7757
Central Florida Psychological
Services
202 N. Park Avenue
Sanford, FL 32772-2524
(407) 330-0418
Harbor City Counseling Centers
504 N. Harbor City Blvd.
Melbourne, FL 32935
(407) 253-2733
Fields Counseling, Inc.
421 North Montgomery Rd.
Suite 151
Altamonte Springs, FL 32714
(407) 880-2131 or 463-1197
Western Judicial Services
1600 Sarno Road, Suite 24
Melbourne, FL 32935
(321) 752-7557
Family Therapy Center of West
Broward
9950 Stirling Road, Suite 108
Pembroke Pines, FL 33024
(954) 436-1222
Heartwork
300 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 237
Casselberry, FL 32750
(407) 830-0417
Fifth Street Counseling
4121 NW 5th Street, Suite 206
Plantation, FL 33317
(954) 797-5222
A No Abuse Program
706 East Colonial Drive
Orlando, FL 32803
(407) 999-9703
Lifeline of Miami, Inc.
6550 Griffin Road, Suite 104
Davie, Florida 33314
(954) 791-5484
Alliance for Psychological Srv.
1570 Madruga Avenue, Suite 309
Coral Gables, FL 33146
(305) 663-6540
Circuit 19
Stop Battering Now
Mental Health Association of Indian
River County
2001 9th Ave., Suite 301
Vero Beach, FL 32960
(561) 569-9788
D.A.R.T.
185 E. Indiantown Rd., Suite 108
Jupiter, FL 33477-5071
(561) 743-2797
Recovery Associates, Inc.
8000 South U.S. 1, Suite 202
Port St. Lucie, FL 34952
(561) 878-9368
Alcohol & Drug Abuse Program
412 E. Osceola St.
Stuart, FL 34994
(561) 286-8933
Breakthrough Recovery Services
202 NW 5th Avenue
Okeechobee, FL 34972
(863) 467-2300
Breakthrough Recovery Services
1122 U.S. Highway 1
Sebastian, FL 32958
(561) 581-0610
Breakthrough Recovery Services
2126 N. US Highway 1
Ft. Pierce, FL 34950
(561) 489-0005
Kathairein Center for
Human Development, Inc
950 S.E. Central Parkway
Stuart, FL 34994
(772) 529-1676
Kathairein Center for Human
Development, Inc
2933 South U.S. I
Ft. Pierce, FL 34982
(772) 529-1676
Kathairein Center for Human
Development, Inc.
638 SW Old Dixie Hwy
Vero Beach, FL 32962
(772) 529-1676
AIM Target Programs, Inc.
3615 Central Ave., Suite 1
Ft. Myers, FL 33901
(239) 939-3363
S.A.F.E.
The David Lawrence Center
2806 South Horseshoe Drive
Naples, FL 34104
(941) 643-6101
TLC Educational Consultants, Inc
Castello Square Executive Suites
5051 Castello Drive, Suite 215
Naples, FL 34103
(941) 403-9997
Collier County Counseling/Peace
Program
3375 Taimiami Trail E.
Naples, FL 34112
(941) 417-0181
Lee Co. Counseling dba Collier Co.
Counseling/Peace Program
9371 Cypress Lake Dr., Suite 17
Ft. Myers, FL 33919
(239) 437-0009
Alcoholism Treatment Services
Aztec Realty Plaza, Suite A5
4456 Tamiami Trail
Charlotte Harbor, FL 33980
(941) 505-1187
Atwell Center
5647 Naples Blvd
Naples, FL 34109
(941) 514-4550
The Halcyon Group, Inc.
4055 Tamiami Trail, Suite 33
Port Charlotte, FL 33950
(941) 235-4414
DENIED
CERTIFICATION
Abuse Counseling & Treatment
P. O. Box 60401
Ft. Myers, FL 33906-6401
(239) 939-2553
New Hope (Dade County)
Circuit 12
Manatee County Domestic Violence
Intervention Program
Circuit 14
Community Services of North Florida
Circuit 15
Atlantic Counseling
Circuit 18
Personal and Professional Development Services
Circuit 19
Safespace, Inc.
Circuit 20
The Willoughs at Naples
Positive Adjustments of Florida, Inc.
WITHDREW,
CLOSED OR
INACTIVE
Circuit 5
Citrus County Abuse Shelter
The Harbor
CATS, Inc.
Tri-County Rehab, Inc.
Prevention Projects
Circuit 6
The Harbor
Randolph Butts
Family Service Center
Beta-Genesis, Inc.
Nell Cotter
Behavioral Sciences Center
Advanced Counseling
Robert Moore and Associates
Circuit 7
Circuit 1
Family Crisis Center
Helping Hands/Lee Conlee House
Santa Rosa Counseling
Lakeview Center
Circuit 8
Circuit 5
Circuit 20
Circuit 11
Christine Harris
Circuit 9
Groveland Family and Crisis
Counseling
All Dimensions, Inc.
BATTERERS INTERVENTION PROGRAMS
Stop Battering Now
Mental Health Association of Indian
River County
Miracle Prayer Temple Church
3215 Avenue Q
Fort Pierce, FL 34950
(561) 467-2672
The Unlimited Path, Inc.
Circuit 9
Universal Recovery
Parkside Professional
Court Classes, Inc.
Colonial Counseling
Park Place Behavioral Health Care, Inc.
25
BATTERERS’ INTERVENTION PROGRAMS
Circuit 10
New Directions
Daylight Group
Heart of Florida Behavioral Center
Counseling Associates of Bartow
Peace River Center for Personal
Development
Alpha Counseling
Lorna Thomas Multi-Counseling
Circuit 11
The Advocate Program
Merrill Frank
Hope Wine, Psy.D.
Family Counseling of Greater Miami
Las Brisas Health Center
FMH Adult Day Care
Circuit 12
First Step of Sarasota
Family Violence Treatment Program
Circuit 14
Brent Decker, Ph.D.
Life Management
John A. Williams, LMHC
Circuit 15
Treating Abusive Partners
Circuit 16
Domestic Safety Program
Circuit 17
26
Associates for Psychological
Services, Inc.
The Peace Project, Inc.
Circuit 18
Seminole Community Mental Health
(DOVE)
Stop Battering Now (Brevard
County)
Circuit 19
Forest Hill Counseling (Martin
County)
Martha’s House
Alpha Alternatives
Circuit 20
Charter Glades
Solutions for Families, Inc.
Creative Counseling Associates
Charlotte Community Mental
Health, Inc.
Treatment Works!
Hendry-Glades Mental Health
Choices & Recovery, Inc.
DECERTIFIED
PROGRAMS
Circuit 6
Parkside Professional Group
Circuit 20
Family Quest, Inc.
During 2002, there were 906 reported murders in
Florida of which 188 (21 percent) were related to
domestic violence. Of these offenses, the spouse or
live-in partner was the victim in 52 percent and children
accounted for 16 percent of the victims.1
In the quest to better understand, intervene, and
prevent domestic homicides, many communities
throughout the state have developed Domestic Violence Fatality Review Teams. The review teams are
comprised of community members representing law
enforcement, courts, social services, domestic violence
centers, state attorneys and various other interested
community representatives. The reviews performed by
the teams are a “deliberative process for identification
of deaths, both homicide and suicide, caused by domestic violence.”2
At the beginning of 2002,
there were 13 active
“During 2002,
domestic violence fatality
there were
review teams covering 15
counties: Bay, Brevard,
906 reported
Broward, Collier, Miamimurders in
Dade, Duval, Escambia,
Lee, Orange, Palm Beach,
Florida of
Pinellas, Polk and Sarasota/
which 188
Manatee/Desoto. The
Putnam/Volusia Counties
(21 percent)
Review Team and the
were related
Collier County Review
Team went on inactive
to domestic
status during the 2002violence.”
2003 fiscal year. Columbia
County established a new
review team in March
2003. Currently, there are 12 active teams.
The Department’s Domestic Violence Program Office
provides technical assistance to the community-based
review teams through various venues including training
events and newsletters. One such training event was
the First National Conference on Domestic Violence
Fatality Review in Phoenix in August 2002. The conference included presentations on emerging practices with
opportunities for participants to engage in mock reviews. The Department provided resources to members of the 12 teams to attend.
Additionally, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE) provides support to the teams by furnish-
1
2
ing a standardized collection form for the recording of
their findings. FDLE issues a report annually that
documents the teams’ activities, findings and recommendations. (See section 741.316, F. S.) In June 2003,
FDLE released its report with data and recommendations compiled from 12 participating teams. The teams
included Bay, Brevard, Broward, Collier, Duval,
Escambia, Lee, Orange, Palm Beach, Pinellas, Polk, and
Sarasota/Manatee/DeSoto counties.
Highlights of the Report include a comparable analysis
of findings from the 2002 and 2003 reports. Data
reviewed included the average age and sex of perpetrators and the decedents, the location of the incidents,
weapons used, relationship, and history. The report
indicates an overwhelming number of perpetrators of
domestic violence are male (85 percent) with the
average age of 42. Additionally, 84 percent of decedents are female. Of the 60 fatalities reviewed, 63
percent involved the use of a firearm, 52 percent of the
parties involved in the domestic violence incidence
resided in the same household, and 40 percent had
reported prior incidents of domestic violence.
FATALITY REVIEW TEAMS
Domestic Violence Fatality Review Teams
The Report suggests law and policy changes to include:
• Increased funding for mental health and domestic
violence programs,
• Mandated local law enforcement agencies to
employ victim advocates,
• Provisions for outreach efforts to the public on
what they can do when they are aware of an
abusive relationship,
• Mandated judicial training, and
• Stricter laws requiring batterers to be sentenced
to certified batterers intervention programs.
Major findings related to domestic violence fatalities
from the review teams were:
• Untreated or under-treated drug and/or alcohol
abuse,
• Easy access to firearms,
• Failure to effectively utilize appropriate services
and service providers, and
• A need for better overall training.
The Florida Domestic Violence Fatality Review Team
Annual Report 2003 may be accessed on the Internet at:
http://www.fdle.state.fl.us/CitResCtr/
Domestic_Violence/index.html.
FDLE, Florida Domestic Violence Fatality Review Team Annual Report 2003.
Barbara Hart, Domestic Violence Death Review, Febuary 9, 1995, National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges.
27
FATALITY REVIEW TEAMS
Domestic Violence Fatality Review Teams
Bay
Dade/Miami
Orange
Cheryl Murray, Chair
Department of Health
597 W. 11th Street
Panama City, FL 32401
PH: (850) 872-4455, ext.175
FAX: (850) 747-5475
[email protected]
Lauren Lazarus, Esq., Chair
Admin. Offices of Courts
175 NW 1st Avenue, Rm 1502
Miami, FL 33128
PH: (305) 349-5555
Fax: (305) 349-5559
[email protected]
Jana Jasinski, Co-Chair
University Central Florida
P.O. Box 25000
Orlando, FL 32816
PH: (407) 823-6568
FAX: (407) 823-3026
[email protected]
Brevard
Desoto/Sarasota/
Manatee
Palm Beach
Nancy Slater, Chair
Brevard Co. Criminal Justice, Inc.
1040 S. Florida Avenue
Rockledge, FL 32955
PH: (321) 633-2006
[email protected]
Broward
Nancy Tanner, Chair
State Attorney’s Office
16 SE 6th Street
Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33301
PH: (954) 765-4133
Fax: (954) 765-4178
[email protected]
Charlotte
28
Kay Tvaroch, Chair
C.A.R.E.
P.O. Box 510234
Punta Gorda, FL 33951
PH: (941) 639-5499
FAX: (941) 639-7079
[email protected]
Columbia/Dixie/
Hamilton/
Lafayette/Madison/
Taylor/Suwannee
Nancy Holliday-Fields, Esq. Chair &
Deputy Court Administrator
Family Court Third Judicial Circuit
P.O. Box 1569
Lake City, FL 32056
PH: (386) 719-2012
Fax (386) 719-7576
[email protected]
Stephanie Woods, LMHC, Chair
SPARCC
2139 Main Street
Sarasota, FL 34237
PH: (941) 365-0208.
FAX: (941) 365-4919
[email protected]
Duval
Libby Senterfitt, Chair
State Attorney’s Office
330 E. Bay Street, Rm 504
Jacksonville, FL 32202
PH: (904) 630-2502.
FAX: (904) 630-1848
[email protected]
Escambia
Greg Marcille, Co-Chair
State Attorney’s Office
P.O. Box 12726
Pensacola, FL 32591
PH: (850) 595-4200
FAX: (850) 595-4762
[email protected]
Lee
Nica Bobak, Co-Chair
Abuse Counseling & Treatment
P.O. Box 60401
Ft. Myers, FL 33906
PH: (239) 335-2140
FAX: (239) 335-2135
[email protected]
Cynthia Rubenstein, Co-Chair
YMCA Harmony House
2200 N Florida Mango Rd #102
West Palm Beach, FL 33409
PH: (561) 338-3764
FAX: (561) 640-0050 or 640-9155
[email protected]
Community education is an essential tool in increasing
awareness and changing public attitudes about domestic
violence. Appropriate training is imperative for those
who come in contact with victims of domestic violence
in order to safeguard them and their children and
provide the resources they need. The Domestic
Violence Office not only provides resources, but also
works closely with the Executive Office of the Governor, the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence,
and other public and private agencies to educate
Florida’s citizens. We are committed to building
community awareness of domestic violence and meeting the educational needs of professionals throughout
the state.
Violence Free Florida!
The Department of Children and Families and the
Executive Office of the Governor, recognizing that while
much has been achieved, much remains to be done,
initiated a statewide
public education
campaign, Violence
Free Florida!. The
goals of the
Governor’s campaign are to raise the
level of awareness of
domestic violence as
a significant problem in Florida and increase the safety
and well-being of Florida’s families experiencing such
violence.
To accomplish these goals, the Domestic Violence
Program Office is responsible for developing and
implementing:
• An electronic newsletter, DV Digest, highlighting
Florida’s domestic violence initiatives, activities and
achievements and post on the Internet at: http://
www5.myflorida.com/cf_web/myflorida2/healthhuman/
domesticviolence/publications/index.html.
• A Religion and Domestic Violence Advanced Issues
Workshop on Addressing Interfaith Responses to Battering.
Held in Orlando on February 5-6, 2003, in collaboration
with the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence.
The presenters included Dr. Leo Mesa of Miami’s
Healing Hearts Family Center, Reverend Lou Reed of
Miami’s West Side Baptist Church, Ray Rufo of Trinity
International University, Sharifa Alkhateeh of the
Peaceful Families Project and many others. Workshop
subjects included Religious Values of Human Dignity and
Nonviolence, Scriptural Sources of Islam and the Mind of
the Muslim Victim; Opening the Doors to Jewish Women: A
Model for Culturally Specific Programs; Is Your Church
Safe?: Creating a Culture of Safety for Victims Within the
Local Church; Clergy Response to Domestic Violence:
Developing a Spiritual Framework and several others.
• The Volunteer for Ending Abuse, Improving Lives
program, a facilitated pro bono provision of health care
to battered women and children in shelter. Announced
by Governor Jeb Bush and Secretary Jerry Regier on
National Health Cares About Domestic Violence Day,
October 9, 2002, in observance of Domestic Violence
Awareness Month. Partners in this effort include the
Florida Medical Association, the Florida Dental Association, Florida Osteopaths Medical Association, Florida
Commission on Community Service, and Florida
Coalition Against Domestic Violence.
Nearly 25 percent of American women report being
raped and/or physically assaulted by a current or former
spouse, cohabiting partner, or date at some time in their
lifetime. Victims of abuse are more likely to suffer from
arthritis, chronic neck, back and pelvic pain, migraine
headaches, stomach ulcers and other digestive diseases,
and are at significantly higher risk for sexually transmitted diseases and invasive cervical cancer.
In addition to the long-term physical harm that may
be caused by violence, there is a growing body of
research linking domestic violence with a wide range of
emotional and behavioral effects, including depression,
anxiety, eating disorders, chronic sleep disturbance,
alcohol and other substance abuse, aggression toward
self and others, and suicide attempts, to name a few.
Many times victims do not have health insurance or
financial resources, or because of the abusive relationship have been prevented from getting health care. The
Volunteer for Ending Abuse, Improving Lives recruits
physicians and dentists willing to give their time for the
provision of basic, non-urgent health care to battered
women in shelter and promotes the routine screening
of medical and dental patients for domestic violence.
Informational brochures were sent to approximately
20,000 physicians and dentists across the state in
January 2003, while recruitment and organizing kits
were also distributed to Florida’s certified domestic
violence centers. An editorial piece with screening
guidelines by Secretary Regier was published in several
professional journals, including the January 2003 edition
of the Florida Medical Association Quarterly Journal;
February 2003 edition of Today’s Florida Dental Association Monthly Journal; Fall/Winner 2002 edition of The
Journal, Florida Osteopathic Medical Association, and
the Spring 2003 edition of OB/GYN Today.
COMMUNITY EDUCATION & PUBLIC AWARENESS
Community Education and Public Awareness
29
COMMUNITY EDUCATION & PUBLIC AWARENESS
Governor’s Peace at Home:
Stopping Domestic Violence
Awards
JUSTICE SYSTEM: Developed programs or services
in the justice system to prevent domestic violence,
protect the public or stop the perpetrators of domestic
violence.
As awareness of domestic violence has grown over
the years, so has the number of remarkable individuals
and organizations who are making a difference in our
state. Each year, through the Governor’s Peace at Home
Awards, Governor Bush honors individuals and organizations in Florida for their outstanding accomplishments
and contributions in the areas of services to children,
survivor support, justice system programs, health care,
public education and awareness, research, and an
overall award.
• Honorable
Raymond T.
McNeal, Circuit
Court Judge, 5th
Judicial Circuit
Ocala
To launch Florida’s observance of National Victims’
Rights Week, the Governor’s Office and the Department of Children and Families hosted an awards ceremony in Tallahassee on April 7, 2003. Lt. Governor
Toni Jennings and Secretary Jerry Regier presented
awards to the following winners:
CHILDREN’S SERVICES: Developed prevention
programs or has created or enhanced support for
children who have suffered from the trauma of domestic violence.
• Robert “Bob”
Whitworth, Victim
Advocate, Lake
County Sheriff’s
Office
• Detective Jorge
Fernandez de Lara
Sweetwater Police
Department
HEALTH CARE: Provided health or dental care
through volunteer service to domestic violence victims
and their children.
• Dr. Bruce Grozier
and Staff, Family
Medical Clinic
Sarasota.
30
SURVIVOR SUPPORT: Promoted greater selfdetermination and empowerment of survivors through
exemplary programs or services.
• Melbourne Police
Department
Domestic Violence
Unit
Celia Kettner, Yolanda Ortiz,
Commander Steve Mimb, Detective
Sandy Meyers, & Mary Highland
Nurse Ronalda Hobson accepting
award on behalf of Dr. Bruce
Grozier and the staff of the Family
Medical Clinic, Sarasota
PUBLIC AWARENESS AND EDUCATION: Promoted education and awareness of domestic violence
through communications, media, curriculum, or other
activities that have enhanced prevention of domestic
violence, and advanced a greater understanding of the
problem.
• Carol Bailey, Victim
Advocate, The
Haven of Religious
Community
Services Clearwater
• Carol Bailey, Victim
Advocate, The
Haven of Religious
Community
Services
Clearwater
Domestic Violence Training
The Domestic Violence Program Office works with
and provides resources to many public and private
agencies to provide domestic violence training. We are
committed to insuring that quality training and education is provided to professionals who come in contact
with domestic violence in their work, as well as the
public. Provided is a summary of educational events
contracted by the Department with various agencies:
Batterers Intervention Programs
The Department of Children and Families completed
its first year of providing continuing education for staff
of state certified batterers intervention programs during
FY 2002-2003. The Domestic Violence Program Office
in partnership with the Department’s Education and
Training Office offered training on the co-occurrence of
domestic violence and child abuse. The newly offered
continuing education course was provided regionally
and launched at the Annual Meeting of Batterers
Intervention Programs in October 2002. At the annual
meeting, courses on learning principles and diversity
within batterers intervention programs were also
provided. The Domestic Violence Program Office is
committed to not only meeting the educational needs of
the program staff, but making it convenient as well.
After numerous requests, an additional curriculum
was developed for victim liaisons and added to the
training. Two courses have been offered in partnership
with the Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence.
Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence
The FCADV provided professional training and
technical assistance services to domestic violence
programs, law enforcement, social services, the judi-
ciary, the health care fields and others. Public education
on domestic violence was held through conferences,
seminars, institutes and presentations. The Coalition’s
educational goals are to strengthen direct service
provision to victims of domestic violence who receive
welfare; increase domestic violence center and economic service staff’s understanding of the connection
between welfare and domestic violence; strengthen the
ability of domestic violence centers, law enforcement
agencies, medical personnel and community based
organizations to meet the needs of rural and
underserved victims of domestic violence; and increase
victim safety by enhancing the competency of attorneys
representing victims of domestic violence.
Florida Council Against Sexual Violence
The FCASV provided training and technical assistance
to sexual violence program staff, law enforcement, and
the public through:
• On-site training and technical assistance to six
rape crisis centers
• Ten regional law enforcement trainings on the
Florida Model Policy on (addressing crimes of)
Sexual Violence
• Annual Conference and Training for sexual
violence victim service providers
• Various regional trainings for allied organizations
and professionals
• In-depth training for sexual violence program staff
and volunteers
• Annual Awareness Summit of Florida’s Sexual
Violence Programs
Florida Prosecuting Attorney’s Association
The FPAA provided training to prosecutors and office
staff in State Attorney’s Offices on the following subjects:
• Prosecuting Internet Predators
• Civil Commitment of the Sexually Violent
Predator
• Juvenile Prosecution of Domestic Violence
and Sexual Assault crimes
• Domestic Violence Basic Prosecution
• Supporting Your Case Using DNA Evidence
• Prosecuting Sex Crimes
Office of the State Courts Administrator, Florida
Supreme Court
Approximately 30 judges across the state received
enhanced training on issues related to crimes associated
with domestic violence.
COMMUNITY EDUCATION & PUBLIC AWARENESS
OVERALL: To an individual or organization whose
efforts towards ending violence in the family far exceeds
the requirements of their employment, organizational
mission, or program activities. Such an individual,
organization, or program is generally known throughout
the community for their “beyond the call of duty”
activities in assisting domestic violence survivors.
31
The Domestic Violence Program Office is responsible
for administering and managing several federal and state
grant programs, totaling approximately $22 million
during Fiscal Year 2002-2003. These funds went to
community and statewide programs to construct, repair
and operate domestic violence centers; assist victims
transitioning from welfare to work; enhance victim
services; provide domestic violence education for law
enforcement officers, prosecutors, judges and the
general public; and many other life-saving activities. A
description of each grant program is provided.
Capital Improvement Program
Recognizing the centers’ need for capital improvements, the Florida Legislature passed the Capital
Improvement Grant Program during the 2000 legislative
session. The program provided for certified centers to
apply to the Department for a capital
improvement grant.
“...charges were
The program was
filed in 82 percent*
funded from General
Revenue for $4
of domestic viomillion in Fiscal Year
lence arrests,
2002-2003 for a
cumulative total of
a considerable
$8 million over three
increase
years.
compared to 58
percent from the
previous year. ”
The purpose of the
program is to provide grants to
certified domestic
violence centers in
Florida to construct,
repair, improve or upgrade systems, facilities or equipment. The Legislature established criteria for funding,
and mandated that the program be developed in
partnership with the Florida Coalition Against Domestic
Violence.
As mandated by section 39.9055, F.S., a domestic
violence capital needs assessment was developed and
conducted during the 2002-2003 fiscal year. The
assessment was completed utilizing a survey tool
designed by Department staff. Thirty six of the 38
centers certified at that time responded to the survey.
As was the case in the 2001 needs assessment, repairs
or renovations to facilities for safety, to meet code
requirements, or for other reasons, and the building of
new shelters, continue to be the most urgent needs of
certified domestic violence centers.
After the completion of the survey the Solicitation for
Application for the Capital Improvement Grant Program
was developed and released February 5, 2003. Twentynine applicants responded, and on April 18, 2003,
fourteen projects were awarded a total of $4,000,000.
Family Violence Prevention and
Services Act
The Family Violence Prevention and Services Act
(FVPSA) allots funds to states based on a formula, for
the purpose of assisting in the prevention of family
violence and the provision of immediate shelter and
related assistance for victims of family violence and their
dependents. Florida’s allotment is allocated by the
Legislature to Florida’s certified domestic violence
centers in order to provide emergency shelter, counseling, information and referral, 24-hour hotline, case
management, child assessment, community education
and professional training services to domestic violence
victims and the public at large. During FY 2002-2003
the Department received $3,406,322 from the US
Department of Health and Human Services, which
provides an integral part of each certified domestic
violence center’s budget. A small percentage goes to
support the efforts of the Florida Coalition Against
Domestic Violence.
TANF Domestic Violence
Diversion Program
The Federal Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 provided states the
option of developing a state program to address issues
of domestic violence for recipients of the Temporary
Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program. In
recognition of the federal option the Florida Legislature
created the Domestic Violence Diversion Program to
provide support services to victims who are unable to
temporarily participate in training or work requirements
due to safety considerations or the residual effects of
the violence. (See Chapter 414, F.S.) Florida’s certified
domestic violence centers play a pivotal role in providing safety and support to these TANF clients.
The Department provided $8,097,521 in TANF funds
in FY 2002-2003 to certified domestic violence centers
for provisions of counseling and other related services
to eligible clients. Regional Workforce Boards, as well
as, service agencies, and other sources, refer clients to
the certified domestic violence centers. The funds also
provide for domestic violence training for the
Department’s Welfare Transition Program employees
who work with TANF recipients. Funds are provided
GRANT PROGRAMS
Grant Programs
33
GRANT PROGRAMS
to the Department by the U.S. Department of Health
and Human Services.
charges were filed in 82 percent* of domestic violence
arrests, a considerable increase compared to 58 percent
from the previous year.
Violence Against Women Act
Additionally, State Attorney’s offices were provided
funds for the prosecution of these domestic violence
cases and reported a significant increase from the
previous year (27 percent) of cases resulting in plea
agreements or trials.
The Department directed two grants under the
Violence Against Women Act Program, which is administered by the U.S. Department of Justice. The Grants
to Encourage Arrest Policies and Enforcement of Protection
Orders is a competitive grant, and the STOP Violence
Against Women is a formula grant.
Grants to Encourage Arrest Policies and
Enforcement of Protection Orders
The Grants to Encourage Arrests Policies and Enforcement of Protection Orders Program is a discretionary grant
to encourage states, units of local government, and
Indian tribal governments to treat domestic violence as
a serious violation of criminal law.
During FY 2002-2003, the Domestic Violence Program continued the work begun in previous years to
provide technical assistance, and training and networking opportunities to the local domestic violence fatality
review teams.
34
STOP Violence Against Women Grant
The STOP (Services, Training, Officers, and Prosecutors)
Violence Against Women formula grant funds are used
for the training of law enforcement officers and prosecutors to more effectively identify and respond to
domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking; to
develop domestic violence units in police departments
and prosecutors’ offices; to enhance victim services; and
to improve court responses to these crimes. Each year
the Department must allocate at least 25 percent to
police, at least 25 percent to prosecution, at least 5
percent to state and local courts including juvenile
courts, and at least 30 percent to nonprofit, nongovernmental victim services. This is a statutory requirement
that applies to the states. These allocations may not be
redistributed or transferred to another area. The
remainder of the funds may be spent at the discretion of
the state to address the statutory program purposes
described previously.
The Department received $6,182,000 during FY
2002-2003 that, in turn, awarded subgrants to local
programs. The programs included local police and
sheriff departments, prosecutors, victim services
agencies and the Florida Supreme Court.
During FY 2002-2003 the law enforcement units,
which were funded to establish specialized units on
domestic and sexual violence crimes, reported that
A detailed list of these projects, by county or judicial
circuit as well as statewide, is provided in the Financial
Highlights section on page 39.
*Some arrest charges had not been filed or cases
finalized by end of the reporting period.
Attorney General’s Office
The Attorney General’s Office Division of Victim
Services and Criminal Justice Programs operates two
programs that provide services to domestic violence
victims, the Domestic Violence Relocation and Address
Confidentiality programs. These two programs enable
victims of domestic violence to provide for their own
safety.
Address Confidentiality Program
The 1998 Legislature found that many victims of
domestic violence who were fleeing from domestic
violence situations were establishing new addresses to
prevent their abusers from finding them. The Address
Confidentiality Program “enable(s) state and local
agencies to respond to requests for public records
without disclosing the location of a victim of domestic
violence, to enable interagency cooperation with the
Attorney General in providing address confidentiality for
victims of domestic violence, and to enable state and
local agencies to accept a program participant’s use of
an address designated by the Attorney General as a
substitute mailing address.” (See s. 741.401-409, F.S.)
The Address Confidentiality Program provides a
substitute mailing address for relocated victims of
domestic violence; serves as legal agent for receipt of
mail and service of process; trains and certifies application assistants statewide to assist victims in the registration process; and prevents public access to information
regarding clients through voting records and state and
local governmental agencies. The program is administered by the Bureau of Advocacy and Grants Management which reports that 165 participants were certified
during FY 2002-2003, making a cumulative total of 405
participants.
Information regarding the Address Confidentiality
Program can be obtained by calling the Attorney
General’s Information and Referral Line at (800) 2266667 or by contacting Debbie Smith at (850) 414-3300.
Domestic Violence Relocation
The Domestic Violence Relocation benefit was
created by the 1999 Legislature and established in the
Attorney General’s Office in January 2000 to provide
immediate financial assistance to domestic violence
victims escaping from a domestic violence environment.
(See s. 960.198, F.S.) For victims to be eligible for the
benefit there must be proof that a domestic violence
offense was committed pursuant to s. 741.28(1), F.S.,
must be reported to the proper authorities, and the
victim’s need must be certified by a state certified
domestic violence center. The Domestic Violence
Relocation benefit is funded through the Crimes Compensation Trust Fund (CCTF) and administered through
the Bureau of Victim Compensation. According to the
Attorney General’s Office, a total of $2,243,412 was
approved for payment to 2,259 victims of domestic
violence during fiscal year 2002-2003.
Information regarding the relocation benefit can be
obtained by calling the Attorney General’s Information
and Referral Line at (800) 226-6667. Compensation
applications, compensation brochure and other program information can be accessed on-line at: http://
myfloridalegal.com/victims
Further information may be obtained from Gwen
Roache, Bureau Chief, or Julie Elliott, Assistant Chief, at
(850) 414-3300.
OTHER STATEWIDE PROGRAMS
Other Statewide Programs
Florida Council Against Sexual
Violence
One out of four American women has been physically
assaulted or raped by an intimate partner, and nearly
two-thirds of women who reported being raped,
physically assaulted, or stalked since age 18 were
victimized by a current or former husband, cohabiting
partner, boyfriend, or date according to the National
Violence Against Women Survey. The risk of injury also
increases when their assailant is a current or former
intimate.
The Florida Council Against Sexual Violence (FCASV)
is the statewide not-for-profit agency that serves as a
coalition of the state’s rape crisis programs and Florida’s
coordinating body advancing the issue of sexual violence
in the state. Beginning as a volunteer group in 1986,
FCASV was formed to improve Florida’s sexual violence
programs, including seeking funding, resources and
services; to advance the issue of sexual violence; and to
provide a network of information exchange for Florida’s
sexual assault advocates. The FCASV provides leadership, education, and advocacy on behalf of individuals
impacted by sexual violence. They are working to
achieve the following goals:
• improving Florida’s sexual violence programs,
including seeking funding, resources and services;
• collaborating with agencies from many different
fields—including prosecutors, law enforcement,
social workers and medical professionals—to
advance the issue of sexual violence;
35
OTHER STATEWIDE PROGRAMS
36
• providing up-to-date information and training to
Florida’s professionals;
• raising public awareness about the impact of
sexual violence;
• working with policy makers on issues that affect
sexual violence survivors and the programs that
serve them; and
• supporting the reduction of the risk of sexual
violence through prevention education and
through increased prosecution and criminal
justice system accountability of perpetrators.
other and to network with providers of similar services
in their local areas. The annual summit provides tracks
for both educators and managers to provide the most
up-to-date information on every aspect of rape crisis
work. Through training and technical assistance initiatives and the development of service standards, FCASV
is working to ensure that all victims of sexual violence
receive the highest quality care.
Florida Prosecuting Attorneys
Association
The Department contracts with FCASV to provide
The Florida Prosecuting Attorneys Association (FPAA)
technical assistance and training to the rape crisis
is a nonprofit membership organization created to serve
centers and to expand and enhance services to victims
the needs of the state’s prosecutors. Through in-depth
of sexual violence. During FY 2002-2003, FCASV
trainings, technical assistance, newsletters and conferreceived $296,952 through funding from the STOP
ence calls, the FPAA has been able to make it possible
Violence Against Women grant program. Sexual
for prosecutors, investigators,
violence victims need a variety of
law enforcement and victim
services in response to the many
advocates to better serve the
issues and systems involved in
needs of Florida’s domestic and
“One
out
of
four
this crime and stable and effecsexual violence victims. By
American women has
tive sexual violence programs.
providing better service to
Sexual assault advocates and
been
physically
assaulted
victims, state prosecutors
allied professionals need to be
increase the victims’ willingness
or raped by an intimate
specially trained to provide these
to participate in the criminal
services. To meet this need,
partner, and nearly twojustice system and hold offendFCASV provides on-site technical
ers accountable for their
thirds of women who
assistance, training initiatives, and
actions.
provides supportive services to
reported being raped,
The Department contracts
the state’s community-based
physically
assaulted,
or
with
the FPAA to provide
programs and allied professionals
technical assistance, training
as they work to expand and
stalked since age 18 were
and newsletters to state
improve their responses to
victimized
by
a
current
or
prosecutors, victim advocates,
sexual violence victims.
law enforcement, and investigaformer husband,
As a statewide organization,
tors who are assigned to
FCASV has the opportunity to
cohabiting partner,
domestic violence and sex
provide high quality, up-to-date
crimes units in State Attorney’s
boyfriend, or date...”
training on issues of sexual
Offices and in other related
violence through an annual
criminal justice agencies. The
conference, on-site technical
FPAA is a valuable resource for
assistance and specific training
state prosecutors on complex topics such as domestic
initiatives. The FCASV has recently begun a new
violence, sex crimes, the civil commitment of the
training initiative in conjunction with the National
sexually violent predator and the proper utilization of
Institute for Crime Prevention to provide sexual vioDNA evidence.
lence training to law enforcement in local communities
During FY 2002-2003, FPAA received $150,000
throughout the state. An annual Leadership Forum is
through
funding from the STOP Violence Against
coordinated by FCASV to serve as a resource for the
Women grant program. In addition, 15 of the 20 State
leaders of Florida’s sexual violence programs including
Attorney’s Office received individual funding from the
such topics as resource development, service standards
STOP grant, totaling $1,318,225. See the Financial
and legislative updates regarding sexual violence issues.
Section on page 39 for further details of each program.
Additionally, regional meetings allow sexual violence
program staff to share their best practices with each
• six training seminars on domestic and sexual
violence; for a total of 328 participants;
• almost 15,000 technical assistance requests; and
• published four issues of the Domestic Violence/Sex
Crimes Newsletter with 3,200 copies distributed.
National Health Care Standards
Campaign
The National Health Care Standards Campaign, in
which Florida participates, is in the third phase of the
Family Violence Prevention Fund’s (FVPF) National
Health Initiative on Domestic Violence. Projects of the
first phase of the initiative included the:
• development of a highly popular resource manual,
Improving the Health Care Response to Domestic
Violence, called the “bible of the field” by the past
president of the AMA, Robert McAfee;
• a companion trainer’s manual;
• effective public education materials for providers
and patients; and
• a model health care training program designed to
help health care systems create sustainable
programs to help victims of domestic violence.
• resource materials were created and collaboration among domestic violence and health care
providers were increased;
• public education messages within local communities were strengthened;
• evaluation of mandatory domestic violence health
care training for quality and consistency was
conducted while strengthening training mechanisms throughout the state; and
• development of model clinical guidelines for
health care professionals by the Florida Department of Health.
The Department of Children & Families, Office of
Domestic Violence, is one of several state agencies with
representation on Florida’s Leadership Team, and
continues the work to coordinate the efforts of the Pro
Bono Health Care initiative of Violence Free Florida!
with the National Health Care Standards Campaign.
OTHER STATEWIDE PROGRAMS
FPAA’s activities during the year included:
The Ten-State Program, the second phase of the
Initiative, was launched in 1997 to ensure that the
resources developed in the first phase were widely
developed and had a lasting impact.
Florida’s Leadership Team was one of ten teams the
FVPF worked closely with to institute and replicate
model health care programs to respond to family
violence. As a result of this project, over 10,000 providers representing hundreds of health care systems
nationwide have developed sustainable programs to
respond to domestic violence.
Throughout this effort, the Florida Coalition Against
Domestic Violence and others identified the need to
further strengthen policy reforms, increase and build
upon the participation of the public health units, develop additional information tools, and create uniform
screening and protocol guidelines. Florida was again
selected as one of 15 states and tribes to participate in
the third phase of the National Health Care Standards
Campaign, which was launched in 2001. During this
fiscal year the following activities were accomplished:
• develop a systematic process for domestic
violence screening, assessment and referral in all
county health departments was continued;
37
Eighty-two percent of the Domestic
Violence Program’s budget is used
for community-based and statewide
programs to support the provision
of temporary emergency shelter
and related services to domestic
violence victims and their
dependents.
The Department’s Domestic Violence Program is
funded through state fees, general revenue, and federal
grant programs from the US Departments of Health
and Human Services and Department of Justice. Fees
include batterers intervention certification, divorce
filings, marriage licenses, and domestic violence fines.
These fees comprise 22 percent of the Department’s
budget for domestic violence. Federal programs
include the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families
(TANF), Family Violence Prevention and Services Act
(FVPSA), and the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA).
See the Grant Programs section on page 33 for further
discussion of the individual programs.
Two percent of the Domestic Violence Program’s
budget is used for administrative oversight of all domestic violence programs and the remaining two percent is
designated for special projects and the operation of the
Certification and Monitoring of Batterers’ Intervention
Program.
Utilization of Funds
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
Financial Highlights
Eighty-two percent of the Domestic Violence
Program’s budget is used for community-based and
statewide programs to support the provision of temporary emergency shelter and related services to domestic
violence victims and their dependents. It also provides
funding to law enforcement agencies, prosecutors,
courts, and victim service providers in an effort to
prevent and/or remediate the effects of domestic
violence. Fourteen percent of the budget is used for
the Capital Improvement Program, which is available to
certified domestic violence centers for construction,
acquisition, repairs, improvements, or to upgrade
systems, facilities, or equipment.
39
Funding Sources
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
Violence Against Women Act
Law Enforcement, Courts, & Victim Services Projects
County
Project and Contact Information
Funding
Broward
Specialized Law Enforcement Domestic & Sexual Violence Units, Equipment & Personnel
Broward County Sheriff’s Office, Ft. Lauderdale ......................................................................................... $196,463
Janet Cid, Grants Coordinator
(954) 831-8932; [email protected]
Victim education, counseling, investigation, suspect release notification, and referrals to other appropriate social
services for victims of domestic and sexual violence.
Hollywood Police Department, Hollywood ................................................................................................. $116,168
Detective Susan Hayes
(954) 967-4411; [email protected]
Early intervention, counseling, safety planning, investigation and public education services to victims in
underserved population.
Direct Services to Victims of Domestic and Sexual Violence
Legal Aid Service of Broward County, Ft. Lauderdale .................................................................................... $42,941
Kathy Thompsen, Assistant Director of Development
(954) 765-8950, ext. 279; [email protected]
An array of legal services aimed at reducing the incidence of domestic violence in order to ensure the safety of
women and children and improve the quality of their lives.
Collier
40
Specialized Law Enforcement Domestic & Sexual Violence Units, Equipment & Personnel
Collier County Sheriff’s Office, Naples ........................................................................................................ $137,363
Joyce Houran, Grant Coordinator
(941) 793-9346; [email protected]
Increase victim and community awareness of domestic violence and the resources available to victims.
Direct Services to Victims of Domestic and Sexual Violence
Project HELP, Inc., Naples .............................................................................................................................. $41,826
Elizabeth (Beth) Knake
(239) 649-1404; [email protected]
Comprehensive counseling and forensic examinations to sexual assault victims and community education on
prevention of sexual assault.
Dade
Specialized Law Enforcement Domestic & Sexual Violence Units, Equipment & Personnel
City of Miami Police Department, Miami ..................................................................................................... $158,953
Lt. Daniel Dominguez
(305) 579-6530; [email protected]
Advocacy and community resources that will continue to improve safety for victims and their children.
City of Opa-Locka Police Department, Opa Locka
Major E. M. Crawford ................................................................................................................................... $149,500
(305) 953-2867; [email protected]
Services to female victims of crimes including transportation to court, shelters, depositions, and injunctions for
protection. A special emphasis is placed on decreasing repeat domestic violence.
Law Enforcement, Courts, & Victim Services Projects
County
Project and Contact Information
Funding
Dade cont’d
City of Sweetwater Police Department, Sweetwater .................................................................................... $32,350
Jorge Forte, Grant Administrator
(305) 221-0411; [email protected]
Bi-lingual (English & Spanish) assistance to victims including counseling, support groups, case management,
investigation and law enforcement training.
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
Violence Against Women Act
Homestead Police Department, Homestead ................................................................................................. $96,750
Edward F. Bowe, Jr., Captain – Support Services
(305) 242-3915; [email protected]
Combined law enforcement and tri-lingual (English, Spanish & Creole) social service programs to address family
violence using a culturally appropriate service delivery model targeted to Homestead’s underserved Haitian
population.
Direct Services to Victims of Domestic and Sexual Violence
Florida International University Victim Advocacy Center, Miami ................................................................... $73,004
Sharon M. Aaron, Director
(305) 348-1215; [email protected]
Raise awareness and provide direct services to underserved Hispanic and immigrant victims of intimate partner
violence, sexual assault and stalking in the F.I.U. community, with an emphasis on aiding victims with mental health
and substance abuse issues.
Legal Aid Society of Dade County, Miami ...................................................................................................... $69,731
Sharon L. Langer
(305) 579-1024; [email protected]
Target underserved victims of domestic violence and provide clients with free legal representation in obtaining an
injunction for protection.
One Stop Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault Center, Homestead ............................................................. $87,702
Mujeres Unidas En Justicia, Educacion y Reforma, Inc. (MUJER)
Susan J. Reyna, Executive Director
(305) 247-1388; [email protected]
Comprehensive bi-lingual services to mostly Hispanic migrant and immigrant farm worker women living in rural
S. Dade.
41
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
Violence Against Women Act
Law Enforcement, Courts, & Victim Services Projects
County
Project and Contact Information
Funding
Duval
Direct Services to Victims of Domestic and Sexual Violence
Quigley House, Inc., Orange Park .................................................................................................................. $62,596
Ilene Fisher
(904) 284-0340; [email protected]
Transitional Housing Program - Free childcare for clients during counseling, case management and advocacy
services, and conversion of one unit of transitional housing to an elder shelter.
Sexual Assault Project - On-call coverage and advocacy to victims upon emergent sexual assaults.
Sexual Assault Response Center, Jacksonville ................................................................................................. $38,145
Lee Ann Summersgill, LCSW
(904) 244-4651; [email protected]
Increase awareness of sexual assault in the deaf community and eliminate communication barriers for deaf victims
of sexual assault in order to receive services.
Women’s Center of Jacksonville, Inc., Jacksonville ......................................................................................... $76,711
Shirley K. Webb, LMHC
(904) 722-3000; [email protected]
Provide crisis intervention, advocacy, individual and group counseling to sexual assault victims, and rape
prevention education to the community.
Flagler
42
Specialized Law Enforcement Domestic & Sexual Violence Units, Equipment & Personnel
Flagler County Sheriff’s Office, Bunnell .......................................................................................................... $71,935
Linda Bolante, Grants Administrator
(386) 437-4116, ext. 330; [email protected]
Victim advocacy including transportation to court, counseling and shelter, translation services, assistance obtaining
protection orders, court accompaniment, and referrals to other appropriate social services.
Hillsborough
Direct Services to Victims of Domestic and Sexual Violence
The Spring of Tampa Bay, Inc., Tampa ............................................................................................................ $69,742
Maria Francis
(813) 247-5433, Ext. 307; [email protected]
Increase services and accessibility to rural victims of domestic violence.
Lee
Specialized Law Enforcement Domestic & Sexual Violence Units, Equipment & Personnel
Lee County Sheriff’s Office, Ft. Myers ......................................................................................................... $145,619
Lieutenant Ron Curtis, Sex Crimes Unit
(239) 477-1096; [email protected]
Investigation of sex crimes and assistance to victims of sex crimes through the judicial process; helping them to
maintain a positive outlook during and after the investigative contact initiated at the onset of reporting the
offense.
Law Enforcement, Courts, & Victim Services Projects
County
Project and Contact Information
Funding
Leon
Direct Services to Victims of Domestic and Sexual Violence
Refuge House, Inc., Tallahassee .................................................................................................................... $194,268
Maureen O’Neil
(850) 922-6062; [email protected]
Domestic and sexual violence assistance to victims in underserved population.
Orange
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
Violence Against Women Act
Specialized Law Enforcement Domestic & Sexual Violence Units, Equipment & Personnel
Orange County Sheriff’s Office, Orlando ..................................................................................................... $176,250
Lieutenant Kevin Behan
(407) 836-4020; [email protected]
A two-pronged approach emphasizing perpetrator accountability and victim support with a focus on repeat
offenders and crimes of stalking.
Palm Beach
Model Law Enforcement Project to Enhance Domestic Violence Evidence Collection
Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office, West Palm Beach ................................................................................ $150,000
Sgt. Scott Shoemaker
(561) 688-4162; [email protected]
Development and implementation of a web-based enhanced evidence collection system that provides greater
access to evidence related to crimes of domestic violence for the various agencies (i.e. other law enforcement
agencies, State Attorney’s Offices, judges, shelters, probation officers, etc.). Digital photographs of victim
injuries, 911 phone calls related to a case, criminal histories of all involved parties and victim/witness information
will be made available to judges at First Appearance hearings via the Internet.
Pinellas
Direct Services to Victims of Domestic and Sexual Violence
Center Against Spouse Abuse, Inc. (CASA), St. Petersburg ........................................................................... $86,817
Linda Thielmann, Grants Coordinator
(727) 895-4912, Ext. 116; [email protected]
A licensed mental health clinician provides needed therapeutic services for both residential and outreach
participants. Two community outreach advocates provide specialized services to the elderly and women of color.
Family Service Centers Rape Crisis Program, Clearwater
Mary Jo Sutcliff, Director, Recovery Services .................................................................................................. $41,437
(727) 535-9811; [email protected]
Increased counseling services for rape survivors and educational services for the community, as well as,
educational counseling services for the developmentally delayed, a population at high risk of sexual assault.
43
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
Violence Against Women Act
Law Enforcement, Courts, & Victim Services Projects
County
Project and Contact Information
Funding
Polk
Specialized Law Enforcement Domestic & Sexual Violence Units, Equipment & Personnel
Lakeland Police Department, Lakeland .......................................................................................................... $86,700
Tom Trulson, Grants Coordinator
(863) 834-6947; [email protected]
Support services to victims of domestic violence, which include counseling, referrals, assistance with
compensation forms, etc.
St. Johns
Direct Services to Victims of Domestic and Sexual Violence
Safety Shelter of St. Johns County, Inc. dba Betty Griffin House, St. Augustine ............................................. $87,328
Betty Hughes, Executive Director
(904) 808-8544; [email protected]
Full range of legal representation to victims of domestic violence and adult/teen sexual assault victims such as
counsel, negotiation, court representation and advocacy.
Volusia
Direct Services to Victims of Domestic and Sexual Violence
Central Florida Legal Services, Daytona Beach ............................................................................................ $100,000
Michelle Lilevois
(386) 255-6573; [email protected]
Legal counsel and representation at emergency injunction for protection hearings.
44
Statewide
Judicial Training
Office of the State Courts Administrator, Florida Supreme Court, Tallahassee........................................... $293,645
Pat Badland, Program Manager
(850) 487-1414; [email protected]
Develop and implement various trainings, meetings, and educational materials on domestic violence for judges,
court personnel, and others. Develop a statewide Model Domestic Violence Court Action Plan for use by the
judicial circuits to incorporate findings of a previous Domestic Violence Assessment project. Provide guidance to
circuits in the development and implementation of their court improvement efforts, consistent with the goals of
the Unified Family Courts.
Domestic Violence Services
Florida Coalition Against Domestic Violence, Inc., Tallahassee ................................................................. $2,514,924
Tiffany Carr, Executive Director
(850) 425-2749; [email protected]
Statewide coordinating functions for certified domestic violence centers in the following areas, rural, legal
advocacy for victims, domestic violence hotline, and clemency for battered women.
Sexual Violence Service
Florida Council Against Sexual Violence, Inc., Tallahassee ........................................................................... $296,952
Jennifer Dritt, Executive Director
(850) 297-2000; [email protected]
Activities to improve the continuum of care for victims of sexual violence throughout the state by strengthening
the ability of service providers to respond to the needs of their clients.
Specialized Prosecution Units
Circuit
County
Project and Contact Information
Funding
1st
Escambia
Santa Rosa
State Attorney’s Office, Pensacola ................................................................... $70,383
Contact: Wayne Peacock, Court Administrator
(850) 595-4400; [email protected]
Specialized assistance to victims, monitoring and enforcement of injunctions for
protection, court action, public awareness education, and resource information to
victims.
2nd
Franklin
Gadsden
Jefferson
Leon
Liberty
Wakulla
State Attorney’s Office, Tallahassee ................................................................. $54,004
Contact: Holly Francis
(850) 488-6701; [email protected]
Prosecution of felony and misdemeanor domestic violence cases and assistance to
victims.
4th
Clay
Duval
Nassau
State Attorney’s Office, Jacksonville ................................................................. $82,089
Contact: Libby Senterfitt, Director, Special Assistance Unit
(904) 630-2502; libbys[email protected]
Prosecutions of domestic violence cases, one-on-one meetings with victims, network with other agencies, provide training to the community, and participate in
specialized domestic violence training.
5th
Citrus
Lake
Marion
State Attorney’s Office, Ocala .......................................................................... $75,390
Contact: Suz Geeraerts
(352) 620-3700, [email protected]
Strengthen criminal domestic violence cases for successful prosecution through early
intervention with victims.
6th
Pasco
Pinellas
State Attorney’s Office, Clearwater ................................................................. $94,738
Contact: Kim Thomas, Investigator
(727) 464-6013
Conduct 40 specialized domestic violence training sessions to targeted police
officers for the purpose of increasing the prosecution of domestic violence cases.
7th
Putnam
Santa Rosa
St. Johns
State Attorney’s Office, Daytona Beach........................................................... $69,391
Contact: Carol Polzella, Assistant Chief Investigator
(386) 239-7710. [email protected]
Victim advocacy for victims of domestic violence focusing on assisting the
underserved migrant population. Technical assistance and support to law
enforcement agencies.
8th
Alachua
Baker
Bradford
Gilchrist
Levy
Union
State Attorney’s Office, Gainesville .................................................................. $52,101
Contact: Dave Remer, Director of Victim Services
(352) 374-3627; [email protected]
Provides a law enforcement officer to aggressively contact and locate victims,
perform follow-up investigations, provide training and other expertise to area law
enforcement agencies.
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
Violence Against Women Act
45
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
Violence Against Women Act
Specialized Prosecution Units
Circuit
County
Project and Contact Information
11th
Dade
State Attorney’s Office, Miami ....................................................................... $147,037
Contact: Denise Moon, Director, Victims Witness Services
(305) 547-0510; [email protected]
Provides for the Mobile Operations Victim Emergency Service (MOVE) project;
developed to address the inconsistencies in both services and legal interventions
afforded domestic violence victims.
13th
Hillsborough
State Attorney’s Office, Tampa ........................................................................ $81,749
Contact: Nancy Lopez, Director, Victim Assistance Program
(813) 272-5454; [email protected]
Provides an investigator to assist in the location, service, and transportation of
domestic violence victims.
14th
Bay
Calhoun
Gulf
Holmes
Jackson
Washington
State Attorney’s Office, Marianna .................................................................... $52,098
Contact: Peggy Peacock, Executive Director
(850) 482-9559; [email protected]
Reduce the number of domestic violence and sexual assault cases dropped and
increase the number of prosecutions for protective injunction or probation/parole
violations in domestic violence and/or sexual assault cases.
15th
Palm Beach
State Attorney’s Office, West Palm Beach ..................................................... $236,805
Contact: Lois Messer
(561) 355-7057; [email protected]
Victims advocacy and services to domestic violence victims. This project also
includes funding for the development and implementation of a web-based
computerized Domestic Violence Information System (DVIS) that will coordinate
and track the processing of information relevant to a domestic violence case from
various agencies.
16th
Monroe
State Attorney’s Office, Key West .................................................................... $39,250
Contact: Eva Carbone
(305) 292-3400; [email protected]
Victim advocacy and services to domestic violence victims.
17th
Broward
State Attorney’s Office, Ft. Lauderdale .......................................................... $106,812
Contact: Brian T. Trehy, Assistant State Attorney in Charge
(954) 831-7978; [email protected]
Provides an attorney and advocate on weekends to assist victims of domestic
violence and follow-up after first appearance.
18th
Brevard
State Attorney’s Office, Viera ........................................................................... $74,079
Contact: Brenda A. Quinn, Grant Administrator
(321) 264-6933; [email protected]
Monitoring of domestic violence cases, assistance to misdemeanor trial divisions,
and training.
46
Funding
Specialized Prosecution Units
Circuit
County
Project and Contact Information
Funding
20th
Lee
State Attorney’s Office, Ft. Myers .................................................................... $82,299
Contact: Elizabeth Biffl, Assistant State Attorney
(941) 335-2923; [email protected]
Intervention in domestic cases to improve safety for the victims including
investigation and victim advocacy.
Statewide
Florida Prosecuting Attorney’s Association, Inc. ............................................ $150,000
John Hogenmuller, Executive Director
(850) 488-3070; [email protected] or [email protected]
Provide specialized staff to function as a central clearinghouse for information
needed by domestic violence and sex crimes prosecutors. In addition to technical
assistance, several training seminars are held annually to address issues including:
how to effectively interview victims of domestic violence, how to make filing
decisions, how to prosecute a case with an absent or recanting victim, DNA use in
sex crimes cases, Civil Commitment of the Sexually Violent Predator, issues of
cultural sensitivity, and assisting Florida’s underserved populations.
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
Violence Against Women Act
47
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
Funding of Florida’s Certified
DCF
District
County
Served
Center
Domestic
Violence
Trust Fund
Family
Violence
Prevention &
Services Act Grant
DV Diversion
Program
TANF
1
Okaloosa
Walton
Shelter House
Ft. Walton Beach
$106,244
$42,890
$147,935
1
Okaloosa
Walton
FavorHouse of
NW Florida
Pensacola
$157,560
$63,535
$182,429
2
Bay
Calhoun
Gulf
Holmes
Jackson
Washington
Salvation Army
Domestic Violence
Program
Panama City
$141,963
$57,284
$169,400
2
Franklin
Gadsden
Jefferson
Leon
Liberty
Madison
Taylor
Wakulla
Refuge House
Tallahassee
$188,185
$75,934
$207,045
3
Columbia
Dixie
Gilchrist
Hamilton
Lafayette
Levy
Suwannee
Another Way
Chiefland
$55,486
$73,552
$141,128
3
Alachua
Bradford
Putnam
Union
Peaceful Paths
Gainesville
$144,056
$60,852
$177,282
4
Baker
Duval
Nassau
Hubbard House
Jacksonville
$219,027
$180,195
$288,385
4
Clay
Quigley House
Orange Park
$40,280
$33,138
$110,424
4
St. Johns
Safety Shelter of
St. Johns Co.
St. Augustine
$35,332
$29,067
$108,827
7
Brevard
Salvation Army
Domestic Violence
Program
Cocoa
$108,298
$43,690
$155,175
7
Orange
Harbor House, Orange
County Center
Against Domestic
Violence
Orlando
$257,717
$103,970
$337,441
$347,270
48
State
Access &
Visitation Grant
-
Child
Abuse &
Neglect Grant
Violence
Against
Women Act
Grant
-
Capital
Improvement
Grant
Total
-
$297,069
-
$403,524
-
$73,296
-
$471,245
$913,188
-
-
$194,268
-
$665,432
-
-
-
$787,925
$1,058,091
-
-
-
-
$382,190
-
$12,795
-
$27,949
$728,351
-
-
$62,596
$11,439
$257,877
-
-
$87,328
-
$260,554
-
-
-
$787,890
$1,095,053
-
-
-
$172,246
$1,218,644
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
Domestic Violence Centers
49
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
Funding of Florida’s Certified
DCF
District
County
Served
Center
Domestic
Violence
Trust Fund
Family
Violence
Prevention &
Services Act Grant
DV Diversion
Program
TANF
7
Brevard
Serene Harbor
Palm Bay
$67,596
$27,270
$96,855
7
Orange
Osceola
Polk
Seminole
Help Now
Kissimmee
$84,800
$34,210
$121,505
7
Seminole
Seminole Co. Victims
Rights
Sanford
$107,997
$43,568
$154,746
8
Collier
Shelter for Abused
Women
Naples
$26,877
$55,298
$142,260
8
Glades
Hendry
Lee
ACT (Abuse Counseling
& Treatment)
Ft. Myers
$80,279
$182,783
$198,454
8
Charlotte
CARE (Center for Abuse
& Rape Emergencies)
Punta Gorda
$29,044
$36,928
$115,406
9
Palm Beach
AVDA (Aid to Victims
of Domestic Abuse)
Delray Beach
$86,935
$116,643
$205,941
9
Palm Beach
YWCA Harmony House
West Palm Beach
$86,935
$116,643
$205,941
10
Broward
Women in Distress of
Broward
Ft. Lauderdale
$420,421
$241,198
$685,929
11
Dade
Metro Dade Advocates
for Victims, Safespace
North Miami
$545,478
$220,105
$522,366
11
Monroe
Domestic Abuse Shelter
Marathon Shores
$270,711
$109,234
$264,029
12
Volusia
Domestic Abuse Council
Daytona Beach
$157,489
$63,531
$183,148
12
Flagler
Family Life Center/
SafeHouse Women’s
Center
Bunnell
$18,209
$7,348
$90,525
13
Hernando
Dawn Center of
Hernando County
Brooksville
$44,429
$17,928
$109,224
13
Marion
Ocala Rape Crisis
Domestic Violence
Center/Creative Services
Ocala
$78,294
$31,592
$147,274
50
State
Access &
Visitation Grant
Child
Abuse &
Neglect Grant
Violence
Against
Women Act
Grant
Capital
Improvement
Grant
Total
-
-
-
-
$191,721
-
-
-
-
$240,515
-
-
-
$801,120
$1,107,431
-
-
$34,000
-
$258,435
$38,449
-
-
-
$499,965
-
-
-
$ 191,021
$372,399
-
-
-
-
$409,519
-
-
-
-
$409,519
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
Domestic Violence Centers
51
-
-
-
-
$1,347,548
-
-
-
$303,951
$1,591,900
-
-
-
$28,270
$672,244
-
-
-
-
$404,168
-
$2,975
-
-
$119,057
-
-
-
$179,650
$351,231
-
-
-
-
$257,160
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
Funding of Florida’s Certified
DCF
District
County
Served
Center
Domestic
Violence
Trust Fund
Family
Violence
Prevention &
Services Act Grant
DV Diversion
Program
TANF
13
Citrus
CASA (Citrus County
Abuse Shelter Association)
Inverness
$46,476
$18,732
$107,735
13
Lake
Sumter
Haven of Lake & Sumter
Counties
Leesburg
$77,410
$31,235
$142,425
14
Hardee
Highlands
Polk
Peace River Center/
Domestic Violence
Shelter
Lakeland and Sebring
$207,338
$83,646
$233,532
15
Okeechobee
Martha’s House
Okeechobee
$73,970
$26,483
$125,872
15
Indian River
Martin
St. Lucie
Safespace
Ft. Pierce
$134,600
$56,261
$149,083
Sun
Coast
Manatee
Hope Family Services
Bradenton
$151,981
$47,884
$131,530
Sun
Coast
Pinellas
The Haven of RCS
Clearwater
$104,009
$49,604
$150,812
Sun
Coast
Pinellas
CASA (Center Against
Spouse Abuse)
St. Petersburg
$116,811
$36,803
$150,812
Sun
Coast
Pasco
Sunrise of Pasco County
Dade City
$104,009
$49,605
$150,812
Sun
Coast
Pasco
Salvation Army Domestic
Violence Program
Hudson
$116,811
$36,803
$135,954
Sun
Coast
DeSoto
Sarasota
SPARCC (Safe Place and
Rape Crisis Center)
Sarasota
$129,944
$61,973
$169,932
Sun
Coast
Hillsborough
The Spring of Tampa Bay
Tampa
$240,840
$115,453
$332,427
Statewide
Florida Coalition Against
Domestic Violence
$344,654
$406,114
$500,000
$5,408,495
$3,088,982
$8,097,270
52
TOTAL
State
Access &
Visitation Grant
Child
Abuse &
Neglect Grant
Violence
Against
Women Act
Grant
Capital
Improvement
Grant
Total
-
-
-
-
$172,943
-
-
-
-
$251,070
-
-
-
$21,736
$546,252
-
-
-
-
$226,325
-
-
-
$173,904
$513,848
-
-
-
-
$331,395
-
-
-
-
$304,425
$38,449
-
$86,817
-
$429,692
-
-
-
$41,654
$346,080
-
-
-
-
$289,568
-
-
-
-
$361,850
-
-
$69,742
-
$758,462
-
-
$1,264,156
-
$2,514,924
$76,898
$89,066
$1,798,907
$4,000,000
$22,559,618
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
Domestic Violence Centers
53
APPENDICES
Appendices
Total Domestic Violence and Rate
for Florida, 1993-2002
Ten Year Trend
1993-2002
After years of steady increases in total domestic violence
numbers, the total number of reported domestic violence
offenses declined slightly in 1998 and is down again in 2002
from 2001, by 1.8 percent in volume and 3.8 percent in rate.
See table below.
Domestic Violence Crimes include: Murder, Manslaughter, Forcible
Rape, Forcible Sodomy, Forcible Fondling, Aggravated Assault,
Aggravated Stalking (1996-present), Simple Assault, Simple Stalking,
Threat/Intimidation & Arson (1992-1995).
54
1993
2002
Total Domestic Violence
112,585
Total Domestic Violence
121,834
Rate
827.3
Rate
730.7
This graph illustrates changes in the volume and rate (per
100,000 population) of domestic violence since 1993. From
1993 to 2002, domestic violence is up 8.2 percent in number
and down 11.9 percent in rate.
55
APPENDICES
56
APPENDICES
57
APPENDICES
58
APPENDICES
Office of Domestic Violence Program
Florida Department of Children & Families
1317 Winewood Blvd., Bldg. 7
Tallahassee, FL 32399
Phone: 850/921-2168; SUNCOM 291-2168
FAX: 850/413-0812; SUNCOM 293-0812
Trula E. Motta, Director
Fiscal and Resource Management
Pat Barrett, Operations and Management Consultant Manager
Sandy Hand, Government Operations Consultant II
Sonja Horne, Government Operations Consultant II
Kim Musgrove, Government Operations Consultant II
Vera Kirkland, Administrative Assistant II
Domestic Violence Programs
Mary L. Marotta, Program Administrator
Mary Lay, Administrative Assistant II
Barbara Carter, Program Administrator, BIP
Deborah Kleinman Robinson, Research & Training Specialist
Research, Education and Operations
Renee C. Starrett, Operations & Management Consultant Manager
Bianca J. Lewis, Research & Training Specialist
Office of Domestic Violence Program
Florida Department of Children & Families
1317 Winewood Blvd., Bldg. 7
Tallahassee, FL 32399
Phone: 850/921-2168; SUNCOM 291-2168
FAX: 850/413-0812; SUNCOM 293-0812