NATIONAL PARK COMMUNITY COLLEGE

NATIONAL PARK COMMUNITY COLLEGE
SEPTEMBER 15, 2007
ACCREDITED BY
The Higher Learning Commission
A Commission of The North Central Association of Colleges and Schools
30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400
Chicago, IL 60602-2504
(800) 621-7440 www.ncacihe.org
National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission
61 Broadway
New York, NY 10014
1-800-669-1657 www.nlnac.org
Commission on Accreditation for Health Informatics and Information
Management Education (CAHIIM)
233 N. Michigan Ave, Suite 2850
Chicago, IL 606063182
(312) 233-1131 www.cahiim.org
The Joint Review Committee in Education on Radiologic Technology
20 North Wacker Drive, Suite 900
Chicago, IL 60606-2901
312-704-5300 www.jrcert.org
The National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences
P.O. Box 75634, Chicago, IL 60675-5634,
(773) 714-8880 www.naacls.org
The Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs
7007 College Blvd., Suite 420, Overland Park, KS 66211
(913) 339-3956
Committee on Accreditation of Educational Programs for the EMS
Professions (CoAEMSP)
1248 Harwood Road
Bedfore, TX 76021
817-283-9403 www.coaemsp.org
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Council on Occupational Education
41 Perimeter Center, NE
Suite 640
Atlanta, GA 30334
770-396-3898
APPROVED BY
The Arkansas State Board of Nursing
The Arkansas Health Department
The Arkansas Department of Emergency Health Services
National Automotive Technicians
Associated General Contractors of America
American Health Information Management Association
MEMBERSHIP IN
The American Association of Community and Junior Colleges
The Council of North Central Community and Junior Colleges
The National Institute for Staff and Organizational Development
The Arkansas Association of Two-Year Colleges
The college reserves the right to make changes in regulations and offerings as circumstances may
require.
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President’s Welcome
Let me congratulate you on your decision to
become a member of the NPCC family.
We’re delighted that you’ve chosen our campus to further your education. Now, it’s
YOUR campus too. It’s YOUR place to
learn.Our faculty and staff are professionals
who believe in the value of an education, a
sound work ethic, and quality instruction and
training.
Dr. Sally Carder
While the College offers a variety of programs and classes designed to help you
obtain the technical skills necessary to get a job, many of our students complete a
two year associate’s degree that will transfer to complete a bachelor’s degree.
Through our Adult Education program, we provide students the opportunity to
finish their high school equivalency diploma. Through the Secondary Technology
Center students may receive high school credit in technical skills. The college
offers a full range of continuing education classes each semester and provides
training to upgrade the skills of employees in our area businesses and industries.
National Park Community College is truly a comprehensive community college.
No matter where you set your goal, we’ll work to make your college experience a
positive one. You’ll have access to the student support services you need to be a
success. I challenge you to take full advantage of your opportunities here. Don’t
just attend classes, become involved in the campus organizations and network with
the business professionals available to you. The possibilities are limitless. And
along the way, don’t forget to have fun. Best wishes for a great year and enjoy
your “walk in the Park!”
Sally Carder, Ed.D
President
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Academic Calendar Spring 2008 - Summer II 2009
Spring 2008
January 2 (W)
College Reopens
January 9 (W)
Workshop Day (COLLEGE CLOSED)
January 10-11 (R-F)
Instructor Preparation and Registration Days
January 14 (M)
Classes Begin
January 14-17 (M-R)
Evening Classes Registration Only
January 21 (M)
MLK, Jr. Day (COLLEGE CLOSED)
March 12 (W)
Mid-Semester Grade Reports Due (Noon)
March 14 (F)
Last Day to Apply for May 2008 Graduation
March 24-25 (M-T)
Spring Vacation (Adm. Offices, etc open 8:00-4:30)
March 26-29(W-S)
COLLEGE CLOSED
March 31 (M)
Classes Resume
March 31 (M)
Last Day to Drop/Withdraw
April 7 (M)
Priority Registration Begins for Currently Enrolled
Students
April 21 (M)
Public Registration
May 5 (M)
Last Day of Classes
May 6-10 (T-S); May 12 (M)
Final Exams
May 14 (W)
Final Grades Due 4:30 p.m.
May 17 (S)
Graduation - Summit Arena
Summer I 2008
May 26 (M)
May 27 (T)
May 27-28 (T-W)
June 20 (F)
June 30 (M)
July 1 (T)
July 3 (R)
July 4 (F)
Memorial Day (COLLEGE CLOSED)
Classes Begin
Last Days to Drop/Add Courses
Last Day to Withdraw
Last Day of Classes
Final Exams
Final Grades Due (Noon)
Independence Day (COLLEGE CLOSED)
Summer II 2008
July 7 (M)
July 7-8 (M-T)
August 1 (F)
August 7 (R)
August 8 (F)
August 12 (T)
Classes Begin
Last Days to Drop/Add Courses
Last Day to Withdraw
Last Day of Classes
Final Exams
Final Grades Due (Noon)
Fall 2008
August 18 (M)
August 19 (T)
August 21 (R)
Workshop Day (COLLEGE CLOSED)
Faculty Workday
Classes Begin
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August 21-27 (R-W)
September 1 (M)
October 6 (M)
October 12 - 14
October 17 (F)
October 23 (R)
October 31 (F)
November 10 (M)
Students
November 26-29 (W-S)
December 1 (M)
December 10 (W)
December 10 (W)
December 11 (R) -16 (T)
December 17 (W)
December (19)
Evening Classes Registration Only
Labor Day (COLLEGE CLOSED)
Fall Break (COLLEGE CLOSED)
AATYC
Last Day to Apply For December 2008 Graduation
Mid-Term Grades Due (Noon)
Last Day to Withdraw/Drop
Priority Registration Begins For Currently Enrolled
Thanksgiving Break (COLLEGE CLOSED)
Public Registration
Last Day of Classes
Final Exams for Wednesday Evening Classes
Final Exams
Final Grades Due 4:30 p.m.
Board Meeting
December 22, 2008 - January 2, 2009
College Closed
CAMPUS REOPENS MONDAY, JANUARY 5, 2009
Spring 2009
January 5 (M)
January 8 (R)
January 9-14 (F-W)
January 15 (R)
January 15-21 (R-W)
and Monday, January 26
January 19 (M)
March 11 (W)
March 13 (F)
March 23-24 (M-T)
March 25-28(W-S)
March 30 (M)
March 30 (M)
April 6 (M)
Students
April 20 (M)
May 6
May 6
May 7 (R)-May 12 (T)
May 13 (W)
May 16 (S)
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College Reopens
Workshop Day (COLLEGE CLOSED)
Instructor Preparation and Registration Days
Classes Begin
Evening Classes Registration Only
MLK, Jr. Day (COLLEGE CLOSED)
Mid-Semester Grade Reports Due (Noon)
Last Day to Apply For May 2009 Graduation
Spring Vacation (Adm. Offices, Etc Open 8:00-4:30)
COLLEGE CLOSED
Classes Resume
Last Day to Drop/Withdraw
Priority Registration Begins For Currently Enrolled
Public Registration
Last Day of Classes
Final Exams for Wednesday Evening Classes
Final Exams
Final Grades Due 4:30 p.m.
Graduation - Summit Arena
Summer I 2009
May 25(M)
May 26 (T)
May 26-27 (T - W)
June 19 (F)
June 29 (M)
June 30 (T)
July 2 (R)
July 3 (F)
Memorial Day - College Closed
Classes Begin
Last Days To Drop/Add Courses
Last Day to Withdraw
Last Day of Classes
Final Exams
Final Grades Due (Noon)
Independence Day observed (COLLEGE CLOSED)
Summer II 2009
July 6 (M)
July 6 - July 7 (M - T)
July 31 (F)
August 6 (R)
August 7 (F)
August 11 (T)
Classes Begin
Last Days to Drop/Add Courses
Last Day to Withdraw
Last Day of Classes
Final Exams
Final Grades Due (Noon)
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TELEPHONE NUMBERS WHEN YOU NEED INFORMATION
501-760-4222 OR 1-800-760-1825
ADMISSIONS
EXT. 4363
ADULT EDUCATION/GED
EXT. 4335
ASSESSMENT
EXT. 4321
BOOKSTORE
EXT. 4117
BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS/MAINTENANCE
EXT. 4197
BUSINESS OFFICE
EXT. 4125
BUSINESS/INFORMATION SCIENCES DIVISION
EXT. 4258
CAMPUS TOURS
EXT. 4364
CAREER PLANNING SERVICES
EXT. 4243
CHILD CARE
EXT. 4306
COMMUNICATIONS & ARTS DIVISION
EXT. 4148
COMMUNITY SERVICES/CONTINUING EDUCATION/
WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT
EXT. 4156
COMPUTER LAB
EXT. 4171
DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT
EXT. 4129
FINANCIAL AID
EXT. 4237
HEALTH SCIENCES DIVISION
EXT. 4269
INSTRUCTIONAL MATTERS
EXT. 4202
LEARNING ACCELERATION DIVISION
EXT. 4160
LIBRARY
EXT. 4110
MATHEMATICS/SCIENCES DIVISION
EXT. 4148
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NURSING DIVISION, RN
EXT. 4290
NURSING DIVISION, PN
EXT. 4269
NURSING SKILLS LAB
EXT. 4292
REFUNDS/BUSINESS OFFICE
EXT. 4125
REGISTRATION
EXT. 4232
SCHOLARSHIPS
EXT. 4275
SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION
EXT. 4258
STUDENT BILLING/BUSINESS OFFICE
EXT. 4125
STUDENT CENTER
EXT. 4131
STUDENT CONCERNS
EXT. 4203
STUDENT NURSE/IMMUNIZATION RECORDS
EXT. 4131
STUDENT SERVICES
EXT. 4232
TECHNICAL/PROFESSIONAL DIVISION
EXT. 4320
TESTING
EXT. 4231
TOURS
EXT. 4363
TRANSCRIPTS/ACADEMIC RECORDS
EXT. 4210
TUTORING LAB
EXT. 4228
VETERANS AFFAIRS
EXT. 4234
PRESIDENT’S OFFICE
PRESIDENT OF THE COLLEGE
EXT. 4200
ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT
EXT. 4204
VICE PRESIDENTS’ OFFICES
VICE PRESIDENT FOR FINANCE
EXT. 4215
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EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT
EXT. 4202
VICE PRESIDENT FOR STUDENT SERVICES
EXT. 4203
ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENTS
ASSOCIATE VP FOR HUMAN RESOURCES
EXT. 4313
ASSOCIATE VP FOR STUDENT SERVICES
EXT. 4364
ASSOCIATE VP FOR TECHNICAL EDUCATION
EXT. 4311
COLLEGE MISSION
National Park Community College
Our Mission:
Learning is our focus; student success is our goal.
Our Values:
Access - We assist students in achieving their individual educational goals by creating a learning community that is accessible, convenient, caring, affordable, and
secure.
Excellence - We strive for exemplary performance in all we do. Assessment of
student learning is a means of measuring our success.
Accountability - We are all accountable to ourselves and to one another in a
learning community. We expect all members to act responsibly, behave ethically,
and grow professionally.
Collaboration - We facilitate partnerships that enhance learning, solve problems,
promote economic development, and improve quality of life.
Mutual Respect and Support - We recognize the dignity and inherent worth of
all individuals. We create opportunities to explore diversity of ideas, individuals,
and cultures through open communication.
Our Vision:
We aspire to be the premier comprehensive community college in the state by
providing learning for life opportunities while offering exemplary service to our
community.
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Our Purpose:
As a comprehensive community college, NPCC offers a broad general education
curriculum and support services for all students as a basis for transfer, further
study, professional specialization, and personal enrichment.
Pre-college coursework to prepare students for academic success.
A variety of technical and professional programs to prepare students for career
experiences.
Continuing education and workforce training opportunities to meet community
needs and personal interests.
NATIONAL PARK COMMUNITY COLLEGE
National Park Community College emerged as a result of the blending
of Garland County Community College and Quapaw Technical Institute into a
comprehensive two-year institution by Act 678 of the 2003 Arkansas General
Assembly effective July 1, 2003. Nestled in the Ouachita Mountains, the college
is located in Mid-America Park, just outside the city limits of Hot Springs,
America’s oldest national park service site.
Previously, GCCC had been established as a two-year college in 1973 to
provide post secondary higher education opportunities to the citizens of Garland
County and the surrounding areas. QTI was first established Quapaw Vocational
Technical School, a branch campus of the Ouachita Vocational Technical School
at Malvern. The facility at the Hot Springs Branch opened in 1969, and Act 310
of 1973 stipulated that the Hot Springs branch of the school at Malvern be a
separate independent entity named Quapaw Vocational Technical School. As a
result of Act 1244 and Act 773 of 1991, the State Board of Vocational
Education changed the name to Quapaw Technical Institute, July 8, 1991.
Vocational technical schools throughout history have been designated to provide
job training for business and industry. As a Technical Institute, Quapaw was
committed to providing quality education and training to enhance the employ11
ment opportunities and increase the personal development of students.
Combined, NPCC forms a comprehensive institution offering associate degrees
and certificates as well as continuing education/ community services and workforce training.
The college is among the top 20 employers in the county providing a
significant economic impact to the community as well as providing services that
contribute to further economic development in the area. The college has approximately 379 employees including 210 full time and 169 part time. The college’s
operating budget is more than $12 million. The college’s payroll for last year was
$9.2 million.
NPCC averages approximately 3,000 credit students per semester
enrolled in college courses blending liberal arts with occupational education to
prepare students to enter the workforce or transfer to a four-year institution.
Over 3,818 students a year also enroll in a wide range of non-credit and continuing education services provided by the Community and Corporate Training
Division. These include customized workforce training for business and industry, on-site courses for the hospitality and tourism industry, on campus computer
classes, online classes, and various professional development workshops.
GENERAL INSTITUTIONAL POLICIES
ACCIDENTS
When an accident of any kind involving students or visitors occurs on campus, the
Health Services nurse and the Vice President for Student Services should be notified immediately.
In the case of accidents or other medical emergencies College personnel should
not, under any circumstances, make any statements causing those involved to
believe that the College will pay for necessary medical treatment.
AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT OF 1990
It is the intent of NPCC to work toward full compliance with the Americans with
Disabilities Act and to make their facilities accessible to students, staff and visitors
and to make the various instructional programs accessible to all people, or to provide reasonable accommodations according to the law. It is the policy of NPCC
that no individual shall be discriminated against on the basis of disability in the full
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and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, and advantages or
accommodations at the College.
COMPUTING AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS
National Park Community College’s computing and telecommunications networks, computing equipment and computing resources are owned by the College
and are provided primarily to support the academic and administrative functions
of the College. Federal and state laws, and College policies and procedures govern the use of these resources. Additional rules and regulations may be adopted
by various divisions/departments to meet specific administrative or academic
needs. Any adopted requirements must be in compliance with applicable federal
and state laws, and this policy.
To assure that everyone uses these facilities in an ethical and professional manner,
students must abide by the Student Computer/Network Acceptable Use policy. A
copy of this policy in its entirety is available via the college’s Web site, at the Help
Desk in the Computer Resource Center, and in the NPCC Student Handbook.
Any violation of this policy may result in the revocation or suspension of access
privileges by the Department of Computer Services with review by the appropriate academic or administrative authority.
DRUG-FREE CAMPUS
National Park Community College is committed to maintaining a drug-free campus environment for students and employees. The Board of Trustees opposes the
unlawful manufacture, distribution, possession or use of a controlled substance by
any employee or student.
The President or his designee shall direct a drug-free awareness program to inform
students and employees of the dangers of drug abuse, the availability of drug
counseling, rehabilitation, student and employee assistance programs, and the
penalties for drug abuse violations.
The College adheres to Public Law 101-226, as mandated by the United States
Department of Education.
(PL 101-226 is on file in the Office of the Vice President for Student Services).
FIRE
In the event of fire any person may sound the fire alarm. A student should notify the nearest faculty or staff member to ensure that the Piney Fire Department is
called promptly.
Staff members and students should know where fire extinguishers are located and
are asked to use them if possible.
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Everyone should evacuate the building and move to safety. The person reporting
the fire should remain available to give the location to the proper authority and
explain any necessary details.
LAB SAFETY
The health and safety of NPCC students is of primary concern whether on campus or attending high school sponsored activities. Policies, procedures, and guidelines pertaining to health and safety must be followed for the protection of all.
Students are required to adhere to all safety procedures and utilize safety and protective equipment in all lab settings. Eye protection will be worn while operating
machinery. Appropriate attire is required in shop areas.
In the event of an accident or minor medical requirements, first aid supplies are
available in each lab area, administration, student services and the student center.
These procedures will be followed:
1.
2.
3.
At the occurrence of an accident, the student will notify the instructor or
responsible staff member immediately;
For the safety of all, minor cuts or abrasions must be given proper medical
attention;
An accident report must be completed and turned in to the administration
office.
Safety instruction is included in all lab areas. Students are to observe all policies and
regulations pertaining to safety throughout the campus. If it is necessary to transport a student to a medical facility and an ambulance is not required, the student
will be taken by designated NPCC personnel.
REPORTING CRIMINAL VIOLATIONS
Upon receiving a signed allegation of a criminal violation, the President or a
designee will notify the proper law enforcement officials. Students, faculty, or staff
members wishing to report a criminal violation that they feel has occurred on the
NPCC campus or at a NPCC sponsored activity shall put the allegation in writing,
sign the statement, and present this statement to the Office of the President or a
designee should the President not be available.
SEVERE WEATHER
National Park Community College will continue to address inclement weather situations similarly to past practices and consistent with the Governor’s Policy
Directive and the NPCC Board policy. The general policy is that NPCC does not
close due to inclement weather if at all avoidable. However, the obligation to provide services to the citizens of the area must be balanced with the risk of danger
to students and employees.
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The President or the Vice President for Instruction will determine when the
inclement weather policy is implemented based on area weather conditions. Local
media, listed below, will be used to notify students and employees of policy implementation. The state policy provisions regarding late arrival and leave time will
apply to NPCC employees.
In the event of early morning severe inclement weather conditions in the NPCC
area, the President or Vice President for Instruction will determine whether to
place the inclement weather policy in effect and will publicly announce its implementation between 6:00 a.m. and 6:30 a.m. if possible. The decision to implement
the inclement weather policy for evening classes will be made by mid-afternoon
and announced between 3:00 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. if possible. Announcements
affecting Saturday classes will be made between 7:00 a.m. and 7:30 a.m. when possible. In an effort to inform students, staff, and faculty of any college closing due
to inclement weather, the following stations will be notified:
Radio
Hot Springs
Glenwood
Malvern
Television
Little Rock
KLAZ 105.9 FM and KXOW 1420 AM
KQUS 97.5 FM, KZNG 1340 AM, and
KYDL 96.7FM
KWXI 670 AM and KWXE 104.5 FM
KBOK 1310AM
KATV Channel 7
KTHV Channel 11
SEXUAL HARASSMENT
Sexual harassment of students is illegal in accordance with section 703 of Title VII
of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and/or Title IX of the Elementary/ Secondary Act
of 1972.
The College is committed to providing an environment of study and work free
from sexual harassment. Sexual harassment of students is prohibited in and out
of the classroom and in the evaluation of students’ academic performance.
Unwelcome sexual advances toward any student should be reported to the Vice
President for Student Services. Counselors, instructors, and any other employees
who know of such situations are instructed to help students get such complaints
to the Human Relations Coordinator, if assistance is needed. The student should
follow the procedural guidelines established in the NPCC Sexual Harassment
Policy.
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SEXUAL OFFENDER REGISTRATION
As of November 2002, anyone who wishes to inquire about a registered sex
offender in Garland County may come by the Vice President for Student Services’
office on the third floor of the Gerald Fisher Campus Center (Room 327) between
the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Your request will be reviewed, and if necessary referred to the appropriate agency.
SMOKE FREE TOBACCO FREE CAMPUS
Effective January 2 2008, National Park Community College shall be entirely
smoke free and tobacco free. The Smoke Free Tobacco Free Policy applies to all
National Park Community College facilities and vehicles, owned or leased, regardless of location. Smoking or tobacco use shall not be permitted on the NPCC
campus or any off-campus sites. The policy applies to all students, faculty, staff
and visitors. As with any NPCC policy, violation can result in dismissal.
STALKING
The State of Arkansas has established that stalking is a crime under Act 379, effective March 8, 1993, (available in the Vice President for Student Services’ Office).
The law against stalking encompasses such courses of conduct as harassment
(physical, written, telephone, telegraph, or any other form of written communication), terroristic threatening, following a person, insults, taunts, or challenging a
person in a manner likely to provoke a violent or disorderly response.
Violations of the law will be reported immediately to law enforcement agencies.
STUDENT ACCESS REQUEST
Requests for information and/or access to students must be made through the
Director of Counseling or the Associate Vice President of Student Services or the
Vice President of Student Services.
STUDENT RIGHT TO KNOW
A prospective or currently enrolled student has the right to request graduation or
completion rates of National Park Community College students as well as the
annual Campus Security Report. These documents are available in the Registrar’s
Office, located on the third floor of the Fisher Campus Center.
TITLE IX COMPLIANCE
Students, their parents, and employees of NPCC are hereby notified that the
College does not discriminate on the basis of sex in its educational activities and
employment practices. Any person having inquiries concerning NPCC compliance
with Title IX is directed to contact the Vice President for Student Services Office
on the third floor of the Gerald Fisher Campus Center or by telephoning (501)
760-4203.
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TOBACCO-FREE CAMPUS
Use of tobacco products, including smokeless tobacco, is prohibited in all buildings on the NPCC campus. Use of tobacco products is permitted outside NPCC
buildings unit January 2, 2008. The “Smoke Free Tobacco Free Campus policy will
then be in effect.
TORNADO ALERT
An alert will be given on campus to indicate that a tornado warning has been issued
for Garland County by the National Weather Bureau. In case of a tornado alert,
students and staff should take cover in a lower level corridor, basement area free
of glass exposure to the outside, or in spaces on the southwest side of a building
below ground level.
The following suggested areas of cover are recommended: Campus Center - first
floor in the Bookstore and student activity room; Math and Science Building lower level Art Department; Library - rest rooms; Liberal Arts Building - lower
level south side of the building; Faculty Offices - rest rooms; Health Sciences
Building - lower level, south side; Gymnasium - hallways, away from windows.
Computer Center - lower level, south side classrooms away from windows.
On the south side of the campus, follow the tornado instructions in each building.
All personnel should keep away from windows and, if possible, seek the protection of a table or desk. The greatest hazard of a tornado is flying glass and debris.
If a person is unable to secure the protection of a building and is caught outdoors,
a depression in the ground such as a gully, culvert, or deep ditch is better protection than nothing at all. Regardless, if caught outside during a storm, lie flat on
the ground to reduce the hazard of being hit by flying objects.
PHILOSOPHY FOR STUDENT EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES
The College’s philosophy is to provide educational opportunities for all constituents. However, the college recognizes that a balance between opportunity for
access and appropriate standards must be maintained.
The typical student population seeking admission to a community college presents
a wide range of aspirations, levels of motivation, and capabilities. In order to attain
the desired balance between access and quality standards, procedures are needed to
constructively address this diversity. Each student’s educational goals, previous academic experience, placement test scores, and life experiences will be evaluated and
serve as the basis for development of their educational plan. Some students seeking admission will be underprepared in certain subject areas and will require developmental courses prior to attempting college-level work. Thus, students may be
required to successfully complete prerequisites, pre-college courses and/or Adult
Education offerings before enrolling in some college level classes. Students under
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23 years of age who have not graduated from or who are not currently in high
school will be required to successfully complete the GED equivalency certificate
before being admitted to the college.
COLLEGE PREPAREDNESS PROGRAMS (PCL COURSES)
Pre-college courses of instruction in reading, writing, math and study skills are
designed to match a student’s ability through required assessment and placement
scores prior to registration. In accordance with state law, entering students are
directed into courses appropriate for addressing their academic needs and guiding
them toward college success. These courses do not count as credit courses toward
a degree program or a certificate, but do provide institutional course credit.
ADULT EDUCATION
The Adult Education assists adults to prepare for postsecondary education, successful careers, and productive lives. Instruction is conducted in an informal learning environment, with an emphasis on individual or small group instruction. Adult
Education activities include, but are not limited to the following:
General Adult Education (GAE)
This program is designed for persons who need to develop basic reading, writing,
or math skills. Topics may focus on skill development through the areas of science, social studies, and literature. Emphasis is on vocabulary development, comprehension improvement, dictionary skills, critical thinking, basic mathematical
computation procedures, and mathematical problem solving. The curriculum is
designed to enhance basic skills required for job advancement and to prepare students for further education.
GED Program
This program is designed for those persons who would like to earn their Arkansas
High School diploma through the General Educational Development program
(GED). Students must earn a passing score on the Official GED Practice Test
before they may take the Official GED Test. Instructional focus will be on the
topics that are included in the GED battery of five tests: language arts/writing,
language arts/reading, science, social studies, and mathematics.
There is no charge for adult education classes or GED testing.
Enrollment for 16 and 17 Year Old Students
Students who are sixteen (16) or seventeen (17) years old must make formal application to their school district for a waiver to enroll in the adult education program.
Once accepted by the adult education program, the sixteen or seventeen year old
student must stay in the program until successful completion of the GED
(Arkansas High School Diploma), the student’s eighteenth birthday, or the student’s return to the sending school district.
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The Adult Education program requires a minimum of twenty hours per week of
class attendance and instruction.
ADMISSIONS
National Park Community College is committed to providing quality educational
opportunities and has an open door policy of admission that works within state
regulations and guidelines. Admission to the college does not insure admittance to
a particular course or program of study. Some programs have special admission
requirements and/or enrollment limitations which are listed in the admissions
requirements for each program of study.
Students maintain the right to admission, re-admission and/or registration by
adherence to academic integrity, academic progress and program requirements as
outlined in the college catalog.
FIRST TIME ENTERING STUDENT
A student admitted as a degree-seeking student is one who has graduated from
high school or who has successfully completed the General Educational
Development Test (GED) and has never declared a major at another college or
university.
Requirements:
1. Complete an application for admission
2. Placement test scores (ASSET, COMPASS, ACT or SAT) are required
prior to registration.
3. Students born on or after January 1, 1957, must submit proof of two
measles (rubeola) and one German measles (rubella) rubella immunizations.
4. High school transcript or GED test scores.
1. Unconditional Admission Status
Under Act 1290 of 1997, high school graduates must have successfully completed the college preparatory core curriculum with
a cumulative grade-point average of 2.0 to be eligible for unconditional admission to the College.
2. Conditional Admission Status
Under Act 1290 of 1997, high school graduates who have completed the technical preparation core curriculum and students
with home school, unaccredited high school, or alternative school
diplomas shall be admitted conditionally.
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Students seeking admission under the conditional admission status and pursuing an Associate of Arts or Associate of Science
degrees must complete at least twelve (12) hours of the required
general education core and any necessary remedial courses with at
least a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 within the first 36
semester credit hours. Students seeking admission under the conditional admission status and pursuing an Associate of Applied
Science degree or technical certificate program must complete at
least six (6) hours of general education core academic courses and
six (6) hours of required technical courses, and any necessary
remedial courses with at least a cumulative grade point average of
2.0 within the first 36 semester hours.
Students 23 years of age or older who have not completed high
school or the GED equivalency program may be admitted conditionally to take courses. Upon successful completion of at least
twelve (12) hours of the required general education core, the student may petition for certificate or degree seeking status.
TRANSFER STUDENT STATUS
A student admitted as a “transfer” is one who has successfully completed six (6)
hours of college level courses at another regionally accredited college or university. Students previously enrolled in other postsecondary institutions must provide
evidence of good standing from those institutions. Transfer students who are not
eligible to return to their previous institution because of academic or disciplinary
reasons will not be considered for admission until they have been out of college
for at least one regular term (fall or spring) or are eligible to return to the previous
institution. A summer term does not fulfill this requirement. NPCC accepts transfer credit from any regionally accredited college or university. Applicability of
credit to specific degree programs is subject to the most current published policies
of the institution and the program, including but not limited to a minimum grade
of "C" on prerequisite courses and a limit on the age of some courses required by
occupational programs. In addition, a minimum of 18 semester credit hours of
any associate degree granted by National Park Community College must be completed at NPCC, regardless of transfer credits. Each additional associate degree
will require an additional 18 semester credit hours with the college. All degree
requirements must be met as well, and a cumulative NPCC grade point average of
2.00 or higher is required for graduation.
Credit earned at unaccredited institutions is not accepted in transfer; however, any
student applying for a particular occupational program may request that the credit be evaluated by the program director. Departmental exams, CLEP tests, and/or
20
course substitutions may be recommended by the evaluator as a method of expediting program completion.
Requirements:
1. Complete an application for admission
2.
Placement test scores (ASSET, COMPASS, ACT or SAT) are required prior
to registration or evidence of satisfactory completion of the pre-requisite(s)
for the course(s).
3.
Students born on or after January 1, 1957, must submit proof of measles,
mumps and rubella immunizations.
4.
Official academic transcripts from all previously attended colleges/universities attended sent directly to the Registrar’s Office prior to the registration
period. Transcripts must be received no later than 30 days after classes begin.
5.
High School transcript or GED test scores.
TRANSIENT TRANSFER STATUS
Students who are maintaining primary enrollment at another institution may enroll
for courses and transfer them back to their primary institution.
Requirements:
1. Complete an application for admission
2.
Placement test scores (ASSET, COMPASS, ACT or SAT) are required prior
to registration or evidence of satisfactory completion of the pre-requisite(s)
for the course(s).
Concurrent Enrollment Status
Students currently enrolled in a high school in grades 9 through 12 may enroll in
1000- 2000-level courses for dual credit (high school credit and college credit).
Requirements:
1. Complete an application for admission
2. Placement test scores (ASSET, COMPASS, ACT or SAT)
3. Current High School transcript
4. Recommendation from a high school counselor or principal
21
In compliance with the Arkansas Department of Higher Education guidelines and
a decision by the College Curriculum Committee, high school students are not eligible to register for any pre-college level courses (PCL) while they are still in high
school.
ARTICULATED HIGH SCHOOL COURSES AND PROGRAMS
Articulated courses provide high school students with an opportunity to work
toward a specific post-seconday educational goal while still in high school. The
benefits of enrolling in this program include: 1) Non-duplication of classes from
high school to post-secondary, 2) opportunity to enroll in a sequence of courses
that best prepares students for a career in their chosen field of interest, 3) gain
post-secondary credit while still in high school, and 4) more time at the post-secondary level for advanced skills courses. For more information about this program, contact the Associate Vice President for Technical Education..
TRANSFER OF CREDIT FROM A TECHNICAL SCHOOL/COLLEGE
College credit will be granted to students transferring credit from a technical
school provided that the school is accredited by The Higher Learning
Commission, a Commission of The North Central Association of Colleges and
Schools or a similar regional accrediting body. Credit earned from technical
schools that do not meet the above requirement will be considered on an individual basis.
SPECIAL STUDENT STATUS
An application is required but no other documents must be submitted unless a student desires to enroll in 6 hours or more of course work. ASSET placement tests
are required before enrolling in any mathematics, English, or reading course.
Students with Special Student Status are not eligible for financial aid. The following are eligible for Special Student Status:
A.
Adults who have previously completed a college degree and do not wish to
pursue a degree at NPCC.
B.
Persons who wish to enroll for personal enrichment or skills improvement
provided there is no conflict with other college admission guidelines.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT STATUS
The College welcomes students who are citizens of other nations and who are able
to meet certain requirements. This school is authorized under Federal law to enroll
nonimmigrant students, as covered in Section 8, CFR 214.3. Requirements of
issuance of an I-20 AB include:
1.
An application for admissions made eight weeks in advance of the start of
the semester.
22
2.
Authenticated copies of academic records with English translations must
include course of study, number of years spent in school, grades earned and
subject matter covered.
3.
International applicants must present evidence of proficiency in the English
language in one of the following ways:
(a) For unconditional admittance - Submit official documentation
of TOEFL test scores of 500 or higher (paper based) or 173
or higher (computer based), or 61 or higher (internet based).
4.
Applicants must present a certified statement from their sponsor and/or
their sponsor’s banker indicating they have sufficient funds to cover all
expenses the student may incur while attending NPCC including tuition, fees,
books, room and board, travel and miscellaneous personal expenses.
5.
Healthcare costs in the U.S. are very high, and the College cannot assume
financial responsibility for its students. International students will be
required to provide adequate health insurance while attending National Park
Community College.
6.
International applicants should be aware that NPCC has no residential campus housing.
Programs with Selective Admission
Specific requirements for each of the following programs are detailed in the
“Academic Programs” section of this catalog.
1.
2.
3.
Health Sciences
Emergency Medical Services and Paramedic Program
Nursing Programs: Associate (RN) and Certificate (PN)
WAGE
Workforce Alliance for Growth in the Economy is a program designed to benefit
the employer and potential employees by teaching basic skills necessary to meet the
community’s workforce needs.
Students in the WAGE program may earn three continuing education certificates:
Industrial, Clerical, or Employability. Through WAGE, participants master the
basic skills necessary for reading, writing, computation, problem solving, and communications. Instruction is customized to local business and industry needs.
Employers offer job applicants added consideration if they have earned a WAGE
certificate when qualifications between applicants are otherwise equal. Employers
23
also use the WAGE program for existing workers to gain skills required for high
performance work standards and technical training.
NON-CREDIT COURSES
Adult and continuing education non-credit courses are open to all members of the
community who can benefit from instruction. The described methods of admissions and acceptance do not apply to those who wish to enroll in non-credit and
continuing education classes for personal enrichment.
ADVISEMENT AND ENROLLMENT
ADVISING AS PART OF THE ENROLLMENT PROCESS
NPCC advisors take a special interest in students and their future educational goals
by guiding them in planning their course of study (degree checks), preparing them
for graduation, considering their transfer options and providing them with job
search information. During initial enrollment or at orientation, students will
become acquainted with the academic advisors. To ensure success at NPCC, an
advisor will meet with students throughout the semester. Students must consult
with an advisor before or during each enrollment period and at any time when
decisions concerning registration (including adding, dropping and withdrawing
from classes) are made. The advisors have been selected because they care about
students’ well-being. They can be a key resource person to be contacted on a regular basis to ensure students are on the right track to be successful at NPCC. The
Counseling/Advising office is located on the second floor of the Gerald Fisher
Campus Center and in the Ish Stivers Building.
FIRST-TIME STUDENTS
1. Comply with Assessment Testing and Placement Requirements established
for the following: 1) all first-time, full-time entering freshman, or 2) any student wishing to take mathematics, English, or reading-intensive courses.
2.
Schedule first semester classes with the assistance of an Academic
Counselor, located on the second floor of the Gerald Fisher Campus Center
or in the Ish Stivers Building.
3.
Participate in Freshman Orientation. The purpose of Freshman Orientation
is to help you get off to a good academic start and begin to make new friends.
Both of these goals foster educational and personal growth.
COURSE PLACEMENT FOR FIRST-TIME STUDENTS
The Arkansas State Legislature established (in Section 19 of Act 1052, 1997) a testing and evaluation program for all degree-seeking students in the state. The
24
Arkansas Department of Higher Education followed established guidelines and
issued cutoff scores for student placement in college-level or preparatory-level
courses in mathematics, English composition, and reading skills. Approved tests
include: the American College Test (ACT), the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT), the
Assessment of Skill for Successful Entry and Transfer (ASSET), and The
Computerized Adaptive, Placement, Assessment Support System (COMPASS).
The student is responsible for submitting these test scores. Any score(s) over three
years old cannot be accepted.
New students who do not have one of these test scores at the time of application
and/or enrollment will be required to take the ASSET or COMPASS evaluation.
Students who do not meet the minimum scores for placement into college-level
coursework may be admitted to NPCC on the contingency that they enroll in and
successfully complete the necessary remedial courses(s) prior to advancing to the
next course level.
Students taking pre-college level courses must receive a final grade of “C” or better to advance to the next course level. Pre-college level courses will not transfer
to another institution for college credit. Students are encouraged to read the academic section on pre-college level courses for additional
information. Any student whose placement test scores require registration in two
or more pre-college level courses must also complete College Study Skills I in the
same semester. First-time, full-time students who are required to take one or more
pre-college level course(s) are limited to a maximum of four courses and Freshman
Orientation. National Park Community College Singers may register for an additional credit in music. Students who earn a “D” or “F” as a final grade in any precollege level course must repeat the course and may not advance to the next level
through additional COMPASS testing.
TRANSFER STUDENTS
1.
Students transferring to NPCC are not required to submit test scores for
placement if they have successfully completed, as documented on an official
transcript, a college-level course in English composition and a college-level
mathematics course. The College requires an official transcript prior to
enrollment in college-level mathematics and English composition.
2.
Schedule classes with the assistance of an Academic Advisor, located on the
second floor of the Gerald Fisher Campus Center and in the Ish Stiver’s
Building.
25
TRANSFER STUDENT GUIDELINES
Entering transfer students must have a cumulative grade point average which falls
within NPCC’s guidelines for good academic standing. Students on academic suspension from another institution will be eligible for admission only after having
remained out of school for one semester or upon being eligible to return to the
institution previously attended.
Transfer credit will only be evaluated and added to a permanent record for those
students who have completed course work as a degree-seeking candidate at NPCC.
Grades earned in transfer courses are not considered in calculating student grade
point averages at NPCC.
CREDIT FOR PREVIOUS TRAINING OR EXPERIENCE
Persons with previous training or experience in their vocational objective may be
granted advanced status if approved by the Registrar. The student must furnish
evidence, request evaluation, and may be required to take proficiency examinations
in order to receive this credit. The Financial Aid and Veterans Affairs Office are
notified of previous credit, when applicable.
CREDIT FOR MILITARY EXPERIENCE
Credit awarded for military experience is based on the American Council of
Education’s (ACE) recommendation for the Veteran’s Military Occupational
Specialty (MOS) code found in the current Guide to the Evaluation of Educational
Experiences in the Armed Services. The discharge/transfer form DD-214 is
required. After completion of a course at NPCC, the ACE-recommended credits
for the veteran’s MOS code will be placed on the student’s NPCC transcript as general elective credits.
Any additional educational courses taken while in the military will be evaluated and
awarded credit as per NPCC’s general procedures for acceptance of transfer credit.
RETURNING STUDENT ENROLLMENT
Enrollment for the spring semester begins mid-November and for the fall and
summer semesters in April. It is very important to set up an appointment with an
advisor as early as possible. If a student waits until the last minute to enroll, they
may not get the course or section desired. At the time of enrollment, an advisor
will also update career plans, transfer or employment options, as well as current
information such as name, address, and telephone number.
26
EVENING AND LATE REGISTRATION
The College provides evening registration opportunities for the convenience of
students who find these class times better suited to their schedule.
A complete list of classes to be offered prior to each semester is available in
Student Services. A class schedule will be mailed to you upon request. Please contact the Counseling Center for registration dates and procedures.
Enrollment is not complete until all required admission credentials are received
and approved, and no credit will be given to any student who does not enroll during the proper registration periods.
STUDENT COST AND BILLING INFORMATION
RESIDENCY DETERMINATION FOR BILLING PURPOSES
For the purpose of assessing tuition payment based on legal residency, students are
identified as in-district, out-of-district, or out-of-state. Residency is determined by
Arkansas Law as follows:
In-district - A student must have lived in Garland County for six consecutive months prior to the beginning of any semester (fall, spring or summer) for reasons other than attending college to be classified as an in-district resident.
Out-of-district - A student who lives in Arkansas, but has not lived in
Garland County for six consecutive months before entering college is designated as an out-of-district resident.
Out-of-state - An out-of-state resident is defined as a person who has not
lived in Arkansas the previous six months.
International - A student originates from another country and is here on
an approved student visa.
Classification for residency purposes is made at the time of admission. In determining residency, the following applies:
1.
2.
Classifications may change if a student relocates and files a formal change of
address notification with the Registrar’s Office on the third floor of the
Gerald Fisher Campus Center.
The residency identified by anyone under 21 years of age is that of his/her
parents or guardian unless the student is married or has established a separate legal residence.
27
3.
4.
When enrolling, the student is responsible for indicating the proper residence
classification for tuition and fee costs. If there is a question, the student
should consult with the Registrar’s Office before registration.
Contact the Registrar’s Office for a list of documents required to prove residency and/or for information on special conditions as they pertain to residency.
AFFORDABLE COSTS AND DUE DATE FOR PAYMENT
Tuition and fees are payable in full at the time of registration or an on-line payment plan must be set up by connecting to the FACTS e-cashier Website through
www.npcc.edu. Recipients of scholarships or grants should verify with the
Financial Aid Office that their file is complete and adequate funds are available
prior to registration.
National Park Community College Returned Check Policy
In accordance with the Arkansas Hot Check Law, the NPCC Business
Office is authorized to assess a collection fee of $25.00 for each item
returned.
TUITION AND FEES*
2007-2008
Semester Costs
Garland
County
Out-ofCounty
Out-ofState
International
Per Semester Credit Hour
$ 56
$ 66
$130
$194
Registration Fee
30
30
30
30
Maximum Cost Per Semester,
1008
1188
2340
3492
(excluding fees)
Technology fee - $3 per credit hour to a maximum of $45 each semester.
Telecourse capitation fee - $20 per course
Lab fees listed with each class
* Tuition rates are set by National Park Community College Board of Trustees and are subject to
change.
Notification: Effective November 1, 2006, if a check is returned by the bank,
the Business Office sends written notification within three (3) working days to
the check address or the student’s permanent address. The notice contains complete information on the check and service charge, total balance due, accepted
forms of payment, the payment deadline, and contact information.
Payment: Payment for returned checks and service charges are received at the
Business Office window. Cash, cashier’s checks, and money orders are the accepted forms of payment. Returned checks that are left unpaid after 10 days are subject to the Arkansas Hot Check Law and turned over to the Garland County
28
Prosecuting Attorney’s Office for collection. Once a check is turned over, payment must be made at the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office.
*Financial Holds Unpaid returned checks will result in a transcript and/or diploma hold until the total balance due (returned check and hot check fee) is paid.
HOW COURSE WITHDRAWAL AFFECTS FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID
Withdrawal from classes prior to completion of 60 percent of the semester or
dropping credit hours below full time (twelve credit hours) may result in the student becoming liable to the U. S. Department of Education or NPCC for repayment of Title IV funds.
In cases where the student drops courses and has already received full payment of
financial aid awards from federal sources, the student must repay any cash disbursement which is determined by the college to be an overpayment.
SPECIAL FEES
Some courses have special fees and these must be paid in full during registration.
Fees for supplies and materials may be an additional cost for courses such as science laboratories or specialized art courses, such as pottery or photography. Other
courses, such as music classes, which require individual instruction, also have fees.
Any special fees are indicated on the official class schedule of courses.
TRANSCRIPT HOLDS
Transcripts will not be issued for students who fail to meet or make arrangements
to fulfill financial obligations. (See the section on Withdrawing in Academic
Information.)
TUITION REFUNDS AND HOW ADDING/DROPPING COURSES AFFECTS YOUR
COSTS TUITION WAIVER POLICY
REFUNDS
No refunds of student tuition/fees will be made unless a student OFFICIALLY
withdraws from classes. Stopping class attendance or failure to attend classes does
not constitute an official drop/withdrawal. ALL refunds are calculated from the
start date of the semester, not the start date of the class, and are based on week
days excluding holidays—not class days.
Refund Schedule Fall or Spring:
1.
Prior to First Day of Semester: 100% of tuition and all fees, excluding registration fee
29
2.
3.
4.
Days One to Five of Semester: 100% of tuition and technology fees only
Days Six to Ten of Semester: 50% of tuition and technology fees only
No refunds after day ten of the semester
Exceptional circumstances by which a refund may be calculated after the refund
period are limited to: death of a student, death of immediate family member with
documentation, unanticipated serious illness of the student with documentation,
or institutional error.
Refund Schedule Summer I or Summer II:
1. Prior to First Day of Semester: 100% of tuition and all fees, excluding registration fee
2. Days One and Two of Semester: 100% of tuition and technology fees only
3. Days Three and Four of Semester: 50% of tuition and technology fees only
4. No refunds after day four of the semester
Persons 60 years of age and older may take college courses tuition-free when
enrolling for credit. The registration fee and any lab fees will be paid by the student.
Families of Policemen and Firemen who suffered fatal injuries or became
permanently and totally disabled due to performance of a hazardous duty,
may attend college credit courses tuition free. Contact the Financial Aid
Office for more information.
Public school faculty and staff who live within commuting distance of the
College may have tuition and fees waived for one course per semester,
excluding the registration fee.
NELNET PAYMENT PLAN
Connect to the Nelnet e-cashier Web site through www.npcc.edu. Sign up for our
interest free payment plan allowing students to make monthly or full payments of
tuition and fees.
Financial Assistance
AVAILABILITY OF FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
NPCC is committed to providing access to higher education programs to all students who qualify. The cost of attending NPCC depends on students’ residency,
program of study and other factors. Financial assistance may help students with
tuition, books, fees, and in some cases uniforms. The following table of estimat-
30
ed costs for tuition, books, supplies, and fees should serve as a suggested guide for
calculating college expenses.
* These expenses are estimated and may be subject to change based on national
averages.
** Costs are estimated for a full-time student, attending both Fall and Spring
Semester. The Tuition is calculated at the maximum amount charged to a student
enrolled full-time which is 12 or more hours.
NOTE: Tuition rates are subject to change.
Academic Year
2007-2008
Garland
County
Resident
Tuition
Out-Of
County
Resident
Out- Of State International
Resident
$2016
$2376
$4680
$6984
Registration Fee
60
60
60
60
Technology Fee
90
90
90
90
*Books and General
Supplies
800
800
800
800
**Estimated Totals
2007-2008
$2966
$3326
$5630
$7934
STUDENT FINANCIAL AID
The bulk of assistance available to students in financial aid is provided by the
U. S. Department of Education. The Federal Financial Aid programs offered
through NPCC include Federal Pell Grants, Federal Supplemental Educational
Opportunity Grants, Federal Work Study, and Stafford Federal Loans. The College
also has financial aid programs available through the state of Arkansas, the institution, local agencies and transfer institutions. NPCC’s Financial Aid Office will
make every effort to meet the college related costs of each qualified student based
on eligibility criteria, satisfactory academic progress, and availability of funds.
TYPES OF FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS
The Pell Grant is a federal program designed to provide financial assistance to
those who demonstrate a need for such funds. Pell grants are intended to be the
“floor” of a financial aid package and may be combined with other forms of aid
in order to meet the costs of education. The amount of Pell Grant awarded is
determined on the basis of the resources of the student, as well as that of the student’s family. Student eligibility depends on several important criteria:
*
*
*
Student must be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen.
Student must be registered with Selective Service (if required).
Student must be attending at least half time (6 hours).
31
*
*
*
*
*
*
Student must have a high school diploma, GED or meet other standards
indicating ability to benefit.
Student must have a social security number.
Student must be working toward a degree or certificate.
Student must be making satisfactory academic progress.
Student cannot owe a refund on a Federal grant or be in default on a Federal
educational loan.
Student must have financial need, as determined by the results of your Free
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
TYPES OF FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID PROGRAMS
FEDERAL PELL GRANT
This is a Federal grant based on a family’s financial situation. PELL awards may be
received by undergraduate students who have not received a bachelor’s degree at
the time of application. Applications for this award must be made for each academic year by filing a Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Generally, students
are required to be enrolled at least half-time.
FEDERAL SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANT (FSEOG)
A Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) is for undergraduates with exceptional financial need, that is, students with the lowest
Expected Family Contributions (EFCs) who are also Federal Pell Grant Recipients.
FSEOG is awarded to eligible students on a first come, first served basis.
FEDERAL STAFFORD LOAN PROGRAM
The Stafford Loan Program is available to students in a subsidized or unsubsidized
version. The subsidized Stafford is need-based and interest on the loan is paid by
the Federal government while the student is either in school or has deferment status. The unsubsidized Stafford is available to any student regardless of need, but
the interest on this loan is payable by the student from the date of loan disbursement. PELL eligibility must be determined prior to loan eligibility, and applicants
must meet the application criteria of the lender.
FEDERAL PLUS LOAN PROGRAM
The PLUS Loan Program makes loans available to parents of dependent undergraduate students. Borrowers are not required to show need but the amount borrowed cannot exceed the cost of education minus other aid. A borrower is
required to repay the lender the full amount borrowed plus interest with the first
32
payment due within 60 days of the date of disbursement. The student should
apply for need-based aid prior to application for the PLUS Loan to be sure the loan
could not be replaced with other forms of aid.
FEDERAL WORK-STUDY PROGRAM
This program is designed for students who have additional need which cannot be
met by other financial sources. Eligibility is determined by financial need, class
schedule, and academic progress.
The College arranges jobs on campus according to availability of funds. Students
may be employed a variable number of hours per week while classes are in session
and may earn up to the maximum amount of need when combined with other
financial resources. Working hours should not conflict with class schedules. Workstudy students must complete W-4 and I-9 forms in the Office of Human
Resources and related paperwork with the Office of Financial Aid.
WHEN TO APPLY FOR FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID
Priority is given to students who apply for financial aid on a first-come firstserved basis and according to available funds. Students may apply at any time during the academic year for the PELL Grant. However, the student should allow at
least four weeks for complete processing of the application. Students wishing to
charge tuition and books to the PELL Grant should sign an award letter prior to
the last date to pay or be dropped from classes.
Many other programs and scholarships have different deadlines. Check with the
Office of Financial Aid for exact dates.
PROCESS FOR APPLYING FOR FEDERAL FINANCIAL AID
Obtain a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) from your high school
counselor or from the Financial Aid Office at NPCC. Complete and mail in the
application in the envelope provided or process the application via the internet at
www.fafsa.ed.gov
Approximately four weeks after mailing the application, you will receive the results
in the form of a Student Aid Report (SAR). If you submit the application via the
internet, you will receive a SAR in approximately two weeks.
Financial Aid personnel at NPCC will work with you through correspondence
and/or individual counseling to complete your financial aid file. Your financial aid
file must be complete with all necessary documentation prior to receiving your
financial aid award.
33
PROCESS FOR APPLYING FOR FEDERAL OR INSTITUTIONAL WORK STUDY
Applications for all work-study positions are available in the Financial Aid office.
Each department within the institution is responsible for hiring their own student
workers. Therefore, students interested in work-study positions should actively
seek out and contact the various college departments.
Financial need, class schedule and academic progress is the criteria considered by
college departments when employing work-study students.
PROCESS FOR APPLYING
PLUS LOANS)
FOR
STUDENT LOANS (FEDERAL STAFFORD
AND/OR
Students interested in applying for a student loan must first complete a Free
Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). This application is available
through the Financial Aid Office at NPCC or through your high school counselor.
After the Student’s Financial Aid file is complete, the student’s eligibility for a student loan can be determined.
Once the loan eligibility has been determined, the student must:
1. Complete entrance loan counseling via the internet at
www.mapping-your-future.org.
2. Complete a loan application.
If approved, the application will be submitted for processing by the Financial Aid
Office. All student loans will be disbursed in two checks. Each check will have the
Origination Fee and the Guarantee Fee deducted automatically by the lender.
The student will receive a Disclosure Statement in the mail from the lender. This
statement reflects the loan disbursement schedule and the statistics regarding the
loan. The lender will electronically forward the funds to the College by the disbursement date.
Students who have never received a student loan before through a college are considered to be “first-time borrowers” and must wait thirty (30) days after the start
of classes to receive their first loan disbursement. Students who have had a loan
at NPCC previously may pick up their loan checks after the eleventh (11th) class
day. Absolutely no loans will be disbursed prior to the end of the waiting periods
or prior to classes starting.
34
Students who receive a student loan must maintain satisfactory academic progress
and a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 to continue to be eligible to receive the
loan funds.
FINANCIAL AID AND THE PAYMENT OF TUITION, FEES, AND BOOKS
Financial aid will be applied toward the enrollment costs of tuition, fees, books
and academically related expenses first. Any remaining funds will be refunded. If
the amount of the financial aid awarded is not enough to cover the enrollment
costs, you are responsible for payment of the balance of your account. You will
be responsible for payment of the balance on your account if you do not receive
official written notification by NPCC’s Financial Aid Office awarding your financial aid. Financial assistance may still be awarded after your tuition, fees, and books
have been paid and reimbursement obtained.
FINANCIAL AID VERIFICATION POLICY
The Financial Aid Verification Policy is kept in the Financial Aid Policies and
Procedures handbook located in the Director of Financial Aid’s Office.
Satisfactory Academic Progress and Conditions for Reinstatement of
Financial Aid
Students who have applied for federal financial aid funds are required to make satisfactory academic progress. If a student does not meet the SAP policy,
he/she must attend one or more semesters without financial aid until the
required standard is met. Students are considered to be making SAP if they
meet the following criteria:
1.
Degree seeking: The student must be admitted and enrolled in a degree or
certificate program.
2.
Credit hours: Student must be enrolled in a minimum of six (6) credit hours
per semester (or a summer) for most aid programs. Full-time enrollment is
required for some aid programs. A student’s official enrollment status will be
determined on the 11th day of enrollment each semester. However, financial aid disbursement will be based on enrollment status at the date financial
aid locks hours (two weeks prior to Pell check dates).
3.
GPA requirement: Progress each term according to the following grade
scale:
Hours attempted:
1 - 30
31 - 45
46 - 100
Minimum Cumulative GPA 1.50
1.75
2.00
35
4.
Maximum credit hours: The student must complete requirements for a
degree at this school within a maximum of 150% of the published length of
the degree as follows:
Nursing, Radiology & Electronics Degrees
Associate Degrees
LPN Degrees
Certificates
115 credit hours
100 credit hours
85 credit hours
50 credit hours
NONTRANSFER STUDENTS
W’s, I’s, and grades of audit are included in cumulative attempted credit hours.
Maximum hours apply whether or not the student was receiving financial aid at the
time credits were being attempted. Students may receive aid for developmental
courses up to a maximum of 30 attempted credit hours, which will not count
toward the maximum attempted hours. Any developmental course can only be
excluded twice from total attempted hours. A student will not receive financial aid
for any class taken at NPCC more than twice, whether or not financial aid was
received for the first two attempts at the course.
TRANSFER STUDENTS
For financial aid purposes, all hours attempted at all institutions previously attended count for the maximum hour limit whether or not aid was received. Students
who transfer or change majors must also adhere to the maximum hour standard.
Academic transcripts are required from all institutions previously attended regardless of the time span. No penalties will be assessed for withdrawal semester or
drops below eligibility due to low cumulative grade point averages on academic
transcripts from previous institutions.
1.
Withdrawals: The student must maintain and complete the semester with the
following number of credit hours:
Financial Aid Lock Hours
12 or more
6 - 11
less than 6
2.
Must Complete
9
6
all
Probation: Students are allowed to drop below eligibility due to withdrawals
or drops below required cumulative GPA one time only in their careers without penalty. Subsequent drops below eligibility require completion of a minimum of six credit hours without federal financial aid.
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3.
Attendance: The student must attend all classes as required in each instructor’s syllabus. Students who are reported as non-attending may be administratively withdrawn from classes. Students reported as having excessive
absences on the grade roster will be notified by letter of the possible ramifications these absences will have on their future financial aid. Only charges
will be covered by Title IV aid and a refund check will not be issued for the
class(es) in which a student has not resolved documented excessive absences.
Students dropped from federal aid eligibility must request reinstatement after
the SAP standard is reached. Students who do not maintain SAP and who
are denied aid may file an appeal with the Financial Aid Office if extenuating
circumstances exist.
This policy is distributed with the Award Letter to every student receiving
federal financial aid.
INSTITUTIONAL AND FINANCIAL AID REFUND POLICY
In addition to the Institutional Refund Policy, Title IV recipients may also be subject to a return to Title IV calculation as noted under “How Course Withdrawal
Affects Financial Aid.” The Institutional refund policy is also located in the
Registration and Enrollment section of this catalog.
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NATIONAL PARK COMMUNITY COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS
AM E R I C A N IN D I A N SC H O L A R S H I P S
Students of American Indian descent may apply for this scholarship which
includes tuition, fees, books, and a stipend. In addition to having Indian heritage,
the student must be a recognized member of an Indian tribe and be able to prove
tribal membership. The student must be an Arkansas resident, and unemployed,
underemployed, or economically disadvantaged. The student must maintain high
attendance standards in order to continue to receive this award.
For additional information, please contact the American Indian Center, 1100
North University, Suite 133, Little Rock, AR 72207-6344, or call 1-800-441-4513.
ARKANSAS DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION WORKFORCE IMPROVEMENT
GRANT PROGRAM
Awarded to students who are at least 24 years old, an Arkansas resident and a US
citizen. Students must be enrolled in a minimum of 3 credit hours, be a degree
seeking student and meet satisfactory academic progress requirements. The
amount of the grant will not exceed $1,000 per semester ($2,000) per year and will
be reduced by the amount of Pell received.
ART SCHOLARSHIPS
Sophomore graphic art majors may apply for the Scott Graphic Arts Scholarship.
The amount of the award varies. The selection is based upon a portfolio of recent
work (at least 6 pieces) any medium(s). The student must enroll full time and complete, as an art major, a minimum of two art courses per semester, and maintain at
least a “C” (2.0) average in all classes.
DAVIS MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
This is a foundation scholarship set up in the memory of Melvin and Phyllis Davis.
Preferably, applicants should be a first generation college student who is ineligible
for any other aid. Interested students should apply the month of May. Scholarship
pays in county tuition for one semester, and may be renewable at donor’s discretion for the following spring semester.
DISCRETIONARY SCHOLARSHIP
Must be an Arkansas resident, must enroll in 12 credit hours with a minimum of
9 hours in college level courses, eligible if receiving less than full tuition, fees, and
books in aid or scholarships at the time of application, students who are receiving
loans and federal work study funds are eligible to receive this scholarship, recipient
must meet required cumulative GPA per Satisfactory Academic Progress policy,
maximum 150 credit hours attempted, recipient must have a GED or High School
Diploma, amount of scholarship is tuition (in or out of county), renewable for one
39
additional semester if student completes at least 12 credit hours with cumulative
2.75 GPA.
DIVISIONAL SCHOLARSHIP
Any National Park Community College full-time continuing student may apply for
a Divisional Scholarship. Each division selects recipients from the Divisional
Scholarship Applicants. The scholarship consists of a full tuition waiver.
Applications must be resubmitted each semester to the division.
FIRST CLASS SCHOLARSHIP
Must be an Arkansas resident, must be 20 years or older, must enroll in a least 3
credit hours, eligible if receiving less than tuition in aid or scholarships at the time
of application, students who are receiving loans and federal work study funds are
eligible to receive this scholarship, recipient must not have been enrolled in an
institution of higher education in the previous year, amount of scholarship is
tuition for one class (in or out of county), maximum 3 credit hours, scholarship is
not renewable.
FRED’S SECOND OPPORTUNITY GRANT
Several factors will be considered in the selection of recipients. These are, including but not limited to, previous education, need, desire, minimum age of 21, and
the number of dependents. This scholarship is not transferable and has no cash
value. Award is a tuition waiver for the fall and spring semesters. For more information, contact the Assistant Director of Admissions and Scholarships.
GENERAL EDUCATION DIPLOMA (GED) SCHOLARSHIP
1. Complete NPCC Scholarship Application
2. Receive GED from NPCC Adult Education Program.
3. Complete 15 hours of instruction in NPCC Adult Education Program.
4. Have letter from NPCC Adult Education Director verifying completed
requirements.
5. Enroll within one year of receiving GED.
6. Enroll full time (12 credit hours for fall and/or spring term) (6 credit hours
for summer term) and complete 12 credit hours for fall and/or spring term
and complete 6 credit hours for summer term.
7. Maintain 2.5 GPA.
This scholarship is for up to 50% tuition waiver only. Students are eligible if
receiving less than full amount of tuition in other aid and/or scholarship.
Scholarship is available until the funds are depleted.
HONOR SCHOLARSHIPS
High school seniors who plan to attend National Park Community College may
apply for an honor scholarship for tuition. Students selected to receive an Honor
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Scholarship must meet two of three criteria to be eligible. The criteria are as follows: have a 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale, rank in the top 25% or be one of the top five
students of their high school class, or have scored a minimum 22 composite on the
ACT. Students not meeting this criteria will not be considered.
The Honor Scholarship is renewable for three semesters if the student maintains
a minimum of 12 semester hours and earns a 3.0 GPA each semester and is making satisfactory progress toward fulfilling the requirements for a degree.
HOVEY HENDERSON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
A full tuition scholarship is awarded each year to a deserving sophomore student.
Contact the Assistant Director of Admissions and Scholarships.
LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS’ DEPENDENTS SCHOLARSHIP
The Law Enforcement Officers’ Dependents Scholarship Program provides an
eight (8) semester scholarship at any state-supported college or university in
Arkansas to spouses/children of any Arkansas law enforcement officer or fulltime or volunteer fireman who suffered fatal injuries or wounds or became permanently and totally disabled due to performance of a hazardous duty. The scholarship will pay tuition and fees but does not cover the cost of books, food, school
supplies and materials, or fees for extracurricular activities. Contact the Admissions
& Scholarship Coordinator’s Office or the Arkansas Department of Higher
Education for further information.
MISSING IN ACTION/KILLED IN ACTION (MIA/KIA) DEPENDENTS’ SCHOLARSHIP
The MIA/KIA Dependents’ Scholarship Program created by Act 759 of 1989
provides free tuition and fees at any state-supported institution of higher education for the dependents of Arkansas citizens who were prisoners of war, missing
in action, or killed on ordnance delivery during active military service after January
1, 1960. The scholarship is provided for undergraduate students seeking a bachelor’s degree or certificate of completion. The scholarship will pay the cost of
tuition at the in-state rate and fees. Contact the Assistant Director of Admissions
and Scholarships or the Arkansas Department of Higher Education for further
information.
NATIONAL PARK COMMUNITY COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMS
For more information or an application for any NPCC scholarship, contact the
Assistant Director of Admissions and Scholarships.
NATIONAL PARK COMMUNITY COLLEGE SINGERS SCHOLARSHIPS
Any high school senior or NPCC student may apply for a Choral Scholarship. The
student must demonstrate vocal talent and maintain the minimum grade point
requirement.
41
NATIONAL PARK TECHNOLOGY SCHOLARSHIP
Students who have completed a minimum of two years in the same secondary program are eligible for up to a 50% reduction in tuition if they enroll within one year
of receiving their high school diploma. Students are eligible if they are receiving
an amount less than the cost of full tuition, fees and books or other aid.
NURSING SCHOLARSHIPS
The Nursing Division offers additional scholarships to nursing students. In order
to qualify for any of these scholarships, applicants must present a completed application to the Student Affairs Committee in the Division of Nursing. The Nursing
Scholarships usually include: the Fawnda Broach R.N. Memorial Scholarship, the
Geraldine Zachary Memorial Scholarship, Garland County Medical Alliance
Scholarship, PEO Chapter BJ Scholarship, Women’s Welcome Club Scholarship,
Charlotte Phelps Nursing Scholarship, Jackson Scholarship, Women of the First
Presbyterian Church Scholarship, and Ellis Scholarship - Nursing Division,
PART TIME SCHOLARSHIPS
Must be an Arkansas resident, must enroll in 6-11 credit hours (at least 3 hours college level courses), eligible if receiving less than tuition, fees, and books in other
aid or scholarships at the time of application, students who are receiving loans and
federal work study funds are eligible to receive this scholarship, recipient must meet
required cumulative GPA per Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy, maximum
150 credit hours attempted, recipient must have a GED or High School Diploma,
renewable if student completes at least six credit hours with cumulative 3.0 GPA,
and is working toward first associate degree, amount of scholarship is $200 to be
awarded to the first qualifying applicants until allotted funds are disbursed.
SINGLE PARENT SCHOLARSHIPS
County Single Parent Scholarship Funds provide scholarships to single students in
Arkansas who are income eligible and who have custody of children under 18.
Students can apply for the scholarships through the Arkansas Scholarship
Information Service (ASIS) Web site [http//www.scholarships-ar-us.org], or the
resident county contact. Scholarships can be used for education related expenses
including childcare and transportation.
THE RAMBOW MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP
This is a foundation scholarship set up in the memory of Jan and Phil Rambow.
Preferably, applicants should be a first generation college student who is ineligible
for any other aid. Interested students should apply the month of May. Scholarship
pays one-half of in county tuition for one semester, and may be renewable at
donor’s discretion for the following spring semester.
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TRANSFER SCHOLARSHIPS
A student who plans to transfer to a four-year institution should discuss scholarship opportunities at the transfer institution. The following are universities which
offer scholarships to transfer students:
Arkansas State University
Arkansas Tech University
Harding University
Henderson State University
Hendrix College
Ouachita Baptist University
Southern Arkansas University
University of Arkansas at Fayetteville
University of Arkansas at Little Rock
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
University of Central Arkansas
WENCEL SCHOLARSHIPS
Any National Park Community College full-time continuing student may apply for
this full tuition scholarship. Each division selects one student from the Divisional
Scholarship Applicants. Recipients must possess a minimum 2.5 grade average.
Applications must be resubmitted each semester.
LOCAL AGENCIES
Arkansas Career Pathways is a new state education and assistance program that
enables NPCC to offer those who qualify free career training and college classes.
In addition to free training and college classes, the Pathways program may be able
to help you with things like:
1. Child care
2. Transportation
3. Career counseling
4. Job search after training
In order to enroll in the Arkansas Career Pathways program, you must qualify to
receive benefits. Basic eligibility requirements include:
1. You must be a parent, with children under the age of 21 living in your home.
2. You must be receiving Transitional Employment Assistance (TEA) now, or
have received TEA in the past.
3. Or, you must be receiving food stamps or Medicaid.
4. Or you must have annual family income below 250% of Federal poverty level
(about $34,340 annually for a family of three).
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If anything is stopping you from getting the training and education you need, call
Pathways to see if you qualify for help.
Pathways Staff:
Diane Meredith, Director
B.A., Henderson State University
M.S., Henderson State University
501-760-4384
[email protected]
LaTaschya Harris, Community Outreach Coordinator
A.A., Garland County Community College
B.A., Henderson State University
501-760-4379
lharris[email protected]
Erin Buffington, Intake Coordinator
A.A., National Park Community College
A.S., National Park Community College
501-760-4238
[email protected]
Ruben Flores, Counselor
A.A., National Park Community College
A.L.S., National Park Community College
501-760-4238
[email protected]
Arkansas Human Development Corporation
The purpose of this program is to provide educational assistance to qualified students under AHDC’s program. The program will pay fees, books, supplies, and a
weekly allowance to the trainee. To be eligible, a student or parents of a dependent student must have derived 51% of their gross income from the past year from
farm-related employment. The AHDC representative will determine student eligibility. (1-900-482-7641).
Arkansas Rehabilitation Services
The vocational rehabilitation program in Arkansas offers assistance for tuition,
fees, and books to students who are vocationally handicapped. Information may be
obtained from the Arkansas Rehabilitation Services, 115 Market Street, Hot
Springs, AR 71901.
Workforce Investment Act (WIA)
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Workforce Investment Act provides federal funds to be used for training and
employment activities. Eligibility and services are determined by the staff of the
Arkansas Workforce Centers located in each county. Services may include enrollment in approved training programs provided by National Park Community
College.
STUDENT RECORDS
Academic Records Privacy Rights
A student’s academic record is confidential and will not be released to unauthorized persons without written approval from the student. The following items are
considered public information and may be made available upon inquiry unless the
student requests nondisclosure for the enrollment period: name, address, e-mail
address, phone number, place and date of birth, citizenship status, number of academic hours completed, academic major, full-time or part-time status, academic
and nonacademic honors, other academic institutions attended, degree obtained
and date conferred, campus activities, leadership positions, and dates of attendance.
NPCC complies fully with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act
(FERPA) of 1974 which was designated to protect the privacy of education
records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their education
records, and to provide guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading
data through informal and formal hearing. Students also have the right to file complaints with The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act office concerning
alleged failures by the institution to comply with the Act.
Questions concerning FERPA may be directed to the Registrar’s Office.
Records on Hold
Records may be placed on hold for any of the following actions, which include but
are not limited to a non-submitted official transcript from another institution, a
financial obligation to the College or library books due. Students will not be
allowed to do any of the following until the hold is removed:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Drop or add any classes during the semester
Enroll in courses in subsequent semesters
Obtain a transcript
Receive a diploma or certificate
Requesting a Transcript
The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 requires that all transcript
requests be in writing, signed and dated by the person to whom the record belongs.
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Transcript request forms are available from the Registrar’s Office and online at
www.npcc.edu. Students may also obtain a transcript by mailing a written request
that includes the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
FULL NAME as it appears on your record. Please include your maiden
name, if married, or any other name used while enrolled at the college.
SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER
LAST TERM ATTENDED
ADDRESS to which the transcript is to be mailed.
Your RETURN ADDRESS and TELEPHONE NUMBER
After signing and dating your request, send it to:
Registrar’s Office
Attn: Transcripts
National Park Community College
101 College Drive
Hot Springs, AR 71913
The current transcript processing fee is $2 per copy. Payment should accompany
your request. If the cost changes, the transcript request will be fulfilled and you will
be billed for any amount due.
If transcripts are mailed to students, the transcript will be stamped “Issued to
Student.” Students should note that most institutions prefer the copy be mailed
directly to their office. You should check with the receiving institution before
requesting a transcript. All transcripts are mailed within one working week of
receipt of request.
NPCC does not accept transcripts for evaluation that are submitted by fax. The
college also does not send transcripts by fax. College policy prohibits issuing transcripts to any student indebted to the college.
Student Code of Good Conduct
The Vice President for Student Services Office is charged with the responsibility
of maintaining a college atmosphere which is conducive to academic development
and social growth. Violators of the student code of good conduct will be dealt
with accordingly. Students may obtain copies of the Alcohol and Drug Policy,
Annual Campus Security Report, Graduation/Completion rates and Sexual
Harassment/Sexual Offense Policy in the Vice President for Student Services
Office, located on the third floor of the Gerald Fisher Campus Center.
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Student Disciplinary Procedures
In accordance with Policy No. 9.310, the Board of Trustees of National Park
Community College charges the President of the College with the responsibility of
maintaining appropriate standards of conduct of students and authorizes her to
expel, dismiss, suspend, and place limitations on continued attendance and to levy
penalties for disciplinary violation. In accordance with this responsibility, disciplinary sanction shall be applied only after the requirements of due process, fairness,
and reasonableness have been met. The aim of disciplinary action is the redirection of student behavior toward the achievement of academic goals.
An appeal of disciplinary action must be made within nine weeks from the end of
the semester in which the action that is being appealed occurs.
The President of National Park Community College has delegated the disciplinary
function to the Vice President for Student Services. It is the responsibility of the
latter office to initiate, implement, and supervise the disciplinary process for students.
The Vice President for Student Services is assisted in the disciplinary determinations by the Discipline Committee, members of which are appointed by the
President of the College. The committee is composed of twelve people, six faculty members and six students. For a copy of the complete policy, stop by the Vice
President for Student Services Office or telephone (501)760-4203.
Student Identification Number
Each student is assigned a unique NPCC ID number upon admission. Online
access from the college website to registration, grades, and financial information
will require the use of both the NPCC ID and a PIN number which will initially
be set to the last four digits of their social security number plus the two-digit
month and two digit day of birth. Each student is encouraged to obtain a college
photo ID card from the College Library which will contain their student ID number, and to update their PIN number online to a more secure combination immediately upon registration. It is the student's responsibility to maintain the confidentiality of their PIN number to avoid unauthorized access to their academic record.
Student Right to Know
A prospective or currently enrolled student has the right to request graduation or
completion rates of National Park Community College students. This information
is available through the Registrar’s Office located on the third floor of the Gerald
Fisher Campus Center. In addition, the annual Campus Security report is available
in the Vice President for Student Services Office, also located on the third floor of
the Gerald Fisher Campus Center.
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Transcripts
The Registrar’s Office maintains an academic record of coursework completed at
the College. Transcripts will be released only after receipt of a signed written
request. Transcripts issued to students will be marked “Issued to Student.”
Transcripts will not be released if records are on hold for financial or disciplinary
reasons. Official transcripts from other institutions cannot be released to any individual or institution. Any release of a student’s transcript information will be
approved and documented by the Registrar.
STUDENT SERVICES
NPCC offers a comprehensive array of Student Services. These services are
designed to meet the needs of a diverse student body. The aim of NPCC’s Student
Services programs is to work closely with instructors to create an environment
where students can feel welcome and realize their potential. The following services are available to assist students.
Sudent Services plays an important role in the academic experience at National
Park Community College. The professional counselors provide academic advising.
Whether students are undecided or know what they want to major in, the counselors can assist in developing an individualized degree plan. Day and/or evening
course offerings are available to work around family and/or job commitments. A
computerized degree check showing how a student is progressing toward a degree
can be provided by a counselor. Counselors and faculty advisors assist students
with academic advising. Students may meet with a counselor or faculty advisor to
register for classes each semester.
As a service to students, the counselors also provide personal and short-term crisis counseling, career counseling and testing services. All counseling sessions of
this nature are kept confidential.
Other Student Services include: admissions processing, orientation, veterans services, and student academic follow-up.
Student Services is located on the second floor of the Gerald Fisher Campus
Center. The Center is open Monday-Thursday 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and Friday
7:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Telephone inquiries can be directed to 760-4232.
Bookstore Services
The Bookstore is located across from the Student Center on the first level of the
Gerald Fisher Campus Center. Its primary purpose is to supply textbooks and
supplies needed for classes. In addition to books and supplies, the Bookstore also
carries reference books, art supplies, T-shirts, sweatshirts, jackets, caps, and other
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items. Students who want specific items not carried by the Bookstore should contact the bookstore manager.
At designated times each semester an independent book company comes to the
Bookstore to conduct a buyback to repurchase books.
Career Center
Assessment, employability services and job referrals are provided through the
Career Center activities. Career Center services are open to all students at no cost.
Materials, including Internet access, to assist with job search activities are available.
Current job referrals are listed weekly, and there are opportunities for on campus
interviews with area employers. The annual Job Fair is sponsored by the Career
Center and is held in the spring. The Career Center is located on the second floor
of the Gerald Fisher Campus Center.
Child Development Center
NPCC Child Development Center is designed for children ages 6 weeks to 5 years.
The Center emphasizes developmentally appropriate activities to help each child
grow mentally, physically, socially, emotionally, and creatively. The Center is used as
a pre-employment laboratory training center for early childhood education students. Both full-time and part-time care is available. Priority is given to children as
follows:
1.
2.
Students and Staff of National Park Community College;
General Public.
The Center is licensed by the Department of Human Services and is accredited by
the National Association of Education for Young Children (NAEYC).
Educational Talent Search (ETS)
ETS is a U.S. Department of Education grant funded student support program
that reaches out to 600 low income, first generation middle and high school students in the seven Garland County school districts. Participating students enjoy
involvement in activities such as campus tours, cultural events, College Hops, ACT
Prep workshops, Career Awareness activities and summer camp opportunities. For
more information about the ETS program, contact the Director at 760-4397.
Employment and Job Information Assistance
The Career Center serves as a clearinghouse for a number of local employers who
are seeking qualified, part-time and full-time employees. The staff also attempts
to work with graduate and non-graduates who seek permanent, full-time employment. This service is based on information and needs given to the staff by instructors and business firms. Students are encouraged to contact the Career Center for
any career service needs.
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Food Service
A small cafe is located in the Student Center. A variety of food entrees, including
hamburgers, fries, sandwiches, salads and a daily luncheon hot meal special, are
offered. The hours of operation are 7:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. to 6:00
p.m. Snack and drink vending machines are also located in the Student Center.
Gear Up Program
Gear Up is a U.S. Department of Education grant funded program which provides
academic support to Hot Springs High School and Middle School students.
Services provided include tutoring, after school academic program, and summer
school programs. For more information about the Gear Up program, contact the
Coordinator at 624-5228, extension 26.
Graduate And Job Placement
College faculty and support staff and advisory committee members work closely
with area business and industry to place students in the area(s) for which they were
trained. Program directors and the Director of Career Services College staff assist
students in obtaining permanent career employment. Graduation and placement
statistics for individual programs are available on request.
Health Services
A Health Services Nurse is on campus Monday through Friday. The nurse’s office
is located on the first floor of the Fisher Campus Center.
First aid kits are located in almost all campus buildings for minor emergencies.
Students who are injured while on campus should notify the Health Services
Nurse. Notify the Student Services or Vice President for Student Services’ office
if the nurse is not on campus.
Housing and Transportation
There is no resident housing on campus. City bus transportation is available from
various areas of Hot Springs to the campus. Bus transportation is provided by the
Hot Springs Rehabilitation Center for students who live in the Rehabilitation
Center.
Library
The Library plays a vital role in the instructional programs of the College. As the
information center for the College, it provides books, periodicals, microforms,
audio and videotapes, and computer access to specialized databases as well as to
the Internet. The Library is also a service center providing assistance in reference
and research and in the use of audio-visual materials and equipment.
50
It contains 23,500 books, more than 300 periodicals, a 25,000 unit microfilm
library, and over 2,000 videotapes. The Library also provides video broadcast services to the campus-wide closed circuit TV system as well as maintaining programming on cable Channel 14 for College sponsored telecourses. It also maintains a
rotating art exhibit featuring notable Arkansas artists.
The facilities and services of the Library are available free of charge to all members of the community, as well as college students. During spring and fall semesters, library hours are 7:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m., Monday-Thursday and 7:00 a.m.-4:30
p.m., Friday. Summers and intercessions hours are concurrent with other campus
offices.
Lost and Found
Students seeking lost items should check with the Student Center Manager located on the first floor in the Gerald Fisher Campus Center. Students who find items
should turn them in to the same office.
Orientation
The purpose of Freshman Orientation is to help students have a positive academic start and make new friends. It is a practical guide to beginning college life and
a way to learn about campus resources and the location of classes.
Parking
Traffic signs are posted throughout the campus and students are encouraged to
familiarize themselves with the posted speed limits, directions and parking areas.
These traffic regulations are established by the State of Arkansas and failure to
abide by these regulations constitutes a violation of state law. State and county law
enforcement officials do tow vehicles at the owner’s expense if they are parked illegally or in an unauthorized area. This includes vehicles illegally parked in
“Handicapped” and “No Parking” slots. In addition, according to state law, vehicles parked on Mid-America Boulevard must be at least 3 feet off the travel portion of the road or their owners will be subject to tickets and tows.
Since this is a commuter college, parking and traffic regulations must be maintained for the protection of both drivers and pedestrians. Students must park only
in designated parking areas, including additional parking spaces at the gym. Special
parking areas for students with disabilities are identified throughout the campus.
Car decals are free and may be obtained during the enrollment process in the
Student Center.
Recruitment and Campus Tours
National Park Community College welcomes potential students and their families.
Stop by the Office of Recruitment located in the Ish Stivers Building. Telephone
inquiries can be directed to 760-4363. You may contact this office to schedule individual or group campus tours and to arrange other recruitment activities.
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Student Activities
The Board of Trustees of National Park Community College believes that an
active program of student activities is an important part of college life. Student
groups may schedule a variety of campus activities.
All official College organizations must be approved by the Vice President for
Student Services, the President, and the Board of Trustees. Student activities are
governed under the guidelines of the College’s approved Statement of Student
Rights and Responsibilities. This document is available from the Vice President for
Student Services. Failure to comply with the rules and regulations of this statement
can result in action being taken against groups and individuals by the College.
Services for Students with Disabilities
National Park Community College is committed to fulfilling all Federal requirements as stated in the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Section 504, and the Americans
with Disabilities Act. Services provided to students with disabilities include registration; academic counseling; faculty and staff training for meeting the needs of
disabled students; automatic doors to most buildings; wheelchair ramps; and tutorial, note taking, reader, and interpreting services. Services for students with disabilities are coordinated by Student Services and the Student Support Services
Program (SSS) on campus in conjunction with State Rehabilitation Services
Agencies. Students with disabilities are responsible for notifying the Vice President
for Student Services or Student Support Services at least two weeks prior to the
beginning of each semester if special academic accommodations are needed to
assure that services are in place by the beginning of their first day of classes at
NPCC. For more information, please contact the Student Support Services
Program.
Adaptive Equipment Lab
Services for students with disabilities are provided through Student Services. The
adaptive equipment for Braille printing, textbook reading and voice dictation software, and JAWS usage are located in Student Services (CC 243). Students may
schedule tutoring time by registering for Intro to Adaptive Equipment (a one-hour
class) or by contacting the Student Services Office.
Student Activities
Student Activities are usually scheduled during the noon hour on Wednesday. A
variety of entertainment and educational seminars are presented during the year.
Free food is served to students at many of the events.
Student Centers
There are two Student Centers at NPCC. One is located on the first floor of the
Gerald Fisher Campus Center. Between classes, students can engage in a game of
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pool or ping pong. A large screen TV and video games are also available for viewing during leisure time. There are vending machines for snacks as well as a snack
bar where students can order burgers, fries, and a variety of sandwiches and hot
meals.
The other Student Center is located on the south side of campus in close proximity to the technical classrooms. This Student Center is used for group meetings,
lunch, and break periods. A large screen TV is available for viewing during leisure
time. Vending machines are available. No cafeteria services are available in this
Center.
Student Support Services
Student Support Services is a federally-funded TRIO Program designed to provide
services to approximately two hundred eligible students. These services include
counseling in academic, personal, career, and financial aid areas; transfer and transitional services for those students wishing to transfer to four-year institutions;
tutoring in most subject areas; small group non-credit math instruction; cultural
enrichment activities; and additional financial aid for students receiving a Pell
Grant. For information about eligibility, contact Student Support Services.
Testing
The Testing Center is located in the Gerald Fisher Campus Center, Room 217.
Course placement assessment (ASSET and COMPASS) testing is provided in the
center. A fee is assessed to students taking the ASSET or COMPASS test at NPCC
and using the results for entrance into another post-secondary institution.
Tutoring
Tutoring is provided free of charge to NPCC students. Tutoring is available for
math and science courses and is conducted by both professional and peer tutors.
The lab is located in the Gerald Fisher Campus Center, Room 211. For more
information, contact the Tutor Supervisor at 760-4228.
Veterans Services
The College has approved programs for veterans training and applications are
available in Student Services. The Counselors assist with certification of veterans
approved for monthly benefits such as Montgomery G. I. Bill Chapter 30,
Montgomery G. I. Bill National Guard Chapter 1606, Dependents of Veterans
Chapter 35, and VA Vocational Rehabilitation Chapter 31. The Financial Aid
Office certifies those veterans eligible for tuition assistance programs. The College
certifies enrollment and maintains records for the Veterans Affairs Office.
Eligibility and payment information is available for the Department of Veterans
Affairs, VA Regional Office, P. O. Box 8888, Muskogee, OK 74402-8888; 1-888442-4551 (1-888-GI-Bill); www.gibill.va.gov; [email protected]
53
CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS
Advocates for Barrier Awareness
The Advocates for Barrier Awareness Organization promotes the needs of students with disabilities. For more information concerning the organization, please
contact Student Support Services at Ext. 4227.
Arkansas Early Childhood Association (AECA)
Arkansas Early Childhood Association is the organization for students enrolled in
the Child Care Guidance and Management Program. In addition, our students
participate locally in HSECA (Hot Springs Early Childhood Association). The
fourteen (14) southern regional states invite state and local chapters to participate
in SECA (Southern Early Childhood Association).
SECA, AECA and HSECA chapters conduct training sessions throughout the year
for teachers and caregivers. They collaborate with other advocacy and professional organizations devoted to the interest of young children. SECA publishes a journal, Dimensions of Early Childhood, which our students receive as part of their
membership, and through which they are informed of child care concerns. Other
publications and training are available. Students are invited and encouraged to participate in local and state projects. On campus, the student chapter, Child Care
Student Organization, elects officers, conducts workshops, and, in general, supports the child care program.
Cultural Diversity Awareness Club
Purpose is to provide members and students of NPCC with a better knowledge of
the many cultures and heritages of our students and to make NPCC aware of the
needs of those students. For more information, contact Linda Franklin at Ext.
4132.
Intramurals
Students are encouraged to participate in the intramural athletic program. The
intramural program is designed to attempt to meet the needs of all students by giving them the privilege of participating in a wide range of activities. The program
is varied enough to meet the needs of most individuals.
National Park Community College Singers/Soundwaves
NPCC currently offers two choral groups for student participation, the NPCC
Singers and the NPCC “Soundwaves”.
The “Singers” is an auditioned chorus of NPCC students. This group performs a
concert each fall and spring semester. They also sing for community functions.
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The “Soundwaves” is the newest performing group at NPCC and is a select
ensemble that performs mostly jazz/pop arrangements. The members of the
“Soundwaves” are also in the NPCC Singers scholarship. This group performs frequently throughout the year for area schools,charity benefits, and conferences.
Members of these groups who are on scholarship must maintain a 2.25 GPA.
NPCC Recreation Association
This is a student organization for students interested in the field of recreation. This
organization is open to students that want to increase their knowledge in this area.
Students will have the opportunity to participate in activities that will increase their
awareness of the positive benefits of recreation and the benefits it can provide for
NPCC and the community.
National Technical Honor Society (NTHS)
The National Technical Honor Society is a national organization with state and local affiliation. Membership in this organization is available to students enrolled secondary career
education course. Individuals are selected based upon the following criteria which have
been observed by his/her instructor: a desire to pursue a career in his/her course of study,
scholastic achievement, honesty, dependability, responsibility, high quality task performance
and pride in work performed, cooperation and ability to work well with others, interest in
learning, initiative, leadership, and citizenship.
The purpose of the NTHS is to promote the ideals of honesty, service, leadership, and skill
development among America's future workforce; to reward scholastic achievement in occupational, vocational and/or technical education; to assist society members in their pursuit of
career and educational goals; to help build and maintain a stronger, more positive image for
career and technical education in the local community and throughout the nation.
Phi Beta Lambda (PBL)
Phi Beta Lambda is the national organization for students enrolled in programs of
business education on the post-secondary level. The organization, composed of
more than 450 chapters, operates as an integral part of the educational program
under the guidance of business instructors, state supervisors, school administrators, and members of the business community.
The activities of PBL provide opportunities for business students to establish
occupational goals and facilitate the transition from school to work. Members of
PBL learn how to engage in individual and group business enterprises, how to hold
an office and direct the affairs of the group, how to work with other organizations,
and how to compete honorably with their colleagues on the local, state, and national levels.
PBL helps build competent, aggressive business leadership; strengthens the confidence of students in themselves and in their work; develops character; prepares
for useful citizenship; fosters patriotism; and practices efficient money management.
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Phi Theta Kappa
Phi Theta Kappa is the international honor society of the two-year college. The
local chapter is Alpha Beta Psi. A student must have completed 12 or more semester hours of coursework at NPCC, leading to an associate degree, and must have
a cumulative grade point average of 3.5 or higher. A student must be of good
moral character, possess recognized qualities of leadership, and have established
academic excellence as judged by the faculty. Contact the Vice President for
Student Services for more information.
SkillsUSA
SkillsUSA is a national organization with state and local affiliation. SkillsUSA
membership is available to students enrolled in post-secondary or secondary trade
and industry courses. SkillsUSA assists students in developing social and leadership skills. Skill enhancing activities are conducted by the club’s members and advisors. The activities may include events among students of a school or among
schools at the local, state and national levels.
Student Activities Council
All students are eligible to become members of the Student Activities Council.
The Council helps schedule, organize, and provide a student activity program.
They make recommendations for any legislation that will improve student activities for NPCC. Any student who is willing to work with student activities and
become a member of the Student Activities Council should contact Ron Chesser
in the Student Services.
Student Artists Guild
Students are eligible to join this organization if they are enrolled in at least one art
class. The organization promotes the art program at NPCC, promotes the exhibition and sale of student artwork, promotes an appreciation for the arts, and is constantly working to provide a more aesthetic atmosphere for the college and community.
Student Health Information Management Association
Students may enhance their educational experience of Health Information
Technology through membership in this organization. Membership is open to students enrolled at NPCC, but not yet enrolled in the Health Information
Technology program, honorary membership, and alumni.
Student Nursings Association
All students enrolled in the NPCC nursing program are members of the class
organization. Class organizations are active in projects that promote student success and nursing image. They also participate in community service projects and
organize the Nursing Pinning ceremony.
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Student Radiography Association
Students are eligible to become members of the Student Radiography Association
who are enrolled in the NPCC Radiology Program. Members will have the opportunity to assume the responsibility for contributing to the radiology education to
provide the highest quality health care. For more information call Ms. Debra
Wilson.
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ACADEMIC INFORMATION
National Park Community College strives to meet the academic needs of students
in three ways:
1. By providing programs of study for students planning to continue their college education at four-year colleges and universities;
2. By providing two-year associate degrees that lead to rewarding careers or
enhance career mobility;
3. By providing a variety of short term programs designed to upgrade technical
skills and knowledge leading to a certificate from the College.
To ensure academic excellence and create an environment conducive to teaching
and learning, the College requires that students meet clearly defined academic standards and adhere to general academic policies. Students are expected to become
familiar with the general academic policies of the College and to adhere to these
guidelines. Questions concerning the College’s academic policies should be directed to a College counselor, the Vice President for Student Services, or the Executive
Vice President.
General Education Objectives
Students enrolling in a college need to prepare themselves to be well-informed and
responsible citizens for a complex and culturally diverse world. It is the intent of
National Park Community College to provide general education that will enhance
common knowledge, intellectual concepts, and attitudes that every educated person should possess regardless of his/her career path. The College will ensure that
the general education offered is consistent with its missions and designed to ensure
breadth of knowledge and to promote intellectual inquiry. The College also recognizes the importance of general education related studies as integral components of technical education.
The College will strive through general education to lead the student to:
*
*
*
*
Write and speak clearly, concisely, and coherently;
Reason and think logically and clearly;
Understand world cultures, past and present; and,
Apply mathematics to solve problems.
Student Outcomes Assessment
Systematic assessment of student learning is an integral element of the College’s
academic programs. National Park Community College students participate in a
variety of assessments throughout their course of study. These multiple assessments are a required part of the educational experience. Information collected in
the assessment process is used to identify relative strengths and weaknesses in academic programs or courses, thus facilitating systematic improvement of teaching
59
and learning at the College. Data collected from assessment activities is kept confidential and will not affect the student’s academic standing in regular course work.
Attendance and Class Work
Regular attendance is a critical element in student success. Therefore, students are
expected to attend all regularly scheduled class sessions and to complete all
assigned class work. Instructors will provide written attendance policies that outline how attendance may affect students’ final grades.
Except for extreme circumstances, students are not permitted to be absent from
scheduled tests without prior approval of the instructor. Make-up arrangements
with an instructor are the responsibility of the student.
If a student is judged to be absent excessively, the instructor will report this immediately to the Counseling Center for follow-up action. The Counseling Center will
arrange a counseling session with the student and instructor. Every effort will be
made by faculty and staff to help the student with any academic difficulty.
Throughout this process, it is recognized that the instructor is the judge of the
final grade a student receives in any course.
The College reserves the right to withdraw a student for excessive absenteeism. Excessive absenteeism may also result in failing grades, academic
probation or suspension and loss of financial aid.
60+TUITION WAIVER
Students who are 60 years of age or older as of the first day of classes for any
semester, are eligible for a waiver of tuition charges for all courses taken for college credit, per Arkansas State Law 6-60-204. Audited courses are not eligible for
this tuition wavier.
Academic Appeals
The College maintains an Academic Appeals Committee appointed each year by
the President. Committee membership includes both faculty and students. The
committee reviews cases that cannot be satisfactorily resolved in the normal student-instructor classroom relationship, as well as cases in which College policy or
procedure creates conflicts which cannot be resolved through informal means.
Students are entitled to full due process before this committee, and a student who
feels that there are circumstances in a situation which warrant an academic appeals
hearing may petition the Academic Appeals Committee to review the facts pertaining to the situation.
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Students should contact the Vice President for Student Services for an explanation
of the process and/or forms to begin the appeal.
Academic Clemency
Act 1000 of 1991 describes academic clemency as a second opportunity for undergraduate students who performed poorly at some point in their studies and who
wish to return to college after having gained a new appreciation of the benefits of
higher education.
Institutional Policy at National Park Community College is in compliance with Act
1000 and guidelines adopted by the State Board of Higher Education.
1. Academic clemency may be granted by the registrar to returning students who
have not been enrolled in any college or university for two calendar years and
who now demonstrate the commitment to succeed academically.
2. Students may request clemency for course work at NPCC for one semester
only.
3. The original grades for the requested clemency semester will remain on the student’s transcript. However, the GPA will be 0.00 for that semester regardless
of the grades earned. No credits for the requested semester will count toward
graduation requirements. Courses passed during that semester need not be
repeated; however, a sufficient number of additional credits must be earned to
meet graduation requirements. The student’s transcript is a comprehensive
academic record. Notation will be placed on the transcript to show that academic clemency has been granted. This information cannot be removed and
will become part of the student’s permanent record.
4. Since the student’s GPA will have to be recalculated by the registrar from the
time that academic clemency is granted, there is a $25 fee.
5. Students seeking academic clemency must submit a written request and have a
review conference with the registrar. The request, signed by both parties, will
become part of the student’s permanent record.
6. Under State Board of Higher Education guidelines, no post-secondary institution is required to honor academic clemency granted by another institution.
However, students who receive academic clemency at NPCC and plan to transfer should be allowed to petition for academic clemency under the provisions
established by the receiving institution.
7. In the case of transfer students to NPCC, the College will honor academic
clemency allowed by any accredited college/university for admission purposes.
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In the interest of consistent application of policy, the registrar will treat the
academic clemency as if it had been granted at NPCC for graduation purposes.
Academic Honesty
Academic integrity is a vital element of any learning community. NPCC faculty
hold themselves to the highest standards in this regard and expect their students to
do the same. Students who compromise the integrity of academic inquiry are subject to disciplinary action on the part of the College. A violation of academic honesty may include (but is not limited to) the following:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Cheating on written examinations, quizzes or other written work;
Plagiarism—the use of another’s intellectual property (thought, writing, etc.)
without proper reference/citation, whether directly quoted or paraphrased;
Giving or receiving unauthorized assistance during a test;
Falsification, forgery, or alteration of academic records; and
Obtaining or attempting to obtain copies of a non-circulating examination
Penalties for breaches of academic integrity may include receiving an F for the
assignment in question, receiving an F for the course, and/or dismissal from the
course. In extreme cases, the administration reserves the right to suspend the student from all studies at the College.
Academic Honors
The College provides four opportunities for honoring student academic achievement:
1. The Dean’s List,
2. The President’s List,
3. Who’s Who in American Junior Colleges,
4. Induction into Phi Theta Kappa Honor Society or Phi Beta Lambda.
Students who achieve academic excellence are included on the President’s List or
Dean’s List each semester. Candidates must have completed all courses and earned
a minimum of six semester credit hours of college-level coursework for the current semester and a minimum of twelve semester credit hours of college-level
coursework cumulatively (including the current semester).
The President’s List indicates highest academic achievement. Students with both
semester and cumulative grade point averages from 3.60 to 4.0 qualify for this
honor.
The Dean’s List indicates high academic achievement. Students with a grade point
average of 3.25 to 3.59 and a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.25 are
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honored, as are students with a semester grade point average of 3.60 or greater
whose cumulative grade point average is in the 3.25 to 3.59 range.
Students are selected for Who’s Who in American Junior Colleges by a vote of the
faculty. Full-time sophomore students with a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 who
exhibit outstanding abilities in scholarship, leadership, and citizenship are eligible
for this honor.
Students invited to join the Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society are
required to have a 3.5 GPA in a minimum of twelve (12) or more college level
semester credit hours completed at NPCC as well as other criteria.
Academic Standards and Satisfactory Progress
A 2.00 cumulative grade-point average is required for successful completion of all
degree and certificate programs. This level of performance is considered satisfactory progress while undertaking any academic program.
Any student who falls below a total 2.00 NPCC grade-point average after the first
semester will be placed on academic probation by the Vice President for Student
Services for the next semester.
Students must regain a 2.00 NPCC grade-point average to be removed from probation. If improvement has not been shown at the end of two semesters on probation, students may be restricted to a maximum of two courses for the next
semester.
Any student who falls below a total 1.00 NPCC grade-point average after two
semesters may be suspended for the next semester. Upon readmittance, the student will be restricted to no more than two courses. These courses will be determined after a conference with a counselor or academic advisor. Credit earned at
any institution during a period of suspension will not be applicable to graduation
requirements.
Transfer students are subject to the same probationary requirements. Although all
course work and grades earned at another institution will be recorded on the
NPCC transcript, the total NPCC grade-point average will be determined only by
grades earned while attending NPCC.
Adding a Course
Classes may be added through the first four days of the semester (prorated for
summer session). For evening classes which meet only once a week, the second
class meeting will be the last opportunity to enroll. Students may register for
Honors Study projects when all of the requirements listed in the Honors Study
section of the Academic Programs section of this catalog have been met.
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Administrative Withdrawal/Drop Policy
The College administration reserves the right to drop a student from a course or
program for sufficient cause, such as flagrant disruptiveness, excessive absences,
unsafe practice in clinical/lab assignments, documented plagiarism, etc. when the
Executive Vice President and the Vice President for Student Services agree that it
is necessary. Prior to any such administrative action, the student will be notified in
writing that action is pending and given the opportunity for an academic hearing.
Faculty members may recommend to the Executive Vice President in writing that
a student be administratively dropped from a class for any of the aforementioned
reasons.
Advanced Placement Program (AP)
The Advanced Placement (AP) Program of the College Entrance Examination
Board gives students the opportunity to pursue college-level studies while still in
high school and, with an appropriate score on an AP exam, to receive advanced
placement and/or credit upon entering the College. The AP examinations are
offered annually by high schools that participate in this program. Students who
earn a 3 on an AP exam should be aware that credit may not be awarded for that
score at another institution should they transfer to another college or university.
Students should check with the registrar of any institution they plan to transfer to
if they have AP test scores of 3 to determine what level of credit or placement
they will receive for this score. Scores of 4 or 5 carry an award of credit at all public institutions of higher education in Arkansas. NPCC awards AP credit as shown
in the chart.
AP Examination
Qualifying Score
NPCC Credit
Awarded
American Government and Politics
3
POLS 1113
American History
3
4
HIST 2223
HIST 2223 & HIST 2233
Art, Studio
3
ART 1103* or ART 1113*
or GRD 1103*
*Review of portfolio by
NPCC faculty required
for credit.
Art History
4
5
ART 2213
ART 2213 & ART 2223
Biology
4
BIOL 1114
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Calculus AB
3
MATH 2215
Calculus BC
3
MATH 2215 & MATH 2225
Chemistry
4
CHEM 1204 & CHEM 2204
Computer Science A
3
IST 1103
English Composition and Literature 3
or English Language and Comp.
4
ENG 113
ENG 1113 & ENG 1123
Environmental Science
3
ESC I2263
European History
3
HIST 2213
French Language
3
4
FREN 1103
FREN 1113 & FREN 1103
Macroeconomics
3
ECON 2203
Microeconomics
3
ECON 2213
Music Listening & Lit.
3
MUS 1213
Music Theory
4
5
MUS 1113 & MUS 1131
MUS 1113 & MUS 1131 &
MUS 1123 & MUS 1141
Physics B
4
PHYS 1204
Physics C
5
PHYS 2204
Psychology
3
PSY 1103
Spanish Language
3
4
5
SPAN 1113
SPAN 1113 & SPAN 2113
SPAN 1113 & SPAN 2113 &
SPAN 2123
Statistics
3
MATH 1293
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Auditing a Course
Students auditing a course pay all tuition and fees associated with the course. Since
no grade is assigned for this audit (visitor) status, it will not transfer to another college or university, it will not qualify a student for Pell Grant or Veteran’s benefits,
and it will not be listed on the College’s transcript or count toward full-time status.
A registered student may change from an audit status to a grade status only during
the specified period of late registration. Once instruction begins, no student may
change from a grade basis to an audit status.
College-Level Examination Program
The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) permits students to earn college
credit by examination. Although the CLEP tests are standardized on a national
level, each college or university sets its own standards for acceptance of CLEP
scores. Students are encouraged to make use of the CLEP tests in order to receive
credit for those courses and academic areas in which they already have knowledge.
Successful completion of CLEP tests and scores which meet the College CLEP
policy will result in records of the credit earned being placed on the student’s transcript.
National Park Community College uses the following priorities for awarding college credit to students:
1.
A student must earn nine-semester credit hours at National Park
Community College before petitioning for CLEP credits to be posted on a
transcript.
2.
A student may earn a maximum of 30 CLEP credit hours toward an associate degree at National Park Community College.
3.
No grade is awarded for CLEP credit, and CLEP credit is not calculated in
a student’s grade-point average.
4.
CLEP credit shall be entered on a student’s transcript as “Credit by CLEP
Examination” with credit recorded in lieu of grade.
5.
CLEP Credit earned at other colleges and universities shall be accepted
without challenge.
6.
The College makes no charge transcripting CLEP scores. There is, however, a charge required by the test publisher for taking the test.
66
National Park Community College is a CLEP testing center, and CLEP tests are
given to any interested person on regularly scheduled dates. However, the process
of applying to take a CLEP exam may take several weeks. Call the NPCC Testing
Center to obtain more information regarding CLEP test dates.
The following table contains CLEP general and subject exams, scores required for
earning credit, and National Park Community College course equivalents:
CLEP Examination Standard
NPCC
Semester Hours
Score
Credit Earned
Credit
American Government
50
1113 American National Government 3
American History
50
2223 U. S History to 1865
3
American History
50
2233 U. S. History since 1865
3
American Lit
50
2223-2233 American Lit I & II
6
College Algebra
50
1123 College Algebra
3
Freshman College Comp 50
1113 English Composition I
3
Freshman College Comp 60
1123 English Composition II
3
General Psychology
50
1103 General Psychology
3
Human Growth & Dev
50
2003 Human Growth & Dev
3
Introductory Accounting 50
1103-1113 Principles of Acct I & II
6
Introductory Business Law 50
2203 Business Law I
3
Intro Macroeconomics
50
2203 Macroeconomics
3
Intro Microeconomics
50
2213 Microeconomics
3
Intro to Sociology
50
1103 Introduction to Sociology
3
Trigonometry
50
1113 Trigonometry
3
Western Civilization
50
2203 Western Civilization to 1660
3
Western Civilization
50
2213 Western Civilization II
3
The scores are based on a national norm group of college sophomores who
earned a grade of “C” on the course in questions.
Cumulative Grade-Point Average
1. The phrase “cumulative grade-point average” is uniformly interpreted to
include only credits actually earned at the college at which the student is
currently enrolled. Course work transferred from another accredited institution will be honored as appropriate, but such work will not affect the student’s cumulative NPCC grade-point average.
2.
The evaluation of incoming transfer credits and transcripts is based on
norms listed elsewhere in this catalog and may result in an administrative
decision to admit a transfer student on probation. Probational admission is
used for admission classification purposes only and does not affect the
cumulative grade-point average (CGPA) of student work completed at this
College.
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3.
Transfer students may repeat a course completed at another institution provided the following conditions are met:
a. All transcript information and grades are part of the student’s permanent academic record.
b. Any course successfully completed at another accredited institution and
voluntarily repeated will not result in the accumulation of any additional
credit for the student, but the grade for the repeated course will affect the
student’s GPA earned at this college.
c. If a student voluntarily repeats a course which was previously passed at
another accredited college, the student shall be allowed to count the passed
course as transfer credit even if the student fails the repeated course at this
college.
Dropping a Course
Students are expected to successfully complete the courses for which they register.
If a class change becomes necessary, the student must file an official drop form
with the Counseling Center. The date this form is approved by the Registrar’s
Office is the date used to determine eligibility for a refund or financial aid. Those
who qualify for a tuition waiver (see Admissions Section or Financial Assistance
Section) are not eligible for a refund at any time.
A class may be dropped up to the deadline specified in the official College calendar each semester.
Whenever a student stops attending class or is absent excessively and does not
complete the necessary paperwork to drop the class officially, an “F” (failing) grade
may be recorded by the instructor.
Grade Report Procedures
Grades are posted and academic transcripts updated at the close of each semester. Students access their grades online from the college website (npcc.edu).
Mid-term and final grade printouts for the last term are available online for one
month following the end of the semester; complete unofficial transcripts are
available at any time. The Student ID and PIN number are required for online
access. Computers are available in several campus buildings (Computer Center,
College Library, Gerald Fisher Student Center) for students without home internet access. Students may also receive a copy of the most recent semester's grades
via first-class mail by submitting a signed request to the Registrar's Office.
Grade-Point Average
Each letter grade awarded to a student for a course is assigned a point value as
noted below. A student may determine the grade points for each course by multiplying the number of points the grade is worth times the number of credit hours
the course carries.
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Thus a “B” letter grade (worth 3 points) in a three-credit hour course is worth 9
points, and an “A” (worth 4 points) in the same three-credit hour course is worth
12 points.
The grade-point average is found by adding the total point values for all courses
and dividing by the total number of credit hours attempted during the same period of time.
Grading System
The College adheres to the following system of course grades:
GRADE
A
B
C
D
F
*X
*W
*P
GRADE-POINT
INTERPRETATION
VALUE
Excellent
Above Average
Average
Below Average
Failing
Incomplete
Withdrawal
Passing
4
3
2
1
0
0
0
0
Graduation/Degree Requirements
To be eligible for any associate degree at National Park Community College, a student must successfully complete at least 18 semester hours with the College regardless of transfer credits. Each additional associate degree will require another 18
semester hours with the College and the satisfactory completion of all required
courses. Students must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.00 or higher
for graduation.
Students may meet the graduation requirements listed in the catalog in effect at the
time they enter the institution, or those listed in any later catalog. Exceptions to
this policy include requirements from a catalog more than three years old or
changes in a program or curriculum mandated by external accrediting agencies.
Honors Study Program
The Honors Study Program allows academically outstanding students to pursue
specialized areas of study beyond the general course offerings. In a tutorial setting, instructor and student will intensively explore a jointly agreed upon topic.
Both instructor and student should benefit from this advanced and personalized
intellectual experience.
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1.
Students must have completed at least 30 college-level credits of course
work, 12 of which must be completed at National Park Community College
with a cumulative grade-point average of at least 3.5.
2.
Written permission for the project must first be given by the respective
Division Chairperson:
Ed Bennett
Mathematics/Sciences
Roger Fox
Communications/Arts
Van Davis
Social Sciences
Debbie Burks
Business Administration
LaJuana Mooney
Health Sciences
Linda Castaldi
Nursing
Bob Kissire
Technical Programs
3.
Honors Study will be conducted only by full-time faculty.
4.
If a course is offered on the schedule during the semester it is requested by
a student as an Honors Study, it may not be offered as an Honors Study
course.
5.
A copy of the student’s academic proposal, signed by the Division
Chairperson, instructor, and student, shall be given to the Vice President
for Instruction in conjunction with the registration process.
6.
Registration for Honors Study must be completed after regular registration
during late registration and before the add/drop date.
7.
Honors Study must be taken on a grade basis.
8.
No more than six Honors Study credits may be applied to degree requirements in a given program.
Incomplete Grades
1.
An incomplete “X” grade may be requested by a student and given by an
instructor only if a minimum of 75 percent of all semester class work,
especially where laboratory work is involved, has been satisfactorily completed in the judgment of the instructor, whose decision is final.
Consequently, an “X” grade may not be assigned at mid-semester.
2.
The student must have a passing grade in the judgment of the instructor
when the request is made and before approval can be given.
70
3.
In requesting an “X” grade, a student automatically waives the right to
request or to receive a withdrawal “W” grade or an “AU” audit grade at a
later date.
4.
A student should not register again for the same course.
5.
To complete the necessary class work, the student and instructor must sign
a written contract defining the work that must be completed to finish the
course. Both the student and instructor will retain a copy of the signed
contract.
6.
The resolution of incomplete academic work is to be negotiated with the
instructor but may not exceed a time limit of the mid-semester date the following semester. At the end of this deadline, based on the judgment of
the instructor whose decision is final, a change of grade will be issued by
the instructor to the Registrar’s Office.
7.
The same instructor who assigned the “X” must contract with the student
to affect a grade change.
8.
Once an instructor has agreed to assign an “X” grade at the end of the
semester, it is the student’s responsibility to arrange with the instructor for
completion of all unfinished work.
Repeating a Course
If a student chooses to repeat a course, both grades earned for the course will be
reported on the student’s transcript. However, only the latter grade shall be used
in determining the grade-point average.
Students who fail and/or drop a course may repeat the course up to three times.
If a fourth attempt is necessary, the student has two options:
1.
Complete the course at another accredited college or university;
2.
Sit out one calendar year and then seek permission from the Vice President
for Instruction before re-enrolling in the course.
Students who plan to transfer to a four year college or university should be aware
that some institutions may average both the original and the subsequent grades for
determining transfer eligibility. Students should check with that college or the
Counseling Center prior to enrolling for a course on a repeat basis.
As long as a student is making satisfactory academic progress as defined above,
repeating a course will not adversely affect financial aid eligibility. Independent
study may not be used to repeat a failed course.
71
The Veterans Administration will pay for given course only once. Repeating and
accepting benefits for a course already passed and for which benefits have already
been received will result in an overpayment and may be considered by the V.A. to
be a deliberate attempt to defraud the Federal Government; repayment may be
required.
The Division of Health Sciences has a policy that if a student is required to withdraw from a course due to unsafe clinical behavior, he or she may not reapply to
repeat that course.
Transcripts and Records
Each student who completes a College course has an official transcript on file in
the Registrar’s Office. This is the student’s official College record. Any student
who feels a grade has been recorded in error has until the end of the following
semester, excluding summer sessions, to notify the Registrar’s Office. Any exceptions to this procedure will require a joint decision by the Executive Vice President
and the Vice President for Student Services.
Students who have attended another college or university shall have an official
copy of their transcript(s) forwarded to the Registrar for evaluation and recording.
The Registrar’s Office should be notified immediately of any name changes or
address changes.
Official copies of a student’s NPCC transcript will be forwarded to other colleges
and universities upon the receipt of a signed request by the student. All financial
obligations to the College must be met before transcripts are released by the registrar. Each transcript is $2.00.
Student records are private and may not be released to any individual, organization,
group, or institution without prior written consent of the student. Access to student records is protected by the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974
(Buckley Amendment). Information concerning access and the procedure for
challenging the content of student records may be obtained from the Registrar.
Withdrawing from College
The college recognizes that there are circumstances in which a student must withdraw from all classes. Students are urged to discuss withdrawal with their instructors or academic advisor to determine if an alternate action may be available.
Merely stopping attendance or failing to complete payment does not constitute
proper withdrawal.
If a student does find it necessary to withdraw, they must:
72
1.
2.
3.
4.
Contact their financial aid advisor, if they are receiving aid; some repayment
may be necessary,
Contact the NPCC veteran's advisor, if they are receiving benefits; modification or termination of VA benefits may be required,
Complete the paper withdrawal form with a NPCC counselor,
Complete the withdrawal survey in the Testing Center.
Failure to complete all of the above procedures will constitute improper withdrawal and may result in failing grades being placed on the student's permanent academic transcript.
Work Ethics
Technical faculty at NPCC agrees with the industrial community that a strong work
ethic is as important to student success as academic and skills attainment. Students
will receive a mid-term and final grade in Work Ethics. Students who do not maintain a "C" average in Work Ethics for the semester will not be allowed to participate
in the mentor/internship program.
73
Degrees and Certificates
NPCC's academic programs are designed for students who plan to earn a two-year
Associate Degree or the one-year Technical Certificate leading to employment, as
well as for those who plan to transfer to four-year colleges and universities. The
programs are, in some cases, flexible. However, students are encouraged to talk
with an assigned academic advisor or a counselor each semester in order to insure
a successful course of study.
Before selecting a major field of study, a student may wish to consider the future
employment possibilities in each area of concentration. A suggested source of
information is The Occupational Outlook Handbook, published by the U.S.
Department of Labor. Current copies are available in the Counseling Center.
Specific requirements and information on course sequencing for each degree and
technical certificate program are described in detail in the college division sections
of the catalog. Special requirements, prerequisites, corequisites, and other information are noted. For details about individual courses, see the catalog section on
Course Descriptions.
Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS)
ACT 672 of 2005 states that the Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS) contain information about the transferability of courses within Arkansas public colleges and universities. Students are guaranteed the transfer of applicable credit and
the equitable treatment in the application of credits for the admissions and degree
requirements. Course transferability is not guaranteed for courses listed in ACTS
as “No Comparable Course.” Additionally, courses with a “D” frequently do not
transfer and institutional policies may vary. ACTS may be accessed on the Internet
by going to the ADHE website and selecting Course Transfer (http://adhe.edu)
Certificate of General Studies
The Certificate of General Studies is a one-year award designed to provide recognition of the completion of a body of knowledge in general education. The
Certificate of General Studies will be comprised of 31 credit hours. Modeled after
the majority of courses listed in the State Minimum Core, the curriculum includes
areas of study in English, communication, science, math, technology, social sciences, fine arts, and humanities.
Required Courses for Certificate of General Studies
English/Communication - 9 Credit Hours Total
ENG 1113
English Composition I
ENG 1123
English Composition II
SPCH 1103
Speech
3
3
3
75
Mathematics (3 credits; select ONE course)
MATH 1013
Mathematics for General Education
(confer course description) OR
MATH 1123
College Algebra
3
Sciences (4 credits; select ONE course)
Life Science
BIOL
1114
General Biology
BIOL
1154
Zoology
BIOL
1164
Botany
BIOL
2224
Anatomy and Physiology I
4
4
4
4
Physical Science
CHEM 1104
ESCI
1104
GEOL 1104
PHYS 1114
PHYS 1204
Chemistry for Non-Majors
Earth Science
Physical Geology
Physical Science
Physics I
3
4
4
4
4
4
History (3 credits; select ONE course)
HIST
2223
U.S. History I or
HIST
2233
U.S. History II
POLS
1113
American National Government
3
3
3
Fine Arts/Humanities (3 credits; select ONE course)
ART
1593
Art Appreciation
MUS
1143
Music Appreciation
TART 1153
Introduction to Theatre
ENG
2273
World Literature I
3
3
3
3
Computer Literacy (3 credits; select ALL courses)
CIS
1001
Introduction to Computing I
CIS
1011
Introduction to Computing II
CIS
1501
Introduction to the Internet
1
1
1
Psychology or Sociology (3 credits, select ONE course)
PSYC
1103
General Psychology
SOC
1103
Introduction to Sociology
3
3
Social Science Elective (3 credits, select ONE course)
ANTH 1113
General Anthropology
ECON 2203
Macroeconomics
ECON 2213
Microeconomics
GEOG 1103
Introduction to Geography
3
3
3
3
76
POLS
PSYC
SOC
SOC
1123
1123
2203
2213
State and Local Government
Applied Psychology
Social Problems
Marriage and the Family
TOTAL
3
3
3
3
31
Associate of Arts Degree (A.A.)
The Associate of Arts Degree (A.A.) gives students who plan to transfer to a fouryear college or university the opportunity to complete the first two years of course
work leading to a baccalaureate degree. Although most courses at NPCC transfer
to most colleges and universities, students should see a NPCC counselor to be sure
the courses will apply to the specific degree the student is seeking at the transfer
institution. Each candidate for the Associate of Arts Degree must successfully
complete the following general education requirements which are in compliance
with ACT 98 of 1989:
Required Core Curriculum for the A.A. Degree
English/Communication - 9 Credit Hours Total
ENG
1113
English Composition I
ENG
1123
English Composition II
SPCH 1103
Speech
Mathematics - 3 Credit Hours Total
MATH 1013
Mathematics for General Education
(confer course description) OR
MATH 1123
College Algebra OR
MATH 1133
Trigonometry OR
MATH 2215
Calculus I
3
3
3
3
3
3
5
Sciences - 8 Credit Hours Total
(One 4 hour course in Life Science and one 4 hour course in Physical Science)
Life Science
BIOL
1114
General Biology
4
BIOL
1154
Zoology
4
BIOL
1164
Botany
4
Physical Science
CHEM 1104
ESCI
1104
GEOL 1104
PHYS 1114
PHYS 1204
Chemistry for Non-Majors
Earth Science
Physical Geology
Physical Science
Physics I
4
4
4
4
4
77
Fine Arts/Humanities - A.A. Candidates - 12 Credit Hours Total
Option I (Select three of the following courses)
ART
1593
Art Appreciation
ENG
2293
Creative Writing I
ENG
2693
Creative Writing II
MUS
1143
Music Appreciation
PHIL
1123
Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL
1133
Fundamentals of Ethics
SPAN 1103
Spanish I
SPAN 1113
Spanish II
Option II (Select one of the following courses)
ENG
1183
Introduction to Literature
ENG
2223
American Literature I
ENG
2233
American Literature II
ENG
2273
World Literature I
ENG
2283
World Literature II
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Social Sciences - A.A. Candidates - 15 Credit Hours Total
A. (Select two of following three courses)
HIST
2223
U.S. History I or
HIST
2233
U.S. History II
POLS
1113
American National Government
B. (Select one course)
HIST
2203
Western Civilization to 1660
HIST
2213
Western Civilization since 1660
3
3
3
3
3
C. (Select two courses)
General education requirements, under the state articulation agreement
between two-year and four-year institutions of higher education, stipulate
that the social science electives must include at least three semester hours--in
two different areas: Psychology; Sociology; Economics; Geography; Political
Science; or Anthropology.
ANTH 1113
General Anthropology
3
ECON 2203
Macroeconomics
3
ECON 2213
Microeconomics
3
GEOG 1103
Introduction to Geography
3
POLS
1123
State and Local Government
3
PSYC
1103
General Psychology
3
PSYC
1123
Applied Psychology
3
SOC
1103
Introduction to Sociology
3
SOC
2203
Social Problems
3
SOC
2213
Marriage and the Family
3
78
Physical Education - (2 Credit Hours Total)
Arkansas colleges and universities require at least two physical education credits in
activity courses for graduation eligibility. Medically exempt students, approved by
the Executive Vice President, may take Health and Safety (PE 1113) as a substitute.
The faculty of the physical education department strongly recommend that students take HPR 1102 Life Fitness Concepts as one of the two PE activity courses.
Electives - (12 Credit Hours Total)
Since the choice in the core curriculum may vary in the amount of credits earned,
students should work with their academic advisor in selecting the most appropriate electives and be certain of acquiring 61 total credits for graduation eligibility.
Students should choose electives accepted by the institution to which they plan to
transfer. A.A. candidates need at least 12 elective credits to satisfy the required 61
SSCH for their degree plan.
A.A. Degree Requirements Summary
Academic Areas
Credit Hours
English Composition
6
Speech
3
Arts & Humanities
12
College Algebra (or above)
3
Science (with integrated labs)
8
Social Sciences (including 1 course in
15
U.S. History or American National Government)
and 1 course in Western Civilization)
Physical Education Activity Courses
12
General Electives
12
Total Credit Hours
61
Associate of Arts in Teaching (AAT)
The Associate of Arts in Teaching (AAT) is a two-year transfer degree designed to
introduce students to the teaching profession and to ease transfer to 4-year institutions.
Each candidate for the Associate of Arts in Teaching degree must:
1. Complete the AAT with a cumulative GPA of 2.50
2. Pass the Praxis I and complete the required core curriculum for A.A.T.
English/Communication (9 credit
Composition I
Composition II
Fundamentals of Speech
3
3
3
ENG 1113
ENG 1123
SPCH 1103
79
Mathematics (3credit hours)
College Algebra
3
MATH 1123
Life Science (4 credit hours)
Biology
Botany
Zoology
4
4
4
BIOL 1114
BIOL 1164
BIOL 1154
Chemistry for Non-Majors
Physical Science
4
4
CHEM 1104
PHYS 1114
Fine Arts (3 credit hours)
Art Appreciation
Music Appreciation
Introduction to Theater
3
3
3
ART 1593
MUS 1143
TART 1153
Humanities (3 credit hours)
Introduction to Philosophy
Fundamentals of Ethics
3
3
PHIL 1023
PHIL 1133
Literature (3 credit hours)
World Literature I
World Literature II
American Literature I
American Literature II
3
3
3
3
ENG 2273
ENG 2283
ENG 2223
ENG 2233
Physical Science (4 credit hours)
Social Sciences (9 credit hours)
Select one of the following courses.
US History to 1865
3
HIST 2223
US History since 1865
3
HIST 2233
American National Government 3
POLS 1113
Select one of the following courses.
Western Civilization to 1660
3
HIST 2203
Western Civilization since 1660
3
HIST 2223
Select one of the following courses.
General Anthropology
3
ANTH 1113US History
Introduction to Geography
3
GEOG 1103
Arkansas History
3
HISY 1143
General Psychology
3
PSYC 1103
Introduction to Sociology
3
SOC 1103
80
3
Physical Education (2 credit hours)
Two activity courses
PE 2
Education (6 credit hours)
Foundations of Education
3
Introduction to K-12 Technology 3
EDUC 2243
EDUC 2263
The specialization track course requirements may be used to substitute for the
required core curriculum course. See an advisor for complete information on the
specific course requirements for the 4-year institution of choice.
SPECIALIZATION TRACKS
Specialization tracks include: Early Childhood Education (P-4); Middle School
Mathematics/Science; and, Middle School Language Arts/Social Sciences
Associate of Liberal Studies (A.L.S.)
The Associate of Liberal Studies Degree (A.L.S.) offers students maximum flexibility in selecting courses to meet their individual employment and educational
needs. Although many courses leading to the Associate of Liberal Studies degree
may be transferable on an individual basis, sometimes the combination of courses
will not complete a major area suitable for transfer. Students should see a counselor or advisor pertaining to the transfer of courses taken to complete the
Associate of Liberal Studies Degree.
Students interested in an A.L.S. degree with a Business Administration emphasis
should contact the Division Chair, Debbie Burks. Those interested in an A.L.S.
degree with a transfer program emphasis in Visual Art Studio should contact
instructor Thad Flenniken or Richard Browne.
Communication: (6 Credit Hours Total)
Written - Select ONE course from the following options:
ENG 1113
English Composition I
ENG 1133
Technical Report Writing
JRNL 1103
Newswriting I
OFAD 1133
Business English
and
Oral - Select ONE course from the following options:
SPCH 1103
Fundamentals of Public Speaking
SUPM 1183
Effective Communications
Art: (3 Credit Hours Total)
Select ONE course from the following options:
ART
1593
Art Appreciation
MUS
1213
Music Appreciation
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
81
FLM
ENG
1103
1183
Introduction to Film
Introduction to Literature
3
3
Heritage: (3 Credit Hours Total)
Select ONE course from the following options:
HIST 2203
Western Civilization I
HIST 2213
Western Civilization II
HIST 2223
U.S. History to 1865
HIST 2233
U.S. History since 1865
HIST 2283
The American Civil War
3
3
3
3
3
Institutions: (3 Credit Hours Total)
Select ONE course from the following options:
SOC
1103
Introduction to Sociology
POLS 1113
American National Government
POLS 1123
State & Local Government
SOC
2213
Marriage and the Family
BUS
1193
Consumer Economics
ECON 2203
Macroeconomics
ECON 2213
Microeconomics
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Nature: (3 or 4 Credit Hours Total)
Select ONE course from the following options:
ESCI
1104
Earth Science
ESCI
1153
Astronomy
ESCI
2244
Meteorology
ESCI
2254
Oceanography
ESCI
2263
Environmental Science
GEOG 1123
Conservation
GEOL 1104
Physical Geology
PHYS 1123
Physical Science
Work: (3 Credit Hours Total)
Select ONE course from the following options:
BUS
1113
Introduction to Business
BUS
1143
Introduction to Marketing
BUS
1183
Small Business Management
CIS
1013
Information Systems I
CRJ
1103
Introduction to Criminal Justice
EDUC 2243
Foundations of Education
JRNL 1243
Introduction to Mass Media
PHOT 1103
Introduction to Photography
PE
1103
Fundamentals of Physical Education
OFAD 1083
Word Processing I
LAD
1303
Career Exploration
82
4
4
4
4
3
3
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Identity: (3 Credit Hours Total)
Select ONE course from the following options:
PSYC 1103
General Psychology
PSYC 1153
Human Sexuality
PSYC 1173
Psychology of Parenting
PSYC 2003
Human Growth and Development
PSYC 2133
Mental Health
PHIL 1123
Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 1133
Fundamentals of Ethics
SOC
1103
Introduction to Sociology
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Mathematics: (3 Credit Hours Total)
Select ONE course from the following options:
MATH 1003
Intermediate Algebra
MATH 1013
Mathematics for General Education
OFAD 1053
Business Math with Calculators
MATH 1123
College Algebra
MATH 1293
Introduction to Statistics
3
3
3
3
3
Total Required for Integrated Core Curriculum
Subtotal
Total Electives for Personal Enrichment Courses
Subtotal
Total Credit Hours
27
33
60
Associate of Science Degree
The Associate of Science Degree (A.S.) is designed for transfer to upper-level colleges and universities. Academic concentration is in the areas of the sciences curriculum. (See major areas of study.) Each candidate for the of Associate of
Science Degree must successfully complete the following general education
requirements which are in compliance with ACT 98 of 1989.
Required Core Curriculum for the A.S. Degree
English/Communication - 9 Credit Hours Total
ENG 1113
English Composition I
ENG 1123
English Composition II
SPCH 1103
Speech
3
3
3
Mathematics/Science - 17-22 Credit Hours Total
Students should follow carefully the curriculum advised by the senior institution to
which they will transfer to determine exactly which mathematics and/or science
courses they should take, but in general, the mathematics and science requirements
are as follows:
83
Math - 3 Credit Hours Required (select one)
MATH 1123
College Algebra
MATH 1133
Trigonometry
MATH 2215
Calculus I
3
3
5
Science - 14-19 Credit Hours Required
(Select one course from Option I, one course from Option II, and two courses from Option III)
Option I - Life Sciences (one course)
BIOL 1114
General Biology
BIOL 1154
Zoology
BIOL 1164
Botany
4
4
4
Option II - Physical Sciences (one course)
CHEM 1104
Chemistry for Non-Majors
CHEM 1204
Chemistry I
ESCI
1104
Earth Science
GEOL 1104
Physical Geology
PHYS 1114
Physical Science
PHYS 1204
Physics I
4
4
4
4
4
4
Option III - (two courses not satisfying previous requirements)
MATH 1133
Trigonometry
MATH 2215
Calculus I
MATH 2225
Calculus II
MATH 2233
Number Systems for Elementary
Education Majors I
MATH 2243
Number Systems for
Elementary Education Majors II
BIOL 2224
Anatomy &Physiology I
BIOL 2234
Anatomy &Physiology II
BIOL 1154
Zoology
BIOL 1164
Botany
CHEM 1204
General Chemistry I
CHEM 2204
General Chemistry II
PHYS 1204
General Physics I
PHYS 2204
General Physics II
PHYS 1124
Astronomy
ESCI
2244
Meteorology
ESCI
2254
Oceanography
ESCI
2263
Environmental Science
84
3
5
5
3
3
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
3
Fine Arts/Humanities - A.S. Candidates - 9 Credit Hours Total
Option I (Select TWO of the following courses)
ART
1593
Art Appreciation
MUS
1143
Music Appreciation
PHIL 1123
Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 1133
Fundamentals of Ethics
SPAN 1103
Spanish I
SPAN 1113
Spanish II
3
3
3
3
3
3
Option II (Select ONE of the following courses)
ENG 1183
Introduction to Literature
3
ENG 2223
American Literature I
3
ENG 2233
American Literature II
3
ENG 2273
World Literature I
3
ENG 2283
World Literature II
3
Any course not used to satisfy Option II may be used to meet the requirements of Option I.
Social Sciences - A.S. Candidates - 15 Credit Hours Total
A. Select TWO of the following three courses
HIST 2223
U.S. History to 1865
HIST 2233
U.S. History since 1865
POLS 1113
American National Government
3
3
3
B. Select ONE of the following two courses
HIST 2203
Western Civilization I
HIST 2213
Western Civilization II
3
3
C. Select TWO of the following courses
ANTH 1113 General Anthropology
GEOG 1103 Introduction to Geography
POLS 1123 State and Local Government
PSYC 1103 General Psychology
PSYC 1123 Applied Psychology
SOC
1103 Introduction to Sociology
SOC
2203 Social Problems
SOC
2213 Marriage and the Family
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Physical Education - 2 Credit Hours Total
Arkansas colleges and universities require at least two physical education credits
in activity courses for graduation eligibility. Medically exempt students, approved
by the Executive Vice President, may take Health Safety (PE 1113) as a substitute
for the two physical education courses. Transfer students should be aware that
85
many colleges and universities require Life Fitness Concepts in partial fulfillment
of the physical education requirement. The faculty of the Physical Education
Department strongly recommend HPR 1102 Life Fitness Concepts as one of the
two required physical education courses.
Electives - 11 Credit Hours Total
Since the choice in the core curriculum may vary in the amount of credits earned,
students should work with their academic advisor in selecting the most appropriate electives and be certain of acquiring 60 credits for graduation eligibility. Choice
of electives should be greatly influenced by the program requirements of the senior college to which the student plans to transfer. A.S. candidates need 11 elective
credits to satisfy the required 60 SSCH for their degree plan.
Degree Requirements Summary
Academic Area
English/Communications/Art/Humanities
Math/Science
Social Science
Electives
Physical Education
Credit Hours
18
17-21
15
11
2
Total Credit Hours
63
In addition, the college offers the following specialized A.S. degrees:
Associate of Science Degree in Medical Laboratory Technology
The Associate of Science Degree in Medical Laboratory Technology is designed
for career entry and articulation with four-year institutions so graduates may pursue a baccalaureate degree in medical technology or related areas.
Associate of Science Degree in Nursing
The Associate of Science Degree in Nursing (A.D.N.) is designed for career
entry and so students who wish to pursue a Bachelor's of Science Degree in
Nursing (B.S.N.) may continue their formal education at a four-year college or
university.
Associate of Applied Science Degree (A.A.S.)
The Associate of Applied Science Degree (A.A.S.) is designed for students who
seek occupational, technical, and vocational skills primarily for employment or
advancement.
Students seeking one of the following degrees should contact the College
Counseling Center or an assigned faculty advisor for specific degree requirements
in any of the areas listed in this chapter.
86
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
Accounting
Child Care Management
Computer Information Systems (Microsoft, Cisco, Computer Support and
Programming Support)
Criminal Justice
Emergency Medical Services- Paramedic Education
Fire Protection
General Technology
Graphic Design
Health Information Technology
Hospitality Administration
Office Administration
Radiologic Technology
Recreation
Associate of Applied Science in General Technology (A.A.S) (60 SSCH)
A.A.S. Transfer Disclaimer
The Associate of Applied Science Degree is designed for employment purposes,
and it should not be assumed that the degree or the courses in the degree can be
transferred to another institution. While some institutions do accept some courses in A.A.S. Programs, the general rule is that courses in A.A.S. Degrees are not
accepted in transfer toward bachelor's degrees. Students to whom transfer is
important should get assurances in writing in advance from the institution to which
they wish to transfer.
The Associate of Applied Science in General Technology is designed to meet the
needs of students who wish to combine technical or vocational coursework with
general education requirements to complete a two-year degree.
The Associate of Applied Science in General Technology degree enables a student
to design an individual program of study to fulfill a unique career goal that cannot
be met through the completion of any single technology program offered by the
college. It also serves as a bridge program for students enrolled in technical programs at other institutions who wish to complete an Associates Degree.
Students wishing to complete the A.A.S. degree in General Technology will develop an individualized course of study through a structured advising process with
faculty and college counselors. A total of at least 60 credits is required for the
A.A.S. in General Technology. The courses are distributed in the following areas:
Major Technical Discipline (24-30 credit hours)
Technical Minor/Approved Support Courses (15-21 credit hours)
General Education Courses (15 credit hours, minimum)
87
Communication Skills-6 credit hours total (select one from each group)
Group One
ENG
ENG
OFAD
1113
1133
1133
English Composition I
Technical Report Writing
Business English
3
3
3
Group Two
SPCH
SUPM
ENG
BUS
1103
1183
1123
2033
Speech
Effective Communication
English Composition II
Business Communication
3
3
3
3
Computer Literacy (3 credits; select ALL courses)
CIS
1001
Introduction to Computing I
CIS
1011
Introduction to Computing II
CIS
1501
Introduction to the Internet
1
1
1
Social Science (3 credits; select One course)
HIST
2223
U. S. History I
HIST
2233
U.S. History II
HIST
2203
Western Civilization I
HIST
2213
Western Civilization II
PSYC
1103
General Psychology
PSYC
1123
Applied Psychology
SOC
1103
Intro to Sociology
POLS
1113
American National Government
POLS
1123
State & Local Government
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Mathematics (3 credits; select One course)
MATH 1013
Math for General Education
MATH 1123
College Algebra
MATH 1293
Introduction to Statistics
MATH 1133
Trigonometry
MATH 1053
Business Math w/ calculators
MATH 1103
Technical Math
3
3
3
3
3
3
Early Childhood Education, Associate of Applied Science (AAS)
(60 credit hours)
The AAS Degree includes those courses required in the Early Childhood
Education Technical Certificates (36 hours) plus an additional 24house of classroom and/or laboratory instruction for a total of 60 credit hours. The AAS
Degree in Early Childhood Education will provide students with a solid knowledge
base upon which to build a career in the childcare profession. Students who have
88
earned their Child Development Associate (CDA) License may qualify for credit in
specific courses.
Early Childhood Education, Associate of Applied Science (AAS)
(60 credit hours)
Required Classes:
ECE
ECE
ECE
ECE
ECE
ECE
ECE
ECE
ECE
TECH
TECH
ECE
ECE
ECE
OR
1103
1143
1223
1173
1183
1133
1283
1203
1403
1101
1102
1113
1163
1253
Practicum I
Family Involvement
Infant & Toddler
Methods & Materials
Health, Safety, Nutrition
Child Guidance
Special Needs
Practicum II
Nanny Orientation
Computer Technology
Tech Communications
Child Development *
Program Management *
Curriculum Development*
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3 OR
3
1
2
3
3
3
*Child Development Associate (CDA) License
Electives (9 credit hours maximum)
MUS
2213
Public School Music
ART
2203
Public School Art
PE
1113
Health and Safety
HPR
1113
Personal Safety and First Aid
3
3
3
3
Natural or Physical Science w/ Lab
BIOL
1114
General Biology
BIOL
1154
Zoology
BIOL
1164
Botany
CHEM 1104
Chemistry for Non-Majors
ESCI
1104
Earth Science
GEOL 1104
Geology
PHYS 1114
Physical Science
PHYS 1204
General Physics
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
General Educations Courses (15 credit hours, minimum)
89
Communications skills-6 credit hours, select one from each group
Comp I and II are recommended for those considering study beyond the A.A.S. in
General Technology.
Select one from each group
Group One
ENG
1113
Composition I
ENG
1133
Technical Report Writing
OFAD 1133
Business English
Group Two
SPCH 1103
Speech
SUPM 1183
Effective Communications
ENG
1123
Composition II
BUS
2033
Business Communications
Computer Literacy (3 credits; select ALL courses)
CIS
1001
Introduction to Computing I
CIS
1011
Introduction to Computing II
CIS
1501
Introduction to the Internet
Social Sciences--Select One
HIST
2223
United States History I
HIST
2233
United States History II
HIST
2203
Western Civilization I
HIST
2213
Western Civilization II
PSYC
1103
General Psychology
PSYC
1123
Applied Psychology
SOC
1103
Introduction to Sociology
POLS
1113
American National Government
POLS
1123
State/Local Government
Mathematics-- Select One
MATH 1013
Math for General Education
MATH 1123
College Algebra
MATH 1293
Introduction to Statistics
MATH 1133
Trigonometry
TECM 1103
Technical Math
OFAD 1053
Business Math w/Calculators
Total Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1
1
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
60
Graphic Design (A.A.S.)
This program is designed to help students enter the job market upon completion
of required course work or to continue formal study at a four-year college or university.
90
The program utilizes the most modern graphic design equipment including phototypesetting equipment. The courses are designed to allow students to experience
the broadest possible range of techniques and to provide the student with a portfolio of work that will demonstrate mastery of those techniques to prospective
employees.
Subject areas range from Design and Advertising to Photography. An Introduction
to Business course is included in the curriculum, since many graphic designers
operate their own shop.
The Graphic Design Program will enable the student to gain expertise in a variety
of skill areas, ranging from 35mm photography to Macintosh computers, along
with printing, drawing, advertising, reproduction and layout, lettering, illustration,
display, packaging, art direction, and other related courses. Predictions indicate that
there will be a growing demand for graphic designers during the next ten years,
according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Openings for talented graphic designers in all areas of visual advertising, package design, industrial design, television
graphics, and other fields will increase. However, competition will be keen and the
best jobs will go to those with both talent and training. The need for free-lance
graphic designers will also increase during the next decade.
The degree requires 60 SSCH with 15 of those hours being required core curriculum courses.
The following is a list of required courses in sequential order for the graphic design
degree program offered by the Communication/Arts Division.
GRAPHIC DESIGN DEGREE PROGRAM (A.A.S.)
(60 SSCH)
First Semester
ART
ENG
GRD
GRD
MATH
OR
OFAD
1113
1113
1103
1183
1013
Drawing I
English Composition I
Advertising Design I
Desktop Publishing I
Mathematics for General Education
1053
Business Math
Subtotal
Second Semester
ART 1103
ENG 1123
Design I
English Composition II
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
91
GRD 1113
GRD 1153
PHOT 1113
Advertising Design II
Photo Shop Studio
Intro to Photography
Subtotal
Third Semester
ART 2213
Art History I
GRD 1163
Silkscreen Printmaking
GRD 2023
Production & Layout I
PHOT 1113
Intermediate Photography
*Selection From Social Science Core
Subtotal
Fourth Semester
ART 2223
GRD 1143
GRD 2013
GRD 2033
GRD 2043
Art History II
Adobe Illustrator
Art Direction
Production & Layout II
Commercial Illustration
Subtotal
Total Credit Hours
*Social Science Core - (Select one course)
HIST 2203
Western Civilization I
HIST 2213
Western Civilization II
HIST 2223
U.S. History I
HIST 2233
U.S. History II
POLS 1113
American National Government
POLS 1123
State & Local Government
PHIL 1123
Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 1133
Fundamentals of Ethics
PSYC 1103
General Psychology
SOC 1103
Introduction to Sociology
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
60
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Associate of Applied Science in Hospitality Administration
(60 credit hours)
The AAS degree in Hospitality Administration will provide students with a solid
knowledge base upon which to build a career in the hospitality industry. The
degree includes those courses required in the hospitality certificate of proficiency
and the hospitality technical certificate (30 hours), hospitality related electives (15
hours), and core general education courses (15 hours).
Required Courses
HA
1043
92
Introduction to Hospitality Administration
HA
HA
HA
HA
HA
HA
HA
TECH
TECH
HA
1103
1013
1053
1063
1113
1163
1153
1101
1102
1073
Principles of Food Preparation I
Restaurant Orientation/Sanitation
Introduction to Food & Beverage Management
Hotel Operations
Principles of Food Preparation II
Restaurant Management
Beverage Management
Computer Technology
Technical Communication
Hospitality Administration Internship
Electives (15 credit hours, minimum)
HPR 2403
HPR 1113
HPR 1803
HPR 1703
HPR 2213
GRD 1143
GRD 2073
GRD 1183
Commercial Recreation, Tourism, & Hospitality Enterprises
Personal Safety & First Aid
Promotion & Production of Programs & Special Events
Leadership in Recreation, Hospitality, & Tourism
Marketing of Leisure Services
Adobe Illustrator
Advertising Design for the Small Business
Desktop Publishing and Design I
General Education Courses (15 credit hours, minimum)
Communication Skills - 6 credit hours, select one from each group
Comp I and II are recommended for those considering study beyond the A.A.S. in General
Technology.
Group One
ENG
1113
English Composition I
Group Two
ENG
ENG
1123
1133
English Composition II
Technical Report Writing
Computer Literacy - 3 credit hours, select one course
CIS
1013
Information Systems I
OR
CIS
1011
Introduction to Computer I
CIS
1011
Introduction to Computer II
CIS
1501
Introduction to Internet
Social Sciences - 3 credit hours, select one course
HIST
2223
US History to 1865
93
HIST
HIST
HIST
PSYC
PSYC
SOC
POLS
POLS
2233
2203
2213
1103
1123
1103
1113
1123
US History since 1865
Western Civilization I
Western Civilization II
General Psychology
Applied Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
American National Government
State and Local Government
Mathematics - 3 credit hours, select one course
MATH 1013
Math for General Education
MATH 1123
College Algebra
MATH 1293
Introduction to Statistics
MATH 1133
Trigonometry
OFAD 1053
Business Math with Calculators
TECM 1103
Technical Math
Technical Certificate Programs
The Technical Certificate is a planned and coherent program of classroom and laboratory/shop work at the collegiate level. It recognizes the completion of a specified level of competency in an occupational field. The program of study may be
part of an Associate of Applied Science curriculum or a stand-alone program.
The curriculum requires a demonstration of competency in communications (oral
and written), mathematics, and other general education disciplines necessary to be
successful in the field. The state range of credit hours is 14to 36 semester hours.
Exceptions to this range will be allowed only when accrediting or approval agencies require additional semester hours. The College Curriculum Committee established a minimum of 30 credit hours for each technical certificate awarded.
College-level technical certificate programs are designed to allow students to
obtain general educational requirements while upgrading or acquiring new skills in
occupational and vocational curricula.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Accounting Technician
Advanced Emergency Medical Technology -Paramedic Education
Allied Health
Auto Service Technology
Computer Information Systems (Tracks in Microsoft, Cisco, Computer
Support, Programming Support
Early Childhood Education
General Studies
Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning
Hospitality Administration
Industrial Maintenance
Legal Office
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
94
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
Licensed Practical Nurse
Marine Technology
Medical Office
Medical Transcription
Office Administration
Phlebotomy
Professional Medical Coding
Programming Support
Residential Carpentry
Supervisory Management
Web Design
Welding
Certificate of Proficiency Programs
A Certificate of Proficiency is awarded to students who have demonstrated the
attainment of basic skills in one of following areas:
1. A+
2. Accounting Technology
3. Child Development
4. Emergency Medical Service - Basic
5. Hospitality Administration
6. Medication Aide
The program of study is normally not part of other programs leading to the
awarding of a Technical Certificate or Associate Degree. Under Department of
Higher Education guidelines, only one certificate of achievement can be awarded
prior to completion of a related Technical Certificate or Associate Degree.
Aviation Courses
These special courses are designed for those who hold Federal Aviation
Administration (FAA) certificates and wish to pursue an associate degree, as well
as for those who may wish to use their formal study to continue in a four-year aviation degree program. The aviation program is designed to allow a person who
qualifies for Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) certificates to acquire college
credit and also complete the requirements for an Associate degree.
A student already holding a FAA certificate in Private Pilot, Commercial Pilot or
Instrument Pilot may gain college credit for that certificate. This credit will be
awarded upon successful completion of FAA requirements for the certificate and
the completion of at least 6-semester credit hours of college work at NPCC.
Those students who hold an FAA Private Pilot Certificate will receive credit for:
AVN
1021
Introduction to Aeronautics Lab
1
AVN
1161
Private Pilot Certification
1
95
AVN
1171
Private Pilot Certification Lab I
1
Those students who hold an FAA Commercial Certificate will receive credit for:
AVN
2031
Commercial Pilot Certification
1
AVN
2051
Commercial Pilot Lab I
2
AVN
2062
Commercial Pilot Lab II
2
Those students who hold an FAA Instrument Pilot Certificate will receive credit
for:
AVN
2071
Instrument Pilot Certification
1
AVN
2083
Instrument Pilot Certification Lab
3
DEGREES
It should not be assumed that these courses could be transferred to another institution that does not offer an Aviation Program. The courses may be used as electives at NPCC in:
Associate of Arts Degree (A.A.) (Electives - 12 Credit Hours Total)
Associate of Liberal Studies Degree (A.L.S.) (Electives - 33 Credit Hours Total
Associate of Science Degree (A.S.) (Electives - 11 Credit Hours Total)
Some programs list electives in specific areas. The following list of courses may
help students in choosing an elective.
Transferring to Another Institution
Students who plan to transfer should be aware that some Arkansas colleges and
universities may accept U.S. Government rather than U.S. History as a requirement
for graduation. In addition, state requirements are currently being revised.
Therefore, four-year institutions are revising their curricula accordingly. Most fouryear colleges and universities will limit the number of transfer credits applicable to
a baccalaureate degree to about 64 credits. In any case, students should check with
the college or university to which they plan to transfer for these particular requirements.
Students officially admitted to one of the College's health science programs should
be aware that there is a seven-year statute of limitations for all required science and
mathematics courses.
96
Adult Education
FACULTY - Adult Education
Becky Linsky
Director
B.S., University of Arkansas; M.S., University of Arkansas
[email protected]
501-760-4339
Joe Colvis
Faculty
B.S.E., Henderson State University; M.S.E., University of Arkansas, Little Rock
[email protected]
501-760-4350
Beth Correll
Faculty
B.S.E., Henderson State University
[email protected]
501-760-4373
Ralph Edds
Faculty
B.S.E., Henderson State University, M.S.E., University of Central Arkansas
[email protected]
501-321-2744
Pat Longinotti
Faculty
B.S. Arkansas Tech University; M.S.E. Henderson State University
[email protected]
501-624-4411 ext. 560
Claudia Lippold Administrative Secretary
A.A.S., Garland County Community College, B.S.E., University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
[email protected]
501-760-4335
97
BUSINESS DIVISION
MISSION STATEMENT:
The mission of the Business Division is to offer academic and
vocational programs in the areas of business, information sciences, and technology for individuals in the
college’s service area.
FACULTY
Deborah Burks
Business/Computer Information
B.S.E., Henderson State University; M.B.A., Henderson State University
[email protected]
Tena Brown
Office Administration
B.S.E., Henderson State University, M.Ed.,University of Arkansas at Fayetteville
[email protected]
Division Chair
501-760-4251
501-760-4380
Susan Gaither
Business/Computer Information
B.S.B.A., Henderson State University; M.B.A., Henderson State University, ABD - Ed.D. University
of Arkansas at Little Rock
[email protected]
501-760-4257
Rob Hillard, MCSE
Computer Information
A.A., Garland County Community College; B.S.E., University of Arkansas at Fayetteville
[email protected]
501-760-4136
Jackie Holloway, CPA
Accounting
B.S., University of Arkansas, Little Rock; M.B.A., Arkansas State University; Jonesboro; S.C.C.T.,
Arkansas State University, Jonesboro
[email protected]
501-760-4256
Allan Mesko
Computer Information
B.A., University of Arkansas, Fayetteville; M.A., University of Texas, Austin; additional graduate
study
[email protected]
501-760-4262
Ralph Ramsey
Business
B.S.B.A., University of Arkansas, Fayetteville; M.B.A., Henderson State University
[email protected]
501-760-4255
99
Linda Reis
Business/Computer Information
B.S.E., University of Central Arkansas; M.Ed., University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
[email protected]
501-760-4254
Linda Stanley
Office Administration/ Computer Information
B.S.E., Henderson State University; additional course work
[email protected]
501-760-4322
Michelle Thomson
Computer Information
B.S.E., Henderson State University; M.E., University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
[email protected]
501-760-4356
Faculty Emeritus
Billie Wetzler
1991 - 2007
DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAMS
The Business Division offers certificate and associate degree programs designed to
prepare students for employment in the business field, as well as opportunities for
continuing promotion and advancement. The certificate and associate degree
programs are in the areas of Accounting, Computer Information Systems, and
Office Administration and Computer Applications.
ACCOUNTING
Accounting (A.A.S.)
The accounting program prepares students for entry-level employment in accounting. Coursework includes courses in accounting, computer technology, and general
education so that graduates possess the skills necessary to clearly communicate the
results of their work, both orally and in writing, to clients and management.
Students are prepared for career opportunities in positions such as accounting
assistants, bookkeepers, payroll clerks, and management trainees.
Accounting Technology (Technical Certificate)
Graduates who complete this 36-hour certificate will possess the basic knowledge
of accounting and computer technology to be employed as accounting technicians,
accounting assistants, or accounting clerks (payroll, receivables, payables). Courses
include both accounting theory and computerized accounting systems as well as an
income tax course.
100
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
Computer Information Systems (A.A.S.)
The courses available in this program are for those interested in the use, application, or maintenance of computers and information. Consequently, some courses
in this program will not transfer to all four year institutions. Extensive computer
use, interaction, and maintenance are significant features. This degree includes
courses in networking, hardware maintenance, and applications programming.
General education courses included in this degree prepare the student to communicate with customers and management.
A+ (Certificate of Proficiency)
The A+ Certificate of Proficiency provides future information technology professionals with the basic hardware, software, and networking skills necessary to be
successful in a variety of Information Technology positions. The recipient of the
certificate will gain knowledge and competency in core hardware and operating
system technologies including installation, configuration, diagnosing, preventive
maintenance, and basic networking.
Computer Information Systems (Technical Certificate)
Graduate who complete the technical certificate acquire knowledge, skills, and
technical ability appropriate for employment requiring entry-level duties and
responsibilities in the computer information systems field.
Web Design (Technical Certificate)
Graduates who complete this 30-hour credit technical certificate acquire the
broad-base skills in Web development including the ability to create, edit, optimize,
manage, and secure a Web presence effectively. This program will benefit anyone
who wishes to develop an understanding of nearly every fact of Web development.
Courses include classes in applications and software programs needed to develop
media such as text, graphics, and animation, as well as web site server security.
Graduates of this certificate are prepared for positions in businesses, government,
and nonprofit organizations that require service, support, and development for the
World Wide Web.
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION AND COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
Office Administration and Computer Applications (A.A.S.)
This degree is designed for those seeking employment and not planning to
continue formal study in pursuit of a baccalaureate degree. Consequently, some
courses in this program will not transfer to all senior institutions. Students are
exposed to a broad base of computer software in courses that teach word processing, spreadsheets, and database. General education courses are included in this
degree.
101
Legal Office (Technical Certificate)
Graduates who complete this 36-hour credit technical certificate acquire the
knowledge of general legal office procedures, systems, and technology appropriate
for entry-level employment in a modern legal environment. Courses include
computer classes, general business classes, and transcription classes.
Medical Office (Technical Certificate)
Graduates who complete this 36-hour credit technical certificate acquire the
knowledge of general medical office procedures, systems, and technology appropriate for entry-level employment in a modern medical environment. Courses
include medical terminology, computer classes, general business classes, and transcription. Students may become employed as a receptionist or medical transcriber
in medical and dental offices, hospitals, clinics, or home health agencies.
Office Administration and Computer Applications (Technical Certificate)
Graduates who complete this 33-hour credit technical certificate acquire knowledge of general office procedures, systems, and technology appropriate for entrylevel employment in a modern business environment. Courses include computer
classes, general business classes, and transcription. Students may become
employed as clerical and administrative support workers, general office clerks,
receptionists, secretaries, or word processors.
SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT
Supervisory Management (Technical Certificate)
Graduates who complete this 30-hour credit technical certificate acquire the
knowledge of general management procedures, systems, and technology appropriate for first-line management employment in supervisory and human resource
fields. Computer, supervision, and communication courses are included in this
certificate.
Degree/Certificate Requirements
The following is a list of required courses in sequential order for each of the
degree/certificate programs offered by the Business Division.
ACCOUNTING DEGREE PROGRAM (A.A.S)
This A.A.S. Program is primarily intended for those interested in an accounting
career. Completion of the recommended courses leads to the Associate of Applied
Science Degree in Accounting. Consequently, some courses in this program may
not transfer to all senior institutions. Students who plan to transfer to a senior institution are strongly advised to correspond with the institution to which they plan to
transfer.
102
All courses listed are required, but the sequence of courses taken is based on availability and the necessity for prerequisites.
In the Business Division curricula, courses prerequisite to another class require a
minimum grade of “C” in order to advance to the next course
Pre-requisite courses include:
ACT
1103
Principles of Accounting I
ACT
1113
Principles of Accounting II
CIS
1013
Information Systems I
CIS
1263
Microcomputer Operating Systems I
ECON 2203
Macroeconomics
OFAD 1002
Keyboarding I
OFAD 1012
Keyboarding II
OFAD 1133
Business English
First Semester
ACT
1103
___
___
CIS
1013
Principles of Accounting I
Structured Elective
Information Systems I
3
3
3
Choose One:
MATH 1013
OFAD 1053
MATH 1003
Mathematics for General Education
Business Math with Calculators
Intermediate Algebra
3
English Composition I
Business English
Subtotal
3
Choose One:
ENG
1113
OFAD 1133
Second Semester
ACT
1113
BUS
1193
CIS
1173
___
____
Choose One:
BUS
2033
ENG
1123
Third Semester
ECON 2203
ACT
1203
BUS
1133
___
____
15
Principles of Accounting II
Consumer Economics
Spreadsheets I
Structured Elective
3
3
3
3
Business Communications
English Composition II
Subtotal
3
Macroeconomics
Computerized Accounting
Introduction to Income Taxes
Structured Elective
15
3
3
3
3
103
Choose One:
PSYC
1103
SOC
1103
HIST
2223
HIST
2233
POLS
1113
Fourth Semester
ECON 2213
BUS
2203
SUPM 1103
___
____
General Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
United States History To 1865
United States History Since 1865
American National Government
Subtotal
15
Microeconomics
Business Law I
Management/Budgetary Accounting
Structured Electives (2)
Subtotal
Total Credit Hours
3
3
3
6
15
60
Structured Electives
ACT
2003
Cost Accounting
ACT
2043
Intermediate Accounting
BUS
1113
Introduction to Business
BUS
1143
Introduction to Marketing
OFAD 1083
Word Processing I
OFAD 1133
Business English
CIS
1813
Computer Law & Ethics
CIS
1903
Web Design/Front Page
CIS
1913
Web Design/HTML
CIS
2013
Information Systems II
BUS
1143
Introduction to Marketing
___
____
Social Sciences (1 additional course)
Choose One:
BUS
1183
SUPM 1123
3
3
Small Business Management
Introduction to Supervision
ACCOUNTING TECHNOLOGY
(Technical Certificate) (36 SSCH)
First Semester:
ACT
1103
BUS
1133
CIS
1013
OFAD 1053
OFAD 1133
OFAD 1203
104
Principles of Accounting I
Introduction to Income Taxes
Information Systems I
Business Math with Calculators
Business English
Business Practices & Procedures
Subtotal
Credit
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
Second Semester:
ACT
1113
Principles of Accounting II
ACT
1203
Computerized Accounting
BUS
2033
Business Communications
CIS
1173
Spreadsheets I
Choose One:
CIS
1203
Presentation Graphics/Desktop Publishing
CIS
1903
Web Design/Front Page
Subtotal
Summer Semester:
ACT
2393
Accounting Technology
Internship
Total Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
36
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
DEGREE PROGRAM (A.A.S.) (60 SSCH)
The courses available in this A.A.S. program are for those interested in the use,
application, or maintenance of computers and information. Extensive computer
use, interaction, maintenance, and networking are significant features. Completion
of the recommended courses leads to the Associate of Applied Science Degree in
Computer Information Systems.
Some courses in this program may not transfer to all senior institutions. Students
who plan to transfer to a senior institution are strongly advised to correspond with
the institution to which they plan to transfer.
In the Business Division curricula, courses prerequisite to another class require a
minimum grade of “C” in order to advance to the next course.
Prerequisite courses include:
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
OFAD
1013
1053
1263
1593
2013
2053
2153
2163
2273
2283
1002
Information Systems I
Networking & Communications I
Microcomputer Operating Systems I
Programming in C++
Information Systems II
Networking & Communications II
Networking & Communications III
MS Essentials
MS NOS
MS Networking I
Keyboarding I
105
OFAD
OFAD
PCLM
1012
1133
0083
Keyboarding II
Business English
Intermediate Algebra
To insure success in the Computer Information Systems program, the following
program prerequisites are required before entering the program:
Type 28 wpm (3-minute exam)
English ACT score of 19
Reading ACT score of 19
Math ACT score of 19 for Intermediate Algebra
Math ACT score of 18 for Business Math with Calculators
Computer Literacy
First Semester
CIS
1013
CIS
1243
Information Systems I
Microcomputer Hardware Maintenance I
Choose One:
MATH 1003
OFAD 1053
Intermediate Algebra
Business Math with Calculators
Credit
3
3
3
Choose One:
ENG
OFAD
1113
1133
English Composition I
Business English
Subtotal
3
12
Specific Program Requirements:
Operating Systems
CIS
2163
MS Essentials
Total
Networking
CIS
1053
Networking & Communications I
Total
Programming
CIS
1593
Programming in C++
Total
Computer Support Specialist
CIS
2263
Microcomputer Operating Systems II (MOS II)
Total
106
3
15
3
15
3
15
3
15
Second Semester
ACT
1103
Principles of Accounting I
CIS
2013
Information Systems II
Choose One:
CIS
1903
CIS
1913
Web Design/Front Page
Web Design/HTML
Subtotal
Credit
3
3
3
9
Specific Program Requirements:
Operating Systems
CIS
2273
Microsoft Network Operating Systems (MS NOS)
CIS
2283
MS Networking I
Total
Networking
CIS
1823
Network Cabling
CIS
2053
Networking & Communications II
Total
3
3
15
3
3
15
Programming
CIS
1303
Visual Basic I
CIS
XXXX Structured Elective
Total
3
3
15
Computer Support Specialist
CIS
1823
Network Cabling
CIS
2143
Microcomputer Hardware Maintenance II
Total
3
3
15
Third Semester
CIS
1813
Choose One:
BUS
1113
OFAD 2073
Computer Law & Ethics
Introduction to Business
Administrative Office Management
Subtotal
Credit
3
3
6
Specific Program Requirements:
Operating Systems
CIS
1053
Networking & Communications I
CIS
2383
MS Networking II
CIS
2293
Microsoft Windows Directory Services
Total
3
3
3
15
107
Networking
CIS
2153
Networking & Communications III
CIS
2163
MS Essentials
CIS
XXXX Structured Elective
Total
3
3
3
15
Programming
CIS
2123
Database Applications Development
CIS
XXXX Structured Elective
CIS
XXXX Structured Elective
Total
3
3
3
15
Computer Support Specialist
CIS
1053
Networking & Communications I
CIS
2123
Database Applications Development
CIS
XXXX Structured Elective
Total
3
3
3
15
Fourth Semester:
Choose One:
HIST
2223
HIST
2233
POLS
1113
PSYC
1103
SOC
1103
Choose One:
BUS
2033
ENG
1123
SUPM 1183
Credit
United States History To 1865
United States History Since 1865
American National Government
General Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
3
Business Communications
English Composition II
Effective Communication
Subtotal
3
6
Specific Program Requirements:
Operating Systems
CIS
XXXX Structured Elective
3
Choose One:
CIS
2423
CIS
2433
3
Choose One:
CIS
2413
CIS
2313
108
MS Firewall
MS Mail
MS Networking Design
MS Security Design
Total
3
15
Networking
CIS
2023
CIS
2253
CIS
2903
Visual Basic for Applications
Networking & Communications IV
Internship
Total
3
3
3
15
Programming
CIS
2093
Advanced Programming in C++
CIS
XXXX Structured Elective
CIS
XXXX Structured Elective
Total
3
3
3
15
Computer Support Specialist
CIS
1213
Help Desk Support
CIS
2163
MS Essentials
CIS
2903
Internship
Total
3
3
3
15
Structured Electives:
ACT
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
1203
1053
1173
1273
1213
1303
1503
1593
1603
1823
1903
1913
2023
2053
2093
2123
2143
2153
2163
2243
2253
2263
2273
2283
Computerized Accounting
Networking & Communications I
Spreadsheets I
Spreadsheets II
Help Desk Support
Visual Basic I
Computer-Aided Drafting I
Programming in C++
UNIX
Network Cabling
Web Design/Front Page
Web Design/HTML
Visual Basic for Applications
Networking & Communications II
Advanced Programming in C++
Database Applications Development
Microcomputer Hardware Maintenance II
Networking & Communications III
MS Essentials
Visual Basic II
Networking & Communications IV
Microcomputer Operating Systems II
MS NOS
MS Networking I
109
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
CIS
SUPM
2293
2313
2383
2413
2423
2433
2503
2903
1123
MS Directory Services
MS Security Design
MS Networking II
MS Networking Design
MS Firewall
MS Mail
Computer-Aided Drafting II
Internship
Introduction to Supervision
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
TECHNICAL CERTIFICATE
To insure success in the Computer Information Systems program, the following
program prerequisites are required before entering the program:
Type 28 wpm (3-minute exam)
English ACT score of 19
Reading ACT score of 19
Math ACT score of 19 for Intermediate Algebra
Math ACT score of 18 for Business Math with Calculators
Computer Literacy
Core Requirements
CIS
CIS
CIS
1013
1243
1813
Information Systems I
Microcomputer Hardware Maintenance I
Computer Law & Ethics
3
3
3
Choose One:
OFAD 1133
ENG
1113
Business English
English Composition I
3
3
Choose One:
MATH 1003
OFAD 1053
Intermediate Algebra
Business Math with Calculators
3
3
Students must select a track in Networking, Computer Support, Operating
Systems, or Programming Support. Courses to complete Computer Information
Systems Technical Certificate requirements follow: Check with the Business
Division Chair for sequence of courses.
Networking
CIS
1053
CIS
2053
110
Networking & Communications I
Networking & Communications II
3
3
CIS
CIS
CIS
2143
2163
2273
Microcomputer Hardware Maintenance II
MS Essentials
MS NOS
Computer Support
CIS
1053
Networking & Communications I
CIS
1213
Help Desk Support
CIS
2013
Information Systems II
CIS
2163
MS Essentials
Choose One:
CIS
1903
Web Design/FrontPage
CIS
1913
Web Design/HTML
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Operating Systems
CIS
2163
MS Essentials
CIS
1053
Networking & Communications I
CIS
1823
Network Cabling
CIS
2273
Microsoft Network Operating Systems (MS NOS)
CIS
2283
MS Networking I
3
3
3
3
3
Programming Support
CIS
1303
Visual Basic I
CIS
1593
Programming in C++
CIS
2013
Information Systems II
CIS
2093
Advanced Programming in C++
3
3
3
3
WEB DESIGN CERTIFICATE
(Technical Certificate) (30 SSCH)
First Semester
CIS
1013
CIS
1203
CIS
1913
OFAD 1133
ENG
1113
MATH 1003
OFAD 1053
Second Semester
CIS
1813
CIS
1903
CIS
1283
CIS
2423
CIS
2513
Information Systems I
Presentation Graphics/Desktop Publishing I
Web Design/HTML
Business English OR
English Composition I
Intermediate Algebra OR
Business Math
Subtotal
Computer Law & Ethics
Web Design/Front Page
JAVA Programming I
MS Firewall
Macromedia Studio
Subtotal
TOTAL
Credit
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
111
A+CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY
CIS 1263
Microcomputer Operating Systems I
CIS 1243
Microcomputer Hardware Maintenance I
CIS 2143
Microcomputer Hardware Maintenance II
CIS 2163
MS Essentials
3
3
3
3
12
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION & COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
This A.A.S. Program is designed for those seeking employment and not planning
to continue formal study in pursuit of a baccalaureate degree. Consequently, some
courses in this program will not transfer to all senior institutions. Students who
plan to transfer to a senior institution are strongly advised to correspond with the
institution to which they plan to transfer.
In the Business Division curricula, courses prerequisite to another class require a
minimum grade of “C” in order to advance to the next course.
Prerequisite courses include:
ACT
1103
Principles of Accounting I
ACT
1113
Principles of Accounting II
ECON 2203
Macroeconomics
CIS
1013
Information Systems I
OFAD 1002
Keyboarding I
OFAD 1012
Keyboarding II
OFAD 1083
Word Processing I
OFAD 1133
Business English
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION & COMPUTER APPLICATIONS
(A.A.S.) (60 SSCH)
First Semester:
CIS
1013
OFAD 1053
OFAD 1083
OFAD 1133
OFAD 1203
Information Systems I
Business Math with Calculators
Word Processing I
Business English
Business Practices & Procedures
Subtotal
Second Semester:
ACT
1103
Principles of Accounting I
CIS
2013
Information Systems II
OFAD 1093
Machine Transcription
OFAD 2053
Word Processing II
112
Credit
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
Choose One:
CIS
1203
CIS
1903
Third Semester:
ENG
1113
CIS
1173
OFAD 2073
___
___
Choose One:
HIST
2223
HIST
2233
POLS
1113
PSYC
1103
SOC
1103
Presentation Graphics/Desktop Publishing
Web Design/Front Page
Subtotal
English Composition I
Spreadsheets I
Administrative Office Management
Structured Elective
U.S. History To 1865
U.S. History Since 1865
American National Government
General Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
Subtotal
Fourth Semester
BUS
2033
Business Communications
OFAD 2393
Office Support Internship
___
___
Structured Electives
Choose One:
CIS
1203
CIS
1903
Presentation Graphics/Desktop Publishing
Web Design/Front Page
Subtotal
Total Credit Hours
Structured Electives:
ACT
1113
Principles of Accounting II
ACT
1203
Computerized Accounting
ACT
2003
Cost Accounting
ACT
2043
Intermediate Accounting
ALH
1303
Professional Medical Transcription
BUS
1113
Introduction to Business
BUS
1133
Introduction to Income Taxes
BUS
1143
Introduction to Marketing
BUS
1183
Small Business Management
BUS
1193
Consumer Economics
BUS
2203
Business Law I
ECON 2203
Macroeconomics
ECON 2213
Microeconomics
CIS
1813
Computer Law & Ethics
CIS
2123
Database Applications Development
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
6
3
15
60
3
113
OFAD
SUPM
SUPM
1173
1103
1123
Legal Office Transcription & Procedures
Management/Budgetary Accounting
Introduction to Supervision
LEGAL OFFICE
(Technical Certificate) (36 SSCH)
First Semester:
BUS
2203
CIS
1013
OFAD 1053
OFAD 1083
OFAD 1133
OFAD 1203
Business Law I
Information Systems I
Business Math with Calculators
Word Processing I
Business English
Business Practices & Procedures
Subtotal
Second Semester:
ACT
1103
Principles of Accounting I
OFAD 1093
Machine Transcription
OFAD 2053
Word Processing II
OFAD 1173
Legal Office Transcription and Procedures
Choose One:
CIS
1203
Presentation Graphics/Desktop Publishing
CIS
1903
Web Design/Front Page
Subtotal
Summer Semester:
OFAD 2393
Office Support Internship
Total Credit Hours
Credit
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
36
MEDICAL OFFICE
(Technical Certificate) (36 SSCH)
First Semester:
ALH
1203
ALH
1303
CIS
1013
OFAD 1053
OFAD 1083
OFAD 1133
Medical Terminology
Professional Medical Transcription
Information Systems I
Business Math with Calculators
Word Processing I
Business English
Subtotal
Second Semester:
ACT
1002
Basic Accounting
OFAD 1081
Medical Office Procedures
114
Credit
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
2
1
OFAD
OFAD
OFAD
1093
1203
2053
Choose One:
CIS
1203
CIS
1903
Machine Transcription
Business Practices & Procedures
Word Processing II
Presentation Graphics/Desktop Publishing
Web Design/Front Page
Subtotal
Summer Semester:
OFAD 2393
Office Support Internship
Total Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
15
3
36
OFFICE ADMINISTRATION
(Technical Certificate) (33 SSCH)
First Semester:
CIS
1013
OFAD 1053
OFAD 1083
OFAD 1133
OFAD 1203
Information Systems I
Business Math with Calculators
Word Processing I
Business English
Business Practices & Procedures
Subtotal
Second Semester:
ACT
1103
Principles of Accounting I
CIS
2013
Information Systems II
OFAD 1093
Machine Transcription
OFAD 2053
Word Processing II
Choose One:
CIS
1203
CIS
1903
Presentation Graphics/Desktop Publishing
Web Design/Front Page
Subtotal
Summer Semester:
OFAD 2393
Office Support Internship
Total Credit Hours
Credit
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
33
SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT
This certificate program is designed for those seeking employment in supervisory
management. Students will acquire the basic business concepts necessary to be
competent in a supervisory position while cultivating professional values, attitudes,
115
and behaviors appropriate for a career in supervisory management.
Some courses in this program may not transfer to all senior institutions. Students
who plan to transfer to a senior institution are strongly advised to correspond with
the institution to which they plan to transfer.
SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT (Technical Certificate) (30 SSCH)
First Semester
BUS
1113
CIS
1013
OFAD 1133
SUPM 1123
_____
____
Second Semester
OFAD 1053
SUPM 1103
SUPM 1183
_____
____
Choose One:
PSYC
1103
PSYC
1123
Introduction to Business
Information Systems I
Business English
Introduction to Supervision
Structured Elective
Subtotal
Business Math with Calculators
Management/Budgetary Accounting
Effective Communication
Structured Elective
General Psychology
Applied Psychology
Subtotal
Total Credit Hours
Certificate Electives (Select 2)
ACT
1103
Principles of Accounting I
CIS
2013
Information Systems II
OFAD 2073
Administrative Office Management
SPAN
1103
Beginning Spanish I
SPAN
1113
Beginning Spanish II
116
Credit
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
30
3
117
Communication & Arts Division
Mission Statement: The mission of the Communications & Arts Division is to provide
quality education to its students. The division works to help prepare students for success and
fulfillment in both college and in their lives beyond college, through the myriad courses the
Division offers.
Faculty
Roger Fox
Division Chairperson/English
A.A., Garland County Community College; B.S.E., Henderson State University; M.S.E.,
Henderson State University
[email protected]
501-501-760-4270
Barbara Briscoe
B.S.E., Henderson State University; M.S.E., Henderson State University
[email protected]
Speech
501-760-4274
Richard Browne
Art
B.A., Hendrix College; M.F.A., University of Arkansas, Fayetteville; University of
Arkansas, Fayetteville, additional graduate study
[email protected]
501-760-4266
Anzolette Cheatham
B.F.A., University of Illinois
[email protected]
Art
501-760-4166
Kenneth Cook
English
B.A., Oklahoma State University; M.A., Oklahoma State University; D.A., Idaho State
University
[email protected]
501-760-4267
Denise Edds
Music/National Park Singers
B.M.E., Ouachita Baptist University; M.M.E., University of North Texas
[email protected]
501-760-4165
Thad Flenniken
Art
B.A., University of Arkansas, Fayetteville; M.F.A., University of Arkansas, Fayetteville;
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, additional graduate study
[email protected]
501-760-4271
Joan Henry
English
B.A., University of Arkansas, Pine Bluff; M.S.E., Henderson State University
[email protected]
501-760-4265
119
Description of Programs
The Communication/Arts Division offers the following degree program:
Graphic Design (A.A.S.)
This program is designed to help students enter the job market upon completion
of required course work or to continue formal study at a four-year college or
university.
The program utilizes the most modern graphic design equipment including
photo-typesetting equipment. The courses are designed to allow students to
experience the broadest possible range of techniques and to provide the student
with a portfolio of work that will demonstrate mastery of those techniques to
prospective employees.
Subject areas range from Design and Advertising to Photography. An
Introduction to Business course is included in the curriculum, since many graphic designers operate their own shop.
The Graphic Design Program will enable the student to gain expertise in a variety of skill areas, ranging from 35mm photography to Macintosh computers,
along with printing, drawing, advertising, reproduction and layout, lettering, illustration, display, packaging, art direction, and other related courses. Predictions
indicate that there will be a growing demand for graphic designers during the
next ten years, according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Openings for talented graphic designers in all areas of visual advertising, package design, industrial
design, television graphics, and other fields will increase. However, competition
will be keen and the best jobs will go to those with both talent and training. The
need for free-lance graphic designers will also increase during the next decade.
The degree requires 60 SSCH with 15 of those hours being required core curriculum courses.
The following is a list of required courses in sequential order for the graphic
design degree program offered by the Communication/Arts Division.
GRAPHIC DESIGN DEGREE PROGRAM (A.A.S.)
(60 SSCH)
First Semester
ART
1113
Drawing I
ENG 1113
English Composition I
120
3
3
GRD
GRD
MATH
or
OFAD
Second Semester
ART
ENG
GRD
GRD
PHOT
1103
1183
1013
Advertising Design I
Desktop Publishing I
Mathematics for General Education
1053
Business Math
Subtotal
3
15
1103
1123
1113
1153
1113
Design I
English Composition II
Advertising Design II
Photo Shop Studio
Intro to Photography
Subtotal
3
3
3
3
3
15
Third Semester
ART
2213
Art History I
GRD 1163
Silkscreen Printmaking
GRD 2023
Production & Layout I
PHOT 1113
Intermediate Photography
*Selection From Social Science Core
Subtotal
Fourth Semester
ART
2223
Art History II
GRD 1143
Adobe Illustrator
GRD 2013
Art Direction
GRD 2033
Production & Layout II
GRD 2043
Commercial Illustration
Subtotal
Total Credit Hours
*Social Science Core - (Select one course)
HIST 2203
Western Civilization I
HIST 2213
Western Civilization II
HIST 2223
U.S. History I
HIST 2233
U.S. History II
POLS 1113
American National Government
POLS 1123
State & Local Government
PHIL 1123
Introduction to Philosophy
PHIL 1133
Fundamentals of Ethics
PSYC 1103
General Psychology
SOC
1103
Introduction to Sociology
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
15
3
3
3
3
3
15
60
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
121
122
Health Sciences Division
Mission Statement: The mission of the Health Sciences Division is to provide students with
didactic education and practical experiences necessary to create a solid foundation for graduates to
qualify as contributing members of their chosen profession.
Faculty
LaJuana Mooney
Chair
B.S., University of Central Arkansas; B.S.E., Henderson State University; M.S.E.,
Henderson State University; Ed.D., University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
[email protected]
501-760-4159
Valerie Bond
Program Director
Health Information Technology
A.A.S., Garland County Community College; B.S., Arkansas Tech University; M.A., The
College of St. Scholastica
[email protected]
501-760-4294
John Dodd
Program Director
Emergency Medicine
A.A.S., Garland County Community College; B.S., Columbia Southern University; M.S.
Columbia Southern University NREMT-P, National Registry Emergency Medical
Technician-Paramedic
[email protected]
501-760-4158
Carla Kelley
Radiography
BSRT (R) (M), University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR; A.A.S.,
Garland County Community College; American Registry of Radiologic Technologists
[email protected]
501-760-4286
Mark Oliver
Wellness Instructor
A.A., Araksansas State University, Beebe; B.S.E., University of Central Arkansas; M.S.,
University of Central Arkansas
[email protected]
501-760-4296
Dawn Poe
Radiograph Technologist
A.A.S., Garland County Community College, American Registry of Radiologic, B.A.,
University of Arkansas, Little Rock
[email protected]
501-760-4281
John Rima
Program Director
Recreation
B.S.E., University of Central Arkansas, M.S.E. Henderson State University
[email protected]
501-760-4298
125
Rose Skaife
Health Information Technology
B.A., Westmar College, M.Ed., University of Arkansas
[email protected]
501-760-4187
Timothy Skaife
Program Director
Radiography
B.S., University of Minnesota-Morris, M.A., Chapman University, R.T.(R), American
Registry of Radiologic Technologists
[email protected]
501-760-4282
Carol Spargo,
Medical Program Director
Medical Laboratory Technology
B.S.M.T., University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, M.Ed., University of Arkansas at
Little Rock
[email protected]
501-760-4130
Britt Turner
Medical Lab Technician
A.A.S., Garland County Community College; B.S., University of Arkansas for Medical
Sciences; M. A., Webster University
[email protected]
501-760-4278
Debra Wilson
Radiography
AR; A.A.S., Garland County Community College; BSRT (R) (M), University of Arkansas
for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, M. Ed., University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, American
Registry of Radiologic Technologists
[email protected]
501-760-4285
Faculty Emeritus
Phil Arman
1978-2007
Description of Programs
The Health Sciences Division offers the following certificate and degree programs:
Basic Emergency Medical Technology (Certificate of Proficiency)
This program includes an introduction to anatomy and physiology, medical terminology, wound control, splinting, and moving patients. This course is required of
all ambulance service personnel prior to employment and serves as a prerequisite
to the EMT-Intermediate and Paramedic courses.
126
Emergency Medical Services/Paramedic (A.A.S.)
This program will advance Basic EMTs and EMT-Is to the next level recognized
in Arkansas—the EMT-Paramedic. Employment opportunities include ambulance
services and hospital emergency rooms.
Health Information Technology (A.A.S.)
Health Information Technology (HIT) prepares the student to perform tasks
related to the use, analysis, presentation, abstracting, coding, storage and retrieval
of healthcare data in manual or electronic form. Graduates are eligible to take a
national certification exam to become a Registered Health Information Technician
(RHIT).
Medical Laboratory Technology (A.S.)
Medical Laboratory Technology (MLT) is that branch of medical science employing chemistry, physics, and biology in the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of
diseases. This program encourages men and women with an interest in science and
a commitment to service to investigate this many-faceted career field.
Phlebotomy (Technical Certificate)
Due to the increase in the number and complexity of laboratory tests and the need
to increase the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of detection, diagnosis and treatment of disease, phlebotomy has become a specialized area of practice. Graduates
from this certificate program will be eligible to sit for national certifying exams.
Professional Medical Coding (Technical Certificate)
A professional medical coder transforms verbal descriptions of diseases, injuries,
and procedures into alphanumeric designations. Upon completion of the program,
graduates are eligible for entry-level positions as coders in hospitals, clinics, and a
variety of other healthcare facilities. Graduates are eligible to take the National
Certification Exam for Certified Coding Associate (CCA).
Professional Medical Transcription (Technical Certificate)
A professional medical transcriptionist is a medical
language specialist who interprets and transcribes dictation by physicians and other
healthcare professionals regarding patient assessment, work-up, therapeutic procedures, clinical course, diagnosis, prognosis, etc. in order to document patient care
and facilitate delivery of healthcare services.
Radiography (A.A.S.)
This program prepares the student with the necessary technical skills of imaging
and interpersonal patient care skills to qualify as contributing members in today’s
healthcare environment. Upon completion of the program, graduates are eligible
to write the American Registry of Radiologic Technology examination to attain
professional status as entry-level radiographers.
127
Recreational Leadership Program (A.A.S.)
This program is designed to prepare students for jobs in the field of recreation.
Students will develop an understanding of the concepts and the skills needed in
commercial recreation and public recreation as they relate to a career.
Admission To All Health Science Programs
Students seeking admission to a Health Science program must complete all general
requirements for admission to National Park Community College. Admission to
the College does not mean a student is admitted to a Health Science program.
Students seeking admission to any of the Health Science programs must also meet
additional admission requirements. Each applicant must be approved by the
respective program coordinator. Additional requirements exist for the Emergency
Medical Service specified in this section. Students officially admitted to one of the
College’s Health Science Programs should be aware that there is a seven-year
statute of limitation pertaining to the completion of required science and mathematics courses.
Refer to program-specific policies regarding readmission to Health Science
programs.
Procedure for Application
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
Contact the Health Science Division. All Health Science majors must have a
Health Science advisor.
Forward an official high school transcript or G.E.D. certification.
Provide official transcripts from any college or university previously
attended.
If the student applying is still in high school, provide a list of subjects
planned for the senior year, and a transcript of the student’s first six semesters. Official high school transcripts must still be provided following graduation.
All students submitting an application to the programs must provide ACT,
SAT, ASSET, or COMPASS scores.
Attend a scheduled general information meeting.
Complete an interview with the assigned faculty advisor.
Provide the necessary health records.
No record of felony convictions.
Emergency Medical Services and
Paramedic Program Requirements
1.
Be 18 years of age.
128
2.
3.
Supply a copy of their Arkansas Emergency Medical Technician certification.
Provide three letters of recommendation.
Degree/Certificate Requirements
Emergency Medical Services - Paramedic
(A.A.S.) (69 SSCH)
The purpose of this program is to elevate, through a rigorous training program,
entry level Basic Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT) to the classification of
Paramedic (EMTP). The program is specifically dedicated to nurturing basic attributes in the EMS field: intelligence, self-awareness, the ability to relate to people,
and a capacity for reasoned judgment under stress. The curriculum addresses these
qualities through classroom lecture, in-hospital instruction, and direct patient care
aboard an Advanced Life Support vehicle during a supervised field internship.
After fulfilling the requirements outlined in this catalog, graduates are qualified to
sit for both the Arkansas State and the National Registry Paramedic Exams. This
program exceeds the standards set forth by the U.S. Department of
Transportation EMS-Paramedic guide and the Arkansas EMTP Training Site
requirements.
Individuals with this level of training commonly are recruited by ambulance
companies in both the public and the private sector and due to recent state legislation, in hospital emergency departments.
Applications to the program are accepted for consideration from February 1
through June 30 prior to the academic year. The number of hours dedicated to
paramedic instruction is approximately 1430.
Instructional time for this portion of the training is structured such that a prospective student could maintain a full-time job while enrolled.
The following is a list of required courses in sequential order for each of the
degree/certificate programs offered by the Health Sciences Division.
Fall Semester
BIOL 2224
ENG
1113
MATH 1123
MATH 1013
PHIL
1133
PSYC 1103
*ORT 1101
Anatomy & Physiology I
English Composition I
College Algebra OR
Math for General Education
Fundamentals of Ethics
General Psychology
Freshman Orientation
Subtotal
4
3
3
3
3
1
17
129
Spring Semester
BIOL 2234
ENG
1123
SOC
1103
SOC
1603
CIS
1013
Summer Semester
SPCH 1103
Fall Semester
ALH
1302
EMSP 1203
EMSP 1403
EMSP 1601
EMSP 1603
EMSP 2402
Spring Semester
EMSP 1303
EMSP 2203
EMSP 2603
EMSP 2702
EMSP
2802
Summer Semester
EMSP
2203
EMSP
2403
Anatomy & Physiology II
English Composition II
Introduction to Sociology OR
Aging in America
Information Systems I
General Elective
Subtotal
Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Subtotal
4
3
3
3
3-4
16-17
3
3
Introduction to Health Sciences
Emergency Respiratory Support
Pharmacology
Etymology
Emergency Patient Assessment
Anatomy & Physiology
Subtotal
2
3
3
1
3
2
14
Emergency Cardiac Care
Medical-Surgical Emergencies
Advanced Cardiac Life Support
Advanced Medical-Surgical
Lab Simulations
Specific topics
Subtotal
3
3
3
2
2
13
Clinical Practicum
Field Practicum
Subtotal
Total Credit Hours
3
3
6
64
Note: Admission to any of the above courses will require formal admission to the
Paramedic Program by the National Park Community College Department of
EMS. Arkansas State requirements include Arkansas EMT certification. Prerequisites to EMSP Courses: Students must complete the following courses prior
to enrollment in EMSP classes: BIOL 2224, BIOL 2234, ENG 1113, ENG 1123,
MATH 1013 OR MATH 1123. *ORT 1101-Freshman Orientation is only required
for full-time students.
130
EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN - BASIC
(CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY) (7 SSCH)
The certificate of proficiency for Emergency Medical Technician- Basic is
designed to train individuals to rapidly recognize, assess, and treat medical and
trauma-related emergencies. It is based on guidelines from the Department of
Transportation and serves as a prerequisite to the EMT - Intermediate and
Paramedic courses.
EMT
EMT
1501
1376
Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers
Emergency Medical Technician- Basic
Total Credit Hours
1
6
7
HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
(A.A.S.) (64 SSCH)
A health information technician performs a variety of functions including: organizing, analyzing and technically evaluating health information; compiling various
administrative and health statistics; and coding diseases, operations, procedures
and other therapies. They also maintain and use a variety of health information
indexes, special registries and storage and retrieval systems; input and retrieve
computerized health data; and control the use and release of health information.
Graduates are eligible to take a national certification examination to become a
Registered Health Information Technician (RHIT).
Prerequisites:
1. English score of Compass 75 - 100 or ACT score of 19 or equivalent
2. Reading score of Compass 82 -100 or ACT score of 19, or equivalent
3. Numerical skills score of Compass 41-100 or ACT score of 17 or equivalent.
Fall Semester
ALH
1203
CIS
1013
AAS
Core*
AAS
Core*
BIOL 1114
Spring Semester
HIT
1113
BIOL 1224
HIT
1212
HIT
2102
CIS
2013
Medical Terminology
Information Systems I
Communication I Elective
Math Elective
General Biology +
Subtotal
Health Data Content
Basic Human A&P +
Legal Aspects of Health Information
Health Statistics
Information Systems II
3
3
3
3
4
16
3
4
2
2
3
131
Subtotal
14
+ Students may take EITHER: BIOL 1114 General Biology and BIOL 1224
Basic Human A&P or A&P I and II
Summer Semester
ALH
1203
BIOL 1114
Fall Semester
HIT
1014
HIT
2002
HIT
2004
HIT
2213
HIT
2222
Spring Semester
HIT
2203
HIT
2402
HIT
2503
HIT
2014
Medical Terminology
General Biology +
Subtotal
3
4
7
Basic Diagnostic and Procedure Coding
Health Care Quality Management
Fundamentals of Medical Science
Computers in Health Care
Directed Practice I
Subtotal
4
2
4
3
2
15
Reimbursement Methods
Directed Practice II
Supervision in HIT
Intermediate Coding
Subtotal
Total Credit Hours
3
2
3
4
12
64
*Students intending to transfer to a bachelor’s degree program for Health
Information Administration are advised to choose English Composition I & II,
and College Algebra as their electives in communication and math.
+Students may take EITHER BIOL 1114 General Biology AND BIOL 1224
Basic Human A&P OR BIOL 2224 Anatomy & Physiology I AND BIOL 2234
Anatomy & Physiology II (note pre/co-requisites).
ANY deviation from this list requires permission of the program director.
MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY
(A.S.) ( 68 SSCH)
The program is fully accredited by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical
Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS). NAACLS may be contacted at P.O. Box 75634,
Chicago, IL 60675-5634, (773)714-8880, www.naacls.org.
All MLT students must have successfully completed two years of high school algebra, or Intermediate Algebra at the College, prior to admission to the MLT
program. They also must have successfully completed advanced high school biology or register for General Biology 1114 at NPCC.
132
A grade of “C” (2.0) or better average must be maintained in MLT courses. Only
one grade of “D” (1.0) in all required chemistry and biology classes will be allowed
for continuation in or completion of the MLT Program.
Because this is a specialized program, all courses required for the Associate Degree
in Medical Laboratory Technology are accepted in transfer at selected institutions.
Consult your advisor regarding the articulation agreement between NPCC and
other institutions for further information.
Required Courses
ALH
ENG
ENG
BIOL
BIOL
CHEM
CHEM
MATH
MLT
MLT
MLT
MLT
MLT
MLT
MLT
MLT
MLT
MLT
MLT
PSYC
1302
1113
1123
2224
2234
1204
2204
1123
1022
1024
2002
2015
2024
2032
2034
2114
2123
2134
2154
1103
Introduction to Health Sciences
2
English Composition I
3
English Composition I
3
Anatomy and Physiology I
4
Anatomy and Physiology II
4
General Chemistry I
4
General Chemistry II
4
College Algebra
3
Serology/Immunology
2
Hematology
4
Introduction to Medical Laboratory Technology 2
Pathogenic Microbiology
5
Immunohematology
4
Clinical Microscopy
2
Clinical Chemistry
4
Clinical Application Microbiology
4
Clinical Application Immunohematology
3
Clinical Application Chemistry
4
Clinical Application Hematology
4
General Psychology
3
Total Credit Hours
68
PHLEBOTOMY
(TECHNICAL CERTIFICATE) (34 SSCH)
Due to the increase in the number and complexity of laboratory tests and the need
to increase the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of detection, diagnosis and treatment of disease, phlebotomy has become a specialized area of practice. A strong
background in science is supplemented with communication and interpersonal
skills, ethics and decision making, and professional growth in a structured series of
courses. Graduates from this certificate program will be eligible to sit for national
certifying exams.
133
Fall Semester
BIOL 1114
ALH
1203
ALH
1302
*ENG 1113
ORT
1101
Spring Semester
BIOL 1224
ENG
1123
SPCH 1103
MLT
2002
*MATH
Summer Semester
MLT
2006
General Biology
Medical Terminology
Intro to Health Science
English Composition I
Freshman Orientation
Subtotal
4
3
2
3
1
13
Basic Human Anatomy & Physiology
English Composition II or
Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Introduction to Medical Laboratory Technology
Math
Elective
Subtotal
4
3
2
3
3
15
Clinical Applications in Phlebotomy
Subtotal
Total Credit Hours
6
6
34
* Level of course determined by proficiency demonstrated on placement tests.
+ Students may choose from Business Math, College Algebra or Mathematics for
General Education
PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL CODING
(TECHNICAL CERTIFICATE) (35 SSCH)
Medical coding is the transformation of verbal descriptions of diseases and procedures into alphanumeric codes. The coding of health-related data permits access
to medical records by diagnoses and procedures for use in clinical care research and
education. Accurate coding is also required for reimbursement from Medicare and
other insurance plans. Graduates are eligible to take the national certification exam
to be a Certified Coding Associate.
Prerequisites:
1. English score of Compass 75 - 100 or ACT score of 19 or equivalent
2. Reading score of Compass 82 -100 or ACT score of 19, or equivalent
3. Numerical skills score of Compass 41-100 or ACT score of 17 or equivalent.
Summer Semester
ALH
1203
BIOL 1114
134
Medical Terminology
General Biology+
Subtotal
3
4
7
Fall Semester
BIOL 1224
OFAD 1081
HIT
1014
HIT
2004
Spring Semester
HIT
1113
HIT
2203
HIT
2014
CIS
1013
Basic Human A & P+
Medical Office Procedures
Basic Diagnostic and Procedure Coding
Fundamentals of Medical Science
Subtotal
4
1
4
4
13
Health Data Content
Reimbursement Methods
Intermediate Coding
Information Systems I
Subtotal
3
3
4
3
13
Summer Semester
HIT
2703
Coding Practicum
3
Subtotal
3
Total Credit Hours
36
+Students may take EITHER BIOL 1114 General Biology AND BIOL 1224
Basic Human A&P OR BIOL 2224 Anatomy & Physiology I AND BIOL 2234
Anatomy & Physiology II (note pre/co-requisites)
ANY deviation for this list requires permission of the program director.
PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION
(TECHNICAL CERTIFICATE) (33 SSCH)
A professional medical transcriptionist is a medical language specialist who interprets and transcribes dictation by physicians and other healthcare professionals
regarding patient assessment, work-up, therapeutic procedures, clinical course,
diagnosis, prognosis, etc. in order to document patient care and facilitate delivery
of health care.
1. English score of Compass 75 - 100 or ACT score of 19 or equivalent
2. Reading score of Compass 82 -100 or ACT score of 19, or equivalent
3. Numerical skills score of Compass 41-100 or ACT score of 17 or equivalent.
Summer Semester
ALH
1203
BIOL 1114
Fall Semester
ALH
1303
OFAD 1063
CIS
1013
BIOL
HIT
1224
2004
Medical Terminology
General Biology+
Subtotal
3
4
7
Professional Medical Transcription
Word Processing I OR
Information Systems I
3
Basic Human Anatomy & Physiology+
Fundamentals of Medical Science
4
4
3
135
Spring Semester
ALH
1603
HIT
1113
OFAD 1133
OFAD 1081
Summer Semester
ALH
2102
Subtotal
14
Advanced Medical Transcription
Health Data Content
Business English
Medical Office Procedures
Subtotal
3
3
3
1
10
Applied Medical Transcription
Total Credit Hours
2
33
+Students may take EITHER BIOL 1114 General Biology AND BIOL 1224
Basic Human A&P OR BIOL 2224 Anatomy & Physiology I AND BIOL 2234
Anatomy & Physiology II (note pre/co-requisites)
ANY deviation for this list requires permission of the program director.
Radiography
(A.A.S.) (72 SSCH)
This A.A.S. Degree is offered only to students who have been accepted into the
program after meeting all requirements. Class size is mandated by clinical limitations; therefore, early completion of application forms is necessary. Applications
for the two-year program are to be submitted from January through April, and
classes begin each Fall Semester. Personal interviews may be required of students
who are in the final steps of acceptance. Selection is based on previous educational
history, recommendations of the Admission Committee, and other relevant
requirements. Once accepted into the program, students must meet all college
requirements for the Associate of Applied Science Degree, and they must maintain at least a 75% grade in all Radiography courses as listed in the Radiography
Student Handbook. The student must perform at a grade level of “C” or better in
Anatomy & Physiology, Medical Terminology, and Information Systems I.
ALH
RAD
ALH
RAD
RAD
RAD
BIOL
BIOL
ENG
ENG
136
1203
1302
1302
1403
1703
1803
2224
2234
1113
1123
Medical Terminology
Introduction to Radiography
Introduction to Health Sciences
Radiographic Procedures I
Radiographic Procedures II
Radiographic Procedures III
Anatomy & Physiology I
Anatomy & Physiology II
English Composition I
English Composition II
3
2
2
3
3
3
4
4
3
3
RAD
RAD
MATH
RAD
RAD
CIS
PSYC
RAD
RAD
RAD
RAD
RAD
RAD
RAD
RAD
RAD
1802
1902
1123
2303
2503
1013
1103
2803
2903
2913
1502
1512
1903
2603
2703
2901
Radiographic Exposure
Radiation Protection & Biology
College Algebra
Radiation Physics
Advanced Radiographic Procedures
Information Systems I
General Psychology
Radiographic Pathology
Image Quality and Processing
Radiography Seminar
Clinical Education I
Clinical Education II
Clinical Education III
Clinical Education IV
Clinical Education V
Clinical Education VI
Total Credit Hours
2
2
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
2
3
3
3
1
72
RECREATIONAL LEADERSHIP
(A.A.S.) (60 - 62 SSCH)
Recreational leadership is designed to prepare the students for jobs in the field of
recreation. The student will develop an understanding of the concepts and the
skills needed in commercial recreation and public recreation as they relate to a
career. The students will have an opportunity to see and experience jobs with the
chamber of commerce, city, state, national parks, corps of engineers, and many
forms of private recreational business. Approval for transfer of credits to other
colleges should be in writing in advance to avoid disappointment.
A.A.S. Degree Recreational Leadership
Communication Group One ( 3 Credits; select ONE course )
ENG
1113 English Composition I
ENG
1133 Technical Report Writing
OFAD 1133 Business English
Communication Group Two ( 6 Credits; select ONE course )
SPCH 1103
Speech
** Required **
ENG
1123
English Composition II
3
3
Computer Literacy Group Three( 3 Credits; )
CIS
1001
Introduction to Computing I
CIS
1011
Introduction to Computing II
CIS
1501
Introduction to Internet
1
1
1
137
Social Science Group Four ( 3 Credits; select one course)
HIST
2223
U.S. History I
HIST
2233
U.S. History II
HIST
2203
Western Civilization I
HIST
2213
Western Civilization II
PSYC
1103
General Psychology
SOC
1103
Intro to Sociology
POLS
1113
American National Government
POLS
1123
State & Local Government
Mathematics Group Five ( 3 credits; select One Course)
MATH 1013
Math for General Education
MATH 1123
College Algebra
OFAD 1053
Business Math with Calculators
MATH 1103
Technical Math
There are no prerequisites for Recreational leadership classes
Recreation BLOCK Group Six ** Required**
HPR
1211
Recreational Programming I **
HPR
2211
Recreational Programming II **
HPR/PE
PE or Recreational Activities **
HPR/PE
PE or Recreational Activities **
HPR
2003
Adventure Games & Group Problem Solving **
HPR
2203
Fundamentals of Recreation **
HPR
2213
Marketing for Leisure Services **
HPR
1703
Leadership in Recreation, Hospitality,
and Tourism **
HPR
2403
Commercial Recreation, Tourism
and Hospitality Enterprises **
PE
1113
Health & Safety **
HPR
1803
Promotion & Production of Special Events **
HPR
1102
Life Fitness Concepts **
PE
1113
Personal Safety & First Aid **
HPR
2406
Field Placement Experience **
3
6
Selected electives BLOCK select 6 credit hours
See Program Director for approval of selected electives
Total Hours
6
60 - 62
138
1
1
1
1
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
LEARNING ACCELERATION DIVISION
MISSION STATEMENT: The mission of the Learning Acceleration Division’s pre-college
level coursework is to prepare the students for successful entry into the core curriculum through the
development of cognitive, affective, and behavioral skills. This mission can only be accomplished
in an atmosphere of acceptance and flexility that characterizes all aspects of the division, from
its instructors to its course design to its retention methods.
FACULTY
Dana Murphy, Division Chair
B.A., University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, M.A., University of Colorado, Boulder
[email protected]
760-4139
James Castaldi
Reading
B.A., Murray State University; M.A., Murray State University; S.C.T., Murray State
University; Murray State University, additional graduate study
[email protected]
501-760-4273
Mark Chapel
Writing Instructor
B.A., Ouachita Baptist University, M.A., University of Georgia, Indiana University, additional graduate study
[email protected]
760-4140
George Corley
B.S., Louisiana Tech University; M.B.A., Webster University
[email protected]
Math Instructor
760-4374
Linda Franklin
Math Instructor
A.A., Garland County Community College, A.S., Garland County Community College,
B.S.E., Henderson State University, M.S.E., Henderson State University
[email protected]
760-4132
Mary Jane Robins
B. S., Murray State University, M.B.A., Colorado State University
[email protected]
Math Instructor
760-4162
Karla Williams
Math Instructor
A.A., Garland County Community College; A.S., Garland County Community College;
A.L.S., Garland County Community College; B.S.E., Henderson State University; M.S.E.,
Henderson State University
[email protected]
760-4133
137
DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAMS
The Learning Acceleration Division offers both academic preparatory and vocational coursework. Courses within the division are designed to serve as bridges to
college achievement, career specialties, and employment success. The classes,
explanations, and prerequisite requirements are subject to change in the event that
the Executive Vice President, the NPCC faculty, or the Learning Acceleration
Division find such change to be required in the pursuit of the NPCC mission or
the mission of the LAD, defined elsewhere in this catalog.
Pre-College Level Courses
Upon enrolling at NPCC, students may be asked to schedule one or more PreCollege Level (PCL) classes. These PCL classes provide the student with a refresher semester before he/she enrolls in college level classes. Students must earn a "C"
to pass these classes in order to move into college level studies.
Active high school students are prohibited from taking pre-college level classes due
to state regulations.
Grades given in these classes will count in the Grade Point Average calculation.
NPCC gives institutional credit for PCL classes, so they can be counted for financial aid or veteran's benefits purposes. However, these classes may not be used
toward any college certificate or associate degree, not even as an elective.
138
MATH & SCIENCE DIVISION
MISSION STATEMENT: The mission of the Math and Science Division is to provide its
students with the opportunity to acquire knowledge and skills necessary to live and work in today’s
society. Through exploration and application of mathematical and scientific methods, both with
and without technology, students will learn to understand processes, think critically, and make
educated judgments, for the betterment of their lives and experiences.
FACULTY
Ed Bennett
Division Chairperson
B.S., Northwestern State University; M.S., Oklahoma State University; Ph.D., Oklahoma
State University
[email protected]
501-760-4143
Ann Bragg
Biological Science
B.S., University of Arkansas at Monticello; M.S., Henderson State University; Ed.D.,
University of Arkansas at Little Rock
[email protected]
501-760-4146
Janet Braley
Biological Science
B.A., University of California, Berkeley, CA; Ph.D. University of Colorado School of
Medicine, Denver. CO
[email protected]
501-760-4147
Darlene Gentles
Biological Science
A.S., Garland County Community College; B.S.E., Henderson State University; M.S.E.,
Henderson State University
[email protected]
501-760-4144
Jim Johnson
Physical Science
B.S., Henderson State University; M.S.E., Henderson State University; Additional graduate
studies, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
[email protected]
501-760-4142
Dianne S. Marquart
B.S., Old Dominion University; M.S., Old Dominion University
[email protected]
Kim McIntyre
B.A., University of New Mexico; M.A., University of New Mexico
[email protected]
Mathematics
501-760-4338
Spanish
501-760-4272
139
Donald Mori
Mathematics
A.A., Saint Louis Community College; B.S.Sec.Ed., University of Missouri at
Saint Louis; M.A.T., Webster University at Saint Louis
[email protected]
(501) 760-4149
Faculty Emeritus
Paul Thomas
1973-2007
DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAMS
The Math/Science Division at National Park Community College offers transferlevel coursework in mathematics and the natural and physical sciences for students
planning to complete an Associates degree and/or transfer to a four-year university. Division coursework fulfills specific general education requirements for the
Associate of Arts degree, adds important components to some programs within
the Associate of Applied Science degree, and forms the core of the Associate of
Science degree.
Mathematics courses offered by the Division include Math for General Education,
College Algebra, Trigonometry, Calculus, Introduction to Statistics, and Number
Systems for Elementary Education Majors.
Science courses offered by the Division include Anatomy and Physiology
(designed primarily for students enrolled in health-related or nursing programs),
General Biology, Botany, Microbiology and Zoology.
Physical Science courses include Astronomy, Chemistry, Earth Science, Historical
and Physical Geology, Meteorology, Oceanography, Physical Science, General
Physics, and Physical Science for the Elementary Teacher.
Students working on an Associate's degree should consult specific degree outlines
elsewhere in this catalog for appropriate mathematics and science courses for a
particular degree/major. Those planning to transfer to a four-year university
should consult with advisors from that institution to identify specific mathematics
and science requirements for the degrees they plan to pursue.
For more information on courses offered through the Math/Science Division,
contact 501-760-4148.
140
NURSING DIVISION
Mission Statement: We are committed to evidence-based learning which promotes excellence in
nursing and maximum development of student potential within an environment of caring.
Faculty
Linda Castaldi Division Chairperson/A.D.N. Program Director Nursing
RN, B.S.N., Murray State University, M.N.Sc., University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
[email protected]
760-4288
Tamara Abernathy
RN, Baptist School of Nursing
[email protected]
PN Program Director
760-4352
Shelley Austin
Nursing Skills Lab
A.D.N., Garland County Community College; L.P.N., Quapaw Technicial Institute; B.S.N.,
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
[email protected]
760-4367
Valerie Bearden
PN Program
B.A., Zoology, University of Arkansas; BSN, Henderson State University
[email protected]
760-4283
VaDonna Boyles
RN, A.S.N., Garland County Community College
[email protected]
PN Program
760-4355
Arlene Cevela
AD Nursing
RN, St. Joseph’s School of Nursing, B.A., Stephens College, M.S.N., University of Central
Arkansas
760-4279
[email protected]
Diane Christensen
PN Program
RN, Diploma, Bryan Memorial School of Nursing, B.S., Nova University, Additional graduate work, Florida International University
[email protected]
760-4355
Denice Davis
AD Nursing
RN, A.S.N., Garland County Community College, B.S.N., Henderson State University,
M.N.Sc., University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
[email protected]
760-4280
141
Suzan Davis
AD Nursing
L.P.N., Ouachita School of Practical Nursing, RN, B.S.N., University of Central Arkansas,
M.N.Sc., University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
[email protected]
760-4284
Diane Fergadis
AD Nursing
RN, B.S.N., Texas Woman’s University, M.S.N., University of Central Arkansas
760-4287
[email protected]
Debbie Freyman
AD Nursing
RN, B.S.N., William Jewell College, M.A., Webster College, M.S.N., Nursing University of
New Mexico
[email protected]
760-4295
Janice Ivers
RN, B.S.N., Arkansas State University
[email protected]
AD Nursing
Marlene Stafford
B.S.N., University of Central Arkansas
[email protected]
AD Nursing
760-4289
760-4304
Rebecca White
AD Nursing
A.A., Southern Baptist College, L.P.N., Baptist Medical System School of Practical Nursing,
RN, A.S.N., University of Arkansas at Little Rock, B.S.N., Henderson State University;
MNSc, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
760-4276
[email protected]
Mary Zody
RN, B.S.N., Texas Woman’s University, M.A., Webster University
[email protected]
AD Nursing
760-4291
Description of Programs
The Nursing Division offers a certificate and an associate degree program
designed to prepare students for employment in the health care field, as well as an
opportunity for continuing advancement. The certificate is a 12-month full-time
or 24-month part-time program that, when completed, enables the individual to
apply for licensure and to write the National Licensure Examination for Practical
Nurses (LPN). The Associate of Science (A.S.) degree can be completed in two
years of full-time study or part-time over a longer time frame. The curriculum
consists of study in arts, social and biological sciences, humanities and nursing.
Completion of the A. S. Degree allows the individual to apply for licensure and to
write the National Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (RN). In addi-
142
tion, an introductory course of study in Surgical Technology is available. This
course is designed for entry level work force training, and does not lead to national
certification. Information and comparison of these programs are available from
the Division Office.
It is important to note that completion of the certificate or degree program in
nursing does not guarantee a graduate the right to take the national exam. The
State Board of Nursing makes the decision regarding eligibility to apply for licensure and testing. On the State Board of Nursing Application, applicant is asked if they have
ever been convicted of a misdemeanor or a felony. The application process for licensure in
Arkansas includes criminal background checks, and the AR State Board of Nursing is required
by law [AR 17-87-309] to deny licensure for certain offenses.
Nursing coursework for both programs consists of classroom, campus laboratory,
and clinical experiences. Clinical experiences begin early in the program of study
and take place in hospitals, long-term care facilities and healthcare agencies in Hot
Springs and the surrounding area. Clinical experiences may be morning, day or
evening hours. The clinical rotation is planned to provide varied experiences in
the health care field.
The Nursing Programs are approved by the Arkansas State Board of Nursing. The
Associate degree program is accredited by the National League for Nursing
Accrediting Commission (NLNAC). NLNAC may be contacted at 61 Broadway,
New York, NY 10014, phone 1-800-669-1657 or www.nlnac.org .
Cost of the Nursing Program
Cost of the nursing courses includes traditional expenses of tuition and books.
Additional expenses include uniforms, accessories, equipment, liability insurance
and graduation expenses related to licensure and testing. For specific information
about these costs, contact the Nursing Division. This information is provided to
all who attend the A.S. (RN) admissions meeting.
ADMISSIONS POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR ASSOCIATE DEGREE (RN)
The application process for students who desire to enter the Nursing Program
begins in January. The application deadline for the program is March 1st.
Admissions to the Nursing Programs are selective.
A student who applies to the Nursing Program shall:
A. Provide the following credentials to the office of the Director:
1. Completed nursing application;
2. Official high school transcript indicating diploma or GED scores;
3. An official transcript from any college or university, or;
143
4. If other schools of nursing have been attended, the applicant is
required to submit a letter of eligibility to return to the nursing
school;
5. Entrance scores (COMPASS, ASSET, ACT or SAT);
6. High school seniors must submit a list of planned senior year
subjects and a transcript of the first six semesters. This must be
supplemented upon high school graduation with an official high
school transcript.
B. Meet all the following requirements:
1. Be a high school graduate or anticipate high school graduation or,
where applicable, pass the General Education Development test
(GED)
2. Have at least a 2.5 GPA in required courses at the end of the
semester of application
3. Science courses accepted toward the Nursing Degree cannot be
over seven years old at the time of entry into the nursing
program.
4. Attend one admissions meeting early in the Spring Semester in
which admission policies and important nursing information is
given. Dates and times are available by calling the Division or on
the web site.
It is the applicant’s responsibility to provide all documents in “A” and follow the
procedures in “B” for their application to be considered. Enrollment requirements
must be completed prior to class selection. Applicants must apply each year to be
considered for the Nursing I class.
Admission Process/Selection
The admission process to the Nursing Program, including Nursing I and the LPN
to RN track for the A. S. degree is selective. The majority of the applicants for the
A. S. (RN) degree are chosen using the grade point average of the general education courses that are required in the A. S. degree plan. Priority is given to those
applicants with greater than 20 hours. Specifics of the selection criteria are available in writing by contacting the Nursing Division. Please note that there are slots
for students who desire and are eligible for a two-year degree plan.
Admission Qualifiers
All students entering NPCC are tested by the counseling center and according to
the entrance test results are placed in specific math, English, reading, or study skills
courses. A student can apply for entrance into the A.S. (RN) Nursing Program
according to certain parameters. Information about the admission qualifiers can be
obtained in writing by contacting the Nursing Division.
144
Progression
All courses required for the Nursing Program must be completed with a “C” or
better. Nursing courses include a theory/classroom grade and a clinical grade.
Both components of the course must be passed to progress in the program.
Re-admission
Students admitted and enrolled in nursing are allowed only one re-admission
according to space available. Students wishing to re-enter the A. S. (RN) program
in Nursing 1208 or succeeding semesters must enroll within three years of previous enrollment in a nursing course. Students re-applying for admission must
complete a skills performance competency evaluation. If the student is unsuccessful in their skills competency demonstration, remediation will be required. Specific
information regarding readmission, skills evaluation and the remediation is available by contacting the Nursing Division.
Advanced Standing: LPN/LPTN APPLICANTS to RN TRACK
There are special degree plan options for licensed LPN/LPTN applicants.
Information about these degree plans with admission and selection criteria is available on the web page or by contacting the Nursing Division. In order for a
LPN/LPTN to apply for, progress in, or complete the ASN degree, they are required to maintain an unencumbered LPN/LPTN license in all states registered (must include Arkansas) as
well as be a graduate from a state approved LPN/LPTN school.
HIGH SCHOOL TO ASN TRACK (3-Year Plan)
This degree plan is intended to encourage high school students to pursue a nursing career. Those accepted into this degree track are admitted to the nursing
program and can take three years to complete the Associate of Science degree in
Nursing. The first year of this plan allows the student to complete the general
education requirements and the last two years concentrate on the Nursing courses.
Information about this degree plan with admission and selection criteria is available in writing by contacting the Nursing Division.
Additional Information and Requirements for Nursing Majors
See section following Applications for Certificate Programs for additional information that applies to all Nursing applicants.
ADMISSIONS POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR CERTIFICATE PROGRAM (PN)
Application process for students who desire to enter the PN Nursing Program
begins in January. The application deadline for the program is March 1st.
Admissions to the Nursing Program are selective.
A student who applies to the Nursing Program shall: provide the following credentials to the office of the Director:
145
1.
Completed nursing application; Official high school transcript indicating
diploma or GED scores;
2. An official transcript from any college, university, or schools of nursing
attended;
3. Entrance scores (COMPASS, ASSET, ACT or SAT), and ;Nurse Entrance
Test ( Applicant must meet required scores on the COMPASS Test to
proceed to the Nurse Entrance Test.);
4. Three references forms
Meet all the following requirements:
1. Students must be 18 years old at time of entry into the program to meet
requirements for legal documentation and administration of medications in
the hospital setting;
2. Be a high school graduate or anticipate high graduation or where applicable,
pass the General Education Development test (GED).
It is the applicant’s responsibility to provide all documents in “A” and follow the
procedures in “B” for the application to be considered. Enrollment requirements
must be completed prior to class selection.
Admission Process/Selection
The admission process to the Certificate (PN) Nursing Program is selective.
Consideration is given to students previously enrolled in NPCC nursing programs
or the high school medical professions program at NPCC. The majority of applicants for the Certificate (PN) are chosen using the percentage scores from the
Nurse Entrance Test, and the reference forms. College courses may be accepted
towards the PN certificate, evaluation will be done by the Program Director and
the Registrar. Math and Science courses cannot be over seven years old at the time
of entry into the nursing program. Completion of the secondary Medical
Professions course allows for the waiver of selected PN coursework.
Progression
All courses required for the Nursing Program must be completed with a “C” or
better. Nursing courses include a theory/classroom grade and a clinical grade.
Both components of the course must be passed to progress in the program.
Progression in the nursing sequence requires a minimum grade of C in all courses
and their pre-requisites/co-requisites. Students who are failing to meet minimum
grade requirements may petition the faculty regarding a change in enrollment
status to day or evening to allow for continued progression.
Attendance Policy
The Practical Nurse Program is a fast pace curriculum that requires dedication and
time. The Arkansas State Board of Nursing mandates the number of hours for
clinical and theory that a PN Program must offer. The student should plan to be
in attendance every day and schedule appointments after 3:00 pm or when there is
146
time off from school. (See calendar) If a student has to be absent, then there is a
limit on how much time can be missed. Total number of hours missed cannot
exceed 72 hours. If hours exceed this total, then the student is terminated from
the program. Excused absences will be for court appearances, jury duty, and military service. Special consideration will be given on individual basis for any hospitalization that does not exceed one week.
Re-admission
Students admitted and enrolled in nursing are allowed only one re-admission
according to space available. Students wishing to re-enter the Certificate (PN)
program must apply as a new applicant. The PN Program Director and Division
Chairperson of Nursing will evaluate each student wishing to re-enter before
granting permission. The following conditions will prevent re-admission in to the
program: an incident of patient endangerment or lack of patient safety.
Applications for Transfer
Students wanting to transfer from another Nursing Program must utilize the
general admissions procedures. Deadline for the fall semester is March 1st.
Deadline for the spring semester is October 1st. Admissions of transfer students
to the Nursing program utilizes NPCC selection criteria, and is dependent on
space available. Evaluation of the credit to be awarded for previous college work
will be made by the Registrar in collaboration with the Division Chairperson and
Program Director.
A.
A student who applies to the Nursing Program shall: provide the following
credentials to the office of the Director:
1. Completed nursing application;
2. Official high school transcript indicating diploma or GED
scores;
3. An official transcript from any college or university;
4. Syllabi or Letter of confirmation to evidence the number of
clinical hours completed;
5. Letter of reference from previous nursing school addressing
their eligibility to return; and,
6. Entrance scores (COMPASS, ASSET, ACT or SAT), if
needed.
B.
Meet all the following requirements:
1. Have an appointment with the Program Director and/or the
Division Chairperson;
2. Have at least a 2.0 GPA in required courses at the time of
application;
147
3.
4.
Completion of a skills competency testing prior to the
semester of admission. If students are unsuccessful in their
skills competency demonstration, they must enroll in a
Special Studies Course to remediate the designated skills;
and,
Meet the additional requirements as required for all nursing
majors.
Additional Requirements for Nursing Majors (RN and PN)
In compliance with the terms of contractual agreements with health care agencies
which serve as clinical laboratory sites as well as accreditation, federal or state
requirements, all nursing students will:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Present evidence of required immunizations as required by the State of
Arkansas clinical agencies;
present evidence of Tuberculosis (TB) testing;
present evidence of Hepatitis B vaccination or sign the Nursing Division’s
declination statement to refuse the Hepatitis B vaccination;
maintain current certification in CPR for the professional rescuer;
maintain current student-nurse professional liability insurance coverage;
and, maintain current health data forms and other information needed
according to contractual agreements with clinical agencies. If further test or
corrections are needed, they will be completed prior to the first day of
classes. All health data forms must be on file before the first day of class,
be required to fulfill drug testing requirements as required by clinical agencies and comply with the NPCC Nursing Program Substance Abuse policy.
Denial of Clinical Experience
Enrollment for each nursing class is determined by a faculty/student ratio for clinical experiences set by the State Board of Nursing. Any student who is denied clinical experience by any clinical facility for reasonable cause will be required to withdraw from the National Park Community College Nursing Program. Any student
denied clinical access for a justifiable cause by the clinical facility will not be eligible for re-admission into the National Park Community College Nursing Program.
Additional Information for Nursing Majors (RN and PN)
1. The roles of RN and PN student and graduate require specific physical and
mental abilities to assume the roles and meet expected educational outcomes
for the associate degree or certificate nurse. The student must possess the
following abilities: verbal and written communication, problem solving, nursing assessment of both physical and psychosocial health status of clients as
well as the safe performance of nursing skills and procedures which include
strength and coordination with gross motor ability to lift and ambulate
148
patients safely, hand-eye coordination and fine motor dexterity, as well as
problem-solving and comprehension, analysis, and synthesis of data.
2.
Students with documented disabilities who are applying for admission to
National Park Community College Nursing Programs are welcome according to the guidelines of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of
1990. Reasonable accommodations will be made for students with disabilities who have the required documentation. It is the student’s responsibility
to inform the faculty of the disability at the beginning of the term (within
the first two weeks of the start of each nursing class), how the disability
affects performance, and what accommodation(s) will be required. For
applicants, please inform the nursing advisor when initiating the application
process. For more information, refer to the sections on student activities
and special programs in this catalog. If there are any questions,please
contact the Division of Nursing in writing.
3.
Exposure to communicable diseases (for example, the human immunodeficiency virus which is associated with AIDS, the organism causing
Tuberculosis which may be resistant to treatment, and the virus associated
with Hepatitis B disease), injuries, and related accidents can occur as part of
nursing clinical experiences. Students in the Nursing Program are provided
with information and guidance about 1) Protection from infectious
illnesses, 2) Immunizations recommended for healthcare workers, 3) Testing
for infectious illnesses, 4) Protection from injuries during clinical experiences, and 5) Blood borne Pathogens Education.
4.
The faculty of the Nursing Division strongly recommends that students
maintain adequate health care coverage and disability insurance for their
protection in the event of illness and/or injury.
Third Party Comments about the A.S. (RN) Nursing Programs at NPCC
The National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) invites third
party comments for all programs being reviewed for initial or continuing accreditation. The NLNAC welcomes comments from interested individuals from the
nursing community as well as the public at large. The third party comments may
be shared at an open meeting or in writing with a signed and dated letter to the
Executive Director, NLNAC, 61 Broadway, New York, NY 10014; phone 1-800669-1656. Comments may be provided up until one month prior to the regularly
scheduled accreditation visits. Contact the Division of Nursing for date of next
accreditation visit. The comments will be shared with the nursing administrator of
the school/program, the program evaluators composing the site visit team, and the
Commission. The nursing administrator of the school/program may submit written clarification of any item addressed in the comment letter to the Commission.
(NLNAC, 2004)
149
Degree Requirements- Associate Degree
The following is a list of required courses in sequential order for the Associate
Degree (RN) Nursing program.
First Semester
*ORT 1101
Freshman Orientation
1
BIOL 2224
Anatomy & Physiology I
4
MATH 1123
College Algebra
3
NUR
1108
Nursing Process I
8
NUR
1001
Critical Thinking Applications I
1
Subtotal
17
Second Semester
BIOL 2234
Anatomy & Physiology II
4
NUR
1208
Nursing Process II
8
NUR
1201
Critical Thinking Applications II
1
Elective
3
Subtotal
16
Summer Semester
BIOL 2244
Microbiology
4
ENG
1113
English Composition I
3
Subtotal
7
Third Semester
ENG
1123
English Composition II
3
NUR
2107
Nursing Process III
7
NUR
2303
Nursing Process IV
3
PSYC 1103
General Psychology
3
Subtotal
16
Fourth Semester
NUR 2203
Issues & Trends
3
NUR 2210
Nursing Process V
10
SOC
1103
Intro to Sociology
3
Subtotal
16
Total Credit Hours
71
*Freshman Orientation is not a requirement of the Nursing Program; rather it is a
college requirement for any full time first time freshman student. High School to
ASN degree plan is 71 SSCH over three years.
Degree Requirements- Associate Degree for LPN to RN Track
The following is a list of required courses in the Associate Degree (RN) Nursing
for LPN to RN program. Special admissions requirements apply to this program.
This criteria is available in writing from the Division office. Nursing courses must
be taken in sequence.
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General Education Courses:
*ORT 1101
Freshman Orientation
BIOL 2224
Anatomy & Physiology I
MATH 1123
College Algebra
BIOL 2234
Anatomy & Physiology II
BIOL 2244
Microbiology
ENG 1113
English Composition I
ENG 1123
English Composition II
PSYC 1103
General Psychology
SOC
1103
Intro to Sociology
Elective (may be Chemistry for non-Majors)
Subtotal
Spring or Summer
NUR 1302
Current Concepts
NUR 1208
Nursing Process II (spring, only)
Or
NUR 1216
Accelerated Nursing
Subtotal
Fall
NUR
NUR
2107
2303
Nursing Process III
Nursing Process IV
Subtotal
Spring
NUR
NUR
2203
2210
Issues & Trends
Nursing Process V
Subtotal
Total Credit Hours
1
4
3
4
4
3
3
3
3
3/4
30 or 31
2
8
6
8 or 10
7
3
10
3
10
13
61 to 64
(depending on degree track)
*Freshman Orientation is not a requirement of the Nursing Program; rather it is a
college requirement for any full time first time freshman student.
Degree Requirements- PN Certificate: Day Program
The following is a list of required courses in sequential order for the Certificate
(PN) Nursing program.
Summer One
PCLM 0063
PNP
1131
Summer Two
PNP
1212
Basic Math
Medical Terminology
Subtotal
Legal and Ethical Aspects
(3)*
1
1
2
151
PNP
PNP
1232
1225
Fall Semester
PNP
1308
PNP
1322
PNP
1331
PNP
1342
PNP
1351
PNP
1366
Spring Semester
PNP
1412
PNP
1422
PNP
1432
PNP
1446
PNP
1458
Summer Term
PNP
1513
PNP
1522
Mental Health Nursing
Anatomy and Physiology
Subtotal
2
5
9
Basic Concepts of Nursing
Nutrition
Gerontological Nursing
Pharmacology I
Medical Surgical Nursing I
Clinical and Clinical Research I
Subtotal
8
2
1
2
1
6
20
Maternity Nursing
Nursing of Children
Pharmacology II
Medical Surgical Nursing II
Clinical & Clinical Research II
Subtotal
2
2
2
6
8
20
Medical Surgical Nursing III
Clinical III
Subtotal
Total Credit Hours
3
2
5
55
* College placement testing may require the student to remediate math skills with
the pre-college level course 0063.
Graduation Requirement: All students completing the LPN Certificate program
are required to complete the Practical/Vocational Nursing Review and the PN
CAT (Computerized Analysis Test).
Degree Requirements- Certificate Part-time Evening Program
The following is a list of required courses in sequential order for the Certificate
(LPN) Nursing evening program. If Basic Math 0063* is needed, it must be
completed prior to entry into the Nursing sequence.
May Mini Sessions
PNP
1131
Medical Terminology
PNP
1212
Legal and Ethical Aspects
Subtotal
152
1
2
3
Summer One/Two
PNP 1225
Anatomy and Physiology
Subtotal
Fall Semester
PNP 1308
PNP 1232
Basic Concepts of Nursing
Mental Health Nursing
Subtotal
Spring Semester
PNP 1322
PNP 1342
PNP 1351
PNP 1364
Nutrition
Pharmacology I
Medical Surgical Nursing I
Clinical and Clinical Research I
Subtotal
Summer One/Two
PNP 1413
Maternity Nursing
PNP 1423
Nursing of Children
Subtotal
Fall Semester
PNP 1331
PNP 1433
PNP 1454
Spring Semester
PNP 1432
PNP 1443
PNP 1464
Summer Term
PNP 1513
PNP 1522
5
5
8
2
10
2
2
1
4
9
3
3
6
Gerontological Nursing
Medical Surgical Nursing II, Part 1
Clinical and Clinical Research I
Subtotal
2
3
4
9
Pharmacology II
Medical Surgical Nursing II, Part 2
Clinical & Clinical Research II
Subtotal
2
3
4
9
Medical Surgical Nursing III
Clinical III
Subtotal
Total Credit Hours
3
2
5
55
* College placement testing may require the student to remediate math skills with
the pre-college level course 0063
Graduation Requirement: All students completing the LPN Certificate program
are required to complete the Practical/Vocational Nursing Review and the PN
CAT (Computerized Analysis Test).
153
Surgical Technology
This is an introductory course of study designed for a beginning level of practice
in the operating room, or an area designed to prepare sterile equipment for use in
the operating room. The course of study offers a variety of options, including
classroom work only or classroom and clinical experience. Additional courses are
available on campus to enhance one’s ability to prepare for a role in the operating
room. The Surgical Technology courses are non-transferable and would not meet
requirements for certification.
Admissions to the Surgical Technology Courses are selective. Information requiring coursework and applications are available from the Division Chair/Nursing
Program Director. Additional admission information regarding selection is available on the Surgical Tech application. Application deadline for the fall semester is
August 1st and October 1st for the spring semester. Other students may be
considered following these dates if there is space available.
A student who applies for the course at National Park Community College shall:
A.
Provide the following credentials to the Office of the Director, Division of
Nursing, 101 College Drive, Hot Springs, AR 71913.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Completed application with two letters of reference (if you
have worked in the Operating Room, one letter must be
from a supervisor);
complete a six (6)-hour observation in an operating room
(TB skin test and confidentiality form required)[may be
waived if presently working in the OR];
official high school transcript indicating diploma or GED
scores;
an official transcript(s) from any college, university or
schools of nursing attended;
entrance scores (Compass, ASSET, ACT, or SAT).
Medication Aide - Certified
There are two options that allow the student to take the state proficiency test which
permit employment as a MA-C in a nursing home setting. The student may
complete a Certificate of Proficiency (10 to 12 SSCH) requiring one semester, or
the student may take only the 5 SSCH coursework (MA 1103 and MA 1102).
Admissions
Students admitted to the medication aide program must meet the general requirement for College admissions. In addition, they must submit an application to the
154
Division of Nursing. This process documents that the student meets all of the
state requirements for entry. Once the student's file is complete, they will be notified of admission. If the number of applicants is greater than can be accommodated by clinical arrangements, students will be admitted based on date the file is
complete. Sufficient number of students must enroll in order for the College to
offer the course. Requirements include:
1. High school graduate or equivalency.
2. Documentation of completion of the Compass test in reading with appropriate score.
3. Documentation of listed in good standing on the state's certified nurse aide
registry and has maintained registration continuously for a minimum of one
year.
4. Documentation of current employment in a nursing home.
5
Documentation of completion of one continuous year of full time employment as a certified nursing assistant.
6. Medication Aide application .
7. Completion of the required Division of Nursing paperwork (Responsibility
forms and Health Data form).
Medication Aide Certificate of Proficiency
The following is a list of required courses.
First Semester
MA
1103
MA
1102
ALH 1203
CIS
1101
Medication Assistance
Medication Assistance
Medical Terminology
Introduction to Computing I
Choice of elective (pick one)
SUPM 1183
Effective Communication
CIS
1011
Intro to Computing II
SPCH 1103
Fundamentals of Public Speaking
Social Science Course - approval of Chair
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS
3
2
3
1
3
1
3
3
10 - 12
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FACULTY - SECONDARY PROGRAMS
David Hughes
Division Chair
Associate Vice President for Technical Eduation
B.A., Drury College, B.S.E., University of Ozarks, M.S.E., University of Central
Arkansas
[email protected]
501-760-4311
Kay Anthony
Advertising and Design
B.S.B.A., University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, M.Ed., University of Arkansas
[email protected]
501-760-4336
Richard Beason
Machine Tool Technology
A.A.S. Ouachita Technical College; B.S.E. University of Arkansas
[email protected]
501-760-4185
Laryssa Blunt
L.P.N., Quapaw Technical Institute
[email protected]
Medical Professions Education
501-760-4371
Devron Dever
Automotive
Technical Certificate, Auto Service Technology, National Park Community College; A.L.S.,
National Park Community College
[email protected]
501-760-4333
Paula Ford
Law Enforcement
B.S. Criminal Justice, University of Arkanas, Little Rock, A.A.S. in Criminal Justice,
Garland County Community College, EMT Certification, Garland County Community
College , Certified Law Enforcement Officer, Arkansas Commission of Law Enforcement
Standards, Certified Law Enforcement Instructor, Arkansas, Commission of Law
Enforcement Standards and Training
501-760-4391
[email protected]
Don Foshee
Automotive
Business Manager and Service Advisor (Foshee Automotive) ASE Certification
[email protected]
501-760-4333
Pam Herrington
Medical Professions Education
B.S.E., University of Arkansas, Monticello; R.N., Jefferson School of Nursing
[email protected]
501-760-4343
157
Jason Hudnell
B.A., Ouachita Baptist University
[email protected]
Career Based Internship
501-760-4374
John Millwood
Small Engine Technology
NOCTI Certification, Marine & Small Engine Certification
[email protected]
501-760-4330
David Reagan
B.A., University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
[email protected]
Shelly Tankersley
A.D.N., Garland County Community College
[email protected]
Emeritus - Phillip Holliman, 2001-2007
158
Woodworking Technology
501-760-4326
Medical Professions
501-760-4371
SOCIAL SCIENCE DIVISION
MISSION STATEMENT: The mission of the Social Science Divisioin is to provide college level
instruction. The disciplines within the division are involved with studying human interaction, past
& present, through the use of scientific methodology. These critical analyzes of the human condition help students know more about themselves and their contemporary society. Each course is
designed to provide varied perspectives on what it means to be living in the 21st century.
FACULTY
Van Davis
Division Chairperson
B.A., Simpson College, M.A., Oxford University, Ph.D., University of Virginia
[email protected]
760-4250
Stephanie Coke
B.A., Hendrix College, M.A., University of Central Arkansas
[email protected]
Social Science
Dawn Reed Purifoy
B.A., Judson College, M.A. University of Alabama
[email protected]
Social Science
760-4252
760-4297
Carol Stonecipher
Social Science
B.A., Adrian College, M.S.E., Henderson State University, Licensed Professional Counselor,
State of Arkansas
[email protected]
760-4137
Martin White
Criminal Justice
A.A., Garland County Community College, B.A., University of Arkansas at Little Rock,
M.P.A., University of Arkansas at Little Rock
[email protected]
760-4157
DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAMS
The Social Sciences Division offers the following degree and certificate programs.
Criminal Justice (A.A.S.)
This program is designed for those who wish to pursue a career in law enforcement. A high percentage of criminal justice students obtain jobs in the field both
while they are pursuing their degree and after completion of the program. The
degree serves as a solid base from which to pursue a four-year degree and law
school.
159
Fire Protection (A.A.S.)
This program is designed for those who wish to pursue a career in fire protection,
as well as for those who may wish to use their formal study at the Arkansas Fire
Academy in Camden, Arkansas.
CRIMINAL JUSTICE DEGREE PROGRAM (A.A.S.)
(60 SSCH)
The criminal justice degree program consists of a minimum of 24 credit hours in
1000 and 2000 level criminal justice courses in addition to the core requirements
of standard A.A.S. programs. Students completing this program also must choose
6 hours of electives, with 3 hours being in criminal justice electives. This program
also requires 6 credit hours of Western Civilization and U.S. History courses.
A special feature of this program is the availability of criminal justice internship in
various criminal justice agencies in the state. Currently, NPCC has reciprocal
agreements with the following agencies where students may be placed.
Garland County Sheriff ’s Department
Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, 18th Judicial District
Circuit Court Division II (Juvenile Court)
Arkansas Game and Fish
Arkansas Department of Community Corrections
Arkansas State Crime Laboratory
Other agencies by special arrangemen
CRJ
CRJ
CRJ
CRJ
CRJ
CRJ
ENG
ENG
ENG
POLS
POLS
PSYC
CRJ
SOC
SOC
MATH
OFAD
160
1103
1123
2153
2243
2253
2263
1113
1123
1133
1113
1123
1103
2273
1103
2203
1013
1053
Required Courses - 48 Credit Hours Total
Introduction to Criminal Justice
Criminal Procedures and Evidence
Criminology
Police Organization & Management
Criminal Law
Juvenile Justice and Delinquency
English Composition I
English Composition II OR
Technical Report Writing
American National Government
State and Local Government
General Psychology
Introduction to Corrections
Introduction to Sociology
Social Problems
Mathematics for General Education OR
Business Math with Calculators
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
CIS
Computer Literacy
Subtotal
3
48
Criminal Justice Elective - 3 Credit Hours Total
(select one course)
CRJ
2223
Police Community Relations
CRJ
2283
Criminal Justice Internship
CRJ
2293
Special Studies
3
3
3
History Requirements - 6 Credit Hours Total
(select two courses)
*HIST 2203
Western Civilization to 1660
*HIST 2213
Western Civilization Since 1660
HIST 2223
U.S. History to 1865
HIST 2233
U.S. History Since 1865
3
3
3
3
* Students planning to transfer to UALR are advised that UALR requires 6 SSCH of
Western Civilization.
General Electives - 3 Credit Hours Total
(Select one 3 SSCH course offered at NPCC)
Total Credit Hours
3
60
FIRE PROTECTION DEGREE PROGRAM
(A.A.S.) (60 SSCH)
This program consists of 18 credit hours of core curriculum supervised by onsite instructors and 42 credit hours of fire related coursework taught by faculty
employed in the fire protection field.
Core Curriculum Requirements
Communication Skills - 6 Credit Hours Total
(Select two courses)
ENG 1113
English Composition I
ENG 1123
English Composition II OR
ENG 1133
Technical Report Writing
Computer Literacy- 3 Credit Hours Total
(Select one course)
CIS
1013
Information Systems I
CIS
1003
Information Systems A
OFAD 1063
Word Processing I
3
3
3
3
3
161
Social Science - 6 Credit Hours Total
(Select two courses)
PSYC 1103
General Psychology
SOC
1103
Introduction to Sociology
POLS 1123
State and Local Government
HIST
Any history course at NPCC
3
3
3
3
Mathematics
OFAD 1053
3
FIRE
FIRE
FIRE
*FIRE
FIRE
FIRE
FIRE
FIRE
FIRE
FIRE
*FIRE
FIRE
EMT
1003
1023
1033
1083
2013
2023
2033
2043
2053
2073
2083
2103
1376
Business Math with Calculators
(or higher level such as College Algebra)
Required Courses - 42 Credit Hours Total
Introduction to Fire Protection
Organization and Administration of Fire Department
Fire Suppression, Strategy, Tactics, and Equipment
Firefighter I
Fire Apparatus and Fire Hydraulics
Fire Laws, Codes, and Ordinances
Private Fire Protection Systems and Equipment
Hazardous Materials
Industrial Fire Prevention/Suppression
Arson Investigation
Firefighter II
Incident Command System
Emergency Medical Technician-Basic
Subtotal
Total Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
6
42
60
N.B. Those who take English Composition I and II must comply with state norms on ACT,
SAT or ASSET tests.
Revised - November 1996
Effective - July 1, 1997
This revision affects new students who began a degree plan as of July 1, 1997.
Those already in a degree plan under a former catalog shall continue under that
degree plan.
* Firefighter I and II may also be satisfied with the AFTA course
"Fire Fighter Standards" (380 clock hours).
National Park Community College is participating in a statewide agreement, effective July 1, 1993, that places a ten year statute of limitations on the use of training
hours toward an Associate of Applied Science degree in Fire Protection. The
rationale for this reasonable restriction is to guarantee that fire training will keep
pace with changing technology and equipment.
162
TECHNICAL & PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS
MISSION STATEMENT: The mission of the Technical and Professional Programs is to provide
quality education and training that enhance the employment opportunities and increase the
personal development of students.
Faculty
Bob Kissire
Division Chair
Technical Communications & Computer Applications
B.S.E., Henderson State University
[email protected]
501-760-4320
Jason Armitage
Automotive Service Technology
Automotive Service Technology Diploma, Quapaw Technical Institute; A.A.S., Garland County
Community College; ASE Certified Automobile advanced Engine Performance Specialist; ASE Certified
Automobile Parts Specialist
[email protected]
501-760-4380
William Bell
Electrical Home Inspection, Liscensed
[email protected]
HVAC
501-760-4340
Mark Bradley
Welding
A.A. S., Tidewater Technical College, Aviation Structural Mechanic, Certified Welder
[email protected]
501-760-4334
Tim Hutchins
Automotive Service Technology
Automotive Diploma, National Technical School of Los Angeles; Automotive Service Technology
Diploma, Ouachita Technical College, ASE Certified Master Technician; ASE Certified Automobile
Advanced Engine Performance Specialist; ASE Certified Automobile Parts Specialist
[email protected]
501-760-4309
Dennis Jester
Marine Mechanics
Mercury Outboard Certified; Mercruiser Sterndrive Certified; Johnson/Evinrude Master Technician;
Yamaha Outboard Technician; OMC Cobra Certified; Volvo Sterndrive Certified; Polaris ATB and
Watercraft Certified; Westerbeke Generator Certified; Mathers Control Certified
[email protected]
501-760-4332
Karla Nardi
Hospitality Administration
B.A., Texas Tech University, Certified Hospitality Educator American Hotel and Lodging
Association, Certified ServSafe Food Instructor, Certified ServSafe Alcohol Instructor,
Certified Culinary Essentials Instructor
[email protected]
501-760-4277
Cindy Kirk
Child Care Guidance and Management
Business Office Technology Diploma, Quapaw Technical Institute; A.A. Garland County Community
163
College; B.S.E., Henderson State University
[email protected]
Paul Scrivner
Residential Carpentry Diploma, Quapaw Technical Institute
[email protected]
501-760-4353
Residential Carpentry
760-4328
Description of Programs
Associate of Applied Science in General Technology
(60 credit hours)
The A.A.S. in General Technology is designed to meet the needs of students who wish to
combine technical or vocational coursework with general education requirements to
complete a two-year degree.
The Associate of Applied Science in General Technology degree enables a student to design
an individual program of study to fulfill a unique career goal that cannot be met through
the completion of any single technology program offered by the college. It also serves as a
bridge program for students enrolled in technical programs at other institutions who wish
to complete an Associates Degree.
Students wishing to complete the A.A.S. in General Technology will develop an individual
course of study through a structured advising process with faculty and college counselors.
A total of at least 60 credit hours are required for the A.A.S. in General Technology. The
courses are distributed in the following areas:
Major Technical Discipline (24 - 30 credit hours)
Technical Minor/Approved Support Courses (15 - 21 credit hours)
General Education Courses (15 credit hours, minimum)
Communication Skills - 6 credit hours, select one from each group
Comp I and II are recommended for those considering study beyond the A.A.S. in General
Technology.
Group One
ENG
1113
ENG
1133
OFAD 1133
English Composition I
Technical Report Writing
Business English
Group Two
SPCH
1103
SUPM 1183
ENG
1123
BUS
2033
Speech
Effective Communication
English Composition II
Business Communication
164
Computer Literacy - 3 credit hours, select one course
CIS
1013
Information Systems I
OFAD 1063
Word Processing I
Social Sciences - 3 credit hours, select one course
HIST
2223
US History I
HIST
2233
US History II
HIST
2203
Western Civilization I
HIST
2213
Western Civilization II
PSYC
1103
General Psychology
PSYC
1123
Applied Psychology
SOC
1103
Introduction to Sociology
POLS
1113
American National Government
POLS
1123
State and Local Government
Mathematics - 3 credit hours, select one course
MATH 1013 or MATH 1123 is recommended for those considering study beyond the
A.A.S. in General Technology.
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
OFAD
TECM
1013
1123
1293
1133
1053
1103
Math for General Education
College Algebra
Introduction to Statistics
Trigonometry
Business Math with Calculators
Technical Math
Early Childhood Education, Associate of Applied Science (AAS)
(60 credit hours)
The AAS Degree includes those courses required in the Early Childhood Education
Technical Certificates (36 hours) plus an additional 24 hours of classroom and/or laboratory instruction for a total of 60 credit hours. The AAS Degree in Early Childhood
Education will provide students with a solid knowledge base upon which to build a career
in the childcare profession. Students who have earned their Child Development Associate
(CDA) License may qualify for credit in specific courses.
Required Courses:
ECE
ECE
ECE
ECE
ECE
ECE
ECE
ECE
ECE
OR
TECH
1183
1283
1143
1173
1223
1133
1103
1203
1403
Health, Safety & Nutrition
Special Needs
Family Involvement
Methods and Materials
Infant and Toddler
Child Guidance
Practicum I
Practicum II OR
Nanny Orientation
1102
Technical Communications
165
TECH 1101
Computer Technology
ECE
1113
Child Development*
ECE
1163
Program Management*
ECE
1253
Curriculum Development*
OR
* Child Development Associate (CDA) License
Electives (9 credits minimum)
MUS
ART
PE
HPR
2213
2203
1113
1113
Public School Music
Public School Art
Health and Safety
Personal Safety and First Aid
Natural or Physical Science w/Lab
BIOL
1114
General Biology
BIOL
1154
Zoology
BIOL
1164
Botany
CHEM 1104
Chemistry for Non-Majors
ESCI
1104
Earth Science
GEOL 1104
Geology
PHYS
1114
Physical Science
PHYS
1204
General Physics
General Education Courses (15 credit hours, minimum):
Communication Skills - 6 credit hours, select one from each group
Comp I and II are recommended for those considering study beyond the A.A.S. in General
Technology.
Group One
ENG
1113
ENG
1133
OFAD 1133
English Composition I
Technical Report Writing
Business English
Group Two
SPCH
1103
SUPM 1183
ENG
1123
BUS
2033
Speech
Effective Communication
English Composition II
Business Communication
Computer Literacy - 3 credit hours, select one course
CIS
1013
Information Systems I
OFAD 1063
Word Processing I
Social Sciences - 3 credit hours, select one course
HIST
2223
US History I
HIST
2233
US History II
HIST
2203
Western Civilization I
166
HIST
PSYC
PSYC
SOC
POLS
POLS
2213
1103
1123
1103
1113
1123
Western Civilization II
General Psychology
Applied Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
American National Government
State and Local Government
Mathematics - 3 credit hours, select one course
MATH 1013 or MATH 1123 is recommended for those considering study beyond the
A.A.S. in General Technology.
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
OFAD
TECM
1013
1123
1293
1133
1053
1103
Math for General Education
College Algebra
Introduction to Statistics
Trigonometry
Business Math with Calculators
Technical Math
Associate of Applied Science in Hospitality Administration
(60 credit hours)
The AAS degree in Hospitality Administration will provide students with a solid
knowledge base upon which to build a career in the hospitality industry. The
degree includes those courses required in the hospitality certificate of proficiency
and the hospitality technical certificate (30 hours), hospitality related electives (15
hours), and core general education courses (15 hours).
Required Courses
HA
HA
HA
HA
HA
HA
HA
HA
TECH
TECH
HA
1043
1103
1013
1053
1063
1113
1163
1153
1101
1102
1073
Introduction to Hospitality Administration
Principles of Food Preparation I
Restaurant Orientation/Sanitation
Introduction to Food & Beverage Management
Hotel Operations
Principles of Food Preparation II
Restaurant Management
Beverage Management
Computer Technology
Technical Communication
Hospitality Administration Internship
Electives (15 credit hours, minimum)
HPR 2403
HPR 1113
HPR 1803
Commercial Recreation, Tourism, & Hospitality Enterprises
Personal Safety & First Aid
Promotion & Production of Programs & Special Events
167
HPR 1703
HPR 2213
GRD 1143
GRD 2073
GRD 1183
Leadership in Recreation, Hospitality, & Tourism
Marketing of Leisure Services
Adobe Illustrator
Advertising Design for the Small Business
Desktop Publishing and Design I
General Education Courses (15 credit hours, minimum)
Communication Skills - 6 credit hours, select one from each group
Comp I and II are recommended for those considering study beyond the A.A.S. in General
Technology.
Group One
ENG
1113
English Composition I
Group Two
ENG
1123
ENG
1133
English Composition II
Technical Report Writing
Computer Literacy - 3 credit hours, select one course
CIS
1013
Information Systems I
OR
CIS
1011
Introductino to Computer I
CIS
1011
Introductin to ComputerII
CIS
1501
Introduction to Internet
Social Sciences - 3 credit hours, select one course
HIST
2223
US History I
HIST
2233
US History II
HIST
2203
Western Civilization I
HIST
2213
Western Civilization II
PSYC
1103
General Psychology
PSYC
1123
Applied Psychology
SOC
1103
Introduction to Sociology
POLS
1113
American National Government
POLS
1123
State and Local Government
Mathematics - 3 credit hours, select one course
MATH
MATH
MATH
MATH
OFAD
TECM
1013
1123
1293
1133
1053
1103
Math for General Education
College Algebra
Introduction to Statistics
Trigonometry
Business Math with Calculators
Technical Math
Technical Certificates
168
The Technical Certificate is awarded after successful completion of combined classroom
and laboratory work. Successful completion of the certificate requirements provides a minimum degree of competency in the field of choice. This certificate program is designed for
entry level technicians.
Placement requirements for unconditional entry in to the Certificate Program:
1. A minimum score of 48 on the Pre-Algebra section of the COMPASS.
Students falling below 48 will be required to enroll in TECM 1103
Technical Math.
2. Students falling below 52 on the reading section of the COMPASS will be
required to complete Reading Practice and review in Adult Education.
Automotive Service Technology (36 credit hours)
The mission of the Automotive Service Technology program is to assist students in gaining
employment in new car agencies, independent repair facilities, automotive supply stores,
service stations and as fleet mechanics. The program is certified through the National
Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF).
AST
AST
AST
AST
AST
AST
AST
AST
AST
AST
AST
AST
AST
TECH
TECH
1103
1303
1803
1403
1203
1503
1603
1703
1102
1101
1202
1301
1903
1102
1101
Electrical/Electronics I
Electrical/Electronics II
Engine Performance I
Engine Performance II
Brakes
Suspension & Steering
Engine Repair
High Performance
Automotive Lab I
Automotive Lab II
Automotive Lab III
Automotive Lab IV
Heating and Air Conditioning
Technical Communications
Computer Technology
Early Childhood Education (36 credit hours)
The mission of the Early Childhood Education program is to provide knowledge and practical experience for students seeking employment in a variety of child care settings. The
program also affords those currently working with children opportunities for updating and
improving their knowledge and skills through classes, workshops and seminars. Classroom
instruction is complemented by practical experience in child care settings, including the oncampus Child Development Center.
The curriculum is flexible and permits several points of entry into classes. The program
provides student preparation in five areas: Associate of Applied Science in Child Care, Child
Care Teacher, Child Care Center Owner/Director, Nanny and readiness for the Child
Development Associate (CDA) credential examination.
169
Teacher Option
ECE
1103
ECE
1203
ECE
1113
ECE
1143
ECE
1173
ECE
1183
ECE
1223
ECE
1133
ECE
1253
ECE
1283
ECE
1353
TECH 1102
TECH 1101
Practicum I
Practicum II
Child Development
Family Involvement
Methods & Materials
Health, Safety and Nutrition
Infant & Toddler Curriculum
Child Guidance
Curriculum Development
Special Needs
Internship
Technical Communications
Computer Technology
Owner/Director Option
ECE
1103
Practicum I
ECE
1203
Practicum II
ECE
1113
Child Development
ECE
1143
Family Involvement
ECE
1163
Program Management
ECE
1183
Health, Safety and Nutrition
ECE
1223
Infant & Toddler
ECE
1133
Child Guidance
ECE
1253
Curriculum Development
ECE
1283
Special Needs
ECE
1353
Internship
TECH 1102
Technical Communications
TECH 1101
Computer Technology
Nanny Option
ECE
1103
ECE
1403
ECE
1113
ECE
1183
ECE
1143
ECE
1223
ECE
1133
ECE
1253
ECE
1173
ECE
1283
ECE
1363
TECH 1102
TECH 1101
Practicum I
Nanny Orientation
Child Development
Health, Safety and Nutrition
Family Involvement
Infant & Toddler
Child Guidance
Curriculum Development
Methods & Materials
Special Needs
Internship
Technical Communications
Computer Technology
Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration (34 credit hours)
The mission of the HVAC program is to provide entry level skills in a broad spectrum of
maintenance areas on all types of home and commercial heating, ventilation, air condition-
170
ing and refrigeration. Students are prepared for a variety of employment opportunities
including national dealers, independent contractors or for self-employment.
Students completing the HVAC program are eligible for membership in the Refrigeration
Service Engineers Society. Certification in EPA Refrigeration is also available.
HVAC
HVAC
HVAC
HVAC
HVAC
HVAC
HVAC
HVAC
HVAC
TECH
TECH
1014
1013
1023
1033
1043
1054
1064
1074
1083
1101
1102
Basic Electricity
Schematics
Air Properties
Intro to Air Conditioning
Heating Technology
Residential Systems
Refrigeration Systems
Air Conditioning Systems
Tubing, Pipe, and Welding
Computer Technology
Technical Communications
Hospitality Administration
Associate of Applied Science in Hospitality Administration
(60 credit hours)
The AAS degree in Hospitality Administration will provide students with a solid knowledge
base upon which to build a career in the hospitality industry. The degree includes those
courses required in the hospitality certificate of proficiency and the hospitality technical
certificate (30 hours), hospitality related electives (15 hours), and core general education
courses (15 hours).
Certificate of Proficiency in Hospitality Administration (18 credit hours)
HA
1043
Introduction to Hospitality Administration
HA
1013
Restaurant Orientation, Safety & Sanitation
HA
1103
Principles of Food Preparation I
HA
1053
Introduction to Food and Beverage Management
HA
1063
Hotel Operations
HA
1113
Principles of Food Preparation II
TOTAL
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
Technical Certificate in Hospitality Administration (30 credit hours)
HA
HA
HA
HA
HA
HA
HA
HA
1043
1013
1103
1053
1063
1113
1163
1153
Introduction to Hospitality Administration
Restaurant Orientation, Safety & Sanitation
Principles of Food Preparation I
Introduction to Food and Beverage Management
Hotel Operations
Principles of Food Preparation II
Restaurant Management
Beverage Management
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
171
HA
TECH
TECH
1073
1102
1101
Hospitality Administration Internship
Technical Communications
Computer Technology
TOTAL
Associate of Applied Science in Hospitality Administration
HA
1043
Introduction to Hospitality Administration
HA
1013
Restaurant Orientation, Safety & Sanitation
HA
1103
Principles of Food Preparation I
HA
1053
Introduction to Food and Beverage Management
HA
1063
Hotel Operations
HA
1113
Principles of Food Preparation II
TOTAL
HA
HA
HA
HA
HA
HA
HA
HA
HA
TECH
TECH
Introduction to Hospitality Administration
Restaurant Orientation, Safety & Sanitation
Principles of Food Preparation I
Introduction to Food and Beverage Management
Hotel Operations
Principles of Food Preparation II
Restaurant Management
Beverage Management
Hospitality Administration Internship
Technical Communications
Computer Technology
TOTAL
Electives - 15 credit hours, minimum
Choose 9 hours from the following:
HPR
HPR
HPR
HPR
HPR
1043
1013
1103
1053
1063
1113
1163
1153
1073
1102
1101
2403
1113
1803
1703
2213
Commercial Recreation, Tourism & Hospitality Enterprises
Personal Safety & First Aid
Promotion & Production of Programs and Special Events
Leadership in Recreation, Hospitality and Tourism
Marketing of Lesiure Services
Choose 6 hours from the following:
GRD
1143
Adobe Illustrator
GRD
2073
Advertising Design for the Small Business
GRD
1183
Desktop Publishing and Design I
Total
3
2
1
30
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
2
1
30
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
45
General Education Courses
15 credit hours, minimum
Communication Skills - 6 credit hours (select one from each group)
Group One
ENG
1113
Eng
1133
OFAD
1133
172
English Composition I
Technical Report Writing
Business English
3
3
3
Group Two
SPCH
1103
SUPM
1183
ENG
1123
BUS
2033
Speech
Effective Communication
English Composition II
Business Communication
3
3
3
3
Computer Literacy - 3 credit hours (select one)
CIS
OFAD
1013
1063
Information Systems I
Word Processing I
3
3
Social Sciences - 3 credit hours (select one)
HIST
2223
US History I
HIST
2233
US History II
HIST
2203
Western Civilization I
HIST
2213
Western Civilization II
PSYC
1103
General Psychology
SOC
1103
Introduction to Sociology
POLS
1113
American National Government
POLS
1123
State and Local Government
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Mathematics - 3 credit hours (select one)
MATH 1013
Mathematics for General Education
MATH 1123
College Algebra
MATH 1293
Introduction to Statistics
MATH 1133
Trigonometry
MATH 1103
Technical Mathematics
OFAD
1053
Business Math with Calculators
TOTAL CREDIT HOURS
3
3
3
3
3
3
60
Industrial Maintenance Technology (31 credit hours)
The Technical Certificate in Industrial Maintenance Technology is designed to provide
students with skill necessary for general facilities and equipment maintenance in an industry setting. Students who complete this program will have a broad knowledge of electronics, heating and air conditioning, hydraulics, welding and industrial safety. This certificate
program is offered primarily as an evening program.
WLD
HVC
ELT
ELT
ELT
ELT
MMFG
MMFG
MMFG
TECH
TECH
1023
1014
1153
1163
1263
1233
1204
1143
1153
1102
1101
Introduction to Welding
Basic Electricity
Electrical Circuit Fundamentals
Industrial Wiring Methods
Programmable Logic Controllers I
Instrumentation
Machine Technology I
Industrial Safety
Hydraulics
Technical Communications
Computer Technology
173
Marine Technology (33 credit hours)
The mission of the Marine Technology program is to provide entry level mechanical skills
in the repair and service of marine engines and drives. The program covers all facets of the
marine repair industry including engine repair and service, fiberglass and off-season boat
maintenance.
Students are prepared for employment as entry-level repair technicians. Opportunities are
available in the repair and service field with national and local dealerships, dealership
management, marine sales or as an independent service provider.
The Marine Technology program is the only one of its kind in the state of Arkansas and
only one of a handful in the country.
MAR
MAR
MAR
MAR
MAR
MAR
MAR
MAR
MAR
TECH
TECH
1303
1313
1903
1504
1524
1703
1604
1603
1223
1102
1101
2 & 4 Cycle Theory
2 & 4 Cycle Lab
Fuel Systems
Electrical Systems I
Electrical Systems II
Service & Routine Maintenance
Major Overhaul
Major Overhaul Lab
Fiberglass
Technical Communications
Computer Technology
Residential Carpentry (34 credit hours)
The mission of the Residential Carpentry program is to prepare students for entry-level
positions in the field of carpentry. The program is certified by the Associate General
Contractor of America (AGC).
The Residential Carpentry program requires students to have an understanding of math and
geometry, attention to detail, manual dexterity and physical stamina. Instruction covers all
phases of residential construction. Students will be prepared for employment in general
carpentry or in construction management. The program provides training in several special
areas including framing, roofing, cabinet making, siding applications, finish carpentry and
dry wall installation.
RCC
RCC
RCC
RCC
RCC
RCC
RCC
TECH
TECH
174
1103
1205
1305
1215
1505
1405
1403
1102
1101
Blueprint Reading
Pre-Construction
Floor & Wall
Interior
Exterior
Roofing
Cabinet Making
Technical Communications
Computer Technology
Welding Technology (32 credit hours)
The mission of the Welding Technology program is to provide students with the training
necessary to make them leaders in the industry.
Students are prepared for employment in industry with a variety of specialization including
metal fabrication, basic metallurgy, use and application of various types of welding equipment and welding techniques. Students will be prepared for employment in industrial operations, privately owned shops and personal business ownership.
The program provides students with the opportunity to receive certification in several welding processes that are recognized nationally.
WLD
WLD
WLD
WLD
WLD
WLD
WLD
TECH
TECH
1023
1035
1013
1043
1255
1275
1265
1102
1101
Intro to Welding
Position Welding
Blueprint Reading
Metallurgy
Inert Gas Welding
Welding Metal Alloys
Pipe Welding and Metal Fabrication
Technical Communications
Computer Technology
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Community & Corporate Training
Center
MISSION STATEMENT: We are committed to providing local businesses with superior
customized training services designed to improve employee skills, enhance productivity, and
contribute to the economic development of the community.
Faculty/Staff
Jill Johnson
Director of Community Projects
B.S.E, University of Arkansas; M.Ed. University of Arkansas at Little Rock, Certified in
WAGE, Adult Ed and Vocational Ed
[email protected]
501-760-4324
Bert Clevenger
B.A. Harding University; M. S., Arkansas State University
[email protected]
Vickie Harrison
[email protected]
Workforce Trainer
Workforce Secretary
501-760-4135
Dick Howk
Director of Workforce Development
Iowa State University - Engineering courses, William Penn College - Business
courses, H.B. Maynard - Industrial Engineering Training, ASQC - Quality
Training, Industry - Engineering Management (30 years), BAT Certified Trainer
[email protected]
501-760-4349
Donna Wilhelmi
[email protected]
Ann Wilson
[email protected]
Department Secretary
501-760-4156
Administrative Assistant
501-760-4155
Description of Programs
The Division of Community and Corporate Training offers a wide range of noncredit and continuing education services. This includes customized workforce
training for business and industry (which may also be offered for college credit),
and tourism industry, computer classes, and professional development workshops. Noncredit continuing education courses include seminars for personal
enrichment, instruction in specialized technical areas, hobby instruction, professional continuing education, and adult training programs. Continuing education
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offers a variety of classes online as well that can be taken from the convenience
of your home or office.
Students enrolling in non-credit courses generally do not need to meet specific
admissions requirements or have a certain level of prior education. These
courses are not designed to meet college degree requirements, but may provide
needed CEUs (continuing education units) for professionals upgrading their skills
or lead to industry recognized certifications such as in the computer or hospitality industry. Certificates of completion are awarded for each course. Registration
for classes may be completed in person, on the phone, via fax or email. Tuition
and registration fees vary from course to course. Individuals or groups often
have ideas for a special class, event, or seminar they would like the College to
develop. Community and Corporate Training works with many non-profit organizations, government entities, and businesses to provide educational support, and
we welcome your ideas. We will assist in the development of self-supportive
events that are consistent with the mission of the College.
Short term extension classes are offered throughout the year. These classes are
organized when there is a need for refresher courses, related instruction, or
classes to upgrade or update skills of individuals already employed. Extension
classes requested by industry will be designed to meet industry needs.
Customized Workforce Development Programs
The College offers short non-credit courses designed to improve an organization's performance. Seminars are customized for a specific business, industry or
organization and can be taught on site or on campus. Curriculum options include
Achieve Global (formerly Zenger Miller) and in-house development. For more
information visit our website at www.shortclass.com and click on the "Workforce
Department" link or call Dick Howk at 501-760-4349. Seminar topics available
include, but are not limited to:
Management/Leadership/Supervision
Helping Your Team Reach Consensus
Making the Most of Team Differences
Solving Problems: The Basic Process
Solving Problems: Tools & Techniques
Taking Correction Action
Establishing Performance Expectations
Clarifying Customer Expectations
Giving & Receiving Constructive Feedback
Coaching: Bringing Out the Best in Others
The Basic Principles for a Collaborative Workplace
Moving from Conflict to Collaboration
Expressing Yourself: Presenting Your Thoughts & Ideas
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Proactive Listening
Handling Emotions Under Pressure
Personal Strategies for Navigating Change
Raising Difficult Issues With Your Team
Stress Management
First Line Supervisor
Business Admin. & Management
Communicating with People
Skills of Managing People
Conflict Resolution
Team Building
Problem Solving
Interpersonal Relations
Critical Thinking Skills
General Multi-task Skill Training
Implementing Change
Time Management
Technical
Hydraulics/Pneumatics
Math for Machine Technology
Blueprint Reading
Basic Welding Basic Electricity-AC/DC
Industrial Electricity /NEC
Pipe Welding
Machine Shop
Precision Measurement
Shop Math & Tech Math
Digital Electronics
Soldering
AC & Refrigeration
Mechanical Drafting
AutoCAD
Apprenticeship Programs (4-year programs)
Electrical Apprenticeship and Plumbing Apprenticeship
Production
Statistical Process Control
Quality Management & Production Maintenance Controls
ISO 9000 Overview
OJT-Train the Trainer
Waste Management
Work Flow Management
Bottleneck Reduction
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Computers
Basic Computer Training
Computer Programming
Microsoft Windows Office Suite
Microsoft Word
Microsoft Excel
Microsoft Access
Microsoft Outlook
Microsoft PowerPoint
Microsoft Publisher
QuickBooks Pro
Health & Safety
First Aid
CPR
EMT
First Responder
Electrical Safety
Forklift Safety/Forklift Rodeo
Forklift Training-Train the Trainer
Blood Borne Pathogens
OSHA Safety-Train the Trainer
PPE Overview
Power Industrial Truck Safety
Hearing Conservation
Rigging
Hazard Communication
Environmental Management
Work Skills
These seminars address the basics of success in the workplace, employer expectations including appropriate dress, regular attendance, and other aspects of a
strong work ethic as well as broad guidelines for day-to-day interactions with
others.
What It Takes to Succeed
Speaking with Confidence
Getting the Information You Need
Managing Life Outside Work/ Handling Emergencies & Resisting Temptations
Business
Business Basics
Starting a Small Business in Arkansas
Writing Business Plans
Getting Government Contracts
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Grants, Loans, and Other Financing Options
Zig Ziglar
Restraints and limitations of time, budget, and resources often prevent employers
from providing quality training for employees or work teams. Each Ziglar topic
involves a 12-hour unit of instruction and can be broken into two-hour modules.
All training can be offered day or evening at your convenience. Specific topics
include:
Selling!
Strategies for Success
Customer Service
ZIGGETS are 50-minute presentations that are perfect for short employee training. Each 50-minute lesson is rich in content with two to three key points that
canbe put to work immediately. Call us and we'll help you choose the right zigget
for your organization.
Customer Service
Sales
Team Development
Marketing
Management
Personal Development
True Colors
For over 26 years, True Colors has been teaching people how to discover their
greatest strengths and understand the strengths of others. We invite you to
discover what life-changing experiences others have found with True Colors.
Learn how True Colors programs have affected: Students, teachers, administrators and entire school districts; corporate and organizational environments; individual's personal and professional lives; and thousands of individual's family and
friends. People of all ages, backgrounds, and occupations can benefit from the
concepts revealed by the True Colors program. Your organization can see
immediate results, including better communication, more harmonious relationships, improved morale, strengthened teams, reduced absenteeism, and decreased
turnover.
Online Courses - www.ed2go.com/npcc
There are over 100 online courses offered in the following categories: computers,
internet, small business, large business management, legal, personal enrichment
and nursing. Each course runs for six weeks and consists of 12 lessons. The
lessons are supplemented by interactive quizzes, assignments, tutorials, and online
discussion areas available via the internet. Students who finish an entire course
will receive a letter of completion. Learn at home or in the office, day or night,
for your convenience. All you need to participate is Internet access and a valid
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email address. Additional requirements, if any, will be listed in the course description. All registration and orientation will be completed online. For more information go to www.ed2go.com/npcc
Career Certificate Programs Online - www.ed2go.com/npcc
The Career Certificate programs can provide you with the experience you need
to find exciting opportunities in these fast growing fields. Part online classes and
part correspondence courses, these programs vary from 140 contact hours to
620 contact hours to complete. Several programs are currently available:
Medical Coding and Billing, Medical Transcription, Medical Office Assistant,
Home Inspector, and PC Repair. Program completion certificates are issued by
Ed2Go and are not eligible for college credit hours. For more information go to
www.ed2go.com/npcc. These courses are NOT for college credit.
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Course Descriptions
Each course carries a four-digit number. The first digit (1 or 2) identifies whether the course
is recommended primarily for freshmen (1) or sophomores (2). The second and third digits
do not pertain to students. The fourth digit (1 through 6) identifies the number of school
semester credit hours awarded for the course. Behind each course title the reader will find
three numbers in parenthesis. The first number identifies the required number of lecture
hours per week for a regular semester. The second number identifies the required number
of laboratory hours per week for a regular semester. The third number identifies the amount
of school semester credit hours (SSCH) awarded for the course.
ACCOUNTING
ACT 1002 Basic Accounting (2-0-2)
This course will introduce the basic accounting procedures needed to maintain daily records
for a small business and the use of such records in the decision-making process. Emphasis
is on analyzing and recording financial transactions, classifying and summarizing data, and
preparing financial statements. Basic payroll functions will also be introduced. This course
does not transfer to a four-year college. Fall, Spring.
ACT 1103 Principles of Accounting I (3-0-3)
Designed to give the student fundamental knowledge of generally accepted concepts and
principles employed in keeping accounting records and to give the students who wish to
pursue the study of accounting as a profession the necessary fundamentals to do so. For
those students who do not intend to continue their education at a senior institution, it will
furnish background in business practices that will make the student a more knowledgeable
consumer and investor. Fall, Spring.
ACT 1113 Principles of Accounting II (3-0-3)
Designed to further the student’s fundamental knowledge of generally accepted concepts
and principles of accounting. Completes the basics, working with partnership and corporations. Emphasizes significance of financial statements, their importance, and analysis.
Prerequisite: ACT 1103 Principles of Accounting I with a grade of “C” or better. Fall,
Spring.
ACT 1203 Computerized Accounting (3-0-3)
Computerized Accounting is designed to give the student hands-on experience in operating
an accounting software package. Students will learn to use the accounting systems commonly found in computerized accounting environments including General Ledger,
Accounts Payable, Accounts Receivable, Inventory, Fixed Assets, and Payroll. Prerequisites:
OFAD 1001 Keyboarding I or a formal keyboarding course; ACT 1103 Principles of
Accounting I or Instructor Permission. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
ACT 2003 Cost Accounting (3-0-3)
Covers accounting procedures for a manufacturing enterprise. Topics include entries for
materials, labor, and overhead placed in production; job order and process cost systems;
standard costs and variances analysis; and budgeting and control. Not intended for business
administration transfer program. Prerequisite: ACT 1113-Principles of Accounting II with
a grade of "C" or better. Available upon sufficient student demand.
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ACT 2043 Intermediate Accounting (3-0-3)
Study of accounting theory and problems. Includes review of accounting cycle, statements
from incomplete records, statement analysis, preparation of financial statements, and other
topics. Not intended for business administration transfer program. Prerequisite: ACT 1113Principles of Accounting II. Available upon sufficient
student demand.
ACT 2393 Accounting Technology Internship (1-9-3)
The Accounting Technology Internship is an opportunity to enhance and reinforce classroom instruction with on-the-job work experience. Appropriate training stations will be
developed, and supervision will be provided by instructors and site personnel. Students are
required to complete 135 clock hours of supervised experience during the term.
Prerequisites: All classes for the Accounting Technical Certificate must be completed
before a student is eligible to enroll in the Accounting Technology Internship. Students
must maintain a "C" average in all classes required for the certificate.
ALLIED HEALTH
ALH 1114 Mathematics for Nurses (4-0-4)
Covers math and problem solving related to Practical Nursing. Topics include a review of
fractions, decimals, percents, and ratio and proportion, as well as in-depth study of metric,
household, and apothecary systems of measurement. Temperature conversions and basic
dosage calculations are also emphasized. Additional math instruction will be incorporated
into Pharmacology I and II.
ALH 1122 Computer/Communications (2-0-2)
Includes the fundamentals of computer in the following areas: keyboarding, word processing, Internet and email. Formatting a resume with cover letter to present during interviewing process. The communications aspect is designed to develop speaking, reading, writing,
and human relations required in the employment setting.
ALH 1203 Medical Terminology (3-0-3)
Provides the student with an application of and orientation to medical terminology. The
basic structure of medical terms and their components, roots, prefixes, suffixes, and combining forms with emphasis on analyzing meaning, spelling, and pronunciation. The student
will build a medical vocabulary applicable to the specialties of all health care professions.
Fall, Spring, Summer.
ALH 1302 Introduction to Health Science (1-2-2)
An introduction to the health care field, including health care delivery systems, reimbursement, communication, legal and ethical issues, and health and safety. The laboratory components offer variety based on the student’s chosen field. Topics range from professionalism to specific skills, clinical applications and computer lab sessions. Fall, Spring.
ALH 1303 Professional Medical Transcription (3-0-3)
Introduction to the healthcare record and medical documents. Transcription of basic medical dictation, incorporating English usage and machine transcription skills, medical knowledge, and proofreading and editing skills, and meeting progressively demanding accuracy
and productivity standards. Prerequisites: English ASSET score of 45, COMPASS score of
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75 or completion of appropriate English Writing course. Corequisite: ALH-1203. Fall.
ALH 1603 Advanced Medical Transcription (3-0-3)
Transcription of advanced, original medical dictation, using advanced proofreading and
editing skills, while meeting progressively demanding accuracy and productivity standards.
Prerequisite: ALH 1303 with "C" or better. Corequisite: HIT 2004, BIOL 1114. Spring
ALH 2003 Nutrition (3-0-3)
This Nutrition course is designed for college-level
students enrolled in health science programs as well as students who are interested in
obtaining information on nutrition in order to better their lives and the lives of their families. Fall.
ALH 2103 Applied Medical Transcription (0-8-3)
Medical transcription experience in a local medical facility. Experience emphasizes histories
and physicals, consultations, operative reports, and discharge summaries. Prerequisite: ALH
1603 with a grade of "C" or better and instructor permission. Summer.
ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH 1113 General Anthropology (3-0-3)
Introduction to human evolution. Comparative study of cultural development, including
archaeology, ethnology, and linguistics. Also deals with processes of cultural change. Spring.
ANTH 2263 Social Anthropology (3-0-3)
Comparative study of social systems of peoples around the world. Emphasis is on nonWestern societies. Culture and society viewed as adaptive mechanisms. Available upon sufficient student demand.
ANTH 2291-6 Special Study (1-6 Variable Credit)
Individual study of various areas in anthropology. Course to be worked out by the student
with the instructor's guidance. May be repeated for up to six hours total credit. Prerequisite
Permission of the instructor. Available upon student eligibility.
ART (ALSO SEE GRAPHIC DESIGN).
ART 1093 Advanced Painting (3-3-3)
Course designed for students who have completed two or more semesters of painting. Not
designed for transfer. Fall, Spring.
ART 1103 Design I (3-3-3)
A study of the creative process and the structure of two-dimensional art forms and their
relationship to our environment. Specific problems will focus on line, shape, color, space,
and texture. Fall, Spring.
ART 1113 Drawing I (3-3-3)
Introduction to drawing with specific emphasis on seeing, hand-eye coordination, and basic
techniques. The figure and still-life subjects will be stressed. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
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ART 1123 Drawing II (3-3-3)
Continuation of Drawing I, with emphasis on composition and color. Prerequisite: ART
1113-Drawing I. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
ART 1133 Design II (3-3-3)
The second half of Design I. Prerequisite: ART 1103- Design I. Fall, Spring.
ART 1143 Painting I (3-3-3)
Introduction to painting from painting surface to special techniques. Specific problems will
deal with still-life, landscape, abstraction, and self-portrait. Either oils, acrylics, or watercolors may be used. Prerequisite: ART 1103-Design I, or ART 1696-Color Theory, or ART
1113-Drawing I. Fall, Spring.
ART 1153 Painting II (3-3-3)
Continuation of Painting I with problems dealing with special techniques, styles, and specific subjects. Prerequisite: ART 1183 Printmaking I (3-3-3)
ART 1183 Printmaking I (3-3-3)
The first half of the semester deals with the techniques of woodcut. The emphasis of the
second half is on the techniques of etching. Basic introductory procedures of both are
explored. Fall, Spring.
ART 1293 Printmaking II (3-3-3)
Continuation of Printmaking I. The student may choose to further explore either or both
techniques of the first semester. Prerequisite: ART 1183-Printmaking I. Fall, Spring.
ART 1593 Art Appreciation for Non-Art Majors (3-0-3)
A course designed to analyze the structures, functions, styles, and mediums of the visual arts
as they relate to and influence contemporary life. This is NOT an art history course. It will
be a "hands on" course where the student will be expected to participate in the exploration
of art definitions and use of art foundations (Design and Drawing) with their appropriate
grammar and philosophies. Fall, Spring.
ART 1693 Color Theory (3-0-3)
Student will explore color theory relationships by creating a reference workbook that visually illustrates these relationships. Student will then apply these theories and relationships to
painting specific exercise still-lifes that require the observing, mixing, matching, and painting of actual colors seen. Prerequisite: Experience with chosen medium. Fall, Spring.
ART 2203 Public School Art (3-0-3)
Designed for the prospective teacher. A study of the creative growth of children, methods
and techniques for directing an art program in the public schools, with emphasis on art and
its relationship to the child. Education methods courses for Arkansas State Teacher
Certification will not be offered for home study credit in the Division of Communication
and Arts. Prerequisite: English Composition I. Fall.
ART 2213 Art History I (3-0-3)
A study of the major world civilizations. Areas of study in Art include Paleolithic cave painting, pre-Colombian art of Central and South America, the civilization and art of Egypt,
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Mesopotamia, Greece, and Rome, early Christian art, Byzantine art, and the art works of the
Middle Ages. Fall.
ART 2223 Art History II (3-0-3)
A study of Renaissance Art, the contributions of various dynasties and periods to art in
China and Japan, the Baroque and Rococo, French Neo-Classical, Romanticism,
Impressionism, Expressionism, and other forms of modern art. Spring.
ART 2233 Silkscreen Printmaking I (3-3-3)
A one semester studio course designed for students to learn to make art prints in any number of colors swiftly and without elaborate equipment. Students will learn to build their own
screen frames and will study the many technical possibilities that silk screen printing offers:
Touche lifts, film stencil, glue resists, and photo-direct screen printing. Fall.
ART 2243 Sculpture I (3-3-3)
Introduction to three-dimensional form through additive and/or subtractive methods. Clay
will be the primary medium for exploration. Prerequisite: ART 1103Design I. Fall, Spring.
ART 2253 Sculpture II (3-3-3)
Continuation of Sculpture I. Prerequisite: ART 2243-Sculpture I. Fall, Spring.
ART 2263 Landscape Painting I (3-3-3)
Basic painting techniques applied to the landscape. Drawing and painting will occur on location when possible. ART 1113-Drawing I suggested but not required. Experience with
painting medium of choice required. Available upon sufficient student demand.
ART 2273 Batik I (3-3-3)
Basic techniques of wax resist and dye fabric decoration are explored. Prerequisite: ART
1103-Design I or ART 1113-Drawing I suggested but not required. Fall, Spring, Summer.
ART 2283 Batik II (3-3-3)
Continuation of Batik I. Emphasis on increased experimentation with the Batik process.
Prerequisite: ART 2273-Batik I. Fall, Spring, Summer.
ART 2293 Silkscreen Printmaking II (3-3-3)
Continuation of Silkscreen Printmaking I. Prerequisite: ART 2233-Silkscreen Printmaking
I. Spring.
ART 2363 Landscape Painting II (3-3-3)
Continuation of Landscape Painting I. Available upon sufficient student demand.
ART 2391-6 Art Special Study (1-6 Variable Credit)
A course designed as a special problems course where students can choose their scope and
direction for continued study. Permission of the instructor required.
AUTO SERVICE TECHNOLOGY
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AST 1603 Engine Repair (3-0-3)
This course covers the introduction to automotive gasoline engines, and their theories of
operation. The student will be instructed from the beginner level of engine operation
through the final stages of engine rebuilding. Areas of training include assembly of major
engine components, lubrication, cooling systems, basic tools and precision measuring
devices. Shop safety, preventive maintenance, and engine troubleshooting are stressed.
Corequisite: AST 1101 Automotive Lab II. Fall.
AST 1803 Engine Performance I (3-0-3)
This course offers an introduction to basic ignition system fundamentals and fuel system
design and operation. This course is a how to class on tune-ups, carburetor rebuilding, and
fuel injection service. The modern automotive computer system will be introduced along
with troubleshooting and diagnostic procedures. Corequisite: AST 1102 Automotive Lab
I. Fall.
AST 1403 Engine Performance II (3-0-3)
In this course the operation of computer sensors and their effect on drive ability will be covered. The use of computer scan tools, lab scopes, four-gas exhaust analyzers, and chassis
dynamometers will be used to monitor the vehicles fuel, ignition, and electrical systems.
Diagnostic procedures and troubleshooting will be stressed. Prerequisite: AST 1803 Engine
Performance I. Corequisite: AST 1202 Automotive Lab III. Spring.
AST 1703 High Performance (3-0-3)
This course covers engine modifications and component selection to improve performance
of the modern internal combustion engine. High performance carburetion and fuel injection, ignition system upgrades, fuel selection, and chassis improvements will be stressed.
The theory of superchargers, turbochargers, and nitrous oxide will also be explained.
Corequisite: AST 1301 Automotive Lab IV. Spring.
AST 1203 Brakes (3-0-3)
This course is designed to offer an introduction to the automotive brake system and its
hydraulic principles of operation. Includes the theory, operation, and construction of disc
brakes, drum brakes, power brakes, master cylinders, precision machining of rotors and
drums as well as antilock braking systems and their related computer controlled components. Troubleshooting, diagnosis, and repair are emphasized. The student completing this
curriculum will have been given the opportunity to gain the technical skills required to
become a certified automotive brake specialist.
Corequisite: AST 1101. Automotive Lab II. Fall.
AST 1503 Suspension and Steering (3-0-3)
This course is the study of the automotive suspension and steering designs used in late
model cars, trucks, and sport-utility vehicles. Instruction will cover suspension and steering
components, McPherson strut, rack and pinion, power steering, wheels and tires as well as
two and four-wheel alignment. Diagnosis, service, and repair will be emphasized along with
the latest procedures used with specialized tools and computerized equipment in order for
the student to gain the knowledge and hands-on skills needed to become a certified suspension and steering technician.
Corequisite: AST 1301 Automotive Lab IV. Spring.
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AST 1103 Electrical/Electronic Systems I (3-0-3)
An introductory course to the basic fundamentals of the automotive electrical and electronic systems, and how they apply to the modern automobile. Electrical theories and principles, Ohms Law, basic electrical circuits, wiring diagrams, electrical symbols, and test meters
will be covered as well as the construction and operation of batteries, alternators and
starters. This course will serve as an excellent foundation for further studies as an automotive electrical service technician. Corequisite: AST 1102 Automotive Lab I. Fall.
AST 1303 Electrical/Electronic Systems II (3-0-3)
This course will build upon the knowledge gained on Electrical/Electronics I. The student
will continue to build upon the basic fundamentals and principles of automotive electrical
and progress to troubleshooting and analysis. Major subjects covered are electrical system
failures, troubleshooting techniques, chassis electrical, lighting, specialized electronic circuits, electrical components, and power accessories. Students completing this curriculum
will have been given the opportunity to gain the technical skills required to become a certified automotive electrical systems specialist.
Prerequisite: AST 1103 Electrical/Electronic Systems I. Corequisite: AST 1202 Auto Lab
III. Spring.
AST 1903 Heating and Air Conditioning (3-0-3)
Theory of refrigeration, the refrigeration cycle and the basic components of a typical automotive refrigeration system will be introduced. The function of compressors, lines, expansion valves, orifice tubes, receiver dryers, condensers, evaporators and air distribution systems will be covered. Service and maintenance procedures, basic shop safety, environmental concerns and recycling of refrigerant are included. Summer.
AST 1102 Automotive Lab I (0-6-2)
The Automotive Lab courses are designed to allow the students to gain practical working
knowledge in a simulated automotive repair setting. Electrical/Electronic and/or Engine
Performance will be emphasized along with a variety of actual automobile repairs to give
the student the "hands-on" instruction needed to complete their training as an automotive
repair technician. Corequisite: AST 1103 Electrical / Electronic Systems I or AST 1803
Engine Performance I. Fall.
AST 1101 Automotive Lab II (0-3-1)
The Automotive Lab courses are designed to allow the students to gain practical working
knowledge in a simulated automotive repair setting. Engine Repair and/or Brakes will be
emphasized along with a variety of actual automobile repairs to give the student the "handson" instruction needed to complete their training as an automotive repair technician.
Corequisite: AST 1203 Brakes or AST 1603 Engine Repair. Fall.
AST 1202 Automotive Lab III (0-6-2)
The Automotive Lab courses are designed to allow the students to gain practical working
knowledge in a simulated automotive repair setting. Electrical/Electronics II and/or
Engine Performance II will be emphasized along with a variety of actual automobile repairs
to give the student the "hands-on" instruction needed to complete their training as an automotive repair technician. Corequisite: AST 1303 Electrical / Electronic Systems II or AST
1403 Engine Performance II. Spring.
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AST 1301 Automotive Lab IV (0-3-1)
The Automotive Lab courses are designed to allow the students to gain practical working
knowledge in a simulated automotive repair setting. Suspension & Steering and/or High
Performance will be emphasized along with a variety of actual automobile repairs to give
the student the "hands-on" instruction needed to complete their training as an automotive
repair technician. Corequisite: AST 1503 Suspension and Steering or AST 1703 High
Performance. Spring.
AVIATION
AVN 1013 Introduction to Aeronautics (3-0-3)
Beginning with an overview of aviation, the course covers basic and advanced aerodynamics, navigation, safety, weather, aircraft performance, flight planning, introduction to aircraft
systems, and FAA regulations. Includes technical data necessary for the FAA Private and
Commercial Pilot Certificates. Available through private flight training services. The curriculum for this course must meet the same standards as AVN 1013, Introduction to
Aeronautics at Henderson State University.
AVN 1161 Private Pilot Certification (1-0-1)
Ground school instruction in preparation for the FAA Private Pilot written examination.
Available through private flight training services.
AVN 1171 Private Pilot Certification Lab (0-2-1)
Flight instruction necessary to complete requirements for the FAA Private Pilot Certificate.
Available through private flight training services.
AVN 2031 Commercial Pilot Certification (1-0-1)
Ground instruction in preparation for the FAA Commercial Pilot written examination and
Commercial Pilot certification; instruction emphasizes advanced aerodynamics, aircraft performance, precision maneuvers, extended cross country and night flight, relevant FAA regulations, introduction to advanced systems and transition to more sophisticated aircraft.
Available through private flight training services.
AVN 2052 Commercial Pilot Certification Lab I (0-4-2)
Flight instruction necessary to complete requirements for the FAA Commercial Pilot
Certificate. Available through private flight training services.
AVN 2062 Commercial Pilot Certification Lab II(0-4-2)
Flight instruction necessary to complete requirements for the FAA Commercial Pilot
Certificate. Available through private flight training services.
AVN 2071 Instrument Pilot Certification (1-0-1)
Preparation for FAA Instrument Pilot written examination. Course completion requires
passing the FAA Instrument written exam. Available through private flight training services.
AVN 2083 Instrument Pilot Certification Lab (0-6-3)
Flight instruction necessary to complete requirements for the FAA Instrument Pilot
Certificate. Available through private flight training services.
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BIOLOGY
BIOL 1114 General Biology (3-2-4)
Provides an integrated study of plant and animal topics including the scientific method,
introductory biological chemistry, cell structure, function and reproduction, nutrition, energy transformations such as photosynthesis and cellular respiration, the molecular basis of
inheritance and the interaction of the organism and the environment. Prerequisite: A reading score of 80 Compass, 18 ACT, or 41 ASSET. Fall, Spring, Summer. Lab Fee.
BIOL 1154 Zoology (3-2-4)
Designed as a survey of the animal kingdom with emphasis on the structure, function and
reproduction of the invertebrate phyla. The course emphasizes comparisons of the different animal phyla regarding: obtaining, storing and utilizing food, exchanging gasses and
eliminating wastes; transporting materials; coordinating activities; receiving and responding
to environmental stimuli; moving and maintaining the species. A survey of Latin binomial
nomenclature and identification methods are included. Prerequisite BIOL 1114-General
Biology with a “C” or better. Fall. Lab Fee
BIOL 1164 Botany (3-2-4)
Provides a survey of the plant kingdom with emphasis on the anatomy and physiology of
the flowering plants. Prerequisite: BIOL 1114-General Biology with a C or better. Spring.
Lab Fee.
BIOL 1224 Basic Human Anatomy & Physiology
(3-2-4)
Designed for students needing fundamentals in the structure and function of human body
systems. Systems to be covered: Integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, special senses,
endocrine, blood, cardiovascular, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, and reproductive. Prerequisite: BIOL 1114 - General Biology with a "C" or better. Lab Fee.
BIOL 2224 Anatomy and Physiology I (3-2-4)
Designed to study the anatomy and physiology of the human body. Topics include introductory biological chemistry, study of cells and tissues, the integument, skeletal system,
muscular system, and the nervous system. Prerequisite: Compliance with NPCC placement
standards. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
BIOL 2234 Anatomy and Physiology II (3-2-4)
Continuation of BIOL 2224-Anatomy and Physiology I. Topics include circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and endocrine and reproductive systems, fluids and electrolytes.
Prerequisite: BIOL 2224-Anatomy and Physiology I, Corequisite: CHEM 1104-Chemistry
for Non-Majors I or one year of high school chemistry. A “C” or better is required for prerequisite courses and all prerequisites must have been earned within the last 5 years. Lab
Fee.
BIOL 2244 Microbiology (3-2-4)
Introduces the fundamentals of microbiology with emphasis on the impact of microorganisms on the human population. Primarily designed for the student entering a health related field. Prerequisite: BIOL 1114 General Biology or BIOL 2224 Anatomy and Physiology
I, and CHEM 1104 Chemistry for Non-Majors or one year of high school chemistry. A “C”
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or better is required for prerequisite courses and all prerequisities must have been earned
within the last 5 years. Lab Fee.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
BUS 1113 Introduction to Business (3-0-3)
Surveys business activities of individual, national, and international scope. A comparison of
economic systems with emphasis on the free-enterprise system including forms of ownership, organization, management, ethics, labor relations, production, marketing, finance, and
legal and regulatory influences. Fall, Spring.
BUS 1133 Introduction to Income Taxes (3-0-3)
Introduction to federal income taxation with special emphasis on tax rules and conventions,
preparing tax forms for individuals, and tax planning. An introduction to corporate taxation concepts will also be discussed. This course is designed for individuals from all disciplines regardless of major. No business or accounting experience is required. Fall.
BUS 1143 Introduction to Marketing (3-0-3)
Overviews marketing and its role both within the firm and society. Explores concepts, functions, and institutions involved in the creation, distribution, and sale of products and services, along with the tasks and decisions facing the marketing manager. Fall
BUS 1173 Management Fundamentals (3-0-3)
A study of basic types of business organization, principles of operation, efficiency analysis,
personnel aspects, industry perspective, and practical applications. Prerequisite: ACT 1103Principles of Accounting I with a grade of "C" or better. Available upon sufficient student
demand.
BUS 1183 Small Business Management (3-0-3)
Focus is on the application and interpretation of management concepts and techniques to
the small business firm and the problems faced in the formation and early growth periods.
Permission of the instructor. Available upon sufficient student demand.
BUS 1191 Special Problems in Real Estate (1-0-1)
Companion course to BUS 2223, Basic Principles of Real Estate. This course is designed
for the student who wishes to meet the Arkansas Real Estate Commission's requirement of
four college credit hours in order to take the State license examination. The course will
involve directed studies and research tailored to the educational need of each student and
should be taken concurrently with BUS 2223, Basic Principles of Real Estate. Fall, Spring
BUS 1193 Consumer Economics (3-0-3)
Designed as a practical personal finance course to acquaint students with consumer behavior principles, personal financial statements, budgeting, types of insurance, taxes, credit,
housing, and investments. Spring.
BUS 2033 Business Communications (3-0-3)
Focus is on the principles of effective business letter writing and the solutions of business
communications problems in the modern business world. Special emphasis on letters of
application, sales and credit letters, related business forms, business reports, and the devel-
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opment of effective expression. Prerequisite: OFAD 1133-Business English with a grade of
"C" or better; CIS 1013-Information Systems I or OFAD 1063 Word Processing I. Spring.
BUS 2203 Business Law I (3-0-3)
Focus is on the basic principles of contracts, negotiable instruments, real and personal property sales, secured property, insurance, bankruptcy, wills, trusts, and probate estates. Fall,
Spring.
BUS 2213 Business Law II (3-0-3)
Covers domestic relations, wills, probate, estates, guardianship, adoptions, and criminal law
from a probation standpoint. Prerequisite: BUS 2203-Business Law I with a grade of "C"
or better. Available upon sufficient student demand.
BUS 2223 Basic Principles of Real Estate (3-0-3)
Introduces the student to real estate terms, land description, appraisals, financing, deeds,
mortgages, leases, wills, basic real estate math, regulations concerning taxes, truth and lending, and federal housing. Also, some discussion and/or reading will be included involving
the legal aspects concerning Arkansas real estate laws and contracts, i.e. listing agreements,
offer and acceptances, and land contracts. Fall, Spring.
BUS 2232 Real Estate Appraisal (2-0-2)
Covers basic principles and techniques of appraising residential real estate. Available upon
sufficient student demand.
BUS 2233 Legal Aspects of Real Estate Transactions (3-0-3)
Covers a range of legal aspects including estates, dowers, homesteads, easements, property
ownership, mortgages, transferring titles, requirements for valid conveyance, taxes, liens,
escrows, probate proceedings, trusts, zoning ordinances, etc. Prerequisite: BUS 2223-Basic
Principles of Real Estate with a grade of "C" or better. Available upon sufficient student
demand.
BUS 2263 Real Estate Property Management (3-0-3)
Covers property analysis, rental collection, budgeting, maintenance, repair, investment planning, and executive control as it relates to the management of residential, commercial, and
industrial property. Prerequisite: BUS 2223-Basic Principles of Real Estate with a grade of
"C" or better. Available upon sufficient student demand.
BUS 2273 Fundamentals of Abstracting (3-0-3)
Covers the basic principles and techniques of abstracting residential, commercial, and industrial property. Prerequisite: BUS 2223-Basic Principles of Real Estate with a grade of "C"
or better. Available upon sufficient student demand.
BUS 2291-2292 Business Games (1-3 Variable Credits)
Harding University Invitational Business Games. A computerized business game designed
to teach students real-life aspects of owning and operating a business. Instructor approval.
Available upon sufficient demand.
BUS 2293 Business Strategy and Decision Making
(3-0-3)
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Computerized business simulation. Student teams make real-world decisions concerning
their businesses in competition with other teams. The course develops logical thinking and
provides training in writing and oral presentation of financial results integrating the fields
of marketing, finance, law, accounting, economics, personnel, insurance, and other areas
affecting business. Prerequisite: ACT 1113-Accounting II, BUS 1113-Introduction to
Business, and CIS 1013-Information Systems I or instructor permission. Available upon
sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
BUS 2323 Creative Finance (3-0-3)
Provides the student with a survey of the strategies for real estate investments. Available
upon sufficient student demand.
CHEMISTRY
CHEM 1104 Chemistry for Non-Majors I (3-2-4)
Introduces the student to descriptive inorganic chemistry, emphasizing those aspects pertinent to nursing science. Prerequisite: MATH 1003-Intermediate Algebra taken previously or
concurrently with this course. Fall, Spring, Summer. Lab Fee.
CHEM 1114 Chemistry for Non-Majors II (3-2-4)
Continuation of Chemistry for Non-Majors I. Basic course in descriptive organic and biochemistry, emphasizing those aspects pertinent to nursing science. Prerequisite: CHEM
1104-Chemistry for Non-Majors I. Spring, or available upon sufficient student demand.
Lab Fee.
CHEM 1204 General Chemistry I (3-2-4)
Provides the student with the fundamental laws and
theories with respect to structure and interactions of matter, properties of matter, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, chemical reactions, physical states of matter, and changes of
state. Corequisite: MATH 1123-College Algebra. Fall. Lab Fee.
CHEM 2204 General Chemistry II (3-2-4)
Continuation of General Chemistry I. The study of solutions, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, pH, electro chemistry, nuclear chemistry, and fundamental concepts of organic chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 1204-General Chemistry I. Spring. Lab Fee.
COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS
(See also Electronics,
Engineering, Office Administration and Physics)
CIS 1001 Introduction to Computing I (1-0-1)
Introductory course designed to give the student hands-on computer instruction. Hardware
and software basics, using the mouse and keyboard shortcuts, managing files and folders,
running multiple applications concurrently, and cut-copy-paste techniques will be covered.
Prerequisite: None; however, formal keyboarding course strongly recommended. The grading system for this class is Passing/Failing or letter grade. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
CIS 1003 Information Systems A (3-0-3)
This course considers terminology and concepts, operating environments (Windows), word
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processing (WordPerfect), spreadsheets (QuattroPro), and database systems (Paradox).
Prerequisite: OFAD 1002-Keyboarding I with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent.
Recommended: Computer Literacy or CIS 1001-Introduction to Computing I. Available
upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
CIS 1011 Introduction to Computing II (1-0-1)
Introduction to Computing II is an introductory course designed to give the students additional hands-on computer instruction. Course content focuses on software applications that
learners use on a regular basis, including word-processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentations. Prerequisite: CIS 1001 Introduction to Computing I or instructor permission.
Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
CIS 1013 Information Systems I (3-0-3)
This course introduces computer terminology and concepts, Web browser, word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentations software. Emphasis is placed on hands-on
practice to produce interesting and useful projects, and computer skills will be reinforced
through the use of tutorials and cases. Prerequisites: OFAD 1002 Keyboarding I with a
grade of "C" or better or equivalent; CIS 1001 Introduction to Computing I or CIS 1263
Microcomputer Operating Systems I or competency test. Fall, Spring, Summer. Lab Fee.
CIS 1021 Introduction to Microsoft Works (1-0-1)
This introductory course is designed to give the student hands-on computer instruction in
the integrated software program, Microsoft Works for Windows. This integrated software
program combines word processing, spreadsheet, graphics and database tools. Prerequisite:
CIS 1001 Introduction to Computing I, CIS 1011 Introduction to Computing II, or equivalent. The grading system for this class is Passing/Failing. Available upon sufficient student
demand. Lab Fee.
CIS 1053 Networking & Communications I (3-0-3)
This course provides an introduction to microcomputer-based local area networks. Issues concerning
hardware and software for networks; data transmissions; and network architectures, protocols and standards are addressed. This course will familiarize students with the OSI model and network connectivity. Fall or available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
CIS 1101 Introduction to PowerPoint (1-0-1)
This course introduces basic and advanced Power Point techniques to create, modify,
enhance and deliver dynamic and compelling on-screen presentations containing text,
graphics, charts, and multimedia. Prerequisite: CIS 1001 Introduction to Computing I or
Windows competency. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
CIS 1103 Foundations of Computer Science (3-0-3)
Designed to give students an all around knowledge of computer and information systems.
Included is a study of information systems, computer systems, quantitative methods, and
basic programming concepts and techniques. Prerequisite: PCLM 0063-Basic Math or
equivalent, CIS 1013-Information Systems I with a grade of "C" or better or CIS 1003Information Systems A with a grade of "C" or better. Corequisite 1593-Programming in
C++. Available upon sufficient student demand.
CIS 1144 RPG II A (3-2-4)
This course presents elements of the computer programming language RPG II (Report
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Program Generator II), a report writer command used in IBM environments. It is the language for IBM systems 34, 36, and some 38's. Emphasis in the course is on writing and
maintaining RPG II programs for business needs. Available upon sufficient student
demand. Lab Fee.
CIS 1153 Systems Analysis and Design (3-0-3)
This course introduces practical and theoretical issues in Systems Analysis & Design using
modern methods. Students are introduced to traditional SDLC (System Development Life
Cycle) and to modern methods of database design and the use of CASE tools. Relational
Database Management Systems and fourth generation languages like SQL play a central part
in the student's understanding of the material. Students are expected to complete a major
practical project in Systems Analysis & Design. Available upon sufficient student demand.
Lab Fee.
CIS 1163 Introduction to Computer Information (3-0-3)
This course is designed to give students a thorough introduction into the electronic computer industry that began more than fifty years ago. The main focus of the course is to introduce the student to the world of computing, concepts relating to interaction with computers, fundamental hardware, software, and communications’ concepts, and going online.
Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
CIS 1173 Spreadsheets I (3-1-3)
This course is designed to instruct students in the use of spreadsheet software to model,
analyze, and support common business decisions. Instruction will include using the software as a decision support tool and as a list management tool. Concepts and features presented include: scenario and regression analysis, data scrubbing, chart building and analysis, Pivot tables and Pivot charts, filtering, troubleshooting formulas, tracing errors, and
using advanced functions. An introduction into Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is
included and used in creating custom forms, custom functions, recording and editing
macros, using variables and ranges and controlling code execution. Instruction is also given
in importing, linking, and using VBA to share spreadsheet data with databases and the Web.
Prerequisite: CIS 1013 Information Systems I with a grade of "C" or better; CIS 2013
Information Systems II recommended. Spring. Lab Fee.
CIS 1183 Assembler Language (2-2-3)
This course provides an introduction to programming using an Assembly level language.
Programming exercises include using the 8086/8088 Macro assembler for IBM PC series
microcomputers. Other common assembler languages are also considered. Prerequisite:
Programming course or experience. Lab Fee.
CIS 1203 Presentation Graphics/DeskTop Publishing I (3-0-3)
This course covers basic design principles, desktop publishing fundamentals, document
planning & layout, specific design tools, and Web publishing. Students will create interesting and useful desktop publishing projects with desktop publishing/photo-editing software.
The application of design principles and layout will also be applied to presentations.
Teamwork skills are taught through the use of team projects. Computer skills are reinforced
through the use of lab assignments, individual projects, and team projects. Prerequisite:
1013 Information Systems I with a grade of "C" or better or instructor approval. Lab Fee
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CIS 1213 Help Desk Support (3-0-3)
This course provides a broad understanding of help desk support services and the tools and
technology most frequently used to support business practices. This course focuses on
training in user support, help-desk concepts and software, customer service, problem solving, evaluation techniques and interpersonal and communication skills are emphasized.
Students will have an opportunity to apply their knowledge through hands-on projects, exercises, and case study assignments. Prerequisite: CIS 1013 Information Systems I. Spring
or upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
CIS 1223 Presentation Graphics/Desktop Publishing II (3-0-3)
This course covers planning, creation, and delivery of computerized presentations. Case
studies with realistic business content are utilized. Effective delivery techniques are emphasized for both a live audience and a web audience. Software skills are reinforced through
the use of lab assignments and creative projects. Prerequisite: CIS 1013 Information
Systems I with a C or better or instructor approval. Lab Fee.
CIS 1243 Microcomputer Hardware Maintenance I (3-0-3)
This course provides knowledge of and experience with microcomputer hardware selection,
installation, maintenance and operation of external and internal components. Students will
gain hands-on experience in the assembling of computers and the installation of drivers that
make the components functional. Prerequisite: CIS 1263 Microcomputer Operating
Systems I or equivalent. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
CIS 1263 Microcomputer Operating Systems I (3-0-3)
This course provides hands-on introduction to the Windows operating environment.
Topics covered include graphical user interface basics, icon-based file manager and program
manager operations, windows customization, and linking technologies. Fall, Spring. Lab
Fee.
CIS 1273 Spreadsheets II (3-1-3)
This course is designed to teach intermediate and advanced features of Excel. Topics covered will include What-If Analysis, Multiple Worksheets/Workbooks, Scenario Manager,
Goal Seek, Solver, Pivot Table and Charts, Data Exchange, Auditing a Worksheet, and VBA
code. The learning experienced in this course will help to make the student a more productive worker by teaching the skills necessary to be competitive in the workplace. Prerequisite:
CIS 1173 Spreadsheets I. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee
CIS 1283 JAVA Programming I (3-0-3)
This course is designed for student with previous keyboarding and Windows computer
experience. Mastery of basic computer concepts and terminology is also assumed. This
course provides a hands-on introduction to the JAVA programming language from a procedural point of view. Topics include programming fundamentals and structures, variable,s
constants, functions, and writing and debugging JAVA code. Prerequisite: CIS 1013
Information Systems I with a grade of "C" or better, CIS 1263 Microcomputer Operating
Systems I with a grade of "C" or better. PCLM 0063 Basic Math or equivalent with a grade
of "B" or better. Strongly Recommended: Grade of "B" or better in all the above or equivalent. Fall. Lab Fee.
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CIS 1293 JAVA Programming II (3-0-3)
This course is designed for students with previous JAVA programming experience for the
Windows environment. Topics covered include variable arrays, object-oriented programming. Unified Modeling Language (UML) classes, data structures, exception handling and
JAVA input/output (I/)) streams. Prerequisite: CIS 1283 JAVA Programming I with a grade
of "C" or better. Strongly Recommended: Grade of "B" or better in CIS 1283 JAVA
Programming I. Spring, Lab Fee.
CIS 1301 Introduction to Personal Web Page (1-0-1)
This course introduces FrontPage basic features to create, modify, format, enhance, and
publish personal Web pages. Prerequisites: CIS 1001 Introduction to Computing I or
Windows competency; CIS 1501 Introduction to the Internet or Internet competency. Lab
Fee.
CIS 1303 Visual Basic I (3-0-3)
This course provides a hands-on introduction to the Visual Basic programming language.
Topics covered include menus, IDE tools and forms, GUI's, and writing and debugging VB
code. Prerequisite: CIS 1593 Programming in C++ with a grade of "C" or better or competency test. Spring. Lab Fee.
CIS 1491-1496 Special Study in Computer Information Systems (1-6 Variable Credits)
Special courses or independent studies in computer information systems are offered on
demand. Students may plan individual projects and research in consultation with the
instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Lab Fee.
CIS 1501 Introduction to the Internet (1-0-1)
This introductory course is designed to give the student basic hands-on computer instruction on the most widely used services of the Internet: getting connected; learning to use
features of the web browser, searching the web, downloading files and programs, and using
e-mail. Prerequisite: CIS 1001-Introduction to Computing or Windows competency. The
grading system for this class is Passing/Failing. Fall, Spring. Lab fee.
CIS 1503 Computer-Aided Drafting I (3-0-3)
This course provides knowledge about and experience with industry standard graphics software. Tasks included are: Line Drawings, Bar Graphs, Shapes, and 3-D Representation. Fall,
Spring. Lab Fee.
CIS 1593 Programming in C++ (3-0-3)
This course is designed to develop proficiency in the fundamental structures of computer
programming using the "C" language. The structured nature and versatility of the language
are emphasized as well as techniques for developing applications. Prerequisites: CIS 1263
Microcomputer Operating Systems I with a grade of "C" or better or competency test; Math
ACT with a score of 19. Fall. Lab Fee.
CIS 1603 UNIX (3-1-3)
This course provides an introduction to the UNIX operating system. The course considers and utilizes the features and commands available through this operating system.
Prerequisites: CIS 1013 Information Systems I with a grade of "C" or better; Math ACT
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with a score of 19. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
CIS 1803 Internet (3-1-3)
Introduces the Internet from a user's perspective, with an emphasis on productive, professional access. Topics include how to connect to the Internet, how to communicate with others, how to find and share information productively utilizing presentation software, as well
as educational, business and social issues related to the Internet. Prerequisite: CIS 1013
Information Systems I with a grade of "C" or better. Lab Fee.
CIS 1813 Computer Law & Ethics (3-0-3)
This course covers ethical issues related to technology including responsibility, liability, and
legal issues affecting computer professionals and users. This course is designed to develop
and encourage ethical decision making, behavior, and character expected of an IT professional. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
CIS 1823 Network Cabling (2-3-3)
This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to
become entry-level technicians in the Network Cabling industry with a concentration in
Copper Cabling and Fiber Optics. The focus of the course is on the following: tool use
and construction techniques; the characteristics of various industry standards; copper and
fiber optic theory; characteristics of various cabling components; and troubleshooting and
repair. After successful completion of this course and certification exams, a certificate will
be issued from C-Tech Associates, Inc. Spring. Lab Fee.
CIS 1903 Web Design/Front Page
This course introduces FrontPage basic and advanced features to create, publish, and maintain websites. Emphasis is placed on hands-on practice to produce interesting and useful
projects, and computer skills will be reinforced through the use of tutorials, lab assignments,
and cases. Prerequisite: CIS 1013 Information Systems I with a grade of "C" or better.
Internet literacy. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
CIS 1913 Web Design/HTML
This course introduces the student to Web authoring and publishing using Hypertext
Markup Language (HTML). This course covers HTML structure and the HTML tags supported in HTML 4.0. Emphasis is placed on hands-on practice to produce interesting and
useful projects, and computer skills will be reinforced through the use of tutorials, lab
assignments, and cases. Prerequisites: CIS 1013 Information Systems I with a "C" or better. Fall. Lab Fee.
CIS 2013 Information Systems II (3-0-3)
This course considers the more complex capabilities of application packages. Word processing topics covered include: styles, outlines, tables and tables of contents, mail merge,
comparing and merging documents, and Object Linking and Embedding (OLE).
Spreadsheet topics covered include: sorting, filtering, subtotals, Pivot tables and charts within a data list; templates, multiple worksheets/workbooks, macros, application creation, and
Object Linking and Embedding (OLE). Database topics include: database and table design
and maintenance, advanced queries, custom forms, and custom reports. The course also
covers integration of all application programs with the Web and other programs.
Prerequisite: CIS 1013 Information Systems I with a grade of "C" or better. Fall, Spring.
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Lab Fee.
CIS 2023 Visual Basic for Applications (3-0-3)
This course is designed to introduce students to Microsoft Visual Basic for Applications.
Learn how to customize and control MS Access, MS Excel, and MS Word with VBA.
Automate repetitive tasks and learn ho to add loops to recorded macros. Prerequisite CIS
2013 Information Systems II or CIS 1173 Spreadhseets I with a grade of "C" or better or
with Instructor's permission. Lab Fee.
CIS 2053 Networking & Communications II (3-0-3)
This course is designed to provide students with classroom and laboratory experience in
current and emerging network technology. Instruction includes: networking, LANs,
WANs, Ethernet, TCI/IP, cabling, cabling tools, routers and basic router setup and programming. Prerequisite: CIS 1053-Networking & Communications I with a grade of "C"
or better. Spring. Lab Fee.
CIS 2093 Advanced Programming in C++ (3-0-3)
This course is a continuation CIS 1593 Programming in C++ and is intended for those who
want to pursue programming for more complex applications. Topics include: sorting,
arrays, classes and more advanced object-oriented programming concepts. Prerequisites:
CIS 1593 Programming in C++ with a grade of "C" or better. Spring. Lab Fee.
CIS 2123 Database Applications Development (3-0-3)
This course provides an introduction to the use of database applications design tools
including VBA programming. Approximately 60% of the course is the development of customized database applications. Prerequisite: CIS 2013-Information Systems II with a grade
of "C" or better. Recommended: CIS 1303 Visual Basic I or CIS 2023 Visual Basic for
Applications. Fall. Lab fee.
CIS 2133 Applications in Structured Query Language (SQL (3-0-3)
This hands-on course is designed for students with previous Windows and computer database design experience. Mastery of basic computer / database concepts and terminology
is also assumed. This course employs a variety of database application design tools, primarily using SQL (Structured Query Language) and VBA (Visual Basic for Applications) programming. Prerequisite: CIS 2013 - Information Systems II - minimum grade of "C".
Recommended: CIS 2123- Database Applications Development - minimum grade of "C"
OR instructor permission Strongly Recommended: Grade of "B" or better in all the above
or equivalent. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab fee.
CIS 2143 Microcomputer Hardware Maintenance II (3-0-3)
This course is designed to introduce students to servicing computer systems from the software standpoint. This course includes IRQ, DMA, files, drivers, operating systems, applications, and other software conflicts that occur in computer systems. An in-depth focus on
application conflicts and software installation and troubleshooting, utilizing various software packages, is included. Virus scan software is touched upon. Emphasis is toward
hands-on software troubleshooting and repair environment. Prerequisite: CIS 1243
Microcomputer Hardware Maintenance I with a grade of "C" or better or equivalent. Fall,
Spring. Lab Fee.
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CIS 2153 Networking & Communications III (2-3-3)
This course is designed to teach the student how to make networks operate faster and better regardless of their size. The focus is on the design and management of local area networks covering protocols, switching and Fast Ethernet. Prerequisite: CIS 2053-Networking
& Communications II with a grade of "C" or better. Fall or upon sufficient student
demand. Lab fee.
CIS 2163 MS Essentials (3-0-3)
This is an introductory course designed to provide an overview of networking concepts and
how they are implemented in Windows. It is the student's responsibility to make arrangements to take and pay for the certification exam. NPCC does not guarantee passage of the
MCSE exam. Prerequisite: CIS 1243 Microcomputer Hardware Maintenance I with a grade
of "C" or better. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
CIS 2243 Visual Basic II (3-0-3)
This course is a continuation of CIS 1303 Visual Basic I and is intended for those who want
to pursue programming for more complex applications. Those intending to do database
development or software support should take this course. Prerequisite: CIS 1303-Visual
Basic I with a grade of "C" or better. Fall. Lab fee.
CIS 2253 Networking & Communications IV (2-3-3)
This course is designed to introduce the student to wide area networks, including different
WAN services such as ISDN and Frame Relay. Prerequisite: CIS 2153-Networking &
Communications III with a grade of "C" or better. Spring or upon sufficient student
demand. Lab fee.
CIS 2263 Microcomputer Operating Systems II (3-0-3)
This course provides a hands-on technical study of the Windows 2000 and Windows XP
Command Line. Topics covered include: opening a command line session and working
with commands, files, directories and subdirectories in the command line interface, managing and backing up a hard disk, using troubleshooting tools, using batch programs, and using
network, TCP/IP, and FTP commands. Prerequisite: CIS 1263 Microcomputer Operating
Systems I or equivalent. Fall or upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
CIS 2273 Microsoft Network Operating Systems (MS NOS)
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to install and configure Microsoft Windows Professional on stand-alone and client computers that are part of a
workgroup or domain. In addition, this course provides the skills and knowledge necessary
to install and configure Windows Server to create file, print, Web, and Terminal servers. It
also provides students with the prerequisite knowledge and skills required for Implementing
a Microsoft Windows Network Infrastructure. It is the student's responsibility to make
arrangements to take and to pay for the certification exam. NPCC does not guarantee passage of the MCSE exam. Prerequisite: CIS 2163 MS Essentials. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
CIS 2283 MS Networking I
This course is for support professionals who are new to Microsoft Windows and will be
responsible for installing, configuring, managing, and supporting a network infrastructure
that uses the Microsoft Windows Server products. It also provides students with the prerequisite knowledge and skills required for Implementing and Administering Microsoft
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Windows Directory Services. It is the student's responsibility to make arrangements to take
and to pay for the certification exam. NPCC does not guarantee passage of the MCSE
exam. Available upon sufficient student demand. Prerequisite: CIS 2273 MS NOS. Fall.
Lab Fee.
CIS 2293 MS Directory Services
This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to
install, configure, and administer Microsoft Windows® Active Directory™ directory services. The course also focuses on implementing Group Policy and performing the Group
Policy-related tasks that are required to centrally manage users and computers. This course
is designed to assist students in gaining the technical skills required to attain the Microsoft
Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE). It is the student's responsibility to make arrangements
to take and to pay for the certification exam. NPCC does not guarantee passage of the
MCSE exam. Prerequisite CIS 2273 MS NOS. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
CIS 2313 MS Security Design (3-0-3)
This course provides you with the knowledge and skills to design a secure network infrastructure. Topics include assembling the design team, modeling threats, and analyzing security risks in order to meet business requirements for securing computers in a networked
environment. The course encourages decision-making skills through real-life scenarios that
the target audience may encounter. You are given the task of collecting the information and
sorting through the details to resolve the given security requirement. Fall. Lab Fee.
CIS 2353 Networking and Communications V (3-2-3)
This course is designed to introduce the student to Hierarchical Network Design Model,
including Classfull Addressing, Routing Processes, OSPF (Open Shortest Path First)
Overview, EIGRP (Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol) Concepts, and Traffic
Management Techniques. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
CIS 2383 MS Networking II
This course is for support professionals who are new to Microsoft Windows and will be
responsible for installing, configuring, managing, and supporting a network infrastructure
that uses the Microsoft Windows Server products. It also provides students with the prerequisite knowledge and skills required for Implementing and Administering Microsoft
Windows Directory Services. Spring. Lab Fee.
CIS 2413 MS Networking Design (3-0-3)
This course provides students with the knowledge and skills to design a Microsoft Active
Directory® directory service and network infrastructure for a Microsoft Windows environment. The course is intended for systems engineers who are responsible for designing directory service and/or network infrastructures. It is the student's responsibility to make
arrangements to take and to pay for the certification exam. NPCC does not guarantee passage of the MCSE exam. Prerequisite: CIS 2283 MS Networking I. Spring. Lab Fee.
CIS 2423 MS Firewall
The goal of this course is to provide Information Technology (IT) professionals with the
knowledge and skills to deploy and manage Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration
(ISA) Server in an enterprise environment. It is the student's responsibility to make arrangements to take and to pay for the certification exam. NPCC does not guarantee passage of
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the MCSE exam. Prerequisite: CIS 2273 MS NOS. Available upon sufficient student
demand. Lab Fee.
CIS 2433 MS Mail
The goal of this course is to teach students the knowledge and skills necessary to install,
configure, and administer Microsoft Exchange. It is the student's responsibility to make
arrangements to take and to pay for the certification exam. NPCC does not guarantee passage of the MCSE exam. Prerequisite: CIS 2273 MS NOS. Fall. Lab Fee.
CIS 2453 Networking and Communications VI (3-2-3)
This course focuses on the techniques and technologies for enabling WAN solutions on
using a combination of both lectures and laboratory exercises. The course topics include
configuring asynchronous connections with modems, PPP (Point-to-Point Protocol), ISDN
(Integrated Services Digital Network), DDR (Dial-on-Demand Routing), X.25, Frame
Relay, Queuing and NAT (Network Address Translation). Available upon sufficient student
demand. Lab Fee.
CIS 2503 Computer-Aided Drafting II (3-0-3)
This course is designed to give the student experience with advanced drafting. Major tasks
included are dimensioning variables, customizing software, developing 3-dimensional drawings, and creating drawings utilizing the two tilemodes. Prerequisite: CIS 1503 ComputerAided Drafting I with a grade of "C" or better. Spring or upon sufficient student demand.
Lab Fee.
CIS 2513 Macromedia Studio (3-0-3)
This course teaches the introductory skills in the Macromedia Studio MX 2004 necessary to
create Web pages (Dreamweaver MX 2004), build Flash animations (Flash MX 2004), and
manipulate graphics for the Web (Fireworks MX 2004). Emphasis is placed on hands-on
practice to produce interesting and useful projects for practice and reinforcement.
Prerequisites: CIS 1013 Information Systems I with a "C" or better. Internet Literacy
strongly recommended. Spring. Lab Fee.
CIS 2603 Advanced UNIX (3-0-3)
This course is a continuation of CIS 1603 UNIX and is intended for those who want to pursue advanced operating system programming and applications. Prerequisite: CIS 1603
UNIX. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
CIS 2704 COBOL (3-2-4)
This course provides an introduction to the COBOL programming language (Common
Business Oriented Language). The course is aimed at students interested in understanding
the syntax and semantics of a programming language such as COBOL. Students will understand the role such a language is playing in the business world today, paying special attention to the Y2000 problems, that many organizations which still adopt legacy COBOL applications will face. Students will also gain knowledge of Object Oriented COBOL through
the use of Micro Focus Personal COBOL for Windows. Available upon sufficient student
demand. Lab Fee.
CIS 2903 Internship (1-9-3)
The Internship is an opportunity to enhance and reinforce classroom instruction with on-
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the-job work experience. Appropriate training stations will be developed, and supervision
will be provided by instructors and site personnel. Students are required to complete 135
clock hours of supervised experience during the term. Available upon sufficient student
demand. Prerequisite: Division Chair approval and minimum 2.0 GPA.
COMPUTER SCIENCE (See Computer Information
Sciences and Technology)
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
CRJ 1103 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3-0-3)
Critical analysis of the American criminal justice system and its constituent components of
law enforcement, prosecution, judiciary and corrections as they function interdependently
within a democratic society and its inherent political and social forces; comprehensive examination of the evolution of criminal law and the eternal search for justice within the diversified demands of a multi-cultural society. Spring and Fall, except for home study arrangements.
CRJ 1123 Criminal Procedures and Evidence (3-0-3)
Focus on the criminal process, legal problems associated with investigation of crime, acquisition and preservation of evidence, commencement of a criminal proceeding, prosecution
and defense of charges, sentencing, and appeal. Principal concern is with development of
existing procedures and examination of current efforts for reform. Prerequisite: CRJ 1103Introduction to Criminal Justice. Spring, except for home study arrangements.
CRJ 2153 Criminology (3-0-3)
An interdisciplinary course which examines the nature and origins of criminal behavior and
societal reactions to that behavior. Included are biological, psychological and sociological
theories of criminal behavior; formal responses of societal control agencies, and informal
responses of communities, groups, and individuals in society. Also included are current
research and trends in crime control policies and programs. Spring and Fall, except for
home study arrangements.
CRJ 2223 Police-Community Relations (3-0-3)
Historical examination of the evolution of police work from the ancient to the modern, and
the accompanying struggle of police agents and agencies to discover the right mix of
enforcement and service. Focus is on contemporary movements from traditional, reactive
police work to community-oriented, proactive models where citizens and police form partnerships to solve neighborhood social problems that generate disorder, fear and crime.
Spring, except for home study arrangements.
CRJ 2243 Police Organization and Management (3-0-3)
Study or principles and theories of organization, management and administration as applied
to law enforcement agencies operating within the political climate of democratic government; includes evolution of theory and practice in management styles, leadership, organizational structure, policy, planning, productivity, technology, public personnel issues and public sector liability. Fall, except for Home Study arrangements.
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CRJ 2253 Criminal Law (3-0-3)
History and philosophy of modern criminal law, including structure, definition, and application of statutes and leading case law; elements of crimes; penalties and general provisions
of the penal code. Fall, except for home study arrangements.
CRJ 2263 Juvenile Justice and Delinquency (3-0-3)
Historical analysis of problems associated with juvenile delinquency and the evolution of a
juvenile justice system apart from the adult criminal justice system; study of landmark court
cases which have shaped the system's response to juvenile problems; dilemmas faced by
criminal justice practitioners in deciding whether to apply juvenile or adult criteria in deciding cases involving young offenders. Spring, except for home study arrangements.
CRJ 2273 Introduction to Corrections (3-0-3)
History and evolution of theories and practices in penology and penal institutions; psychological and sociological profiles of the keepers and the kept; sentencing of offenders and
unique problems associated with handling special categories of inmates: female, disabled,
aged and those suffering from debilitating diseases. All students will participate in scheduled field trips to various correctional facilities. Fall, except for home study arrangements.
CRJ 2283 Criminal Justice Internship (3-0-3)
Criminal justice interns will be assigned to observe, record, and to the extent possible, participate in routine agency operations under supervision of agency officials. Written reports
covering specific agency functions are submitted at regular intervals in accordance with a
work-study plan, to be finalized with the submission of a formal work project paper as
agreed upon by student and instructor. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Fall, Spring,
Summer.
CRJ 2291-6 Special Study (1-6 Variable credits)
Special courses or independent studies in criminal justice are offered on demand. Students
may plan individual projects and research in consultation with the instructor. Prerequisite:
Permission of the instructor.
EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION
ECE 1103 CHILD CARE PRACTICUM I (1-6-3)
A lab experience designed to provide opportunities to teach children in the child development center under the supervision of the program staff. Course time is divided between
the lab (children's program) and classroom. Lab includes working with children, food lab,
resource, and office administration. Fall & Spring.
ECE 1203 CHILD CARE PRACTICUM II (1-6-3)
A lab experience designed to provide opportunities to teach children in the child development center under the supervision of the program staff. Course time is divided between
the lab (children's program) and classroom. Lab includes working with children, food lab,
resource, and office administration. Fall & Spring.
ECE 1113 Child Development (3-0-3)
This class examines basic principles of development: physical, emotional, social, and intellectual. Emphasis will be placed on developmentally appropriate practice, developmental
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growth, and theories and special problems. Prerequisite or corequisite for other courses.
Required for CDA. Fall.
ECE 1183 Health, Safety & Nutrition (3-0-3)
This class explores the fundamentals of children's good health. It provides training in the
ability to recognize and appropriately assume responsibility for the well being of children.
Fall.
ECE 1143 Family Involvement (3-0-3)
Covers the diversity of experiences, values, and functioning found in today's family. The
ability to empathize with parents and development of communication skills and techniques
to support families is included. Students learn the value and necessity of developing a partnership between parents and the child care teacher and/or center. Required for all options
except CDA. Spring.
ECE 1163 Program Management (3-0-3)
Covers general management concepts, personnel, legal concerns, financial record keeping,
food management, and management of daily operations. Includes study of local, state, and
federal regulations for child care facilities, guidelines for conducting a community needs
assessment, location of child care facility, components of the facility design, facility space
arrangements, storage needs, surfaces and materials for indoor facilities, and listening techniques useful in finding, applying for, and getting a job. It includes an introduction to selfimprovement and non-verbal communications.
Required for CDA, Owner/Director, and Associate Degree Options. Fall.
ECE 1223 Infant/Toddler Curriculum (3-0-3)
Preparation and procedures for working as nannies, teachers, and family day care providers,
providers for ill or fragile children, and parents of very young children. Covers materials
and activities for young children and provision of optimal health and safe environments for
infants and toddlers. Prerequisite or corequisite: ECE 1113 Child Development. Required
for all options except CDA. Fall.
ECE 1133 Child Guidance (3-0-3)
Explores the factors which affect the behavior and guidance techniques in-group child care
settings. Units on development factors, indirect guidance, direct guidance, and strategies will
be studied. Prerequisite: ECE 1113 Child Development. Required for all options except
CDA. Spring.
ECE 1253 Curriculum Development (3-0-3)
Presentation of a wide variety of classroom activities for child care. Designed to promote
creative expression in the areas of art, creative play, dramatic play, and movement activities.
Prerequisite: ECE 1113 Child Development. Required for all options including CDA.
Spring.
ECE 1173 Methods & Materials (3-0-3)
Practical "hands-on" experiences to develop materials and illustrative methods related to the
study of child care. Production of a collection of illustrative materials pertinent to the child
care profession including specific themes to be used in a child care center. Required for
Teachers and Associate Degree options. Fall.
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ECE 1403 Nanny Orientation (1-6-3)
Nanny orientation is the study of developmental needs of children, interaction with parents
and employers, family dynamics, professionalism, personal development and social skills,
physical care of children, and domestic tasks and care of the children's environment.
Designed to provide lab experiences in a child care center under the supervision of the staff.
Required for Nanny option only. Spring.
ECE 1363 Internship for Nanny (0-9-3)
Intensive hands-on experience working directly with children within the family setting.
Planning, implementing, and evaluating directed experiences for age appropriate development. Observation and recording of this are included. Prerequisite: Must have a minimum
of 70% (C) in all course work before enrolling in Internship. Required for Nanny option
only. Summer.
ECE 1353 Internship for Teacher or Owner/Director (0-9-3)
Internship provides an opportunity to obtain additional experiences in a child care setting.
Appropriate training stations and supervision will be provided in cooperation with work site
directors. Prerequisite: Must have a minimum of 70% (C) in all course work before
enrolling in Internship. Required for Teacher and Owner/Director options. Summer.
ECE 1301 CDA Documentation (0-3-1)
This course will focus on the completion of CDA competency goals, professional resource
file, and field advising visits. An advisor will complete the CDA Observation instrument as
a part of this course. Students are to enroll in this course concurrently with their final CDA
class. Spring.
ECE 1283 Special Needs (3-0-3)
A survey of the most frequent kinds of disabilities likely to be encountered in child care.
Includes name recognition of common syndromes, acceptable professional attitudes, ways
of communicating with parents, use of equipment helpful in management, and when and
how to refer special needs children. Required for all options. Spring.
EARTH SCIENCE
ESCI 1091-1093 Earth Science Honors' Study
(1-3 variable credits)
Special Studies in Earth Science, Astronomy, Meteorology, or Oceanography on a one-toone basis with the instructor. Available by request upon meeting Honors' Study Program
requirements listed in current catalog.
ESCI 1104 Earth Science (3-2-4)
Provides the student with a survey of the earth, including concepts from geology, astronomy, meteorology, plate tectonics, and physical geography. Offered a minimum of once a
year. Lab Fee.
ESCI 1151 Astronomy Lab (0-2-1)
This laboratory course is designed for students who have successfully completed ESCI 1153
Astronomy, formerly listed in the GCCC catalog which is no longer offered. See PHYS
1124 for current astronomy listing. This introductory lab will reinforce concepts previous-
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ly studied pertaining to the Solar System, Stars, Galaxies, Cluster, the Universe, and
Cosmology, as well as the physics, chemistry and biology by which these operate.
Prerequisite: ESCI 1153 Astronomy, Spring. Lab Fee
ESCI 2244 Meteorology (3-2-4)
Introduces the student to a study of weather, physics of the atmosphere, and associated
phenomena. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
ESCI 2254 Oceanography (3-2-4)
Provides the student with a broad survey of the ocean sciences, fundamental concepts of
the biological, chemical, geological, and physical processes of the sea and air-sea interactions. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
ESCI 2263 Environmental Science (3-0-3)
This course provides an introduction to the most important concepts in the study of the
environment. This course combines ideas from the natural sciences with environmental
ethics, environmental economics, environmental law, environmental impact, and environmental planning. The student will be provided with the knowledge and insight to understand the general idea of how nature works and the interconnectedness between people and
the environment. Available at least once a year.
ECONOMICS
ECON 2203 Macroeconomics (3-0-3)
Designed as the introductory course to basic economic concepts, tools, reasoning, and
methods of analysis relating to the economizing problem and capitalism. The course concentrates on basic topics of the determinants of employment and prices; measuring national income;
monetary and fiscal policy; and money and banking. Fall, Spring.
ECON 2213 Microeconomics (3-0-3)
Continues Macroeconomics with emphasis on the microeconomic topics of theories of
consumer behavior; cost and price; and production, consumption and distribution of goods
between consumers, producers, and resource suppliers in market models of pure competition and imperfectly competitive markets. Prerequisite: ECON 2203-Macroeconomics with
a grade of "C" or better. Spring or available upon sufficient student demand.
EDUCATION
EDUC 2243 Foundation of Education (3-0-3)
Study of various educational policies, practices, and trends; learning objectives; the nature
of teaching; professional ethics; history of education, and teacher liabilities. Ten (10) hours
of public school observation is required. Education methods courses for Arkansas State
Teacher Certification will not be offered for special study credit in the Communication and
Arts Division. Prerequisite: ENG 1113-English Composition I. Spring.
EDUC 2263 Introduction to K-12 Technology (3-0-3)
This course introduces future teachers to the different technologies used by classroom
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teachers. Instruction will include e-mail, presentation software, web, BlackBoard, digital
camera, and scanners. Prerequisites: OFAD 1002 Keyboarding I with a grade of “C” or
better or equivalent and CIS 1001 Introduction to Computing I or CIS 1263 Microcomputer
Operating. Lab Fee.
EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICESPARAMEDIC
EMSP 1203 Emergency Respiratory Support (3-0-3)
Examines the etiology, pathophysiology, and clinical features and treatment of respiratory
emergencies. The course includes various techniques and equipment used by the paramedic.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor, and acceptance into the Paramedic Program.
EMSP 1303 Emergency Cardiac Care (3-0-3)
Presents techniques used by the paramedic in providing emergency care to patients with cardiac disorders and dysrhythmias. Emphasis is placed on acute and chronic disease processes, including appropriate pharmacological intervention, electrocardiography, and telemetry.
Also included are various simulations dealing with cardiac-related emergencies. Prerequisite:
Permission of the instructor.
EMSP 1403 Pharmacology (3-0-3)
Examines the actions, indications, precautions, dosage, and administration of medications
and intravenous fluids. Emphasis is placed on drugs carried on Mobile Intensive Care Units,
fluid and drug therapy, legal controls, dosage calculation, and metric conversions.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor, and acceptance into the Paramedic Program.
EMSP 1601 Etymology (1-0-1)
Medical terminology is introduced in this course by the use of prefixes, suffixes, root words,
and abbreviations, in order to build a vocabulary that will allow for communication with
other professionals and enhance one's overall job performance. Prerequisite: Permission of
the instructor, and acceptance into the Paramedic Program. Lab fee.
EMSP 1603 Patient Assessment (3-0-3)
Includes history taking, physical examination, applying the principles of anatomy, physiology, and etymology to detecting, defining, and describing abnormal changes and processes in
the body. Also, triage and scene assessment and control are emphasized. Prerequisite:
Permission of the instructor, and acceptance into the Paramedic Program.
EMSP 2203 Medical-Surgical Emergencies (1-6-3)
Recognition, management, and pathophysiology involved in the care of various medicalsurgical emergencies. Techniques of trauma management are examined. Pharmacology pertinent to the treatment of abnormal, metabolic, structural, and toxic conditions is included.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor, and acceptance into the Paramedic Program.
EMSP 2303 Clinical Practicum (0-18-3)
Rotations through clinical settings allow for further sharpening of paramedic skills and
other patient care techniques. Areas of experience include, but are not limited to: (1) OR,
(2) ICU and CCU, (3) Emergency Department, (4) Pediatrics, (5) Labor and Delivery.
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Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor, and acceptance into the Paramedic Program. Lab
Fee.
EMSP 2402 Anatomy and Physiology (2-0-2)
Presents basic anatomy and physiology beginning with cellular structure and function and
progressing to systems applications. It provides the student with knowledge of normal and
abnormal body anatomy and processes. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor, and
acceptance into the Paramedic Program. Lab Fee.
EMSP 2403 Field Internship (0-27-3)
In the field internship, students apply their knowledge, techniques, and abilities in actual
field situations. All activities are supervised by physicians, registered nurses, and certified
paramedics. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor, and acceptance into the Paramedic
Program. EMSP 2503 Emergency Medical Service-Paramedic Refresher Course (3-0-3) The
Emergency Medical Service-Paramedic Refresher Course is designed to refresh the
Emergency Medical Service-Paramedic in all areas of emergency medical technology including advanced life support. The course follows the EMT-Paramedic Refresher Training
Program, National Standard Curriculum of the US Department of Transportation; and
meets the requirements for refresher training established by the Arkansas Department of
Health and National Registry of EMT-Paramedics for recertification. Prerequisite: current
certification as an EMT-Paramedic and permission of the instructor. Lab Fee. Fall & Spring.
EMSP 2603 Advanced Cardiac Life Support (3-0-3)
Focuses on the knowledge and skills necessary to provide emergency cardiac care. Lectures
presenting didactic material concerning arrhythmias, defibrillation, airway control and ventilation, pharmacology, intravenous techniques, myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac
death, acid-base and resuscitation of infants and children are provided. These lectures are
followed by practical teaching stations to integrate the knowledge and skills needed.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Lab Fee.
EMSP 2702 Advanced Medical-Surgical Laboratory (1-3-2)
Laboratory simulations of field exercises performed by a functioning paramedic are practiced in this course. Incorporates the knowledge of all previous courses. Prerequisite:
Concurrent enrollment with EMSP 2802 - Specific Topics of Emergency Medicine
required, Permission of the instructor, and acceptance into the Paramedic Program is
required.
EMSP 2801 Special Study (2-0-2)
This course is targeted at refining specific clinical skills in the hospital. Course must be
arranged in consultation with program director. Current malpractice insurance is required.
EMSP 2802 Specific Topics of Emergency Medicine (1-3-2)
Deals with the following two topics in individualized and seminar format. a) Legal
Implications of Emergency Medicine - This seminar provides an introduction to the legal
aspects of emergency medicine, including basic principles of law, malpractice, consent, and
contracts, b) Emergency Psychiatric Intervention -This seminar examines methods used by
the paramedic intervening in behavior emergencies, drug/alcohol abuse, and attempted suicide. Instruction includes legal considerations and case studies. Prerequisite: Permission of
the instructor, and acceptance into the Paramedic Program.
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EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNICIAN
EMT 1501 Basic Life Support for Health Care Providers (1-0-1)
The classes range from training limited to one-rescuer Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation to
training, which consists of one and two rescuer Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation on the
adult and infant obstructed airway techniques of the adult and infant. Also included are
introduction to the respiratory system and mouth-to-mouth resuscitation of the adult, child
and infant; instruction of the heart and circulatory system and its functions; and risk factors
of coronary heart disease. The hours of this course range from four to eighteen classroom
hours, depending on variation of training. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
EMT 1353 Emergency Medical Technician - First Responder (3-0-3)
The 48 hour first responder course is designed for individuals, industrial personnel, day care
personnel, and many other functions which require rapid response to accident victims. The
course includes training in cardiopulmonary resuscitation, immobilization of fractured
bones, obstructed airways, control of life-threatening bleeding, and accidental poisonings.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab
Fee.
EMT 1376 Emergency Medical Technician - Basic
(4-10-6)
The basic level Emergency Medical Technician class is designed for training individuals to
rapidly recognize, assess, and treat medical and trauma-related emergencies. This course was
designed by the Department of Transportation and is taught under its standard guidelines.
The course involves training in Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation, application and use of military anti-shock trousers (MAST), identifying signs and symptoms of shock; internal and
external life-threatening bleeding, immobilization of fractured bones, including spinal
injuries and head trauma; emergency childbirth; pediatric emergencies; gaining access to victims entrapped; radio communications; as well as water rescue techniques, and automobile
extrication. The length of this course is 228 hours and provides six college credit hours.
This course is beneficial to both individuals and industrial personnel, and is a prerequisite
to the Emergency Medical Technician-Intermediate or Paramedic course. Prerequisite: Must
be 18 years old, have a GED or high school diploma, have no physical handicaps which
would preclude participation in all program aspects, and have no record of felony convictions. Fall and Spring.
EMT 1401 Emergency Medical Technician - Basic Refresher Course (1-0-1)
The Emergency Medical Technician-Basic Refresher course is designed to meet the requirements of the Arkansas Department of Health and the National Registry of Emergency
Medical Technicians for bi-annual refresher training. The course is designed to update persons already certified at the EMT-Basic level in new trends in EMS and to refresh skills
already learned. The course length is 24 contact hours. Condition of registration is student
proof of EMT certification by the Arkansas Department of Health, by another state's EMS
accreditation agency, or National Registry of EMT certification; and the permission of the
instructor. Fall and Spring.
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ENGINEERING
(SEE ALSO COMPUTER INFORMATION SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY)
EGR 1303 Machine Blueprint Reading (3-0-3)
Knowledge course in basic blueprinting and print reading or increased knowledge in industrial drawings intended for technical students, adult workers and apprentices. Available upon
sufficient student demand.
EGR 1603 Computer-Aided Drafting (3-0-3)
Computer-Aided Drafting offers hands-on learning of the basic operations of AutoCAD
Release 12. The course includes basic drawing techniques; advanced editing; blocking; creation of symbols libraries, macros, and menus; attribute and data extraction; and 3D techniques. Fall, Spring.
ENGLISH
ENG 1113 English Composition I (3-0-3)
Writing paragraphs and expository themes to give the student practice in communication.
Emphasizes good writing techniques and correct grammatical construction, enabling the
student to think coherently, write clearly and effectively, and read more efficiently.
Prerequisite: Pre-Test; or a grade of "C" or better in Writing II (PCLC 0053) and/or a comprehension score of 11.0 on the exit test for Reading Improvement (PCLC 0023). Fall,
Spring, Summer.
ENG 1123 English Composition II (3-0-3)
Continuation of English Composition I. Study of good writing and rhetorical style.
Students develop research skills through writing a formal, documented paper. Prerequisite:
ENG 1113-English Composition I with a grade of "C" or better. Fall, Spring, Summer.
ENG 1133 Technical Report Writing (3-0-3)
Technical Report Writing is designed for students pursuing careers in technical and vocational fields. Technical papers include process analysis, description of a mechanism, definition, analysis by partition, comparison/contrast, cause/effect. Considerable research is
expected for technical papers, articles, summaries, and a full research report, all of which are
on topics related to the student's major. Use of visuals and technical paper layout are covered. Grammar, mechanics, usage are covered as needed. Fall, Spring, Summer upon sufficient student demand.
ENG 1143 Introduction to the Novel (3-0-3)
A beginning course in reading and understanding of the novel, focusing upon strategies for
analysis. The purpose of the course is to make the student comfortable and confident in the
reading of the novel. Available upon sufficient student demand.
ENG 1153 Introduction to Poetry (3-0-3)
A beginning course in the reading of poetry, designed to acquaint students with the language and form of poetry. The purpose of the course is to make the student comfortable
and confident in the reading of poetry. Available upon sufficient student demand.
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ENG 1163 Introduction to Drama (3-0-3)
Critical reading of selected traditional and contemporary plays, focusing on plot, character,
dramatic conventions, and language. The purpose of the course is to make the student comfortable and confident in the reading of drama. Available upon sufficient student demand.
ENG 1173 Introduction to the Short Story (3-0-3)
A beginning course to introduce the major short story writers and the techniques, terms,
and elements that these writers employ. The student will also learn to write about literature
effectively. Prerequisite: Pre-test. Available upon sufficient student demand.
ENG 1183 Introduction to Literature (3-0-3)
A beginning course in reading and analysis of fiction, poetry, and drama. The purpose of
the course is to have the student become comfortable in the reading of literature. The
instructor may choose to focus on a particular genre. Prerequisite: Pre-test. Available upon
sufficient student demand.
ENG 1193 English as a Second Language (3-0-3)
An English language course designed for the student whose native language is not English.
Using a communicative approach, this course focuses on Basic English grammar while helping students improve their speaking, reading, and writing skills. The course objective is that
students obtain a level of proficiency in the English language that prepares them to function in American society by emphasizing good communication and daily living skills.
Available upon sufficient student demand. Non-transferable at some colleges.
ENG 2223 American Literature I (3-0-3)
Survey of American poetry, fiction, and essays from 1620 to 1860. Provides historical, biographical, and formal approaches to these works of American literature. Prerequisite: Pretest. Available upon sufficient demand.
ENG 2233 American Literature II (3-0-3)
Survey of American poetry, fiction, essays, and drama from 1860 to the present. Provides
historical, biographical, and formal approaches to these works of American literature.
Prerequisite: Pre-test. Available upon sufficient demand.
ENG 2243 English Literature I (3-0-3)
Survey of English literature from the Anglo-Saxon period through the eighteenth century.
Prerequisite: Pre-test. Available upon sufficient student demand.
ENG 2253 English Literature II (3-0-3)
Survey of English literature from the Romantics to contemporary writers, with emphasis on
major figures. Prerequisite: Pre-test. Available upon sufficient student demand.
ENG 2273 World Literature I (3-0-3)
Survey of master works of literature of the world from the ancient period through the
Renaissance. Prerequisite: Reading test. Fall, Spring, Summer.
ENG 2283 World Literature II (3-0-3)
Reading and discussion of master works of world literature from the seventeenth century
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to modern times. Prerequisite: Reading test. Fall, Spring, Summer.
ENG 2291-2296 English: Special Problems
(Variable Credits)
Organized class or individual instruction to meet special literary/writing needs.
ENG 2393 Creative Writing I (3-0-3)
The writing of poetry and fiction. No prerequisite. Available once each year.
ENG 2693 Creative Writing II (3-0-3)
In this course, students write in the genre of choice: poetry, fiction, non-fiction, drama, etc.
Students will learn advanced critique methods, including editorial symbols. They will also
learn how to submit their work for publication. Prerequisite: Creative Writing I. Available
upon sufficient student demand.
FILM
FLM 1103 Introduction to Film Art (3-0-3)
A survey course on film as an art form with an emphasis on the technical/creative aspects.
Screenings and discussion of selected films and a film journal will be required.
FLM 1203 Film Comedy (3-0-3)
A study of cinematic comedy from a historical perspective of the American Cinema from
its early origins to
contemporary expressions. Students will be required to attend screenings and keep a film
journal.
FLM 1603 Film Directors/Actors (3-0-3)
Through viewing and discussion, students will learn the artistry of particular directors and
actors. They will come to understand how various styles affect the movement and interpretation of film. Prerequisite: Introduction to Film or instructor permission. Available upon
sufficient student demand.
FLM 1901-1906 Special Study Projects
(Variable credits)
An in-depth study of some particular aspect of the cinema. Prerequisite: Permission of the
instructor.
FIRE PROTECTION
FIRE 1003 Introduction to Fire Protection (3-0-3)
The history and philosophy of fire protection, review and analysis of fire losses, introduction to fire protection agencies, current technological developments, and career possibilities.
Fall of odd-numbered years, except for home study arrangements.
FIRE 1023 Organization and Administration of Fire Department (3-0-3)
Principles of organization and administration, personnel management and training, communications, records, reports, and public relations of fire protection agencies. Spring of
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even-numbered years, except for home study arrangements.
FIRE 1033 Fire Suppression: Strategy, Tactics, and Equipment (3-0-3)
Special methods of teaching tactical concepts relative
to extinguishing all classes of fire from grass/brush to vehicle and modern buildings are
covered. Forms of extinguishing equipment and compounds, as well as development, are
stressed. Spring of odd-numbered years, except for home study arrangements.
FIRE 1083 Firefighter I (3-0-3)
This course is the first step in meeting three National Fire Protection Association regulations that pinpoint the skills necessary for effective fire protection and personal safety for
firefighters. The material covers fifteen modules available at all fire stations throughout the
State. College faculty associated with the technical portion of the degree plan should evaluate the students' work on modular material. Registration through the College or through
the Arkansas Fire Academy is required.
FIRE 1091-1096 Fire Protection: Home Study (1-6 Variable Credits)
Special course or home study in Fire Protection are offered on demand. Students may plan
individual projects/ research with an instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
FIRE 2013 Fire Apparatus and Fire Hydraulics (3-0-3)
Evaluation of modern fire apparatus, operating principles of pumps, pumper, aerial trucks,
elevating platforms, and special equipment; maintenance of apparatus, principles of
hydraulics, solution of problems invading fire streams. Fall of even numbered years, except
for home study arrangements.
FIRE 2023 Fire Laws, Codes, and Ordinances (3-0-3)
This course is designed to acquaint the student with buildings and fire codes. Course also
helps to develop skills of investigation, detection, recognition, and preservation of evidence, as well as court demeanor and procedures. Fall of even-numbered years, except for
home study arrangements.
FIRE 2033 Private Fire Protection Systems and Equipment (3-0-3)
Involves installation standards and design of sprinkler systems, study of protection and
alarm devices, relationship of water supply, extinguishing materials, insurance standards,
alarm systems, special hazardous situations, and related topics. Spring of odd-numbered
years, except for home study arrangements.
FIRE 2043 Hazardous Materials (3-0-3)
Identification, handling, and fire-fighting practices of explosives, toxic substances, and
radioactive materials in storage or in transit. Spring of even-numbered years, except for
home study arrangements.
FIRE 2053 Industrial Fire Prevention/Suppression (3-0-3)
Fundamental study of industrial fire hazards. Learn laws and codes that are involved in risk.
Learn how to conduct job safety analysis and develop industrial safety records. Identify
methods of eliminating hazards and protecting lives during fires.
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FIRE 2073 Arson Investigation (3-0-3)
Conduct investigation of fires by determining the origin and cause of a given fire and prepare the necessary forms, sketches and reports to record the facts determined in an investigation. Identify common motives and identify, collect, and preserve evidence. Prerequisite:
Permission of Instructor. Available upon sufficient student demand.
FIRE 2083 Firefighter II (3-0-3)
Continuation of additional modular material with a prerequisite of Firefighter I.
Registration through the College or through the Arkansas Fire Academy is required.
FIRE 2103 Incident Command System (ICS) (3-0-3)
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the use, deployment, implementation
and the ability to function within an Incident Command System. Learning the structure and
expandable nature of ICS, an understanding of skills necessary to effectively use ICS and
scenario practice on applying ICS to real emergency situations.
FORESTRY
FORT 1103 Introduction to Forestry (3-0-3)
Provides the beginning student with a general review of the field of forestry, and a preview
of the areas to be studied by the forestry major. Topics included measurement, protection,
utilization, preservation, and forest management. Available upon sufficient student
demand.
FRENCH
Students who have taken a foreign language course in high school may receive college credit. If a student enrolls for the first language course at National Park Community College at
a level beyond the beginning classes, the maximum of six hours' credit may be earned for
beginning classes bypassed. When the student finishes the course with a grade of "C" or
better, the college will award college credit for the courses bypassed.
FREN 1103 Beginning French I (3-0-3)
First semester course in fundamentals of French: vocabulary, pronunciation, oral comprehension, grammar, and composition. Exercises in writing, listening and speaking. Some
computer exercises. Fall.
FREN 1113 Beginning French II (3-0-3)
Continuation of Beginning French I. Prerequisite: Beginning French I or equivalent.
Spring.
GEOGRAPHY
GEOG 1103 Introduction to Geography (3-0-3)
Presents the nature of geographic study; illustrates world conditions with emphasis on cultural and environmental issues; introduces map reading; and examines basic concepts.
Offered at least one semester per year.
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GEOG 1123 Conservation (3-0-3)
Basic concepts in supply, exploration, and use of
minerals and natural resources. Emphasis on complex relations between the individual and
the physical environment, and the policies of ecology. Special attention to ecology of
Arkansas. Available upon sufficient student demand.
GEOG 1193 Special Study (3-0-3)
Individual study of various areas in geography; course to be worked out by the student with
the instructor's guidance. Permission of the Division Chairperson and instructor required
before registration is allowed.
GEOLOGY
GEOL 1104 Physical Geology (3-2-4)
Introduces the student to the field of physical geology in general, such as the geologic environment, geologic processes shaping the surface of the earth, plate tectonics, crust, and the
interior of the earth. Offered a minimum of once a year. Lab Fee.
GEOL 1114 Historical Geology (3-2-4)
Interpretation of the earth's history, origin of the earth, evolutions of the continents and
oceans, geologic time, and evolution of life. Fossils, rocks, and geologic maps are studied in
the laboratory. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab fee.
GEOL 1504 Arkansas Geology (3-2-4)
This course includes a brief study of physical and historical geology concepts with the main
emphasis of the course on the physical and historical geological aspects of the six physiographic divisions of Arkansas. Those divisions are Ozark Plateau/Arkansas Valley, Ouachita
Mountains, Gulf Coast, Mississippi Embayment, Crowley's Ridge, and the New Madrid
Fault zone. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab fee.
GRAPHIC DESIGN
GRD 1103 Advertising I (3-3-3)
This is the introductory course in graphic arts for the two-year program in graphic design.
Basic studio techniques involved in paste-up and layout will be practiced by the students,
using their own designs with the goal of producing camera-ready art and copy. Some lettering and typography will also be studied. Fall, Spring.
GRD 1113 Advertising II (3-3-3)
This continuation of Advertising I will find the student working on projects in illustration,
color separation, and three-dimensional package design. The basic skills used in Advertising
I will continue to be used and more complex problems introduced. Prerequisite: GRD 1103Advertising I. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee
GRD 1133 Free Hand Studio I (3-0-3)
FreeHand, a drawing and design program, is one of a triad of software programs that currently create a standard in the graphic design industry. Students will learn the techniques
possible with the tools in FreeHand by designing pages demonstrating each tools function.
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GRD 1143 Adobe Illustrator (3-0-3)
The oldest of the drawing and design programs, Adobe Illustrator has again become the
illustration program most used by professionals. Students will explore all the tools of
Illustrator while preparing a book with their examples to illustrate each technique they are
assigned to master. The program uses lines, shapes, and freehand tools as well as color fills
and blends to create high resolution vector graphics.
GRD 1153 Photoshop Studio I (3-0-3)
PhotoShop is the premiere photographic manipulation and retouch program for publishers
and designers. Students will become familiar with many of the image-altering filters and the
multifaceted layers of manipulation possible with this highly creative program using both
traditional and digital black and white and color photographs.
GRD 1163 Silkscreen I (3-3-3)
This course enables the student to learn a method of making art prints in any number of
colors without elaborate equipment. The students will learn to build their own frames and
will study many techniques from hand-cut stencils to photo-direct screen printing. Spring.
GRD 1183 Desktop Publishing (QuarkXPress) and Design I (3-0-3)
This course is designed to give a fundamental proficiency in desktop publishing and design
to students in the Graphic Design Program and interested member of the community. As
a foundation course in computerized design and layout, the class will explore the programs
that are industry standards for the Apple Macintosh computer and discover the pros and
cons of those programs. Students will also learn how to implement them on a basic level.
Lab Fee.
GRD 2003 Lettering/Calligraphy (3-3-3)
This one semester course will give the students a foundation in hand lettering techniques
and a history of lettering styles which should benefit their knowledge of the origins of contemporary type faces. In addition to producing lettering for their commercial art projects,
the students will also study free calligraphic techniques. Spring.
GRD 2013 Art Direction (3-3-3)
This course is designed to give the students a knowledge of the procedures of an advertising agency. The students will be responsible for the creation of campaigns using art and
copy, and they will study problems such as distribution, client relations, product image, and
art selection. Prerequisite: GRD 2023-Production and Layout I. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
GRD 2023 Production and Layout I (3-3-3)
This course will involve the student in the production of camera-ready art and copy for brochures, catalogues, and magazine and newspaper advertisements. The students will have the opportunity to be
involved in actual work experience and have their designs printed while learning to use professional
process cameras, photo typesetting equipment, and large and small format photography. Prerequisite:
GRD 1113-Advertising Design II. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
GRD 2033 Production and Layout II (3-3-3)
In this continuation of Production and Layout I, the students will be working with more
advanced production techniques with an emphasis on completing work for their personal
portfolios. Prerequisite: GRD 2023-Production and Layout I. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
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GRD 2043 Commercial Illustration (3-3-3)
Both product and editorial illustration assignments will be presented to the students.
Projects will include work with pen and ink, airbrush, color separations, and black and white
color photography. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
GRD 2053 Package Design (3-3-3)
In this one semester course the student will be concerned with designing for three-dimensional packaging and point of purchase advertisements. In addition to complete comprehensives on each assignment, copies of the package or ad will be constructed. Available
upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
GRD 2063 The Design and Printing of the Book (3-0-3)
This course will give the student the opportunity to work with the studio class to produce
a small quarter-bound book using traditional letterpress methods. The student will study and
practice all the techniques necessary for illustrating, setting printing, and binding a limited
edition.
GRD 2073 Advertising Design For the Small Business (3-0-3)
This course, offered through the Graphic Design program, gives owners and employees of
small businesses, members of organizations who are responsible for newsletters, and
employees of businesses who must deal with the specification of advertising, catalogs, and
brochures an opportunity to learn the fundamentals of advertising design, type specification, techniques of print media production, and graphic arts terminology. Class members
will work in a graphic design studio with the latest equipment, but there will be an emphasis on using the equipment found in the typical office in combination with graphics materials readily available in the community to produce quality advertising with a minimum of
expense. In order to facilitate participation by the business community, the class will be held
on one afternoon per week for one semester. Lab Fee.
GRD 2083 Designing for the Internet
An introductory course that explores the necessary ingredients of a good web page and how
to design a web page both mechanically and aesthetically to accomplish the purpose of the
page. Emphasis will be on the fundamental structure of a web page and the basic tools of
design and construction. Prerequisite: Photoshop Studio
GRD 2133 FreeHand Studio II (3-0-3)
Students who have mastered the basic tools in the FreeHand Studio I class will be able to
use those skills to design illustrations and other graphic art pieces in this studio class. The
emphasis will be on innovative solutions to the assigned projects and the quality of the portfolio presentation.
GRD 2153 Photoshop Studio II (3-0-3)
For students having completed PhotoShop Studio, this course offers the opportunity to
experiment creatively with these newly learned skills. Students will work within a series of
assignments that go beyond basic techniques to the creation of multi-layered artwork.
GRD 2163 Silkscreen II (3-3-3)
Continuation of Silkscreen I gives the students the opportunity to expand technical skills.
Students may use typesetting and process cameras to produce compositions. Prerequisite:
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GRD 1163 Silkscreen I. Spring. Lab Fee.
GRD 2183 Desktop Publishing and Design II (QuarkXpress) (3-0-3)
QuarkXpress on Macintosh computers is an industry standard in the design and publishing
fields. This course builds on skills learned in Desktop Publishing and Design I and gives the
student the opportunity to use Quark in more detail, including color applications. Students
will design ads, newsletters, booklets, business cards, posters, flyers and logos.
GRD 2293 Advanced Lettering/Calligraphy (3-0-3)
This course offers the student with some background in lettering skills the opportunity to
learn new lettering styles and calligraphic alphabets. Available upon sufficient student
demand.
GRD 2591-2596 Special Studies in Graphic Design
(1 - 6 variable Credits)
Individual study of various topics and concepts in graphic design. Course content and
objectives to be developed and approved by the instructor and student. The instructor will
assign appropriate course credit. Pre-requisite. Permission of the instructor. Available
upon sufficient student demand.
HEALTH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
HIT 1014 Basic Diagnostic & Procedure Coding (2-2-4)
To develop an understanding of coding and classification systems in order to assign valid
diagnostic and/or procedure codes. It will include validation of coded clinical information
and case mix/severity of illness data. Co-requisite: ALH 1203, BIOL 1224, HIT 2004. Fall
HIT 1113 Health Data Content (2-2-3)
Standards for patient and health care data; data collection issues and documentation requirements; data
access and retention. Prerequisite: CIS 1013-Information Systems I with a “C” or better. Fall, Spring.
HIT 1212 Legal Aspects of Health Information (2-0-2)
Consents, authorization for release of information, confidentiality, subpoenas, and other
legal aspects of health information. Spring.
HIT 2002 Health Care Quality Management (2-0-2)
Improving organization performance through quality assessment, utilization review, risk
management, and medical staff credentialing. Prerequisite: HIT 1113-Health Data Content,
HIT 2102-Health Statistics with a “C” or better.; Corequisite CIS 2013-Information Systems
II. Fall.
HIT 2004 Fundamentals of Medical Science (4-0-4)
Disease process, pharmacology, diagnostic and treatment methodologies for: all body systems. Includes computer-assisted instruction. Pre-requisite: ALH 1203-Medical
Terminology; BIOL 1114 General Biology with a “C” or better; Corequisite BIOL 1224Basic Human Anatomy & Physiology. Fall.
HIT 2014 Intermediate Diagnosis and Procedure Coding (2-2-4)
Intermediate diagnosis coding to include: Case studies using more complex code assign-
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ments with ICD-9-CM. Case studies using more complex code assignments with ICD-9CM. Intermediate Procedure coding: RBRVS, APCs, ASC examples sued including professional fee billing examples in coding. Case studies and more complex code assignments
using CPT and HCPCS Level II codes. Procedure coding for inpatients.
HIT 2102 Basic Health Statistics (1-2-2)
Computation, interpretation of hospital rates and percentages, report generation and data
display, introduction to research. Prerequisites: CIS 1013-Information Systems I with a “C”
or better. Spring.
HIT 2203 Reimbursement Methods (2-2-3)
Course includes a study of the uses of coded data and health information in reimbursement
and payment systems appropriate to all health care settings and managed care. Charge master maintenance, identify fraudulent billing practices. Prerequisite: HIT 1014 Basic
Diagnostic & Procedure Coding with a “C” or better. Spring.
HIT 2213 Computers in Health Care (1-2-3)
Basic Introduction to computerized health information systems, computer-based patient
records, automated registries and applications in Health Information Technology. Pre-requisite: HIT 1113 Health Data Content with a “C” or better. Corequisite: CIS 2013Information Systems II. Fall.
HIT 2222 Directed Practice I (0-8-2)
Professional practice experiences in acute care, ambulatory care, rehabilitation, long-term
care, and home health. Emphasis on record assembly & analysis, file management, release
of information, statistics, indexes & registers, and special projects. Pre-requisite: Permission
of instructor. Limited enrollment. Travel required. Fall.
HIT 2402 Directed Practice II (0-8-2)
Professional practice experiences in acute care, ambulatory care, behavioral health, and cancer registry. Emphasis on ICD-9-CM coding & DRG assignment, CPT coding, quality management, supervisory principles, medical staff & hospital committees, and special projects.
Pre-requisite: Permission of instructor. Limited enrollment. Travel required. Spring.
HIT 2503 Supervision in HIT (3-0-3)
Supervisory principles for the health information management department, including monitoring adherence to budgets, staffing schedules, policies, procedures, and productivity standards. Prerequisite: HIT 1113 Health Data Content with a “C” or better and permission of
instructor. Spring.
HIT 2703 Coding Practicum (0-6-3)
Supervised coding experience in hospitals, clinics, and other health care facilities. Liability
insurance is required. Travel may be required. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Summer.
HIT 2901-2903 Special Study in HIT (1-3 variable credits)
Individual study of a particular area of health information technology. Course content proposal and course objectives to be developed by the student and submitted to the instructor
for approval and assignment of appropriate course credit. Prerequisite: Completion of 30
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college level credits with GPA 3.5. Permission of instructor. Fall/Spring.
HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND
RECREATION (also see Physical Education)
HPR 1102 Life Fitness Concepts (1-1-2)
Basic concepts of physical activity as they relate to healthy living. One lecture a week, one
laboratory per week. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
HPR 1103 Public Safety Diver (3-0-3)
The Public Safety Diver program is an open water certification which meets and exceeds the
standards as set forth by the Recreational Scuba Training Council and its ANSI committee.
It emphasizes the specific responsibilities of public safety diving which are broader in scope
than that of open water recreation diving. Available upon sufficient student demand.
HPR 1113 Personal Safety and First Aid (3-0-3)
Basic principles of personal safety and safety education; safety programs as they apply to
the school, home and working environment, legal aspects, and methods of responding to
basic emergency response. American Red Cross First Aid and CPR. Spring.
HPR 1211 Recreation Programming I (1-0-1)
This course is an introduction to recreation program planning, supervision, and evaluation.
The study emphasized is theory, principles, and leadership techniques of working with individuals and groups in a variety of settings, including the community, institutions, and camps.
Fall.
HPR 1216 Fundamentals of Landscaping and Turf Management
Students learn the fundamentals of horticulture, Turf grass and landscape as they apply to
plant growth, development, and culture. Identification of ornamental trees, shrubs, palms,
bedding plants, groundcovers, herbaceous plants, ferns, and warm-seasoned turf grasses
commonly grown in the this zone. Students will also learn the cultural requirements of the
plants introduced in the course. Identification and physiology, morphology, and cultural
requirements of turf grass are studied. Turf grass establishment and maintenance are also
emphasized. Students will also learn the introduction to basic principles of soil science. The
physics, chemistry, and biology of soil are covered in this course. Other topics to be covered are soil genesis and classification, soil fertility and plant nutrient, plant growth media,
and soil's natural ecosystems. Students will learn how to identify plant diseases, insect pests,
and weeds commonly found attacking ornamentals, turf, and food crops. Emphasis is on
control methods and pesticide safety. Students will learn to introduction to irrigation systems commonly used on golf courses and landscape facilities. Irrigation principles, systems
and components, installation, a design are studied. Students are introduced to basic
hydraulics and irrigation repair, troubleshooting, and maintenance. Career opportunities in
the field of horticulture will also be explored,” hands- on" experience in horticultural skills..)
`
HPR 1301 Outdoor Recreational Activities (1-0-1)
This course presents concepts and activities of Outdoor Recreational Activities. The course
includes activities such as sailing, scuba, hiking, camping, canoeing, hunting, fishing, horseback riding, bicycling, and other outdoor recreational activities. One lecture, one lab per
week. Fall.
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HPR 1703 Leadership in Recreation, Hospitality, and Tourism (3-0-3)
This course deals with the theories, the techniques, and recurrent problems of leadership in
recreation, hospitality and tourism. Students learn leadership skills in the planning, organization, conducting of the organizational needs in a service industry.
HPR 1803 Promotion and Production of Programs and Events (3-0-3)
The development of an understanding of requirements for the production and promotion
of events with an emphasis on advertising and publicity, insurance, scheduling, security, and
co-sponsorships of both commercial and non-profit events. Fall.
HPR 2003 Adventure Games and Group Problem Solving (3-0-3)
Students will learn, through new games, methods of leadership, risk level awareness, trust,
group decision-making, planning and implementation, as well as rapid adjustment skills.
Students will work together using the resources of the group to accomplish tasks and enjoy
the method as a recreational activity. Fall.
HPR 2011 Aerobic Instructor Lab Experience
This course requires students to team teach with a Nationally Certified Aerobic Instructor
in a community or club based group exercise program two-hours per week for six consecutive weeks. Prior to team teaching the student will physically practice group exercise
instruction two hours per week for ten consecutive weeks with an AFAA Certified Aerobic
Instructor.
HPR 2012 Aerobic Instructor Certification Course (1-0-1)
The student will become an AFAA Certified Aerobic Instructor. The AFAA Primary
Certification exam will be offered at the end of the course.
HPR 2203 Introduction to Natural and Historical Interpretation (3-0-3)
Introduction to Natural and Historical Interpretation is designed to acquaint the student
with the concepts of environmental and historical interpretation through a practical
approach. Students will use computer-assisted learning programs and develop audio-visual
techniques, nature trail development techniques, develop nature oriented activities and study
actual practices used in the field as demonstrated by National Parks Services, Arkansas State
Parks, Arkansas Game and Fish Department and Garvan Woodland Gardens.
HPR 2211 Recreation Programming II (1-0-1)
This course is a continuation of recreation program planning, supervision, and evaluation.
The study emphasizes a more in-depth study of theory, principles, and leadership techniques of working with individuals and groups in a variety of settings, including the community, institutions, and camps. Prerequisite: HPR 1202. Spring.
HPR 2213 Marketing of Leisure Services (3-0-3)
Application of economic and marketing principles to leisure service delivery systems, including procedures for developing marketing plans for recreation agencies.
Emphasis on organizing and analyzing the marketing process and planning the
marketing mix, including product, price, place, and promotion. For recreation hospitality and tourism majors with limited background in economics and marketing.
This subject develops a comprehensive awareness of marketing in the leisure envi223
ronment. It gives students the opportunity to develop applied skills in the construction of a marketing plan and the management of the marketing mix in the
leisure industry.
HPR 2302 Fitness Trainer Field Placement Experience
This class will consist of a minimum of 250 hours and not less than 10 consecutive weeks of working with clients in any of the following capacities: community
or health club fitness floor trainer, aerobics instructor, and/or personal trainer.
HPR 2403 Commercial Recreation, Tourism and Hospitality Enterprises (3-0-3)
This course has an emphasis on existing recreational, tourism and hospitality enterprises
within the area. It also emphasizes an in-depth study on demographics, advertising promotion, and staff development. Students will develop a network of relationships with the
chamber of commerce and the advertising and promotion commissions, as well as other
enterprises in the leisure industry.
HPR 2406 Field Placement Experience (200 clock hours - 6 SSCH)
Field Placement Experience requirements within the Associate of Applied Science Degrees
in Recreation will consist of a minimum of 200 hours, or not less than 10 consecutive weeks
of field placement experience in a clinical, residential, community, or commercial-based
recreational programs under an on-site agency field placement supervisor and Director of
the Associate of Applied Science Degree Program.
HPR 2663 Motor Development and Skill Acquisition (3-0-3)
Deals with contemporary motor development and movement theory. Development hierarchies, physiological aspects of development, motor learning models, perception, feedback
and psychological factors affecting performance. Available upon sufficient student demand.
Fall
HPR 2903 Special Studies in Leisure Services (3-0-3)
Individual study of a particular area of the health, physical education and recreation field.
Course content proposal and course objectives to be developed by the student and submitted to the instructor for approval. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. Available upon
sufficient student demand.
HEATING VENTILATION AND AIR
CONDITIONING
HVC 1013 Schematics (3-0-3)
This course is designed for the student to learn to read, draw, and interpret wiring diagrams
and place the circuitry in operative arrangements with electrical and electronic symbols.
Also included is the study of the distribution mediums such as duct design and sizing. Fall
HVC 1014 Basic Electricity (3-3-4)
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the theory and practice of using electricity as it applies to HVC technology. Fall/Spring
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HVC 1023 Air Properties (3-0-3)
This course is designed for the study of air properties and the instrumentation to meet the
environmental needs of structures, residential and commercial, and the factors involved in
the calculation of heating and cooling loads. Fall
HVC 1043 Heating Technology (2-3-3)
This course is designed to cover the construction, design, operation, and servicing of fossil
fuel heating equipment, and heat pumps, both air to air and geothermal. Also included is
the thermodynamics of heat flow, humidification, dehumidification, and filtering. Co-requisite: Basic Electricity, Air Properties, and Schematics. Fall
HVC 1074 Air Conditioning Systems (3-3-4)
This course is a comprehensive study of A/C systems and the practical applications and
installation of air conditioning units. Testing procedures, parts removal, and installation are
covered in depth. Prerequisite: Basic Electricity, Air Properties, and Schematics. Spring
HVC 1033 Introduction to Air Conditioning (3-0-3)
This course is designed to teach the principles of the basic refrigeration cycle, including
temperature-pressure relationships, evaporation, condensation, heat transfer, and refrigerants. Also included is the identification and use of hand tools, principles of measurement,
and safety principles and practices. Fall
HVC 1054 Residential Systems (3-3-4)
This course is a comprehensive study of the major components and control devices and
their applications. Testing procedures, parts removal, and installation are covered in depth.
Prerequisite: Basic Electricity, Air Properties, and Schematics. Spring
HVC 1064 Refrigeration Systems (3-3-4)
This course is a comprehensive study of mechanical refrigeration systems emphasizing
proper service techniques through analysis of the problem. Testing procedures, parts
removal, and installation are covered in depth. Prerequisite: Basic Electricity, Air
Properties, and Schematics. Spring
HVC 1083 Tubing, Pipe, and Welding (2-3-3)
This course is designed to cover the process of identifying tubing and piping with practical
applications in sizing and fitting to different configurations using mechanical fittings, soft
soldering, silver brazing, aluminum brazing, and equipment usage. Practical application is
provided in the lab. Spring
HISTORY
HIST 1143 Arkansas History (3-0-3)
Designed to acquaint the student with the economic, social and political evolutions of
Arkansas from the Spanish and French explorations to the present. "Local color" interrelated to these socio-economic studies will be an integral part of the course: folklore, native art
and music, and traditions that have remained a unique part of Arkansas heritage. Available
upon sufficient student demand.
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HIST 2203 Western Civilization to 1660 (3-0-3)
Study of the rise of early Mediterranean Greek and Roman civilizations, development of
medieval Europe, and beginning of the modern era. Course focuses on the interplay of culture, government, society, and ideas. Fall.
HIST 2213 Western Civilization Since 1660 (3-0-3)
Rise of scientific thought, absolutism, the enlightenment, and capitalism; challenges of revolution and nationalism; Marx, Darwin, and Freud; and culture and trauma of 20th century
civilization. Spring.
HIST 2223 United States History To 1865 (3-0-3)
Survey of the growth of the United States from early colonial days through the struggle for
independence, development of the American mind, and the struggle of nation-making,
Jeffersonian politics and Jackson democracy, up through the crisis of Civil War. Fall, Spring.
HIST 2233 United States History Since 1865 (3-0-3)
Overcoming the upheavals of the Civil War, economic growth and industrialism, democracy and empire, and the 20th century issues of world prominence and the struggle for social
equality. Fall, Spring.
HIST 2283 The American Civil War (3-0-3)
An analysis of the sectional factors leading to the Civil War and a survey of the politicaleconomic problems in conducting it. Available upon sufficient student demand.
HIST 2291-2296 Special Study (1-6 Variable credit)
Occasionally, on demand, special courses or topics are offered; or students may choose a
series of independent, directed readings. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.
Available upon student eligibility.
HOSPITALITY ADMINISTRATION
HA 1013 Restaurant Orientation/Sanitation & Safety (3-0-3)
A survey of the food service industry to include its history, various food service systems,
organization and operations, and franchising. Emphasizes the aspects of sanitation.
Designed for those who would like to learn about the food service industry in terms of sanitation and safety. Fall.
HA 1043 Introduction to Hospitality Administration (3-0-3)
The history and development of the hospitality industry which comprises of food, lodging,
and tourism management, an introduction to management principles and concepts used in
the service industry, and career opportunities in the field. Fall, Spring.
HA 1053 Introduction to Food and Beverage Management (3-0-3)
This course covers the practical skills and knowledge necessary for the effective operation
of food and beverage service in a variety of settings. Topics include reservations, greetings
and service of guests, styles of service, handling complaints, management responsibilities,
and sales and merchandising. Fall.
HA 1063 Hotel Operations (3-0-3)
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Provides an overview of the management in the lodging industry. Topics include management & supervision skills, human resources, the front office, housekeeping, food & beverage, safety & security, sales & marketing, facility engineering & maintenance, franchise
agreements & management contracts. Designed for those who would like to learn more
about the lodging industry. Spring
HA 1073 Hospitality Administration Internship (0-9-3)
This course furnishes participation in a 135 clock hour internship work experience program
in a college-approved hospitality operation. Co requisite or Prerequisite: HA 1043Introduction to Hospitality Administration with a grade of "C" or better. Permission of the
instructor is required. Fall, Spring.
HA 1103 Principles of Food Preparation I (3-0-3)
Focus on principles, techniques, and theories of food preparations emphasizing nutritional
content, proper use and selection of equipment, while stressing sanitary quality controls and
guest accommodations that focus on food production. Fall.
HA 1113 Principles of Food Preparation II (3-0-3)
Focuses on the principles, techniques, and theories of food preparations. Nutritional content, proper use, and selection of equipment, while stressing sanitary quality controls, and
guest accommodations that focus on food production are emphasized. Prerequisite: HA
1103 Principles of Food Preparation I or instructor permission.
HA 2213 Beverage Management (3-0-3)
Covers the history and development of wine, beer, and spirits. It includes an introduction
to service principles used in the hospitality industry as it relates to Alcohol Safety and the
liabilities involved. The course also includes management concepts concerning purchasing,
costing, controlling inventory, and professional alcohol service. Spring.
HA 2214 Restaurant Management (3-0-3)
Covers the different kinds and characteristics of restaurants and the development of concepts, designs, marketing and business plans. This course will consider financing, legal and
tax issues, as well as purchasing, budgeting, staffing, training, and sanitation. It includes an
in depth look into service and management principles, customer relations, and their overall
importance to succeeding in the restaurant industry. Spring.
HA 2291-2296 Special Study in Hospitality Administration (1-6 variable credits )
Special courses of independent studies in Hospitality Administration are offered on
demand. Course content will be worked out by the students with the instructor’s guidance.
Course may be repeated for additional credit if subject content changes. Prerequisite:
Permission of the instructor and the Division Chair.
INDUSTRIAL ELECTRONICS
ELT 1153 Electronic Circuits Fundamentals (3-0-3)
Selected concepts of DC and AC circuits as applied to Industrial Control Electronics.
Fall, Spring.
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ELT 1163 Industrial Wiring Methods (3-0-3)
Selected topics of the National Electric Code needed for power and control of auxiliary
equipment. Emphasizing wiring fundamentals and metal conduit fabrication techniques.
Fall, Spring.
ELT 1263 Programmable Logic Controllers I (3-0-3)
A study of the fundamental architecture both in hardware and software of 8, 16, and 32 bit
microprocessors as used in programmable logic controllers. Fall, Spring.
ELT 1233 Instrumentation (3-0-3)
This course illustrates the practical applications of sensors used in industrial process control such as: heat, pressure, position, stress and strain are also covered. Fall, Spring.
ELT 1254 Electronic Devices (3-1-4)
A study of active devices such as: diodes, bi-polar junction transistors, field effect transistors and other devices found in Industrial Control Electronics systems.
Corequisites: ELT1154 Electronic Circuits Fundamentals. Fall and Spring.
ELT 1364 Programmable Logic Controllers II (3-1-4)
An advanced study of programmable logic controller operation using commercial equipment and fraction horsepower electric motors. Prerequisite: ELT1264 Program Logic
Controllers I. Spring.
JOURNALISM
JRNL 1103 Writing for the Mass Media I (3-0-3)
A beginning course for students interested in broadcasting, print journalism or public relations. Designed to teach basic skills in gathering information and writing news stories. Fall,
Spring.
JRNL 1111 Journalism Practicum I (0-2-1)
This course gives students practical experience in journalism. Upon completion of this
course, students should have basic knowledge of at least one aspect of newspaper production. Students signing up for this course should contact the instructor to arrange a work
schedule. Fall, Spring.
JRNL 1213 Writing for the Mass Media II (3-0-3)
Continuation of Writing for the Mass Media I. Skills taught include research techniques for
reporters, editing, news interpretation and investigative reporting. Fall, Spring.
JRNL 1243 Introduction to the Mass Media (3-0-3)
Designed to give interested students a working knowledge of mass communications media.
Includes a general description and survey of various media and current theories of mass
communication. Includes history and trends of newspapers, magazines, radio, motion pictures, television, recording industry and the internet. Fall, Spring.
JRNL 2111 Journalism Practicum II (1-0-1)
Continuation of Journalism Practicum I. This course gives students practical experience in
journalism. Upon completion of this course, students should have basic knowledge of at
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least one aspect of newspaper production. Students signing up for this course should contact the instructor to arrange a work schedule. Fall, Spring.
JRNL 2203 Feature Writing (3-0-3)
Designed for students interested in writing feature articles for mass communications media,
with emphasis on magazine and newspaper features. Types and styles of features are discussed, as well as markets for feature writing. Spring.
LEARNING ACCELERATION DIVISION
(Note: For courses in the Learning Acceleration Division with the PCL designation, please turn to the PreCollege Level Courses section.)
LAD 1201 Introduction to Adaptive Equipment for People with Disabilities (1-0-1)
A one-hour college credit course designed to introduce students to adaptive equipment
technology for persons with disabilities. The special studies class will teach the basics of
Voice Activated Computer systems (Dragon Dictate and Dragon Naturally Speaking), how
to use the software and how to apply it to word processing concepts, the Internet, and
spreadsheets. In addition, the basics of adaptive equipment for persons with visual impairments will be introduced to include ZOOM Text Computer Print Enlargement Systems, a
Voice Synthesizer Systems. Closed Circuit TV Systems, and an introduction to utilizing a
Braille printer. Students will be required to complete lab work and to schedule two(1) hour
sessions for 10 weeks with the instructor. Purchase of a book will be not be required.
However, a notebook of assignments and completed lab work will be required.
LAD 1301 Notetaking and Research (1-0-1)
Notetaking and Research is a one-hour elective. It is designed to assist general education students in the development and application of note-taking and research skills (online, as well
as traditional). The five-week course will focus on effective notetaking, research as a thinking process, taxonomy of research, the research process, using the research process on-line,
developing a thesis and formulating questions, and planning research on a thesis. Available
upon sufficient student demand. Fall, Spring.
LAD 1401 Critical Thinking (1-0-1)
Critical Thinking is a one-hour elective. It is designed to assist general education students in
the development and application of critical thinking skills. The five-week course will focus
on understanding habits of mind and individuality, evaluating both short and long arguments, recognizing faulty logic, applying critical thinking to both in-class and out-of-class
evidence, and expressing ideas persuasively. Available upon sufficient student demand. Fall,
Spring.
LAD 1501 Advanced Study Skills (1-0-1)
This course is a one-hour elective. It is designed to assist general education students with
the skills needed for success in college academics. The five-week course will focus on five
skills: Study Environments and Learning Styles, Time Management, Advanced Reading
Strategies, Memory Techniques, and Test Taking Skills.
Available upon sufficient student demand. Fall, Spring.
LAD 1603 Mastering the College Experience (3-0-3)
Mastering the College Experience is an elective course designed to assist general education
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students with the transition from pre-college or work place learning strategies to the environment of college academics. Available upon sufficient student demand. Fall, Spring.
Prerequisite: ACT score of 19 or equivalent. Telecourse.
MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY
MMFG 1143 Industrial Safety (3-0-3)
This course covers the principles of industrial safety. Emphasis is placed on industrial safety, OSHA, and environmental regulations. Upon completion, students should be able to
demonstrate knowledge of a safe working environment. Fall, Spring.
MMFG 1153 Hydraulics (3-0-3)
This course will cover the basic concepts of hydraulics and hydraulic operation in an industry setting. Fall, Spring.
MMFG 1204 Machine Technology I (2-6-4)
This course introduces machining operations as they relate to the manufacturing industry.
Topics include shop safety, measuring tools, lathes, drilling machines, saws, milling
machines, bench grinders, and layout instruments. Lab fee. Fall, Spring.
MARINE REPAIR TECHNOLOGY
MAR 1302 2 & 4 Cycle Lab (0-9-3)
Practical application lab for 2 and 4 cycle theory class. Students will have hands on training
in disassembly of 2 and 4 cycle engines. Co requisites: MAR 1303 2 & 4 Cycle Theory.
Fall.
MAR 1303 2 & 4 Cycle Theory (3-0-3)
This class covers the theory of operation of both 2 cycle and 4 cycle engines and their application to the marine industry. Items covered in this class will be engine identification and
parts look up, history of the outboard motor, stern drive and inboard application, parts
identification for both outboard and stern drive. Also covered will be basic theory of fuel
delivery, ignition, and drive systems. Practical application lab required. Co requisite: MAR
1302 2 & 4 Cycle Lab. Fall.
MAR 1223 Fiberglass (3-0-3)
This is a course of study in the use and repair of structural fiberglass as applied to the
marine industry. Students will study the history of fiberglass usage in the marine industry,
molding and repair techniques, and the different types of resins and glass. Spring.
MAR 1504 Electrical Systems I (3-3-4)
This course is a basic study of electricity and electrical systems as applied to the marine
industry. Areas of study will be AC and DC electricity, ignition systems, starting and charging systems, and boat electrical systems and wiring. Fall.
MAR 1524 Electrical Systems II (3-3-4)
This course is a continuing study of the fundamentals of basic electricity and magnetism in
marine engines. Course covers various types of manual and electrical starters, circuitry,
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charging and circuits, batteries, motor starting, ignition systems, and magnetos. Prerequisite:
MAR 1504 Electrical Systems I. Spring.
MAR 1602 Major Overhaul Lab (0-9-3)
This course includes Practical lab for major overhaul class. Student will have hands on training in overhaul of outboard engines and gear cases as well as stern drive units and transom
assemblies. Co requisite: MAR 1604 Major Overhaul. Spring.
MAR 1603 Off Season Boat Maintenance (3-0-3)
This course covers basic theory of operation, general maintenance of boat and engine systems and cleaning trailer maintenance and off season storage. Fall.
MAR 1604 Major Overhaul (3-3-4)
This course covers the disassembling, repair and reassembly of power heads, lower units
and out drives. It includes inspection testing and service of the power and drive components of marine engines. Safety is emphasized. Co requisite: MAR 1602 Major Overhaul
Lab. Spring.
MAR 1703 Service and Routine Maintenance (3-0-3)
This course covers the service and maintenance of marine products, such as, oil changes,
water pump service, off season storage, decommissioning, cleaning and interior care.
Safety is emphasized. Fall.
MAR 1903 Fuel Systems (3-0-3)
This class covers fuel systems as applied to the marine industry. Course of study will be
outboard carburetion, outboard EFI and Direct Fuel Injection, Stern Drive Fuel Systems,
Carburetion 2V and 4V, Throttle Body Injection and Multi Port Injection. Fall.
MATHEMATICS
MATH 1003 Intermediate Algebra (3-0-3)
This course includes the following topics: properties of numbers; fundamental
operations with algebraic expressions; polynomials; systems of equations; ratio and
proportion; factoring; functions; graphs; solutions of linear inequalities; and linear
and quadratic equations. Pre-requisite: Placement test scores or PCLM0074 with a
“C” or better. Credit earned not applicable for the Associate of Arts or the Associate
of Science degrees. Fall, Spring, and Summer.
MATH 1013 Mathematics for General Education (3-0-3)
This college level course is as sophisticated as College Algebra but does not include the traditional pre-calculus topics of College Algebra. Four units of study include: Problem
Solving & Algebra; Sequences, Series & Financial Management; Geometry & Measurement;
and Probability & Statistics. A TI-83+ calculator is recommended. Designed for students
whose degree plans do not require additional courses in mathematics, students interested in
transferring credits from this course should consult the registrar’s office at the receiving
institution to confirm acceptance. Prerequisite: MATH 1003 - Intermediate Algebra (C or
better) or two years of high school algebra and compliance with State/NPCC placement
test standards. Fall, Spring.
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MATH 1123 College Algebra (3-0-3)
College Algebra provides the student with a foundation in problem solving in these topics:
functions, graphing techniques, polynomial, rational exponential, and logarithmic functions;
systems of equations and inequalities, matrices, and determinats, sequences and series, and
the binomial theorem. Concepts and problem solving are presented from both the traditional and graphing calculator approaches. A graphing calculator is required, and the TI83+ calculator is recommended. Prerequisite: MATH 1003-Intermediate Algebra ("C" or
better) or two years of high school algebra and compliance with state/NPCC placement test
standards. Fall, Spring, Summer.
MATH 1133 Trigonometry (3-0-3)
Introduces the student to the study of trigonometric functions; angles and their measures,
right triangles, oblique triangles, and the graphs of trigonometric functions; identities and
trigonometric equations; inverse functions; vectors and complex numbers and polar coordinates. The use of the TI-83+ and available computer software is included in the course.
Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra or equivalent or MATH 1123-College
Algebra taken previously or concurrently with this course. Fall, Spring, Summer.
MATH 1191-1193 Mathematics Honors' Study
(1-3 variable credits)
Special studies in math or topics of study which are offered only upon demand. Individual
programs are arranged with the instructor upon meeting Honors' Study Program requirements in current catalog.
MATH 1293 Introduction to Statistics (3-0-3)
Introduces the student to elementary statistical concepts using a basic algebra background.
Topics include: organizing and analyzing data, probability, normal distribution, central limit
theorem, hypothesis testing, confidence intervals, regression-correlation, Chi-Square and
ANOVA (basic). Prerequisite: Intermediate Algebra (with a C or better) or High School
Algebra II (with a C or better) and compliance with state/NPCC placement tests or
Instructor approval. Available upon sufficient student demand.
MATH 2215 Calculus I (5-0-5)
Calculus I includes the study of Analytic Geometry; functions; limits and continuity; the
derivative; the integral; and selections from logarithmic and exponential functions if time
permits. The use of the TI-83+ graphing calculator and or computer software packages as
tools for visualization of functions and for problem solving will be an integral part of the
course. Prerequisites: MATH 1123-College Algebra or high school Algebra II and MATH
1133-Trigonometry taken previously or concurrently with this course. Available upon sufficient student demand.
MATH 2225 Calculus II (5-0-5)
Calculus II includes the study of inverse functions, techniques and applications using integration, sequences and series, and parametric and polar curves, vectors, lines and planes. The
TI-83+ graphing calculator and or computer software packages for problem solving and
visualization of functions will be an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: MATH 2215Calculus I and MATH 1133-Trigonometry. Available upon sufficient student demand.
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MATH 2233 Number Systems for Elementary Education Majors I (3-0-3)
Introduces the prospective elementary teacher to deductive reasoning, set theory, numeration systems (bases), the real number system and its subsystems, number theory, and geometry. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in Intermediate Algebra or passing an NPCC
pretest. Fall.
MATH 2243 Number Systems for Elementary Education Majors II (3-0-3)
Continuation of Number Systems for Elementary Education Majors I, which is not necessarily a prerequisite. Prerequisite: A grade of “C” or better in Number Systems l. Spring.
MATH 2255 Calculus III (5-0-5)
Continuation of Calculus II. Topics include further applications of the integral, indeterminate forms, infinite series, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, and solid analytic geometry.
Prerequisite: MATH 2225-Calculus II. Available upon sufficient student demand.
MATH 2273 Basic Concepts of Statistics and Probability (3-0-3)
This course examines the basic concepts and methods of the statistics and probability which
underlie the elementary and middle school curriculum. Statistics will e presented as a problem solving process involving question formation, data collection, data representation, data
analysis, and interpretation of results. discrete probability models will e studies using both
mathematical approaches and simulations.
MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY
MLT 1002 Phlebotomy (1-2-2)
Students become familiar with the equipment and procedures to collect blood samples, the
proper approach to patients, and will practice techniques until proficient. The organization
and operation of laboratories in a variety of institutions will be taught. Prerequisites: High
school GPA of 2.5 or above or GED 450 or above, 12th grade reading ability. Potential students must complete application form and be admitted to program. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
MLT 1022 Serology/Immunology (1-3-2)
Theory of antibody production and antigen-antibody reactions. Tests for syphilis, rheumatoid arthritis, bacterial and viral infections, pregnancy, and others are performed.
Prerequisites: ALH 1302-Introduction to Health Science and MLT 2002-Introduction to
Medical Laboratory Technology or equivalent. Summer. Lab Fee.
MLT 1024 Hematology (2-6-4)
Cellular elements of the blood, the blood-forming organs, and the theory of blood formation. Blood collection and handling. Routine blood counts, morphology of cells, and differentials of white cells. Additional emphasis on the study of anemias, leukemias, and other
blood dyscrasias, plus additional lectures and/or demonstrations on automation in hematology. Includes studies in coagulation. Prerequisites: ALH 1302-Introduction to Health
Science and MLT 2002-Introduction to Medical Laboratory Technology or equivalent.
Summer. Lab Fee.
MLT 1202 Phlebotomy for EMT/Paramedics (1-3-2)
During a six week course of study, students will become familiar with all equipment and
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procedures for IV diagnostic testing, will learn the proper approach to patients, and will
practice techniques until proficient. Prerequisite: Admission to EMT/Paramedic program
or its prior completion. Potential students must complete an application from the College
and have the permission of the Education Coordinator with a recommendation for admission. Classes are limited to twenty (20) students. A waiting list will be maintained from which
students will be admitted on a first-come, first-served basis. Lab fee.
MLT 2002 Introduction to Medical Laboratory Technology (1-2-2)
Emphasis on job-related problems and experiences in the clinical laboratory, with a review
of current techniques in testing, instrumentation, personnel practices, and
governmental/legal aspects. Suitable for continuing education requirements. Prerequisites:
MLT 1002-Phlebotomy, ALH 1302-Introduction to Health Science or experience in a clinical laboratory, and permission of the instructor. Available upon sufficient student demand.
Lab Fee.
MLT 2006 Clinical Applications in Phlebotomy
(0-24-6)
Increased proficiency in phlebotomy techniques. Responsibilities of the phlebotomist in the
medical laboratory and total patient care. Available upon sufficient student demand.
Prerequisite: MLT 2002. Lab fee.
MLT 2015 Pathogenic Microbiology (3-4-5)
Culture media, morphology of bacteria, relation of bacteria to diseases, transmission of
infections, preparation of smears from various sources, stains and staining procedures, classification of bacteria, study of bacteria of clinical importance, isolation and identification of
bacteria, preparation of material for parasites which affect humans, and preparation and
study of material for disease-causing fungi. Prerequisite: ALH 1302-Introduction to Health
Science, and MLT 1022-Serology/Immunology. Fall. Lab Fee.
MLT 2024 Immunohematology (1.5-5-4)
Identification of blood groups; identification of subgroups of ABO and Rh systems; crossmatching and blood banking techniques in accordance with AABB recommendations;
investigation of hemolytic disease of the newborn; antibody detection and identification;
donating, processing, and storage of blood. Prerequisite: ALH 1302-Introduction to Health
Science, MLT 2002-Introduction to Medical Laboratory Technology, MLT 1024Hematology, and MLT 1022-Serology/Immunology. Fall. Lab Fee.
MLT 2032 Clinical Microscopy (1-3-2)
Chemical, macroscopic, and microscopic study and analysis of the urine for normal and
abnormal constituents. Further practice with the microscope and its utilization in other laboratory procedures. Prerequisites: ALH 1302-Introduction to Health Science and MLT
2002-Introduction to Medical Laboratory Technology or equivalent. Fall. Lab Fee.
MLT 2034 Clinical Chemistry (2-6-4)
Presence and quantity of chemical substances in the blood and other body fluids; instrumentation, including the principles of instruments and their use; performance of such tests
as blood sugar, electrolytes, calcium, enzymatic determinations, and liver and kidney functions. Special emphasis on quality control. Prerequisite: ALH 1302-Introduction to Health
Science and MLT 2002-Introduction to Medical Laboratory Technology or equivalent. Fall.
Lab Fee.
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MLT 2114 Clinical Application Microbiology (0-12-4)
Increased proficiency in bacteriology, mycology, and parasitology techniques.
Responsibilities of the medical laboratory technician in the medical laboratory and total
patient care. Prerequisite: MLT 2015-Pathogenic Microbiology. Spring. Lab Fee.
MLT 2123 Clinical Application Immunohematology (0-9-3)
Increased proficiency in the techniques of blood banking and serology. Responsibilities of
the medical laboratory technician in the medical laboratory and total patient care.
Prerequisite: MLT 2024-Immunohematology. Spring. Lab Fee.
MLT 2134 Clinical Application Chemistry (0-12-4)
Increased proficiency in chemistry. Responsibilities of the medical laboratory technician in
the medical laboratory and total patient care. Prerequisite: MLT 2034-Clinical Chemistry.
Spring. Lab Fee.
MLT 2154 Clinical Application Hematology (0-12-4)
Increased proficiency in hematology, coagulation, urinalysis, and the collection of blood
specimens. Responsibilities of the medical laboratory technician in the medical laboratory
and total patient care. Prerequisite: MLT 1024-Hematology, MLT 2032-Clinical Microscopy.
Spring. Lab Fee.
MUSIC
MUS 1111 Music Education: Strings (1-0-1)
Study of the elementary playing techniques, teaching procedures, and materials for the
stringed instruments will be conducted on a private lesson basis. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor. Lab Fee.
MUS 1113 Music Theory I (3-0-3)
To be taken concurrently with Ear Training I. All fundamentals of music, major and minor
scales, key signature, intervals, note value, and meter signature. Part writing using primary
and some secondary triads. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Fall.
MUS 1123 Music Theory II (3-0-3)
To be taken concurrently with Ear Training II. Continuation of Music Theory I. Triads and
Seventh chords, non-harmonic tones, and modulations to closely related keys are studied.
Models are harmonized and figured basses are realized. Prerequisite: MUS 1113-Music
Theory I and MUS 1131-Ear Training I. Spring.
MUS 1131 Ear Training I (0-2-1)
Rhythmic reading, sight singing, ear training, dictation, and keyboard harmony. (Concurrent
with Music Theory I). Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available upon sufficient
student demand.
MUS 1141 Ear Training II (0-2-1)
Continuation of Ear Training I. (Concurrent with Music Theory II.) Prerequisite: MUS
1131-Ear Training I. Available upon sufficient student demand.
MUS 1161 Community College Choir I (0-2-1)
This course is designed for community members and college students who wish to partici-
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pate in special public music performances sponsored by the College. Permission of the
instructor through audition is usually required.
MUS 1163 Music History I (3-0-3)
This course traces the forms, styles, and composers of music in western civilization in the
18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. Available upon sufficient student demand.
MUS 1171 Community College Choir II (-0-2-1)
Continuation of Community College Choir I.
MUS 1173 Music History II (3-0-3)
This course traces the forms, styles, and composers of music in western civilization before
the 18th century. Available upon sufficient student demand.
MUS 1201 Community Band Ensemble (1-0-1)
The Hot Springs Community Band (HSCB) is dedicated not only to the preservation and
continuation of the "community band" tradition, but also to the on-going promotion of
musical education and performance opportunities for local students. Musicians of all ages
who believe their instrumental skills are adequate are welcome to participate in weekly
evening rehearsals and scheduled performances. The HSCB awards honoraria to its high
school members who qualify for All-Region or All-State Band status.
MUS 1213 Music Appreciation (3-0-3)
Music, its origin and development. A library of recorded instrumental and vocal music is
used to illustrate. The course seeks to relate music to the other arts, literature, and the social
sciences. A foundation to the appreciation of music. Fall, Spring.
MUS 1311 Class Voice I (0-2-1)
Group instruction in the basics of singing. Group and individual application of proper
breathing, phrasing, and correct vocal production. For anyone who wants to improve his or
her singing ability. Previous music training is helpful, but not essential. Fall, Spring.
MUS 1321 Class Voice II (0-2-1)
Continuation of Class Voice I.
MUS 1331 Class Piano I (0-2-1)
Group instruction in piano to familiarize the beginning student with the keyboard. For anyone who wishes to learn to play the piano. Prior keyboard experience is not necessary. Fall,
Spring.
MUS 1341 Class Piano II (0-2-1)
Continuation of Class Piano I.
MUS 1351 Class Guitar (0-2-1)
Group instruction for both beginning and experienced students. Covers the rudiments of
music and proper technique of memorization and performance on the guitar. Although the
classic guitar will be emphasized, all styles will be covered, including popular song accompaniment, blues improvisation, and the use of the plectrum. Fall, Spring.
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MUS 1361 Woodwind Ensemble (0-2-1)
Group instruction utilizing a variety of flutes (Piccolo, C Flute, Alto and Bass) in a group
choir setting. A variety of musical styles are utilized and public performances
are required. The course incorporates ear training as well as pitch and tone blending.
Musicianship is developed through repertoire, techniques, harmony styles, and rhythmic
variations. Fall, Spring.
MUS 1431 Vocal Jazz Ensemble I (0-2-1)
National Park Community College "Soundwaves" membership through audition only. This
group performs a variety of musical styles including "Pop/Show Choir". Several public performances each semester.
MUS 1441 Vocal Jazz Choir II (0-2-1)
Continuation of Ensemble Choir I. Fall.
MUS 1451 National Park Community College Singers I (0-2-1)
A group of mixed voices which performs throughout the year for area churches, civic clubs,
and schools. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Fall, Spring.
MUS 1461 National Park Community Singers II
(0-2-1)
Continuation of NPCC Singers I. Fall, Spring.
MUS 1511-1513 Private Voice I (1-3 Variable Credits)
Individual instruction in singing for beginning and advanced students. Development in all
phases of performance: techniques, style, musicianship, interpretation, and repertoire. A
jury examination and/or a public recital may be required. Prerequisite: Permission of the
instructor. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
MUS 1521-1523 Private Voice II (1-3 Variable Credits)
Continuation of Private Voice I. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available upon
sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
MUS 1531-1533 Private Piano I (1-3 Variable Credits)
Private piano lessons for those who have mastered the keyboard and can read music.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab
Fee.
MUS 1541-1543 Private Piano II (1-3 Variable Credits)
Continuation of Private Piano I. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available upon
sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
MUS 1551-1553 Private Organ I (1-3 Variable Credits)
Individual instruction in organ for beginning and advanced students. Development in all
phases of performance: technique, style, musicianship, interpretation, and repertoire. A jury
examination and/or public recital may be required. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
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MUS 1561-1563 Private Organ II (1-3 Variable Credits)
Continuation of Private Organ I. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available upon
sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
MUS 1611-1613 Private Woodwind I (1-3 Variable Credits)
Individual instruction for those who can play a woodwind instrument and read music.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab
Fee.
MUS 1621-1623 Private Woodwind II (1-3 Variable Credits)
Continuation of Woodwind I. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available upon
sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
MUS 1631-1633 Private Brass I(1-3 Variable credits)
Individual instruction for those who can play a brass instrument and read music.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab
Fee.
MUS 1641-1643 Private Brass II (1-3 Variable Credits)
Continuation of Private Brass I. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available upon
sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
MUS 1711-1713 Private Strings I (1-3 Variable Credits)
Private instruction for violin and other stringed instruments. Development in all phases of
performance: technique, style, musicianship, interpretation and repertoire. Permission of
instructor. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
MUS 1721-1723 Private Strings II (1-3 Variable Credits)
Continuation of Private Strings I. Permission of instructor. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
MUS 1731-1733 Private Guitar (1-3 Variable Credits)
Individual instruction to prepare the student in classic
guitar performance, technique, style, musicianship, interpretation, and repertoire. Minimum
requirements are a basic music ability, a good attitude, and a playable classic guitar. A jury
examination and/or public recital may be required. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
MUS 2161 Community College Choir III (0-2-1)
Continuation of Community College Choir II.
MUS 2171 Community College Choir IV (0-2-1)
Continuation of Community College Choir III.
MUS 2213 Public School Music (3-0-3)
An activities approach designed to give future classroom teachers a background in basic
music fundamentals needed in their preparation to teach general music in elementary
school. Education methods courses for Arkansas State Teacher Certification will not be
offered for independent study credit in the Division of Communication and Arts. Spring.
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MUS 2431 Vocal Jazz Ensemble III (0-2-1)
Continuation of Vocal Jazz Ensemble II. Fall.
MUS 2441 Vocal Jazz Ensemble IV (0-2-1)
Continuation of Vocal Jazz Ensemble III. Fall.
MUS 2451 National Park Community College Singers III (0-2-1)
Continuation of National Park Community College Singers II. Fall, Spring.
MUS 2461 National Park Community College Singers IV (0-2-1)
Continuation of National Park Community College Singers III. Fall, Spring.
MUS 2511-2513 Private Voice III (1-3 Variable Credits)
Continuation of Private Voice II. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available upon
sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
MUS 2523 Private Voice IV (1-3 Variable Credits)
Continuation of Private Voice III. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available upon
sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
MUS 2531-2533 Private Piano III (1-3 Variable Credits)
Continuation of Private Piano II. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available upon
sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
MUS 2541-2543 Private Piano IV (1-3 Variable Credits)
Continuation of Private Piano III. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available
upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
MUS 2551-2553 Private Organ III (1-3 Variable Credits)
Continuation of Private Organ II. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available upon
sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
MUS 2561-2563 Private Organ IV (1-3 Variable Credits)
Continuation of Private Organ III. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available
upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
MUS 2611-2613 Private Woodwind III (1-3 Variable Credits)
Continuation of Private Woodwind II. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available
upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
MUS 2621-2623 Private Woodwind IV (1-3 Variable Credits)
Continuation of Private Woodwind III. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available
upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
MUS 2631-2633 Private Brass III (1-3 Variable Credits)
Continuation of Private Brass II. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available upon
sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
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MUS 2641-2643 Private Brass IV (1-3 Variable Credits)
Continuation of Private Brass III. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available upon
sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
MUS 2711-2713 Private Strings III (1-3 Variable Credits)
Continuation of Private Strings II. Permission of instructor. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
MUS 2721-2723 Private Strings IV (1-3 Variable Credits)
Continuation of Private Strings III. Permission of instructor. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
NURSING
NUR 1001 Critical Thinking Applications I (1-0-1)
This course will provide opportunities for the first semester nursing student to practice critical thinking and decision making skills in simulated patient care situations within a laboratory setting. Nursing skills and procedures, within a nursing process format, will be utilized
to stimulate the student to think critically, problem solve, and make decisions while applying fundamental principles. Since NUR 1001 is taught concurrently with NUR 1108, all students must satisfactorily pass NUR 1001 in order to progress to the 2nd semester nursing
course, NUR 1208. Corequisite: NUR 1108-Nursing Process I. Prerequisite or Corequisite:
BIOL 2224-Anatomy & Physiology I, MATH 1123-College Algebra. Fall
NUR 1108 Nursing Process I (4-12-8)
Nursing Process I provides an introduction to curricular concepts, role responsibilities and
development of fundamental knowledge and nursing skills. The nursing process is introduced as the method for patient care planning. Student behaviors include learning to identify human responses to physical, emotional, intellectual, social, and spiritual dimensions.
Opportunities will be provided for the student to demonstrate fundamental nursing skills in
the clinical and laboratory settings. Morning, afternoon, and/or evening hours may be
scheduled for clinical experience. A medication calculation test will be given. Each student
will be required to achieve a 90% on the calculation test to pass the course. Prerequisite:
Departmental approval. Prerequisite or Corequisite: BIOL 2224 Anatomy & Physiology I,
Math 1123 College Algebra. Fall. Lab Fee. Corequisite: NUR 1001 Critical Thinking
Applications I.
NUR 1201 Critical Thinking Applications II (1-0-1)
Focus of this course is to practice critical thinking and decision making skills in simulated
medical-surgical patient care situations. Nursing skills and patient situations, within the nursing process format, will be utilized to stimulate the student to think critically, problem solve,
and make decisions while applying principles. Knowledge and skills from NUR 1001 and
NUR 1108 are reinforced and related to new content and skills. Prerequisite: NUR 1108
Nursing Process I, NUR 1001 Critical Thinking Application I or NUR 1302 Current
Concepts in Nursing, BIOL 2224 Anatomy and Physiology I, MATH 1123 College Algebra.
Corequisite: NUR 1208 Nursing Process II, BIOL 2234 Anatomy and Physiology II. Fall.
Lab Fee.
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NUR 1208 Nursing Process II (4-12-8)
Focus of Nursing Process II is on the identification and clustering of human responses in
order to implement the 5 step Nursing Process in selected medical-surgical situations with
adult patients. NPCC curricular concepts continue to be built upon. A unit on
Gerontological Nursing is included. Knowledge and skills from previous courses are reinforced and related to new content. Clinical experiences are scheduled involving morning,
afternoon or evening hours. Prerequisite: NUR 1108 Nursing Process I, NUR 1001 Critical
Thinking Applications I, or NUR 1302 Current Concepts in Nursing, BIOL 2224 Anatomy
and Physiology I, MATH 1123 College Algebra. Corequisites: NUR 1201 Critical Thinking
Applications II, BIOL 2234 *Anatomy and Physiology II. Fall. Lab Fee.
*See biology requirements for BIOL 2234 Anatomy and Physiology II.
NUR 1216 Accelerated Nursing (5-3-6)
Nursing 1216 focuses on the identification and clustering of human responses in order to
fully implement the 5-step nursing process in selected medical-surgical situations with adult
clients. Curricular concepts that contribute to development of the RN role continue to be
built upon. There is a gerontological emphasis that includes a unit on health care of the
older adult. Consideration is given to factors that influence adult development and health
factors such as age, beliefs, resources, and cultural background. Prerequisite and
Corequisites vary depending on semester of enrollment. Spring: Prerequisites include BIOL
2224 Anatomy and Physiology I, MATH 1123 College Algebra. Corequisites: NUR 1302
Current Concepts in Nursing, BIOL 2234 *Anatomy and Physiology II. Summer
Prequisites include all general education courses in the AS degree plan except General
Psychology and Introduction to Sociology. Spring or Summer Lab Fee.
NUR 1302 Current Concepts in Nursing (2-0-2)
The focus of this two-credit hour, web-enhanced course is to introduce the LPN/LPTN to
concepts related to the transition and socialization toward associate degree (A.D.) education
and the Registered Nurse role. The course provides learning in relation to the NPCC
Nursing Philosophy and an introduction to NPCC A.D. Nursing curricular concepts.
Selected NUR 1108 topics are examined in an effort to develop the LPN/LPTN knowledge
base to a level consistent with that of the RN student entering NUR 1208/1216. A major
focus is the use of the nursing process in relation to physical, emotional, social, intellectual,
and spiritual responses. There is no clinical component to the course. Prerequisite:
Graduation from a state approved PN or PTN educational program, Unencumbered
LPN/LPTN license in all states registered (must include Arkansas), Officially admitted to
the NPCC Nursing Program or with departmental approval, Minimum of 90% score on the
Dosage Calculation Exam, and Evidence of completion of HIPAA and Blood-Born
Pathogen education or successful completion of the HIPAA and Blood-Borne Pathogen
modules within the course materials, or a nursing student transferring from an accredited
nursing program. Prerequisite: BIOL 2224-Anatomy & Physiology I, MATH 1123-College
Algebra. or departmental approval. Spring and Summer.
NUR 2107 Nursing Process III (4-9-7)
This course continues to integrate curricular concepts with focus on patient responses with
specific long and short term health problems in the areas of maternal and children's health.
Student behaviors include use of the nursing process in/with specified nursing diagnoses in
relation to patients and families. Areas of health maintenance and promotion are also examined. Knowledge and skills from previous courses are reinforced and related to new content. Clinical experiences will focus on patient responses in the area of
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maternal-child health primarily in acute care settings. This course provides opportunity for
the student to expand their knowledge with the self-selection of clinical experiences.
Experiences will be scheduled involving either morning, afternoon, or evening hours.
Prerequisites: NUR 1208 Nursing Process II, NUR 1201 Critical Thinking Applications II,
BIOL 2244 Microbiology, BIOL 2234 Anatomy & Physiology II, BIOL 2224 Anatomy &
Physiology I, and MATH 1123 College Algebra. Corequisite or prerequisite: NUR 2303
Nursing Process IV. Fall. Lab Fee.
NUR 2203 Nursing Issues and Trends (3-0-3)
This course is designed for the exploration of topics pertinent to successful transition to the
roles of the Registered Nurse. Social, political, educational, and professional trends influencing the future of nursing are examined. Opportunity is offered for the students to analyze their own growth in areas of Effective Communication, Nursing Management,
Delegation, Ethical-legal Issues, Critical Thinking, Initiating and Managing Change, Cost
Effectiveness, Values Clarification, Caring for Self and Caring for the Profession of
Nursing. Corequisite: NUR 2210.
NUR 2210 Nursing Process V (6-12-10)
The focus of this course is on human responses to physical, emotional, intellectual, social
and spiritual functioning throughout the life span, with an emphasis on middle and later
years. Curricular concepts are expanded and student behaviors are centered on acquiring
new knowledge and skills while providing preventative, acute and restorative care in selected medical-surgical hospital units and home health. Students use the nursing process to
demonstrate the synthesis of knowledge and skills acquired in previous courses.
Prerequisite: NUR 2107 Nursing Process III, NUR 2303 Nursing Process IV. Corequisite:
NUR 2203.
NUR 2303 Nursing Process IV (2-3-3)
This course continues to apply curricular concepts with focus on acute and chronic needs
in the area of mental health. Student behaviors include the application of the nursing
process with emphasis on the emotional-intellectual-social-spiritual responses of the patient
and family. Principles and practice of psychiatric-mental health nursing are integrated
through classroom and clinical experiences. A variety of agencies are utilized to focus on
patient responses and nursing roles. Prerequisite: NUR 1208 Nursing Process II, NUR 1201
Critical Thinking Application II, BIOL 2224 Anatomy & Physiology I, BIOL 2234
Anatomy and Physiology II, BIOL 2244 Microbiology, MATH 1123 College Algebra.
Corequisite or prerequisite: NUR 2107 Nursing Process III, PSYC 1103 General
Psychology. Fall. Lab Fee.
NUR 2304 Health Assessment
This web-enhanced course is designed for Registered Nurses preparing for a bachelors
degree in nursing (or with instructor permission). Complete assessment of all body systems
will be explored with emphasis on physical examination techniques. Spring, Fall.
NUR 2901 -2906 Special Study in Nursing (1 - 6 variable credit)
Individual study of a particular area of nursing. Course content proposal and course objectives to be developed by the student or group of students and instructor, depending on the
identified need and/or interest of the student. The Division Chair of Nursing will make
assignment of appropriate course credit. Prerequisite: Completion of 8 hours of nursing.
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Fall/Spring
SUR 1103 Surgical Technology I (3-0-3)
This course is an introduction to the principles, procedures and techniques of surgical procedures with emphasis on surgical asepsis. This course introduces concepts of professional ethics, communication techniques, and legal requirements. This course is designed as content/theory only with no clinical component. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.
SUR 1105 Surgical Technology I (3-6-5)
This course is an introduction to the principles, procedures and techniques of surgical procedures with emphasis on surgical asepsis. This course introduces concepts of professional ethics, communication techniques, and legal requirements. Opportunities are provided for
the student to demonstrate basic skills in the clinical and laboratory setting. Students are
introduced to the physical environment of the operating suite and will have experiences in
the care and use of instruments and surgical supplies, as well as the opportunity to scrub
for surgical procedures. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.
SUR 1123 Surgical Technology II (3-0-3)
The course will build upon the knowledge of Surgical Technology I. The student will continue to build
knowledge of roles and responsibilities of the surgical scrub tech, particularly in related to
specialized surgeries. This course is designed as content/theory only with no clinical component. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.
SUR 1125 Surgical Technology II (3-6-5)
The course will build upon the knowledge of Surgical Technology I. The student will continue to build knowledge of roles and responsibilities of the surgical scrub tech, particularly in related to specialized surgeries. Opportunities are provided for the student to increase
their skills in the clinical setting with growing ability to function as a member of the operating team. Clinical Prerequisite: Departmental approval.
MA 1102 Medication Aide (0-3-2)
This course is designed as the practicum for the medication aide to administer medications
in the skills lab setting and the nursing home setting. Content will focus on the application
of knowledge from MA 1103. Students will have the opportunity to practice the role of
medication aide un the supervision of the instructor and preceptor. Students will successfully complete 90 hours of practicum. Grade will be Pass or Fail. Prerequisite: Department
approval. Corequisite: MAC - 1103
MA 1103 Medication Aide (3-0-3)
This course is an introduction to the principles and concepts related to the administration
of approved medications by a medication aide in the nursing home environment. Safety
issues related to medication administration and common effects of medication is presented. Students must also register for the clinical companion course to be eligible to write the
state certification exam. PREREQUISITE: Departmental approval. COREQUISITE:
MAC-1102
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OFFICE ADMINISTRATION
OFAD 1001 Introduction to Word Processing (1-0-1)
Introductory course designed to orient the student to the essential skills of a word processing program on a personal computer. This course involves hands-on experience at the keyboard console. Prerequisite: Formal keyboarding course strongly recommended. Available
upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
OFAD 1002 Keyboarding I (3-0-2)
Designed to develop basic keyboarding skills essential to the touch system. Includes development of proper keyboarding techniques, drills to develop speed and accuracy, and solving simple keying problems. Not open to students who have had one or more semesters of
keyboarding except with the consent of the instructor. Outside practice required. Fall,
Spring. Lab Fee.
OFAD 1003 Records Management (3-0-3)
This course develops an understanding of the specific
filing concepts and their applications. The course is designed to give students an in-depth
coverage of alphabetic, subject, numeric, and geographic filing procedures; equipment; supplies; records management organization, maintenance and administration; and the values
and attitudes appropriate for a records management professional. Records retrieval is reinforced using both manual and electronic (Access software) methods. Prerequisite: OFAD
1002-Keyboarding I with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent and CIS 1013-Information
Systems I. Available upon sufficient demand.
OFAD 1012 Keyboarding II (3-0-2)
Continuation of development of correct techniques, speed, and accuracy and an introduction to letter writing, outlines, manuscripts, and composing. Outside practice required.
Prerequisite: OFAD 1002-Keyboarding I with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent. Fall,
Spring. Lab Fee.
OFAD 1053 Business Math with Calculators (3-0-3)
Review of basic arithmetic calculations, decimals, percentages, discussion of discounts, simple and compound interest, credit cards, home mortgages, taxes, fire and auto insurance,
payrolls, graphs, and other business-related computations. Prerequisite: PCL 0063 Basic
Math with a grade of "C" or better, or ACT 18, or the numerical equivalent on the COMPASS test. Fall, Spring.
OFAD 1083 Word Processing I (3-0-3)
The student will learn to create, edit, format, save, and print documents; learn to manage
documents and enhance documents with customized features such as fonts, tabs, and writing tools such as spelling checker, grammar checker, and a thesaurus; learn to create multiple-page documents with elements such as headers, footers, footnotes, and endnotes; move
text within and between documents; and prepare form documents with personalized information. Prerequisite: OFAD 1012-Keyboarding II with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent. Fall, Spring. Lab fee.
OFAD 1071 Introduction to Transcription (1-0-1)
Instruction and practice in the operation of transcribing machines using the personal com-
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puter. Includes preparation of business documents from machine recorded materials and a
review of basic language skills with emphasis on correct spelling, punctuation, grammar,
and proofreading skills. Prerequisite: OFAD 1012-Keyboarding II with a grade of "C" or
better or equivalent, recommend OFAD 1133-Business English with a grade of "C" or better. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
OFAD 1081 Medical Office Procedures (1-0-1)
Designed to give the student a basic understanding of the day-to-day tasks performed in a
medical office setting. Using custom-designed software, the student will complete various
business tasks similar to those performed in a medical office. Prerequisite: OFAD 1002
Keyboarding I with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
OFAD 1093 Machine Transcription (3-0-3)
Develops productive machine transcription skills through combined use of word processing and transcription equipment. Study includes realistic transcribing experiences in language skills, document formatting, editing, proofreading, and decision making. Prerequisite:
OFAD 1133-Business English with a grade of "C" or better and OFAD 1083-Word
Processing I with a grade of "C" or better. Spring. Lab Fee.
OFAD 1123 Keyboarding III (3-0-3)
Develops both speed and accuracy through further development of techniques. Emphasis
on special problems in letter arrangement, tabulated reports, problems in centering, rough
drafts, and manuscript writing. Outside practice required. Prerequisite: OFAD 1012Keyboarding II with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
OFAD 1133 Business English (3-0-3)
Provides a review of the essential principles of English grammar, style, and usage, as well
as an overview of current practices in business communications. Fall, Spring.
OFAD 1173 Legal Office Transcription and Procedures (3-0-3)
Designed to teach basic legal terminology and formatting skills of legal correspondence and
documents directly from tape into mailable form. This course also includes a special study
of the types of activities most often performed by the legal secretary in a general law office.
Prerequisite: OFAD 1093-Machine Transcription with a grade of "C" or better and OFAD
1083-Word Processing I with a grade of "C" or better or skill equivalent, and OFAD 1133Business English with a grade of "C" or better. Available upon sufficient student demand.
Lab Fee.
OFAD 1203 Business Practices and Procedures (3-0-3)
This course is designed to give students an understanding of basic procedures for business
offices including telephone techniques, scheduling/contact management, and records management. Students receive hands-on practice using photocopiers, fax machines, scanners,
telephones, digital cameras and pocket pc's. In addition, professional ethics and business
conduct are introduced and reinforced throughout the course. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
OFAD 2023 Keyboarding IV (3-0-3)
Special emphasis on increasing speed and accuracy of problem typing. Study includes problem solving of the type found in a general business office, a technical office, a professional
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office, and an executive office. Outside practice required. Prerequisite: OFAD 1123Keyboarding III with a grade of "C" or better, or equivalent, and OFAD 2053-Word
Processing II with a grade of "C" or better. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab
Fee.
OFAD 2053 Word Processing II (3-0-3)
The student will learn to add special features to documents and enhance the visual display
of documents with macros, templates, graphic features, Draw, format text into columns,
tables, charts; organize text with the outline, sort and select features; automate the formatting of text using styles; and create tables of contents, indexes and tables of authorities.
Prerequisite: OFAD 1083-Word Processing I with a grade of "C" or better. Recommended:
OFAD 1133-Business English with a grade of "C" or better. Spring, or upon sufficient student demand. Lab fee.
OFAD 2063 Office Procedures (3-0-3)
Provides the capstone for the college-trained office administrative position. Emphasis is on
development of decision-making abilities and good human relations skills. Prerequisites:
OFAD 1093-Machine Transcription, OFAD 1133-Business English with a grade of "C" or
better and CIS 1013-Information Systems I with a grade of "C" or better. Available upon
sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
OFAD 2073 Administrative Office Management (3-0-3)
Study of the process of planning, organizing, and controlling of all the information-related activities and of leading or directing people to attain the objectives of the organization,
keeping in mind the benefits of progressively more powerful technologies, equipment and
concepts. Fall, Spring.
OFAD 2083 Word Processing Skills Lab (2-2-3)
Integration of expanded word processing applications with desktop publishing, spreadsheets, data bases, and graphics applications. Prerequisite: OFAD 2053-Word Processing II
with a grade of "C" or better. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
OFAD 2291-2293 Special Study in Office Administration (1-3 Variable Credits)
Special courses or independent studies in office administration are offered on demand.
Students may plan individual projects and research in consultation with the instructor.
Permission of the instructor and the Division Chair. May be repeated for credit when topics vary.
OFAD 2393 Office Support Internship (1-9-3)
Office Support Internship is an opportunity to enhance and reinforce classroom instruction
with on-the-job work experience. Appropriate training stations will be developed, and
supervision will be provided by instructors and site personnel. Students are required to
complete 135 clock hours of supervised experience during the term. Prerequisites: All
classes for the Office Support Technical Certificate must be completed before a student is
eligible to enroll in the Office Support Internship. Students must have maintained a "C"
average in these classes.
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ORIENTATION
ORT 1101 Freshman Orientation (1-0-1)
This one day course is designed to orient students to the programs and services offered at
NPCC. Topics of the day include Secrets to Success, Student Services, and a welcome to
campus by a faculty member. A comprehensive campus tour is included in the day's activities, as is lunch. Points will be awarded for activities that students accomplish during their
first semester. The activities are designed to further acquaint students with the campus and
various departments. This course is required for all first-time, full-time students at NPCC.
ORT 1201 Success Seminar (1-0-1)
This course is designed to assist general education students with the skills needed for success in both college academics and life after college. The five-week course will focus on you
as a learner and participant in college society. However, we will also examine your strengths,
values, and motivations. Specifically, we will be concerned with understanding yourself as
a learner in every area of your life, information and cultural literacy, college demeanor, and
the habits of mind that characterize the college experience. This is a required course for all
first-time, full-time students who are not enrolled in vocational programs. Students in vocational programs who take TECH 1102 Technical Communications in their first semester will
not be required to take ORT 1201.
PHILOSOPHY
PHIL 1093 Special Study (3-0-3)
Individual research on worthy projects of personal interest in specialized area determined
by instructor and student.
PHIL 1123 Introduction to Philosophy (3-0-3)
Examination of critical questions of human existence such as free will versus determinism,
the nature of knowledge, and the basis for moral judgment. Reading and discussion of
works by classical and contemporary philosophers. Fall, Spring, Summer.
PHIL 1133 Fundamentals of Ethics (3-0-3)
A study of the philosophical bases for moral judgment and an application of those principles to problems in contemporary society. Fall, Spring, Summer.
PHIL 1603 Logic (3-0-3)
A structured study of deduction, induction, the scope of logic, and its relationship with language and communication. Available upon sufficient student demand.
PHOTOGRAPHY
PHOT 1103 Introduction to Photography (3-0-3)
A course designed to give the student a mastery of basic photographic techniques and a creative outlet to be used and enjoyed throughout life. Topics of study include camera basics,
photographic theory, negative development, printing and enlargement of negatives, and
print enhancement and presentation. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
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PHOT 1113 Intermediate Photography (3-0-3)
Continuation of Introduction to Photography. Includes advanced printmaking and introduction to color. Prerequisite: PHOT 1103-Introduction to Photography. Fall, Spring. Lab
Fee.
PHOT 1143 Video Production I (3-0-3)
This is a studio class in videoproduction techniques designed to give the student
an introduction to the disciplines involved in the preproduction, production and
post-production work necessary to create a digital video presentation. This class is
concerned with production work for documentaries, commercials, industrial film.
and independent films rather than broadcast television practices. Study will include
script preparation, storyboards, camera operation, lighting, sound acquisition, and
video and sound editing.
PHOT 1191-1194 Photography: Special Study (1-4 Variable Credits)
This course offers the advanced photography student the opportunity to explore personal
directions in the photographic arts.
PHOT 1243 Studio Photography I ( 3-0-3)
This is a studio course designed to give the student the opportunity to work with
professional studio equipment including medium format and large format cameras
using both film and digital backs. Both tungsten and HMI lights as well as studio
flash systems will be used. The student will learn techniques that are in current use
for portrait, product,catalog and advertising photography, while preparing a personal portfolio.Prerequisite: Intermediate Photography, PHOT 1113.
PHOT 2103 Advanced Photography (3-0-3)
Continuation of Intermediate Photography. Prerequisite: PHOT 1113- Intermediate
Photography. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
PHOT 2143 Video Production II (3-0-3)
Students will work as a group on a video productions, performing a range of jobs
from camera operator to lighting and sound. Post production work will include
video and sound editing, music mixing, voice-over, and DVD production.
Prerequisite: Video Production I, PHOT 11143.
PHOT 2213 Color Photography (3-0-3)
This course extends the skills learned in Advanced Photography, with an emphasis on color
control. Prerequisite: PHOT 2103-Advanced Photography. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
PHOT 2223 Digital Photography (3-0-3)
This Course within the art department deals with the production of digital images from varied sources including images from digital cameras, scanned film, scanned prints, and
scanned objects. The student is not required to own a digital camera, but must have access
to a conventional 35 mm. camera. A number of digital cameras
will be made available for studio use. The course is one of exploration, using different
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means of image input to produce digital prints or negatives. As in all photography classes,
there will be an emphasis on concept and composition leading to the production of prints
for portfolio presentation.
PHOT 2243 Studio Photography II ( 3-0-3)
This class will allow the student-dent further practice with medium and large format cameras. Assignments will require more complex imaging techniques including some Photoshop manipulation and
more advanced lighting
solutions.Prerequisite: Studio Photography I, PHOT 12443
PHOT 2303 Photography Business Practice (3-0-3)
The U.S.Department of Labor reports that more than half the photographers in
the country are self-employed. It is therefore extremely important that students are
prepared to face the realities of running a studio. Attention will be given to marketing strategies,copyright issues, job estimating, and the day-to-day expenditures
required to run an independent business.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
PE 1031 Introduction to Fencing (0-2-1)
This course is designed to provide a sound basic understanding of the history, rules, etiquette, and safety aspects of the sport of fencing. Will demonstrate basic technical and tactical skills needed for novice level competition through emphasis on basic offense and
defense, continuation of attack, compound attacks, and practical bouting.
PE 1051 Beginning Yoga (0-2-1)
For those who wish to master the fundamentals of Hatha Yoga. Emphasis is given to the
synchronization of breath and movement and to the understanding of the basic yoga postures. Taught in Vinyasa style (flowing from one posture to the next, inspired by breath)
together with some held postures.
PE 1103 Fundamentals of Physical Education (3-0-3)
Emphasizes history, principles, relationship of physical education to general education, professional literature and vocational opportunities. Designed for physical education majors but
open to any student. Spring.
PE 1111 Nautilus Conditioning (0-2-1)
Nautilus Conditioning is an individual physical training course designed to enhance one's
physical and mental state. This course is designed with four levels of conditioning for muscle groups. Credit may not be earned more than once for each level. All participants must
be registered, attend an orientation session and demonstrate an understanding of the physical education principles. All students must follow guidelines for Use of Nautilus
Conditioning Equipment and must sign a Voluntary Assumption of Risk form. Student
enrollment limited. Students must provide their own towels and lock for lockers. May be
repeated once. Fall, Spring. Lab Fee.
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PE 1112 Drivers' Education (1-2-2)
Details basic principles of good driving, including highway courtesy, approved driving practice, responsibility of car owner, the why and how of accidents, and care and economical
use of the auto. Course will include six or eight hours behind the wheel and 20 hours observance. Spring, Summer. Lab Fee.
PE 1113 Health and Safety (3-0-3)
Designed to motivate the student toward better health behavior. Emphasizes principles and
contemporary issues involved in better individual and community health. Fall, Spring,
Summer.
PE 1201 Team Sports (0-2-1)
Consolidates volleyball, softball, basketball, and other team sports. Lab Fee. Available upon
sufficient student demand.
PE 1411 Jazz Dance (0-2-1)
This beginning jazz course stresses placement, technique, and rhythm through basic jazz
movements and combination work. May be repeated once. Available upon sufficient student
demand.
PE 1431 Introduction to Tai Chi (0-2-1)
This soothing practice treats the body and mind to a non-impact, stress-relieving workout.
Tai Chi is a combination of Yoga and a moving form of medication. This exercise is said
to help circulate energy within the body, reduce stress, improve balance and coordination,
increase respiratory function, improve sleep patterns and reduce pain and injury.
PE 1501 Golf (0-2-1)
This course is designed to introduce the game of golf as a life time recreational activity. Students will
learn the basics of the stance, the swings, scoring and gain edict. Fall, Spring.
PE 1503 School Health Problems (3-0-3)
Designed for health education coordinators and teachers dealing with personal and school
health in grades K-12. Specific attention is directed toward the organization and curriculum
of school health programs. Emphasis is placed on understanding the health needs of children, correlation of health and various school subjects, and evaluation of health programs.
Prerequisite: PE 1113-Health and Safety. Available upon sufficient student demand.
PE 1511 Aerobics (0-2-1)
An introduction to aerobics, students will learn step and floor exercises. During the semester students
should show progress by target heart rate and size of boxes. By the end of the course, students should
improve their level of aerobic performance. Available upon sufficient student demand.
PE 1601 Bowling (0-2-1)
Introduces the basic skills and techniques involved in beginning bowling. Included will be
the grip, the approach, the release, and the follow through; also, knowledge of the rules,
equipment, and strategies pertaining to the game of bowling will be studied. May be repeated once. Fall, Spring.
PE 1603 Playground Games and Recreation Activities (3-0-3)
This course introduces the student to a variety of developmentally appropriate games and
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activities. The course targets individuals who will be group leaders in volunteer organizations, physical education instructors, classroom teachers, activities and recreation directors.
Spring.
PE 1701 Beginning Tennis (0-2-1)
Introduces fundamentals of tennis. May be repeated once. Available upon sufficient student
demand. Lab Fee.
PE 1801 Hiking (0-2-1)
Presents instruction in fundamentals of hiking. Student must be able to walk up inclines. If
a student has a physical problem, advice of a physician should be sought. May be repeated
once. Fall, Spring.
PE 2002 Theory of Coaching Baseball (2-0-2)
Introduces students to the various philosophies, fundamentals, and techniques involved in
coaching the game of baseball. Spring.
PE 2102 Theory of Coaching Softball (2-0-2)
This course is designed to teach and develop the skills and knowledge needed to coach,
teach, manage, and umpire the game of softball. This class will prepare students for coaching softball at the Jr. High, High School, College and Community Recreational League levels. Spring.
PE 2202 Theory of Coaching Basketball (2-0-2)
Analyzes offensive and defensive play and integrates various aspects of coaching, such as
scouting, conditioning, etc. Fall.
PE 2203 Fundamentals of Recreation (3-0-3)
Emphasizes history, principles, relationship of recreation to physical education, professional literature, and vocational opportunities. Designed for recreation and physical education
majors but open to any student. Fall.
PE 2222 Techniques of Athletic Training (2-0-2)
Designed for the athletic trainer or team manager. Considers care and treatment of injuries.
Spring of even years.
PE 2303 Sports Officiating (3-0-3)
This course is an introduction to the rules and officiating techniques related to basketball,
football, and baseball. Fall.
PE 2401 Scuba (0-2-1)
This course is designed to serve as an introduction to scuba diving. This class will include
classroom work and laboratory (pool practice). All students must have instructor's permission and pass a basic swim test. Summer.
PE 2441 Advanced Open Water Diver (0-2-1)
This course is designed to be an introduction to advanced diving techniques. It includes a
review of basic scuba skills, natural navigation, compass navigation, night diving, search and
light salvage, and deep diving. Prerequisite: Certified open water diver.
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PE 2701 Tennis II (0-2-1)
Continuation of Beginning Tennis. Offered upon sufficient student demand. May be repeated once. Lab Fee.
PHYSICS (Also see Engineering)
PHYS 1091-1093 Special Problems in Physical Science (1-3 Variable Credits)
Special studies in Physics, Chemistry, Earth Science, Astronomy, or Physical Science for
Elementary Teachers. Individual programs are arranged with the instructor upon meeting
Honors' Study Program requirements in current catalog. Fall/Spring/Summer with sufficient demand.
PHYS 1114 Physical Science (3-2-4)
Introduces the basic principles and concepts in the areas of physics, chemistry, earth science, and astronomy. Offered a minimum of once a year. Lab Fee.
PHYS 1123 Physics for the Health Sciences (3-0-3)
Provides an introductory course in Physics for students in the Health Sciences. A study of
the basic principles and applications of physics to be used in health related professions.
Available upon sufficient student demand.
PHYS 1124 Astronomy (3-2-4)
This course introduces the student to the concepts of the Solar System, Stars, Galaxies,
Clusters, the Universe and Cosmology, as well as the physics, chemistry, and biology by
which these operate. Offered a minimum of one a year. Lab Fee.
PHYS 1204 General Physics I (3-2-4)
Designed to present students with fundamental laws, principles, and problem solving in
mechanics, wave motion, sound, kinetic theory, heat, and thermodynamics. Prerequisite:
MATH 1133-Trigonometry taken previously or concurrently with this course. Available
upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
PHYS 2204 General Physics II (3-2-4)
Continuation of General Physics I. The study of geometrical and physical optics, electricity and magnetism, atomic and nuclear, and quantum theory. Prerequisite: PHYS 1204General Physics I. Available upon sufficient student demand. Lab Fee.
PHYS 2223 Physical Science for the Elementary Teacher (3-0-3)
Introduces the prospective elementary teacher to a broad survey of the physical sciences. In
this methods course the students are engaged in hands-on laboratory work and current
teaching practices of curriculum development, instruction, and assessment. Spring.
POLITICAL SCIENCE
POLS 1113 American National Government (3-0-3)
Studies the historical and modern role of government in American life. Specific attention is
given to constitutional development and the various mechanisms of contemporary
American politics. Fall, Spring.
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POLS 1123 American State and Local Government (3-0-3)
Principles and practices of state, county, and municipal government, their variety across
America, and movements toward reform in larger metropolitan governments. Fall.
POLS 2091-2096 Special Study (1-6 Variable Credits)
Individualized study of special topics in political science. Prerequisite: Permission of the
instructor.
POTTERY
PTRY 1103 Pottery I (3-3-3)
A program directed toward professional careers in pottery design. Instruction covers forming and shaping by mechanical means and by hand, building and firing kilns, understanding
the nature of clay and glazes, and achieving control of all aspects and materials of pottery
design. Fall, Spring.
PTRY 1113 Pottery II (3-3-3)
Further study and application of techniques learned in Pottery I. Fall, Spring.
PTRY 2003 Pottery III (3-3-3)
Continuation of Pottery II with emphasis on firing and glazing. Fall, Spring.
PTRY 2016 Special Problems in Pottery (6-0-6)
Independent study in specialized area determined by instructor and student.
PTRY 2113 Pottery IV (3-3-3)
Independent work under direction of the instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of the
instructor. Fall, Spring.
PTRY 2121-2126 Kiln Building (1-6 Variable Credits)
Kiln building offers two intense five-week sessions in Studio Workshops. Individual student
projects and research documentation required. The first five weeks, students will research
every phase of kiln construction. The second five weeks, one of three types of kiln will be
constructed: (1) Raku, (2) Updraft, and (3) Downdraft. Available upon sufficient student
demand.
PRACTICAL NURSE PROGRAM
PNP 1131 Medical Terminology (1-0-1)
Introduces the student to terms used in nursing. Focus is placed on prefixes, suffixes, &
abbreviations commonly used with terminology.
PNP 1212 Legal & Ethical Aspects (2-0-2)
Covers personal development, ethical, legal and social responsibilities as related to the role
of the practical nurse. This course will also incorporate communication skills & the concept of delegation for the practical nurse. Information also includes the various nursing
organizations and local, state, and national health resources. Summer.
PNP 1225 Anatomy and Physiology (4-2-5)
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Examines the human body and its systems as a foundation for understanding the principles
of maintaining positive health as well as understanding deviations from the norm. Each
unit in this course involves the study of a major system of the body and the interlocking
dependency of one system upon another, with contributions of each system to the wellbeing of the body as a whole. Integrated campus labs are scheduled. Summer
PNP 1232 Mental Health Nursing (2-0-2)
This course includes an introduction to common conditions of mental illness, prevention
of such conditions, and the care of the patient suffering from abnormal mental and emotional responses. (Mental hygiene aspects will be integrated throughout the course.)
Summer and Fall
PNP 1308 Basic Concepts of Nursing (4-4-8)
American Heart Association & the National Safety Council Guidelines are followed during
CPR & First Aid instruction. Basic Concepts of Nursing includes fundamental principles,
skills, and attitudes needed to give nursing care. Emphasis is placed on skill, safety, comfort,
& preventive measures for the spread of disease. A development for awareness in responsibility to communicate and document observations using appropriate medical terms are
integrated throughout this course of study. Integrated campus lab scheduled for practice
and competency demonstrations. Prerequisites: PNP 1131 Medical Terminology, PNP 1212
Legal & Ethical Aspects, PNP 1225 Anatomy and Physiology Concurrent: PNP 1366 for
Day program. Concurrent: PNP 1232 Mental Health Nursing for Evening Program. Fall
PNP 1322 Nutrition (2-0-2)
Examines the principles of good nutrition for all age groups and principles of modification
for therapeutic purposes. Nutritional concepts will be integrated throughout curriculum.
This course will also cover special diets in relation to diseases and disorders of the various
body systems. Prerequisites: PNP 1131 Medical Terminology, PNP 1212 Legal & Ethical
Aspects, PNP 1225 Anatomy and Physiology Concurrent: PNP 1366 for Day Program.
Concurrent: PNP 1351 Medical-Surgical Nursing I, PNP 1342 Pharmacology I, and PNP
1364 Clinical I for Evening Program. Fall and Spring
PNP 1331 Gerontological Nursing (1-0-1)
This course includes the normal aging process in relationship to changes in the body systems and common conditions and characteristics experienced by the older adult. This
course also deals with the emotional responses, care facilities and financial status in relation
to growing older. With conclusion of gerontological nursing the student will be ready to
demonstrate knowledge obtained from the class room activities to the clinical setting.
Prerequisites: PNP 1131 Medical Terminology, PNP 1212 Legal & Ethical Aspects, PNP
1232 Mental Health Nursing, PNP 1225 Anatomy and Physiology. Concurrent: PNP 1366
for the Day Program. Concurrent: PNP 1433 Medical Surgical Nursing II, part 1, PNP
1454 Clinical II for the Evening Program. Fall
PNP 1342 Pharmacology I (1-2-1)
This course is designed to give the student the fundamentals of pharmacology. Math concepts include the various systems of measurements used in nursing and conversion between
systems, common abbreviations, calculation of drug dosages and specific drug formulas,
and using information obtained from drug labels and from physician's orders. This course
presents an introduction to pharmacology, drug names, standards, references, principles of
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drug action, and interactions. The nursing process and patient education in relation to pharmacology is presented. Medication administration includes safety, systems of administration and routes of administration, including intravenous administration. The course will be
completed with classifications of medications so that the student will be prepared to begin
Pharmacology II. Integrated campus lab is scheduled. Prerequisites: PNP 1131 Medical
Terminology, PNP 1212 Legal & Ethical Aspects, PNP 1225 Anatomy and Physiology.
Concurrent: PNP 1366 for the Day Program. Concurrent: PNP 1351 Medical Surgical
Nursing I, PNP 1322 Nutrition, and PNP 1364 Clinical and Clinical Research for the
Evening Program. Fall and Spring
PNP 1351 Medical Surgical Nursing I (1-0-1)
Explores end of life nursing, how to care for the patient and the family. Included, is the
care of the patient with cancer. Concepts of this course will be continued in Medical
Surgical Nursing II. Prerequisites: PNP 1131 Medical Terminology, PNP 1212 Legal &
Ethical Aspects, PNP 1232 Mental Health Nursing, PNP 1225 Anatomy and Physiology.
Concurrent: PNP 1366 for the Day Program. Concurrent: PNP 1322 Nutrition, PNP 1342
Pharmacology I, and PNP 1364 Clinical and Clinical Research for the Evening Program.
Fall and Spring
PNP 1364 Clinical and Clinical Research I ( 0-13-4)
Begins the practice of appropriate patient care. Clinical areas will be chosen and supervision provided in cooperation with area health facilities. Rotation plans will provide time in
each facet of health care available in local clinical facilities. Clinical Research may be
required concerning patient care, medications, treatments and procedures. Clinical experiences include basic nursing principles and skills, and care of the adult patients with Medical
and Surgical conditions. Prerequisites: PNP 1131 Medical Terminology, PNP 1212 Legal &
Ethical Aspects, PNP 1225 Anatomy and Physiology, PNP 1308 Basic Concepts of
Nursing, and PNP 1332 Mental Health Nursing. Concurrent: PNP 1322 Nutrition, PNP
1342 Pharmacology and PNP 1351 Medical-Surgical Nursing I. Spring
PNP 1366 Clinical and Clinical Research I ( 0-18-6) Begins the practice of appropriate
patient care. Clinical areas will be chosen and supervision provided in cooperation with area
health facilities. Rotation plans will provide time in each facet of health care available in
local clinical facilities. Clinical Research may be required concerning patient care, medications, treatments and procedures. Clinical experiences include care of the geriatric patient,
basic nursing principles and skills, and care of the adult patients with Medical and Surgical
conditions. Prerequisites: PNP 1131 Medical Terminology, PNP 1212 Legal & Ethical
Aspects, PNP 1232 Mental Health Nursing, PNP 1225 Anatomy and Physiology.
Concurrent: PNP 1308 Basic Concepts of Nursing, PNP 1331 Gerontological Nursing and
PNP 1351 Medical-Surgical Nursing I. Fall
PNP 1412 Maternity Nursing (2-0-2)
Includes the modern aspects of maternity nursing with an emphasis on normal obstetrics.
The components of maternity nursing are anatomy and physiology, communication skills,
prenatal care, labor and delivery, postpartum, care of the newborn, and family planning.
Prerequisites: PNP 1308 Basic Concepts of Nursing, PNP 1322 Nutrition, PNP 1342
Pharmacology, and PNP 1351 Medical-Surgical Nursing I and PNP 1366 Clinical I.
Concurrent: PNP 1458 Clinical II. Spring
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PNP 1413 Maternity Nursing (2-3-3)
Includes the modern aspects of maternity nursing with an emphasis on normal obstetrics.
The components of maternity nursing are anatomy and physiology, communication skills,
prenatal care, labor and delivery, postpartum, care of the newborn, and family planning.
Clinical experiences involving the care of woman and infants are included in this course.
Prerequisites: PNP 1308 Basic Concepts of Nursing, PNP 1322 Nutrition, PNP 1232
Mental Health Nursing, PNP 1342 Pharmacology, and PNP 1351 Medical-Surgical Nursing
I and PNP 1364 Clinical I. Summer
PNP 1422 Nursing of Children (2-0-2)
Includes principles of growth and development from infancy to adolescence. Content will
also include behaviors of well and ill children. Prerequisites: PNP 1308 Basic Concepts of
Nursing, PNP 1322 Nutrition, PNP 1342 Pharmacology, and PNP 1351 Medical-Surgical
Nursing I and PNP 1366 Clinical I. Concurrent: PNP 1458 Clinical II. Spring
PNP 1423 Nursing of Children (2-3-3)
Includes principles of growth and development from infancy to adolescence. Content will
also include behaviors of well and ill children. Clinical experiences in the care of well and
sick children are included in this course. Prerequisites: PNP 1308 Basic Concepts of
Nursing, PNP 1322 Nutrition, PNP 1342 Pharmacology, and PNP 1351 Medical-Surgical
Nursing I and PNP 1364 Clinical I. Summer
PNP 1432 Pharmacology II (2-0-2)
This course will continue the course of Pharmacology I, and presents the theory of the purposes, properties, doses, actions and reactions commonly associated with specific drugs.
The most commonly used drugs of each type are studied As the student comes in contact
with new drugs, the relationship to those that have been studied should become clear. The
drugs are presented as they affect body systems. This method makes it more convenient to
integrate the material with Medical Surgical Nursing. Prerequisites: PNP 1308 Basic
Concepts of Nursing, PNP 1322 Nutrition, PNP 1331 Gerontological Nursing, PNP 1342
Pharmacology, and PNP 1351 Medical-Surgical Nursing I and PNP 1366 or PNP 1364
Clinical I. Concurrent: PNP 1458 Clinical II for Day Program. Concurrent: PNP 1464
Clinical II for the Evening Program
PNP 1433 Medical Surgical Nursing II - Part I (3-0-3)
Covers common conditions of illness. Includes nursing care of patients in acute, sub-acute
or convalescent stages of illness of short and long term duration, nutrition and administration of drugs. Builds on concepts from Medical Surgical Nursing I Prerequisites: PNP
1308 Basic Concepts of Nursing, PNP 1322 Nutrition, PNP 1342 Pharmacology, and PNP
1351 Medical-Surgical Nursing I and PNP 1364 Clinical I. Concurrent : PNP 1454 Clinical
II. Fall
PNP 1446 Medical Surgical Nursing II (6-0-6)
Covers common conditions of illness. Includes nursing care of patients in acute, sub-acute
or convalescent stages of illness of short and long term duration, nutrition and administration of drugs. Builds on concepts from Medical Surgical Nursing I Prerequisites: PNP
1308 Basic Concepts of Nursing, PNP 1322 Nutrition, PNP 1331 Gerontological Nursing,
PNP 1342 Pharmacology, and PNP 1351 Medical-Surgical Nursing I and PNP 1366 Clinical
I. Concurrent: PNP 1458 Clinical II. Spring
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PNP 1454 Clinical and Clinical Research II (0-13-4)
This course is a continuation of clinical experience in various health care settings. Clinical
rotations include specialty areas such as operating room, administration of medications, and
nursing procedures. Clinical areas will be chosen and supervision provided in cooperation
with area health facilities. Rotation plans will cover each facet of health care in the clinical
facilities. Research is a requirement of this clinical experience. Includes clinical experience
in care of the geriatric patient, and care of the adult patient with Medical Surgical and
Mental Health problems. Prerequisites: PNP 1308 Basic Concepts of Nursing, PNP 1322
Nutrition, PNP 1232 Mental Health Nursing, PNP 1342 Pharmacology, and PNP 1351
Medical-Surgical Nursing I, PNP 1364 Clinical I, PNP 1413 Maternity Nursing and PNP
1423 Nursing of Children. Concurrent: PNP 1433 Medical Surgical Nursing II, PNP 1331
Gerontological Nursing. Fall
PNP 1458 Clinical and Clinical Research II (0-24-8) This course is a continuation of
clinical experience in various health care settings. Clinical rotations include specialty areas
such as operating room, administration of medications, and nursing procedures. Clinical
areas will be chosen and supervision provided in cooperation with area health facilities.
Rotation plans will cover each facet of health care in the clinical facilities. Research is
required before the clinical experience. Includes clinical experience in Maternity Nursing, .
Nursing of Children, Medical Surgical Nursing and Mental Health Nursing. Prerequisites:
PNP 1308 Basic Concepts of Nursing, PNP 1322 Nutrition, PNP 1331 Gerontological
Nursing, PNP 1342 Pharmacology, and PNP 1351 Medical-Surgical Nursing I and PNP
1366 Clinical I. Concurrent: PNP 1412 Maternity Nursing PNP 1422 Nursing of Children,
PNP 1446 Medical Surgical Nursing II. Spring
PNP 1464 Clinical and Clinical Research II (0-13-4) Care of patients in a variety of settings is included in this rotation, including administration of medications, and nursing procedures. Clinical areas will be chosen and supervision provided in cooperation with area
health facilities. Rotation plans will cover each facet of health care in the clinical facilities.
Research is a requirement of this clinical experience. Continues to build on clinical experiences in care of the adult patient with Medical Surgical problems. Prerequisites: PNP
1331 Gerontological Nursing, PNP 1433 Medical Surgical Nursing II, part 1 and PNP 1454
Clinical. Concurrent: PNP 1432 Pharmacology II, PNP 1443 Medical Surgical Nursing II,
Part 2. Spring
PNP 1513 Medical Surgical Nursing III (3-0-3)
This course is a continuation of Medical Surgical Nursing concepts. Continues with care of
the patient with medical and surgical problems and the required nursing care. Assessment,
management, patient education, discharge teaching, drugs, and nutritional needs of these
patients are covered. Prerequisites: PNP 1412 or PNP 1413 Maternity Nursing, PNP 1422
or PNP 1423 Nursing of Children, PNP 1446 Medical Surgical Nursing II (evening PN students must have PNP 1433 and 1443) , PNP 1458 Clinical II (evening PN students must
have PNP 1454 & 1464), PNP 1432 Pharmacology II, Concurrent: PNP 1522 Clinical III.
Summer
PNP 1522 Clinical III (0-6-2)
Rotation covers the medical and surgical patient with physical and psychological needs.
Clinical areas will be chosen and supervision provided in cooperation with area health facilities. Rotation plans will include physician's offices and the home health care setting. This
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course completes clinical experience related to Nursing of Adult patient with Medical and
Surgical Conditions. Prerequisites: PNP 1412 Maternity Nursing, PNP 1422 Nursing of
Children, PNP 1446 Medical Surgical Nursing II, PNP 1458 Clinical II, PNP 1432
Pharmacology II, Concurrent: PNP 1513 Medical-Surgical Nursing III. Summer
Graduation Requirement: Practical/Vocational Nursing
Review is a two-day review course for practical nursing students as well as for graduate practical nurses who are preparing to take the NCLEX-PN exam. This is a general review of all
program content with the purpose of enhancing the individual student's ability to successfully prepare for the exam. Following the review, the student will take the PN CAT
(Computerized Analysis Test).
PRE-COLLEGE LEVEL CLASSES
What Students Need to Know
High school students may not take these classes. After taking the placement test, a student
may be asked to enroll in one or more Pre-College Level (PCL) classes. These classes provide the student with a refresher semester before he/she enrolls in college level classes.
Students must earn a "C" to pass these classes in order to move into college level studies.
Grades given in these classes will count in the Grade Point Average calculation. NPCC gives
institutional credit for these classes, so they can be counted for financial aid or veteran's benefits purposes. However, these classes may not be used toward any college certificate or
associate degree, not even as an elective.
Requirements for completing the PCL classes vary by certificate or degree plans. Though
NPCC requires that students take their pre-college level classes quickly upon entry into the
college, some exceptions exist. Counselors will assist students with these decisions during
registration.
PCLC 0012 College Study Skills (2-0-2)
This course is required for all students who enroll in two or more PCL classes through the
placement testing. Study skills are specific strategies and techniques that improve a student's
likelihood of success in college. This class teaches notetaking, time management, improving memory and concentration, test taking skills, and goal setting for college and career.
This class helps students learn how to learn. This course includes a required computer component. Students enrolled in PCLC 0013 may be required to attend Freshman Orientation
class. Fall, Spring, Summer.
PCLC 0023 Reading Improvement I (3-0-3)
Deals with reading comprehension, vocabulary, and rate. This course is highly individualized
and structured around the individual weaknesses of the student. Offered in a laboratory setting. A grade of "C" or better AND an 11.0 comprehension score on the exit test are
required to exit this program. Prerequisite: Compliance with State/College Placement
Standards. Some students may be required to take a reading tutorial prior to enrolling in
Reading Improvement I. Fall, Spring, Summer.
PCLC 0033 Reading Improvement II (3-0-3)
This course is required for all students who do not earn an 11.0 comprehension score on
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the exit exam for Reading Improvement I (PCLC 0023), even if they achieved a grade of
"C" or better for the introductory course. Reading Improvement II is a continuation of
Reading Improvement I. Prerequisite: Reading Improvement I. Spring. Available in summer
upon sufficient demand.
PCLC 0053 English Writing (3-0-3)
A continuation and review of topics studied in English Writing I in addition to the study of
writing strategies such as sentence combining through coordination, subordination, and parallel structure. Basic essay format and various methods of essay development are studied, in
preparation for English Composition I. Completion of an exit exam may determine if a student moves on to Composition I. Prerequisite: Placement test. Fall, Spring, Summer.
PCLM 0053 Intensive Basic Math (3-2-3)
This course is for students who have presented placement scores indicating a need for special attention to math preparation for college level math classes. The class will review the
same topics as PCLM 0063 (see below) in a more flexible time frame and instructional
method. This class will be computer-based and instructor-led. An exit grade of “C” or better for the course accompanied by successful completion9on of an exit exam will qualify a
student for Beginning Algebra. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test scores. Fall,
Spring, Summer.
PCLM 0064 Basic Math (4-0-4)
This course is for students who have had no high school algebra and are preparing for
Beginning Algebra. The class will review basic arithmetic skills as well as prepare for entry
into algebra. Topics usually include: whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percent, ratio and
proportion, signed numbers, order of operations, and a brief introduction to algebra.
Completion of an exit exam may determine if a student moves on to Beginning Algebra.
A final grade of "C" or better and successful completion of the exit exam are required to
progress to Beginning Algebra (PCLM 0074). Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test
scores. Some students may be required to take an intensive Basic Math class. Fall, Spring,
Summer.
PCLM 0074 Beginning Algebra (4-0-4)
This course is for students who have had no high school algebra and are preparing for
Intermediate Algebra. The class will review the foundations of algebra and prepare the participant for entry into the intermediate class. Topics usually include: signed numbers, exponents, polynomials, simple linear equations and inequalities, basic factoring, rational expressions, ratio and proportion, quadratic equations by factoring, and the coordinate plane.
Completion of an exit exam may determine if a student moves on to Intermediate Algebra.
A final grace of “C” or better and successful completion of the exit exam are required for
progress to Intermediate Algebra (MATH 1003). Prerequisite: Appropriate placement test
scores or successful completion of Basic Math (PCLM 0064) with a "C" or better. Fall,
Spring, Summer.
PSYCHOLOGY
PSYC 1103 General Psychology (3-0-3)
Focus on the scientific study of behavior and its development as a distinct field of study. A
survey course which considers the brain, states of consciousness, motivation, emotion,
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stress, learning, intelligence, personality, abnormal behavior, therapy, and social psychology.
Fall, Spring.
PSYC 1123 Applied Psychology (3-0-3)
Study of the application of psychological principles and methods to practical problems of
human relationships. Special attention is paid to attitudes, opinions, interpersonal relationships and practical matters in industrial and non-industrial atmospheres. Prerequisite: PSYC
1103-General Psychology. Spring.
PSYC 1153 Human Sexuality (3-0-3)
Exploration of the physical, social, emotional, and political parameters of human sexuality,
family planning, love and intimacy, sex and ethics, sex and society, and sex and humanism.
Prerequisite: PSYCH 1103-General Psychology. Fall.
PSYC 1163 Child Psychology (3-0-3)
Psychological factors influencing development from the pre-natal period to puberty.
Emphasizes interaction of heredity and environmental influences on personality, perception, learning, motivation, cognition and socialization.
PSYC 1173 Psychology of Parenting (3-0-3)
A course dealing with parenting strategies from birth through adolescence, based on sound
psychological principles.
PSYC 2013 Developmental Psychology (3-0-3)
Genetic, maturational, and environmental factors are integrated in the study of behavior
from infancy through adulthood. Prerequisite: PSYC 1103-General Psychology. Spring.
PSYC 2023 Child Growth & Development (3-0-3)
This course is the study of environmental and hereditary effects on the cognitive, affective,
psychomotor and sociolinguistic development of typically and atypically developing children from conception to middle childhood of diverse cultural backgrounds within and outside the United States. These students will be introduced to ways to observe and evaluate
children’s development and recognize possible delays in development. Practical application
of theory is provided through a variety of hands-on experiences and observations. Fall,
Spring or upon sufficient student demand.
PSYC 2133 Mental Health (3-0-3)
Study of psychological factors relating to personal adjustment and mental health with
emphasis on disorders and the well integrated personality. Opportunity for self examination. Fall.
PSYC 2163 Abnormal Psychology (3-0-3)
Designed to survey the principle forms of abnormal behavior. Causes, symptoms, classification, treatment, and prevention will be addressed. Prerequisite: PSYC 1103-General
Psychology. Spring.
PSYC 2183 Readings in Psychology (3-0-3)
Designed to introduce the student to concepts of humanistic psychology via readings and
structured experiences with their own individuality. Fall.
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PSYC 2291-2296 Special Study (1-6 Variable Credits)
Special courses or topics of study are occasionally offered on demand. Students may plan
individual projects and research in consultation with instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of
the instructor. Available upon student eligibility.
RADIOGRAPHY
RAD 1302 Introduction to Radiography (1-2-2)
Introduction to the history of radiography, department and hospital organization, ethics
and medico-legal considerations, the role of the technologist on the medical team.
Discusses the professional organizations of Radiologic Technology and certification, as well
as basic radiation protection. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. Fall.
RAD 1403 Radiographic Procedures I (2-2-3)
Instructs in positioning nomenclature, positioning of the chest, abdomen, digestive system,
upper extremity, lower extremity, hip, pelvis, and C, T, L, S & C spines. Includes routine
positioning. Lecture, skills lab, and demonstration. Prerequisite: Departmental approval.
Fall.
RAD 1502 Clinical Education I (2 credits)
Observation and assistance in the clinical setting. Application of theory commensurate with
level attained in didactics. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. Fall. Lab Fee.
RAD 1512 Clinical Education II (2 credits)
Continuation of RAD 1502-Clinical Education I. Prerequisite: RAD 1302- Introduction to
Radiography, ALH 1302-Introduction to Health Science, RAD 1403- Radiographic
Procedures I, RAD 1502-Clinical Education I, Spring. Lab Fee.
RAD 1703 Radiographic Procedures II (2-2-3)
Positioning of the skull, facial bones, mandible, sinuses, orbits, optic foramina, ribs, contrast
studies, and portable examinations. Lecture, skills lab, and demonstration. Prerequisite:
RAD 1302-Introduction to Radiography, ALH 1302-Introduction to Health Science, RAD
1403-Radiographic Procedures I, RAD 1502-Clinical Education I. Spring.
RAD 1802 Radiographic Exposure (1-2-2)
This course is designed to give students a sound basis for formulating exposure techniques
needed to obtain the best technically accurate radiographs for patient diagnosis. Prerequisite:
ALH 1203, RAD 1502, RAD 1302, ALH 1302, RAD 1403.
RAD 1803 Radiographic Procedures III (2-2-3)
This course provides instruction in the radiographic positioning of structures and organs of
the human body, and is a continuation of Radiographic Procedures II. Positioning for skull,
facial bones, mandible, sinuses, orbits, optic foramina, trauma variations, and portable examinations are covered. The course shall provide precise and detailed information on the various positions and will be supplemented with instruction and application in the skills lab and
clinical site. The skills lab will be held during the class period.
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RAD 1902 Radiation Protection & Biology (1-2-2)
Radiation protection; basic interactions of radiation and matter; quantities and units; biological effects of ionizing radiation; patient, public, and personnel protection are discussed.
Methods of detection and protection are demonstrated. Prerequisites: RAD 1302Introduction to Radiography, ALH 1202-Introduction to Health Science, RAD 1403Radiographic Procedures I, RAD 1502-Clinical Education I. Spring.
RAD 1903 Clinical Education III (3 credits)
Application of theory commensurate with level attained in didactics. Refinement of skills
attained in RAD 1502 and 2503. Prerequisites: RAD 1703-Radiographic Procedures II,
RAD 1802-Radiographic Exposure, RAD 1902-Radiographic Protection and Biology, RAD
2502-Clinical Education II. Summer. Lab Fee.
RAD 2291-2294 Independent Study in Radiography
Designed for those students who have between one and four competencies to complete the
clinical portion of the program. Clinical laboratory experiences in selected areas of radiography needed by the student for completion of the clinical phase of radiography are emphasized. Permission of the Radiography Program Director is necessary for this course.
RAD 2303 Radiation Physics (3-0-3)
This course is a study of basic electricity to include magnetism, magnetic induction, and
transformers. Student is introduced to interactions of x-rays with matter, basic x-ray circuits,
methods of rectification, construction of x-ray tubes, and methods of radiation detection
and measurement. Preventive maintenance to x-ray machines is included. Prerequisite: RAD
1908.
RAD 2503 Advanced Radiographic Procedures (3-0-3)
A study of the special procedures, their contrast media, and the special equipment used
therein. Prerequisite: RAD 1908-Clinical Education III. Fall.
RAD 2603 Clinical Education IV (3 credits)
Continuation of RAD 1908-Clinical Education III. Prerequisite: RAD 1908-Clinical
Education III. Fall. Lab Fee.
RAD 2703 Clinical Education V (3 credits)
Continuation of RAD 2603-Clinical Education IV. Prerequisite: RAD 2603-Clinical
Education IV, RAD 2303-Radiation Physics, RAD 2503-Advanced Radiographic
Procedures. Corequisite: MATH 1123-College Algebra, CIS 1013-Information Systems I.
Spring. Lab Fee.
RAD 2803 Radiographic Pathology (3-0-3)
General overview of diseases: definition, congenital, trauma, bacterial and viral, disorders of
the bodily systems, degenerative, and neoplastic. Lectures by staff with review of appropriate radiographs. Prerequisite: RAD 2603-Clinical Education IV, RAD 2303-Radiation
Physics, RAD 2503-Advanced Radiographic Procedures. Corequisite: MATH 1123-College
Algebra, CIS 1013-Information Systems I. Spring.
RAD 2901 Clinical Education VI (1 credit)
Continuation of RAD 2703-Clinical Education V. Prerequisite: RAD 2703- Clinical
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Education V, RAD 2803-Radiographic Pathology, RAD 2903-Image Quality and
Processing. Summer. Lab Fee.
RAD 2903 Image Quality and Processing (3-0-3)
This course will discuss the various aspects of film, screens, cassettes, and processing; their
relationships and their influence of radiographic imaging. The concepts and mechanics of
quality assurance are covered, as well as evaluation of the quality of radiographs.
Prerequisite: RAD 2303, RAD 2503, RAD 2603.
RAD 2913 Radiography Seminar (3-0-3)
this course provides the student with a capstone of course materials presented during the
two years of the program. The course will better prepare the student for the American
Registry of Radiologic Technologists' examination, which the student may take following
completion of the program.
READING
READ 1113 Speed Reading (3-0-3)
This course is designed for students who want to increase their reading rate, develop rate
flexibility, acquire a more flexible vocabulary, and increase their powers of comprehension
for higher level reading material. Prerequisite: Pre-test. Spring, Summer.
REAL ESTATE
(Business Section of Course Descriptions)
RESIDENTIAL CARPENTRY
RCC 1403 Cabinet Making (3-0-3)
This course uses hands-on projects to include instruction in cabinetry framing, door and
drawer construction, and finish. This class also includes countertop installation. Fall,
Spring.
RCC 1103 Blueprint Reading (3-0-3)
This course includes instruction in the basic symbols of blueprints, in the various types of
blueprints (foundation plan, plot plan, floor plan, elevation plans, roof plans), and in house
placement on a lot. Also included is hands-on practice in activities involved in working with
blueprints, including preparation of materials list for residential construction. Fall.
RCC 1503 Exterior (3-6-5)
This course includes instruction in exterior finish carpentry. It includes roofing materials,
exterior trim, and the selection and installation of materials. It includes practical application
through actual residential construction projects. Spring.
RCC 1305 Floor & Wall (3-6-5)
This course includes instruction in layout principles of wall framing, flooring detail, ceiling
joists, construction scaffolding, and methods for framing an entire wall before erection.
Construction projects will include framing sills, floor joists, blocking and bridging, rough
stairs and stairwells, wall layout, wall bracing, wall openings, ceiling joists, and scaffolding.
Fall.
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RCC 1204 Pre-Construction (3-6-5)
This course includes instruction in construction principles, tools and their proper use, occupational terminology, and shop and site safety. Pre-construction forming for concrete walls,
pillars, floors, steps, foundations, driveways, and patios will be practiced. Also included is
the use of the transit, instructions in layout principles, characteristics of concrete and techniques of mixing and placing concrete. Fall.
RCC 1203 Interior (3-6-5)
This course includes instruction in the finish work of carpentry. It includes practical application through installation of baseboards, molding, door and window trimmings; and finishing staircases, door jambs and doors. Spring.
RCC 1404 Roofing (3-6-5)
This course includes instruction in the practical application of residential roof construction.
It includes roof coverings, use of the framing square, rafter and truss types, and basic estimation. Spring.
SOCIOLOGY
SOC 1103 Introduction to Sociology (3-0-3)
This course is designed to introduce students to various sociological issues and theory.
Sociology is the study of society. Societal issues include the following: family, medicine,
deviance, education, culture, inequality, and others. The course will investigate sociological
forces from a scientific approach. Research methods are vital to understanding social behavior. Fall, Spring.
SOC 1403 Women in America: Problems & Potentials (3-0-3)
Study of the place of women in society, emphasizing personal growth, work, marriage, and
family. Course provides a historical review and values clarification strategies to assist students in making personal choices. Available upon sufficient student demand.
SOC 1603 Aging in America (3-0-3)
A study of the physical, mental, social, emotional, and spiritual adjustments which accompany aging in America. Fall.
SOC 2203 Social Problems (3-0-3)
This course is designed to introduce students to global social problems. Various social problems will be defined, explained, and described in reference to the situation. Some social
problems will be Macro (unemployment, poverty, crime, etc.) and other problems will be
Micro (drug abuse, sexual behavior, well-being). Topics studied are based on empirical
research. Fall.
SOC 2213 Marriage and the Family (3-0-3)
Focuses on global family issues. Provides an introspective view and empirical research of
the family structure, family problems, and family crisis. The course places emphasis on how
the legal system, government, and business community have struggled to make decisions
about who can be considered part of the family. Spring.
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SOC 2291-2296 Special Study (1-6 Variable Credits)
Individual study of various areas in sociology. Course content to be worked out by the student with the instructor's guidance. May be repeated for up to six hours total credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Available upon sufficient student demand.
SPANISH
Students who have taken a foreign language course in high school may receive college credit. If a student enrolls for the first language course at National Park Community College at
a level beyond the beginning classes, the maximum of six hours' credit may be earned for
beginning classes bypassed. When the student finishes the course with a grade of "C" or
better, the college will award college credit for the courses bypassed.
SPAN 1103 Beginning Spanish I (3-0-3)
Beginning Spanish I is an introductory course for students with little or no previous knowledge of the
language. this course is designed to develop the four basic language skills in Spanish--listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis is placed on basic vocabulary, grammatical
structures, and cultural aspects of the language. Fall, Spring, Summer.
SPAN 1113 Beginning Spanish II (3-0-3)
Beginning Spanish II is a continuation of Beginning Spanish I. This is a course designed to
continue the development of the four basic language skills in Spanish--listening, speaking,
reading, and writing. Emphasis is placed on basic to advanced vocabulary, grammatical
structures, and cultural aspects of the language. Prerequisite: SPAN 1103-Beginning Spanish
I or equivalent. Fall, Spring, Summer.
SPAN 2113 Intermediate Spanish I (3-0-3)
Intermediate Spanish I is an intermediate language course designed to expand student's proficiency in the four language skills in Spanish--listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
Emphasis will be placed on reading, writing, and discussing in Spanish along with expanding cultural knowledge. The course will also include the review and perfection of advanced
grammatical structures. Prerequisite: SPAN 1113-Beginning Spanish II or equivalent. Fall,
Spring, Summer.
SPAN 2123 Intermediate Spanish II (3-0-3)
Intermediate Spanish II is a continuation of Intermediate Spanish I and is designed to
expand student's proficiency in the four language skills in Spanish--listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Emphasis will be placed on reading, writing, and discussing in Spanish
along with expanding cultural knowledge. The course will continue the review and perfection of advanced grammatical structures. Prerequisite: SPAN 2113-Intermediate Spanish I
or equivalent. Spring, Summer and upon sufficient student demand.
SPEECH
SPCH 1103 Fundamentals of Public Speaking (3-0-3)
Public speaking course designed to introduce the student to the communicative act and provide experience in composing and delivering different types of speeches. Fall, Spring,
Summer.
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SPCH 1123 Oral Interpretation (3-0-3)
Principles and techniques involved in the analysis and oral reading of basic literature forms:
poetry and verse, prose and drama. Available upon sufficient student demand.
SPCH 2003 Persuasive Speaking (3-0-3)
Designed to acquaint the student with persuasive and manipulative techniques used in communication strategies, persuading groups of people to espouse one cause or another, or to
take a particular course of action. Understanding of the persuasive process and how best to
improve society through peaceful means are course objectives, as the student gains experience in composing, delivering, recognizing, and analyzing persuasive techniques.
Prerequisite: SPCH 1103-Fundamentals of Public Speaking. Spring.
SUPERVISORY MANAGEMENT
SUPM 1103 Management/Budgetary Accounting (3-0-3)
This course presents the accountant's approach to measuring and reporting on business
activity. Emphasis is placed on analyzing and evaluating business performance from a management perspective. The student evaluates business performance in relation to a budget,
including supervisors' role in the budgetary process. It presents the fundamental knowledge
of payroll procedures, recordkeeping, laws, and ethical business processes. Spring.
SUPM 1123 Introduction to Supervision (3-0-3)
Designed to give first-line supervisors and students an overview of the field of industrial
supervision. Topics include techniques and procedures of general supervision, duties and
responsibilities of the foreman, and employer/employee relationships. Attention is given to
quality control, accounting, safety, and industrial engineering. Spring
SUPM 1183 Effective Communication (3-0-3)
An intensive study of the planning, leadership, and practice of business-type meetings; planning and practice in the skills of oral communications such as the organization and delivery
of short speeches; group discussions; and listening. Emphasis is on the practical aspects of
communicating with all levels of personnel and business acquaintances. Fall.
SUPM 2003 Industrial Psychology/Human Awareness (3-0-3)
Designed to assist the student in understanding human motivation, communication, and
behavior management. Study topics include normal/abnormal personality development,
motivation, management styles, communication skills, group processes, influencing others,
improving interpersonal relationships, and goal setting. Available upon sufficient student
demand.
SUPM 2133 Business Labor Law (3-0-3)
Designed to familiarize the student with the structure and operation of the National Labor
Relations Act and its administering agency, the National Labor Relations Board, and their
impact on employer/employee relations. Available upon sufficient student demand.
TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS
TECH 1101 Computer Technology (1-0-1)
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Fundamentals of computer use applied to the technical industry. Students will review keyboarding, computer hardware and software, word processing, databases, Internet, and email. Course meets the first five weeks of the semester. Fall & Spring.
TECH 1102 Technical Communications (2-0-2)
Designed to develop speaking, reading, writing and human relations skills required in the
employment setting. Students will acquire skills in interviewing, public speaking, writing,
and applications useful in finding, applying for and getting a job. Course meets the last ten
weeks of the semester. Fall & Spring.
TECH 2291-2296 Special Study in Applied Technology (1 -6 variable credits)
Special study is a course that covers various areas in applied technology. Course content will
be determined by interest and demand. Credit hours will be determined by the course that
is offered and will vary from one credit up to six credits. Course may be repeated for additional credit if subject content changes. Prerequisite: Permission of the technical instructor and the Division Chair.
TECM 1003 Technical Math (3-0-3)
This course covers ratio and proportion, measurement, estimation, interpretation of graphs,
basic algebra, formula rearrangement, basic geometry, basic trigonometry, and their application to technical problems.
THEATRE ARTS
TART 1153 Introduction to Theatre (3-0-3)
Survey of the theatre, including kinds of plays, function of actor, director, and designer.
Available upon sufficient student demand.
WELDING TECHNOLOGY
WLD 1013 Blueprint Reading (3-0-3)
Basic blueprint reading teaches the student how to understand welding symbols, various
blueprint lines, tolerances, dimensioning and strength of material formulas. This course will
prepare welders for the rigorous demands placed on them in industry when assembling
welded objects large and small. Fall.
WLD 1023 Introduction to Welding (3-0-3)
This course teaches the theory and application of basic oxyacetylene welding and cutting
and Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW). Includes safety, setting of equipment, cutting of
metals, selection of electrodes, running of welding beads in the flat, vertical, horizontal, and
overhead positions. Fall & Spring.
WLD 1034 Position Welding (3-6-5)
A continuation of the study of oxyacetylene cutting, plasma cutting, and the welding of
metals in the flat, horizontal, vertical, and overhead positions. Emphasis is on pursuing a
welding certification in SMAW as it applies to the D1.1 Structural Welding Code. Practical
applications lab reinforces all theory. Fall.
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WLD 1043 Metallurgy (3-0-3)
This is an introduction to the technology of metals including the processes of producing
them, refining them, working them mechanically, external heat treatments, and adapting
them to use in industry. Includes thermal and mechanical processing of metals, particularly through the process of welding in order to meet severely stressed industrial applications.
Covers various types of heat treatment such as annealing, hardening, tempering, and the use
of various alloys (ferrous and nonferrous) in industry. Fall.
WLD 1254 Inert Gas Welding (3-6-5)
Emphasis of this class is placed on the understanding of inert gas welding as it applies to
Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW or MIG), Flux Cored
Arc Welding (FCAW), and other processes which use a shielding gas of inert, reactive, or a
combination of gases to produce a suitable welding atmosphere. All theory is reinforced
through a practical applications lab. Safety is emphasized. Co requisite: WLD 1023
Introduction to Welding. Spring.
WLD 1264 Pipe Welding/Metal Fabrication (3-6-5)
This class is designed to teach the skills used in the welding of transmission piping systems
and pressure vessels. Class information also covers methods and calculations for pipe and
structural steel fabrication, layout, fit-up, and basic machine shop operations. Emphasis is
placed on the need to meet the standards of the API 1104 and ASME codes. Prerequisites:
WLD 1023 Introduction to Welding and WLD 1013 Welding and Blueprint Reading. Co
requisite: WLD 1254 Inert Gas Welding. Spring.
WLD 1274 Welding Metal Alloys (3-6-5)
A continuation of GMAW, GTAW, and FCAW techniques as they apply to nonferrous metals and special alloys. A Practical applications lab will reinforce all theory. Co requisites:
WLD 1023 Introduction to Welding and WLD 1254 Inert Gas Welding. Spring.
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Staff
Administration
Sally Carder
President
B.S.E., Henderson State University, M.S.E., Henderson State University; Ed. Specialist,
University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Ed.D., University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
Gordon Watts
Executive Vide President
B.A. University of Florida; M..Ed., University of Florida; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin
Margaret Picking
Vice President for Student Services
B.A., Fort Hays State University; M.S., Fort Hays State University
Janis Sawyer
Vice President for Financial Affairs
B.A., University of Oklahoma; M.S.E., Henderson State University; Henderson State University, additional graduate study
Susan Aldridge
Assistant to the President
B.S., Arkansas State University; M.S., East Texas State University; Ed.D., University of Arkansas at
Little Rock
Nancy Happy
Associate Vice President for Student Services
A.A. Garland County Community College, B.S.E. Hendrson State University, M.S.E., Henderson
State University
David Hughes
Associate Vice President for Technical Education
B.A., Drury College, Springfield, MO; B.S.E., University of Ozarks; M.S.E., University of Central
Arkansas
Brad Moody
Associate Dean for Institutional Research and Academic Affairs
B.A., Western Kentucky University; M.A., East Central University, Ada, Oklahoma; Ed.D., University
of Arkansas, Fayetteville
Lisa Carey
B.A., Trinity University; M.E. University of Arkansas
Director of Development
Janetta Ritter
Assessment Coordinator
A.G.E., Garland County Community College; B.B.A., Henderson State University, M.B.A.,
Henderson State University
Marilyn Lambert
A.A.S., Garland County Community College
Mary Everett
A.D.N., Grayson County College, Texas
Assistant Registrar
Campus Health Nurse
Sue Burris
Director of Online Learning
B.B.A., Henderson State University; M.Ed., University of Arkansas at Little
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ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT STAFF
Ruth Wood
A.A.S., Garland County Community College
Director of Administrative Support Services
Rose Dunn
Secretary
Ulonda Frazier
A.A., National Park Community College
Secretary
Sandy Godbehere
Development Coordinator
Debora Henson
A.A.S., Garland County Community College
Secretary
Mary Kelley
Business Office Technology Diploma, Quapaw Technical Institute
Secretary
Melba Lancaster
Administrative Assistant
Connie Poteet
Secretary
Janice Russell
A.L.S., National Park Community College
Secretary
Tami Sheffield
Secretary
Sharon Sinclair
A.A., Garland County Community College; BSE, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
Secretary
Alicia Sorrells
A.A.S., Garland County Community College
Secretary
Patty Smykowski
Secretary
Judy Throgmartin
A.A.S., National Park Community College
Secretary
ADMISSIONS, SCHOLARSHIP AND RECRUITING
Nancy Happy
Director
A.A. Garland County Community College, B.S.E. Hendrson State University, M.S.E., Henderson
State University
Sara Brown
Assistant Director, Admission & Scholarships
A.L.S., Garland County Community College, B.B.A., Henderson State University, M. B. A., Henderson
State University
Becky Fugate
A.A., A.S., National Park Community College
JUDY THROGMARTIN
A.A.S., National Park Community College
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Recruiting & Scholarship Specialist
Secretary
ARKANSAS CAREER PATHWAYS
Diane Meredith
B.A., Henderson State University; M.S., Henderson State University
Director
LaTaschya Harris
Community Outreach Coordinator
A.A., Garland County Community College; B.A., Henderson State University
Erin Buffington
Intake Coordinator
A.A., National Park Community College; A.S., National Park Community College
Ruben Flores
Counselor
A.A., National Park Community College; A.L.S., National Park Community College
BOOKSTORE
Todd Cragg
Campus Store Manager
A.A..S. Community College of the Air Force; B.S. Park College; M.S. University of Arkansas
at Fayetteville,
Debbie Kirk
Documents Examiner
A.A.S., in Accounting, National Park Community College, A.L.S., National Park Community College
Melony Ritter
A.A.S., Northeast Texas Community College
Administrative Secretary
Donna Nevill
B.S., Arkansas Tech University
Secretary II
BUSINESS OFFICE
Robin Britt
Business Office Technology Diploma, Quapaw Technical Institute
Accounting Technician II
Joy Cantrell
Accounting Technician II
Marsha Derrick
A.G.E., Garland County Community College
Accountant II
Judy Glenn
Agency Purchasing Official
A.A.L., Garland County Community College; B.S., Arkansas Tech University
Susan Holsomback
A.A.S., Garland County Community College; B.S.B.A., Henderson State University
Controller
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Kathy Hull
A.A., Cerritos College
Payroll Specialist
Latecia Jackson
B.S., Southern Illinois University
Brian Kroening
B. S. Accounting, University of Arkansas at Monticello
M.B.A., Henderson State University
Accountant
Accounting Supervisor
Darla Thurber
Accounting Technician II
A.A.S., A.L.S., A.A., Garland County Community College; B.S.E., H.R.D., University of Arkansas
Fayetteville; M. Ed., University of Arkansas Fayetteville
CAREER SERVICES
Mary Kay Wurm
B.S.E., Henderson State University; M.S.E., University of Arkansas at Little Rock
Director
Margaret Hutchins
Grant Research Support and Career Center
Coordinator
B.S.E., Henderson State University, M.S.E., University of Arkansas at Little Rock
Child Care Center
Dana McClaran
B.S.E., University of Arkansas at Fayetteville
Director
LaQuinta Baker
Child Care Worker
Brandy Bell
Child Care Worker
Brandie Henthorn
Child Care Worker
Theressa Miller
Child Care Worker
COMPUTER SERVICES
Larry Benson
A.A.S., Garland County Community College
Computer Lab Tech II
Eric Boardway
Data Processing Network Technician
A.A.S. in Computer Information Systems, Certificate in Cisco Certified Network Associate
Blake Butler
A.L.S., Garland County Community College
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Director of Computer Services
Eric Jones
B.S.B.A, Henderson State University
Communications/Network Specialist
Rick Lee
Manager of Network Operations
Computer Information Systems Diploma, Quapaw Technical Institute A.A.S., Garland County
Community College
Jennifer Evans
A.A.S., Garland County Community College
Administrative Support Specialist
Ed Kostelaz
Computer Information Systems Diploma, Quapaw Technical Institute
Caroline Mitchell
Business Office Technical Diploma, Quapaw Technical Institute
Miles Morton
A.A.S., National Park Community College
William Picking
A.L.S., National Park Community College
Cynthia Thornton
N. C. S. E., York Technical College
Multi-Media Specialist
Computer Technician II
Website Coordinator
Computer Lab Tech II
Computer Technician II
EDUCATIONAL TALENT SEARCH
Holly Garrett Miller
Director
A.A., Garland County Community College; B.S.E., Henderson State University; M.E., University of
Arkansas at Little Rock
Terry Bayes
B.B.A., University of Iowa, M.S., Drake University
Sarita Etter
B.S., Arkansas State University, Jonesboro
Curriculum Coordinator/Advisor
Instructional Advisor
Chasity Huchingson
Educational Talent Search Instructional Advisor
A.A. National Park Community College; B.S.E., University of Arkansas at Fayetteville
Cathy High
Secretary II
Human Resources
Janet Brewer
BS, M.A.I.O.C. University of Arkansas in Little Rock
Director of Human Resources
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Juanita Brewer
Personnel Assistant II
A.A., Garland County Community College, BSE, HRD, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
Wanda Holden
Personnel Assistant II
Kathy Hull
Payroll Specialist
A.A., CERRITOS COLLEGE
Natasha Dennie
A.A., A.S., National Park Community College
Secretary
LIBRARY
Mary Farris-White
Director
A.G.E., Garland County Community College; A.A., Garland County Community College; B.S.,
University of the Ozarks; M.L.I.S., University of Southern Mississippi
Rita Evans
Kristin Liles
A.A., National Park Community College
Chet Morphew
A.A.S., Garland County Community College
Library Academic Technician III
Library Academic Technician
Multi-Media Technical Controller II
Geri Olmstead
B.S., Missouri State University; M. S., University of Illinois at Urbane -Champaign
Brenda Van Dusen
A.L.S., Garland County Community College
Librarian
Multi-Media Specialist
Keystone Staff
Marguerite Ogden
1986 - 2007
BUILDINGS & GROUNDS
Brad Hopper
B.S. Engineering, Arkansas Technical University
Director of Physical Plant
Greg Parker
Plant Maintenance Supervisor
Jim Blackmon
Plant Maintenance Supervisor
David Caldwell
Maintenance
Teresa Campos
Custodial
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Michael Dugger
Maintenance
Gerry Griffin
Charlene Helvey
Luke Henson
Danny Hughes
Grounds
Custodial Services
Maintenance
Custodial Services
Doug Hunt
Gardenia Jackson
Grounds
Custodial Services
Jeff Kuykendall
Maintenance
Elbert Lewis
Maintenance
Vince Mattoon
Grounds
Richard McEarl
Custodial
Ana Rodriguez
Custodial
Blanca Rodriguez
Custodial
Exzonda Ross
Custodial
Odell Taylor
Custodial
Wendell Taylor
Custodial
Louis Witherspoon
Custodial
STUDENT SERVICES, FINANCIAL AID AND TESTING
Ron Chesser
Director of Counseling
B.S.E., University of Arkansas, Monticello; M.S.E., Henderson State University
Phyllis Brooks
B.A., Henderson State University; M.A., Henderson State University
Counselor
Pam Buenau
Student Services Project Advisor
A.G.E., Garland County Community College; B.B.A., Henderson State University; M.A., University of
Arkansas, Little Rock
Gloria Glover
Documents Examiner
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Lisa Robinette Hopper
Director of Financial Aid
B.S., Arkansas Tech University; M.B.A., Henderson State University
Carolyn Langston
A.A., Henderson State University
Financial Aid Officer I
Gayla Mattoon
Financial Aid Secretary
Patricia Trantham
Financial Aid Secretary
A.A.S., Business Rich Mountain Community College, A.A.S. Office Technology, Rich Mountain
Community College
Catherine Wells
Counselor
B.S., Murray State University; M.A., Murray State University; Murray State University, additional
graduate study
Gail Carmon
Administrative Secretary
Bob Scully
Director of Testing Services
B.S.B.A., Henderson State University, M.B.A. Henderson State University
STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES
John Tucker
Director
A.A., Garland County Community College; B.A., Ouachita Baptist University; M.A., University of
Central Arkansas
Greg Fulton
B.S., Henderson State University
Tutor Supervisor Math Specialist
Suzanne Hendrix
Counselor/Transfer Specialist
B.B.A., Henderson Sate University; M.B.A., Henderson State University
Kelly Picket
Tutor
A.A. and A.S., Garland County Community College; B.S., University of Arkansas at Little
Rock
Audrey Smelser-Kroha
Counselor/Disability Specialist
B.A., Arkansas State University; M.R.C., Arkansas State University; Certified Rehabilitation
Counselor
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Academic Information
60+Tuition Waiver
Academic Appeals
Academic Honesty
Academic Honors
Academic Standards and Satisfactory Progress
Adding a Course
Administrative Withdrawal/Drop Policy
Advanced Placement Program (AP)
Attendance and Class Work
Auditing a Course
College-Level Examination Program
Cumulative Grade-Point Average
Dropping a Course
General Education Objectives
Grade Report Procedures
Grade-Point Average
Grading System
Graduation/Degree Requirements
Honors Study Program
Incomplete Grades
Repeating a Course
Student Outcomes Assessment
Transcripts and Records
Withdrawing from College
Work Ethics
ADMISSIONS
Articulated High School Courses and Programs
First Time Entering Student
International Student Status
Non-Credit Courses
Programs with Selective Admission
Special Student Status
Transfer of Credit From a Technical School/College
Transfer Student Status
Transient Transfer Status
WAGE
Advisement and Enrollment
Advising as Part of the Enrollment Process
Costs and Due Date for Payment
Course Placement for First-Time Students
Credit for Military Experience
Credit for Previous Training or Experience
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Evening and Late Registration
First-Time Students
How Course Withdrawal Affects Federal Financial Aid
Refunds
Residency Determination for Billing Purposes
Returned Check Policy
Returning Student Enrollment
Special Fees
Transcript Holds
Transfer Student Guidelines
Transfer Students
Arkansas Career Pathways
Business Division
A+ (Certificate of Proficiency)
Accounting (A.A.S.)
Accounting Technology (Technical Certificate)
Computer Information Systems (A.A.S.)
Description of Programs
Faculty
Legal Office (Technical Certificate)
Medical Office (Technical Certificate)
Office Administration and Computer Applications (A.A.S.)
Office Administration and Computer Applications
(Technical Certificate)
Supervisory Management (Technical Certificate)
Web Design (Technical Certificate)
Clubs and Organizations
Advocates for Barrier Awareness
Arkansas Early Childhood Association (AECA)
Cultural Diversity Awareness Club
Intramurals
National Park Community College Singers/Soundwaves
National Technical Honor Society (NTHS)
NPCC Recreation Association
Phi Beta Lambda (PBL)
Phi Theta Kappa
SkillsUSA
Student Activities Council
Student Artists Guild
Student Health Information Management Association
Student Nurses Association
Student Radiography Association
College Mission
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101
54
54
54
54
54
54
55
55
55
56
56
56
56
56
56
57
10
Communication & Arts Division
Faculty
Graphic Design (A.A.S.)
Community & Corporate Training Center
Apprenticeship Programs (4-year programs)
Career Certificate Programs Online - www.ed2go.com/npcc
Computers
Customized Workforce Development Programs
Faculty/Staff
Health & Safety
Management/Leadership/Supervision
Online Courses - www.ed2go.com/npcc
Production
Technical
True Colors
Work Skills
Zig Ziglar
ZIGGETS
Course Descriptions
119
119
120
177
179
182
180
178
177
180
178
181
179
179
181
180
181
181
183
Accounting
183
Allied Health
184
Anthropology
185
Art (Also see Graphic Design).
185
Auto Service Technology
187
Aviation
190
Biology
191
Business Administration
192
Computer Information Systems
194
Computer Science (See Computer Information Sciences and Technology)
204
Criminal Justice
204
Early Childhood Education
205
Earth Science
207
Economics
208
Education
208
Emergency Medical Services-Paramedic
209
Emergency Medical Technician
211
Engineering
212
English
212
Film
214
Fire Protection
214
Forestry
216
French
216
279
Geography
Geology
Graphic Design
Health Information Technology
Health, Physical Education and Recreation
Hospitality Administration
Industrial Electronics
Journalism
Learning Acceleration Division
Manufacturing Technology
Marine Repair Technology
Mathematics
Medical Laboratory Technology
Music
NURSING
Office Administration
Orientation
Philosophy
Photography
Physical Education
Physics (Also see Engineering)
Political Science
Pottery
PRACTICAL NURSE PROGRAM
Psychology
Radiography
Reading
Real Estate
Residential Carpentry
Sociology
Spanish
Speech
Supervisory Management
Technical
Theatre Arts
Welding Technology
Degrees and Certificate
Arkansas Course Transfer System (ACTS)
Associate of Arts Degree (A.A.)
Associate of Liberal Studies (A.L.S.)
Associate of Science Degree
Associate of Science Degree in Medical Laboratory Technology
Associate of Science Degree in Nursing
Certificate of General Studies
280
216
217
217
220
222
226
227
228
229
230
230
231
233
235
240
244
247
247
247
249
252
252
253
253
259
261
263
263
263
264
265
265
266
266
267
267
75
75
77
81
83
86
86
75
Certificate of Proficiency Programs
Technical Certificate Programs
95
94
Financial Aid Verification Policy
Institutional and Financial Aid Refund Policy
NONTRANSFER STUDENTS
TRANSFER STUDENTS
35
37
36
36
Federal Financial Aid Program
31
Federal PELL Grant
32
Financial Aid and the Payment of Tuition, Fees, and
Books
35
Financial Assistance
30
Federal PLUS Loan Program
32
Federal Stafford Loan Program
32
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)
32
Federal Work-Study Program
33
Process for Applying for Federal Financial Aid
33
Process for Applying for Federal or Institutional Work Study
34
Process for Applying for Student Loans (Federal Stafford and/or PLUS
Loans)
34
When to Apply for Federal Financial Aid
33
General Institutional Policies
Accidents
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990
Computing and Telecommunications
Drug-Free Campus
Fire
Lab Safety
Reporting Criminal Violations
Severe Weather
Sexual Harassment
Sexual Offender Registration
Stalking
Student Right to Know
Title IX Compliance
Tobacco-Free Campus
Tornado Alert
Health Sciences Division
Admission To All Health Science Programs
Basic Emergency Medical Technology (Certificate of Proficiency)
Emergency Medical Services/Paramedic (A.A.S.)
Faculty
Health Information Technology (A.A.S.)
12
12
12
13
13
13
14
14
14
15
16
16
16
16
17
17
126
124
125
123
125
281
Medical Laboratory Technology (A.S.)
Phlebotomy (Technical Certificate)
Professional Medical Coding (Technical Certificate)
Professional Medical Transcription (Technical Certificate)
Radiography (A.A.S.)
Recreational Leadership Program (A.A.S.)
Learning Acceleration Division
Description of Programs
Pre-College Level Courses
Local Agencies
Arkansas Human Development Corporation
Arkansas Rehabilitation Services
Workforce Investment Act (WIA)
Math & Science Division
Description of Programs
Faculty
125
125
125
125
125
126
137
138
138
43
44
44
44
139
140
139
National Park Community College Scholarships 39
American Indian Scholarships
Arkansas Department of Higher Education
Workforce Improvement Grant Program
Art Scholarships
Davis Memorial Scholarship
Discretionary Scholarship
Divisional Scholarship
First Class Scholarship
Fred’s Second Opportunity Grant
General Education Diploma (GED) Scholarship
Honor Scholarships
Hovey Henderson Memorial Scholarship
Law Enforcement Officers’ Dependents Scholarship
Missing in Action/Killed in Action (MIA/KIA)
Dependents’ Scholarship
National Park Community College Scholarship Programs
National Park Community College Singers Scholarships
National Park Technology Scholarship
Nursing Scholarships
Part Time Scholarship
Single Parent Scholarships
The Rambow Memorial Scholarship
Transfer Scholarships
Wencel Scholarships
282
39
39
39
39
39
40
40
40
40
40
41
41
41
41
41
42
42
42
42
42
43
43
NURSING DIVISION
Additional Information and Requirements for Nursing Majors
Admission Process/Selection
Admissions Policies and Procedures for Associate Degree (RN)
Admissions Policies and Procedures for Certificate Program (PN)
Applications for Transfer
Attendance
Cost of the Nursing Program
Degree Requirements- Associate Degree
Degree Requirements- Associate Degree for LPN to RN Track
Degree Requirements- Certificate Part-time Evening Program
Degree Requirements- PN Certificate: Day Program
Denial of Clinical Experience
Description of Programs
Faculty
HIGH SCHOOL TO ASN TRACK (3-Year Plan)
Medication Aide Certificate of Proficiency
Progression
Re-admission
Surgical Technology
Pathways Staff:
Social Science Division
Criminal Justice (A.A.S.)
Criminal Justice Degree Program (A.A.S.)
Description of Programs
Faculty
Fire Protection (A.A.S.)
Staff
Administration
Administrative Support Staff
Bookstore
Buildings & Grounds
Business Office
Career Services
Computer Services
Educational Talent Search
Library
Student Support Services
Student Educational Opportunities
Adult Education
College Preparedness Programs (PCL Courses)
Enrollment for 16 and 17 Year Old Students
145
144
143
145
147
146
143
150
150
152
151
148
142
141
145
155
145
145
154
44
159
159
160
159
159
160
269
269
270
271
274
271
272
272
273
274
276
17
18
18
18
283
GED Program
General Adult Education (GAE)
Student Financial Aid
Student Records
Academic Records Privacy Rights
Records on Hold
Requesting A Transcript
Student Code of Good Conduct
Student Disciplinary Procedures
Student Identification Number
Student Right to Know
Transcripts
Student Services
Adaptive Equipment Lab
Bookstore Services
Career Center
Child Development Center
Educational Talent Search (ETS)
Employment and Job Information Assistance
Food Service
Gear Up Program
Graduate And Job Placement
Health Services
Housing and Transportation
Library
Lost and Found
Orientation
Parking
Recruitment and Campus Tours
Services for Students with Disabilities
Student Activities
Student Centers
Student Support Services
Testing
Tutoring
Veterans Services
Technical & Professional Programs
Associate of Applied Science in General Technology
Associate of Applied Science in Hospitality Administration
Automotive Service Technology (36 credit hours)
Certificate of Proficiency in Hospitality Administration
Description of Programs
Early Childhood Education
284
18
18
31
45
45
45
45
46
47
47
47
48
48
52
48
49
49
49
49
50
50
50
50
50
50
51
51
51
51
52
52
52
53
53
53
53
163
164
167, 171
169
171
164
169
Early Childhood Education, Associate of Applied Science (AAS)
Faculty
Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration
Industrial Maintenance Technology
Marine Technology
Residential Carpentry
Technical Certificate in Hospitality Administration
Welding Technology
Telephone Numbers
165
163
170
173
174
174
171
175
8
285
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