Document 65403

The Children’s Plan
One Year On
ISBN 978-1-84775-312-0
You can download this publication or order copies online at:
www.dcsf.gov.uk/publications
Search using the ref: 01050-2008DOM-EN
Copies of this publication can also be obtained from:
Department for Children, Schools and
Families Publications
PO Box 5050
Sherwood Park, Annesley
Nottingham NG15 ODJ
Tel 0845 60 222 60
Fax 0845 60 333 60
Textphone 0845 60 555 60
Please quote ref 01050-2008DOM-EN
© Crown Copyright 2008
Published by the Department for Children, Schools and Families
Extracts from this document may be reproduced for non-commercial
research, education or training purposes on the condition that the
source is acknowledged. For any other use please contact
[email protected]
The Children’s Plan
One Year On
ISBN 978-1-84775-312-0
You can download this publication or order copies online at:
www.dcsf.gov.uk/publications
Search using the ref: 01050-2008DOM-EN
Copies of this publication can also be obtained from:
Department for Children, Schools and
Families Publications
PO Box 5050
Sherwood Park, Annesley
Nottingham NG15 ODJ
Tel 0845 60 222 60
Fax 0845 60 333 60
Textphone 0845 60 555 60
Please quote ref 01050-2008DOM-EN
© Crown Copyright 2008
Published by the Department for Children, Schools and Families
Extracts from this document may be reproduced for non-commercial
research, education or training purposes on the condition that the
source is acknowledged. For any other use please contact
[email protected]
THE CHILDREN’S PLAN ONE YEAR ON
Foreword
Our goal is to make our country the best place
in the world for children and young people to
grow up. That is why, a year ago, we published the
Children’s Plan, with the aim of putting children and
young people at the heart of everything we do.
To prepare the Children’s Plan, we listened to
children, young people, parents and professionals
up and down the country about the things that
mattered to them. We are still listening.
You tell us you want to live in a place where children
are safe, happy and healthy – a place where children
are able to enjoy themselves as they grow up as well
as doing well at school. And you tell us you want
these opportunities to be available to all children,
no matter what their background.
The Children’s Plan set out our ambitions for
achieving this – and one year into the Plan a great
deal has already been achieved. This progress is
thanks to the hard work of the millions of people
who help and support children and families, in
thousands of organisations across the country,
every day. It is right that we celebrate this.
But we also know that there is much more to do.
Too many young people are still not doing as well
as they could, there are too many schools where
standards are not high enough, and we can never
be satisfied until we have done all we can to protect
every child from harm.
Here we set out the steps we are going to take
in 2009 as we continue to work to make sure that
every child and young person gets the best start
in life.
With everyone playing their part, we can make
this the best place in the world to grow up.
Ed Balls
Secretary of State for Children,
Schools and Families
Professional Everyone working with families, young
people and children has a different role to play,
but they all share common values. We want to help
social workers, teachers and health professionals,
for example, to be similarly ambitious for those in
their care, excellent in their practice, committed to
partnership, and respected as professionals.
Youth centre Everyone agrees that young people
need more and better places to go and things to
do, supporting individuals and families, and the
whole community. Giving young people more local
responsibility is also a great way to give them a real
say in the issues that affect them.
Playground Children and their parents know that
play is the key to an enjoyable, happy childhood, as
well as helping them grow and develop physically
and socially. We’re giving every local authority at
least £1m to improve local play areas, involving
families and children to make neighbourhoods
places where people want to live and grow up.
School The Children’s Plan expects schools to
provide excellent, personalised education and
development for all children, identifying additional
needs early. It further supports their role as a vital
community resource. We now need to help all
schools look beyond the pupils on their rolls and
make it easier for them to work in partnership
– with parents, other schools, colleges, and wider
children’s services.
…helping
children to be
safe and healthy,
to enjoy and
play, to achieve
their potential,
and to prepare
for their future.
The Children’s Plan
Parents want the best for their children. They want
them to be safe, happy, healthy, doing well and able
to get good qualifications and eventually a good job.
We have talked to children, young people and their
parents across the country about what life is like for
them today. They tell us that now is a great time to
be growing up, with more opportunities than ever
before to learn, experience the world and enjoy
childhood in new and exciting ways.
But bringing up children, and being a child in today’s
world, can be tough. Parents tell us that juggling
work and family life can be hard. Children and young
people have experiences and opportunities that
their parents may never have had and this can mean
tough choices for parents who want to let their
children take advantage of these new opportunities
whilst trying to keep them safe.
The world is changing, and so are the skills, attitudes
and aspirations that children and young people
need to succeed in a changing global economy.
Despite the fact that most families are doing well,
too many young people still suffer an unhappy
childhood and fail to reach their potential because
of poverty and disadvantage, or problems that are
not addressed, or tackled too late. And while the vast
majority of parents provide safe and loving homes
for their children, in the very small
minority of families where this is
not the case, it is our top priority to
take the action needed to protect
those children from harm.
THE CHILDREN’S PLAN ONE YEAR ON
The Children’s Plan is how we are trying to meet the
challenges facing children, young people and families
today, to make this the best place in the world to
grow up. At its heart are some guiding principles:
• p arents bring up children, not government, but
parents need help and support to do their job;
• a ll children have the potential to succeed and
should go as far as their talents can take them;
• c hildren and young people need to be safe,
healthy and enjoy their childhood as well as grow
up prepared for adult life;
• a ll children and families deserve services that
work together for them, and meet their individual
needs; and
• it is always better to prevent a failure than tackle
a crisis later – by intervening early in problems,
spotting those who need extra help and making
sure they get it.
Here we set out what we’ve done so far, and the
next steps we need to take, to make a reality of
our ambition.
Parents bring up children,
not government
Parents tell us that bringing up children can be
tough, and they want more help and support to
do their job. They want to be able to find good,
affordable childcare when they need it, they want
support for themselves and their families at difficult
times and they want advice on how they can help
their children to learn and succeed. Parents also
want more help and advice on how to protect
their children in a changing world, for example
from unsupervised access to the internet or the
pressures of increased commercialisation.
What we’ve done so far
One year on from the Children’s Plan, we’ve begun
to put more help in place for parents and families:
• in nearly 3,000 communities, families with
young children are getting advice on health and
parenting, and information on going back to work
and childcare, all under one roof in their local
Sure Start Children’s Centre;
• w e are helping more parents juggle work and
family life, providing more free childcare places
to 2, 3 and 4-year-olds;
• w e asked Dr Tanya Byron to review how we could
help parents manage the risks to their children
from using the internet and video games – and
we have set up the new UK Council for Child
Internet Safety in response;
THE CHILDREN’S PLAN ONE YEAR ON
• w e launched a Youth Alcohol Action Plan and
committed to a hard hitting campaign to make
young people think about the consequences
of drinking too much alcohol; and
• w e set up Parent Know How, a range of free
services to give all parents access to expert
advice, and increased the number of parenting
experts working locally, in Sure Start Children’s
Centres and schools.
We need to do more to help parents cope with
day-to-day pressures and worries by making sure
they can get the help they need when they need
it, including at times we know bring particular
pressures for families – for example when their
relationships come under strain. We need to do
more to help families lift themselves out of poverty,
so that children’s futures are not blighted. We need
to ensure that all parents can help their children
learn and do well at school. And we need to
respond to the challenges brought by a changing
society by making sure those working with children
and families can support all kinds of parents in all
kinds of circumstances – whether they are mothers,
fathers, single parents or non-resident parents –
to help their children to learn and succeed.
The Children’s Plan in action – Julie
Julie has four children and is bringing
them up on her own. Her eldest son
has special educational needs and her
younger daughter is having medical tests
to explore possible health problems so
she understands how important it is to
get support and wanted to help others
who were struggling.
Julie went to her local Sure Start
Children’s Centre with an idea that maybe
parents could support each other and
from that a new parents’ support group
has grown. The children’s centre team
gave her the support and encouragement
to set up the group which will soon be
offering much needed support for local
parents with disabled children.
7
Priorities for 2009
In 2009 we will take additional steps to make
sure families get the help and support they need.
We will:
• e nshrine in law our commitment to eradicate
child poverty by 2020, and publish a ‘routemap’
for achieving it;
• e xtend our offer of a free childcare place to more
2-year-olds, making sure more children benefit
from early learning;
• w ork with schools to help more parents get
involved in their child’s learning, for example by
ensuring that all new teachers are trained to work
with parents;
• introduce new ways to support parents at times
when their relationships come under strain,
and give more support to children when family
relationships break down; and
• p ublish, for the first time, guidelines on young
people’s alcohol consumption, helping parents to
help their children make sensible decisions about
the amount they drink.
THE CHILDREN’S PLAN ONE YEAR ON
All children and young people
have the potential to succeed
Young people today have higher expectations of
what they can do and parents rightly want more
for their children too. They want excellent schools
that help their children achieve their best, and get
good qualifications, overcoming any barriers they
might face like a disability or special educational
needs. They want them to get better jobs and have
better opportunities than they themselves had
when they were growing up, and they want every
child, whatever their background, to have the same
chance for success.
What we’ve done so far
One year on from the Children’s Plan, we are
making progress:
• w e introduced the Early Years Foundation Stage
so that parents can be sure of the quality of early
learning and care for children from birth to age 5;
• w e launched the National Challenge and our
plans for ‘coasting schools’ to ensure that no
school is left behind and that all children are
taught in schools with high ambitions;
• w e have extended personalised learning in
schools, offering one-to-one tuition in English
and mathematics, through the Every Child
A Writer, Every Child a Reader and Every Child
Counts programmes;
• w e are reforming testing, trialling new single
level tests in primary schools to motivate pupils
and teachers by focusing on individual learning
goals; and
• w e have increased ways for young people to
stay engaged in learning, with new Diplomas
introduced in September and new A-levels and
GCSEs with scope for more stretch and challenge
The Children’s Plan in action – Robert
Eight year old Robert was suffering from a
lack of self-confidence and poor social skills,
so his school arranged for him to go to a
centre which brings together professionals
from health, social care and education.
The team at the centre worked with Robert
to help him build his confidence and to
develop his personal skills. A behaviour
consultant continued to support him and
to work with teachers when he returned to
school. Teachers have welcomed the positive
effect that the sessions with Robert have had
on his behaviour and ability to concentrate
in class.
Priorities for 2009
To help all children achieve their best, in 2009:
• S ir Jim Rose will make his final recommendations
on the primary curriculum to create fresh
momentum in raising standards in primary schools,
strengthening subject knowledge alongside
improved skills and understanding for children,
and we will act to help all primary schools to
improve and ensure no child is left behind;
• N ational Challenge advisers will work with
headteachers to improve standards in their
schools, backed by £400 million;
• schools will begin to offer one-to-one tuition on
a national basis for children aged 7 to 14 and more
young people will benefit from personal tutors;
and more relevant, engaging content. This year
we have seen the highest ever number of 16-19
year olds continuing their education and we have
passed historic new laws to raise the participation
age from 16 to 18 in the future.
In the future we want all learning to be
personalised to help meet children’s individual
needs, whether that means more help with reading
or the chance to talk problems through with a
personal tutor. We want world class schools with
world class standards, so that all children and young
people have good opportunities to explore their
talents and achieve their potential, with all young
people staying on in education until they are 18.
• w e will take forward John Bercow’s
recommendations on improving speech,
language and communication provision,
backed by an additional £12 million;
• w e will begin to invest an additional £31 million
to demonstrate best practice in improving
outcomes for children with special educational
needs (SEN), raising schools’ expectations and
aspirations for these children; and
• w e will introduce five more Diplomas and a
national apprenticeships service, so even more
young people can make learning choices that
will take them on to future success.
10
THE CHILDREN’S PLAN ONE YEAR ON
Children and young people
need to be safe, healthy
and enjoy growing up
Parents want their children to enjoy growing up.
They want their children to grow up in places where
they can play and have fun as they did when they
were young. They want their children to enjoy the
opportunities that new technologies bring to the
way children and young people play, communicate
and enjoy themselves. And young people want to
be able to get involved in the activities they enjoy
like music and sport.
But parents – and the wider public – also want to
know that all children are safe, healthy and protected
from harm. Children can only enjoy childhood if they
can both enjoy safe environments and develop
a good understanding of risks and how to manage
them. Vulnerable children and young people need
to be protected, and those in a position to help must
be able to respond effectively when children and
young people have been harmed. Children can only
enjoy childhood if they are healthy and developing
well, which means excellent health services when
children need them, and communities which
promote healthy living for all children.
One year on from the Children’s Plan, we have
made progress:
• w e published a Staying Safe Action Plan to
set out how we would help keep children safe
from all sorts of risks – from traffic accidents to
bullying – as well as protecting those who are
most vulnerable;
• w e launched an independent review of child
and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS)
which provided a clear set of recommendations
to improve access and quality of mental health
services for vulnerable young people;
• w e are promoting children’s healthy weight
through improved nutrition and exercise backed
by £372 million, we are providing £650 million
to improve school food and introducing
compulsory cooking classes for 11–14 year olds
from 2011;
11
• w e published a Play Strategy setting out our vision
to improve play opportunities in all communities,
and to rebuild or renew up to 3,500 playgrounds
and make them accessible to disabled children;
• w e launched myplace, to invest over £200 million
in creating a wide range of world class youth
facilities – and we are giving young people a
central part in deciding how the money should
be spent; and
• w e have begun to offer more short breaks and
equipment for disabled children, with more
opportunities for them and their families to enjoy
and benefit from help and support.
Keeping children safe is everyone’s responsibility
and we know there is more to do to make sure
that all children are safe and healthy, with the
opportunities and support they need for happy
and enjoyable childhoods.
12
THE CHILDREN’S PLAN ONE YEAR ON
Priorities for 2009
To help all children enjoy childhood, be healthy
and safe, in 2009 we will:
• respond to Lord Laming’s report to strengthen
the arrangements for safeguarding children;
• establish a new taskforce to strengthen and
reform the social work profession, because social
workers play a vital role in keeping some of our
most vulnerable children safe;
• publish a new child health strategy, Healthy Lives,
Brighter Futures, to improve children and young
people’s health services;
• take forward the recommendations of the
CAMHS review, and increase the number of areas
in which mental health services for young people
are provided through schools to 80, as part of
our plan to make this nationally available by
2011;
• respond to the independent review of the impact
of the commercial world on children’s wellbeing
which will report in the spring;
• continue to invest in creating exciting spaces and
activities that children and young people want to
get involved with, with plans to deliver 500 new
playgrounds by April 2009;
• further expand the number of short breaks
available for disabled children and their families,
including those with the most acute needs; and
• require schools to record all incidents
of bullying.
13
All children and families deserve
services that work together for them
We know that many of our teachers, schools, early
years settings and colleges are world class, but
there is still too much variation in quality. Parents
want the best support available for their children
and they want to be able to get the help they need
in one place, from services that treat them and their
children as individuals.
One year on from the Children’s Plan, progress is
being made:
• w e have opened more than 1,000 new Sure Start
Children’s Centres this year, taking the total to
nearly 3,000 – well on track to having a children’s
centre in every community by 2010;
•m
ore than two thirds of schools are now
providing extended services to meet the wider
needs of children – including breakfast clubs,
study support, sports, music and arts activities,
parenting support and swift and easy access
to specialist services for those who need
extra support;
• to make it easier for families to access services all
on one site, we are establishing a new fund of at
least £200 million to support the co-location of
services; and
• w e have set out a long-term plan for the more
than 2.6 million people who work with children
and young people every day, to ensure they have
the capacity and skills to deliver the high quality
services needed to meet our ambitions.
14
THE CHILDREN’S PLAN ONE YEAR ON
We need to do more so that all services are working
together to improve the lives of children and young
people. This means schools and colleges working
more closely with parents, other children’s services
and other schools, and providing more and better
support for children’s wellbeing and personal
development as well as making sure they achieve
academically. And it means supporting our teachers
and all those who work with children to be the best
in the world, making sure all schools are improving
towards the standards of the best.
The Children’s Plan in action –
South Hunsley School, East Yorkshire
Open from 7am to 10pm on weekdays and
7am to 5pm at weekends, South Hunsley
provides an extensive range of activities for
children, courses for parents and year round
community access. It works in partnership
with a range of services leading a cluster of
eight primary schools and having a formal
partnership with a nearby college. The
school is working with Hull and Lincoln
Universities to place trainee social workers in
schools and has worked with local services
to set up four local parenting advice centres.
The school also uses partnerships with
businesses, including BAE Systems, to help
develop its specialism in engineering and
technology and broaden pupils’ education.
Priorities for 2009
Because we are determined that all services for
children and young people should be world class,
in 2009:
• the new Masters in Teaching and Learning will
be available to teachers in National Challenge
schools to improve their professional skills and
subject knowledge;
• w e will set out next steps on achieving our vision
for schools to deliver a 21st century service,
with greater co-location of services and greater
partnership between schools, parents and other
services – with a new school ‘report card’ to help
parents understand how their local schools are
performing; and
• w e will legislate to strengthen Children’s Trusts
in every local area to ensure that local services
– including schools, health services and the police
– work together to improve outcomes for children
and young people.
15
It is always better to prevent
a failure than tackle a crisis later
Children today are growing up sooner and want
more independence at an earlier age. But more
than ever before, they need to be able to deal with
the things that can knock them off course, manage
the risks they might face and get the support they
need to deal with problems. Young people today
can face difficult problems, like drug use and gang
culture, and parents told us they want services
that spot problems early, nipping them in the bud
before they become too serious.
The Children’s Plan in action – Andrew
When Andrew was 16 he was arrested
following an argument at a fast food
restaurant. He was charged with common
assault and criminal damage and was rude
and aggressive towards the Youth Offending
Team caseworker who took up his case.
Over time, the caseworker began to gain
Andrew’s trust including by working with
his mother and brothers who recognised
that Andrew needed help. Andrew attended
a series of anger management sessions,
identifying what the triggers were to him
losing his temper and undertook 41 hours
of “Community Reparation”, which included
removing graffiti. The work helped Andrew
to build his self-esteem and team working
skills, which he continued to develop when
he was referred to the Connexions Service.
Connexions also supported Andrew with
careers advice, which has helped him secure
a post at the local leisure centre. Andrew
continues to work at the leisure centre
and still keeps in regular touch with the
Connexions Service.
16
THE CHILDREN’S PLAN ONE YEAR ON
One year on from the Children’s Plan, we have
started to lay the groundwork:
• w e have established Family Nurse Partnerships
in 20 local authority areas helping the most
vulnerable young first-time mothers;
• w e are improving behaviour in the classroom,
implementing the recommendations of Sir
Alan Steer’s review, with 98 per cent of schools
working in new behaviour partnerships with
other schools and encouraging more Safer
Schools Partnerships;
• w e set out plans and launched 12 new pilot
projects around the country to improve
alternative educational provision for children
who are not able to attend mainstream school,
in Back on Track;
• w e launched our Youth Crime Action Plan, backed
by nearly £100 million, setting out our plans to
tackle offending and re-offending by young
people. As part of these plans, new Family
Intervention Projects are tackling the behaviour
of families with multiple difficulties such as
substance misuse and offending; and
• w e have provided new guidance for teachers
and others working in local services on
preventing violent extremism to support and
empower young people to come together
with their families and the wider community to
expose those who seek to sow division in our
communities and reject cruelty and violence in
whatever form it takes.
But there is more work to do to make sure we give
support to those who need it, whether in the early
years, at school or beyond, to make sure we identify
and address problems before they develop.
17
Priorities for 2009
To help more children and young people before
problems develop, in 2009:
• w e will extend Family Nurse Partnerships to
30 sites by April 2009, and will set out plans for
further expansion of the programme in the new
child health strategy Healthy Lives, Brighter Futures;
• w e will extend the Family Intervention Project
into more areas, to work with the most
challenging families where children and young
people are at risk of poor outcomes; and
• w e will launch a campaign to ensure more youth
facilities are open on Friday and Saturday nights
to prevent young people getting involved in
anti-social behaviour and crime.
18
THE CHILDREN’S PLAN ONE YEAR ON
Every part of
the community,
working together,
makes a vital
contribution
and supports
families…
The Children’s Plan puts children and young
people at the heart of their communities –
communities that offer opportunities to play, learn,
develop and have fun. We want all those working
with children, young people and their families,
from children’s centres to schools and play facilities
to youth centres, colleges and employers, to work
together to improve the lives of children and
young people. This means having services that
parents and families can access easily with health,
childcare and parenting support available under
one roof in children’s centres, and schools providing
education alongside opportunities to get involved
in sport, music and cultural activities.
Town hall Local Authorities lead Children’s Trusts.
These bring together everyone who works with
families and children, including for example
health services, the police, Connexions, schools,
colleges and housing organisations, depending
on the circumstances of the local community.
Trusts develop and provide better services, helping
professionals to work together in ways that make
sense for families and children.
Local business Young people have more choice
than ever to find the best route into work for them.
Local and national businesses, working closely
with schools and universities, are providing more
opportunities for young people to build and
improve their skills, through the new Diplomas and
Apprenticeships, alongside more traditional work
experience for all children.
Further education (FE) colleges Further
education colleges are working closely with
schools, employers and universities, to provide
more choices than ever to learn, train and earn,
so that every young person can fulfil their potential.
Sure Start Children’s Centres By 2010 every
community will be served by a Sure Start Children’s
Centre, providing families with high quality childcare,
health and employment advice and information.
They will offer permanent universal provision across
the country, ensuring that every child gets the best
start in life.
THE CHILDREN’S PLAN ONE YEAR ON
Foreword
Our goal is to make our country the best place
in the world for children and young people to
grow up. That is why, a year ago, we published the
Children’s Plan, with the aim of putting children and
young people at the heart of everything we do.
To prepare the Children’s Plan, we listened to
children, young people, parents and professionals
up and down the country about the things that
mattered to them. We are still listening.
You tell us you want to live in a place where children
are safe, happy and healthy – a place where children
are able to enjoy themselves as they grow up as well
as doing well at school. And you tell us you want
these opportunities to be available to all children,
no matter what their background.
The Children’s Plan set out our ambitions for
achieving this – and one year into the Plan a great
deal has already been achieved. This progress is
thanks to the hard work of the millions of people
who help and support children and families, in
thousands of organisations across the country,
every day. It is right that we celebrate this.
But we also know that there is much more to do.
Too many young people are still not doing as well
as they could, there are too many schools where
standards are not high enough, and we can never
be satisfied until we have done all we can to protect
every child from harm.
Here we set out the steps we are going to take
in 2009 as we continue to work to make sure that
every child and young person gets the best start
in life.
With everyone playing their part, we can make
this the best place in the world to grow up.
Ed Balls
Secretary of State for Children,
Schools and Families
Professional Everyone working with families, young
people and children has a different role to play,
but they all share common values. We want to help
social workers, teachers and health professionals,
for example, to be similarly ambitious for those in
their care, excellent in their practice, committed to
partnership, and respected as professionals.
Youth centre Everyone agrees that young people
need more and better places to go and things to
do, supporting individuals and families, and the
whole community. Giving young people more local
responsibility is also a great way to give them a real
say in the issues that affect them.
Playground Children and their parents know that
play is the key to an enjoyable, happy childhood, as
well as helping them grow and develop physically
and socially. We’re giving every local authority at
least £1m to improve local play areas, involving
families and children to make neighbourhoods
places where people want to live and grow up.
School The Children’s Plan expects schools to
provide excellent, personalised education and
development for all children, identifying additional
needs early. It further supports their role as a vital
community resource. We now need to help all
schools look beyond the pupils on their rolls and
make it easier for them to work in partnership
– with parents, other schools, colleges, and wider
children’s services.
…helping
children to be
safe and healthy,
to enjoy and
play, to achieve
their potential,
and to prepare
for their future.
THE CHILDREN’S PLAN ONE YEAR ON
Foreword
Our goal is to make our country the best place
in the world for children and young people to
grow up. That is why, a year ago, we published the
Children’s Plan, with the aim of putting children and
young people at the heart of everything we do.
To prepare the Children’s Plan, we listened to
children, young people, parents and professionals
up and down the country about the things that
mattered to them. We are still listening.
You tell us you want to live in a place where children
are safe, happy and healthy – a place where children
are able to enjoy themselves as they grow up as well
as doing well at school. And you tell us you want
these opportunities to be available to all children,
no matter what their background.
The Children’s Plan set out our ambitions for
achieving this – and one year into the Plan a great
deal has already been achieved. This progress is
thanks to the hard work of the millions of people
who help and support children and families, in
thousands of organisations across the country,
every day. It is right that we celebrate this.
But we also know that there is much more to do.
Too many young people are still not doing as well
as they could, there are too many schools where
standards are not high enough, and we can never
be satisfied until we have done all we can to protect
every child from harm.
Here we set out the steps we are going to take
in 2009 as we continue to work to make sure that
every child and young person gets the best start
in life.
With everyone playing their part, we can make
this the best place in the world to grow up.
Ed Balls
Secretary of State for Children,
Schools and Families
Professional Everyone working with families, young
people and children has a different role to play,
but they all share common values. We want to help
social workers, teachers and health professionals,
for example, to be similarly ambitious for those in
their care, excellent in their practice, committed to
partnership, and respected as professionals.
Youth centre Everyone agrees that young people
need more and better places to go and things to
do, supporting individuals and families, and the
whole community. Giving young people more local
responsibility is also a great way to give them a real
say in the issues that affect them.
Playground Children and their parents know that
play is the key to an enjoyable, happy childhood, as
well as helping them grow and develop physically
and socially. We’re giving every local authority at
least £1m to improve local play areas, involving
families and children to make neighbourhoods
places where people want to live and grow up.
School The Children’s Plan expects schools to
provide excellent, personalised education and
development for all children, identifying additional
needs early. It further supports their role as a vital
community resource. We now need to help all
schools look beyond the pupils on their rolls and
make it easier for them to work in partnership
– with parents, other schools, colleges, and wider
children’s services.
…helping
children to be
safe and healthy,
to enjoy and
play, to achieve
their potential,
and to prepare
for their future.
The Children’s Plan
One Year On
ISBN 978-1-84775-312-0
You can download this publication or order copies online at:
www.dcsf.gov.uk/publications
Search using the ref: 01050-2008DOM-EN
Copies of this publication can also be obtained from:
Department for Children, Schools and
Families Publications
PO Box 5050
Sherwood Park, Annesley
Nottingham NG15 ODJ
Tel 0845 60 222 60
Fax 0845 60 333 60
Textphone 0845 60 555 60
Please quote ref 01050-2008DOM-EN
© Crown Copyright 2008
Published by the Department for Children, Schools and Families
Extracts from this document may be reproduced for non-commercial
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