motion to diSQuALifY

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King
of the
roost
@
Hampshire
Review.com
Wednesday, November 19, 2014
Dorsey Fox, Everett, Pa.
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Wall takes a dive into underwater construction
HHS graduate gets in the swim of some really wet work
Jim KinG review Staff
PANAMA CITy BEACH, Fla. — A
2011 Hampshire High graduate is
getting his feet wet in a Navy career
that few sailors dive into — underwater
construction.
Petty officer 3rd Class Philip Wall
graduates from his 6-month training
program today. After a little R-and-R
he reports to Port Hueneme, Calif., for a
3-year assignment with the Navy’s West
Coast underwater construction team.
He is one of just 2 sailors completing
the rigorous physical and academic
training this time around.
“My classmate, he’s the smart one,”
Wall quips. “I’m the strong one.”
He’s one of the youngest to graduate
from the program, his dad, John, points
out proudly. But then, Philip Wall got a
quick jump into the Navy.
The former lifeguard at the Romney
Community Pool started boot camp
in October 2011, just before his 19th
birthday. He trained as a construction
electrician in Gulf Port, Miss., before a
6-month deployment to Kuwait and Iraq
in late 2012.
He didn’t see combat in the Arabian
sands, but he had plenty of 12-hour
construction days in temperatures that
often soared to 130 degrees.
Submitted by
John WALL
Philip Wall
flashes a
little underwater pride.
See WALL page 5A n
motion to
diSQuALifY
ed deWitt review Staff
transportation director Calvin davis
says the cameras on all 77 of hampshire County’s school buses play 2 key
roles.
Potomac Center asks judge
to nix all of claimant’s counsel
niCK GAudio review Staff
Drivers, kids: Say ‘Cheese!’
More cameras on buses throughout county — director
niCK GAudio review Staff
AUGUSTA — Hampshire County schools
transportation director wants the public, the parents and
the students to know that every one of the 77 school buses
here now contains a pretty complex camera system.
The purpose of having more digital eyes, Calvin Davis
said, is obviously manifold — but, as always, it’s meant
to protect the county’s children.
“Of course, there are always disciplinary issues the
video system can help,” he explained. “But, what I also
want the public to understand is that we can also use it to
better spot who runs our red lights.”
Davis described the system as “black-box-like,” in that
it not only records sounds throughout the bus, but also
clearly indicates what lights and signals the bus driver
has initiated, as well as if the driver has the parking
HAmpsHire county
g
all about
CwD
mast
report
Check-in
locations
niCK GAudio review Staff
201 4
outl ook
er s
our trail Cam winn
s
plu
s
24 of your best picture
A speciAl section
See driVerS page 5A n
Trail Cam contest
sponsored by
pages 6-7
e review n Wedne
in the hampshir
sdAy, november 19,
DHHR renews
full license
review Staff
ROMNEy — Ten months after being
shut down, Potomac Center has been
granted a full license to house 8 children
on its main campus.
West Virginia’s Department of Health
and Human Resources said it renewed the
license on Oct. 29. Potomac Center CEO
Rick Harshbarger said the paperwork
arrived on his desk Monday.
DHHR in early April granted Potomac
Center a 6-month license to return 8
children to the facility, about 10 weeks
after it closed down the Intensive Care
Program and removed all 24 children
from the 3 homes on the Romney campus.
Harshbarger called the full license
good news. “They are being cautious,
as they should be,” he said. “They are
very complimentary of the changes we
have made and that we are really working
hard to regain our 100-percent occupancy
status.” He called getting all 24 children
back on campus a matter of “when, not
if.”
A routine investigation into a selfreported incident led to the removal of all
24 children on Jan. 17. The state police
investigation of criminal charges remains
open.
See motion page 5A n
Main Street Grill to
get cookin’ this Dec. 1
tion
special sec
H& untin
brake engaged, and other important facts.
Davis said there are, internally 5 cameras and externally
2 cameras on each of the school system’s 77 buses. The
internal cameras monitor the driver, the students and the
stairway. The external cameras catch those speedsters.
“There was a bus rear-ended earlier this year,” Davis
said. “When we pulled the hard drive, we saw the bus
was stopped. I could tell the lights and the stop sign
were activated. I could tell the bus driver had the parking
brake engaged.”
The director said that the camera system also helps
him check in with the logistics of the county bus routes.
“If I’ve got a 74-passenger bus, and I can see the video
and we have consistently 64 kids, we can adjust the route
accordingly, too,” he said.
ROMNEy
—
Defense
attorneys
representing
the
Potomac Center in a civil classaction lawsuit have filed a
motion to disqualify all of the
attorneys on the other side of the
trial.
At the heart of the defense’s
charge is an alleged conflict
of interest where an upperlevel management official at
the Potomac Center apparently
spoke with an attorney who
works with another attorney
who is currently representing
the claimant.
“Defendants just recently
learned of a significant conflict
of interest,” reads the motion,
which was filed on Nov. 7 by
attorney David Mincer of Bailey
and Wyant, out of Charleston.
The motion says that Potomac
Center
Program
Manager
Robyn Vandevander spoke
with attorney Julie Frazer last
spring — Frazer works with
the claimant’s co-counsel, Will
Keaton.
Frazer
had
represented
Vandevander in the past but
apparently was not paid for her
services in the spring.
“While
ultimately
Ms.
Vandevander did not retain Julie
Frazer as counsel (in
2014
ChECK us out onlinE!
SUNRISE SUMMIT — A muchanticipated new version of the Main Street
Grill is soon opening its doors — this one,
in Sunrise Summit. And it’s so close, in fact,
you can almost taste it.
This Dec. 1, the new restaurant will swing
wide its doors, ready to showcase a little bit
of the old Main Street Grill’s know-how,
said owners Matt and Jodi Stotler, but also
to showcase a lot of new eats, too.
The Stotlers say they’ve added lunch
options, as well as healthier choices, and
1C
— the biggest change — even an oldfashioned soda shoppe bar. The options
at the U-shaped marble countertop in the
middle of the restaurant include everything
from classic root beer floats to some of the
couple’s own sweet creations.
The variety isn’t just limited to the soda
bar, either. The new Main Street Grill’s menu
runs the gamut from foot-long hotdogs to 16
ounce ribeye steaks to fajita trios to chicken
wings to salads to crab cakes to nearly else
everything in between.
See GriLL page 5A n
Builder looks to launch housing project
niCK GAudio review Staff
doWnloAd our APP!
© 2014 Cornwell & Ailes inc.
fALL SPortS
fLAShBACK
niCK GAudio review Staff
the main Street Grill in Sunrise Summit is ready to open dec. 1.
ROMNEy — The first steps of
bringing more affordable housing
to Hampshire County are now in
motion.
Joe Leighton of West Virginia
Community Builders LLC, out
of Bridgeport came to County
Commissioners on Tuesday morning
with a proposal and, then, a request.
The proposal outlined most of the
specifications of a multi-family
housing project here and the request
was for commissioners’ “unqualified
support” of that project moving
forward.
During his presentation, Leighton
outlined what the county could
expect should the project eventually
get the necessary funding from the
state.
The Hampshire County project
would include 32 units, from 1
bedroom to 3 bedrooms each. The
townhouses would not be furnished,
but would include Energy Starcompliant refrigerators, stoves, dishwashers and disposals.
Outside of the townhouses, there
See ProJeCt page 5A n
2A
n
hampshire review
Wednesday, november 19, 2014
Hampshire Review
r e A d e r ’ S G u i d e
november 19, 2014 n Vol. 185, no. 47
indeX
d e At h S
4 Sections, 28 pages
Classifieds ............... 1 d
Community Calendar ..2 B
Community Letters .....4 B
opinion......................4 A
farm .........................5 C
health .......................3 C
homespun .................3 B
Legal notices ............ 3 d
milestones ................3 B
obituaries ..................7 A
Poll Question .............4 A
real estate ................6 C
religion .....................5 B
School .......................4 C
Sports .......................1 C
•
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inSertionS
•
food Lion
rite Aid
American Profile
hunting tab
•
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•
death notices are
updated daily online:
www.HampshireReview.com
athey, mary L., 84,
Stephens City, Va.
baker, david L., 78,
Wardensville
delawder, Wilma J., 81,
Paw Paw
Gross, Linda V., 68,
Paw Paw
mongold, Verdie V., 91,
Bergton, Va., formerly of Baker
nelson, Lowell “Lody” m., 91,
formerly of romney
nesmith, Paula G., 67,
Capon Bridge
omps Jr., dayton A. “Pete,” 84,
Berkeley Springs
payne, Carl o., 76,
romney
prosser, Liam m., 8 months,
Springfield
Rinker, Alma J., 72,
Purgitsville
for the RecoRd
The Hampshire Review tries to be accurate and fair in every
story it publishes. When a mistake occurs, we want to correct
it. If you spot an error, please call 304-822-3871 and ask to
speak to the editor, or email [email protected]
@
Hampshire
Review.com
top stoRy online
online fiRst
n WVU announces new school,
State police: 8 month old’s
death under investigation
gallery honoring Jay Rockefeller
n New insurance enrollment
period opens
n Student found unconscious at
WVU fraternity dies
n Ex-CEO of Upper Big Branch
Mine indicted
n WVU suspend all fraternities,
sororities
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Wednesday
State police investigate child’s death
review Staff
SPRINGFIELD — Last week’s death of an 8-month-old child is
only in the early stages of investigation, West Virginia State Police
said Tuesday morning.
Sgt. R.W. Mason said that, among other issues, investigators
are waiting the results of an autopsy by the West Virginia medical
examiner’s office in Morgantown.
“The toxicology alone might not be back for 2 to 3 months,” he
said. “That’s not uncommon.”
Police are not identifying the victim, per departmental policy.
At 4:55 p.m. on Nov. 11 Trooper First Class M.T. Sherman of the
Romney Detachment responded to Hampshire Memorial Hospital
for the death of the 8-month-old boy. Springfield Rescue Squad
transported the victim to the hospital, where he was pronounced
dead by Hampshire County Medial Examiner, Penny Hartman.
Cpl M.G. Spence is assisting Sherman in the investigation.
Donna Steward, president of the Springfield Rescue Squad, said
she could not provide more information about the case because it’s
under investigation. ❏
Jail cost to hold steady for now
miChAEl o’BriEn review Correspondent
ROMNEy — A shared big sigh of relief
is the response form Hampshire County
officials and their counterparts from around
the state over the recent decision by the West
Virginia Regional Jail Authority to keep the
per diem at its present rate.
The per-diem rate that counties pay to
house prisoners in regional jails won’t
increase this year, according to jail authority
executive director Joe DeLong.
DeLong said an increase isn’t necessary
because of better accounting and a costsaving campaign by state jail officials.
The state jail authority board voted in late
October to leave the per diem rate the same
as it set in 2013.
Hampshire
County
commissioners
allocated $100,000 extra to the county’s
budget to cover jail costs when they set
the budget back in March for the current
operating year. The line item went from
$600,000 to $700,000.
That decision at the local level had more
to due with the numbers of inmates from
Hampshire County that were being housed
in the state operated system.
The numbers have been climbing and
commissioners acted in response to that
trend.
Comparatively speaking, things could be
worse — Kanawha County has the highest
jail bill in the state paying on average about
$350,000 a month to house prisoners at the
South Central Regional Jail.
But that’s sort of like comparing apples
and oranges. Hampshire County is basically
a rural area and county government these
days operates annually in the $8 million
range. On the other hand, Kanawha
County has about 10 times the population
of Hampshire County and its government
operates on an annual budget of nearly $60
million.
Starting about 15 years ago or so, counties
across West Virginia started closing their
respective “county jails” and began sending
inmates to the regional jails that were being
built throughout the state.
At the time, the state was recognized for
its forward-thinking approach as far as the
basic design used at each regional jail site.
Hampshire County is home to 1 of the 10
regional jails in the state with the Potomac
Highlands Regional Jail in Augusta.
The Potomac Highlands facility serves
Hampshire, Mineral, Hardy, Grant and
Pendleton counties. o
State looks at role of county school boards
jim King review Staff
CHARLESTON — The
future of West Virginia’s 55
county school boards is open for
comment until Dec. 11.
Officially, last week, the State
Board of Education opened a
30-day comment period on a
report from the School District
Governance and Administration
Commission that recommends
handing more responsibility to
the state’s 8 regional service
agencies and taking it away
from the county school boards.
Hampshire County Board
of Education President Jean
Shoemaker urged residents to
read the report and offer their
opinions.
“The state will listen to the
taxpayers a whole lot better
than they will listen to the board
members,” she said.
The commission is suggesting
a 5-year restructuring of the
RESAs, changes for board
policies and new legislation
regarding regional services.
Under the plan, RESAs’
primary role would evolve
from resource sharing and
professional development to
taking on broader behindthe-scenes administration for
schools.
“It’s a way for counties to
work together to try to save some
money, such as purchasing,”
Shoemaker said. “That is the big
thing.”
Even combined purchasing
has issues to resolve.
“What is the expense going
to be to man that,” Shoemaker
asked. “Are we going to hire
someone to be in charge or are
we going to just reach a deal
with a company?”
The goal is to allow local
school boards to focus more on
student achievement. It would
likely create new money-saving,
job-sharing
arrangements
between county systems.
Tom Campbell, a state board
member who is the commission
chairman, suggested counties
could share attorneys, or
collaborate
on
financial,
personnel or transportation
issues “to help the districts focus
on student instruction and those
functions which can be handled
regionally in support of the
district.”
A 2012 audit of the state’s
education system found millions
of tax dollars being wasted
by inefficiency. In response,
the state board created the
governance commission in 2013
to identify functions distracting
local school boards from student
achievement.
While the board has no
SPeAK uP
You can view the school board proposal at:
WVde.StAte.WV.uS/PoLiCieS/diStriCt-GoVernAnCe-rePort.
htmL
You can comment on it at:
WVde.StAte.WV.uS/PoLiCieS/onLineComment.
htmL?id=diStriCt-GoVernAnCe-rePort&S=1
intentions of eliminating the
state’s
current
55-county
structure, its members hope
the change will create a more
efficient and effective school
system.
As an offshoot of the transition,
in December the commission
will consider redrawing the
RESA map. The commission
meets Dec. 3 and could have a
new map to recommend to the
state board at its meeting a week
later.
Shoemaker said she’s in favor
of splitting the 8-county RESA
8, which includes Jefferson,
Berkeley and Morgan counties to
the east along with the Highlands
counties of Hampshire, Mineral,
Grant, Hardy and Pendleton.
“We’re so spread out it’s
almost impossible for us to share
a lot of things,” Shoemaker
noted.
In addition, she said, the
needs and understanding of
Debts piling up?
bankruptcy
sherman
law Firm
call toDay
304-822-4740
call toll free
800-619-4740
You don’t have to leave
town to file bankruptcy.
We are a debt relief agency. We help people file
for bankruptcy relief under the bankruptcy code.
New Business
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Accepting New Patients
Hearing Tests and
Hearing Aide Services
inteRnet
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bigger systems like Jefferson
and Berkeley are much different
than in the counties to the west.
“I can’t imagine Jefferson
County understanding the needs
of Hampshire County because
their tax base is so much better
than ours,” she said. o
25029 Northwestern Pike
Romney, WV 26757
rAteS
Phone:
304-822-4334
Fax: 304-822-4452
Email: [email protected]
Jana
Brown
AuD, FAAA
Doctor of Audiology
Board Certified in
Audiology
Gourmet tour adds 2 stops
review Staff
ROMNEy — More special tastes than ever will
be available Saturday on the Fall Gourmet Tour
of Romney.
Mario’s restaurant and Miller’s Grocery are
joining the tour’s 3 mainstays — Anderson’s
Corner, B-Belle’s Boutique and Dillon’s Country
Treasures — for the 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. event.
“Gourmet Tour has become a tradition in
Romney and local shops are always up to the
challenge to think of ways to outdo the past 5
years of this event,” said Patty Anderson, owner
of Anderson’s Corner.
HAH
hampshire review n
Wednesday, november 19, 2014
Mario’s will be offering a taste of the garlic
bread and lasagna they make. Miller’s Market will
feature homemade baked goods and deli samples.
“This could be subtitled ‘Taste of Southern
Hospitality,’” Anderson said.
People who visit all 5 stores Saturday can enter
a drawing for a gourmet gift basket that includes
products from each of the participating businesses.
Anderson called the tour a way to strengthen the
community.
“These businesses support local charities and
nonprofits everyday,” she said. “This is a great
chance to show support.”
Colts Restaurant
& Pizza Park
Main St., Moorefield
304-538-2523 • 6 a.m. - 10 p.m.
Daily SpecialS
Weekend Steak
& Seafood Specials
Homemade pizza
Made w/Fresh Ingredients
3A
Hampshire Animal Hospital
304-822-5900
Mon., Wed., Fri. - By Appointment
150 South Marsham St., Romney, WV
Do-si-do at co-op Saturday
jim King review Staff
ROMNEy — Grab your
partner and heat up the joint
— literally — at the Hampshire
Co-op next Saturday.
Friends of the Co-op are
calling it a square dance, with
some cheap grub and lessons
beforehand, to raise money to
add heat to the building at 56 S.
Marsham St.
“We didn’t get our grant so
we’re trying to earn enough
money to heat the back of the
co-op,” explains Patty Anderson
of Anderson’s Corner. “We
have ductwork, but we need a
furnace.”
The furnace that heats the front
of the co-op isn’t big enough
to handle the entire building,
which is being transformed
into an artists’ co-operative and
marketplace.
A pair of callers known
collectively as Step Jam will
introduce clogging and flatfoot
dancing at 4 p.m. Saturday,
followed by a full-blown square
dance at 6.
Admission is $5, or $8 for a
couple and tickets are on sale
at Anderson’s Corner on Main
Street.
Some of the Friends of the
Co-op are making chili, bean
soup and cornbread that will be
sold for $2, Anderson said.
“We want to build a
RECoVERy IS ouT - To CHANGE THE AddICTIoN CoNVERSATIoN FRoM - PRoBlEMS To SoluTIoNS
Second Screening • Friday, November 21 • 7 p.m.
South Branch Inn, Along Rt. 50 Behind CVS Pharmacy, Romney, WV
The screening is being hosted in partnership with the Potomac Highlands Guild, Hampshire County
Community Foundation, Erin Michele Pancake Fund and Hampshire County Pathways
A FEATuRE doCuMENTARy FIlM about the 23.5 million Americans living in
long-term recovery, and the merging public recovery movement that will transform
how alcohol and other drug problems are dealt with in our communities.
FY 2015 Title I Plan Approved
Hampshire County Schools has been notified that the Title I Program for Hampshire County
Schools has been awarded $1,177,649 for FY 2015 (2014-2015 school year).
The Title I Program is a federally-funded program that helps students improve their skills with
extra help in reading and mathematics. More than 1500 students will have the opportunity to
participate in the compensatory education program.
Kim forry and Jan Scopel show off some of their flatfoot
dancing technique.
community as well as get the
co-op up and running,” she said.
Joe Herrmann and friends
will be providing the music. The
callers are Kim Forry and Jan
Scopel of Annapolis, Md.
“They are great,” Anderson
said. Anyone — beginner
through advanced — is welcome
at the dance Saturday. ❏
Title I Elementary School Staff members are:
Augusta Elementary (304-496-7001):
Theresa Eades, Reading Specialist
Ashley Steckman, Reading Specialist
Brenda Haines, Professional Support
Personnel
TBA, Professional Support Personnel
Springfield-GS Elementary (304-822-4317):
Starsha Crouse, Reading Specialist
Erica Asbury, Professional Support Personnel
Jennifer Biddle, Professional Support
Personnel
Linda Carder, Parent Involvement Network
Contact
Capon Bridge Elementary (304-856-3329):
Jennifer Drahuschak, Reading Specialist
Jean Kenney, Professional Support Personnel
Melinda Bremer, Professional Support
Personnel
Susan Chrismore, Parent Involvement Network
Contact
Slanesville Elementary (304-496-7069):
Victoria Ford, Reading Specialist
Leisa Iser, Professional Support Personnel
Gary Wagoner, Professional Support
Personnel
Cindy Bennett, Parent Involvement Network
Contact
John J. Cornwell Elementary (304-492-5521):
Sara Harris Dailey, Reading Specialist
Joyce Oates, Professional Support Personnel
Romney Elementary (304-822-3018):
Nicole Pownell, Reading Specialist
Marlene Eversole, Reading Specialist
Stephanie Corbin, Reading Specialist
Title I Office (304-822-3528):
Carol Fultz, Professional Support Personnel
Deb Hartsock, Title I Director
Pat Bosley, Professional Support Personnel
Judy Davis, Title I Secretary
SuEllen Racey, Parent Involvement Network
Contact
TBA, Academic Coach
Melanie Meck, Countywide Elementary Math Coach
TBA, Countywide Elementary Math Coach
Throughout the school year Family/Parent Engagement sessions are offered for parents and
interested persons that will give them an opportunity to participate in planned trainings and
discuss the Title I Program. Sessions will be announced in school newsletters.
For more information about the Hampshire County Title I Program, please contact the school
principal, the school’s Title I teacher, or Deb Hartsock, Title I Director, Hampshire County Schools,
111 School Street, Romney WV 26757 (telephone: 304-822-3528 ext. 141).
review files
decorations light up the grounds of taggart hall in 2013.
BPO tree lighting at Taggart Nov. 25
review Staff
ROMNEy — The Romney BPO will sponsor
its annual festival of lights tree lighting ceremony
on Tuesday, Nov. 25, on the grounds outside
Taggart Hall beginning at 6 pm.
The lights are strewn through the trees in the
yard facing High Street, and this year 4 new
displays have been added to the festive spread.
“We took on this project many years ago and
this year we’ve added on several pieces. We spent
a day getting it ready and putting it up,” said Dot
Calvert, BPO President.
The new decorations are animated, meaning
the lights blink in a way that appears to make the
decorations move.
A snowman that tilts his hat, a large Merry
Christmas sign, Santa’s sleigh and reindeer and a
helicopter are the newest additions.
Light refreshments, including hot chocolate and
cookies, will be served inside the hall. ❏
November
Happenings
Refer a friend
FREE enrollment for the NEW member,
FREE December monthly fee for the
REFERRING member
25% off personal training
sessions with Jerry Dean
Food pantry
collecting nonperishable goods
Heart Attack Risk Program
Screening
November 13, 8 a.m. – 11 a.m.
Appointments required – call for details
Turkey Splash
November 24-28, 12-4 p.m. only
Kids swim for $5!
Happy Thanksgiving!
November 26-30
20% off all pro shop items
FREE enrollment all day for new
members who sign up
Black Friday ONLY – Adults (age 18
Visit the center today
and start living a
healthier lifestyle!
& up) can work out for FREE
DON’T FORGET!
Pool CLOSED the week of November
16-23 for annual cleaning
Coming December 5-6 – Our
annual Holiday Bazaar, Kidz Santa
drop-off and 5K Santa Trot run/walk to
benefit Hampshire County Pathways
Studio art
Thanksgiving Hours:
Ed dEWitt review Staff
Artist mark Griffith describes one of his unique creations made of found metal objects.
Griffith’s presentation was held at elizabeth’s Glassworks near Slanesville as part of the 7th
annual hampshire highlands Studio tour last weekend at various locations across the county.
the tour showcased more than a dozen artists who use various mediums. o
68 Heritage Circle • Romney, WV 26757
304-822-7255
www.hampshirewellfit.com
November 26, 6 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Closed November 27
November 28, 6 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Normal weekend hours
Opinion
4A
Hampshire
Review
@
Hampshire
Review.com
Wednesday, November 19, 2014
fACts &
oPinionS
Go figure
221,806
hunting licenses issued in
West Virginia during 2013
The poll
this week’s question
how is your thanksgiving turkey being prepared this year?
q We’re roasting it in the
oven.
q We’re deep-frying it.
q Somebody else is cooking
it for us.
q We’re not having turkey.
Vote by 10 a.m. tuesday
@
Hampshire
Review.com
our oPinion
New hope for WVSDB renovations
Prospects suddenly seem brighter for muchneeded renovations of the decaying campus at
the West Virginia Schools for the Deaf and the
Blind.
First, Delegate Ruth Rowan has wrangled a
visit to the state school by key legislators so
they can see firsthand the conditions in which
some of the state’s most fragile students live
and learn.
“I’m hoping they’re going to see the very best
and the very worst,” Rowan says of the Dec. 9
tour for members of the Legislative Oversight
Commission for Education Accountability.
Not much of significance makes its way
into laws or state budgets without LOCEA’s
backing, so the visit will be key if any funding
is to be given in 2015.
Second, newly elected state Sen. Charles
Trump made noises on Election Night that
echo promises he made early in his campaign
— comments that lend hope to the cause.
“I’ll see right away to make sure the West
Virginia Schools for the Deaf and Blind get the
funding they need for the capital improvement
projects,” he said as he acknowledged his
victory in the 15th District senate race.
In April he said much the same thing.
“There needs to be money specifically
allocated in the state budget for the
improvements that are necessary for the
school for the deaf and blind,” he said. “I’m
disappointed that didn’t happen this year.”
That’s exactly what’s needed. In the 2014
session, the Legislature tried to foist the
responsibility for improvements out of its $12
billion budget and onto the School Building
Authority’s $45 million annual bonding
authority for educational facilities in all 55
counties.
Granted, the state was trying to balance a
budget that ultimately had to draw out tens
of millions of dollars from its rainy day fund.
last week’s question
lEttEr to thE Editor
What’s your weather prediction for this winter?
54 Votes cast
22 Worse than last year
20 i hate winter.
9 Warmer tempreatures
with average precipitation.
3 Warmer tempreatures
with more precipitation.
Letters to the Editor are typed as submitted.
No changes are made to sentence structure or
grammar.
PEIA members should attend
upcoming insurance meeting
Brought to you by
Romney Federal
Credit Union
304-822-3116
Did you
know?
educator John
Warren davis
was president of West Virginia State College from 1919
to 1953 and molded it into
one of the strongest black
colleges in the country.
FyI
opinions expressed by
columnists and letter writers
are their own. our publication
of them does not mean that
the review agrees with the
opinion expressed.
Letters of Appreciation are
encouraged and intended for
nonprofit organizations that
wish to thank other organizations, businesses or individuals who helped make the
community we live in a better
place. there is a 200 word
limit and a twice-a-month
limit on submissions.
in touCh
Federal
u.S. SenAtorS
Joe manchin (d-farmington)
306 hart Senate office Building
Washington, dC 20510
Phone: 202-224-3954
www.manchin.senate.gov
eastern Panhandle office:
261 Aikens Center Suite 305
martinsburg, WV 25404
Phone: 304-264-4626
John d. “Jay” rockefeller iV
(d-Charleston)
531 hart Senate office Building
Washington, dC 20510
Phone: 202-224-6472
www.rockefeller.senate.gov
A guide to
contacting
your elected
officials
martinsburg office
217 W. King St. Suite 307
martinsburg, WV 25401
Phone: 304-262-9285
ConGreSS
Shelley moore Capito (rCharleston)
2366 rayburn h.o.B.
Washington, d.C., 20515
Phone: 202.225.2711
martinsburg office:
300 foxcroft Ave. Suite 102
martinsburg, WV 25401
Phone: 304.264.8810
State
GoVernor
earl ray tomblin (d-Logan)
State Capitol
1900 Kanawha Blvd. east
Charleston, WV 25305
Phone: 304-558-2000
[email protected]
StAte SenAte
15th district
Craig Blair (r-Berkeley)
room 203W, Bldg. 1
1900 Kanawha Blvd. e.
Charleston, WV 25305
Phone: 304-357-7867
c[email protected]
donald Cookman (d-hampshire)
Dutch snapshots: 3 views
In all my “snapshots” sequences I usually select one
common theme regarding my
experiences in that country. In
Holland, however — the Netherlands — my experiences
were either so limited as to be
of no consequence or, though
planned, never came about at
all. Thus, these 3 views comprise the full extent of my relationship with Holland.
In July 1966, I finally realized a long-held ambition when
my family and I arrived in Germany for a planned 3-year assignment (planned is the operative word here; things happen).
One major ambition, when I
left the Marines and enlisted in
the Army, was an assignment
in Europe. But from 1960 until 1966, events got in the way
of aspirations: training 2 years
in East Africa, 2 years in college, a year of war in Southeast
Asia, another year in Russian
language school... but finally,
an assignment to northern Germany.
Once settled, Herself and I
got right down to planning full
exploitation of the continent.
We scheduled a trip the following spring (1967) to the Netherlands for the tulip festival. Second year we reckoned we’d do
Spain, and in year 3, Italy. But
in the spring of ’67, Herself was
bedridden with pneumonia. We
But the responsibility lies with the legislature,
which placed the institution here in the1870s,
commissioned it to serve the needs of all West
Virginia students with vision or hearing loss,
and then has neglected to plow any significant
funds into updating the campus for 4 decades
or so.
The newest building on campus, the
Instructional Resource Center, is technically
not even a branch of WVSDB, and it’s more
than 30 years old.
The schools need an overhaul to educate
deaf and blind students for the 21st Century.
The first step is a $20 million request for a
new residential component that turns students’
living experience into a 24/7 education.
That’s what legislators will see on Dec. 9,
thanks to Ruth Rowan’s tireless efforts. That’s
what Charles Trump is pledging to push in the
state senate.
That’s where our hope lies. o
later made it south to Garmisch
in the Bavarian Alps, but no tulips.
That summer I was commissioned a warrant officer, and,
as I had to undergo a command
change with the grade change,
I was fortunately assigned to
the Bavarian region. At Bad
Aibling, we altered our outyear plans, choosing Italy first
as closer, then a year later to
Spain. We made a racing visit to
Venice and Rome in early ’68,
and waited for Spain. But a 2nd
tour in Vietnam erased those
plans. Curtailed from my German tour, I returned to the war.
Ironically, following that year
in ’Nam, I was transferred to
duty in Rome, about which I’ve
written often. But we never did
get to the tulip festival, and later, when I got to Holland, it was
late summer and the fields lay
fallow. My first Holland view,
though assiduously planned,
never happened.
The succeeding view was,
thankfully, another event that
never materialized. In Germany in the late 1960s, at the
height of the Cold War with
the Soviet Union, Army security agency assignments in Europe played out along the contentious borders between West
Germany-East Germany, and
West Germany-Czechoslovakia. Strategic planning devolved
Bob
FlanaGan
bits And pieces
around a common theme scenario in which Soviet troops
would strike into West Germany in a massive armored thrust
through the Fulda Gap, a central
European “alleyway” that cuts
through the mostly mountainous terrain, affording armor the
freedom to move effectively.
Intel activities and main force
preparations were all designed
to deny the Soviets this easy
route.
But in the strategic planning
for eventualities, someone has
to give thought to “what ifs” of
any and all scenarios. Even if
your military philosophy does
not embrace the notion of retreat — “a retrograde movement” as the weasel-worders
would have it — someone must
plan for such a dire eventuality. Thus it was that for those
relatively few of us scattered
about the landscape of northern
Germany without major NATO
forces for defense, the Op plan
for emergency (an attack from
the east) was simple: Get into
your privately owned vehicle and drive west to Holland,
room 417m, Bldg. 1
1900 Kanawha Blvd. e.
Charleston, WV 25305
Phone: 304-357-7980
[email protected]
gov
houSe of deLeGAteS
57th district
ruth rowan (r-Levels)
room 2r, Bldg. 1
1900 Kanawha Blvd. e.
Charleston, WV 25305
Phone: 304-340-3157
[email protected]
58th district
daryl Cowles (r-Berkeley
Springs)
room 258m, Bldg. 1
1900 Kanawha Blvd. e.
Charleston, WV 25305
Phone: 304-340-3177
[email protected]
where evacuation presumably
would be arranged.
This “plan” did not address
massing armor and artillery
along a definitive line, calling
in close air support and awaiting British main forces (we
served in the British zone) to
bail us out. There was no armor or artillery in the north; the
Brits were likely engrossed in
a darts match; and the weather
was so continuously, devastatingly bad as to prevent launching aircraft. No, we were on
our own, our military evacuation to include wives, kids, pets
and whatever impedimenta we
could amass in our VW Beetle. It was not a satisfactory arrangement, sadly wanting in
moral or morale support.
But other events dictating circumstances, we never had to
implement that emergency procedure. All the driving about
toward and to the border of
the Netherlands was done in a
peaceable frame of mind.
The 3rd view is of a more
practicable nature. In the fall
of 1984, some 8 years after
I retired from the Army and
worked for an electronics production corporation in Virginia,
one of my jobs was to produce
a film for the U.S. Air Force
about a proposed electronics intelligence warning system for
the future. To sell their proposal to Congress, the Air Force
contracted my company to produce a film, describing strategic
Editor:
PEIA take aways will cost members 40 million. For Employees and preMedicare Retirees
PEIA is looking at doubling deductibles, increasing copays on primary care- 33 percent, specialists -60 percent, and outpatient surgery/ER/ urgent Care -doubles. Also PEIA plans to stop coverage for impacted wisdom teeth, while doubling
generic drug copays to $20, or changing to 20
percent co-insurance.
Preferred Brand Name medications would increase to $50, or 20 percent to 30 percent. Specialty drug copays would double to $100, and
there would be $150 copays for nonpreferred
specialty medicines. PEIA is also considering a
$500 extra deductible for members who don’t
meet waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose/diabetes, or cholesterol guidelines. “Reference Based Pricing” could cause members to pay
more at perhaps 2/3 of their network providers
for numerous services and operations, or drive
up to 50 miles each way to avoid this.
Medicare /PEIA Retirees face a 300 percent to
500 percent increase in deductibles and Out of
Pocket Maximum increases from $750 to up to
$1200. Copays increase for primary physicians100 percent, for specialists office visits to $40,
and for hospitals 50 percent to 100 percent more.
Outpatient surgery copays double. Large premium increases are being considered. All this
while is spending PEIA funds on setting up farmer’s markets statewide for the public in general (a cause better financed by the state agriculture dept. rather than out of employee health insurance funds). Rather than adequately funding
PEIA, the state funds $25,000 tax credits for
those buying $50,000 trucks that run on natural
gas. 150 attended meeting in Beckley. Let’s triple that.
Please attend the public hearing to stop these
additional take away of benefits on Monday,
Nov. 17, 2014, 6 p.m.- Martinsburg Holiday Inn
- Foxcroft Ballroom, 301 Foxcroft Avenue, and
Tuesday, Nov. 18, at 6 p.m., Ramada Inn, Grand
Ballroom, 20 Scott Ave., Morgantown.
Marilyn Howells, Huntington o
and tactical situations in Germany and proposed future systems to deal with them. I traveled to Germany along with a
professional photographer and
a professional videographer to
get pictures and footage for our
film, for which I was to be writer and film editor.
Working our way across several training “battle zones,” we
found ourselves in northwest
Germany. On our own for a
weekend, we crossed the border to stroll about in Holland.
Movement then, among NATO
countries, was as easy as crossing the Virginia/West Virginia
line, though we hadn’t any force
units stationed in the Netherlands. Within a short time we
approached the town of Nijmegen, which I knew from World
War II history held a significant
place in the annals of that war.
As we drove in our rented Volvo across one of several bridges, I began noticing individuals
and clusters of American soldiers of the 82nd Airborne Division. There were military vehicles transporting squads of GIs
who seemed in a festive mood
for a military movement. And I
recalled the significance of Nijmegen...
On Sept. 17-25, 1944, a massive Allied campaign played out
in Holland as American, British and Polish forces launched
Operation Market Garden, a
combined airborne-ground assault that attempted to secure
critical bridges over rivers in 3
Dutch towns: Arnham, Eindhoven and Nijmegen. This was
to prevent the Germans from
destroying the bridges to deny
Allied access and clear routes
to the Ruhr, the industrialized
center of Germany — the Allied objective to end the war. A
parachute drop of the American
101st Airborne Division was
designed to take the bridges at
Eindhoven; farther north, the
British 1st Airborne Division
and the Polish Airborne Brigade
were to take Arnham; and the
American 82nd Airborne was
to secure Nijmegen crossings.
British XXX Corps would race
up Route 69 and relieve the airborne forces holding the bridges, et Voila! The Allies would
control the Rhine crossing.
Nijmegen, on that late summer day in 1984, was celebrating the 40th anniversary of that
seminal event, complete with
current-day members/units of
the 82nd Airborne. We 3 footloose yankees got drawn into
the rites, which provided for
me, finally, a solid tie to the
Netherlands... though I never did see those hundreds of
square miles of tulip fields in
bloom.
For a riveting, factual look
at Operation Market Garden,
watch the movie A Bridge Too
Far. There aren’t many defeats
that we publicize, but when
you’ve seen this film, you’ll understand the indulgence. o
hampshire review n
Wednesday, november 19, 2014
Eastern’s NewBiz
Launchpad to support
new business start-ups
Submitted by dAniEl silVEr
Think a business can’t start at a
community college? Think again. In
honor of Global Entrepreneurship Nov.
17-23, Eastern WV Community and
Technical College announced several
initiatives it is launching to help spur new
businesses, economic development and
entrepreneurship.
Last year, Eastern became part of an
elite group of colleges selected by the
Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation and
the Association of American Community
Colleges to join the Slingshot Network, a
group of only 20 community colleges from
across the nation focusing on approaches
to entrepreneurship and workforce and
economic development. Members aim to
make community colleges “a front door”
to entrepreneurship in their respective
communities.
“Nowhere is there a better place to be a
self-starter or innovator than in the Potomac
Highlands region of West Virginia,” said
Joe Kapp Entrepreneur-in-Resident at
Eastern. “And there is no better partner for
self-starters and innovators than Eastern
WV Community and Technical College.”
Over the past 12 months, Eastern
has
received
competitive
grants
from a variety of funders to focus on
entrepreneurship and establish the Institute
for Rural Entrepreneurship and Economic
Development (IREED). The funders, both
public and private, including the Claude
Worthington Benedum Foundation, the
Coleman Foundation, the WV Community
and Technical College System and the
Kauffman Foundation, all recognize the
value of entrepreneurship in energizing the
rural economy.
The grants will support 3 primary
IREED projects that include contracting
an Entrepreneur-in-Residence at Eastern;
establishing a business accelerator in
Wardensville; and commissioning an indepth study of the Potomac Highlands
economy to identify ongoing, upcoming
and future areas for strong economic
growth.
As Entrepreneur-in-Residence, Kapp
will work to kick-start entrepreneurship
across the region and inject creative
thinking to otherwise traditional economic
development models. In addition, he
will collaborate with existing area
businesses,
teach
entrepreneurship,
identify opportunities for new business
development and help businesses get off
the ground.
Eastern is also testing a NewBiz
Launchpad accelerator in Wardensville.
Wall
n
from Page 1A
“It was grueling,” he says.
“When the Seabees first got
there, they built buildings that
were not meant to last. We
repurposed the buildings.”
Back
stateside,
the
opportunity arose for him
to apply for the underwater
construction
team,
which
he jumped at for a couple of
reasons.
One is that it pays better,
something he wanted for the
family he hopes to build. He
Drivers
n
from Page 1A
As for those who still run the
red lights, Davis said that it’s
less of a “guessing game,” than
it’s ever been before.
“Technology has really caught
Motion
n
from Page 1A
the spring),” reads the motion,
“during the consultation specific
confidences related to the
allegations and her involvement
and the involvement of others at
the Potomac Center was relayed
to Ms. Frazer.”
“There is substantial risk
that information regarding Ms.
Vandevander’s
confidences
which were conveyed to Julie
Frazer may be used against her
and the Potomac Center in this
litigation,” it says.
Vandevander tells as much in
a sworn affidavit.
“I discussed my role and
participation regarding the facts
surrounding the allegations of
abuse and neglect … as well as
my personal feelings,” she says,
regarding what she told Frazer.
Robert Lorea, another attorney
for the claimant, said that his
office is taking the defense’s
motion “very seriously.”
“We don’t want somebody
saying we’re unethical at all,”
Lorea said. “We don’t think
this is what the rule is. But the
judge is proceeding carefully, it
seems, just as is everyone else
The building includes a retail floor facing
Wardensville’s Main Street. Adaptable to
many different kinds of businesses, the
accelerator also provides mentoring and
co-working areas for 8-12 start-ups and
meeting and conference room spaces for
training, lectures and other purposes.
“Wardensville is a primary gateway to
the Potomac Highlands from Washington,
D.C., and other major markets,” said
Barbara Ratcliff, mayor of Wardensville.
“We have a unique opportunity to utilize
this gateway to drive further new business
and economic development.
“We have so much to offer, from
convenience to major markets, access to
high-speed Internet and beautiful scenery.
It is a great place to start a business,” she
said.
As the driving force behind IREED,
Eastern will also sponsor an in-depth
Potomac Highlands economic analysis to
provide insights into areas that are ripe for
greater economic growth. The college has
identified Economic Modeling Specialist
Incorporated as a proven research firm
in the area of labor market and economic
analysis.
“EMSI will collect and process data to
illuminate many aspects of employment and
human resources,” said Eastern president
Chuck Terrell, “and identify the primary
factors driving eastern West Virginia’s
economy.” As it examines employment and
population growth trends and commuting
patterns and analyzes the workforce across
a variety of factors, the planned research
will highlight the most important industries
for the regions’ economic vitality.
“The study will also investigate the
qualities and features that make our region
unique,” Terrell emphasized, “and identify
additional industries and investors who
would find our geography and workforce
uniquely attractive for start-up, expansion
or relocation.”
“Because of Corridor H, and the
Fiber Optic ring developed by Hardy
Telecommunications, and our closeness
to D.C., northern Virginia and western
Maryland,” he pointed out, “the Potomac
Highlands is in a sweet spot to recruit and
support small business development.”
For more information about Eastern’s
financial aid opportunities, programs of
study, workforce training and community
education and events, call 304-434-8000
or toll-free 877-982-2322; or check the
college’s website at www.easternwv.edu.
Contact Joe Kapp at [email protected]
wvnet.edu for more information regarding
entrepreneurship opportunities. q
married Amy Maphis, his
high school sweetheart who is
studying nursing at Marshall
University, in April 2013. She’ll
be joining him in California
when she graduates next spring.
Another reason, he says, is
for the sense of community.
The Seabees, he notes,
constitute only a half a percent
of the 300,000-plus Navy. Out
of that, only about 120 are on
the 2 underwater construction
teams, 1 on the East Coast and
1 on the West.
“I wanted to do that because
it’s the most challenging
thing to do besides going into
combat,” Philip Wall says,
Division
of Forestry
gives tips for
preventing
fires
Submitted by nAnCY hArmAn
The West Virginia Division of
Forestry for Hampshire, Hardy and
Mineral counties has been experiencing
an increase in wildfires due to stove
ashes and leaf burning. These fires can
easily be prevented.
For stove ashes, put them in an airtight
metal container like a small galvanized
trash can with a lid. Make sure they
are completely cold before dumping
them out. Do not dump stove ashes into
areas with leaves or brush. The cost of
investing in an airtight container for
your stove ashes far outweighs the costs
of an escaped wildfire. your home and
property could be threatened as well
as those of your neighbors. The costs
associated with violating West Virginia’s
fire laws and citations have increased
substantially in recent years.
When burning leaves, make sure
you have at least a 10-foot safety strip
cleared to bare mineral soil around
the pile to be burned. Never burn on a
windy day. Leaves are very light, and
the slightest amount of wind can send a
burning leaf out of the pile and start a
wildfire before you know it. Stay with
the burning pile at all times, and make
sure you have a hose handy just in case.
If you don’t have to burn, don’t.
During hunting season all hunters are
urged to be safe out in the woods. A spark
from an ATV can start a wildfire with
all the leaves on the ground now. Make
sure any warming fires or campfires are
completely out before leaving them. And
to everyone, make sure your cigarette
butts are out completely when near dry
leaves or in the forest.
The Division of Forestry appreciate
everyone’s efforts to prevent wildfires.
This is just a reminder to be extra careful
this time of year.
The state’s fall forest fire season
started Oct. 1 and runs through Dec. 31.
During these 3 months, daytime burning
is prohibited from the hours of 7 a.m.
to 5 p.m. Outdoor burning is permitted
only between the hours of 5 p.m. and 7
a.m.
For more information about West
Virginia’s fire seasons and laws, check
out our website at www.wvforestry.com.
adding with a laugh. “Plus, it
sounds awesome anyway.”
At the end of the 20-year
career he expects to have, the
UCT experience will be a great
gateway into the private sector,
he says.
After all, in addition to the
electrical work he trained for on
dry land, UCT school phased
into all areas of construction
— welding, pouring concrete
underwater and, for these last
few weeks, demolition and
explosives.
“They train me here to do
anything,” he says of a program
that began tough physically,
then turned into more of a
up. It isn’t a guessing game of
whether we got the plate or not.
It’s just right there. If somebody
runs that red light, I take a still
shot of that video and that goes
right to the magistrate. Everything is listed right there so it’s
pretty cut and dry,” he said.
According to state code, any
driver guilty of overtaking a
stopped bus is guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction
for a first offense, shall be fined
not less than $150 or more than
$500 and could even spend up to
6 months in jail.
The state’s penalties get progressively more severe upon repeat offenses. o
involved.”
“We don’t think it’s unethical
and we don’t consider it a
conflict of interest,” Lorea
stressed.
No official ruling was
made during the last week’s
proceedings.
This is not the first time the
defense of the Potomac Center
has filed for a motion that
amounts to a stay in the civil
suit.
This summer, the defense
had filed a motion to stay the
trial until the end of a pending
criminal investigation.
The
defense’s
concern,
Mincer explained then, was that
witnesses of the alleged abuse
at the Potomac Center could be
incriminated by testifying in the
civil suit.
By virtue of witnessing these
crimes, those potentially called
to the stand could be criminally
charged, he said. For that, those
parties should be afforded legal
counsel, Mincer said, as well
as the right to plead the 5th
Amendment, which protects
people from self-incrimination.
In late August, Judge Charles
Parsons told both defense and
claimant counsels that some
resolution should be found
within 18 months of initial filing
in the case.
At the heart of the classaction civil suit are allegations
of cruelty and negligence that
led to the removal of 24 students
from the Potomac Center in
January.
The plaintiff of the case,
identified as T.D., is suing the
Potomac Center, on behalf
of his or her 17-year-old
developmentally disabled child,
identified as R.M.
The complaint combines the
cases of R.M.’s documented
abuse into a class-action lawsuit,
recognizing
those
alleged
instances of abuse as indicative
of problems across the center’s
intensive care program.
Mincer is representing the 3
parties in defense: The Potomac
Center as an institution, as
well as the center’s COO Kim
Helmstetter and CEO Rick
Harshbarger.
The
plaintiff’s
counsel
currently consists of Keaton
and 3 lawyers from Charlestonbased Bailey and Glasser —
Lorea, Jonathan Marshall and
Isaac Foreman. All are subject
to the motion to disqualify.
As long as the most recent
motion to disqualify is pending,
the case remains stayed. o
q
mental challenge.
“The first month it was a
beatdown, trying to weed out
the weak,” he says. “I was really
sore for the entire first month.”
John Wall says he’s not
surprised his son has joined this
elite Navy company.
“Philip has always been
the kind of person who
sets his goals high and will
accomplish those goals through
sheer
determination
and
willpower,” he says. “Philip has
a great life ahead.” o
To All
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T
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Grill
n
from Page 1A
On
Monday
afternoon,
waiters and waitresses-to-be
hustled through the gleaming
restaurant, readying themselves
for what will likely prove to be
a busy season ahead. The booths
and tables have been placed.
The grills are set and clean. The
Christmas decorations were up.
There’s not much else to do, the
Stotlers said, other than to train
the staff.
The new restaurant —
cleverly built to look like 4
small-town buildings, harkening
back to the family-friendly days
of yesteryear — is more than
twice the size of the Grill’s
Slanesville location, which
they’re currently calling the
Main Street Diner, Jodi said.
Now, they’re taking full
advantage of all the new
breathing room with a large,
Project
n
from Page 1A
would be common areas as well,
Leighton said. Those would include a lounge, a playground
and laundry facilities, as well
as off-street parking. There is a
real emphasis on natural space,
too, he said. At least 30 percent
of the grounds would be considered “green.”
In all, what Leighton envisions
is a project that would hold 80 to
100 people, though in order for
a applicant to be accepted as a
resident, they would have to
meet income requirements, pass
a background check and a credit
check, too.
Income would have to fall
between, locally, about $19,000
and $44,000 in order to qualify.
Anticipated rents would be
based on AMHI, or Adjusted
Median Household Income.
For 50 percent AMHI:
• a 1-bedroom townhouse
would cost $474 per month;
• a 2-bedroom townhouse
would cost $531 per month;
• a 3-bedroom townhouse
would cost $615 per month.
In all these cases, the tenant
will be expected to pay their gas
and electric bills.
Leighton said that the project
would bring from 10 to 30
temporary jobs to the county
during the construction phase
and 2 full-time jobs after — that
of a maintenance manager and a
property manager.
He estimated $20,000 in
property taxes each year, as
well.
The
purpose
of
the
presentation, however, was two-
5A
separate banquet room, which
features full-service in-house
catering. The room itself seats
about 50 people, has a gas
fireplace and a video setup that’s
even PowerPoint ready.
The Stotlers said they could
envision the space serving as
a perfect place to hold a baby
shower or a business conference,
for instance.
As part of the new digs, the
Main Street Grill will also be
launching an online ordering
system, too. Oh, and this new
building comes with its very
own side entrance for pickup,
too.
The hours of operation for the
Grill will be Sunday through
Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. and
Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m.
until 10 p.m.
For
more
information,
including putting in those orders
after Dec. 1, call 304-822-GRIL
(4745) or go online to www.
mainstgrillromney.com. o
fold: Leighton not only wanted
to convince commissioners that
his project was a sound one, but
to receive an assurance from the
county that he had their support.
These assurances were crucial
to the application process for
housing tax credits, Leighton
said. Anywhere from 80 to
90 percent of funding for the
project comes from these stateissued tax credits, and the
process to get those is “highly
competitive,” he said,
In order to get a leg up on
competition around the state —
about 35 applications vie for 10
approvals each year, Leighton
estimated — the project
needs to have written proof of
“unqualified support” of local
government.
“Without
the
local
government’s
say-so,
it’s
virtually impossible to get these
tax credits,” he said.
Though the name and location
of the project has yet to be
decided, at several junctures in
the conversation, commissioners
noted the former Hampshire
Memorial Hospital building in
Romney as a potential site.
“Nothing is cast in concrete,”
said Leighton, adding that if
the location of the building is
to be determined as that site, he
said he’d need the support of
Romney Mayor Dan Hileman,
as well.
After the presentation, the
commission
unanimously
agreed to write a letter in support
Leighton’s project.
Leighton’s West Virginia
Community Builders LLC has
been responsible for 2 similar
projects in the Mountain State
already, one in Gilmer County
and another in Upshur. o
Hampshire County
Christmas Food Box
Program (HCCFBP)
PLEASE NOTE THAT ALL 2014 FORMS MUST BE SUBMITTED TO
THE ROMNEY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH TO BE CONSIDERED.
NO OTHER LOCATION WILL ACCEPT THE FORMS.
Romney Christmas Food Boxes have been distributed to families
in Hampshire County for over 30 years. Last year over 260 boxes
were given to needy individuals and families.
The HCCFBP anticipates a similar need this year and is asking
the public and local merchants to contribute and participate.
Residents can help by making monetary donations to the
Hampshire County Christmas Food Box Program. Checks should be
made payable to Romney Presbyterian Church, marked Christmas
Boxes, and mailed to 100 W. Rosemary Lane, Romney, WV 267571632, or delivered to the office of the church. Volunteers are
needed Dec. 13 at 8 a.m. at the Army Reserve Center to pack
boxes.
Referrals for 2014 can only be made by self, a church or civic
organization. No other personal referrals will be accepted. Valid
IDs, i.e., drivers license, WV Med. Card must match the address
given on the attached form and one family will be considered one
household. Only the Christmas Food Box Referral Form will be
accepted.
Please complete the form below and mail to: Hampshire County
Christmas Food Box Program, 100 W. Rosemary Lane, Romney,
WV 26757. For additional information call Romney Presbyterian
Church at 304-822-5083.
2014 Hampshire County
Christmas Food Box Program Referral Form
Over
70,000
Sold
SAVINGS COUPON
RYES! Please accept my order
for the Hometown Cookbook for
only $16.99 + $4.97 s/h.
Order your copy today Call FREE to (800) 715-6248
Name____________________________________________________
Complete Address: (Must be Hampshire County and match valid ID)
Street____________________________________________________
City________________________________ WV Zip________________
Number of individuals in family_______________________________
(There will be only one size box given regardless of family size)
Name
Phone Number ____________________________________________
Address
Name of organization (or self) making referral__________________
City
State
Zip
Make checks payable to: $PHULFDQ3URÀOH
Dept. _ _ _ _ _ _, P.O. Box 344,
Louisiana, MO 63353
Includes our 90-day, money back GUARANTEE
Residents of CA, TN, IL, MO and NY add state sales tax.
Please allow 1-3 weeks for delivery.
_____
Key Code: _490009
A telephone number must appear on the application. If the
household does not have a phone, the phone number of a relative,
neighbor or friend must appear on the application and be identified.
All households scheduled to receive a food box will be notified.
Applications must be received by Wednesday, December 3,
2014.
Families selected to receive a food box must pick up their box at
the Romney Army Reserve Center, Route 28, at the Industrial Park
between 10 a.m. and noon, Saturday, Dec. 13. Distribution will not
begin before 10 a.m. and will end promptly at 12 noon.
6A
State
Hampshire
Review
@
Hampshire
Review.com
Wednesday, November 19, 2014
Freda Tomblin, governor’s mother, dies at 80
The Associated Press
1
Around
CHARLESTON
—
t h e s tat e
Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin’s
mother, Freda Mae Tomb2
lin, has died. She was 80.
The governor said Sunday
in a news release that his
mother died Saturday
3
surrounded by family and
friends.
She was a resident of
Chapmanville.
The governor says his
mother taught him the
importance of education,
hard work and caring for
others.
At t h e
Other survivors include
capitol
1
her husband, Earl; her son,
Carl Edward Tomblin of
Chapmanville; and a sister, Sue Shepherd board
approves in-state tuition
Murray of Hagerstown, Md.
Evans Funeral Home in Chap- increases
CHARLESTON — Famimanville is in charge of arrangelies of West Virginia-based
ments.
H
organ donors were recognized
this weekend during a memorial
ceremony in Charleston.
The Center for Organ Recover
and Education held its 3rd annual A Special Place ceremony
on Sunday at the Clay Center for
the Arts and Sciences.
Speakers included a heart transplant recipient and a physician
whose grandson was an organ
donor.
The Pittsburgh-based center
It will be the first time in
the history of the current state
capitol building in Charleston,
dedicated in 1932, that members
of the Republican Party will
sit in the majority offices.
And Delegate Tim Armstead,
R-Kanawha, is in line to be the
speaker of the 100-member
House of Delegates.
Across the hall in the
34-member state Senate, Sen.
Bill Cole, R-Mercer, is expected
to become the first Republican
in several decades to hold
the office of president of the
Senate. Admittedly, after the
results of the Nov. 4 statewide
general election were reported,
the membership in the Senate
appeared to be a tie with 17
Democrats and 17 Republicans.
But then Sen. Daniel Hall,
D-Wyoming, decided to
switch his political party to the
Republican side in the Senate,
which gave the GOP an 18-16
edge and a chance to elect the
Senate president. Even though
current Senate minority leader
is Sen. Mike Hall, R-Putnam, it
is expected that Sen. Cole will
emerge as the first GOP Senate
president since the days of the
great depression.
Delegate Armstead is
convinced Republicans can
move the state forward now that
they have gained control in both
the House of Delegates and
state Senate. It will be the first
time in the history of the current
Capitol building — dedicated in
1932 — that Republicans will
sit in the majority offices.
Armstead is well aware that
he and his Senate counterpart —
presumably Sen. Cole — will
need to work with Democrat
Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin.
Armstead also has indicated he
plans to have open discussions
with member of both parties —
a practice that he explained was
not always the case when the
Republicans were the minority
party.
The official designations
of the new leaders in both
the House of Delegates and
the state Senate won’t be
declared until the 2015 regular
session convenes at noon on
Wednesday, Jan. 14.
But Armstead and other GOP
leaders in both chambers are
already considering revisions
to the state’s antiquated tax
structure. He said it has to be
changed to foster economic
growth in West Virginia.
The state’s current education
system suffers from bloated
bureaucracy, according to
Armstead. He points to the
fact that while West Virginia
ranks near the top in per capita
education spending while at
the same time raking near the
bottom in K-12 achievement.
And he is adamant about
Tom
Miller
under the dome
avoiding tax increases.
“I don’t think West Virginians
can handle additional taxes,”
he told a Charleston newspaper
reporter.
***
Meanwhile, the shift in the
state Senate from Democrat
to Republican leadership as
a result of the recent general
election results has caused
an initiative to revitalize the
struggling southern coal fields
in West Virginia to be put
on hold, Sen. Mike Green,
D-Raleigh, said last week.
The fate of the Southern
Coalfields Organizing and
Revitalizing the Economy
initiative, or SCORE, is now
up to Senate Republicans.
Three Senate Democrats on the
13-member SCORE pan lost,
including Green; Sen. Truman
Chafin, D-Mingo and Sen. Greg
Tucker, D-Nicholas.
The SCORE group has a
broad initial plan to improve
conditions in the state’s
southern counties, including
increased tourism advertising,
education and workforce
development and retraining.
Sen. Bill Cole, R-Mercer,
is considered one of the
likely candidates for the
job of Senate president. He
represents southern coalproducing counties and both
he and Delegate Armstead, the
anticipated new speaker of the
House of Delegates, realize they
will need to work with Gov.
Earl Ray Tomblin, a Democrat,
during the next 2 years.
***
Finally, construction of the
Korean War Veterans Memorial
in Marion County is about one
third completed, but work has
been halted until more money
can be raised to complete the
project. C. Rick Hardman,
designer for the memorial, has
been involved with the project
since 2007.
Initially, the memorial was
to be constructed on donated
property near Prickett’s Fort,
but there were obstacles,
including a water line that
ran through the middle of the
property. So a 2nd site was
recommended at the edge of
East Marion County Park along
Interstate 79 and Hardman
said he altered his design “to
accommodate the new site.”
The park includes a wave pool
and picnic pavilion with the
new memorial located on the
edge near the I-79 bridge that
is part of the gateway into
Fairmont. q
Romney Historic Landmark Commission
is accepting nominations for the
West Virginia History Hero Award
The purpose of this award is to give state-level recognition
to ONE individual per year for dedicated service and significant
contribution to state or local history through research, interpretation, preservation, publication or website presentation.
Please submit nominations to:
Romney Historic Landmark Commission
340 E. Main Street
Romney, West Virginia 26757
Attention: Royce B. Saville, President
DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION – DECEMBER 15, 2014
For questions, please contact Eileen M. Johnson at
304-822-5118 ext.105 or [email protected]
FRANKLIN — A Pendleton
County judge has prohibited
No administrative fees. Every cent received is used to buy NEW winter clothing!
WARM T
CHILDREN
We’re asking
you again to
please help
2
Senate eyes
tax structure
revisions
Pendleton judge bars
club’s nude, seminude
dancing
3
ordinance’s restrictions on
where
adult
entertainment
venues can be located.
Carl issued his ruling earlier
this month, according to media
sources.
The attorney for the cabaret’s
owners, Floyd M. Sayre III, tells
the newspaper that he expects
his clients will appeal the ruling
to the West Virginia Supreme
Court. o
nude or seminude dancing at a
cabaret.
Circuit Judge H. Charles Carl
III’s ruling says a 2005 county
ordinance regulating exotic
entertainment was properly
enacted. Carl granted the
county’s request for a permanent
injunction barring nude or
seminude dancing at the Golden
Angels Cabaret in Brandywine.
The ruling also says the
cabaret is in violation of the
works with donor families and
health care professionals to coordinate the surgical recovery
of organs, tissues and corneas
for transplants. It also facilitates
matching donated organs and
placement of corneas.
HE
Providing Warm Winter Clothing For Needy
Children in Hampshire County
Like every year in the past, the need is great this year. In Hampshire County, needy children will go cold
this winter without your help. We’re setting a goal of $30,000 to clothe over 550 kids.
Just what is the Warm the Children Program?
It’s neighbors helping neighbors in Hampshire County. And it’s even readers from across the United States
who send donations to this worthwhile cause. It’s also organizations throughout the county holding fundraisers to help out. The program is asking you to donate to the fund, and the proceeds will be used to buy warm
winter clothing for needy kids. There are no administrative fees. All the money donated is used to
buy warm winter clothing.
How will the children’s clothing be purchased?
Thank You
From All
The Needy
Children In
Hampshire
County!
The Warm The Children team of volunteers will shop for the warm clothing after they receive
the applications.
How can I help?
Simply complete the form below and send it with your donation to the address on the
coupon. And thanks for your generosity. All donations are tax deductible.
If you have time to volunteer to help, please call Patty at 304-671-2369.
Sponsoring organizations: Hampshire Review, The Bank of Romney, FNB, Eastern West Virginia
Community Action and Romney Rotary Club.
CLIP AND MAIL
Enclosed is my donation to the Warm The Children Fund. Make checks payable to Warm the Children Fund.
Mail To Either Location:
Warm the Children Fund
FNB Bank
P.O. Box 1037
Romney, WV 26757
Name: ____________________________________
Address: __________________________________
_________________________________________
Warm The Children Fund
The Bank of Romney
P.O. Box 876
Romney, WV 26757
❑ Check here if you do not want your name published in the Hampshire Review.
Providing Warm Winter Clothing for needy Children
Warm the Children Application
Deadline for Submitting Application is November 21, 2014
Parent’s Name: _________________________________
Phone (Required) ____________________________
Second Contact: ________________________________
Phone (Required) ____________________________
Address: _______________________________________
SS#: ______________________________________
City ___________________________________________
State: _________________ Zip:________________
Children from newborn through age 16 as of Nov. 1, 2014 are eligible. Please enter child’s sizes as if you were shopping for new
winter clothing for them. If you need help filling out forms call Community Action 304-822-5584 or Patty at 304-671-2369
Child 1
Child 2
Child 3
Child 4
Child 5
M_______ F_______
M_______ F_______
M_______ F_______
M_______ F_______
M_______ F_______
Age_______
Age_______
Age_______
Age_______
Age_______
Height_______
Height_______
Height_______
Height_______
Height_______
Weight_______
Weight_______
Weight_______
Weight_______
Weight_______
Shoe Size_______
Shoe Size_______
Shoe Size_______
Shoe Size_______
Shoe Size_______
Sock Size_______
Sock Size_______
Sock Size_______
Sock Size_______
Sock Size_______
Please circle only 1 size per child
Size (Circle One)
Children’s Sizes
3 mo.
6
6 mo
8
12 mo.
10
18 mo
12
2T
14
3T
14
4T
18
5T
Size (Circle One)
Children’s Sizes
3 mo.
6
6 mo
8
12 mo.
10
18 mo
12
2T
14
3T
14
4T
18
5T
Size (Circle One)
Children’s Sizes
3 mo.
6
6 mo
8
12 mo.
10
18 mo
12
2T
14
3T
14
4T
18
5T
Size (Circle One)
Children’s Sizes
3 mo.
6
6 mo
8
12 mo.
10
18 mo
12
2T
14
3T
14
4T
18
5T
Size (Circle One)
Children’s Sizes
3 mo.
6
6 mo
8
12 mo.
10
18 mo
12
2T
14
3T
14
4T
18
5T
Adult Sizes For Teens
Adult Sizes For Teens
Adult Sizes For Teens
Adult Sizes For Teens
Adult Sizes For Teens
S
S
S
S
S
M
L
XL
M
L
XL
M
L
XL
M
L
XL
M
L
XL
Larger Size
Larger Size
Larger Size
Larger Size
Larger Size
(Please specify)
(Please specify)
(Please specify)
(Please specify)
(Please specify)
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
_______________
I will not hold the Hampshire Review or all other sponsoring organizations, the store where purchases are made or any volunteer
liable in any way.
Parent or Guardian’s Signature_____________________________________________ Date________________
Items Picked Up By
Initials__________
deadline for Submitting applications is november 21, 2014
Please mail to Eastern West Virginia Community Action, P.O. Box 496, Romney, W.Va. 26757 or return this Date ___________
application to Eastern West Virginia Community Action, 134 West Sioux Lane, Suite 4, Romney, W.Va.
304-822-5584
hampshire review n
Wednesday, november 19, 2014
7A
oBituAriEs
mary louise Athey
Mary Louise Athey, 84, of Stephens City, Va., died Tuesday,
Nov. 11, 2014, at Blue Ridge Hospice Care Center in Winchester,
Va.
Born Dec. 29, 1929, in Jefferson County, she was the daughter
of the late Thomas H. and Annie Gruber White. Also preceding her
in death were her husband, Marvin D. Athey, whom she married
Jan. 24, 1948, in Hagerstown, Md., and who died Oct. 4, 2014; a
son, Thomas Athey; 2 brothers, Douglas and Norman White; and
2 sisters, Kathleen Bradley and Dorothy Linton.
She was a loving wife, mother and grandmother. She was
a member of the Valley Bible Church in Stephens City and the
Ladies Auxiliary Moose Lodge 948 in Charles Town.
Surviving are 4 sons, Ronnie Athey and Jerry Athey, both
of Winchester, Glen “Skeeter” Athey and wife Shirley of Capon
Bridge and Timmy Athey of Stephens City; 2 daughters, Jean
Nicholson and husband Tom of Winchester and Lela Athey of
Bloomery; 9 grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren.
A funeral service was held at Giffin Funeral Home & Crematory
in Capon Bridge, on Friday, Nov. 14, with pastor Calvin Lowder
officiating.
Inurnment will be private. q
david l. Baker
David L. Baker, 78, of Wardensville, died Wednesday, Nov. 12,
2014, near his home.
Born Sept. 25, 1936, in Parkersburg, he was the son of the late
William and Pauline Wigner Baker.
He and his brothers owned and operated Baker Boy Ice Cream in
Gaithersburg, Md. After that, he was known as the “Goody Man”
in the Maryland and Washington, D.C., areas. Wanting to be closer
to home, he opened 2 successful restaurants in Mercersburg, Pa.
He had been retired for the last 12 years in the mountains of West
Virginia, enjoying the beauty of the area. During his retirement
years he chose to work part-time at Wal-Mart, which he enjoyed.
He was an avid hunter and passed away peacefully in his tree stand
doing exactly what he loved. He deeply loved his God, family
and friends.
Surviving are his wife of 57 years, Barbara W. Baker; a son,
David W. Baker and wife Melanie; 2 daughters, Kimberley Twine
and husband Ed and Jennifer Immel and husband Jim; 3 brothers,
John Baker, Tommy Baker and Bobby Baker; 7 grandchildren;
and 7 great-grandchildren.
A funeral service was held at Loy-Giffin Funeral Home
in Wardensville Sunday, Nov. 16, with pastor Joe Quesenberry
officiating.
Private interment followed at the Mt. Vernon Cemetery near
Wardensville.
Memorial contributions may be made to Wardensville Volunteer
Rescue Squad, P.O. Box 2, Wardensville, WV 26851 or Capon
Valley Volunteer Fire Company, P.O. Box 308, Wardensville, WV
26851.q
Wilma jo delawder
Wilma Jo Delawder, 81, of Paw Paw, died
Saturday, Nov. 15, 2014, at her home.
Born Oct. 21, 1933, in Leighton, Ky., she
was the daughter of the late Riley and Cordelila
Cox Fox. Also preceding her in death were
her husband, Jack W. Delawder, whom she
married April 8, 1953, in Cumberland, Md.,
and who died Jan. 29, 1995; a granddaughter,
Dacia Spellman; and 2 brothers, Norris and
Elson Fox.
She was a member of Paw Paw Church of Christ where she
served as a Sunday school teacher. She and her husband fostered
a number of children.
Surviving are 3 sons, Larry J. Delawder and wife Robin, David
W. Delawder and wife Chris and Jack S. Delawder and wife Beth,
all of Paw Paw; a daughter, Mary J. Bradford of Paw Paw; 2
sisters, Iva L. Hough and husband Jim of Spencer, Ind., and Dinah
L. Jones and husband Steve of Greenwood Ind.; 9 grandchildren;
6 great-grandchildren; numerous nieces and nephews; and her
loyal companion, Minnie.
A funeral service was held at Paw Paw Church of Christ
Tuesday, Nov. 18, with minister Richard White officiating.
Interment followed at Camp Hill Cemetery in Paw Paw.
Memorial contributions may be made to the Hospice of the
Panhandle, 278 N. High St., Romney, WV 26757 or Paw Paw
youth League, 715 Henry Miller Highway, Paw Paw, WV 25434.
Arrangements were by Giffin Funeral Home & Crematory in
Capon Bridge. q
linda V. newlon day gross
Linda V. Newlon Day Gross, 68, of Paw
Paw, was called home by the Lord Saturday,
Nov. 15, 2014.
Born May 8, 1946, she was the daughter
of the late John William Newlon and Elsie
G. Carter. Also preceding her in death were
2 brothers, John Wayne Newlon and Clem
“Dick” Newlon; and her first husband, Lloyd
Day.
She was a homemaker.
Surviving are her husband, Carson E. Gross of Paw Paw; 2 sons,
Kenneth Day and wife Latonya and Carson E. Gross Jr., all of Paw
Paw; 2 daughters, Karen Hott and husband Phil and Mary Ott and
fiancé Kevin, all of Paw Paw; 8 granddaughters, Jill Whitacre and
husband Jason of Capon Bridge, Jamie Ott and fiancé Eric, Sierra
Hott, Lauren Ott, Jordan Price, Laken Day and Janae Hott, all
of Paw Paw, and Carlin Gross of Berkeley Springs; 3 grandsons,
Andy Day, Kegan Day and Carter Gross, all of Paw Paw; 3 greatgrandchildren, Brantly Whitacre, Lilah Watkins and Adalynn Ott.
Her body was donated to the West Virginia Human Gift Registry
in Morgantown.
The family will receive friends from 5-7 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 23,
at Kimble Funeral Home, Paw Paw.
Memorials may be made to Hospice of the Panhandle. q
Verdie Virginia mongold
Verdie Virginia Mongold, 91, of Bergton, Va., formerly of
Baker, died Monday, Nov. 10, 2014, at her daughter’s home.
Born Oct. 17, 1923, in Arkansaw, she was the daughter of the
late James and Maggie Gochenour Smith. Also preceding her in
death were a brother, Ivan Smith; and 4 sisters, Daisy Combs,
Esther Heishman, Goldie Bradfield and Geneneive Smith.
She was a member of the Zion Lutheran Church in Arkansaw.
Surviving are a daughter, Madeline D. Carr and husband Delmas
of Bergton; 2 grandsons, Travis Carr and wife Jennifer and James
Carr and wife Katie; a great-grandson, Tanner Carr; and numerous
nieces and nephews.
A funeral service was held at Zion Lutheran Church Saturday,
Nov. 15, with pastor Gary Koontz officiating.
Interment followed at the church cemetery.
Memorial contributions may be made to the Zion Lutheran
Church, P.O. Box 250, Baker, WV 26801.
Arrangements were by the Loy-Giffin Funeral Home in
Wardensville. q
Smith Funeral Home
Now Serving You With Two Locations
85 South Main Street, Keyser, WV 26726
304-788-3781
lowell “lody” m. nelson
Lowell “Lody” M. Nelson, 91, passed away
peacefully Thursday, Nov. 6, 2014, at home.
Born Nov. 29, 1922, in a historic building
in Romney that was once an inn that George
Washington stayed in while surveying the area,
she was the daughter of the late Albert K. Martin
and Ollie S. Loy. She kept a wooden nail from
the building she was so proud of. Also preceding
her in death were her husband, Richard Raymond
Nelson; 6 siblings; a grandchild and a great-grandchild.
She attended school in Romney. When she was younger, she once
mistook a skunk for a kitty and brought it to one of her cousin’s
birthday party. The party was ruined but continued to be a funny
memory talked about for many years. One of her most prized
possessions was an autograph she received when she met Eleanor
Roosevelt. During World War II she worked at the Pentagon, where
she met her husband, Richard, who was career U.S. Navy. She had
a wonderful sense of humor and loved to pull the hair on men’s
legs when she volunteered at the navy hospital. She loved visiting
patients and brought cheer to patients, nurses and doctors alike. She
served anywhere that she was asked to serve. She loved to interact
with people and especially loved to hear people laugh. She was an
avid member of many organizations including Emanuel Lutheran
Church, Son of Norway, Bremerton, Wash., Ladies Auxiliary of the
Fleet Reserve, Good Star Wives and the Red Cross.
Surviving are 2 sons, Ronald A. Nelson and William Rogers;
2 daughters, Melinda S. Noriega and Jan A. Robinson; 13
grandchildren; 27 great-grandchildren; 4 great-great-grandchildren;
and numerous nieces and many friends whom she uplifted and made
laugh.
A memorial service will be held at the Pittsburg LDS Chapel in
Kennewick, Wash., Saturday, Nov. 29, at 11 a.m.
Inurnment will take place at Arlington National Cemetery at a
later date.
Arrangements are being handled by Einan’s at Sunset, Richland,
Wash. q
dayton A. “Pete” omps jr.
Dayton A. “Pete” Omps Jr., 84, of Berkeley
Springs, died Friday, Nov. 14, 2014, at
Winchester Medical Center, Winchester, Va.
Born Feb. 5, 1930, in Frederick County, Va.,
he was the son of the late Dayton Adam Omps
Sr. and Icy Virginia Puffinberger Omps. Also
preceding him in death were 2 brothers, Jerry
and Donnie; 3 sisters, Marie, Lola Mae and
Martha; a grandchild, Bobby Omps Jr.; and 2
great-grandchildren, Aiden and Charlie.
He worked for the West Virginia Department of Transportation
where he was a supervisor and a road grader operator. He also held
many positions for various other companies. He was an avid hunter,
fisherman and loved to go camping.
Surviving with his wife of 66 years, Susie Mendola Puffinberger
Omps, whom he married Aug. 21, 1948, in Winchester, are a son,
Bobby Omps and wife Crystal of Berkeley Springs; 5 daughters,
Joann Neundorff and husband Brian of Richmond, Va., Alice Weigle
and husband Mike of Hedgesville, Peggy Waugh and husband Curtis;
Ginger McCumbee and husband Jimmy and Ruth Ann Omps and
husband Kevin, all of Berkeley Springs; a granddaughter/daughter,
Talitha Sue “Ty” Omps; a brother, William “Buck” Omps; a sister,
Bessie Bowers; 18 grandchildren; 14 great-grandchildren; 3 greatgreat grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews.
A funeral service will be held at Giffin Funeral Home & Crematory
in Capon Bridge, Wednesday (today), Nov. 19, at 1 p.m.
Interment will follow in Salem Cemetery near Whitacre, Va.
Memorial contributions may be made to the Omps family, c/o
Giffin Funeral Home, P.O. Box 100, Capon Bridge, WV 26711. q
Carl opie Payne
Carl Opie Payne, 76, of Romney, passed away Tuesday, Nov. 11,
2014, at Hampshire Long Term Care.
Born Jan. 6, 1938, in Ripley, he was the son of the late Opie and
Myrtle Gandy Payne. Also preceding him in death were 3 sisters,
Ruth Haslacker, Margaret Bitner and Pauline Brown.
He worked as a landscaper for Government Service Agency where
he did landscaping at the White House under various presidents and
also at Wolf Trap. He then started his own landscaping company,
Payne’s Landscaping, until retirement. He was an avid Washington
Redskins fan.
Surviving are 2 daughters, Carla Kay Musselman of Romney and
Joyce Brinson of Nokesville, Va.; 2 sisters, Reva Corbin of Romney
and Barbara Booze of Winchester, Va.; and 5 grandchildren, Jamie
Helmick, Amie Helmick, Edward Scholl III, Lisa Lonchiadis and
Lindsey Musselman.
Funeral services were held Saturday, Nov. 15, in McKee Funeral
Home Chapel, Augusta, with pastor Don Kesner officiating.
Interment followed in Ebenezer Cemetery, Romney. q
Look For
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Alma jean rinker
Alma Jean Rinker, 72, of Purgitsville, died Saturday, Nov. 15,
2014, at her residence.
Born Aug. 2, 1942, in Rada, she was the daughter of the late
Ellis Eugene and Alma Frances Rinker See. Also preceding her in
death were several infant children.
She was a graduate of Romney High School, Class of 1960.
She was employed as a seamstress at Kinney Shoe Company,
Romney, until its closing. She was a homemaker and served
her family well as a great babysitter. She loved working jigsaw
puzzles with the children and anyone else who cared to join in
the fun. Her life was greatly touched by her special caregiver and
friend, Kelly Burgess. She was a generous and caring person who
showered her love on all she met.
Surviving are her husband, Edward “Eddie” C. Rinker of
Purgitsville; a son, Eugene C. Rinker and wife Brittany of
Purgitsville; a daughter, Annette Evans and husband Lowell of
Fisher; a brother, Donnie E. See of Romney; 2 sisters, Emily
Shingleton of Purgitsville and Linda Weaver of Fort Ashby; 8
grandchildren, Cassie, Lindsey, Kiersten and Tristen Rinker
and Krysta, Ashlie, Corey and Cera Wehland; and 4 greatgrandchildren, Secret, Abriella, Ember and Owen.
A graveside service will be held Wednesday (today), Nov.
19, at 11 a.m. at Elijah High Cemetery, Purgitsville, with pastor
Loretta Brinker officiating.
Arrangements are under the direction of Shaffer Funeral Home,
Romney. q
Paula gail nesmith
Paula Gail Nesmith, 67, of Capon Bridge,
died Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014, at Hospice
of the Panhandle Inpatient Care Center
in Kearneysville.
Born Jan. 9, 1947, in Winchester, Va., she was
the daughter of the late Russell A. and Alma
Hahn Nesmith.
She was a graduate of Capon Bridge High
School, Class of 1964, Shepherd College in
1968 with an art degree and West Virginia University in 1972 with
Michell St. or North
Fairfax St. (Across from
a master’s degree in library science. She was a librarian for Capon
Pastor Tom
Industrial Park Entrance)
Bridge Junior High School for 3 years and at John Handley High
and Bunny
Rt. 28 N. • Romney WV
Gulbronson
School for 41 years. She was also a farmer. She was a member of the
www.romneyassembly.org
304-822-4263
Shiloh United Methodist Church in Lehew, where she was a trustee,
Pastor Jim &
Sunday school teacher and choir member. She was also member of
Springfield Assembly
Rhonda Mou
the Virginia Education Association, Hampshire County Farm Bureau
Romney
of God Church
and vice president of the Hampshire County Historical Society, Fort
Assembly of God
Edwards Foundation and Fort Mill Ridge Foundation. She was an
Worship Services
Worship Services
Morning Worship 8:15 & 10:30 a.m.
avid collector of glassware and pottery.
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School Adult & Children 9:30 a.m.
Surviving are her fiancé, Robert A. Smith of Rio; a
Morning Worship 10:45 a.m.
Sunday Evening Youth (age 12-20) 5:30 p.m.
Sunday Night 6:30 p.m.
stepmother, Madeline Billmeyer Bott Nesmith of Wardensville; an
and Adult 6:30 p.m. • Wednesday Evenings 6:30 p.m.
Wednesday Family & Youth Group
uncle, Clyde O. “Joe” Nesmith of yellow Spring; 2 aunts, Creola
Night 7 p.m.
Rt.
28, Springfield, WV • 304-298-3993
Run Weekly as a 2x2 ad Hampshire Review Press
Gray of Winchester and Carol Spaid of Olney, Md.; a stepsister,
Janie Mathias of Augusta; and numerous cousins and friends.
A funeral service was held at Shiloh United Methodist
Church Saturday, Nov. 15, with the Rev. Michael Funkhouser and
the Rev. Deborah Shreve officiating.
Interment followed at the church cemetery.
Memorial contributions may be made to the Shiloh United
Methodist Church Pavilion Fund, c/o Henry Krautwurst, P.O. Box
308, Capon Springs, WV 26823.
Arrangements were handled by Giffin Funeral Home & Crematory
in Capon Bridge. q
Rt. 2, Box 1-A, Burlington, WV 26710
304-289-3727
liam mitchell Elliott Prosser
Liam Mitchell Elliott Prosser, 8 months, of Springfield, passed
away Tuesday, Nov. 11, 2014, at Hampshire Memorial Hospital,
Romney.
Born March 7, 2014, in Winchester, Va., he was the son of Josh
Kesner and Tosha Ann Marie Prosser. He was preceded in death
by a great-grandfather, Ike Grimm.
Surviving with his parents are maternal grandparents, Tom and
Holly Cowie of Romney; paternal grandparents, Mark Kesner
of Augusta and Terry Grimm of Springfield; paternal greatgrandparents, Brooks and Avery Kesner of Shanks and Janet
Grimm of Springfield; and godmother, Brittany Labossiere of
Morgantown.
Funeral services were conducted Friday, Nov. 14, at Christ
Community Church in Augusta, with pastor Don Kesner
officiating.
Interment followed at Ebenezer Cemetery Romney.
All arrangements were handled by McKee Funeral Home of
Augusta. q
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hampshire review
Wednesday, november 19, 2014
W.Va. doctor on Ebola battlefront
jim King review Staff
A West Virginia doctor with ties to
Romney has joined the fight against the
deadly Ebola virus on its home turf in
West Africa.
“Dorms are OK. Cold water, lots of
bugs and very hot,” Dr. Rebecca Reece
emailed to friends and family upon her
arrival in Liberia last weekend.
She is the granddaughter of the Rev.
Richard Reece of Romney. Rebecca
and her twin sister, Jo, grew up in the
Wyoming County community of Mullens
and graduated from WVU’s medical
school together in 2008.
Jo Reece is on the faculty at WVU now
while Becky has been doing research
at Brown University Medical Center.
Becky’s schedule as a researcher gave
her the flexibility to volunteer, which
included 4 days of training in Alabama.
“She would travel to Ghana a couple of
times over the past couple of years,” Rev.
Reece said. Her sister also spent a year in
Liberia.
Becky Reece flew out of Dulles Airport
Thursday afternoon to spend 6 weeks
working in an Ebola Treatment Unit
(ETU) in Liberia, returning stateside on
Christmas Eve. Upon her return, she will
spend 21 days in self-quarantine at her
Providence, R.I., apartment, her father,
Steve, said in an email to his family.
While she’s in Liberia, where the
average high is around 88 degrees at
this time of year, she’ll spend 90-minute
stretches in full-body personal protective
equipment, caring for the ill and dying.
Her weekend message outlined some
of the dire conditions there — an ETU
so full that the morgue may have to be
changed into another ward, 12-hour shifts
averaging 1 day a week.
The plus sides are relative. Another
ETU 2 hours away opens at the end of this
week, hopefully alleviating the numbers
where she is, and she has a fan in her room
and a shower albeit with cold water only.
Richard Reece only learned of his
granddaughter’s trip 30 minutes before
she flew out of Dulles on a flight to
Brussels, Belgium.
“So close, yet so far,” he said. Becky
and her dad had kept the trip quiet,
Steve Reece said, in case circumstances
prevented the trip.
Submitted by riChArd rEECE
rebecca reese (left), her grandfather richard reece and her twin
sister Josephine on the women’s graduation day from WVu’s medical School in 2008.
New tech helps teach
kids financial literacy
niCK gAudio review Staff
Submitted by VAllEY hEAlth
mary Sas, director of clinical services at hmh and Christy Conley, community outreach coordinator with Core, exchange a rose vial last week. the vial will be part of a float in this
year’s rose Parade.
Hampshire Memorial gives
vial for Rose Parade float
review Staff
SUNRISE SUMMIT —
Staff and leaders at Hampshire
Memorial Hospital met with
representatives of the Center
for Organ Recovery and
Education last week to hand
over a rose.
No, this wasn’t a businessto-business courtship. It was
part of a celebration of life.
Across the region, hospitals
are dedicating roses by placing
them in a vial that carries a
unique, personal message of
hope and remembrance to
honor organ donors, recipients
and those touched by organ,
tissue and cornea donation.
These roses create a
dedication garden that is a
featured design element on
the Donate Life float in one
of the country’s most notably
televised parades — the Rose
Parade, which is set to take
place this Jan. 1 in Pasadena,
Calif.
This is the 12th year the
Donate Life float will appear in
the Rose Parade and this year’s
theme is “The Never-Ending
Story,” featuring butterflies
emerging from storybooks to
symbolize the enduring power
of organ, tissue and cornea
donation and transplantation.
The Center for Organ
Recovery and Education,
which sponsors the float, is one
of 58 federally designated not-
SUNRISE SUMMIT — It’s never too early to
start learning how to handle your money.
So, the Bank of Romney has introduced an
initiative to bring financial literacy to students
at Hampshire High School through some pretty
snappy new technology.
A web-based program, called “EverFi Financial
Literacy,” uses simulations, avatars and gaming
to bring complex financial concepts to life for
today’s most digital of generations.
Through this platform, students will become
certified in hundreds of topics in personal
finance, allowing them to become more informed,
responsible citizens.
The 10-unit course offers about 6 hours of
programming aimed at teaching, assessing and
certifying students in a variety of relevant financial
topics.
Last week, about 20 students in DiAnna Liller’s
class were clicking around, learning things about
their all-important credit score, insurance, credit
cards, student loans, mortgages, taxes, stocks,
savings, 401(k)s and other critical concepts that
map to national financial literacy standards.
The EverFi platform tracks the progress and
score of every student and provides students
who successfully complete the course with
Certification in Financial Literacy, a valuable
mark of distinction on college applications and
resumes, Liller said.
Even better? The Bank of Romney has partnered
with EverFi to bring the program to the students at
no cost to the schools.
“The Bank of Romney is committed to providing
our young people with the knowledge and skills
needed to make educated decisions about their
financial futures. We are excited to offer students
an innovative educational experience that uses
the tools they love — digital learning and gaming
— to teach this important topic,” said Lawrence
Foley, president and CEO of The Bank of Romney.
“From the small rural towns to major cities
across the U.S., EverFi technology is literally
transforming how students learn, and we
are incredibly grateful for the public-private
partnerships that make this possible,” said EverFi
CEO Tom Davidson. “The Bank of Romney is
critical to the success of our mission to ensure that
these cutting-edge tools reach all communities.”
for-profit organ procurement
organizations in the U.S.
CORE works closely with
donor families and designated
health
care
professionals
to coordinate the surgical
recovery of organs, tissues and
corneas for transplantation.
The group also facilitates the
computerized matching of
donated organs and placement
of corneas.
With
headquarters
in
Pittsburgh, Pa., and an office
in Charleston, CORE oversees
a region that encompasses
155 hospitals and almost six
million people, which includes
western Pennsylvania and West
Virginia. o
Hampshire County No. 4 in
business growth so far in 2014
niCK gAudio review Staff
ROMNEy — This year has
been a particularly great one
for the business climate in
Hampshire County, at least in
comparison to most elsewhere
throughout the state.
Currently ranked number
4 out of West Virginia’s 55
counties,
Hampshire
has
enjoyed 10.85 percent business
growth since Jan. 1 — from
710 to 787 businesses thus
far, according to the Business
Industry Growth Map, a tool
provided by Secretary of State
Natalie Tennant’s office.
The top 3 counties —
Webster at 1, Pendleton at No.
2 and Mason at No. 3 — have
fewer total businesses, so their
percent of business growth is
more dramatically affected by
any new business than is ours.
In fact, Hampshire is
currently holds the top spot
— that’s right, No. 1 — for
West Virginia counties that
started 2014 with 500 or more
businesses, according to the
BIG map.
The
towns
and
unincorporated
areas
in
Hampshire County that have
seen the most business in 2014,
include:
• Romney — 24
• Augusta — 19
• Points — 7
• Springfield — 5
• High View — 5
Since the beginning of the
year, Hampshire has gained 96
new businesses and lost 19, the
data shows.
Neighboring counties aren’t
doing nearly as well. Ranked
50, Morgan County has grown
5.89 percent; at 47, Mineral
has had 6.29 percent growth;
and Hardy registered 6.87
percent growth at the 36th spot
statewide.
The counties with the most
total businesses remain no
real surprise: Charleston’s
Kanawha County logs in
8,896
businesses;
West
Virginia University’s county,
Monongalia,
has
5,302
businesses; and Huntington’s
Cabell County has 3,690. o
niCK gAudio review Staff
dean Young of the Bank of romney watches a few hampshire high School students learn on
everfi’s financial Literacy platform last week.
Thank You
Thanks to the following
businesses and
individuals for helping
to Warm the Children
of Hampshire County.
Your generosity is greatly appreciated.
• Wayne and
Bonnie Cummins,
Shanks
$15,000 $12,449
• Bob and Nancy
$10,000
Allen, Romney
$5,000
• Phyllis
$1,000
Shingleton,
Romney
$500
• In Memory of
Jean Calvert
• Ron and Patty Iser, In
Memory of Madalyn Iser and
Eugene W. Tutwiler, Augusta
• Richard L. Haines, Augusta
• David and Jan Tippett,
Slanesville
• Charles and Joann Snead,
Springfield
• Mary Moreland, Points
• White Pine Church, Old Fields
• Capon Bridge Christian
Church
• Herb and Sandee Adrian,
Romney
• Nina Mauk, Romney
• Mill Creek Ruritan Club
• Marvin and Darlene Bendy,
Augusta
• Kathy Owens, Shanks
• Herb Feltner, Winchester, Va.
• Dana Hoffman, Points
• Debbie Miller, Levels
• In Memory of Mary Dickens
from Debbie, Susan and
Janie
• Dorothy Kengla, Augusta
$25,000
$20,000
As we celebrate the Thanksgiving
holiday, we give thanks for our many
blessings, and we count friends and
customers like you among them.
We hope your Thanksgiving is filled
with plenty of laughter, joy, goodwill
and of course, a delicious meal shared
with friends, family and neighbors!
We wish you all the best.
“You’re someone special here”
Member FDIC
Email: [email protected]
Website: www.bankofromney.net
Romney: 304-822-3541
Romney - Sunrise: 304-822-2750
Augusta: 304-496-7460
Capon Bridge: 304-856-3461
Slanesville Customer Service Center: 304-496-8066
Springfield: 304-822-3618 • Paw Paw: 304-947-7255
Apple Express 24-Hr. Banking Information 304-822-5926
Closed Thursday, November 27 In Observance of Thanksgiving
With 125+ Years Of Service To The Community, You Can Count On The Bank of Romney For Safety, Soundness And Security
Panhandle
Wednesday
November 19, 2014
@
Hampshire
Review.com
A
Living
Ed DeWitt Review Staff
mong the menagerie of
barnyard life at H&K
Farms off Ford Hill Road
in Augusta, a somewhat
odd, imposing looking fellow keeps watch.
He’s noisy, stubborn and beautiful. He’s a Royal Palm turkey, and
he’s certainly making the most of
what could be his last few days.
April Bane and her husband,
Carl, are currently the proud owners of 5 turkeys, the dominant
Royal Palm, another male – a Red
Bourbon – and 3 Broad Breasted
Bronzes, the hens of the group.
H&K sits on land that has been
in Carl’s family going back many
years. Hogs, cattle and chickens
also call the farm home.
The story of how the farm added turkeys for the 1st time isn’t
anything extraordinary. It was just
an addition the couple wanted to
make.
A close relative of April’s raises
turkeys and after a recent visit she
and Carl decided they wanted in
on the fun.
So, on April 3, her birthday
as a matter of fact, she got the 3
Bronzes. They are the tamest turkeys of the group, and that’s typical of hens.
The Bronzes are also the closest
to the type of turkeys that live in
the wild across Hampshire County and beyond.
The Palm and the Bourbon
came shortly thereafter, and
though the 2 males coexist with
each other and the 3 females very
well, it’s clear that the big white
Palm is in charge.
“It’s gone really well,” April
said of the few months the turkeys have been around. “They are
beautiful birds. We love them. Everyone who comes here compliments us on how beautiful they
are.”
The flock has been a joyful addition to the farm.
“The human interaction with
them has been phenomenal,”
April said. “We didn’t think that
they would be this tame. We are
very happy that our grandkids
can pet them and that anyone
who comes around is accepted by
them.”
Though the turkeys have quickly become a
part of
the
The bear facts
Nora Kimble, Weekly Chat, Page 6B
King
of the
roost
(for now)
Ed DeWitt Review Staff
April Bane s gets up close with her family’s little flock of 5 turkeys.
one of the hens, a Broad Breasted Bronze; and Carl Bane t with
the Royal Palm tom that may not see the light of day Nov. 27.
s
B
family – so to speak – like every
other animal on the farm they are
there for one purpose more than
anything else.
With Thanksgiving about a
week away, that’s why the Royal
Palm’s days are likely numbered.
“Everything we have here is stuff
that we raise to eat and breed. He
is no different,” April said.
Why him and not the Red Bourbon?
“Mainly because of his dominance,” April said. He’s more ag-
gressive than the others and we
wouldn’t mind taking that dominance out of the herd.”
Why him and not one of the
hens?
“They are layers and they have
already begun laying eggs,” she
said. “Normally they don’t until
they are a year old.”
She has plans to hatch a few
in the spring to sell, and people are already lining up
for the chicks, which will
be a crossbreed between
the Bronzes and the Red
Bourbon.
“We have everything
to incubate them,” April
said. “I’m anxious to see
what the chicks will look
like.”
With the big day fast approaching, decision time
looms for April and Carl.
Though there’s a possibility they will keep him
around, “Chances are we’ll
be using him,” April said.
If and when the Palm is gone,
the Red Bourbon will be king of
the roost and it will stay that way
for a while. “Until something
would happen to these we won’t
get any more right now,” April
said.
The experience from start to inevitable finish is one much like
many others on the farm, just a little bit different than usual.
“The entire thing has been
great,” April said. “They’ve been
very easy to raise.”
Though it appears as though the
end is near for the Royal Palm,
it’s not something April will give
much extra thought to.
“I’m not attached to them the
way I am my cattle and hogs,” she
admitted.
If indeed he’s dispatched, the
Palm will continue his role as
the dominant focal point, but this
time he will be in command of the
Thanksgiving table, not the barnyard.
It’s a suitable ending for such
an impressive bird. o
The days are dwindling
for one (+) of the two
toms at H&K Farms
Sentimental
belongings
My co-workers and I
were talking last week about
things we have kept from
years ago that are still useful. My one co-worker and
I were singing the praises of
metal Maybelline eyelash
curlers from the 1980s.
My sister gave me the eyelash curler I still use today,
and my daughter and I fight
over it. She took it to her
friend’s house last week for
a sleepover, and I threatened
her that she better not lose
it…or else. I have probably
purchased close to a dozen
other curlers, but none com-
Julie
Landis
M o u n ta i n m a m a
pare to my vintage one.
Then, there is the old hairbrush that I still use from my
junior high days. Again, I
have tried to replace it with
other brushes, but have never been able to find one that
works as well as my purple,
Cricket brush that has definitely seen better days.
I also have sentimental
items that have been given to
me from family members.
They don’t have much monetary value, but they hold
special meaning for me.
My great-grandmother gave me a little ceramic chick that is pink and
yellow. I would go visit
her with my grandfather
(her son) when I was really young, and she would
always call me “the little
one.” Maybe she could tell
that we had a special connection. She had twins, and
about 60 years later, I also
had twins.
When my husband’s maternal grandmother passed
away, I received a vase that
had belonged to her. It looks
like a pin-up girl from the
1950s complete with fake
eyelashes and a little pearl
necklace. Everyone else
thought it was goofy, but I
cherish it because she liked
the vase, and it reminds me
of her.
My mother-in-law gave
my husband a special mustache cup and saucer set. She
always told him it would be
his. The cups were popular at
one time and have a guard on
the inside to keep your mustache dry.
From my maternal grandmother, I have vintage mixing bowls that were passed
down to me from my mother.
When I use them, I always
think of her and the great
food that she prepared and
served in them. They are yellow with black flowers on
them — not the prettiest but
special to me.
I also have a little dancing
flower in my kitchen window. It was a gift from my
mom’s friend, and for weeks
after she gave it to me, I
would look at it, and it would
make me smile. She passed
away last year, and it still reminds me of her sunny personality.
Of course, then there are
the special mementos that
my children have made for
me over the years. To anyone
else they are worthless, but I
love to look back at them and
see how they used to draw
and write.
Sentimental items rarely
hold worldly value but to the
owner they are priceless. q
Datebook
2B
Hampshire
Review
@
Hampshire
Review.com
Wednesday, November 19, 2014
BACK in time
100 1914
years ago
On Sunday night, Nov. 8, a
robber entered E.G. Emmett’s
store at Hanging Rock, and
took postal and private funds to
the amount of $25 or $30, and
some shoes. He was tracked
to Pleasant Dale, where he
repeated the operation by
breaking into the office of E.D.
Combs, securing some six or
eight dollars. It is thought he
reached Romney in time for the
morning train. A stranger came
in the vicinity of Hanging Rock
Sunday afternoon and secreted
himself in a stock barn at Mr.
Rogers’. Later in the evening
he was seen, and it is supposed
that this was the thief. He must
have been a professional robber,
as he was equipped with keys
and took great precautions as to
tracking.
50
years ago
1964
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Carl
and Mr. and Mrs. Bob Schnell
and daughter, Nancy, spent
Sunday in Washington, D.C.
They attended services at the
Washington Cathedral. The West
Point Choir sang for the service.
David Carl, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Harold Carl, is a member of the
choir.
Mr. and Mrs. William A.
Johnston and Bill and Paula
Johnston of Richmond, Va.,
were weekend visitors with
relatives in the county. Sunday
dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs.
Paul Smith were the Johnstons,
Dr. and Mrs. Garry Long and
children, Mrs. R.S. Martin and
Larry Smith.
40
years ago
1974
Capt. Robert Hockman and
Mrs. Hockman, located at
Loring, A.F.B., Caribou, Maine,
are visiting the former’s parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Elman Hockman.
Capt. Hockman is a pilot in the
U.S. Air Force.
yELLOW SPRING — The
family of Mr. and Mrs. James
Watson gave a surprise birthday
party in their honor at yellow
Spring Rod and Gun Club
Saturday, Nov. 2, with around
50 people present.
Senior tailback Keith Lee
Submitted by ColonEl r.A. hAmilton
this picture was taken around 1904 in front of the old grist mill
along mill Creek. it was located behind the former hamilton
family home in what is now western Vanderlip. the couple on
the far right is mr. and mrs. George riley hamilton. the tanks
and pumps that are shown were part of the secondary water
source for the town of romney. q
ended his Hampshire High
football career in impressive
fashion
by
scoring
two
touchdowns and rushing for
120 yards while leading the
Trojans to a 40-0 victory over
Berkeley Springs. Other seniors
playing their final game for the
Green and White include split
end Mark Heavner, defensive
halfback Jimmy Miller, fullback
John Corbin, defensive guard
Scott Whetzel, offensive guard
Jamie Simmons, offensive and
CommunitY Calendar
noV.
Applications for Christmas toy Campaign now available
at treasurer’s office in courthouse annex in romney.
Wed.
Sponsored by hampshire Community Association and
hampshire Co. Sheriff’s office. must be picked up in person.
Beautiful Baby Contest now through the month of november, hC
Public Library. two categories: infants (1-2 year old) and toddlers (1-3
years old). Prizes given. An entry form and photo release form must be
filled out at the library to enter. one photo per family may be entered
and one vote per patron may be cast.
fort Ashby friends of the library raffle tickets now through dec.
13. the annual Christmas silent auction will also run dec. 6-13 with
bigger and better prizes.
rio CEos Club 7 p.m. for more info, call the WVu extension office,
304-822-5013.
romney Board of Parks and recreation Commission meeting 4
p.m. City Council Chambers, 340 e. main.
noV.
Central-Dunmore CEOS Club, 1 p.m., Augusta. for more
info, contact the WVu extension office at 304-822-5013.
thurS.
hampshire Center Auxiliary meeting 2 p.m., at hampshire
health Center.
relay for life meeting 6 p.m., hC health dept. Anyone can volunteer
to help with this committee meeting and join the fight against cancer.
for more info., email Patty at [email protected] or call 304676-2480.
noV.
21
fri.
noV.
22
SAt.
tearcoat Church of the Brethren pancake supper 4:307:30 p.m., at the church on rt. 50 in Augusta. Pancakes,
buckwheat cakes, sausage, egg, sausage and chip beef
gravy, drinks. Proceeds benefit ministries of the Women’s
fellowship.
25th Annual ole time Christmas Bazaar 9-5 p.m., Capon
Bridge fire Co. Sponsored by the fire company. Anyone
wishing to be a vendor, contact Brenda or Jennifer Crane at
304-856-1295. tables are $15.
All-you-can-eat pancake breakfast 7a.m.-12 p.m., CB Community
Center. to benefit Cub Scout Pack 51. Advance tickets/$5, at the
door/$7. Children under 5 eat free. for more info., call Steve at 540550-5995.
fairview lutheran Church spaghetti dinner beginning at 4 p.m.,
Gore fire hall. Proceeds will go toward Jennifer Crane’s medical
expenses. freewill offering.
slanesville ruritan winter recycling 10-11 a.m., at ruritan building.
only purchasing clean aluminum cans in clear bags. Cannot purchase
aluminum foil, pie pans or cat food cans.
squirrel fest doors open at 4 p.m., farm in Pleasant dale. hayrides,
live music, wild game dishes and more. A free dinner at 6 p.m. Covered
dish appreciated for those eating. Best dish will win $100. Camping
sites available.
noV.
23
Sun.
All-you-can-eat spaghetti dinner 12-4 p.m., Capon Springs
Vol. fire and rescue on State rt. 16. Spaghetti, salad, garlic
bread, dessert and drinks. Adults/$10, Children/$5, 3 and
under/free.
hunter’s feast 4-8 p.m., Augusta Church of Christ. Adults/$8, Kids
and seniors/$5, 5 years and under free. duck dynasty theme, door
prizes, best beard contest. featuring Chef Paul’s famous ribs or chicken
and side dishes.
noV.
hC Cancer Coalition meeting 11 a.m., the Bank of
romney Community Center.
mon.
jersey mt. ruritan Club meeting 6:30 p.m., clubhouse on
Jersey mountain road.
24
noV.
25
30
years ago
1984
Darren Grace and Rebekah
Hott were honored as Students
of the Months at the November
@
Hampshire
Review.com
4-H Poster Display now through nov. 21, hC Public Library.
19
20
defensive tackle Danny Lynch,
offensive tackle Steve Hannas,
offensive and defensive end Stan
Gower and end Richard Largent.
Friday’s win gives the Trojans a
7-3 record for the year.
romney on trAC meeting 5:15 p.m., romney City office.
tueS.
editor’s note: Log on to our website at www.hampshirereview.com for
the Scheduled meetings section of the Community Calendar. All events
are listed there for you 24/7.
10
7 meeting of the Rotary Club.
Construction of the E.A.
Hawse
Intermediate
Care
facility of Baker is progressing
rapidly. The facility will be
ready to receive its first clients
in March 1985.
Norma
Lee
Clise
of
Hampshire Unit 91, American
Legion Auxiliary, was named
the recipient of the National
Ruby Ward Award for Public
Relations for the 1983-84
Auxiliary year. The award
was presented at the National
Convention in Salt Lake City,
Utah, and accepted for Mrs.
Clise by Past Department
President Shirley Davis.
20
2004
Paul and Lisa Roomsburg of
Augusta are pleased to announce
the engagement and forthcoming
marriage of their daughter,
Amy Brooke, to Brandon Lee
Rickman of Nashville, Tenn.
He is the son of Gary and Karla
Rickman of Rudy, Mo. The
wedding is planned for New
year’s Day in Augusta.
Brenna young, 8, was
selected to appear on Channel
25 News in Hagerstown, Md.,
on Nov. 3 for the 5 p.m. weather
broadcast. She presented the
local weather as part of the Kids
Cast program. She was selected
for her submission of a winter
scene picture in which she and
her brother Mason, 12, were
building a snowman. Brenna
is the daughter of Dean and
Shirlene young of Romney. q
years ago
1994
Senior Kristina Hott was
crowned HHS Homecoming
Queen
XXXI
during
Homecoming festivities Friday,
Oct. 29.
Hampshire
County’s
Outstanding Democrat of the
year, Leona Kidwell of Romney,
was honored at the annual
Jefferson-Jackson Day dinner in
Charleston Saturday, Oct. 5. Mrs.
Kidwell received recognition for
outstanding leadership, service
and dedication to the West
Virginia Democratic Party.
SCHEDULED
MEETINGS
years ago
...........................................
Send your photos showing life in
hampshire County at least 10
years ago to us at [email protected], Box 1036,
romney, WV 26757 or
drop them off at 74 W. main St.,
romney. We need to know who
you are and as much as you
know about when the picture
was taken and what’s shown.
A calendar of regularly scheduled meetings
of community groups is available every day
looKing AhEAd
hC diabetic support group
meeting 1 p.m., Wed., nov. 26,
romney Senior Center. for more info
call Pam francis rn diabetic educator
304-813-6588.
Capon Bridge ruritan Club board
meeting 6:30 p.m., thurs., nov. 27,
CB ruritan Community Center.
Community thanksgiving dinner
12-3 p.m., thurs., nov. 27, romney
first united methodist Church. for
more info., call 304-822-3023 or
to schedule delivery to homebound
persons.
We the People of hampshire
County meeting social meet and
greet 6:30 p.m., meeting at 7 p.m.,
friday, nov. 28, the Bank of romney
Community Center.
1-2 Kidney Punch for Gail Marple
3-6:30 p.m., Silent Auction; 5-7 p.m.,
$7 spaghetti dinner; 8-midnight,
dance — $5; Sat., Nov. 29, American
Legion Post 137, Capon Bridge. open
to the public. All proceeds benefit
Gail and her kidney donor to help pay
for medical expenses. for more info.
or to donate auction items, call 304856-2990.
rosser’s raid on new Creek
sesquicentennial seminar 10-2
p.m., Sat., Nov. 29, the davis Center,
Potomac State College. featuring
talks, period music and artifact
display. free and open to public.
ALA Hampshire Unit 91 meeting
7 p.m., mon., Dec. 1, upstairs, Post
home.
Board of education regular
meeting 6:30 p.m., mon., Dec. 1,
central office.
City of romney Council meeting 7
p.m., mon., Dec. 1, 340 e. main St.,
romney.
Ebenezer CEos Club meeting 11
a.m., mon., Dec. 1. for more info,
call the WVu extension office, 304-
822-5013.
hC Arts Council photography
group meeting 10-11:30 a.m.,
mon., Dec. 1, 2nd floor, hC Public
Library. focus theme: unique People.
for more info., call Sandra Patterson,
304-496-7345.
All
shutterbugs
welcome.
hC Arts Council planning meeting
6 p.m., tues., dec. 2, 4B’s Pizza
and Subs, across from Augusta fire
dept. this monthly planning session
is open to all with interest in helping
make more arts opportunities happen
in the county. for more info., contact
neil Gillies at 304-897-6297.
hC farm Bureau meeting 7 p.m.,
tues., dec. 2, second floor, uSdA
Service Center, heritage hill Complex,
route 50 east, romney.
Pleasant dale CEos Club meeting
1 p.m., tues., dec. 2, Augusta Church
of Christ. for more info, call the WVu
extension office, 304-822-5013.
And BEYond
American legion Aux. hampshire
Post 91 breakfast buffet 8 a.m. to
1 p.m., Sundays, American Legion,
romney. Sausage, bacon, gravies,
biscuits, home fries, pancakes,
french toast and more. these Sunday
meals will continue each Sunday
morning until further notice.
Annual WVsdB Celebration of
lights 5:30 p.m., Wed., Dec. 3,
begins at School for Blind on Antigo
Place. music, singing and lighting of
Christmas decorations. Group will
travel around campus. hot chocolate
and cookies enjoyed at conclusion of
event.
representative
available
1-4
p.m., Wed., Dec. 3, hC Public
Library, romney. Veterans seeking
employment info. should bring a copy
of their dd 214 for verification with
dept. of Labor.
free Vision test for adults
sponsored by Anwar eye Center,
in romney, moorefield and other
surrounding areas. for more info.,
call Sheila at 301-268-3701.
Cub Scout Pack 32 meeting 7
p.m., every Wednesday, romney first
united methodist Church. for more
info., contact rick hillenbrand at 304822-4190. no meeting on nov. 26.
Keyser Area depression/Bipolar
support group 6:30 p.m., tues.,
dec. 2, emmanuel episcopal Church
in Keyser. Peer-led organization, free,
open to anyone, non-denominational.
We have family support, free
literature, care and understanding.
free coffee and tea. We meet every
1st and 3rd tuesday. for more info.,
contact fred at 304-788-3048.
disabled
Veterans
outreach
veteran
employment
narconon can help recognize drug
abuse and help you take steps to
overcome addictions. Call 1-800-4311754 or drugAbuseSolution.com.
one on one singles dance
8-midnight,
fri.,
Nov.
21,
Williamsport, md., American Legion.
Admission $7. Cash bar, snacks
and door prizes. Casual dress. for
more info., call Garry or Barb 681242-2991 or visit the website at
oneononesinglesdance.com.
romney
moose
lodge
and
hampshire Animal hospital spay
event offering $40 discount off
the price of a spay/neuter covering
75 pets. the 76th will have a $150
discount. for more info., call hAh at
304-822-5900.
spay today - this area’s low cost,
nonprofit program for spaying and
neutering cats and dogs. At the time
of surgery, initial tests and shots can
be obtained at lower rates. to find a
participating vet near you call 304728-8330 or visit www.baacs.org.q
sEnior CornEr mEnu
Romney: (Noon)
Wednesday, Nov. 19 —
Vegetable soup, hamburger/
bun, chips, fruit, dessert.
Friday, Nov. 21 — Thanksgiving dinner, turkey/dressing/gravy, whipped potatoes,
green beans, rolls, dessert.
Monday, Nov. 24 —
Chicken fillet/bun, baked
potato, broccoli, fruit, dessert.
Tuesday, Nov. 25 —
Tomato soup, grilled cheese,
fruit, chips, dessert.
Mildred Pfeil Adult Day
Services — Romney: (Noon)
Wednesday, Nov. 19 —
Vegetable soup, hamburger/
bun, chips, fruit, dessert.
Thursday, Nov. 20 — Beef
stroganoff, salad, broccoli,
wheat bread, fruit.
Friday, Nov. 21 — Thanksgiving dinner, turkey/dressing/gravy, whipped potatoes,
green beans, rolls, dessert.
Monday, Nov. 24 —
Chicken fillet/bun, baked
potato, broccoli, fruit, dessert.
Tuesday, Nov. 25 —
Tomato soup, grilled cheese,
fruit, chips, dessert.
Springfield: (5:30 p.m.)
Thursday, Nov. 20
— Thanksgiving dinner,
turkey/dressing/
gravy, whipped potatoes, green beans, rolls,
dessert.
Friday, Nov. 21 —
Breakfast bake, hash
browns, biscuit, fruit,
dessert.
Tuesday, Nov. 25 —
Meatballs, salad, green
beans, garlic bread,
dessert.
Capon Valley View
Center: (Noon)
Friday, Nov. 21 —
Thanksgiving dinner,
turkey/dressing/gravy,
whipped
potatoes,
green beans, rolls, dessert.
Monday, Nov. 24 —
Cook’s choice.
Tuesday, Nov. 25 — Beef
stroganoff, salad, broccoli,
wheat bread, fruit.
***
Administrative offices —
304-822-4097
Professional Directory
Call Today! These Local Professionals Will Be Happy To Serve You ..
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William C. Keaton
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Attorneys at Law
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Settlement
Loan Closings,
Refinancing • Personal Injury,
Auto Accidents,
• Divorce,
Adoption, Name Wrongful Death
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Change
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304-822-4187 or 304-822-3028
n medical equipment
Pulmonary Associates, Inc.
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We Bill Most Major Insurance • Medicare • Medicaid
RoMney
96 W. Main St.
Hours:
304-822-8611
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Toll Free 866-344-8611 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Call
304-822-3871
ext. 25
For information on
placing an ad in the
Professional Directory!
Homespun
@
Hampshire
Review.com
Hampshire
Review
3B
Wednesday, November 19, 2014
The gift that gives double
This time of year tends to be
stressful for me, as I need to
prepare for Thanksgiving, deer
season and Christmas. It just
seems to come at me all at once.
I really enjoy Thanksgiving and
all that it means. I also enjoy
getting ready for deer season
— not that I’m a great hunter,
but I do have fun going to the
hunting camp and taking in the
great fellowship. And of course,
the Christmas season is a special
time, as well.
While I’m preparing food
and packing up for the hunting
camp, I’m also shopping for
the Thanksgiving dinner so as
to avoid last minute crowds.
At the same time, I also want
to take advantage of the preChristmas sales, which seem
to be getting earlier and earlier
each year (thank heavens for
online shopping). While doing
all this, I also need to be getting
my Christmas cards ready,
which is a tradition that means
a lot to me, probably because I
have so many friends and family
members that I only hear from
once a year.
With all this said, I would
like to take a deep breath and
take another look at my plight.
It doesn’t take a rocket scientist
to figure out that all of these
stressors are very minor and
very solvable when taken a step
at a time, doing the important
things and eliminating the things
that really don’t need to be done.
I just need to be reminded of this
every year.
All of this dialogue is meant
to lead up to the most important
part of this holiday season and
that is the importance of giving
to others — not just financially,
but with time, emotions and
prayers. The beautiful thing
about helping others is that it
also makes us feel good. Giving
is the gift you give to others
while getting one yourself.
Be safe this deer season, count
your blessings this Thanksgiving
and take in the holiday spirit that
is all around us.
Melinda
Chambers
in the kitchen
Pumpkin Cheese Ball
1 (8-ounce) package cream
cheese, softened
1/2 cup solid pack pumpkin
2 1/2 ounces dried beef,
finely chopped
2 cups sharp cheddar cheese,
finely shredded
1/4 cup crushed pineapple,
well drained
1 tablespoon chopped onion
1 short stalk of celery for the
stem
Parsley for garnish
Crackers
Combine
cream
cheese
and pumpkin; mix until well
blended. Stir in beef, shredded
cheese, pineapple and onion.
Chill at least 1 hour; form into
a large ball. Score sides of
ball with knife to resemble a
pumpkin. Garnish with celery
for the stem and parsley. Serve
with your favorite crackers.
Veal Paprika
2 pounds stew veal, cubed
3 tablespoons flour
1/4 cup butter
1/4 cup chopped onion
1 cup chicken broth
1/2 teaspoon garlic salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
2 teaspoons paprika
3/4 cup dairy sour cream
1/2 teaspoon salt
Coat veal well in flour. In
Dutch oven, heat 2 tablespoons
butter slowly. In it, brown veal
well, turning on all sides. Add
onions; cook, stirring until onion
is tender. Add broth, salt, garlic
salt and pepper. Bring to boil;
cover and simmer on low 50 to
60 minutes. Blend paprika and
sour cream into veal mixture.
Heat gently. Serve veal dish
over noodles or rice. Makes 6 to
8 servings.
Veal Parmesan
1/4 cup fine dry breadcrumbs
1/2 teaspoon salt
Dash fresh ground pepper
1 beaten egg
5 thin slices mozzarella
cheese
1 clove garlic, crushed
1/4 cup grated Parmesan
cheese
1/2 teaspoon paprika
5 (3/4-inch) veal loin chops
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 (8-ounce) can seasoned
tomato sauce
1 teaspoon crushed oregano
Mix
crumbs,
Parmesan
cheese, salt, paprika and pepper.
Dip chops in egg, then in
crumb mixture. Brown on both
sides in hot oil. Place a slice
of mozzarella cheese atop each
chop. Mix tomato sauce and
garlic; pour over chops; sprinkle
with oregano. Cover, simmer 50
minutes or until meat is done.
Add water to pan if needed.
Venison Stroganoff
1/4 cup vegetable oil
2 pounds venison in 1-inch
cubes
1 envelope onion soup mix
3 cups water
1/4 cup flour
1 can condensed cream of
mushroom soup
6 tablespoons ketchup
Heat vegetable oil in heavy
skillet while shaking meat in
flour to coat. Then sauté venison
cubes until browned. Add soup
mix and water. Simmer, covered,
an hour or more until venison
is tender. Finally add cream of
mushroom soup and ketchup,
heat thoroughly and serve over
noodles or rice. Serves 4 to 6.
Turkey Casserole
8 slices bread
2 or more cups leftover
turkey, diced
1 cup celery, diced and lightly
sautéed
1/2 cup mayonnaise
Salt and pepper to taste
3 eggs
3 cups milk
1 can cream of mushroom
soup
1 cup grated Cheddar cheese
Oil a large casserole (10 by
14-inch). Break up 4 slices of
bread and arrange pieces evenly
in dish. Mix turkey, celery and
mayonnaise together and spread
atop bread. Crumble other 4
slices of bread on top of mixture.
Add salt and pepper to taste.
Beat eggs and mix with milk,
then pour over all. Cover with
foil and refrigerate overnight.
Bake for 1 hour at 350
degrees. Remove from oven,
cover with undiluted cream of
mushroom soup and top with
grated cheddar cheese. Return
to oven; bake an additional 15
minutes and serve. Will serve 8
to 10 people.
Beans and Venison
6 slices bacon, chopped
1 1/2 pounds venison burger
1 medium onion, chopped
1 (16-ounce) can pork and
beans
1 (16-ounce) can kidney
beans, drained
1 (16-ounce) can great
northern beans, drained
1/3 cup packed brown sugar
1 cup ketchup
2 tablespoons vinegar
1 tablespoon Worcestershire
sauce
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon prepared
mustard
Heat oven to 350 degrees.
In Dutch oven, cook bacon
over medium low heat, stirring
occasionally
until
crisp.
Remove with slotted spoon;
set aside. Drain all but 1
tablespoon of bacon fat from
Dutch oven. Add meat and
onion. Cook over medium heat,
stirring occasionally until meat
is no longer pink and onion is
tender. Add reserve bacon and
remaining ingredients to Dutch
oven. Mix well. Cover and bake
until bubbly around edges, about
45 minutes (8 to 10 servings).
Turkey and Broccoli
Alfredo
6 ounces uncooked fettuccine
or 8 ounces spaghetti
1 cup fresh or frozen broccoli
flowerets
1 (10 3/4-ounce) can
condensed cream of mushroom
soup
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup grated Parmesan
cheese
2 cups cubed, cooked turkey
1/4 teaspoon pepper
Prepare fettuccine according
to package directions. Add
broccoli for last 4 minutes of
cooking time. Drain. In skillet,
mix soup, milk, cheese, turkey,
pepper and fettuccine mixture
and cook through, stirring often.
No Sugar Added Cookies
2 cups flour
1/2 cup chopped walnuts
1/2 cup raisins
1/2 cup orange juice
1/2 cup soft margarine
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon grated orange peel
or orange extract, optional
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1 egg
Preheat oven to 375 degrees.
Mix all dry ingredients together.
Add the rest of ingredients and
mix together well. Add raisins
and stir. Drop by tablespoonful
about 2 inches apart on ungreased
baking sheet. Bake 20 minutes
or until lightly browned. Store
in tightly covered container. q
Milestones
Simply Savory Holiday Traditions
engagement
Cole – Davis
Family Features — The
time has come to begin planning your holiday celebrations filled with tasty food and happy
guests.
To ensure a savory and stressfree holiday, Jimmy Dean Chef
Jill Houk shares her favorite goto recipes and tips:
* To feel confident in the kitchen, fill most of your holiday feast with recipes you’ve
made before and then add one
or two new dishes to the mix.
* Whether you’re preparing
a traditional side dish or a
hearty appetizer, you can
make your holiday staples
extra special by incorporating flavorful ingredients,
such as high quality Jimmy
Dean sausage. Known for its
great taste and quality, Jimmy
Dean sausage comes in varieties that feature seasonal
flavors such as sage, so traditional dishes like stuffing are
as flavorful as ever.
* Roasts, hams and turkeys
need time to rest after they
come out of the oven and before you slice and serve them
- anywhere from 45 minutes
to 1 1/2 hours. Use this time
to cook quick items like vegetables, stuffing and dinner
rolls.
* Have a great mix of colors
in your holiday dishes. Top
green veggies with bright
slices of citrus, add cranberries to your salad and serve
your main dish on a brightlycolored platter.
Fill your holidays with flavor
by trying one of these crowdpleasing recipes or visit www.
jimmydean.com for even more
ideas.
Sausage Cornbread
Stuffing
Yield: 8 1-cup servings
Prep time: 20 minutes
Cook time: 45 minutes
1 package Jimmy Dean(r)
Premium Pork Sage Roll Sausage
2 cups chopped celery
1 cup finely chopped onion
4 cups toasted coarsely crumbled cornbread
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
1 teaspoon poultry seasoning
1 cup chicken broth
1 egg, lightly beaten
1/2 cup chopped pecans (optional)
Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
Cook sausage, celery and onion in large skillet over medium-high heat 8-10 minutes
or until sausage is thoroughly cooked, stirring frequently.
Drain. Spoon into large bowl
Add cornbread, parsley and
seasoning; mix lightly. Add
broth and egg; mix just until
blended. Stir in pecans, if desired.
Spoon into lightly greased
2-quart casserole or souffle
dish; cover.
Bake 45 minutes or until
thoroughly heated, uncovering
after 35 minutes.
Tip: To make crumbled cornbread, bake 1 package (8.5
ounces) corn muffin mix according to package directions.
Cool, then coarsely crumble. To
toast, preheat oven to 400∞F.
Spread cornbread in large shallow baking pan. Bake 10 minutes or until lightly browned,
stirring after 5 minutes.
Stuffed Mushrooms
Yield: About 50 mushrooms
Prep time: 45 minutes
Cook time: 20 minutes
2 pounds large mushrooms,
stems removed and reserved
1 package Jimmy Dean(r)
Premium Pork Regular Roll
Sausage
1 clove garlic, minced
4 ounces cubed and softened
cream cheese
3/4 cup dry Italian breadcrumbs, divided
1/2 cup (2 ounces) grated
Parmesan cheese, divided
1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley
1 tablespoon olive oil
Preheat oven to 350∞F.
Finely chop enough mush-
room stems to measure 1 cup;
discard any remaining stems.
Place mushroom caps, rounded-side down, in lightly greased
shallow baking pans.
Cook sausage, chopped stems
and garlic in large skillet over
medium-high heat 8-10 minutes
or until sausage is thoroughly cooked, stirring frequently.
Drain and return to skillet.
Add cream cheese, 1/2 cup
breadcrumbs, 1/4 cup Parmesan
cheese and parsley; mix well.
Spoon into mushroom caps.
Combine remaining breadcrumbs, remaining Parmesan
cheese and oil; sprinkle over
mushrooms.
Bake 20 minutes or until mushrooms are tender and
stuffing is lightly browned.
#12367
Source: Jimmy Dean
AUGUSTA — Lois Davis of
Augusta is pleased to announce
the upcoming wedding of her
daughter, Jennifer Davis, to
Jeffrey Cole, son of Douglas
Cole and Georgia Lawrence of
Brighton, Colo. Jennifer is also
the daughter of James W. Davis
of Augusta.
Jeffrey has retired from the
Army after 23 years of service
to our country. The couple will
be exchanging vows at the
Augusta Church of Christ Nov.
22, at 2 p.m. q
Pancake Supper
TearcoaT church of The BreThren
Route 50 East of Augusta
304-496-7841
Friday, Nov. 21 • 4:30-7:30 p.m.
Menu: Pancakes, Buckwheat Cakes, Sausage
Patties, Scrambled Eggs, Sausage Gravy, Chip
Beef Gravy, Orange Juice, Coffee & Tea
Proceeds go toward the: Ministries of the Women’s Fellowship
Group within our Church Family and our Community.
We serve the Lord in many areas and the funds will
help us to help others.
l
l
i
W
-
Free n
io
Donat
Sponsored by the Women’s Fellowship Group
4B
Hampshire
Review
Community Letters @
Hampshire
Review.com
Wednesday, November 19, 2014
b l u e ’ s g ap
cap o n c h ape l
Spaghetti dinner Saturday to benefit Jennifer Crane
Writer enjoys
visitors from
Maryland
Iris Dale
Kline
304-496-7878
The purpose and mission
of county Community
Educational Outreach Service
is to strengthen the family
and influence our community
through leadership service
and education. The pillars
support is a firm foundation by
the West Virginia University
Cooperative Extension Service
to all persons without regard
to race, color, sex, disability,
religion, age, sexual orientation
or national origin. I feel we
need to see the difference
of this organization and the
women’s club of Romney. They
have their organization and
purpose and this has been very
confusing at times to some.
Both organizations do a lot of
good for the community, so
wish them well.
On Friday, Eileen Sowers
and Iris Kline took a box of
gifts from the Central Dunmore
CEOS Club to the Hampshire
Memorial Nursing Home for
gifts and their annual auction
for the patients and went to
the courthouse to help with the
decorating and display of the
veterans’ tree for the month
of November. The tree is
decorated with photographs of
veterans from our area. There
is a case containing medals and
ribbons of the late Glen Davey
that hangs on the wall in the
courthouse. Davey was killed
in 1967 by an enemy mine near
Saigon while on patrol. Davey
saved his platoon of 17 men —
a very touching story.
Some of the family of
the late Loring Brock from
Westminster, Md., Carroll
County, Md., came for a visit
to Iris Kline’s home and to visit
with Bradley Kline and Kitty
Lee. They were Rodger and
Sandra Pickett, their son Chris
and his wife. We had lunch at
4B’s Pizza and Subs and did
some shopping, then visited the
Mount Zion Cemetery where
relatives are buried. We came
back Ford Hill Road to Tearcoat
and old Victory Hill where
the Victory One-room School
stood a few years ago. I believe
the late Edna Frye Timbrook
was the last teacher there. The
visitors enjoyed the scenery.
Come back again soon. There
are more drives in the area to
enjoy. q
rio
Hunters pancake supper Nov. 23
This reminds me of the “10
Commandments of How to Get
Along with People,” which has
been attributed to Ann Landers:
1. Keep skid chains on your
tongue. Always say less than
you think.
2. Make promises sparingly
and keep them faithfully, no
matter what the cost.
3. Never let an opportunity
pass to say a kind and
encouraging word to someone.
4. Be interested in others —
their pursuits, their work, their
homes and families.
5. Don’t burden others by
dwelling on your minor aches
and pains.
6. Keep an open mind.
Discuss, but don’t argue.
7. Let your virtues, if you
have any, speak for themselves.
8. Be careful of other’s
feelings.
9. Pay no attention to
disparaging remarks.
10. Don’t be too eager to get
the credit due you. Do your best
and be patient.
The Bean Settlement Church
of the Brethren (Rock Oak)
women’s group will have their
annual hunter’s pancake supper
Nov. 23, from 5-7 p.m. at the
church fellowship hall. There
will be lots of great food. Come
out and support our ladies’
fellowship group. Everyone is
welcome.
Donna Charlton and Nina
Mason spent Monday afternoon
in Cumberland, Md., for an
appointment.
Nina and Larry Mason
visited Nina’s cousin, Barbara
(Doman) Luckett in Strasburg
and enjoyed dinner with a lot of
relatives.
The Veterans Day dinner at
the Kirby American Legion and
Unit 134 Sunday afternoon,
Nov. 9, was well attended.
Nina
Mason
304-897-6471
Robbie Robinson and group
gave a very interesting program
on veterans.
The Augusta Elementary
School had their annual
Veterans Day program Monday,
Nov. 10, at 1 p.m. at the school.
Approximately 30 veterans
attended. This is the 11th year
they have been doing this for
veterans. Delicious cookies
and more were served after the
program.
Larry Mason had back
surgery on Thursday, Nov. 13,
at Winchester Medical Center.
He is home and doing very
well. Hope this time it helps the
back.
A happy birthday wish to
everyone celebrating November
birthdays.
Sorry we missed the
visitation for Gary Loy Sunday,
Nov. 9, but our deepest
sympathy, thoughts and prayers
go to his wife, Betty, and
daughter, Beth.
Get well wishes to all who
are sick. Glad Ruth Loar is
home and doing well.
The Kirby Assembly of God
Church will be having their
Christmas program Sunday,
Dec. 7, at 6 p.m. All are invited
to attend.
Until next time, everyone
stay warm. Old man winter is
going to be here for a while.
A blessed Thanksgiving to
everyone — so much to be
thankful for. Attend church
somewhere and always wear a
smile. May God bless all. q
Denied Disability?
Call Chris Kelley
Social Security Disability Representative
Tested And Approved By The Social Security Administration
304-822-7735
6 E. Main Street, Romney, WV 26757
Serving WV, MD, VA and PA
North river valley vol. Fire Co.
Annual
Hunters supper
Turkey or Ham Dinner
Sat., Nov. 22 • 5 p.m.
At the Old Rio Schoolhouse
Rio, WV
On Sunday, Nov. 9, the
Capon Bridge Methodist
Charge presented a dinner
theatre comedy entitled
“The Wild West Adventures
of Nehi Jones” at the Capon
Bridge Ruritan community
center. Two performances
were given, one at 11:30 a.m.
and again at 4 p.m. Members
of Central and Capon Bridge
performed the starring roles,
while North River Mills and
Capon Chapel contributed food
and assistance. We had a great
time and also raised funds for
Jane Arnold’s mission trip to
Africa. I particularly enjoyed
Ron Bowyer and his grandson
Jayden’s performance of
“Ghost Riders in the Sky.”
I want to remind everyone
to come out and support 2
upcoming events. A spaghetti
supper will be held on
Saturday, Nov. 22, at the
Gore Fire Hall at 4 p.m. The
combined forces of Fairview
Lutheran Church and the Gore
4-H Club are sponsoring the
dinner. Come out and enjoy
the dinner while supporting a
good cause for Jennifer Crane’s
medical expenses.
Rain Crow will hold their
2nd annual musical benefit for
the food pantry Friday, Dec.
12, from 6-9:30 p.m. Snow
date will be Saturday, Dec. 13.
Featured performers will be
Buck Mountain String Band,
old time music; Harvest Hill
Bluegrass, bluegrass; Kara
and the Wayfarers, country;
and Rain Crow, vintage rock
and roll. There will be special
appearances by the Knights
of Olde Hampshire, the big
man in the red suit and Bryan
Lafollette on the bagpipes. An
auction will be held, and
everything is donated with all
proceeds going to the Capon
Bridge Food Pantry. Donations
are very welcome. Checks may
be made out to Amazing Grace
Baptist Church Food Pantry
and mailed to Steve Bailes, HC
71, Box 103-C, Capon Bridge,
WV 26711. Sympathy is extended
to the family and friends
of Paula Nesmith. Paula’s
passing leaves a big hole in
the community, church and the
lives of many, especially her
fiance, Robert Smith. We shall
miss her quiet support and
gentle presence.
Shiloh United Methodist
Church regretfully cancelled
their radio show this year. With the Advent season just
around the corner, we should
not forget Thanksgiving. We
have so much to be thankful
for, especially our American
veterans who sacrifice so much
Brenda
Hiett
304-856-2623
for this great country of ours
where we can gather in peace
to enjoy God, family and
freedom.
The Capon Bridge United
Methodist Church will be
presenting a live nativity scene
at 7 p.m. on Dec. 5. The Capon
Bridge tree lighting will be
held at 6 p.m.
I want to thank concerned
friends and family who came
to my rescue during a traffic
accident last Monday. I was
not injured, but my car was
totaled. I was overwhelmed
by all the caring and concern
coming my way. Thank you so
much. q
cap o n b r i d g e
Capon Bridge
Christmas tree
lighting Dec. 5
This coming weekend
brings opportunities to shop
for holiday gifts here in town.
The Capon Bridge Volunteer
Fire Department is sponsoring
its 25th annual old time
Christmas bazaar Friday and
Saturday, Nov. 21-22, from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. at the firehouse.
Saturday is also the final day
for the silent auction set up
in the Capon Bridge Public
Library conference room.
There are some beautiful items
on display, including a whole
table of Jim Shore collectibles.
Now is the time to get those
final bids in.
Next week is Thanksgiving,
and that will be the theme
of the library’s 11:30 a.m.
Wednesday story hour for
toddlers aged 3-5. The children
will be treated to a story,
Wendi Silvano’s “Turkey
Trouble,” and will make
small cornucopias filled with
goodies. (No peanuts — the
library promised.) All of
this will be followed by a
Thanksgiving party.
Rain Crow’s 2nd annual
benefit for the Food Pantry
will be held Friday, Dec. 12, at
the American Legion Building
and will include an auction of
goods and services. Do you
have anything to donate for the
auction? If so, contact George
Constantz at 304-856-1010 or
[email protected] The
Sydney
Pierce
Maurer
540-539-2337
benefit will be family-friendly,
featuring music by the Buck
Mountain String Band, Harvest
Hill Bluegrass, Kara and the
Wayfarers and of course, Rain
Crow. Santa Claus will be
there, along with our Knights
of Olde Hampshire, and all
proceeds will go to the Food
Pantry at the Amazing Grace
Baptist Church.
Kind and generous people
are thanked for supporting
other local groups in recent
weeks. The Capon Bridge
Elementary PTO held a
family craft night last Friday
and thanks all those who
donated canning jars for
the event. They very much
appreciate the community’s
support, as do the students. The
Capon Bridge Ruritan Club is
grateful to the people who gave
so generously at their yard and
bake sale the previous week.
The club collected over $900,
all of which goes to support
our community center.
At the Capon Bridge City
Council meeting last week,
Ruritans Len and Peggy
McMaster gave council
members an update on
the Capon Bridge Ruritan
Club’s plans for December.
They invited everyone to
the lighting of the town tree
A Dog Will Always
Greet You At The Door!
Hampshire County Pet Adoption Program
High View • 304-856-2696
Thank You
Gary R. Loy
The family of
(09.30.32 – 10.30.14) wishes to thank friends and
family for the support given during Gary’s illness
and subsequent passing.
Gary was loved as much as anyone could be,
and the family is grateful to all those who shared
wonderful memories, sent prayers, and extended
their hands to help care for him during his final
days.
The family also wishes to express sincere
thanks to the staffs of the Job Accommodation
Network at WVU, Hospice of the Panhandle,
Hampshire County Committee on Aging/Meals on Wheels, McKee
Funeral Home, Dr. Anthony Haywood, and the United States Navy.
Gary had a life made of friendships, laughter, and wide open spaces.
Although he has left us, we are surrounded by the laughter he left behind.
at 6 p.m. on Friday, Dec.
5, (rain date, Dec. 6). The
Capon Bible Fellowship will
lead us in singing carols,
and refreshments will be
provided by members of the
Capon Bible Fellowship and
the Capon Bridge United
Methodist and Christian
churches, with Greg’s
Restaurant donating hot
chocolate to help keep us warm
and in the holiday spirit.
On Saturday, Dec. 6, Santa
Claus will visit the Ruritan
Community Center from 9 a.m.
to noon. Bring your children to
see him, and the Ruritan Club
hopes to have a photographer
on duty to take pictures of your
little ones with the guy in red.
Other business at the city
council meeting included the
passing of the sewer tariff
increase with the cost of
each 1,000 gallons of sewage
rising from $7 to $9.10, which
should be sufficient to put our
town sewer department back
in the black. The town will
begin charging sewer system
customers the new rate on our
January bills, sent out in early
February.
Eric Sherrard from Thrasher
Engineering reported to city
council that there has been
yet another delay in the water
project with the temporary
bridge needed to install the
pumping station not expected
to arrive until the week after
Thanksgiving. New water
meters have been ordered
and will be installed in early
December.
Police Chief Ralph Rice
reported that the police
department received a $250
grant from the Wal-Mart
Community Grant Program,
and he has submitted four
additional grant applications,
for a total of $6,250. He has
also registered the town with 3
federal grant programs through
which our police department
can apply for assistance with
the purchase of bulletproof
vests, salary costs for newly
hired police officers and funds
to combat drug trafficking.
Chief Rice also reported
that the police department
issued a number of citations
and far more written and
verbal warnings last month,
while handling bolo alerts
for everything from missing
persons with dementia to
reckless driving to domestic
abuse. He also reported
checking to see how fast
people drive through town
when no police car is on
duty and finding many cars
travelling far enough above
the speed limit to be a cause of
concern.
One of the last items on the
city council agenda was the
approval of a building permit
to renovate the former real
estate office next to Eastern
Tire. The new owners plan to
use the building as a grocery
store and butcher shop and
may apply for a license to sell
liquor as well. The permit was
approved on the condition that
a grease trap, main shutoff
and backflow preventer be
installed, if they are not already
in place, to protect our water
and sewer system. q
Stamps For every need ...
Pre-Inked Stamps • Band Stamps • Embossers • Wooden Stamps
Hampshire Review • 304-822-3871
In Loving Memory Of Our Son
Mark Scott Burkett
Aug. 17, 1963- Nov. 16, 1995
It’s been 19 years since the Lord
called you home.
We keep clean flowers on your grave,
and we keep your stone washed because
this is your home.
We just don’t visit you on Memorial
Day it’s all through the year.
We have also kept two of your
flowers alive after all of these 19 years.
With gratitude, Betty and Beth
With Love, Mom, Dad & family
Thank You
Thank You
The Slanesville Presbyterian Church
family wishes to extend its most heartfelt thanks to all who supported our
Christmas Bazaar. Because of you we
were able to give assistance to some local
seniors in critical need of help.
May God bless each and every one of
you.
The family of Virginia Sirbaugh would like to thank everyone for their thoughts, prayers, hugs, flowers, cards, donations,
food and every other act of kindness during the loss of our mother,
grandmother and great grandmother.
We would like to also extend our personal appreciation and
gratitude to Hospice of the Panhandle, Retta Lockwood and
Robin Rippeon her caregivers, and to our extended family Jerry,
Lucas,and Ben Giffin for the special way that they brought comfort
to our family at such a difficult time. We would be remiss if we did
not also thank the Friends of the Library, who did such a great job
of organizing and providing for the meal following the service.
We will be eternally grateful to Steven Szelmeczki, who came
and shared God’s words of comfort and a song of joy and inspiration that brought peace to our loved one in her final hours.
His funeral service was a testament to the way she lived her
life and his words spoke to our hearts in a way that
we shall always remember.
Our Faith
@
Hampshire
Review.com
Hampshire
Review
5B
Wednesday, November 19, 2014
Adventist
Day Adventist – Sat.
9:30 & 11; Grassy Lick Rd., Pastor
Rubi Pimentel 3014-991-4179
Assembly of God
n Mtn View Assembly of God –
Cooper Mtn. worship 10, 6, Wed. 6:30,
304-856-3514, Pastor William Fout
n Lighthouse Assembly of God
– 31/2 miles south of Paw Paw
n Springfield Assembly of God
– Springfield, 304-822-5759 • Mrn.
wor. 8:15 & 10:30 a.m., SS 9:30 a.m.,
Sun. Evn. Yth 5:30 & Adlt 6:30
n Romney Assembly of God
– SS 9:45; Worship 10:45, 6:30;
DivorceCare Wed. 6:30; 304-822-4263,
ww.romneyassembly.org
n Kirby Assembly of God – Pastor Max Cochran, S.S. 10, worship 11,
Sun. 6 p.m., Wed. 7 p.m.
n Augusta Assembly of God –
304-496-8466. 10 a.m.,7 p.m. Sun. Wed. 7 p.m.
n Green Spring Assembly of
God – Green Spring
n Community Bible Assembly
of God – Off Rt. 28, Poland Rd. S.S.
10 a.m., Sun. evening 6.
Baptist
n Fox’s Hollow Baptist – Fox’s
Hollow Rd., 5 miles west of Romney
n First Baptist – Water St., Ft.
Ashby
n Heritage Baptist – Capon
Springs Rd., Capon Springs
n Berean Independent Baptist
– Dan’s Run Road, Fort Ashby
n Faith Bible Baptist – Smokey
Hollow Rd., Capon Bridge
n Little Capon Baptist – 1 mi.
N. of Rt. 50 on Little, Capon Rd. Near
Shanks
n Zoar Baptist – Ford Hill Road,
Augusta, Sunday School 10 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.
n Mt. Bethel Primitive Baptist
– Three Churches
n New Day Baptist – Sunday School
– 10; Worship 11, Tues. Bible Study
6:30 p.m.
n Union Primitive Baptist –
Augusta
n Maranatha Baptist – Romney,
Independent Fundamental, Rt. 28 N. &
Parsons Ave.
n Bethel Baptist – Kirby S.S. 10
a.m., Worship Svc., 11 a.m. Pastor
John Vetter
n First Baptist – Romney, 325 W.
Main St. 304-822-3141, Sun. 9:45,
11, 7; Wed. 7
n Covenant Baptist – Rt. 50. S.S.
9:45 a.m., Sun. worship 11 a.m., Wed.
Bible Study & Youth 7 p.m.
n Amazing Grace Baptist – CB
Christian Church Rd.; S.S. 10 a.m.,
worship 11 a.m., Pastor Kevin Grant
304-856-2773
Brethren
n Bean Settlement Church Of
The Brethren – Rock Oak, S.S. 10
a.m. worship Sun. 11 a.m. Pastor Burl
Charlton
n Capon Chapel Church Of The
Brethren – Levels, Sun. School 10
a.m., worship 11 a.m.
n Kelley Chapel Church Of The
Brethren – Purgitsville, worship
10 a.m. Sun. School 11 a.m., Pastor
Denzil & Shirley Davis
n Hanging Rock Church Of The
Brethren – Rt. 50 East at Hanging
Rock in Augusta. SS 10:15 a.m., Sun.
Morn. wor. 11 a.m., Eve Fellowship
6 p.m., Wor. svc., 7 p.m. Bible Study
Tues. 7 p.m. Pastor Robert D. Combs
Sr., 304-359-0652.
n Oak Grove Church Of The
Brethren – 1.5 mi. N.E. of Levels.
Sun. School 10 a.m., worship 11 a.m.
n Romney Church Of The
Brethren – Parsons Ave., Romney,
Sun. School 9:30 m., Morning worship
10:30 a.m.
n White Pine Church Of The
Brethren – Purgitsville, SS 10 a.m.;
worship every Sun. 11 a.m., Robert
Hughes 304-530-7215
n Tearcoat Church Of The
Brethren – SS 9:15 a.m.; Worship
10:30 a.m.; Wed. 7p.m.
Catholic
n Our Lady Of Grace – 299 School
Street, Romney, Mass: Sat. 5 p.m. Sun.
9 a.m. 304-822-5561
n Annunciation Of Our Lord –
Fort Ashby, Sat. 6 p.m. Sun. 9 a.m.
Christian
n Mt. Union Christian – Rt. 29,
Slanesville
n Delray Christian – Min. Eric
Bridges, S.S. 9 a.m., worship 10 a.m.
& 6:30 p.m., 304-496-7230
n Romney Christian – Sun. S.S.
9:30 & worship 10:45 a.m; Wed. 7
p.m. 304-822-7540
n Capon Bridge Christian – worship 9:30 a.m., S.S. 10:45 a.m., Wed.
BS 7 p.m., Rev. Daniel Smith
n Sandy Ridge Christian – Capon
Bridge
n Timber Ridge Christian – Christian Church Rd., High View, SS 10 a.m.;
worship 11 a.m.; Sun. evening 6 p.m.;
304-856-3658
Church of Christ
n Delray Church of Christ– Rt.
29, 7 mi. S. of Rt. 50. Sun: 10:30, 7
p.m. Wed. 7 p.m.
n Romney Church Of Christ –
293 North High Street, Romney; BS
Sun. 9:45 a.m., Wed. 7 p.m., worship
10:45 a.m., 6 p.m.
n Good Shepherd Church Of
Christ – Capon Bridge; Sun. S.S. 10
a.m., worship 11 a.m., Wed. 7 p.m.,
Pastor Jack Wardrope 304-856-3987
n Augusta Church Of Christ – 9
a.m. SS & worship and 10:30 a.m. worship; & Wed. 7 p.m., 304-496-7775
n Zion Church of Christ – Hoy,
WV, Worship 9:30 a.m., Sunday School
10:30, 304-496-8075
Foursquare Church
n Fireside Christian Fellowship – Call for location, Capon Bridge,
Pastor Dave Chamblee, 304-856-1605,
Sun. worship 10 a.m.
Latter-Day Saints
n Church Of Jesus Christ of
Latter-day Saints – Rt. 50, Sun.
Sacrament meeting at 9 a.m.
Church of God
n Romney Church Of God – S.S.
10 a.m.; worship 11 a.m.; Sun. & Wed.
7 p.m.
n Seventh
n Paw
Paw Church Of God – Rt.
29 304-289-5086 Pastor Larry &
Wanda Shrout S.S. 10 a.m., Worship
11:15 a.m.; Sun. 5 p.m.
Episcopal
n St. Stephen’s episcopal – 310
E. Main, Romney. 9 a.m.; H. Eucharist
Come on in or call 304-822-5054
Lutheran
n Ebenezer Lutheran – Rio, worship 9, S.S. 10:15, 304-490-9281
n Fairview Lutheran – Capon
Bridge, worship 9, S.S. 10:15, 304490-9281
n Hebron Lutheran – S. of Yellow
Spring on Rt. 259, worship 11, 304490-9281
n St. Peters Lutheran – Wardensville, worship 11, 304-490-9281
Mennonite
n Slanesville Community Mennonite – Slanesville Pike, Pastor
Elmer D. Glick
Nazarene
n Romney Church of the Nazarene – 339 Elk Place. S.S. 9:45,
worship and Kidz Korner 10:45 a.m.,
304-822-5412. Pastor Gary Smith
Non-Denominational
n The Outdoor Church – 1,2,3
Sun. 5:30 p.m., Call ahead for location,
4th Adventure Weekend 304-496-7612
n Mtn. View Community
Church – Purgitsville; Pastor Andy
Sions, 304-538-6185
n Capon Bible Fellowship – old
Capon Bridge Middle School annex, 10
a.m., Pastor Jack Whitacre, 304-8563432
n Woodrow Union – Paw Paw,
304-947-7585 S.S. 10 a.m., worship
11 a.m.
n God’s Pavilion – Rio – Pastor
Lewis Paugh, 304-897-6273, Sun.
Evening, 6 p.m.
n Paw Paw Christian Center –
Winchester St., Paw Paw – Pastor Frank
& Linda Lambert, SS,10 a.m.; Church,
11 a.m.; Thurs. B.S. 7 p.m.
n Landmark Holiness Tabernacle - Sun.: 10:30 a.m., 6:30
p.m.; Wed. 7 p.m., Youth Pastor Chad
Everett. Pastor Wendell Everett, 304289-6095
n St. Peter Church of God and
True Holiness – Paw Paw, Serv.:
Wed. 7:30; Sun. 11 & 7:30; 304-9475545
n Community Fellowship –
Points, S.S. 10 a.m., worship 11 a.m.,
B.S. Wed. 7 p.m., children’s Sun. morn.
& Wed. Eve., 304-492-5224
n Behold the Lamb Ministries
– Delray Rd. 1 mi. off Rt. 50, Sun. 11
a.m., Fri. 6 p.m., Pastor Betty Better
304-676-9272
n Evangel Holiness – Shanks, WV,
Rev. Kenneth Powers, Jr., 304-8227772, S.S. 10 a.m., worship 6:30 p.m.,
Wed. 7 p.m
n Christ Community – Rt. 50,
W. of Augusta; 304-496-8566, Sr.
Pas. Don Kesner, Asst. Pas. Michael
Cheshire, Wor. Pas. Greg Staub, Visit
Min. Kevin Evans, Adult & Children’s
Wor. 10:30 a.m., Sun. Eve 6 p.m.
n God’s Word Fellowship – Rt.
50 W. of Romney, Indian Heights Rd.,
worship 10 & SS 11 a.m., Pastor David
Simmons
n Cornerstone Community – Rt.
28, Springfield, Pastor Phill Smith •
304-822-6074
n Safe haven Tabernacle - Sun.:
10 a.m., 6 p.m. Ed Arnold Rd., Augusta, Pastor Mike Hughes 304-289-3683
and Pastor Bob Jeffreys, 304-496-8237
Pentecostal
n U.P.C. Apostolic Tabernacle –
Sunday 10, Sunday Eve. 6, Thur. 7:30,
Larry Powell • 304-813-8607
Presbyterian
n Romney Presbyterian – W.
Rosemary Ln. SS 9:45, Wor: 11, St.
Luke’s Chapel, River Rd. www.romneypresbyterianchurch.org.
n Springfield Presbyterian –
Rt. 28, Springfield, Linda Reece, CLP
worship 9:30 a.m. www.potomacpresby.
net
n Slanesville Presbyterian –
Michele Elliott CLP, Sun. worship 11
a.m.; Sun. School 10 a.m., www.slanesvillepres.org
n Bloomery Presbyterian – Sunday School 9:30, in the Ed. Bldg; Morn.
Worship 11 a.m., 856-3814, Pastor
Ronald L. Wilkes
n Burlington Presbyterian –
Patterson Ck. Rd., Linda Reece, CPL, worship 11 a.m. www.potomacpresby.
net
United Methodist
n Capon Bridge Charge – Pastor
Chris Duckworth. 5th Sunday check
Facebook page. Capon Bridge, Rt. 50,
Cold Stream Road. SS, 10 a.m.; worship, 11 a.m. with a childrens church
during worship. Central, Rt. 50, Timber
Mountain Rd., Loom, worship 9:30
a.m. Coffee hr, 1st Sunday; Children’s
Church during worship. North River
Mills, Cold Stream Rd. 2nd and 4th
Sunday 1 p.m. Capon Chapel, 1st and
3rd Sunday 1 p.m., 2nd and 4th Sunday 11:30 a.m. Christian Church Rd.
n Mill Creek Valley Charge –
Rev. Wade Zirk. Marvin Chapel and
Mt. Olive
n Augusta Charge – Pastor Debbie Shreve. Augusta, Sunday School
10 a.m. Worship: 11; Hott’s Chapel,
Kirby – Worship 9 a.m. Sunday School
10 a.m. Handicap accessible. Mt.
Zion – Worship 10 a.m.; Sunday School
11 a.m.
n Cacapon Charge – Pastor Mike
Funkhouser. Shiloh, 10 a.m. Willow
Chapel, 9 a.m. Bethel, 11 a.m.
n Hampshire Charge – Pastor
Steve Davis, 304-492-5934. Bethel,
10:30 a.m. Island Hill, 9 a.m. Levels,
11 a.m. Salem, 9 a.m. Wesley Chapel,
10 a.m.
n Forest Glen/St. Paul’s
Charge – Pastor Joyce Anderson.
304-726-4012. Forest Glen, worship 9
a.m. St. Paul’s, SS – 10 a.m., worship
11 a.m.
n First United Methodist – 49 N.
High St., Romney. Worship: Sun. 9:55
a.m., S.S. 11 a.m. Mt. Pisgah, Service
11 a.m.
n Ebenezer/Springfield
Charge – Pastor Kenneth Caplinger.
Ebenezer, 9:45 a.m., Sunday School
11 a.m. Springfield, 11 a.m.
Three sides to the coin
There is apparently a big controversy
over whether or not stores should be open
on holidays, such as Thanksgiving and
Christmas (can I still say Christmas?).
Apparently, there are those who think stores
should be closed so that employees can
be home with their families. Others seem
to think stores should be open so that, if a
person wants to shop, by-golly they should
be able to shop and how dare the store not
be open.
Now here is where there really are 3
sides to every coin. There is the side that
votes for the closure of stores on those
special holidays. They want everyone to
be able to be at home with their families,
gathered round the table eating turkey on
Thanksgiving and ham or whatever on
Christmas. It’s obvious that these folks are
traditional family folks who still believe
that the spirit of Norman Rockwell is
alive and well. They still have visions
of sugarplums dancing in their heads at
Christmas and images of families gathered
around the table with a stuffed turkey,
dressing and pumpkin pie on Thanksgiving
Don
Kesner
F o o d f o r Th o u gh t
Day.
Then there’s the 2nd side of the
coin where working on Christmas or
Thanksgiving can mean time-and-a-half
pay for some and double time for others.
It’s just another day for some, and since
there are no special festivities planned and
no interest in munching down on a 2nd
round of dessert during a gridiron rivalry,
then why not make the best of it and make a
little more in the paycheck for the week?
I understand there are a number of major
stores closing their doors on Thanksgiving
this year. A part of me would like to think it
was because the spirit of the holiday is once
again alive and well, but there is a cynical
part of me that says they will still have an
army of workers away from their families
in order to get stocked up and ready for
Black Friday.
And maybe that’s the third side of the
coin. Maybe it’s the idea that there always
seems to be an ulterior motive whenever
corporate America projects the idea that
they are doing something nice. Somewhere,
somehow, behind the facade, no matter how
it all looks on the surface, behind the veil
there is a selfish reason for the season.
It’s unfortunate, but I’m afraid we have
gone too far past the line to ever go back.
The days of “The Waltons” are over for
the most part. For every person who would
love to have the day off to spend with
family, there is most likely 10 who would
demand the stores be open so they can
run out for that last minute item that was
forgotten. Either that or they can’t wait
to get an early start on their Black Friday
shopping.
And so for those who would like to be
home, I hope it works out. For those who
use these holidays as an opportunity to
make a few extra dollars, I also hope it
works. And for those corporate businesses
that tend to let greed run their lives, I’m
sure they will somehow make sure they
come out on top.
But to all, Happy Thanksgiving.
ministers’message
Congratulations
Welcome to the family of
God. You now have been born
again. We are excited because
we know that God has good
things ahead for you.
You may ask yourself, “What
have I gotten myself in to?
What’s next?” Jesus said, “No
one can see the kingdom of God
unless he is born again.” –John
3:3
What this really means is
that you have opened your
heart to the spirit of God,
and he lives within you. You
have surrendered the control
of your life to him. The life
of a Christian is the most
exciting life a person can ever
experience.
There are 5 steps that are
important to help you grow in
Pastor Robert
D. Combs Sr.
Hanging Rock
Church of the
Brethren
the knowledge of Christ.
Step 1: Accept Christ in
your life. Matthew 11:28-30
states, “Come to me and I will
give you rest.” You have done
that by accepting Christ. You
have probably already started
experiencing the rest and peace
Jesus promised. Now you need
to start each day on the right
foot. Come to him in a quiet
time of prayer or Bible reading,
getting to know him better.
Step 2: Give him control over
your life. Jesus wants to steer
Do you believe in
evolution?
I am often asked why I don’t
believe in evolution. There is
no simple answer to this, but
the key word in the question
is “believe.” My attempt to
answer this must come in the
form of more than one column,
but I’ll try to answer as best as
I can. To me, evolution requires
much more faith to believe
than to believe in a creator.
Think of just the evolution of
man and leave all the other
supposedly evolved things out
of the equation for a moment,
which is everything else that
your eyes have ever seen since
rocks would have been the
only thing on this planet in the
evolutionist’s beginning.
Evolutionists ask us to
believe that man evolved
over billions of years from
an inanimate object, a special
type of rock or something
else. This rock or chemical
pile of goo had to come to life,
somehow. It’s easy for them
Rev. David M.
Brown
Cr e at i o n s c i e n c e
to point to an already existing
animal, such as an ape — our
supposedly closest missing
link, since we are somewhat
similar to that animal. However,
it becomes harder to prove our
being something else before
that. There are no fossils of
us turning from say a fish to
an ape. We have no half fish/
half ape fossil. This is where a
belief system or faith system
must come into play. Evolution
becomes more of a religion than
a science at this point.
The tree of life of
evolutionists is called the
“phylogenetic tree” and
supposedly traces us back
to that first pile of inorganic
material that somehow came
alive. If you are wondering
you in the right direction. Let
him take charge of your life.
Step 3: Learn God’s word.
After you have come to Jesus
and willingly turn control over
to him by faith, let him teach
you. The Bible tells us that
growth happens as a result of
knowledge. 2 Peter 1:3 states,
“His divine power has given us
everything we need for life.”
Step 4: Be baptized. Water
baptism is an outward sign of an
inward change or commitment.
It is a public confession and is
a symbol of washing your old
sinful nature out. John 3:5 says,
“Unless one is born of the water
and the spirit, he cannot enter
the kingdom of heaven.”
Step 5: Share the Good News
with others. It is commanded
by Jesus for all who know him
to go forth and tell others about
him and his kingdom while we
witness to our families, next
door or across the country. We
are to fulfill God’s command.
As the people of God, we need
to tell them it is more than
just good advice, it’s good
news, and we can rejoice in his
saving grace and mercy. “Go
therefore and make disciples of
all nations baptizing them in the
name of the Father, the Son and
the Holy Spirit and teach them
to obey his command and surely
I am with you always — to the
very end of the age.” –Matthew
28:19-20
Congratulations — you are
a Christian. “Praise God for
by grace you have been saved
through faith and this is not
from yourself, it is a gift of God
— and not by works so that
no one can boast.” –Ephesians
2:8-9 q
how that “thing” suddenly
came alive, join the crowd.
Like I said, it takes a belief or
faith system, the same as any
religion. The tree of life is a
modern concept developed
sometime back in the mid1800s. Darwin used it to
help write “On the Origin of
Species” in 1859. You can find
his tree of life in the 4th chapter
of that book. This was the kickoff ball for an evolutionary
belief system. The “game”
began. Billions of hours of
research and dollars have been
poured into proving this “tree of
life” ever since. The hope was
that transitional fossils would
one day be found proving the
“tree of life.” Nothing ever
has been found, and most of
the so-called missing links
(monkey men) have been
slowly eliminated from our tree
over the years, too. Some have
proven to be fakes and others
have lacked human DNA.
Those too degenerated to test
for DNA have been kept in the
loop. This doesn’t give one
much confidence in their belief.
Man’s tree of life, out of
necessity, must converge
with every other living thing
on Earth at some point. This
includes fish, spiders, trees,
grass…the list is endless. This
is because evolutionists believe
that non-life matter became
living matter just that once. If
this wasn’t so, we’d be seeing
rocks and piles of chemicals
springing to life on a daily
basis. We just don’t see this, but
we are asked to believe that it
did indeed happen. Your great,
great, great…whatever may
have been a tadpole or a flower.
However, thanks to government
controls, evolution became the
chosen belief to teach in our
country. This is not so in many
other countries, and they look at
us strangely for being so ardent
about this in our school system.
Evolution, in their country, is
taught as another “possibility”
of where life came from.
I’ll write more in the next
column. Keep your columns
together in order to follow
along. q
church notes
A call to prayer for Hampshire
County
The community is invited to gather with
other Christians, pastors and intercessors
to pray for revival in our county. Our
churches, families and individuals are in
need of a mighty move of God. This will
only come by prevailing prayer, unified
prayer, to be held Saturday, Nov. 22, at
Fox’s Hollow Baptist Church at 7 p.m.
Traveling west of Romney 3 miles on
Route 50, turn right onto Fox’s Hollow
Road, bear right and go 1/10 mile. The
church is located on the right.
Every Tuesday at 6 p.m., prayer is
offered up for Hampshire County at Zoar
Baptist Church, 4 miles south on Ford
Hill Road, Augusta. All pastors, churches
are invited to join this weekly time of
interceding for our county, churches,
families and lost souls.
Grief Share held on Wednesdays
Romney Assembly of God will
host Grief Share on Wednesdays
now through Dec. 3 from 6:45-8 p.m.
Margaret Kesner will be the teacher
and will lead the sessions on living
with grief, the journey of grief, the
effects of grief and God’s prescription
for it. Come join this group of friendly,
caring people who will walk alongside
you through one of life’s most difficult
experiences. For more info., visit
bible trivia
griefshare.org.
by Wilson Casey
Christ Community Church holding
senior luncheon
Christ Community Church, Augusta,
will hold a senior luncheon on Friday,
Nov. 21, at 11:30 a.m. Come join in for a
good meal and fellowship.
1. In which book’s 5:18 (KJV) does it state, “In
every thing give thanks, for this is the will of
God?” 1 Thessalonians, 1 Timothy, 1 Peter, 1
John
2. What items of food and drink did Jesus give
thanks for at the Last Supper? Figs/water, Bread/
wine, Fishes/nectar, Honey/milk
3. Which book (KJV) mentions the word
“thanksgiving” the most times at eight? Genesis,
Nehemiah, Psalms, Isaiah
4. From Leviticus 22, a sacrifice of thanksgiving
is most meaningful when it is “what?” Sincere,
Often, Voluntary, Extravagant
5. Where was Jonah when he prayed with the
voice of thanksgiving? Fish’s belly, Aboard ship,
In the wilderness, Mountaintop
6. Whose thanksgiving is expressed in Philippians 4:10-20? Paul, John the Baptist, James,
David
Augusta Community
Thanksgiving service Nov. 25
The
Augusta
Community
Thanksgiving service will be at the
Augusta Church of Christ Tuesday, Nov.
25, at 7:30 p.m. The theme is “In All
Things Give Thanks.” Pastors will be
participating along with special music
by the community choir.
There will be a procession of flags to
honor veterans. Please bring items for
the local food pantry. The offering will
go to the ministerial fund for emergency
needs. Everyone welcome. q
Fifth Sunday evening service
Nov. 30
There will be a special evening
service at Christ Community Church
Sunday, Nov. 30, at 6 p.m. The service
will include an evening of praise and
worship, fellowship, testimonies and
a word from a local pastor. Everyone
welcome including groups from other
church. q
ANSWERS: 1) 1 Thessalonians; 2) Bread/wine;
3) Psalms; 4) Voluntary; 5) Fish’s belly; 6) Paul
hampshire churches
Order Your Custom
Rubber Stampse
Her
Call Linda, Hampshire Review
304-822-3871
Please support the following businesses which help sponsor this page in the belief that attending church is important in our life.
shaffer funeral home
Sarah Shaffer Morgret/Carter R.
Wagoner, Owners, Romney,
304-822-3511
Mckee funeral home
Jim, J.W. & Chad Pyles, Directors
Augusta, WV • 304-496-7077
B.W. Smith well drilling
Springfield, WV • 304-822-5867
Mt. top truck stop
Rt. 50 East, Romney, WV
304-822-5675
Romney unity apartments,
240 Fairfax St., Romney, WV
304-822-7985
locust hills farms
7120 Jersey Mtn. Rd.,
Romney, WV 26757
omp’s grocery
Bloomery, WV • 304-856-3071
judy’s mobile home sales
Shanks, WV • 304-496-7777
John & Melissa Inc.
Financial Planning Center
John R. Zeilor, Romney,
304-822-5404
To correct or add to listings, call the Review at 304-822-3871, ext. 22. To become a sponsor of this page, call the Review at 304-822-3871 ext. 36
puffinburger carpets
Green Spring, WV • M-F 8-4;
Sat. 8-12 • 304-492-5814
farm family ins.
Mathias and Associates
304-538-7444
6B
n
hampshire review
Wednesday, november 19, 2014
Retired school employees pack blizzard bags
The ‘bear’ facts
I’ve told you in previous
columns about the strange
critters that have been seen
around our house, including
a hairless fox and a fisher.
We had seen neither of these
creatures before and have never
seen them again. Although we
never saw it, there is evidence
that we had a visit from a bear
sometime Sunday night or early
Monday morning.
It was still dark when Laurie
left for work, so she didn’t see
anything out of the ordinary.
However, when my son-in-law,
David, drove in from nightshift,
he saw that things under the
carport were out of place. We
have a heavy-duty garbage
building that will accommodate
about 4 or 5 large cans. When
we went to bed there was
a 32-gallon bag of garbage
securely tied in the building
along with a 13-gallon bag
filled with paper products.
David noticed that the lid,
which covered the entire
building, had been ripped off
and was several feet away.
Both doors of the building were
standing wide open and were
completely empty of garbage
bags. Checking the area, David
discovered that both bags had
been dragged up a steep bank
before they were ripped apart.
Nora
KiMble
Romney
Moose
Lodge 1371
Rt. 50 East of Romney
a w e e k ly c H at
It would have had to been
a bear to have the strength
to remove that very heavy
lid. I don’t know if it threw
or dragged it away from the
carport. And if we needed
further proof that it was a bear,
paw prints were and still are on
the lid — bear paw prints.
We’ve had raccoons get
into our garbage, but that was
before we obtained the storage
building. And it would have
taken a host of them to rip the
lid off. No, we were visited by
a bear that has decided that it’s
not time to hibernate.
About 8 years ago, I actually
saw a bear cross the neighbor’s
property that borders our land.
That was close enough for me.
Thankfully, I didn’t witness
one tearing our storage building
apart.
I guess that along with the
hairless fox and the fisher, we’ll
have to be on the lookout for
bears now. It’s beginning to
look like we live in the middle
of a wildlife crossing. q
Friday, Nov. 21
7-11 p.m.
Karaoke & DJ
Ben Jammin’
Saturday, Nov. 22
7-11 p.m.
hArSe members filled 141 blizzard bags to be delivered by the romney meals-on-Wheels
program.
John Bolton
Valid photo id required for all guests
Submitted by donnA CloVis
ROMNEy
—
The
Hampshire Association of
Retired School Employees
packed blizzard bags for shutins Monday, Oct. 20, at the
Romney Senior Center. After
eating a delicious lunch at the
center, the members packed
bags to be distributed to
seniors in Hampshire County.
The project started several
years ago and provides food to
seniors who cannot leave their
homes in case of cold weather
or snow. The Romney Mealson-Wheels program delivers
the bags.
This year the group filled
141 bags with an entrée,
Staff welcome
applesauce, juice, water and
crackers. The next HARSE
meeting will be in April and
will include their annual
luncheon and memorial service
in remembrance of deceased
retirees
from
Hampshire
County Schools and the West
Virginia Schools for the Deaf
and the Blind.
If you would like to join
the organization, contact
Carol Fultz, president, or
Beth Parsons, membership
chairman. q
Better quality of life for people with serious illnesses through:
•Expertmedicalcareinyourhome
•Caregivereducationand24-houron-callsupport
•Assistancewithbathing,hairandnailcare
Call for a free informational visit.
(304) 264-0406 | www.hospiceotp.org
It’s about how you live.
Now in it’s 6th Year!
Friday, Nov. 21
thru TUESDAY,
Nov. 25, 2014
149 HYDE ST., MOOREFIELD
538-8100
www.wvafun.com
SUBJECT TO CHANGE ... CALL AHEAD
COMING SOON: HORRIBLE BOSSES 2
AND PENGUINS OF MADAGASCAR
CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE FOR WEDNESDAY
AND THANKSGIVING DAY TIMES!
INTERSTELLAR
FRI-TUES
Matthew McConaughey
Anne Hathaway
11:45 • 4:30 • 8:00
HUNGER GAMES:
MOCKINGJAY PART 1
PG-13
FRI-TUES 12:00 • 3:00 • 6:00 • 8:45
Jim Carrey
Jeff Daniels
DUMB AND DUMBER TO
CAPon BridGe — the Capon Bridge Public Library Board of
directors, along with head librarian Kathy haines, would like
to introduce their new staff members nancy meade, assistant
librarian, and Christina napier, library aide. the library board is
happy to have such a wonderful team in place. Please feel free
to stop in and welcome nancy and Christina to the library. q
FRI-TUES 12:15 • 3:15 • 6:15 • 8:55
PG-13
BIG HERO 6
FRI-TUES 12:30 • 3:30 • 6:30 • 8:45
JOHN WICK FINAL
PG
Keanu Reeves
WEEK! Michael Nyquist
FRI-TUES 12:15 • 3:15 • 6:15 • 8:55
OUIJA
Join us for a
Taste of
Southern
Hospitality!
PG-13
Jennifer Lawrence
Josh Hutcherson
FINAL WEEK
FRI-TUES 12:30 • 3:30 • 6:30 • 8:55
Saturday
Nov. 22
10 a.m. to
4 p.m.
R
Olivia Cooke
Ana Coto
Gourmet Tastings and
Demonstrations,
Wine Tasting,
Door Prizes,
and Great Sales
PG-13
SUNDAY BREAKFAST 8-11 A.M.
Moorefield, WV 304-530-3226
OUR GIFT CERTIFICATES MAKE GREAT GIFTS!
Violet davey, Brenda Voit, Carolyn Poling and erma Kerns took
the review with them on their trip to the Grand Canyon.
PiCture of tHe week
Visit All 5 Businesses To
WIN The
Grand Prize Gift Basket
Anderson’s
Corner
OPEN 24 HOURS
304-822-4285
SOUTH BRANCH INN
Moorefield 538-2033 • Romney 822-2444
B-Belle’s
Boutique
Suites with Jacuzzis
Have Your Next Party With Us!
Anniversary • Birthday • Reception
Cinema 6 gift certificates available for
purchase at both hotel locations.
Miller’s Market
304-822-5293
Dillon’s
Country
Treasures
Mario’s Italian
Restaurant
304-822-4202
304-822-7776
304-822-8002
OUR GIFT SHOP HAS UNIQUE GIFTS THAT MAKE
GREAT CHRISTMAS PRESENTS!
New First
Time
Home
Buyer
Program
First Time Home Buyer Program
Dahlias
By dorothY roomsBurg Augusta
email your photos showing life in hampshire County to us at
[email protected], mail them to Box 1036, romney, WV 26757, or drop them off at 74 W. main St., romney.
include a title for the photo, your name and hometown, and a
way to contact you.
November
Supper
Saturday, Nov. 22
4:30 to 7 p.m.
Slanesville Volunteer
Fire & Rescue
Rt. 29 North of Rt. 50
Everyone Welcome
Menu:
Turkey or
Country Ham,
Mashed
Potatoes,
Green Beans,
Coleslaw,
Apple Sauce,
Cake
30 year fixed
30 Year Fixed
Rate
rate mortgage is
currently
Mortgage
Is 4.99%
5.094% APR*
(based on
Currently 4.99%
$100,000
mortgage)
5.094% APR*
Borrow up to 95%
of Purchase Price
Borrow up to 95%
of Purchase Price
(PMI required)
(PMI required)
(Based on $100,000 mortgage)
Example: A $100,000 mortgage fixed for 30 years at 4.99% (5.094% APR) - 360 monthly payments of $607.61
Example: A $100,000 mortgage fixedincluding
for 30
yearsinterest,
at 4.99%
APR) - 360 monthy payments of $607.61 including principal, interest and PMI.
principal,
and PMI.(5.094%
Payment amount shown does not include taxes and hazard insurance and the actual
Payment amount shown does not include
taxes will
and
hazard
insurance
actual
obligation
payment obligation
be greater.
Limited
to WV propertiesand
– Somethe
restrictions
apply. payment
*APR – Annual Percentage
Rate will be greater. Limited to WV properties.
Some restrictions apply. *APR - Annual Percentage Rate
Phone: (304)822-8700
Contact Us UsContact
Phone: 304-822-8700
E-mail: [email protected]
Today
Fax:
(304)
822-5309
Email: [email protected]
more information!
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Website: www.fnbromney.com
Fax: 304-822-5309
Information!Romney | Hampshire Square | Fort Ashby | Capon Bridge
Website: www.fnbromney.com
Romney | Hampshire Square | Capon Bridge | Fort Ashby
C
Wednesday
November 19, 2014
@
Hampshire
Review.com
Sports
&
Outdoors
The luck of the draw
Clint Ferguson, WV Outdoors, Page 2C
Ed
DeWitt
e d i t o r i al
Knocking the rust off
I used to play basketball a lot.
I played in church league growing up in Maryland, and that transitioned into a career playing for
Beall that spanned 7th through
12th grades.
In fact, as I mentioned in one
of my very 1st columns at the Review, my 1st trip to Romney was
a basketball game at the old middle school when I was in the 7th
grade.
After high school I played in a
pickup game at Frostburg State
every day at lunchtime when I
didn’t have class. It was the faculty game, but I knew a few people who got me connected to the
group.
At first I would fill in when
they needed extra players. After a
semester or 2 of showing up nearly every day, I was accepted as
one of the guys, and played with
them every weekday afternoon for
the better part of 3 years.
I improved so much as a player
in those years.
I was way better than I ever was
in high school, and looking back
on those days now a decade later,
it’s the reason I can still at least
show my face on a court without
being completely embarrassed.
Last September I broke my finger playing in a pickup game with
my friends in Cumberland. I was
forced out of action for a while,
then I moved to Hampshire County right about the time it was too
cold to play outside.
Basketball went to the back of
the list of priorities.
Flash forward 14 months, and
in the midst of a few changes I’ve
decided to make – the cliché ones
about eating better and exercising
more – I decided to try and get
back out there, and, after a bit of
research, I found a local game.
The only problem?
It’s on Sunday night! As you
know, I usually watch 9 hours of
football on Sunday and have to
numb the pain of the ‘Skins losing. You get the idea.
Luckily, the image makeover I
spoke of above happened to coincide perfectly with the single
worst game I’ve ever watched the
Redskins’ play (and that’s saying
a lot) Sunday afternoon.
The team was wretched on every level and was embarrassed by
the 1-8 Bucs at home. Needless
to say, after the game ended I was
ready to get out of my house.
So I headed for Romney and
into a new situation with new
people hoping for a familiar experience. The resulting hour-anda-half was both expected and unexpected.
The good?
I had a ton of fun and hopefully have found a regular source of
exercise and an outlet for a little
competition in the winter when
I can’t play golf. The guys were
very accommodating of a stranger
and I couldn’t have felt more welcome. Also, I didn’t have any ill
effects from my now crooked pinky finger.
The bad?
I haven’t really run a considerable distance for any amount of
time since the day I broke my finger last year. You can imagine
See Ed page 2C n
Fall ’14
Flashback
Ed DeWitt Review Staff
Some of their best moments resulted in some of our best images this fall. Trojan athletes clockwise from center are runner Anthony Gilreath, soccer
players Jarred Saville and Brooke Harwood, spikers Kirston Sowers and Kaylynn Sneathen, running back Dalton Pritts, soccer’s Emilynn Corbin, the
HHS cheerleaders, soccer’s Jordan Richardson, volleyball’s Katie Lafollette, runner Hannah Lipps and football player Zach Rhodes.
Swimmers jump in Saturday
Review Staff
Staley No. 2 field goal
kicker in West Virginia
Page 2C
​​
Winter
sports are underway at
Hampshire High School and the
swim team will be the 1st Trojan
squad competing in the 2014-2015
campaign.
Hampshire will travel to Alderson
Broaddus College this Saturday for
a meet with 8 other teams.
“The season has started off with a
bang,” Coach Shelby Walburn said
via email Monday morning.
“The meet this Saturday will
give us some really good starting
points. We are without quite a few
key swimmers with the Italian Exchange trip, but I think that some of
our new swimmers are ready to step
up and take charge,” she said.
Returning for the Trojans are girls
Marissa Coyle, Randi McLaughlin,
Miranda Clark, Hattie Dove, Carlee Gagliardo, Amanda Marshall,
Brooke Spencer, Kayla Corbin and
Madison Draper, and boys Gunner
Edgell and Jacob Slocum.
This year, the captains are Edgell,
Draper, Corbin and Gagliardo.
“I am looking at some really
strong relays for both the boys and
the girls,” Walburn said. “We have
some new boys who are incredibly
talented in the pool like Michael
McQuaid and Garrett Lease.
“The entire boy’s team, while
small, is extremely dedicated and
talented. Jacob and Gunner are
ready to take this team to States
again like last year.” For the girls, newcomers Cat
Craig and Lexi Lease will join the
veterans with hopes for a strong
year. “They have been waiting to
have an overall strong team and after 2-plus years of training they are
ready to win,” Walburn said. “I am
looking forward to some strong
competitions on both sides this
year.”
As any coach should, Walburn
has set the bar high this season
See Jump page 2C n
2C
n
hampshire review
sPorts
Wednesday, november 19, 2014
Staley 2nd in state with 6 field goals
review Staff
SUNRISE
SUMMIT
— An up-and-down year for
the Hampshire High football team’s offense yielded 1
standout performance at the
state level.
Those that pay attention to
such things will not be surprised.
Trojan placekicker Evan
Staley, a junior, ranked 2nd
in the state in successful field
goals, splitting the uprights for
3 points 6 times this season.
He also had 30 extra-point
kicks.
Staley finished tied with
Evan Stire from Morgantown
and trailed only Cason Kessinger of Huntington and Zak
Kriechbaum of Linsly who
finished with 7 kicks.
“He did a super job,” Hampshire football coach Darren
Grace said, adding, “his field
goals were great, obviously,
but he also gave us great field
position with his leg all season
long.”
In addition to placekicking, Staley served as the punter and routinely pinned teams
inside the 30 yard-line. He
also specialized in kicking the
football out of the end zone on
kickoffs, forcing touchbacks
for the opposition.
“Hopefully next year he’ll
come out and do even better,”
Grace said. “He’s a big part of
what we do on offense.” o
Ed dEWitt
review
Staff
hampshire
junior
evan
Staley
tries
a field
goal in
a game
this fall.
you’re not in Kansas any longer, Bill Snyder
The HCR spent idle weekend No.
2 passively monitoring the 2014-15
men’s basketball team and convalescing
from football’s painful 1st-half no show
against the Texas Longhorns in Austin. It’s never easy to lose to Texas, especially when one also loses a wager to
his school president, who is a UT alum.
First, the good news: Head Coach
Bob Huggins’ team is a badly aimed
2-0, headed into the Puerto Rico Tipoff
Tournament.
Late Thursday night, WVU faces
nearby George Mason, a team that’s
earned as many Final Fours as WVU
has in recent years. After that, WVU is
guaranteed 3 other games against some
combo of New Mexico, Boston College, UConn, College of Charleston,
Texas A&M or Dayton.
Of course, competing for an audience
with the basketball team will be the 6-4
Mountaineer football team. Remember
them? yes, believe it or not, the season
didn’t end 10 days ago in aforementioned Austin.
The HCR can compare that 1st half
only to the 2nd half of the Kansas game
in terms of lethargy, incompetence, and
disorder, at least on offense and special
teams, the “2 sides of the ball” that cost
WVU’s defense a shutout in that game.
The luck of
the draw
Every year it’s the same old
routine when November rolls
around. The alarm clock goes
off well before daylight, and
any free time is spent on stand
patiently waiting for that big
buck to come by. Trail camera pictures are analyzed, and
stands are placed in the best
possible locations.
Pre-scouting before the deer
season even comes in to figure
out what mast hit and where
the food is going to be helps in
determining where to place a
tree stand or ground blind. Not
to mention all the hours spent
preparing and mowing food
plots in the summer to give
the deer a quality food source.
My point is serious deer hunters spend a lot of time not only
preparing for deer season but
also sitting for hours on stand
once it comes in.
I’ve lived and hunted in
West Virginia all of my life,
and I’ve come to the conclusion that no matter how well
prepared you think you are
once deer season comes in, it’s
being in the right place at the
right time. There are so many
factors that come into play, especially when the rut is in. A
hot doe can lead a big buck
wherever she goes. He could
be under your stand one day
and a mile away the next. you
just never know. Add thousands of hunters in the woods
during buck season, and deer
can be spooked and run your
direction at any second.
Kevin
stewart
hot CouCh rePort
In the game in Austin, the 1st-half defense joined in on the foibles, allowing
UT 24 points and making its normally
pedestrian offense look something akin
to Oregon’s. In the 2nd half, the defense
stiffened mightily, allowing only a late
4th-quarter, short-field TD following a
failed onside kick attempt.
Texas’ other points, a safety, occurred
as a result of breakdowns on offense
and the punt return team. Once again, a
punt went uncaught, and rolled 20 yards
like a golf putt to the goal line, where
it was ceremoniously downed, opening the door for a swinging gate sack by
Cedric Reed, killing what little momentum the offense had arduously chiseled
out in the 3rd quarter.
The HCR hopes that, during the off
week and upcoming short week, special
teams coordinator Joe DeForest finds
Clint
FerGuson
WV outdoorS
Then there’s the chance
that the buck you’re after can
get hit by a vehicle, shot by
a neighbor, poached and so
forth. There are so many factors that cannot be controlled.
As a landowner, all I can do is
create the best possible habitat for wildlife and then just sit
back and wait for hopefully a
big buck to walk through once
deer season comes in.
Those hunting on public
lands have to do their homework as well to determine
where the mast hit, what area
to hunt and how to best access it, where others are hunting and so forth. Even then, it’s
still the luck of the draw and
like playing the lottery trying
to connect with a mature buck.
Of course, the more time
you can spend in the deer
woods, the better your odds
are. I spent 2 months hunting
the buck I fortunately ended up
shooting on Thanksgiving Day
last year.
Without the snow cover on
the ground, I would never have
seen the heavy racked 10-point
that day. I first spotted him at
more than 500 yards, and then
shot him at 326 yards 6 hours
later. Persistence, patients and
snow helped me last Thanksgiving.
Weather is another factor in
someone, anyone, who can field a punt.
Not return a punt — we wish to not get
so ambitious as that — but just catch
the ball somewhere between the 10- and
20-yard line and keep the offense off
the goal line. There are 85 scholarship
players and tons of walk-ons, but no
one can catch a punt?
It also appears, as much as WVU’s
depth has improved, 2 areas are beginning to wear on the offense: the offensive line, especially the tackles, and
playmakers at wide receiver not named
Kevin White and Mario Alford.
On the offensive line, all-conference
Quinton Spain, Tyler Orlosky, Mark
Glowinski, Marquis Lucas, and Adam
“yellow-Flag” Pankey have played a
super majority of the season’s snaps.
Against Texas, they looked tired,
slow and overpowered. Fatigue could
be a factor in pass protection breakdowns and narrower running lanes for
the backs. Nonetheless, since the Baylor
game, there’s been a well-documented
decline in WVU’s offensive production.
Will the off week be enough to remedy WVU’s late-season issues, none of
which truly indicate that, overall, the
program is headed in the wrong direction again? It’s just life in the Big 12.
Next up, Bob Stoops Whoopin’ Bill
deer hunting. As I mentioned
I love hunting with snow on
the ground. Windy conditions
might not allow you to hunt
in a tree stand without getting
rocked all over the place, so
a backup plan is always nice
to have. Rain can allow you
to slip along quietly without
crunching leaves or you can sit
in a ground blind and stay dry.
Speaking as a dad of a
3-year-old, hunting time can
be hard to come by nowadays,
but I make sure to make the
most of it when I’m out there.
I’m really enjoying being able
to hunt on Sunday this year as
it gives me an extra day, but
I’ll save that column for next
week.
So this deer season try to get
out there every chance you get,
be patient and keep a positive
attitude. I know I sometimes
struggle with the last one when
gunshots are ringing out all
around me on the first 3 days
of gun season, but you have to
stay positive and be persistent.
The much-anticipated
2-week long buck gun season
starts Monday, Nov. 24, and
runs to Saturday, Dec. 6. Muzzleloader season is the following week from Dec. 8 to 13.
Then there’s one last chance
to fill the freezer on the split
antlerless season on Dec. 18 to
20. It’s open again on Dec. 29
to 31, to finish the year and the
2014 deer seasons.
As always, good luck, stay
safe and enjoy your time in
the West Virginia deer woods.
Wear those safety belts and
plenty of blaze orange. Most of
all, take your time, settle those
cross hairs and shoot straight.
o
CHARLESTON — As is traditional every Monday before
Thanksgiving, West Virginia’s
2-week antlered firearm season
begins Monday and continues
through Dec. 6, 2014.
The West Virginia buck gun
season provides a wealth of
recreational opportunities for
hunters and has a tremendous
economic impact on the state’s
economy.
“Hunters should enjoy a
great deer season in 2014,”
said Curtis I. Taylor, chief of
the Wildlife Resources Section
of the Division of Natural Resources (DNR). “Hunters can
harvest an additional buck with
the purchase of the appropriate
stamp.”
Resident hunters wanting the
extra buck must purchase the
Class RG stamp prior to the beginning of the season. The cost
is $21. The RG stamp must be
accompanied by a Class A and
CS, A-L, AB-L, X, XS, XJ,
AH, AHJ or free license.
Resident landowners have
the privilege of harvesting an
extra buck without purchasing
the RG stamp if they are hunting on their own property. Nonresident hunters wanting an
extra buck must purchase an
RRG stamp prior to the begin-
ning of the season, and the cost
is $43. The RRG stamp must
be accompanied by the Class
E, AAH, AAHJ or XXJ license.
Nonresident hunters who
own land in West Virginia are
not exempt from purchasing a
license or the extra buck stamp,
even if hunting on their own
property.
Buck firearm hunters in 31
counties are required to take an
antlerless deer with a firearm
prior to harvesting a second
antlered deer during the buck
firearms season.
Most counties are open to
concurrent antlerless deer season hunting during the tradi-
5 Reasons to Hate K-State:
5. That beatdown 2 years ago when
WVU still had a chance to salvage a
very good season. However, Collin
Klein and 55-17 happened.
4. Collin Klein = Tim Tebow light.
3. The Little Apple. yeah, very clever.
2. It’s amazingly hard to have an emotional response to anything related to
Kansas and, thus, to do this list.
1. It’s a partisan red state with a town
named Liberal.
Prediction: A well-rested defense saves
the day, and Dreamius Smith becomes
top dog in the backfield, breaking off at
least 2 long TD runs: WVU 28, K-State
24. o
Jump
n
from Page 1C
when it comes to what the
team will be striving to attain.
“Overall, my goals are to
take at least 2 of the 3 relays
for both the girls and boys to
states and have some swimmers qualify in their individual events as well.
“The team is young this year
with only 2 seniors and 8 juniors out of 29 total swimmers.
I am looking to the future with
the knowledge that we have
even more talent coming in as
well. I think these next 4 years
are going to be incredible. I
want to take the entire team to
States within that time.”
Up 1st will be the meet at
Ed
n
from Page 1C
how that went. A guy who is
33 and about 50 pounds overweight trying to run for the
1st time in 14 month. yeah,
that was the bad.
The ugly? Where do I start?
My shot? I totaled as many
air balls as I did made baskets.
My defense? Well, my high
school coach once famously
describe my coverage by saying, “Ed, you look like a baby
guarding a man.” Not much
has changed.
Overall I was beyond rusty.
After I had enough, I said
my goodbyes and thank yous
and I made the drive back
to Slanesville feeling like I
Buck, antlerless gun seasons open Monday
Submitted by WVdnr
Snyder’s Kansas State Wildcats on a
Thursday night in Morgantown.
Three weeks ago, this game still had
the potential to decide the Big 12 title.
Since then, WVU now rides a 2-game
losing streak, and K-State was dismantled by TCU, removing much of the luster from the game.
The HCR suspects a fickle response
from the home fan base but anticipates
a much more energetic WVU team to
show up.
tional buck gun season. Class
N or Class NN permits to hunt
during the antlerless deer season can be purchased at any
time. Antlerless deer firearm
season opens Monday on private land and selected public
lands.
Hunters should consult the
2014–2015 Hunting and Trapping Regulations
available
at license agents and at www.
wvdnr.gov for specific antlerless deer regulations in each
county and wildlife management area.
Hunters may harvest 2 deer
on the same day, but only 1 of
those can be a buck.
Alderson Broaddus, but an
early snag will keep things interesting as practice plays out
this week. The pools at both
the Hampshire Wellness and
Fitness Center and the West
Virginia Schools for the Deaf
and the Blind are out of commission, forcing the Trojans to
practice out of the water for
the bulk of the week.
They will head to Cumberland on Thursday for practice
at the yMCA.
“I am incredibly excited to
see where we stand on Saturday despite these setbacks,”
Walburn said.
“I’m not pushing some of
our swimmers in some of the
harder events just to get overall points. I really want to see
them be incredibly successful
for the beginning meet.” o
hadn’t felt in a long time; like
something other than a big
heavy waste of space.
It was an eye-opening evening.
I have a long way to go to
get back to respectability fitness-wise, but am glad I’ve
made a few recent changes
that should get me back on the
right track.
years ago I joined up with
some pretty non-athletic
friends and put a team in a local indoor soccer league back
home.
Two of the guys threw up at
the 1st game. I shook my head
in wonder at being THAT out
of shape.
I understand now.
And though I didn’t reach
that unfortunate plateau, I was
closer than I’ve ever been.
Hopefully that was the worst
it will be, and next week will
be a bit easier.
It’s been a vastly different
few weeks for me on a couple
of different levels. I am thankful that after more than a year
of being a bum that I am back
out there, and I’m even happier that I’ve found another
piece of the puzzle in making
Hampshire County feel a little
more like home. o
sCorEBoArd
BoWLinG
WiLSon LAneS
Week of nov. 3
men’s Leagues
Scott hixenbaugh
803 / 289
Josh oates
745 / 256
Josh oates
731 / 268
rodney helsley
724 / 258
Justin Boyer
724 / 277
Allen Buckley
712 / 244
Craig davis
692 / 234
tommy mcdonald
684 / 297
Jeff hixenbaugh
680 / 242
Bob Greene
679 / 250
Brett Stenberg
668 / 264
rodney Kesner
666 / 237
Punkin oates
663 / 238
Johnny Corbin
662 / 277
Brett Stenberg
652 / 236
Joe Shoemaker
650 / 237
Allen Buckley
649 / 264
John ellifritz
645 / 256
Glen Shobe
644 / 244
tommy mcdonald
626 / 223
richard Shanholtz
621 / 237
Greg rinker
621 / 223
tim Parsons
620 / 234
Joe Shoemaker
618 / 228
Johnny Corbin
610 / 217
richard Boyer
606 / 223
John hott
602 / 227
Women’s Leagues
Pat Gwizdale
603 / 237
diana haines
509 / 179
hampshire County Youth
travis Veach
538 / 225
Katherine Corbin
528 / 218
mark Veach
403 / 157
WeeK of oCt. 27
men’s League
Clay Corbin
769 / 268
Bryan Jose
752 / 267
Billy Kyle
727 / 247
rodney helsley
723 / 246
Bob Greene
720 / 254
Joe Shoemaker
720 / 249
Glen Shobe
702 / 242
richard Shanholtz
700 / 257
tommy mcdonald
696 / 267
Bob Greene
694 / 259
Scott hixenbaugh
671 / 244
Craig davis
665 / 246
tommy mcdonald
657 / 247
Josh oates
651 / 257
Larry Younce
647 / 236
Brett Stenberg
643 / 243
Joe Shoemaker
636 / 257
Allen Buckley
633 / 224
Bob Greene
628 / 249
Punkin oates
627 / 221
tim Parsons
625 / 234
Brett Stenberg
623 / 229
Josh oates
621 / 227
Jeff hixenbaugh
610 / 211
Women’s Leagues
Pat Gwizdale
587 / 213
Kaitlyn Sealock
576 / 216
Pat Gwizdale
564 / 202
inella Zirk
523 / 193
Report hunting
violations
Submitted by WVdnr
CHARLESTON — With
buck season set to open this
Monday, the WVDNR is seeking your help.
It’s easy to report hunting or
fishing law violations in West
Virginia, and those reports are
helpful in protecting the state’s
wildlife.
“Anyone who witnesses or
is aware of hunting and fishing law violations can call the
closest DNR district office, 911
or provide information on the
DNR website,” said Col. Jerry
Jenkins, chief of the DNR Law
Enforcement Section.
“We are doing this to ensure
a quicker response to the violations reported by the public.”
For non-emergency calls or
questions, or to report questionable hunting or fishing activity,
telephone calls should be made
directly to the closest of six
DNR district offices.
For emergencies or to report
game law violations in progress, calls should go to local 911
centers or use the DNR website
reporting at www.wvdnr.gov/
LEnforce/Poachers.shtm which
sends information directly to a
Natural Resources Police Officer for immediate response.
“Call immediately, any time,
day or night, if you see something going on in violation of the
state’s wildlife laws,” said Col.
Jenkins. “
When calling, please provide
the following information, if
known, to a West Virginia Natural Resources Police Officer: the
nature of the violation; the location of the violation; the name or
description of the violator; a description of any vehicle and license number or boat involved
in the violation; any other important information which will
assist in apprehending the violator.
Hampshire County falls in
District 2. The Romney office
contact phone number is 304822-3551.o
We’re always looking for news
Send information or ideas to Sports editor ed deWitt in 6
ways. email him at [email protected] Call him at
304-822-3871, ext. 27. find him on facebook. Stop by our
office at 74 W. main St. in romney. mail him at P.o. Box
1036, romney, WV 26757. or corner him when you see
him at a game.
Wednesday, november 19, 2014
hampshire review n 3C
sPorts
Biddy Buddy clinic a big success
If you missed the 2nd annual
Biddy Buddy Basketball Clinic, which was held last Saturday
at Hampshire High School, you
really missed out.
The instruction was great,
and everyone who participated seemed to have a wonderful
time. Special thanks go out to
our clinic instructors Julieanne
Buckley, Orie Pancione, Jamie
Jordan and all the members of
the HHS girls’ basketball team
who helped out.
They were knowledgeable, enthusiastic, and patient
with the kids, and their passion for the game really showed
through.
If you want to sign up for
the Biddy Buddy Basketball
League and weren’t able to
make it to the registration on
Saturday, you’re still not too
late to join the fun. There are
several ways that you may register. you may log onto our
website, hampshirecountyparks.
com, and fill out the program
registration form, which is located at the bottom of the home
page.
you may then mail the $25
registration fee to us at P.O.
Box 213, Romney, WV 26757,
or you may pay the fee the day
of the draft.
you may also register any
weekday between 9 a.m. and 1
p.m. at the HCP&R Office at 90
North High St. in Romney. We
will also be accepting registrations the day of the draft.
This year we are making Biddy Buddy a county-wide league.
There will no longer be separate
leagues in Romney and Capon
Larry
see
PA r K S & r e C
Bridge, but rather one league
that will alternate practices and
games between the two locations.
All registered players will be
entered into the draft together,
rather than being separated by
location.
The draft for this year’s Biddy Buddy League will be held
on Sunday, Nov. 23, at Romney
Middle School. The boys’ draft
will run from 1 until 3 p.m., followed by the girls’ draft from 3
until 5 p.m.
Players will go through some
fundamental drills before the
coaches select their teams, so
players should dress appropriately to work out.
After the draft, parents and
players will have a chance to
meet with their coaches, who
will provide practice schedules
and other pertinent information
about the league.
If you have questions about
Biddy Buddy, you may call
league coordinator David Richardson at 304-813-2644 or the
HCP&R Office.
Biddy Buddy is one of the
longest-running and best programs that we sponsor, so don’t
miss out on this opportunity to
join the fun.
The 2nd annual Christmas
Festival of Lights kicks off with
the lighting ceremony, which
will be held on Saturday, Nov.
29, beginning at 5 p.m. at the
amphitheater at Central Hampshire Park.
We will be serving coffee,
hot chocolate and cookies at
the ceremony, and Santa will
be there to talk to all the kids,
young and old.
The Festival officially begins at 6 p.m. when our displays
are lit for the first time. Thanks
to the generosity of the Hampshire County Commission, the
Hampshire County Parks and
Recreation Board and the donors to our fund drive, the festival has greatly expanded this
year.
We have grown to 49 displays, many of which are animated, and we have purchased
lights for all the pavilions and
most of the trees in the park.
Kenny McBride and his crew
have done a fantastic job of getting the lights up and running
the electricity to them.
The Festival will be open
from 6 until 10 p.m. every night
from Nov. 29 through New
year’s Day. There is no admission charge, so make plans to
come early and often to enjoy
this great Christmas tradition.
If wrestling is your game,
then make sure that you register for the Hampshire Mat Club,
which is a youth wrestling program that teaches folk style
wrestling for boys and girls
ages 4-15.
If you are interested in the
Mat Club and haven’t registered
yet, there’s still time to get in on
Submitted by hCPr
Participants of the hampshire County Parks and recreation’s second annual Biddy Buddy
Basketball Clinic held last Saturday at hampshire high School.
the fun. you may register online at the Hampshire Mat Club
website, hampshirematclub.
com. Just scroll to the bottom of
the home page and click on the
wrestling waiver and registration form link and then print the
form. Completed forms, along
with the $50 registration fee,
may be mailed to HCP&R. you
may also register at the HCP&R
Office. If you have questions
about the Mat Club, contact
Head Coach John Lambert at
304-671-5501, or the HCP&R
Office.
Our Walk To Be Fit Program
officially ended on Oct. 31, and
we have been busy collecting
final tally sheets and calculating
distances walked.
We will be contacting walkers who reached milestones
sometime in the next few weeks
to make arrangements for delivery of prizes.
If you think you have earned
a prize and don’t hear from us
in the near future, give us a call
and we’ll make sure that you
get the reward that you have
earned. It is not our intention
to miss anyone who deserves a
prize for his or her hard work.
Just because Walk To Be Fit
is over for another year, that
doesn’t mean that you have to
stop exercising. There are still
plenty of warm days left when
you can get out and take a walk,
a jog or a bike ride sometime
during the day.
HCP&R would like to thank
all those who participated in
Walk To Be Fit, and we look
forward to seeing all of you
next April when the program
begins anew. o
Health
ACA enrollment
now open
niCK gAudio review Staff
West Virginians can now sign
up for health insurance coverage
for 2015 through the federallysubsidized marketplace under
the Affordable Care Act.
The enrollment period opened
on Saturday and runs through
Feb. 15. The last day to apply for
coverage that will start on the
very first day of 2015, however,
is Dec. 15.
Last year, there was a fee for
not having health insurance — 1
percent of a household’s yearly
income or $95 per person, or
$47.50 per child under 18. This
year, the penalty increases. For
those without coverage, the fee
jumps to whichever is greater —
2 percent of annual household
income or $325 per adult and
$162.50 per child under 18.
The maximum penalty for
a family without insurance is
$975.
If you purchased insurance
through the ACA marketplace
last year, you have the option to
renew it or change your plan.
In order to qualify for subsidies
this year, the ACA states, you
must earn between 138 percent
and 400 percent of the federal
poverty level — which amounts
to between about $16,000 and
$47,000, respectively, for an
individual.
Similar to other, private health
care plans, rates vary based on
tobacco use, family composition,
age, and geography. Officially,
West Virginia has established
11 geographic rating areas.
Hampshire falls in Group 7
with Hardy, Mineral, Pendleton,
Grant and Morgan counties.
The average monthly cost
of the 2nd lowest “Silver”
plan for an individual 50 years
old last year in Hampshire
County ranged from $331 to
$400, according to a report
by the Robert Woods Johnson
Foundation.
Currently, the only provider
on the marketplace is Highmark
Blue Cross/Blue Shield.
For questions, visit healthcare.
gov or by calling 1-800-3182596.
In-person
enrollment
is
also available nearby at the
Hampshire County Department
of Health and Human Resources
building in Romney. you can
call them at 304-822-6900. o
Consenting to a
serious medical
treatment
requires
education and
empowerment
This week a patient came
to me asking if he should
have open-heart surgery. Am
I qualified to provide advice?
Some of my critics believe
I have no business making
recommendations since I am
not a specialist in the field
and that only cardiologists
are qualified to offer such
opinions.
My take on this is simple:
The advice I provide is
based on available scientific
research on the subject, and I
feel able to inform patients of
this research (or on occasion,
lack of it) to help them make
rational decisions. I am not
a cardiac specialist, though I
have access to experts in the
field whose opinion I often
seek. I believe that an educated
second opinion offers a muchneeded outlet for every patient
to make appropriate choices
and decisions. I am simply an
advocate, seeking to compile
the best information possible to
make every reader or patient a
The whole-grain
brain train
Karen herriott presents Jim thrush with the quilt he won in
front of his 1951 ford truck.
Suicide prevention
quilt presented to winner
Jim Thrush, owner of the Millstone Restaurant in Burlington, was
the winner of the quilt that was raffled for the American Foundation
for Suicide Prevention on Sunday, Oct. 19. He was excited about
his win, saying that he “never wins anything.” He stated that several
women in his family want the quilt, but he plans to keep it for
himself.
The quilt was made by members of the Schoolhouse Quilters
Guild in Cumberland, Md., and brought in $1,070 for AFSP. q
Addiction Counseling
Narconon can help you take steps to overcome addiction in your
family. Call today for free screenings or referrals.
800.775.8750
Nutrition scientists at Tufts
University say it may be
possible to train the brain to
prefer healthful low-calorie
foods over high-calorie edibles
— a carrot, for example, over a
Cheetos puff.
“We don’t start out in life
loving French fries and hating,
for example, whole-wheat
pasta,” said Susan B. Roberts,
director of the U.S. Department
of Agriculture’s Energy
Metabolism Laboratory. “This
conditioning happens over
time in response to eating —
repeatedly — what is out there
in the toxic food environment.”
Scientists suspect that with
years of bad food choices,
consumers establish mental
addiction circuits that are
difficult, if not impossible, to
reverse. To see whether it is
possible, they tested groups
of obese people and groups of
people with normal weights
in a new weight-loss/control
program that included brain
imaging and a reward system
for behavioral changes.
They found that the people
who effectively lost weight
also displayed changes in the
brain reward center associated
with learning and addiction. In
such cases, their brains showed
an increased sensitivity for
Dr. David
liPsChitZ
L i f e L o n G h e A Lt h
more empowered consumer.
First and foremost, you must
have faith and trust in your
physician and his abilities. In
addition, being empowered
and knowledgeable about your
disease is critical in decisionmaking. To accomplish this,
every adult must become
computer-literate, as the
Internet has completely
revolutionized our access
to information. Once you
know how to search for a
medical problem, the available
information is overwhelming.
Just as important is learning
how to use reputable medical
websites. Some require a fee,
but others do not. Among the
best are WebMD, the National
Institutes of Health at www.
nih.gov and all reputable
medical schools and hospitals.
When deciding whether
to have a particular surgery
or procedure, ask 3 critical
questions: Will the treatment
prolong life? Will it improve
quality of life? What are the
side effects?
The patient I saw had
Scott
laFee
WeLLneWS
healthful foods, indicating a
greater sense of reward and
pleasure in consuming them.
“The weight loss program
is specifically designed to
change how people react to
different foods, and our study
shows those who participated
in it had an increased desire
for healthier foods along with
a decreased preference for
unhealthy foods, the combined
effects of which are probably
critical for sustainable weight
control,” said co-author Sai
Krupa Das in a news release.
Body of knowledge
Blood travels at about 0.7
mph. It takes 60 seconds for
a drop of blood to circulate
through the body.
Number cruncher
A serving of Arby’s
mozzarella sticks with
marinara sauce (137 grams)
contains 365 calories, 164
from fat. It has 18.3 grams of
total fat or 28 percent of the
recommended total fat intake
for a 2,000-calorie daily diet,
according to the Calorie Count
database.
It also contains 42
already had 2 previous openheart surgeries. His first openheart surgery was in 1995
and the 2nd in 2007. Now his
stress test is abnormal and an
angiogram shows worsening
blockage. His cardiologist
felt a 3rd surgery should be
considered but that he would
leave the decision “up to him,”
as he “was on the fence” about
this one. What was the patient
to do?
Well, actually, the decision
is easy. First, will surgery
prolong his life? He is aged
72, and although, according to
the patient, he understood that
the surgery would prolong his
life by as much as 10 years,
there is no scientific evidence
to support this claim. In fact,
there is no evidence that his
life would be prolonged at all
or that surgery would reduce
the risk of a heart attack.
Would it improve the quality
of life? Again, the answer is
quite clear. Surgery or any
cardiac intervention is effective
in relieving symptoms such as
severe limitation in exercise
tolerance, shortness of breath
or chest pain that no longer
can be treated medically. But
this patient had no symptoms.
He had no shortness of breath,
chest pain or heart failure,
and his heart was pumping
normally. No, the surgery
would not improve his quality
of life.
And finally, what are the
side effects? Here the danger
of a 3rd open-heart surgery is
high. The risk of death is in
excess of 10 percent, and for
memory loss or other serious
medical complication, the risk
is more than 50 percent. So the
decision is easy: Surgery is not
indicated. Rather than surgery,
this patient must be treated
medically and be compulsive
about a heart-healthy lifestyle.
Remember: The goal of
treatment must be clear. No
question you should have
implicit faith and trust in
your physician. But this does
not mean you should blindly
follow his advice. Thanks to
readily available information,
you can learn if quality of life
will be improved and the risk
of side effects. If a physician
tells you side effects are rare
or that his results are better
than anyone else’s, beware.
Obtaining this information
will make it possible to
make a rational choice that is
appropriate for you.
Dr. David Lipschitz is the
author of the book “Breaking
the Rules of Aging.” To find
out more about Dr. David
Lipschitz and read features
by other Creators Syndicate
writers and cartoonists, visit
the Creators Syndicate website
at www.creators.com. More
information is available at
DrDavidHealth.com. q
milligrams of cholesterol (14
percent), 1,511 milligrams
of sodium (63 percent), 31.6
grams of total carbohydrates
(11 percent), 2.5 grams of
dietary fiber (10 percent), 5
grams of sugar and 18.3 grams
of protein.
Counts
50: percentage rise in food
allergies among U.S. children
between 1997 and 2011.
Source: University of Chicago
Stories for the waiting room
Manufacturers of electronic
cigarettes are quick to note
their product does not emit
many of the carcinogens found
in burning tobacco, but a new
study out of the University of
Southern California suggests
e-cigarette vapor contains
much higher levels of nickel
than normal cigarettes, and
there’s evidence of chromium,
which isn’t found in tobacco
cigarettes at all.
Both nickel and chromium
are toxic metals, as are lead
and zinc, which were also
found in e-cigarette vapor,
though in lower concentrations
than tobacco cigarettes.
“Our results demonstrate that
overall electronic cigarettes
seem to be less harmful than
regular cigarettes, but their
elevated content of toxic metals
such as nickel and chromium
(does) raise concerns,” said
study author Constantinos
Sioutas.
Mania of the week
Hexometromania: obsession
with writing in hexameter.
Never say diet
The speed-eating record
for chicken tamales is 47 (2.6
ounces each) in 8 minutes,
held by Stephanie Torres.
(Interesting aside: Stephanie’s
nickname is “Xanadu,” the
name of an idealized place
where eating 47 tamales does
not increase one’s waistline or
odds of myocardial infarction.)
Medical history
This month in 1961, Drs.
Daniel Nathan and David
Spain published the first
compelling statistical evidence
linking heavy smoking with
heart disease. They studied
3,000 men and found that
those who smoked more than
40 cigarettes daily and were
younger than 51 had double
the chance of having coronary
heart disease. The New york
Times reported the news in a
4-sentence article.
Epitaphs
“Norton I, Emperor of the
United States and Protector
of Mexico,” headstone of San
Francisco eccentric Joshua A.
Norton (1819-80). Norton’s
self-proclaimed political
powers were illusory, but he
was treated deferentially by
his humoring neighbors, and
currency issued in his name
was honored by establishments
he frequented.
To find out more visit
www.creators.com. q
School
4C
Hampshire
Review
@
Hampshire
Review.com
Wednesday, November 19, 2014
Testing director highlights WesTest scores
The Hampshire County Board of
Education held a regular meeting Nov.
17, at the central office.
All board members were in
attendance.
Board members approved the agenda.
I. Appearances:
A. Frank Caputo, AFT representative,
requested that board members not
approve the 2nd reading of the proposed
dress code policy.
B. Kim Poland, service personnel
representative, requested that board
members look at the ECCAT (Early
Childhood
Classroom
Assistant
Teacher) requirements and seniority.
II. Presentation:
Mike Coleman, special education
director and testing coordinator, shared
trend data and comparative scores with
board members.
III. Informational item:
A copy of a letter dated Nov. 3, from
Carbone & Blaydes PLLC, on behalf of
the American Federation of Teachers
regarding proposed changes
t o
the dress code policy.
IV. Approval of minutes:
Board members approved the Nov. 3,
board of education minutes.
V. Consent agenda items:
A. Board members approved the
following consent agenda items for
schools:
1. The following fundraiser requests:
Springfield-Green
Spring
Elementary: PTO: Poppin’ Kettle
popcorn sales and Scentsy air freshener
sales.
Hampshire High: PRO Start: lunch
sales to staff.
Band Boosters: uniform drive.
2. One request for individual
exception to the attendance requirement.
B. Board members approved the
following consent agenda item for
finance:
Bills to be paid as submitted by the
finance office.
An executive session was held to
meet with an employee.
C. Board members approved the
following consent agenda items for
personnel:
1. Transfer and employment of
professional
personnel
pending
CIB/FBI clearance with continued
employment contingent upon the
issuance of the appropriate certification
credential:
Employ Georgette Riggleman as
a substitute teacher on a long-term
substitute permit endorsed for biology,
elementary education, school nurse and
health assistant effective Nov. 19.
Employ Frances Shinault as a longterm substitute for a special education
teacher at Romney Elementary on
a professional teaching certificate
endorsed for elementary education and
an out-of-field authorization for special
education effective Nov. 19.
Transfer Nancy Hill, grade 5 teacher
at Augusta Elementary, to a Title I
mathematics
coach
(countywide)
effective Nov.19 or when a
replacement is hired.
Employ Jimmy Lewis as a Title I PSP
at Springfield-Green Spring Elementary
effective Nov. 19.
2. Resignations of professional
personnel:
Tracy Hott, academic coach for
elementary and secondary, effective
Nov. 10, and return her to her grade
6 teacher position at Capon Bridge
Middle School.
Dennis
Shoemaker,
substitute
teacher, effective Nov. 5.
3. Transfer and employment of
service personnel:
Employ Roberta Panico as a
substitute school bus operator effective
Nov. 19.
Employ Tera Royston, Sarah Estep
and Melissa Merritt as substitute
secretaries effective Nov. 19.
Transfer Marci James, secretary
at Capon Bridge Middle School, to
executive
secretary/accountant/
child nutrition at the central office
effective Nov. 19.
4. Resignation of service personnel:
Kathy Smith (Haynes), substitute
aide, effective Oct. 30.
5. Leave of absence of service
personnel:
Wendy Asbury, school bus operator,
extension of leave of absence until Jan.
1.
6. Approval for posting:
Permission to post for up to 10
after school tutors for Hampshire
High School on an as-needed basis as
determined by the principal to be paid
out of SIG grant.
Permission to post for a male aide
for Hampshire High School for the
remainder of the 2014-15 school year.
Permission to post for 1 or up to 2,
electrician II’s (electrician journeyman).
This was pulled from the agenda.
Permission to post for an
extracurricular position for an aide and
a substitute aide who will accompany a
student for bowling practices and meets
effective during the season of the sport.
7. Approval of volunteers for the
2014-15 school year:
Capon Bridge Elementary: Rebecca
Mongold, Thomas VanWay and
Amanda Preiss.
John Cornwell Elementary: Janet
Haines.
Hampshire High School: Debra
Champ.
Romney Elementary: Cassandra
Chenoweth.
Romney Middle: Jennifer Boyles,
Sebrena Keith and Debra Champ.
8. Other:
Permission to offer a $500 bonus
to full-time service personnel and
professional personnel (other than
classroom teachers) who provide
written notification of their intent to
retire at the end of the school year by
Jan. 15, 2015.
Permission for Krisinda Heavener
and Charlie Mullins to observe in
Hampshire County Schools as part
of the training for substitute teacher
effective Nov. 19.
VI. Non-consent items:
1ST NINE WEEKS HONOR ROLL
john j. Cornwell
Elementary
3rd grade
Mrs. Lee
A — Autumn Asbury,
Savannah Bolyard, Dakota
Breeden, Ava Dodson, Jenny
Gayleard, Desiree Graham,
Gavin Hall, Angel Harris,
Hope Heavner, Jesse Saldierna,
Courtney Stabu, Damian Turner
and Chloe Weasenforth
4th grade
Mrs. McKenzie
A — Bryson Nelson and
Ethan Burkett
B — Alanna McDuffie,
Breanna Jenkins, Derek Dodson,
Anthony Ratliff, Taleah Sapin,
Easton Shanholtz, Sydney
Sours, Madison Terrazas and Ian
Turner q
romney middle school
6th grade
4.0 — Doran Bauer, Jeffery
Boyles Jr., Caleb Chidester,
Mackenzie Corbin, Virginia
Feidler,
Sydney
Fischer,
Christian Hicks, Ellen Keaton,
Steven Kline, Grant Landis,
Wesley Landis, Nevin Ludwick,
Benjamin MacArthur, Meredith
Milleson, Samantha Moon,
Elijah
Moreland,
Taylor
Parenteau, Emily Pownell,
Austin
Ramsay,
Alexis
Riggleman, Kellsey Savage,
Lainee Selan, Emily Storey,
Paul Teter, Curtis Twigg and
Chase Wehland
3.5-3.9
—
Macenzie
Anderson, Israel Arellano, Jesse
Britton, Meredith Charlton,
Kelena Ciszewski, Natalie
Colebank, Dane Corbin, Amos
Davey, Brandi Day, Bria
Edgell, Marcus Elmer, Jacob
Fabbri, Kelsey Feller, Gracie
Fields, Riley Flesher, Kileigh
Flynn, Mikayla Freeman, Luke
Funk, Carli Ginevan, Faithlyn
Graham, Leigha Haslacker,
Brianna Heavner, Aryell Helms,
Environmental
Society honored
by Delegate
Rowan
SUNRISE SUMMIT —
Mr. Lee and Mrs. Saville’s
Environmental Society group at
HHS recently received a West
Virginia flag from Delegate
Ruth Rowan, 57th District. The
flag flew over the Capitol in
Charleston Oct. 20, in honor of
the students, teachers and staff
who recycle here to provide a
cleaner atmosphere for all at
Hampshire High School.
The environmental society
volunteers their time at HHS
to recycle the cardboard boxes
from the lunch program on a
daily basis and collects paper
recycling from the entire school
on Fridays throughout the
school year.
The society originated in 1989
and has continued with great
success. The group encourages
all to recycle, not only in
schools, but in our community
as well. q
Cheyenne
Hooker,
Kevin
Howard, Logan Howell, Brandon
Jennings, Jadyn Judy, Harmony
Keister, Isaac Labonte, Megan
Largent, Talia Liberati, Alexis
Martin, Kyla Martin, Makenzie
Park,
Alexander
Phillips,
Mercedes Ravenscroft, Dakota
Sandridge, Trevor Sardo, Barrett
See, Kaleb Shafer, Madison
Sharpless, Jacob Shepherd,
Mackenzie Sherman, Brooklyn
Shoemaker, Mollie Shoemaker,
Alexander Shumaker, Ryan
Stinnette, Andrew Strawn, Patsy
Summers, Devin Swick, Lainie
Umstot, Shelby Westfall and
Skyla Whaley
3.0-3.49 — Nathaniel Bell,
Kelli Casteel, Kelsey Combs,
Alexander
Cotto-Santos,
Christopher Cowgill, Emma
Curry, Katelyn Davis, Dallas
Dorsey, Avery Dow, Miguel
Elmer, Jackie Ficik, Michael
Forson, Burt Gayleard III,
Morgan Healy, Travis Jennings,
Madison Kinnamon, Leann
Kline, Sarah Ladd, Randall
McGee, Taylor Michael, Megan
Pyatt, Janel Riggleman, Lily
Simpkins, Carter Smith, Kellsey
Thomas, Brooklynn Timbrook,
Cain Wagoner, John Whetzel,
Dylan Wiseman and Austin
Wright
7th grade
4.0 — Brittany Adams, John
Barbe, Zoe Grim, Emily Horn,
Alexis Orndorff, Cole Powell
and Maria Terrazas
3.5-3.9 — Kenlie Adams,
Glenna Alt, Jaiden Boyce, Corin
Brinker, Natalie Bruchey, Phillip
Carter Jr., Ethan Champ, Paige
Chaney, Joshua Cobb, Chayson
Combs, Hannah Combs, Sarah
Combs, Hanna Corey, Kayla
Cox, Thomas Davidson, Kilton
Eichelberger, Angela Fagga,
Jada Fout, Paige Golden, Jordan
Hamilton, Emily Hartman,
Hailey Hines, Lauren Hott,
Dalton Keister, Kendra Keith,
Averyanna Kennedy, Kasey
Kesner, Mackenzie Kirby, Cali
Kobasiar, Benjamin Lambert,
Jacob Landis, Eli Lemasters,
Tyus Lewis, Dominick Lilly,
Caileigh
Lupton,
Kaley
McDermeit, Austin Mongold,
Breanna Moorehead, Lucas
Moreland, Matthew Nazelrod
Jr., Jacob Pownall, Forrest
Quinn,
Tiffany
Raigner,
Brae’leigh Riggleman, Jayson
Riley, Taylor Riley, Mia Rogers,
Kortni
Rohrbaugh,
Gavin
Seaman, Aaliyah Shanholtz,
Hannah Shoemaker, Emma
Shreve, Quinten Simon, George
Smith, Isaiah Smith, Dylan
Snow, Cheyanna Sorrell, Ethan
Sowers, Kaitlyn Spring, Ella
Staley, Justin Storey II, Wyatt
Summerlin, Jacob Turner, Ethan
Welch, Brittany Welk, Alyssa
Westfall, Kathren Whitlock,
Bailey Willitts, Kyla Wills and
Kendra Wolford
3.0-3.49 — Nikolas Adams,
Elijah Alger, Mercedes Bennett,
Jade Blackburn, Hope Bond,
Kandi Caldwell, Alana Carr,
Tijaya Carter, Jackson Clower,
Katherine Corbin, Alex Embrey,
Sierra
Fitzwater,
Chance
Flaskamp, Madison Fletcher,
Daniel Fontana, Kalei Haines,
Sarah Herrell, Brittany Heward,
Austin Kesner, Lindsey Kesner,
Ashlan Lucas, Madison Mallery,
Mercedes Matthews, Corey
McLaughlin, Hennessee Michal,
Skylar Moore, Victoria Moore,
Brittany
Moreland,
Blake
O’Brien, Joseph Pancake, Shayla
Powell, Jonathan Puffinburger,
Emily Riggleman, Trent Saville,
Kaitlyn Shanklin, Madison
Shifflett, Hunter Shoemaker,
Meagan Skelton, Slade Smith,
Frederick Stadtmueller, Wyatt
Stotler, Alexandria Swick,
Destinee
Thorne,
William
Thorne IV, Bruce Tierney, Jacob
Whelan, Hailey Whetzel, Kian
Wilt and Jacob Wright
wr your custom
ruBBEr stAmPse
Call Linda, Hampshire Review
304-822-3871
Her
Chicken Strip Basket
$ 99
4
8th grade
4.0 — Laken Corbin, Brandon
Dawson, Tristan Everett, Tyler
Gruno, John Hicks Jr., Eli Hott,
David Keaton, Zoe Keib, Molly
Landis, Austin Loftus, David
Mayfield, Maryanna Milleson,
Trae Paxton, Levi Pownall,
Alexis Ravenscroft, Carlli
Wehland, Nathan Wilson and
Heather Wolford
3.5-3.9 — Destiney Alger,
Dylan Belt, Ashton Blaylock,
Brooklyn
Boyce,
Hayden
Burns, Kyra Byrd, Emma
Charlton, Emily Cramer, Dalton
Elliott, Christopher Fagga,
Jacob Fischer, Madalynn Flick,
Brittney Flynn, Jonathan Flynn,
Chastity Fout, Elijah Haines,
Dylan Keister, Parker Landis,
Adam Largent, William Largent,
Alexander May, Allison McGee,
Emily
McKenzie,
Carissa
Parsons, Austin
Patterson,
Hunter Pownall, Alexander
Ritchie, Bradley Sigley, Breanna
Spring, Levi Steward, Jacob
Stokes, Dustin Swisher, Tyler
Swisher and Brandy Wolfgang
3.0-3.49 — Kaitlin Adams,
James Ayers, Megan Bane,
Tristan
Berkel,
Benjamin
Billmeyer,
Tyler
Blevins,
Breanna
Buracker,
Lydia
Chapman, Mackenzie Cook,
Amber Forson, Lily Gayleard,
Alexis Hayes, Stacey Hose,
Dustin Hott, Clarise Kennedy,
Dylan Kesner, Preston Kinlaw,
Thomas Kinlaw, Rhiannon
Kinnamon, Cheyanne Kinsley,
Douglas Lancaster III, Craig
Lease Jr., Travis Marple, Patrick
Messer, Dustin Miller, Calvin
Moreland,
Logan
Murray,
Olivia Peer, Ashley Pike, Max
Reno, Trenton Shaffer, Bradley
Short, Cameron Sions, Patrisha
Snyder, James Stanley, Heather
Sylvester, Kendal Timbrook,
Ethan Waters, Madison Wilkins,
Christine Willis and Aidan
young q
HampsHire
County
sCHools
nov. 24-28
Breakfast:
Nov. 24 - No school.
Nov. 25 - No school.
Nov. 26 - No school.
Nov. 27 - No school.
Nov. 28 - No school.
Romney
Dairy Queen
West Main Street • Romney
304-822-3111
Winter sneaks in
early
Fall is still in session,
but this wacky weather has
taken a turn for the frigid.
Nationwide people are
breaking out their sweaters
and scarves in preparation
for the glacial winter that is
approaching at a rapid pace.
At this point you might be
asking yourself, “What the
heck does this have to do
with school?” The answer is
quite a few things; students at
Hampshire High School are
reasonably familiar with the
cold weather.
A number of classes at
HHS are located in outer
buildings separate from
the main building. Several
students have to travel outside
to classes multiple times
throughout the day. Getting to
these classes is a hassle when
the weather is warm, but it’s
a downright atrocity in the
winter. Having to carry around
a big winter coat in addition to
a sizably hefty backpack filled
with schoolbooks is extremely
inconvenient, not to mention
uncomfortable, but that feeling
of walking into a heated room
after walking quite a distance
in the cold is second to none.
The point being: having to
walk to class outside in the
cold stinks, but it’s not the
worst thing in the world.
What really stinks though,
is the faulty and even lack
of heating in the school
facilities. In some classrooms
the temperature is pleasant
Shayna
hePner
cRuisinG HHs
and toasty warm, but in the
majority of classrooms, the
temperature is below pleasant.
In many rooms, the heat just
won’t rise to an acceptable
temperature, but in others
it doesn’t work altogether.
However, in a high school as
old as Hampshire, it seems
that not much can be done
about this, which also really
stinks.
Another unpleasant thing
about having to go to high
school when the weather is
cold is waking up early. No
this is never fun any time
of the year, but, like most
other exploits, it’s made
much more unfathomable
when the temperature outside
plummets. Picture this: you’re
in bed, cozy and warm under
approximately 10 blankets,
sound asleep and having
the best dream of your life
when, all of a sudden, you’re
yanked out of your blissful
state of rest by an obnoxiously
dissonant alarm going off.
you wake up, throw off the
blankets and are struck by
how cold the air is. Then you
burrow back into bed under
your 10 blankets. your drive to
get up and going is gone. This
is what it’s like almost every
day the weather is cold. q
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IN GOOD HANDS.
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lunch:
Nov. 24 - No school.
Nov. 25 - No school.
Nov. 26 - No school.
Nov. 27 - No school.
Nov. 28 - No school.
Expires November 30, 2014
A. Board members approved the 3rd
reading and subsequent adoption of
revised policy 8220 — School Day.
B. Board members approved the
2nd reading of the following revised
policies: 3216 – Staff dress and
grooming (professional staff) and 4216
– Staff dress and grooming (service
personnel).
C. Board members approved the 1st
reading of the following revised policies:
1623 — Section 504 Prohibition
against disability discrimination in
employment (administration), 3123
— Section 504 Prohibition against
disability discrimination in employment
(professional staff) and 4123 — Section
504 Prohibition against disability
discrimination in employment (service
personnel).
D. Board members approved the
agreement between Hampshire County
Schools and Hampshire County 911.
E. Board members approved the
working agreement between the
Hampshire County Board of Education
and the Hampshire Center.
VII. Upcoming Hampshire County
board meetings:
A. Monday, Dec. 1, at 4:30 p.m.,
special/regular meeting. Location:
central office.
B. Monday, Dec. 15, at 6:30 p.m.,
regular meeting. Location: central
office.
Mrs. Shoemaker adjourned the
meeting at 9:38 p.m. q
Pay Lunch bills online
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In accordance with Federal law and
U.S.D.A.
301-722-4410
Potomac Farms
Cookman Insurance Group
304-822-3564
(304) 257-0700
2 Alt Avenue
96 East Main Street
Petersburg
ROMNEY
[email protected]
[email protected]
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Farm
@
Hampshire
Review.com
Hampshire
Review
5C
Wednesday, November 19, 2014
Agricultural plastic recycling
effort to begin in December
Do you use plastic bale
wrap or plastic bale netting on
your hay bales? If you do, you
have probably thought, “There
must be a better way to get
rid of this stuff.” The Region
VIII Solid Waste Authority,
West Virginia Department of
Environmental Protection, the
West Virginia Farm Bureau and
the WVU Extension Service
are beginning a pilot project
to collect, free of charge,
certain agricultural plastics for
recycling.
For many years landfills have
been the popular “dumping
place” for these plastics. Even
worse, is the on-farm disposal
that can create unsightly piles,
a rodent haven or simply a
mess. As the hay-feeding
season begins, knowing that
you may have a place to go
with these certain plastic
materials may help to dispose
of these agricultural plastics in
a responsible way.
This project will provide
users of plastic bale wrap
and plastic bale netting the
opportunity to dispose of
most of the material in an
environmentally friendly way.
The agricultural plastics
that can be recycled include
silage bag plastic, plastic net
wrap, silage wrap plastic and
plastic bunk silo covers. These
should be kept relatively clean
(no mud or manure covered
plastic) and dry. It should be
as free of as much vegetative
material as possible, in bundles
that can be handled by one
person, collected and stored
off the ground and again in a
dry location before delivery.
Net wrap of all colors can be
recycled; however, they must
be separated. Rock, soil and/or
manure covered plastic should
not be delivered; excessively
dirty or contaminated material
will not be accepted for
recycling.
Unfortunately, this project
cannot accept plastic bale
twine, row covers, greenhouse
plastic, nursery pots, irrigation
tubing, nor plastic jugs or
bottles. Unacceptable materials
will be immediately returned to
the hauler.
Agricultural plastics will be
accepted for recycling at the
following locations only at
the announced dates and times
for recycling. Agricultural
plastics will be received at the
Romney Transfer Station the
1st Wednesday of the month
from December 2014 through
May 2015 from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
and at the Petersburg Transfer
Station on the 2nd Wednesday
of the month from December
2014 through May 2015 from 8
a.m. to 3 p.m.
For more information on the
agricultural plastics recycling
effort in Region VIII, including
the counties of Hampshire,
Grant, Hardy, Mineral and
Pendleton, contact your local
WVU
Extension
Service
office. q
USDA to collect final crop production data
CHARLESTON — As
the 2014 growing season
officially comes to an end,
the United States Department
of Agriculture’s
National
Agricultural Statistics Service
(NASS) will contact producers
nationwide to gather final
year-end crop production
numbers and the amount of
grain and oilseed they store on
their farms. At the same time,
NASS will survey grain facility
operators to determine yearend off-farm grain and oilseed
stocks.
“These surveys are the largest
and most important year-end
surveys conducted by NASS,”
explained
NASS’s
West
Virginia state statistician David
Knopf. “They are the basis for
the official USDA estimates of
production and year-end grain
and oilseed supplies. Data from
the survey will benefit farmers
and processors by providing
timely and accurate information
to help them make critical
year-end business decisions
and begin planning for the
next growing and marketing
season.”
The information will be
compiled, analyzed and then
published in a series of USDA
reports, including the “Crop
Production Annual Summary”
and quarterly “Grain Stocks”
report.
“Responses to the producer
survey will be included
in the county agricultural
production survey and used
in calculating county yields,”
explained Knopf. “USDA uses
county yield information from
the survey to evaluate and
administer vital farm disaster
and
insurance
programs.
Farmers who receive this
survey are not included in the
county agricultural production
survey; therefore, this is their
only opportunity to be included
in the calculation of West
Virginia county yields.”
As with all NASS surveys,
information
provided
by
respondents is confidential,
as required by federal law.
NASS safeguards the privacy
of all responses and publishes
only aggregate data, ensuring
that no individual operation
or producer can be identified.
These and all NASS reports are
available online at www.nass.
usda.gov.
For more information call
the NASS West Virginia field
office at 1-800-535-7088. q
l i ve s t o ck r ep o r t
FARMERS Livestock
EXCHANGE INC.
Winchester, Va.
MARKET REPORT
Nov. 17, 2014
HOGS: 3
LAMBS: 76
HI CHOICE & PRIME: $180-190.
CHOICE: $181.
SLAUGHTER EWES: 10 –
$67.50-95. KID GOATS: 26 – By lb.
– 40-60 lbs. – $215-220; 60-80 lbs.
– $177.50.
SLAUGHTER CATTLE: COWS:
125 – Utility & Comm. – $92-120;
Canner & Cutter – $74-95; Cutter
and Bng. – $86-113. BULLS: 17 –
1-2 – $113-132. STOCK COWS: 50
– Beef BH – $1,000-1,500. BABY
CALVES: 8 – BH – $185-350; Over
100 lb. by lb. – $350-425.
FEEDER CATTLE: STEERS: 225
– Med & Lg #1 – 300-400 lbs. –
$237.50-282; 400-500 lbs. – $220283; 500-600 lbs. – $217.50-246;
600-700 lbs. – $209-229; 700-800
lbs. – $208. Med & Lg #2 – 300400 lbs. – $212.50-230; 400-500
lbs. – $187.50-220.50; 500-600
lbs. – $208-222.50; 600-700 lbs.
– $185-218; 700-800 lbs. – $183201; 800-900 lbs. – $180-184;
900-1,100 lbs. – $185. HEIFERS:
349 – Med & Lg #1 – 300-400
lbs. – $239-262.50; 400-500 lbs.
– $201-240; 500-600 lbs. – $175228; 600-700 lbs. – $167.50-218;
700-800 lbs. – $178; 800-900 lbs.
– $185.50. Med & Lg #2 – 200-300
lbs. – $261; 300-400 lbs. – $218242; 400-500 lbs. – $170-204;
500-600 lbs. – $154-185; 600-700
lbs. – $135-165; 700-800 lbs. –
$142.50-155; 800-900 lbs. – $160167.50. BULLS: 304 – Med & Lg
#1 – 200-300 lbs. – $230-270;
300-400 lbs. – $245-282.50; 400-
500 lbs. – $245-287.50; 500-600
lbs. – $215-255; 600-700 lbs. –
$190-230.50; 700-800 lbs. – $150185; 800-900 lbs. – $152.50-165;
900-1,100 lbs. – $128-135. Med &
Lg #2 – 200-300 lbs. – $216-242;
300-400 lbs. – $235-255; 400-500
lbs. – $200-237.50; 500-600 lbs.
– $207.50-217.50; 600-700 lbs. –
$180-200; 700-800 lbs. – $135;
800-900 lbs. – $111-145.
TOTAL: 1,193
Regular sale every Monday, 1
p.m. State graded feeder sale 2nd
Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m.
Fat cattle sale 1st Monday of each
month at 3 p.m. q
* * *
grantsville stockyards
1060 Springs Rd.
Grantsville, Md.
301-895-5268 • 301-895-5677
Saturday, Nov. 15, 2014
STOCK STEERS & BULLS: 200500 lbs. – up to $260. STOCK
HEIFERS: 200-500 lbs. – up to
$253. slaughter steers: Good
to Choice – No Market Test; Medium
to Good – up to $148. HOLSTEIN
STEERS: Good – up to $135; Light
– No Market Test. SLAUGHTER
HEIFERS: Good to Choice – No
Market Test; Medium to Good – up
to $140. BULLS: Heavy – $100130; Light – $80-120. COWS:
Utility – $90-112.50; Canners –
$70-88; Culls – $65 and down. BOB
CALVES: $60 and down. HOLSTEIN
BULL CALVES: Return to farm (90120 lbs.) – up to $185. HOLSTEIN
HFR. CALVES: Return to farm – up
to $125. BEEF CROSS CALVES:
Up to $270. HOGS: Top Quality – up
to $95; Heavy – up to $92; Light –
$50-102. FEEDER PIGS: BH – up
to $96. SOWS: Up to $73. MALE
HOGS: $15-49. LAMBS: 70-85 lbs.
Simmental & SimanguS Sale
Shenandoah
Valley Simmentals
540.335.1885
Simmental & SimAngus
Saturday, November 22 • 1 p.m.
Bulls • Pairs • Heifers
www.shenandoahvalleysimmentals.com
3691 South Middle Road, Quicksburg, VA
– up to $222.50; 85-125 lbs. – up
to $215; 30-60 lbs. – up to $230.
SHEEP: Up to $100. GOATS: Large
– By head – $100-187.50; Medium
– By head – $50-90; Small – By
head – $10-60; Kids – By head –
$5-45. q
* * *
Friend’s Stockyard, Inc.
376 Stockyard Rd.
Accident, Md.
301-746-8178
Monday, Nov. 17, 2014
STOCK STEERS & BULLS:
200-500 lbs. – $115-230. STOCK
STEERS & BULLS: 500-850 lbs. –
$130-160. STOCK HEIFERS: $90220. SLAUGHTER STEERS: Good
to Choice – $160-175; Medium
to Good – $135-157. HOLSTEIN
STEERS: Good to Choice – $105130; Light – $80-120. SLAUGHTER
HEIFERS: Good to Choice – $147165; Medium to Good – $110-146.
BULLS: Heavy – $90-130; Light
– $80-122. COWS: Utility – $95120; Commercial to Good – $81103; Culls – $80 and down. VEALS:
Good to Choice – $75-130; Medium
to Good – $45-74; Bob Calves –
$50 and down. HOLSTEIN BULL
CALVES: Return to farm (85-120
lbs.) – Up to $420. HOLSTEIN HFR.
CALVES: Return to farm (85-120
lbs.) – Up to $305. BEEF CROSS
CALVES: Return to farm – Up to
$200. HOGS: Up to $94. SOWS:
$40-64. LAMBS: Up to $175.
GOATS: By Head – $30-140.
Livestock prices are all given per
hundred weight. q
WVU Extension helps farmers,
producers grow businesses
CHARLESTON — West
Virginia University Extension
Service is hosting a Food
for Profit workshop today in
Charleston.
Food for Profit takes attendees
through the beginning steps of
starting small food businesses
and combines presentations and
guest speakers with an interactive
learning environment.
“If you grow, make and pack
The 10th annual
(we think) Old
Hippie Orchard
Day
When a tradition has begun,
it just kind of sneaks up on you.
Oh sure, there are the few that
start as the “1st annual,” but
those are usually commercial
endeavors. The term “1st
annual” roughly translated
means “save up some money
and spend it here next year.”
For those not familiar with
the annual Old Hippie Orchard
Day, I’ll cover some of the
basics. The Old Hippie, aka
my wife, Stephanie, organizes
an annual group adventure
to Marker-Miller Orchard
at Opequon (Frog Eye), Va.
Smiling, cool and persuasive,
she starts recruiting her picking
crew around late September.
Who could resist the prospect
of picnicking in the orchard
with lovely fall weather
amongst apples, weathered field
crates and antique trucks?
These hapless victims fall
willingly into her web. When
at last all the other pickers
have gone through the orchard,
she pays for a truckload of
Pick-Your-Own (PYO) ground
apples. She then works us
like rented mules, picking up
ground apples into buckets,
then dumping them into the
back of her ancient rust and
lichen encrusted Ford pickup
until it’s full. Interestingly, she
has lots of repeat customers.
It kind of reminds me of that
old joke about the free river
cruise.*
Her “apple truck” is a
recurring character in this
column (see the story “Le
Boheme”), so I’ll try to stick
to parts of its history that I
haven’t already covered. It’s
a 1979 Ford F-150. I found it
more or less abandoned under
a load of brush in a field near
Purcellville, Va., around 1998. I
left a note in a plastic bag under
a windshield wiper expressing
my interest in buying the truck.
Months later, a young woman
called, identifying herself as
the owner of the truck. She
had been using it to clean up
her little horse farm when the
automatic transmission failed.
She had been stressing over
how to get rid of the truck
when she found my note. She
very enthusiastically told me
to come and get it — free.
Walker Industries’ rollback was
dispatched shortly thereafter.
With the truck home, I soon
found the problem; mice had
chewed through one of the
transmission fluid cooling
lines, and all the transmission
fluid had leaked out. With a
new section of line and some
fluid, the problem was solved. I
offered to return the truck to the
woman with a small repair and
towing bill but she declined,
wishing me all the best.
I had intended to paint the
truck black, install a tool body
and make it the next Old Black
Truck for my mobile tractor
Farm & Garden
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your own food and sell it at a
grocery store or restaurant, Food
for Profit will help you create
a business that matches your
vision and goals,” said Kerri
Wade, families and health agent
for the Kanawha County WVU
Extension Service.
Food for Profit is an awardwinning program. It comes
to West Virginia through a
2012 Northeast Sustainable
Ted
Kalvitis
fa r m u s e
repair business, but this was not
to be.
I’m still a little confused as to
how it gradually became “her”
truck. I guess it started with
girly things like the colorful
pinwheel mounted on the dash
that spins whenever the sliding
rear window is opened. This
was followed by a flat cushion
to position her higher in the
seat. Its position on the driver’s
seat became its default setting.
Next appeared the small, flat
wicker basket between the
driver and passenger’s side
seats. This basket contains
things like a box of Kleenex,
hand lotion, a few bandanas,
a paperback and a scrunchie
or two. She started leaving
the truck at the far end of her
school bus run.
Unbeknownst to me, she
once lent the truck to 1 of our
daughters while her Jeep was
in the shop. “Hey, I just saw
Leah driving your truck,” I
heard myself say. Note that I
unwittingly and instinctively
referred to the truck as hers.
It was her same slow, cunning
persuasion that caused this crew
of 12 persons to agree to meet
at the orchard last Tuesday. I
should mention that 4 of these
folks were there to get their
own load of cider apples but
helped us as well.
Marker-Miller Orchard
is harvested in a number of
different ways; a contracted
migrant and Jamaican picking
crew from the labor camp picks
the largest volume; Pick-YourOwn visitors harvest certain
designated areas. Next come
the food pantry gleaners and
finally, us — ground apple
PYO’ers. The official term
for what we’re collecting is
“wildlife apples.” Cider and
sauce apples would probably be
a more accurate term, especially
since feeding deer has become
illegal. (Feeding causes deer
to congregate, thus spreading
chronic wasting disease among
the herds.)
Picking strategies can change
hourly as grower, John Marker,
orchestrates this diverse
harvest. We have no choice
but to roll with it. Mr. Marker
called and told us to delay our
arrival by a couple of hours.
A particular block of orchard
that we were interested in
“ground-hogging” hadn’t yet
been picked. He had originally
planned to send the Jamaican
crew through and harvest it in
mere minutes.
However, the weather was
becoming very pleasant and a
Agriculture
Research
and
Education grant. “Food for
Profit has a great history of
success. It will help a lot of
food growers in West Virginia
get the best information on how
to successfully get their food to
the public and make a profit in
doing so,” Wade said. For more info call 304-7209573 or email [email protected]
mail.wvu.edu. q
very promising PYO crowd was
amassing. He decided, instead,
to open the block for PYO for
the morning and early afternoon
after which we could help
ourselves. Having some orchard
background, we understood the
necessity of this change; though
it meant a later start, and we
would have to work faster.
I had my strategy in place as
to how I could avoid being in
the “groundhog” crew. Peaks
of Otter Winery conducts a
series of wine tasting sessions
at the orchard. The fee is $5 per
session and is nonrefundable. I
planned to slap down a twenty
and stay all day. Here’s the
brilliant part; her Scottish
thrift (she’s even authorized to
wear the Gordon plaid) would
prevent her from pulling me
out of there before I got my
money’s worth.
But this was a Tuesday; the
wine tasting was weekends
only. I soon found myself on all
fours — threes actually, with
one arm free for picking —
gathering apples into 5-gallon
buckets, then carrying them to
the truck, just like Tom Joad.
(Although, the 2 cents a bucket
wasn’t forthcoming.)
But seriously, though I have
a little fun at the expense of my
wife and this yearly event, let
me assure the reader that a good
time was had by all. As for the
apples, her loaded apple truck
often draws a crowd in parking
lots on the way home. She gives
an impromptu class in apple
varieties and their cooking,
sauce and dessert properties —
all the while handing out free
samples.
Some will appear in a
basket of mixed apples at the
Hampshire Wellness Center
(apple life expectancy there —
2 minutes). Some of the apples
will appear as applesauce, pies
and apple butter, delivered to
folks who can no longer make
it to the orchard on their own.
Of course, our larder is supplied
as well.
We’ve already received a jug
of fresh cider from the other
crew. I’m leaving it on the
back porch to “turn.” Apples
cider, old trucks and the great
outdoors — does it get any
better than that? Well, yes, a
wine tasting session would have
been nice, too, but that would
come later.
*The joke, as told over a
certain tractor parts counter
(The teller asked that his name
be withheld lest we offend
anyone who may have actually
been on the free river cruise.):
A lone tourist sees a sign for
a free river cruise. He answers
this advertisement only to find
himself tied to a log floating
downstream. At a log-jam
along the way, he encounters
another fellow also tied to a
log. “Do they serve any food on
this tour?” he asked the other
fellow. “They didn’t last year,”
came the reply. q
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6C
n
hampshire review
Wednesday, november 19, 2014
Pin Oak CEOS report on two meetings
Members gain
leadership skills
during 4-H officer’s
training school
Submitted by lindA ArdingEr
ROMNEy — Hampshire
County’s
4-H
members
gathered for the annual 4-H
officer’s training school. This
year’s training was conducted
at the West Virginia School for
the Deaf. 4-H teen leaders Sam
Cookman, Allison Cowgill and
Jordan Clark welcomed newly
elected officers and led them in
an installation ceremony.
Elected
4-H
officers
participated in workshops that
instructed them on the duties
and responsibilities of their
positions. 4-H members were
elected to offices by their peers
at 4-H club meetings.
Special thanks to the 4-H
volunteer leaders and teen
leaders that served as workshop
instructors: presidents and vice
presidents, Cynthia Corbin;
secretaries, Nicole and Emily
Pownell; treasurers, Tammie
Coyle;
reporters,
Sheri
Coleman; health officers, Veva
Nield; song leaders, Gerald
Mathias;
and
recreation
instructor, Evan Staley.
To learn more about new
opportunities in the 4-H
program, visit www.ext.wvu.
edu or contact your local WVU
Extension Service at 304-8225013. q
PAW PAW — Since the last report, the
Pin Oak CEOS Club has held 2 meetings at
the Paw Paw Senior Center. In October, 4
members attended — Jan Ott, Saretta Eaton,
Betty Bridges and Linda Ardinger. Members
present for the November meeting were
Saretta Eaton, Joan Maggio, Jo Musialowski,
Mary Ann Buzzanca, Linda Ardinger, Betty
Bridges, Helen Tucker and Jan Ott.
At each meeting the club collect was read
in unison by the attending members. Some
uplifting words found in the collect are “Let
us be large in thought, in word, in deed.”
These words are not only very important
to be observed by the club but also by each
individual person.
The chairmen of the separate committees
gave their reports. Linda informed us that a
total of 12 cards had been sent from the club
for the months of October and November.
Saretta collected items, which she will
deliver to the Hampshire nursing home,
from the club members. These items will be
used for their Christmas auction program.
Helen gave us a report on the district
achievement luncheon. Three members
were able to attend, Marie, Helen and Joan,
accompanied by her friend, Bill Platt. Bill
was a lucky winner of one of the door prizes.
Receiving certificates for 500 volunteer
hours for the past year were Betty, Joan,
Sonja and Linda. Also, Linda was given a
reward for reading the most books — a total
of 189. Those receiving new member pins
were Mary Ann and Jo. As you can see,
the club, under Jan’s leadership, has been
“large” indeed over the past year. Hurrah for
all.
This year, the Paw Paw “Lights of
Love” tree will be sponsored by the Paw
Paw Public Library. For $5 per name, you
may sponsor a light “in honor of” or “in
memory of” a person of your choice. The
club chose to do a light in memory of a dear
departed member, Ruby Fishel. Also, Betty
presented the library the book of poetry,
“Loving Promises,” by Helen Steiner Rice,
in memory of Ruby. The club also gave
the library a donation of $50. Helen and
Jan presented these donations to Karen
Tomlinson, who represented the library.
your support of the library is very much
needed and will be greatly appreciated.
Jan, health motivator, presented some
helpful facts on the “flavorful curry” and 3
spices, cumin, ginger and cloves. Put some
curry in a stew or soup and serve over rice
or flat bread. Sounds spicy and tasty. Have
a toothache or bad breath? Try some clove
oil. All of these spices are a good way to add
health benefits to your diet.
As the days are shortening and the
weather becomes cooler, don’t let yourself
experience SAD, Seasonal Affective
Disorder. The lesson for October was based
on the symptoms and treatment of this
disorder. Exercise is one important way of
lifting SAD.
And then for November, the club members
learned about “bread-tastic.” Bread is a
traditional global mainstay that is referred
to as the “staff of life.” Some breads found
in the United States and throughout the
world for you to enjoy are bagels, baguette,
cornbread, chapati, pita, tortilla or perhaps
a scone.
The time of year is approaching when
the club members can let their lights shine
in this community. On Monday, Dec. 1, at 9
a.m., weather permitting, members will be
gathering to decorate the Pin Oak Fountain
for Christmas. The filling of the Christmas
stockings for the elderly in the area is
planned for Monday, Dec. 8, at 9 a.m. at
the Ardinger’s. These will be delivered
after lunch. The club Christmas outing was
decided upon for Thursday, Dec. 11, with
lunch at the Country Inn in Berkeley Springs
at 11 a.m. and then touring the Ice House.
Any lady who feels like “shining” come and
join the group for any of these events.
Wow. What a special group of ladies who
are definitely “large in thought, in word and
in deed.” q
McCoy’s Grawnd Theatre presents ‘The Best Christmas Pageant Ever’
4-h teen leaders Sam Cookman, Allison Cowgill and Jordan
Clark lead newly elected officers in this year’s officer
installation ceremony.
MOOREFIELD — Make
plans now to see McCoy’s
production of “The Best
Christmas Pageant Ever.”
The show stars the Herdmans
who are the worst kids in the
history of the world. They
lie, steal, smoke cigars, swear
and hit little kids. So no one
is prepared when this outlaw
family invades church one
Sunday and decides to take over
the annual Christmas pageant.
None of the Herdmans have
ever heard the Christmas story
before. Their interpretation of
the tale — the wise men are a
bunch of dirty spies, and Herod
needs a good beating — has a
lot of people up in arms. But it
will make this year’s pageant
the most unusual anyone has
seen and, just possibly, the best
one ever.
The show will be on McCoy’s
Grand Stage, 121 North Main
St., Moorefield, Nov. 21, 22,
28 and 29, at 7 p.m. and Nov.
23 and 30, at 2 p.m. Tickets
are $10 for adults and $5 for
students and are on sale now at
the following outlets: O’Neils
Restaurant, Summit Community
Bank,
Moorefield;
South
Branch Inn; Moorefield Public
Library; Pendleton Community
Bank, Moorefield; and Colts
Restaurant. q
304-788-5540 • 800-651-5540
Mike Haywood, Broker, 304-790-2820
Chad Haywood, Agent, 304-790-0126
Specializing in Residential, Farms,
Land & Quality Country Estates
gREAT hOMEs AT REduCEd pRiCEs
Richmond Lauds Lincoln
Nov. 11, 1864 — Counter
intuitively,
the
Richmond
newspapers lauded the reelection of Lincoln. Their
praise was founded on 1st,
that Lincoln’s poor leadership
insured an eventual Southern
victory, and 2nd, his presence as
the Federal leader would work
to unite a solid South to stand
against Northern aggression.
The Southern press likewise
disparaged the candidacy of
McClellan explaining that his
leadership would have brought
the war to a negotiated peace
by dividing the South and
subverting its purity.
Richmond Whig, Nov. 15,
1864
“The Presidential Election”
… Lincoln has been reelected.
Few have doubted from the first
that this would be the result,
and fewer still will regret it.
The policy of conciliation…
which McClellan would have
attempted,
was
something
more to be dreaded than
Lincoln’s armies and navies.
With Lincoln… our people will
continue to stand as one… a
united South against a divided
North. With McClellan it might
have been a united North against
a divided South, in which event
all that we have been striving for
in this four years’ struggle would
have been lost. But Lincoln is
to continue to be the master of
the Yankees, and the spectre of
reconstruction vanishes forever.
Richmond Enquirer, Nov. 11,
1864
Lincoln has been reelected
President of the United States.
So far as the people of these
(Confederate)
States
are
interested, the reelection of
Lincoln is entirely satisfactory.
For us, he is the right man in
the right place. We would not
have him defeated, but gave all
the influence of the Enquirer to
him. Our reasons were entirely
selfish. We prefer an ignorant,
brutal tool as Commander-inChief of the enemy to any other
man. He suits us entirely. Gen.
McClellan might have given us
more trouble, but we have taken
the measure of Lincoln, and know
exactly his entire worthlessness.
This reelection of Lincoln binds
our people still firmer together…
We know that it means continued
war… There is no prospect for
peace… Let our authorities
begin immediately the work
of reorganizing the army,
consolidating the regiments,
filling up the ranks, improving
the cavalry and preparing for
the Spring campaign.
On its face, the Richmond
papers did their best to present
a courageous front; in reality,
the noose was tightening. Gen.
Lee was retreating before Grant
as both sparred to the east of the
Confederate capitol. Generals
Sherman and Sheridan were on
the loose; Sherman in Georgia
and Sheridan in the Shenandoah
were incinerating the South’s
ability to wage war. No amount
of bravado could dissuade the
South; they knew Lincoln’s reelection meant inevitable defeat.
(Ed. note: The above account
is written by Rob Wolford,
official historian for the City of
Romney, and will be brought to
Review readers throughout 2014
as a public service.) q
The
temperature
is dropping
and so are
the
prices!
Many of
these listings
have been
REDUCED
21 AC. MTN. RETREAT
Romney, WV - Immac. 3 BR,
Two Stry. Cedar Home on
21 Acs. of Mixed Pasture &
Woods. Cust. Kit. w/Applcs.,
C-Tile Flr. & Full Bsmt. Two
Porches, Beautiful Setting &
Panoramic Vistas. Detached
Barn/Garage & Wildlife Galore!
Only 30 Min. from VA line w/
Low WV Taxes! Priced Way below Appraisal. Motivated Seller,
Act Fast!
Only $195,000
www.mikehaywoodgroup.com
Sandy Reed,
Monica R.
GRI
Anderson
865-680-4945 410-271-3479
25045 Northwestern Pike, Romney, WV 26757
304-822-4488
Wherever federal armies went in the South, the back roads
would become clogged with fleeing refugees. most headed for
the state capitols of the South hoping for relief. others headed
for federal lines, hoping that the u.S. government would care
for them.
RealCo.
Appraisal Service
304.822.7117
Fax: 304.822.7211
T
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91.77 acre
hunting
paradise
w/several
year round
streams.
Unrestricted. Expansive views,
many build sites. Fort Ashby,
$339,500. MI8415093
20 wooded
acres w
private build
sites and
mountain
views. Trophy bucks, bear, & turkey. Lots
of fun for $49,900! Fort Ashby.
MI8458473
T
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Cute little 2
BR 1 BA log
cabin on
20 wooded
acres of
usable
land. Awesome views of western mountains and the South
Branch of the Potomac River.
Points, $125,000. HS8429544
Sportsman’s paradise. 26
powerful
acres w/
long range
shooting, open deer crossing,
natural habitat for food, fields
& water source. Moorefield,
$29,900. HD8493074
T
Mon.-Fri.:
8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
[email protected]
Appraisals
Mortgage Transactions • FHA
Land • Estates • Refinance • Divorce
P.O. Box 498, 20 S. Marsham St., Suite 204, Romney, WV
AC
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Hardy County’s finest mountain property
in the heart of Lost River Valley. 8.48
acres in Milam, ripe for camping, shooting, hunting. $18,500. HD8499801
T
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Co
Judy
Clower-Nazelrod
304-257-3727
Sandra Hunt,
Assoc. Broker
304-257-6343
Shelia Judy
703-999-5559
Jessica Wilkins Jason Ginevan Philip Malick
304-703-8618 301-268-8884 540-383-3165
Two lots
totaling
6.69
beautiful
acres in
Sherman
Estates. Great Access. Hunting, camping, mobile homes
allowed. Augusta, $19,900.
HS8458586
CT
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Danny
Riggleman
540-535-6016
www.4wvland.com
ConTRACT
11.38
beautiful
mountain
acres
overlooking the
South Branch Valley. Incomparable views, easy for building,
camping & stargazing. Milam,
$24,900. HD8141427
ChARM ANd COMfORT
Romney, WV - Two Stry. 3-4
BR, 1.5 BA Cape Cod on 2.89
Acs. w/Huge Eat-in Kit. feat. SS
Applcs. & Oak Cabs. Din. Rm.
w/Brick FP, Open Sun Rm. w/
Outside Access to Lrg. Deck.
Office Area & Liv. Rm. flank the
Din. Rm. Det. Greenhouse &
Workshop Bldg. Circular Blacktop Drvwy. w/Stone Pillars at
Entrance. Long Frontage on Rt
28 w/Comml. Potential. Huge
yard.
Only $179,000
Keenan Shanholtz, Broker
304-813-4858
[email protected]
“THE Authority for Real
Estate in Almost
Heaven West Virginia!”
loT/lAnd
24 acres
w/the best
view money
can buy.
Driveway installed to huge, level build site.
Unobstructed mountain views.
Priced firm but fair at $99,900
in Fort Ashby. MI8498687
20+ acres
w/plenty
of game,
near public
hunting,
trout fishing and public river
access. Several build sites.
Romney, REDUCED to $29,900.
HS8501173
37.45
wooded
acres w
no HOA
within 4
miles of South Branch of the Potomac public river access. Bag
that buck then reel one in! Romney, $134,000. HS8500661
22
wooded
acres w/
awesome
view,
stream, privacy, 100% usable,
deeded access to the South
Branch of the Potomac. REDUCED to 79,900 in Springfield.
HS8346508
sold
A little bit of this and that...34+ acres
with a bit of everything! Forest, stream,
views, & good topo. Big ridgetop, big
hollow. Some restrictions but no HOA.
Bloomery, $99,900. HS8226688
sold
Thinking of listing your property? Call us now 304-822-4488
hampshire review n
Wednesday, november 19, 2014
7C
4-H volunteer leaders recognized
Numerous 4-H volunteer
leaders were recognized during
this year’s 4-H Awards Banquet
and Recognition program.
Hampshire
County
Outstanding 4-H All Star:
Cynthia Corbin has served as a
West Virginia 4-H Volunteer for
11 years. She currently serves as
the organizational club leader for
the Capon Bridge Fort Edwards
4-H Club. Cynthia serves as a
4-H camp counselor and has
served as the camp chairperson
for 2 years. She has instructed
many educational workshops
during 4-H camp and officer’s
training school. Cynthia serves
on the 4-H fair exhibits building
committee and is active as a
4-H project resource leader. She
is always ready to help when
needed. As an elementary school
educator in the county, she
strives to be a good role model
in the community. She and her
husband have raised 2 children in
the West Virginia 4-H program.
Cynthia continues to make a
significant difference in the
lives of 4-H youth members and
the West Virginia 4-H program.
The organization is proud to
recognize her as Hampshire
County’s Outstanding 4-H All
Star.
Hampshire
County
Outstanding 4-H Volunteer
Leader:
Hampshire County is proud
to recognize Janet Haines as
its Outstanding 4-H Volunteer
Leader. Janet has served as a
West Virginia 4-H Volunteer for
24 years. She currently serves
as the organizational club leader
for the Jersey Mountain Workers
4-H Club. Janet has assumed
numerous service roles in the
4-H program. She has instructed
many educational workshops
during Hampshire County 4-H
Camp and 4-H Spring Fling. Her
workshops are always fun and
exemplify hands-on learning at
its best. Janet has also served
as a 4-H camp counselor and
has served on many county
level committees such as
the awards committee. She
continues to make a significant
difference in the lives of all
4-H youth members through
her positive attitude, kindness
and willingness to always lend
a helping hand to others. Janet
and her husband Steve give
much time to 4-H and have
raised their children in the 4-H
program. Congratulations to
a 4-H volunteer who always
strives “to make the best better.”
Hampshire
County
Outstanding
4-H
Alumni
Awards:
Flag presentation
Andrea Kerns served as a
very active 4-H’er growing up
in the Hampshire County 4-H
program. She was a member
of the Savilla-Vale Strugglers
4-H Club where she served
as the president and vicepresident. Some of her favorite
memories include winning
the spirit stick at 4-H camp,
receiving her charting pin and
being introduced into the WV
4-H All Stars. Andrea shared,
“4-H has helped me become
the person I am today. It taught
me invaluable life skills and the
importance of being an active
member of my community. I
treasure the friendships I have
made through 4-H.” Andrea
now gives back to 4-H as a
volunteer leader in Hampshire
County. Andrea has served as a
4-H volunteer for 6 years. She
most recently served as the
organizational
leader
with
the Romney Rising Stars 4-H
Club. Andrea is always ready
to serve others when asked. She
has served as a full-time camp
counselor during Hampshire
County 4-H Camp. She has
instructed classes during 4-H
camp and 4-H officer’s training
school. She currently serves
as the chair of the 4-H awards
banquet. Andrea serves as an
educator with the county’s
school system. She and her
husband have raised 2 children
in the West Virginia 4-H
program.
Teresa Thorne grew up in the
Hampshire County 4-H program
as a member of the Green Leaf
Clovers, Shanks Super Stars and
Herders and Homemakers 4-H
clubs. She excelled in sewing
and beef project work. With her
beef projects, she remembers
winning grand champion as well
as showmanship. She fondly
remembers going to WVU
Jackson’s Mill with her sewing
projects and also competing
in State 4-H Round-Up. As a
member, she always looked
forward to the Hampshire
Kerns
Pleasant Dale CEOS hold
November meeting
thorne
Champ
County Fair as well as the
daylong 4-H field days. Teresa
remembers the monthly 4-H
meetings always being in
homes. Fellow members really
got to know families. This is
one thing that Teresa has tried
to carry on with her club. She
has strived to make the 4-H
meetings and club outings
family friendly. “Good strong
family role models are important
and the reason that I decided to
become a leader. My parents
and aunt/uncle were my club
leaders. They became ‘parents’
to all the members. That is
something that I wanted to do
when I became leader.” Teresa
has served as the organizational
leader for the Slanesville Rise
and Shine 4-H Club for 9
years. She currently serves as
the resource leader for the 4-H
beef project. Teresa serves on
the fair exhibits committee and
has instructed the secretary’s
workshop during 4-H officer’s
training school. Teresa was
inducted into the West Virginia
4-H All Stars in 2013. Teresa
is
dependable,
positive,
hardworking and genuinely
cares about all of the 4-H’ers
she comes in contact with. “As
a kid, 4-H was a fun thing to
do… as an adult, I see the life
lessons that I learned from
being a 4-H member. I pray that
current 4-H’ers will see those
same lessons as they grow in the
The CEOS (Community
Educational
Outreach
Service)
council
meeting
was held on Sept. 17, at the
Hampshire County Health
Department. Sixteen officers
and members were present,
including our WVU liaison
Leah Kidner. Dorothy Swisher
read “Old Glory,” a tribute to the
American flag.
A donation will be sent to
the South Washington County
Military Support Group to
assist with postage to send
Christmas cards to the military
in the Middle East. Clubs will
be sending cards also.
Membership cards were
distributed. Carolyn Bowman
presented a candle with a card,
“you Light Up My Life,” to
all members who helped at the
county fair.
The achievement luncheon
was held Oct. 18, at 11 a.m. at
the Augusta United Methodist
Church. The theme was “CEOS
are the top of their class.”
Nancy Wolfe reported that
803 funnel cakes were sold at
the 2014 Hampshire County
Fair. She thanked everyone
for helping. This is our only
fundraiser. The profit goes back
into the community.
Officers elected for the
year are president, Dorothy
Swisher; vice president, Pamela
Eversole-Kiser;
secretary,
Ruth Martin; treasurer, Ann
McPeak; continuing education
chair,
Angela
Asbury;
marketing and membership,
Carolyn
Bowman;
family,
Merceda Rowzee; and health
motivator, Nancy Wolfe.
In 2015, council meetings will
be held quarterly.
The Review accepts
all Major Credit Cards
program. I never do what I do to
receive praise and recognition. I
always say, my reward is seeing
the smiles on the kids’ faces.”
Debbie
Champ
served
as a very active 4-H’er in
the Hampshire County 4-H
program. She was a member of
the Mill Creek Go-Getters 4-H
Club and was later a member of
the WVU Collegiate 4-H Club.
Debbie is a West Virginia 4-H
charting pin recipient. She won
the State 4-H Roundup several
times, as well as the state’s 4-H
public speaking contest. As a
4-H’er, most of her project work
was in sewing and cooking. She
now gives back to 4-H as a
volunteer leader. Debbie has
served as a 4-H leader in Marion
County.
Debbie
currently
serves as the co-organizational
leader for the Romney Can’t
Be Beat 4-H Club. She serves
as the resource leader for the
4-H goat project. She has been
instrumental in leading positive
youth development activities for
exhibitors during the Hampshire
County Fair. She has organized
the 4-H parade float for youth
members for 3 years. Debbie
is always ready to serve others
when asked and genuinely
cares about the wellbeing of
our youth. The organization
is proud to recognize Debbie
Champ with an Outstanding 4-H
Alumni Award. q
Lois Groves
Certified Appraiser, FHA, VA, HUD, Etc.
Members planned for the fall
conference at Jackson’s Mill
in October and area leadership
training at Fountain held Oct.
28.
To become a CEOS member,
please call WVU Extension
Office at 304-822-5013. q
Appraising:
n Estates
n Divorces
Groves
Appraisals
Farms
n Homes
n
Land
n Etc.
304-822-3507
mountain heritage realty
304-822-7010
304-671-7010
www.century21inwv.com
RealtoRs: Kenneth Rogers: 304-851-3892
Michael Heishman: 304-822-3816
Ruby Wolfe: 304-822-5558
New listiNG
3 BR, 1 bath, in town.
$69,900. HS8434522
3 BR, 2 baths, 2.1
acres. $79,900.
HS8387221
3 BR, 2 baths, 3.21
acres. $88,900.
HS8440780
3 Br, 2 baths, 7.87
acres. $124,900.
HS8349656
3 BR, 2 bath, 2.66
acres. $179,900.
HS8441588
2 BR, 1 bath cabin,
5.29 acres. $59,900.
HS8390606
3 BR, 1 bath, 0.48
acre. $115,900.
HS8264773
2 BR, 2 bath, 2.98
acres. $188,900.
HS8405215
2 BR home
Springfield. $116,000.
HS8376662
ld
so
1 BR, 1 bath, 2
acres. $31,900
HS8187058
5 BR, 3 bath, 24.35
acres. $315,000
HS8150977
FOR LEASE: Commercial space, superb location along
Rt 50, high visibility, plenty of parking, includes water
& sewer. 304-822-3507, 9-5 & after 5, 304 671-7010
3 BR, 2 bath, 6.6
acres. $189,900.
HS8312943
304-492-5487 Carol McKee
304-496-7958
Buying or selling - let us do the work for you!
AUgUsTA - 2 story home situated
on 2 acres on Rt. 29 North. NO
RESTRICTIONS. 3 or 4 bedrooms,
2 baths. Covered rear porch and
large side deck area. Single car detached garage. Concrete driveway
and parking area. $159,900.
To view all listings visit www.ruralrealty.net
The Crossings - Beautifully maintained
Log Home with Cacapon River Frontage, 2
b/r, 2 full baths, High Vaulted ceilings in
the kitchen/living area. Wood stove with
brick wall surround. Large open deck, enclosed back porch, covered front porch
and deck area. Property is comprised of 2 separate lots totaling
14.4 acres, with each lot having a well, septic and electric. Located
within a very private gated river community. Property is fenced and
crossed fenced for 3 different pastures. Tractor shed and hay lofts
on main level w/stalls below on lower level. $259,900.
See all of our listings for HampsHire & Hardy
counties at centralrealtywv.com.
Bob
Groves
Roxanna
Helmick
304-671 304-671 304-846
-3100
-7091
-8470
Beverly Keadle
304-704-9999
Lucy Staggs
304-851-0658
Licensed in WV & Va
haNNaS RD. - Quality solid brick, 3 bedroom, 2
full baths, 2 fireplaces, 2-car garage, full basement, utlity/butler’s pantry, hardwood floors,
granite counters, walking distance to restaurants, doctors and churches. $198,500.
pRopeRty FRoNtS
gRaSSy liCk RD. Surrounded by woods,
2 1/2 acres. excellent
condition. Large covered front porch. deck in back. Full basement. Call
for more details. $139,900.
eD
ReDUC
Savilla-vale - 2 bedrooms, bath, formal dinReDUCeD! New SUN- ingroom, full basement,
RiSe SUmmit - 3 BR, 2 carport, covered front
bath, multi-level home, porch, fenced yard. All
family room, deck. Moti- this in good condition.
vated seller. $103,900. $96,500.
SUNRiSe SUmmit - 3 BR, 1 bath, car- motivateD SelleR! $85,000. valport, spacious yard, great condition, ley StReet. 3 bedrooms 1 bath,
new siding, new windows, new doors. hardwood floors, small deck off the
back for private evenings and enjoy
$114,000.
whippoRwill - Brick Cape Cod, 3 a small garden. Handicapped ramp in
BR, 1-1/2 bath, full basement. Call front for easy entry.
for details. $87,000. Seller may con- aUgUSta - Fronting on aa Rogers
Road. Like new, 3 bedroom doubletribute toward closing cost.
New SUNRiSe. 3 BR, 1 1/2 bath, wide, 2 full deluxe bathrooms and
Family rooms up and downstairs. custom cabinets. Nice level yard with
Attached 2-car garage, 2 covered trees and shrubs. Includes a new
porches, paved driveway, lots of other 2-car garage. All this for only $97,700.
extras. motivated Seller! $89,900. maiN StReet - 3 BR, 2 bath, fenced
backyard, oak stairwell/trim. $79,900.
Owner will help with closing costs.
Ct
a
CoNtR
aCt
CoNtR
Ct
3 BR, 2 bath, 0.88
acre. $169,000.
HS8300229
5 BR, 2.5 baths,
in town. $89,900
HS8312949
3 BR, 1.5 bath,
0.11 acre. $89,900.
HS8295870
land
3 BR, 2 bath, 7.26
acres. $229,000
HS8053595
304-496-7544
Linda Nixon
SolD
4 BR, 1.5 bath, 1 acre 2 BR, 2 bath, 2 acres.
Wiley Ford. $122,500. $79,900. HS8393640
MI8393696
3 BR home,
2.42 acres. $89,900.
HS8366377
16125 Northwestern Pike, P.O.
Box 460, Augusta, WV 26704
169 east main st., romney, WV
email: [email protected]
| 304-671-8470
Michael A. Corbin
Broker/Owner
Randy L. Durst, Broker
Fax: 304822-5727
n
[email protected]
PLEASANT DALE — The
November meeting of Pleasant
Dale CEOS was called to order
by Violet Carnes, and those
attending joined in the Pledge
of Allegiance and the club
collect. Devotions were shared
by Violet — the 23rd Psalm.
One must realize that all are
mentioned personally in this
Psalm, and God always “leads
us by quiet waters.” What a
thought.
Roll call, minutes of the last
meeting and the treasurer’s
report were read by Violet
and approved as read. Juanita
Riggleman was the birthday
girl, and the members sang
“Happy birthday” to her.
There were no committee
reports. Angela Asbury gave a
Lois
Groves
P.O. Box 838, 25060 Northwestern
Pike, Romney, W.Va.
3 BR, 2 bath,
4 acres. $67,000.
HS8313310
report on Jackson’s Mill. The
exchange student seems very
interesting.
In honor of Veterans Day,
Violet read the poem, “Flanders
Field.” The members discussed
in detail the Christmas dinner,
and with a little luck, the
women of Augusta Methodist
Church will be preparing the
food. Wink Judy will let the
club know.
Nancy
Wolfe,
health
motivator, gave the members
information on 3 spices —
cinnamon, ginger and cloves.
The lesson for this meeting,
given by Juanita Riggleman,
was on the diversity of bread
and the many kinds and flavors.
There were 11 members and
1 guest, Denise Thorn, who
attended this meeting. q
Submitted by ViolEt CArnEs
CEOS hold council
meeting, elect officers
Submitted by dorothY sWishEr
PointS — Capon Chapel Church of the Brethren, Points,
was presented with a new American flag from Luci and dan
harris. A dedication service was nov. 9, with 3 veterans
in attendance, including Vernon ullery. Pictured are dan
harris, Luci harris and Vernon ullery. q
haines
Corbin
3 BR, 2 bath, 5.2
acres. $174,000.
HS8431204
ld
o
s
3 BR, 2 bath, 4.5
acres. $90,000.
HS8223576
3 BR, 3.5 bath, 20.15
acres. $485,000.
HS8436802
ld
o
s baths, 3.5
4 BR, 2.5
20 acres near town.
acres. $169,000.
$78,000.
HS8312987
HS8278627
Properties are on the Move! selling or
Buying - Give Us a Call today!!
a
CoNtR
laND
CoNtRaCt
64 aCReS oF beaUtiFUl FaRm laND. Road
frontage, just 1.1 miles from Rio. Older barn with
attached silo. Rolling hay fields, mostly fenced
with approx. 1/4 mile of North River frontage.
Call now to schedule an appointment or for more
information. $352,000. MOtIvAted SeLLeR.
lot 1 available iN SoUth hillS.
$18,000. Call for details.
21 aCReS, lovely wooded area. Only
minutes from town. $59,900.
New LiStiNg! 54 aCReS - pURgitSville - Stringtown Road, over
1/2 mile of road frontage, woods &
stream. Just what you’ve been looking for. $168,000. MOtIvAted SeLLeR. Call Roxanna 304-846-3100.
73 aCReS - pURgitSville - Nice
hay field, woods, pond. these are
just some of the amenities you get
with this property. $228,000. MOtIvAted SeLLeR.
34 aCReS fronting Starnes Rd.,
various building sites, good spring,
mostly hardwoods. $99,500.
vaRioUS bUilDiNg lotS - Crystal Valley estates. Owner financing
available. 1, 3, 5 and 20 acre lots.
Call for details on pricing and locations.
140 aCRe FaRm FRoNtiNg DelRay RoaD - Beautiful hay fields, rolling forests, numerous sites for that
perfect home. Well & septic already
installed on a knoll overlooking North
River valley. Reasonably priced at
$630,000. MOtIvAted SeLLeR.
5 aCReS FRoNtiNg DelRay
CoUNty RD. Only approx. 1 mile off
US Rt. 50. Nicely forested and nice
knoll for a home. $39,900.
20 NiCe wooDeD aCReS. Middle
Ridge. NO ReStRICtIONS. $69,900.
Some owner financing on select properties. Call for more details.
8C
n
hampshire review
Wednesday, november 19, 2014
Highland Arts presents Christmas Memories Dec. 7
KEySER — Take a break from
the decorating and shopping
and spend an afternoon in the
joy of the Christmas season
as Highland Arts Unlimited
presents Latshaw Productions
Christmas Memories.
Coming to Keyser for one
show only, Latshaw will kick
off its holiday performance at
3 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 7, at the
Church-McKee Arts Center on
the campus of Potomac State
College.
Now in more than 20 cities
across 10 states, this show is
becoming one of the area’s most
enjoyed holiday traditions.
Patrons say this heartwarming,
musical
celebration
of
Christmas just gets better and
better each year with its dazzling
production numbers, superb
musical arrangements, beautiful
costumes, dancing and more.
the orchestra will perform during the Christmas memories.
Area police
recognized
for safety
efforts
Eleven West Virginia police
departments were awarded
AAA’s Platinum Community
Traffic Safety awards for their
safety efforts, according to
officials at AAA East Central.
Six additional departments
received gold and silver awards
in recognition of their hard work.
The platinum awards were
given to “commendable leaders”
for their safety efforts and
enforcement activities geared
toward making communities
safer. The recipients of the
prestigious
awards
were
Berkeley Springs, Charles Town,
Harpers Ferry, Martinsburg,
Moorefield, Petersburg and
Piedmont police departments;
Berkeley, Jefferson and Morgan
county sheriffs’ departments;
and West Virginia State Police
Troop 2, Charles Town.
Gold awards, the 2nd highest
recognition to be given, were
awarded to Romney, Ranson
and
Wardensville
police
departments; and Hampshire and
Mineral county sheriffs’ offices.
A silver award was presented
to
Shepherdstown
Police
Department.
“We are honored to recognize
these local departments for
their efforts in the Community
Traffic Safety program,” said J.J.
Miller, AAA East Central safety
advisor. “Each organization has
gone above and beyond the call
of duty to make their community
a safer place for motorists and
residents.”
To be eligible for the annual
awards, a community must
conduct traffic safety promotions
and educate the public on safety
topics. q
Social
Security
Why should you alloW
a social security
representative Who
is not an attorney
represent you?
Over 20 years experience in the
field of Social Security law who
will represent you throughout
your entire case.
The Review online has Breaking News! www.HampshireReview.com
An appearance by Santa
Claus will add to the festivities
and area residents won’t want
to miss Keyser native Rhoades
Whitehill as he performs with
the orchestra.
Latshaw
Productions
is
located in Greensburg, Pa., and
has been specializing in family
oriented programs, concerts
and special events since 1982.
The company has produced
more than 30 original musical
revues, totaling nearly 4,000
performances.
Admission for the upcoming
concert is free to HAU members.
Tickets are $15 for adults and
$10 for students. Children under
12 are admitted free with a
paying adult.
Advance tickets are available
at Anderson’s Corner, Romney
and Moorefield; Reed’s Drug
Store, Clements Jewelers and
The Candlewyck, Keyser;
the Allegany Arts Centre in
Cumberland or by calling 304788-3066 or 304-788-9464. q
NOTICE
The Region VII Workforce Investment Board will hold a
Board meeting beginning at
6 p.m. on November 20, 2014.
The meeting is being held via conference call.
Please call 304-530-5258 for call in information.
Everyone Welcome!
Sun., Nov. 23 • 4-8 p.m.
at
“The Point” — Augusta Church of Christ
Adults $8 • Seniors & Kids $5
5 years and under FREE
• Wear Camo if you want
• Door Prizes
• Best Beard Contest
Featuring:
Chef Paul’s
Famous Ribs or
Chicken and Side
Dishes
“Youth Demo Day” on November 22nd
from 10a-2p. Bring the kids and they
can ride a Honda CRF50 and CRF110
for FREE!
2014 Rincon - 675cc liquid-cooled OHV four-stroke
Automatic transmission with hydraulic torque converter
SRP* $9,199 SALE $8,899
2014 Foreman 4X4
475cc liquid-cooled OHV four-stroke Five-speed with Reverse
SRP* $7,099 SALE $6,999
2014 Rancher 2x4
420cc liquid-cooled OHV four-stroke Five-speed with Reverse
SRP* $5,199 SALE $4,699
2014 Recon
220cc OHV four-stroke Five-speed with Reverse
SRP* $3,949 SALE $3,749
free conSultation!
no fee unless you Win!
Sherman law firm
304-822-4740
304-538-3799
or 800-619-4740
Are to
e
W sed
Plea e You
Serv
United
Disposal
Services
Inc.
For Information or
New Service Call:
1-800-543-7897
2014 Rancher 4X4 EPS - 420cc liquid-cooled OHV four-stroke
Electric Shift Program, TraxLok 2WD/4WD , Digital Meter
SRP* $6,449 SALE $6,199
2014 Rubicon
475cc liquid-cooled OHV four-stroke Five-speed with reverse
SRP* $7,999 SALE $7,699
2015 PIONEER 500 SRP* $8,499
475cc liquid-cooled OHV four-stroke
50”wide- fits on tight trails, is fun to drive, and easy to load into a full-size truck bed.
2014 PIONEER 700/4 SRP* $11,699
675cc liquid-cooled OHV four-stroke
Automotive-style with hydraulic torque converter, three
forward gears and Reverse. Three drive modes include
2WD, 4WD and 4WD with differential lock
2014 PIONEER 700 SRP* $9,999
675cc liquid-cooled OHV four-stroke
Automotive-style with hydraulic torque converter, three
forward gears and Reverse. Three drive modes include
2WD, 4WD and 4WD with differential lock
10385 Mount Savage Rd. Cumberland, MD
(301) 783-1900
TimbrookHonda.com
honda.com MULTI-PURPOSE UTILITY VEHICLES CAN BE HAZARDOUS TO OPERATE. PIONEER IS ONLY FOR DRIVERS 16 YEARS AND OLDER. DRIVER AND PASSENGER MUST BE TALL ENOUGH FOR SEAT BELT TO FIT PROPERLY AND TO BRACE THEMSELVES WITH BOTH FEET FIRMLY ON THE FLOOR. PASSENGER MUST BE ABLE TO GRASP THE HANDHOLD. NEVER DRIVE WITH MORE THAN ONE PASSENGER. ALWAYS WEAR YOUR SEAT
BELT, AND KEEP THE SIDE NETS AND DOORS CLOSED. ALL MUV USERS SHOULD WATCH THE SAFETY VIDEO “MULTIPURPOSE UTILITY VEHICLES: A GUIDE TO SAFE OPERATION” AND READ THE OWNER’S MANUAL BEFORE OPERATING THE VEHICLE. FOR BOTH TYPES OF VEHICLES, ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET, EYE PROTECTION AND APPROPRIATE CLOTHING. AVOID EXCESSIVE SPEEDS, AND BE CAREFUL ON DIFFICULT TERRAIN.
FOR YOUR SAFETY BE RESPONSIBLE. NEVER DRIVE UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF DRUGS OR ALCOHOL, OR ON PUBLIC ROADS. RESPECT THE ENVIRONMENT WHEN DRIVING. UTILITY ATVs ARE RECOMMENDED ONLY FOR RIDERS 16 YEARS OF AGE AND OLDER. BE A RESPONSIBLE RIDER. ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET, EYE PROTECTION AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING, AND PLEASE RESPECT THE ENVIRONMENT. OBEY THE LAW AND READ
YOUR OWNER’S MANUAL THOROUGHLY. *3.49% Fixed APR financing available for customers who qualify for super preferred credit tier for up to 36 months through Honda Financial ServicesSM. Payment example: 36 monthly payments of $29.30 for each $1,000 financed. Offer good on all new and unregistered ATV models. Not all buyers may qualify. Higher rates apply for buyers with lower credit ratings. Offer ends 11/30/14.
Check with participating Honda Dealers for complete details. CRF/Fs ARE INTENDED FOR OFF-ROAD OPERATION ONLY. PARENTS NEED TO CONSIDER A RIDER’S AGE, SIZE, ABILITY AND MATURITY BEFORE ALLOWING THEM TO RIDE. ALWAYS WEAR A HELMET, EYE PROTECTION AND PROTECTIVE CLOTHING, AND PLEASE RESPECT THE ENVIRONMENT. OBEY THE LAW AND READ THE OWNER’S MANUAL THOROUGHLY. Always stay
on established trails in approved riding areas. CRF®, FourTrax®, Rancher® and Foreman are trademarks of Honda Motor Co., Ltd. ©2014 American Honda Motor Co., Inc. (9/14) Offer valid through 10/31/14. *SRP Does not include destination charges. FourTrax® and Pioneer® are trademarks of Honda Motor Co., Ltd. (11/14)
d
Wednesday
November 19, 2014
Classifieds
@
Hampshire
Review.com
WHAT A DEAL!
HOW TO PLACE YOUR AD
By Phone: 304-822-3871
By fax: 304-822-4487
By internet
hampshirereview.com
in Person:
74 West main St.
romney, WV 26757
By mail:
P.o. Box 1036, romney, WV
3 for 1
Review • Weekender • Internet
Cash - Check - money order Credit Card
FIREWOOD/LUMBER
Wanted to buy junk cars and trucks.
304-822-5207.
4 WHEEL DRIVES
2004 Chevrolet Tracker, 4x4, Automatic,
V6, 4 door, PW, PL, AC, new tires, new
brakes, excellent condition. $3,500.
304-822-5506.
4WD 2001 Dodge 1500 ext. cab, full
bed, auto, power locks, etc. Asking
$3,000 OBO. 304-496-1183.
CAMPERS/TRAVEL TRAILERS
Great For Hunting: 1993 GMC Motor
Home. Very good condition with many
extras. 32 feet. Generator, good tires.
Lowered price to $4,800 negotiable.
304-822-6080, 304-813-3248.
Reduced price, 1990 Terry Camper
Trailer $1,500. OBO. 304-897-2912 ask
for Denny.
1996 30 foot camper, $3,000. 240-7274833.
FARM
Hay for sale. 4X5 Round Bales, Orchard
and Brome. Shed kept. 540-550-1705.
Firewood - Split wood, $275, 2 cords.
Local delivery. Call 304-496-7469 or
540-550-1705.
Firewood for sale. 8ft. pick up bed with
10 inch side-racks. Cut and split, thrown
on. Call anytime 304-813-8299.
Fire wood for sale. All hard wood. 1/2
cord pickup truck load. Not split for
$80.00 and split and stacked on truck
for $110.00. Also have pine logs for outside stoves for $75.00 a load, will cut
to length. Free delivery in Hampshire
County. 304-359-3039.
Hardwood - firewood, 8 ft. bed. Delivered local. $80.00. Big Loads. 304-8225640, 304-703-2737.
HOMES/ACREAGE
3 bedroom, 2 bath, 660 Summit Drive
Old Sunrise. Walkout basement, two
kitchens, tile, hardwood floors, newer
kitchen upstairs with newer appliances.
Newer bath, heatpump, front deck,
and paint, extra insulation. 1/2 acre,
$147,000. 304-787-6047.
Land for Sale! Cardinal Ridge Estates,
Romney, WV. 10 acres with mountain
views, electric located at property edge
also public water access. 1 access road
and the community has gravel roads
with a proposed security gate. 410-7870491.
L & T Electrical
Contractors
We Sell & Service York
Air Conditioners &
Heat Pumps
Free eStimAteS
7711 Cumberland Road
Springfield, WV 26763
304-822-7533
ANIMALS/PETS
LOST
HOW TO PAY
AUTOS
madilyn
$6.00
MOTORCYCLES/4 WHEELERS
For Sale - 2004 Yahama Raptor
WYM50, building kept. $1,100. 304671-7010.
FOR SALE
ALL
for
Located along Hoy Road in Augusta
304-496-1119
304-813-4633
304-813-5101
All Phases of Construction
Inside and Out
Remodeling or Repairs
Licensed and Insured • Free Estimates
Contractor’s Lic. No. WV004588
For Sale: Large maintenance free brick
rancher on quiet dead end street in
Romney near school. 376 School Street.
Large LR and DR with eat in kitchen, 3
BR, 3 bath, new roof and central heat
and air, in-ground pool, lots of storage,
60% of basement finished, laundry on
each floor and outside storage building
on two joining lots. Must see, priced to
sell at $169,500. Call 304-671-9989.
HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
Sofa, L-shape sectional like new 114
1/2 inches by 88 inches, $450, Call
304-496-8282.
Captain’s Bed and night stand, natural
wood, bookcase headboard, storage
drawers under bed. $475 OBO. 304496-8189.
Hunting season is here, if you see
me, please call 304-289-5424 IMMEDIATELY, DAY OR NIGHT. Reward
offered. “Pooch,” black and white male
(Husky/German Shepherd mix), 817360-8597. He has been spotted in
Hampshire & Hardy Counties. Please,
help us find our beloved pet.
Reward Offered. Large, long haired,
fluffy, black cat missing near Dunmore
Ridge Road in Augusta. Very friendly.
Please respond with any information to
[email protected]
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR RENT
Maxwell & Swisher’s History of Hampshire Co. (reprint from original edition,
1895). $84.80 (tax incl.) add $8 for
shipping and handling. Limited number
available. Contact Dan Oates, Ft. Pearsall Press, 190 Armstrong St., Romney,
WV 26757; 304-851-5680; email: [email protected] or for sale at the
Hampshire Review office.
Office space for rent. 500 East Main
Street, Heritage Hill Office Complex.
304-822-3953.
Bristol
springs
New Homes • on 2 acres +
Custom Built
Homes starting in the low
$100’s
Model House OPEN by Appointment
304-496-7020
www.bristolspringswv.com
Romney Auto
Repair
SKR
7
birthday
th
• Services
• Announcements
• Wanted
• Legals
• Real Estate
• Autos
• For Sale
• For Rent
• Employment
Happy
Domestic &
Import Vehicles
Quality Repair &
Maintenance Services
ney, $600/mo. plus utilities. 301-5017131.
Mobile Home Park space for rent on Rt.
50, Capon Bridge. Wolfe’s Trailer Park.
Excellent price and location, for more
information please call Pili at 540-6649909.
Rent to Own, Brand New, 14x70 3 BR
mobile home, set up on corner lot, in
nice clean quiet park in Springfield. Will
take payments, $350 per month/$200
lot rent. No pets. 301-707-3925.
Apartments for Rent in Town of Romney, 1 and 2 bedrooms in excellent condition. Quiet and private setting, smoke
free building. Sorry, no pets. Call 304813-5805. Please leave message.
Single Family Home in Fort Ashby, WV,
.35 acs., 3 bd. potentially 4, 2 1/2 bath,
central air and heat, finished basement,
new kitchen, all new appliances, $695.
per month. Call 703-347-3618.
3 Bedroom 2 Bath mobile home in nice
clean quiet park on AA Rogers Road.
$550 per month, no pets, 540-5506570.
For Rent: Commercial Property, approximately 1,800 sq. ft. office/retail
space at 72 South Marsham St., Rom-
Newer mobile home. 3 bedroom, 2 bath,
Rt. 29, Slanesville. AC, dishwasher,
washer/dryer, water/septic/trash removal included. No pets. Very nice. 304496-7896 or 301-616-7899.
Auction Service
Brothers
Call for free estimates on selling
your estate or personal property.
Bid calling for a do-it-yourself
auction or full-service auction your
place or mine.
Let your yea be yea and your
nay be nay; for whatsoever is
more then these cometh of evil.
Matt. 5:37
Alvin Stoltzfus
Auctioneer #2119
Lic & bonded in WV
Nick’s
Air Care
tree Works Inc.
304-822-7722 (Fax)
[email protected]m
455 Center Ave.
Romney, WV 26757
1 - 2 bedroom apartment on S. Branch
River Road. $500/month plus deposit.
Includes electric. No pets or smoking.
304-257-7883.
2 Bedroom, 1 bath in Capon Bridge.
Includes lawn maintenance & snow
removal. Features; covered front porch,
storage building, city water/sewer,
washer/dryer hookup. $674. 540-5355100.
Continued to page 2d ■
Drivers Wanted
CDL-A Drivers, Dedicated Account,
$
1,000 Min. Pay Agreement,
NO HAZMAT REQUIRED,
6 Months Experience.
Call DM
Bowman 1-800-609-0033
TECHNICIAN
NEEDED
State Inspectors License A Plus
Will Trim Service Wires
• Excellent working conditions
• Health/dental/life insurance
• Paid vacation/holidays
• 401(k) Plan
• Uniforms are provided
Free Estimates • Licensed & Insured
304-813-6647
304-822-8011
Quality Home
Improvement
Don’t Get Hot...
Don’t Get Cold...
Free Estimates on New Installs
Reasonable Service Rates
Vic Mathias
304-822-0590
304-702-1761
Free estimates
HVAC
For Lease - Commercial space, superb location along Rt 50, high visibility, plenty of parking, includes water &
sewer. 304-822-3507, 9-5; after 5, 304671-7010.
Bobcat Work, Stump Grinding,
Yard Work, Topping & Removals,
Emergency Storm Work
We Offer:
Must Have:
• Good work attitude
• Neat appearance
• Ability to work in a fast paced
atmosphere
Apply In Person To
Scott Larrick
Serving local people with
quality work since 1989.
Romney, WV
304-822-7993
For Lease - storage unit, 16x45. $250/
mo. 304-671-7010.
304-496-9342
WV004603
Nick Buckley - Owner
2934 Valley Avenue
Winchester, VA
Equal Opportunity Employer M/F
TIMBROOK KIA
This November TIMBROOK KIA Is Celebrating KIA’S “BLACK FRIDAY” SALES EVENT. THAT
MEANS YOU DON’T HAVE TO WAIT FOR THE DAY AFTER THANKSGIVING TO GET A GREAT
DEAL!! EVERYDAY IN NOVEMBER IS “BLACK FRIDAY” AT TIMBROOK KIA.
2
New KIA OPTIMA
New A SORENTO L
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*
MSRP...........................$27,255
SALE PRICE.................$24,255**
AS LOW AS........$23,955***
MSRP...........................$22,640
SALE PRICE.................$20,655**
AS LOW AS........$19,855***
0% UP TO 75 M0****
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TIMBROOK KIA
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AS LOW AS.......$15,823***
1.9% UP TO 75 M0****
2d
n
hampshire review
Wednesday, november 19, 2014
Must have proof of income. Call 304822-2427, leave a message. Located in
Romney.
■ Continued from page 1d
FOR RENT
3 bedroom apartment, no pets, water,
sewer, trash pick up included. References required. 304-268-1033, leave
message. $500/month, plus security
deposit.
Newly renovated 2 bedroom mobile
home, Points, WV. Deposit required. No
pets. No Smoking. 304-790-2775.
HELP WANTED
Receptionist. Seasonal work. Experience in an office setting preferred.
Background check required. Send resumes to Box RH, in care of the Hampshire Review, PO Box 1036, Romney,
WV 26757.
3 BR house, total electric in Romney.
No pets. References required. 1st and
last month rent required. $500/month.
304-671-6657.
The Hampshire County Sheriff/Treasurer’s Office will be accepting applications
for a part-time staff to work in our Capon
Bridge Office. The successful candidate
will be required to work an average of
20 hrs. per week. Must possess necessary computer skills. Preference may be
given to applicants who have prior clerical/accounting experience. Applicants
will be required to submit to a thorough
background investigation. Applications can be picked up at the Sheriff/
Treasurer’s Office or downloaded from
www.hampshirecountysheriffwv.com.
Applications must be submitted to the
Sheriff/Treasurer’s Office by 4:00 P.M.
on December 5th, 2014.
3 BR, 1 BA home, easy access, Purgitsville. No pets or smoking inside. One
year lease. $550/mo., $550 security
deposit. References required. 304-8138038.
Drivers: CDL-A. Do you want more than
$1,000 a Week? Excellent Monthly
Bonus Program/Benefits. Weekend Hometime you Deserve! Electronic Logs/
Rider Program. 877-704-3773.
3 BR trailer $450 a month plus security
deposit required before moving in. Sewer, trash and water included. No pets.
Quality Support Associate/Direct Support Professional wanted for the Wardensville Rescare, Inc. Full time and
We offer All Phases Of Construction,
From Framing To Turn-Key And Any
Stage In Between
SeamleSS Gutter
3 BR Trailers in Romney, security deposit and references required. Call for
info, 304-856-3663, 540-533-7282.
2 bedroom, 2 bath mobile home, $425/
deposit, $425/month plus utilities. Also,
vacant pads for rent. 304-813-1742.
Nice 3 bedroom, 2 bath mobile home,
Green Spring Valley Road, small yard.
$550/month plus $550/Deposit. 240727-4833. Leave message.
Custom Built and Log Homes
Steel Buildings - Farm • Commercial
Residential Garages • Pole Sheds
Capon Bridge, WV
304-856-3875
Hampshire
Home Builders
FULL-SERVICE CONTRACTORS
“Quality Is Our Tradition”
www.hampshirehomebuilder.com
5” Standard &
6” Commercial for
Garages, Barns,
large Homes
Also
Replacement
Windows Remodeling • Decks • Siding
• Soffit Facia • Custom Trim • Roofing
FREE ESTIMATES • WV #005537
Shanklin home
improvement
304-822-3040
Substitute positions available. High
school diploma or GED and a valid
driver’s license with a satisfactory driving record required. Provide support
for the individuals with developmental
disabilities to learn skills to make them
more independent in their daily living.
Applications can be completed on line
at www.rescare.com, go under West
Virginia Eastern Agency (Ed: Rcrs WV
Keyser). If you have any questions,
please call Sai Mine or Jessica Billmeyer at 304-874-4122. EOE/M/F/D/V.
Now Enrolling! Train for a New Career.
CDL-A Training/172 hours. Allstate Career. Charles Town, WV. For more info:
304-724-8999.
The West Virginia Schools for the Deaf
and the Blind are currently accepting
applications for the following position for the 2014-2015 school year:
School for the Blind: Elementary/
Basic Education Teacher Must have
or be eligible for a West Virginia Professional Certificate with endorsement in
Elementary Education. Candidates with
Special Education Multi-Categorical (E/
BD, MI and SLD) preferred. Successful
applicant must also have or acquire an
additional endorsement to teach stu-
Calvert’s
self-storage
In The Storage Business Since 1991
For Office, Home
and Commercial
dents with blindness/low vision. Must
demonstrate proficiency in contracted
Braille within two years of hire date in
accordance with WVSDB Communication Policy. Please submit applications
to Sondra McKenery, Director of Personnel, WVSDB, 301 East Main Street,
Romney, WV 26757 by Wednesday, November 26, 2014, at 4:00 p.m. For a full
job description, application form or additional information call 304-822-4820,
email [email protected] or visit
http://wvsdb2.state.k12.wv.us.
Lynn
Boyer, Ph.D. Superintendent, EQUAL
OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.
The West Virginia Schools for the Deaf
and the Blind are currently accepting
applications for the following positions
for the 2014-2015 school year: Substitute Aide - Must be 24 years of age
and pass State of WV Aide Test. Aides
must have basic keyboarding skills.
Have or acquire appropriate communication skills (Braille or Sign Language
depending upon department assignment) within two years of hire date in
accordance with WVSDB Communication Policy. Must have or acquire
First Aid and CPR certification. To be
eligible for interview for positions with
the School for the Deaf a candidate
must be at a SLPI Intermediate rating
or above. Candidates at an Advanced
SLPI preferred. Substitute General
Maintenance - High school diploma or
equivalent required. Must be 18 years
of age and able to read, write and to follow written as well as oral instructions.
One year of full-time employment in one
or more of the respective building, electrical or mechanical trades. Must pass
State of WV School Service Personnel
Test for General Maintenance. Must
achieve sign language skills as outlined
in the WVSDB Communication Policy.
MULTI-SENSORY PROGRAM (through
6/15/15) 1 Yr. Temporary Aid/Child Care
Worker - High school diploma or equivalent. Minimum of 24 years old to work
with elementary age children and 28
years old to work with secondary age
children. Must have or acquire sign language skills. Must pass WVSDB Child
Care Worker Test and pass or have
passed the service personnel written
test for classroom instructional aides.
Experience working as a classroom
instructional aide preferred. Must have
or acquire sign language as outlined
in the WVSDB Communication Policy.
RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM: Substitute
Child Care Workers (through 6/15/15)
High school diploma or equivalent required. Minimum of 24 years old to work
with elementary age children and 28
years old to work with secondary age
children. Must have or acquire sign language and/or braille skills as delineated
in WVSDB Communication Policy. Must
be physically able to lift fifty pounds.
Must pass Child Care Worker Test.
Deadline for accepting applications
will be Tuesday, November 25, 2014,
at 4:00 p.m. For a job description, application form or additional information
call 304-822-4820, email [email protected]
k12.wv.us or visit http://wvsdb2.state.
k12.wv.us. Lynn Boyer, Ph.D., Superintendent EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER.
Experienced drivers needed for snow
removal contracts. Also, sub-contracters needed with their own trucks. Pay
based on experience. 540-533-7282.
Continued to page 3d ■
PrimeCare Medical
Precision
is seeking LPNs to work Per Diem
hours in the medical dept. at the
Potomac Highlands Regional Jail.
Contact HR at 1-800-245-7277
or fax resumés to 717-651-1865
EOE. REF #633
Overhead Doors
Jim Teter, Owner
Storage
5x10, 10x10, 10x15, 10x20, 10x30
Monitored Daily • Lighted Area
Romney • Rt. 50, Mt. Top
Augusta • Springfield, Rt. 28
304-822-5496
All major Credit Cards accepted
Sales • Service • Installation
HOLIDAY CASH!!
304-856-3894
Now Hiring!!
Serving WV and VA since 1986
WV002326
Full-Time
HC 71 Box 92A, Capon Bridge, WV 26711
Busy manufacturing facility located in
Winchester, VA is now hiring for
In business in Hampshire County
for 40 years.
Full-time Seasonal Help.
These are excellent opportunities to earn Holiday
Cash! Great schedules to choose from to meet your
lifestyle needs, including 8 hour and 12 hour shifts!
Don’t be left out in the cold!
Gray’s Heating & Air, LLC
Please apply in person at:
Sales & Service
304-496-9783
Life Style Staffing
158 Front Royal Pike
Suite 106
Winchester, VA
We sell, install and service Water
Furnace Geothermal Units and High End
Buderus Boiler Systems. Plus outdoor
Woodstoves that include a 30 yr. warranty!
540-678-0411
WV lic #036503 • NATE CERTIFIED
2014 BIG FINISH EVENT!
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Or 2.9% APR For 84 Months** TWO LEFT AT THIS SAVINGS
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LOWEST PAYMENTS OF THE YEAR!
1.9% APR For 84 Months**
Plus $500 Rebate On:
2015 CHRYSLER 200 SEDAN (Excludes LX)
2014 JEEP COMPASS 4X4
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Plus $500 Rebate On:
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HHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH
ADJUSTMENTS: ONE FREE INSERTION DUE TO ERRORS. We accept responsibility for one incorrect insertion. Therefor,e incorrect advertisements must be corrected immediately. The Hampshire Review reserves the right to correctly classify, revise or reject any advertising. EMPLOYMENT: It shall be an unlawful employment practice, unless based upon bona fide
occupational qualifications or except where based upon applicable security regulations established by the United States or the state of West Virginia for an employer or employment agency to print or circulate or cause to be printed or to use any form of application for employment or to make an inquiry in connection with prospective employment, which expresses the
following: Directly or indirectly, any limitation, specifications or discrimination as to race, religious creed, color, national origin, ancestry, physical handicap, marital status, sex, age or any intent to make such limitation, specification or discrimination. RENTALS & REAL ESTATE: Notice: All real estate advertising for housing in this newspaper is subject to the Federal air
Housing Act of 1968. Landlords or home sellers who discriminate among those seeking housing on the basis or race, color, national origin, ancestry, sex, religion, marital status or age may be violating state or federal law, or both. This newspaper odes not knowingly accept ay advertising which is in violation of this law.
hampshire review n
Wednesday, november 19, 2014
WANTED TO BUY
■ Continued from page 2d
LAWN CARE
Michael J.’s Snow Removal, residential
or commercial. Gutter cleaning, leaf removal, lot clearing, trimming and removal of shrubs and trees, power washing,
roofs, metal or shingles, small home
repairs, carpentry, drywall, electrical or
plumbing. Senior citizen discounts. References available. 304-822-5915.
WANTED
Wanted - Snow Removal for commercial parking lot in downtown Romney.
Call 304-813-1092.
Gold, silver, and platinum; jewelry or
coins. Paying top prices. Anderson’s
Corner, Romney WV. Call 304-8224285 or 301-707-5335.
WANTED TO DO
Retired master electrician, master
plumber, master appliance technician.
Major experience, minor cost. Small
jobs only. Hampshire County area. 304856-2909.
Your County Home Repairs, all phases
of carpentry. Remodel. Repairs. Roofing. Plumbing. Light electrical. Mantels,
Barn Repairs. Finish - trim. Power washing. Etc. 304-359-0880. owner Dan.
Michale J’s Total Cleaning Service. Residential and commercial. Get ready for
the holidays. Dusting, vacuuming, buffing or waxing wood or tile floors. Clean
out stoves, refrigerators, re-arrange
furniture and so much more. Call 304822-5915.
Experienced Carpenters - Call Don and
Joe for carpentry jobs done right at a
fair, low price. Experience with decks,
framing, repairs, siding, roofing, sheetrock, tile, windows, doors, remodeling, snow removal. Also handy with
landscaping. Leave message on cell
304-703-1236 for a return call. Free estimates. References.
Computer Repair A+ Certified Technician Serving Hampshire and sur-
rounding. Mobile and drop off services
available 7 days/week. Tune up, system
recovery, Windows factory reinstallation, advanced diagnostics, hardware
installation, virus and spyware eradication, application software, network
troubleshooting, network devices. Full
service for laptops and tablets including internal AC power jack replacement,
and LCD screen replacement. PH#
540-532-1177.
Tim’s Air Conditioning, Heating Service
and Repair. Heat Pumps, Mini-splits,
Central air, Window units. Free Estimates. Universal and CFC certified.
C.N. #2325872. Phone 304-703-1127.
MISCELLANEOUS
Rainbow Pageant. November 22,
Romney. Call 304-263-1499 or [email protected]
NO HUNTING/TRESPASSING
No hunting or trespassing on Locust
Hills Farm Property. Written permission
only. Positively no 4-wheelers on the
property. Not responsible for accidents.
Mrs. Vincent Melzac, Owner.
No hunting is allowed on Lost Mountain
except by owners or with written permission from owners. Lost Mountain will
not be responsible for any accidents.
3D
No hunting is allowed on Farms of the
River Region (FORR) property without
the property owner’s written permission
carried with the hunter when on FORR
property.
No Hunting, No Trespassing on any
land of Linda J. Haines without current
2014 written permission. Absolutely no
ATV/4-wheelers. No taking firewood.
Violators prosecuted!
No Hunting, Trespassing, ATVs on Edgar A. Woods’ property on Little Cacapon. Violators will be prosecuted.
LEGAL ADVERTISEMENTS
County, West Virginia, known and designated as Lot Nos. 2, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, and
17, of Silver Leaf Subdivision. Reference is made to the plats of the various
Sections/Phases of Silver Leaf Subdivision, which are of record in the Office of the
Clerk of the County Commission of Hampshire County, West Virginia, in Map Book
No. 10, at pages 74, 79, 107-109, 187 and 188, and 278-280, for a more particular
description of said parcels, and for any and all pertinent and proper reasons.
West Virginia State Auditor’s Office
County Collections Division
Building 1 Room W-118
1900 Kanawha Boulevard East
Charleston, WV 25305
(Cert No. 14233 Richard Dadds, Jr. & John Butler)
To: ROBERT HOBGOOD, DAIZIE THOMPSON, ROBERT HOBGOOD, ROBERT
HOBGOOD – REGULAR MAIL, DAIZIE THOMPSON - REGULAR MAIL, ROBERT
HOBGOOD – REGULAR MAIL or heirs at law, devisees, creditors, representatives,
successors or assigns.
You will take notice that Richard Dadds, Jr. & John Butler, the purchaser of the
following real estate, Certification No.:14233, located in Springfield District, 2.013 Ac
Lot 25 Potomac River Hills SD .003 Ac Common Area 2011-2012 2.013 Ac Lot 25
Potomac River Hills SD which was returned delinquent or nonentered in the name
of Hobgood Robert & Thompson Daizie, and was sold by the deputy commissioner
of delinquent and nonentered lands of Hampshire County at the sale for delinquent
taxes on 8/29/2014. Richard Dadds, Jr. & John Butler requests that you be notified
a deed for such real estate will be made on or after 12/15/2014, as provided by law,
unless before that day you redeem such real estate. The amount needed to redeem
on or before 12/15/2014, will be as follows:
Amount equal to the taxes and charges due on the date of the sale,
with interest, to 12/15/2014
$933.61
Amount of taxes paid on the property, since the sale, with interest
to 12/15/2014.
$0.00
Amount paid for Title Examination and preparation of the list to be
served and for preparation and service of notice with interest from
to 12/15/2014.
$507.92
Additional Statutory Fees with Interest to 12/15/2014
Total Required
$0.00
$1,441.53
You may redeem at any time before 12/15/ 2014 by paying the above
total less any unearned interest.
And being a portion of the same real estate conveyed unto Randal C. Miller,
Jeffrey G. Miller, and George W. Brent by deed of Randal C. Miller, Jeffrey G. Miller
and Rocket Science, LLC, a West Virginia Limited Liability Company, by deed dated
December 11, 2006, of record in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission
of Hampshire County, West Virginia, in Deed Book 440, at Page 538, and in Deed
Book 461, at page 42. And further being a portion of the same real estate in which
Randal C. Miller conveyed all of his right, title, and interest in said real estate unto
Jeffrey G. Miller, and George W. Brent, by deed dated December 3, 2007, and which
said deed is of record in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office in Deed Book 470, at Page 423.
The property will be conveyed in an “AS IS” condition by Deed containing
no warranty, express or implied, subject to the Internal Revenue Service right of
redemption, all property taxes, prior Deeds, liens, reservations, encumbrances,
restrictions, rights-of-ways, easements, covenants, conveyances and conditions of
record in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office or affecting the subject property.
The Beneficiary and/or the Servicer of the Deeds of Trust and Note reserve the
right to submit a bid for the property at sale.
The Trustee reserves the right to continue sale of the subject property from
time to time by written or oral proclamation, which continuance shall be in the sole
discretion of the Trustees.
The Trustee shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying
the property to vacate said property, and any personal property and/or belongings
remaining at the property after the foreclosure sale will be deemed to constitute
ABANDONED PROPERTY AND WILL BE DISPOSED OF ACCORDINGLY.
Terms of the sale are 10 percent cash down to be paid on day of sale, and the
balance to be paid by certified or cashiers check within 30 days of the date of the
sale.
For further information and/or viewing, contact William C. Keaton, Attorney at
Law, 56 East Main Street, Romney, West Virginia, 304-822-4187.
Given under my hand 10/29/2014
G. Russell Rollyson Jr.
Deputy Commissioner of Delinquent and
Nonentered Lands of Hampshire County, State of West Virginia
All announcements made on the day of sale take precedence over any printed
material.
Please make your certified check or money order payable to the Honorable
John Alkire, Sheriff of Hampshire County and return to WV State Auditor’s
Office, County Collections Office, Building 1,
Room W-118, Charleston, West Virginia, 25305.
Questions please call 1-888-509-6568
11-5-3c
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
(Cert No. 14229 Christopher D. Bohrer)
To: SHAWN A. BREEDEN, KAREN M. BREEDEN, THE BANK OF ROMNEY, STATE
OF WEST VIRGINIA, SHAWN A. BREEDEN, KAREN M. BREEDEN, SHAWN A.
BREEDEN - REGULAR MAIL, KAREN M. BREEDEN – REGULAR MAIL, THE BANK
OF ROMNEY – REGULAR MAIL, STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA - REGULAR MAIL,
SHAWN A. BREEDEN – REGULAR MAIL, KAREN M. BREEDEN – REGULAR
MAIL or heirs at law, devisees, creditors, representatives, successors or assigns.
You will take notice that Christopher D. Bohrer, the purchaser of the following real
estate, Certification No.:14229, located in Bloomery District, 1.22 Ac E Side Sideling
Hill (1.22 Ac Resurvey), which was returned delinquent or nonentered in the name
of Breeden Shawn A & Karen M, and was sold by the deputy commissioner of
delinquent and nonentered lands of Hampshire County at the sale for delinquent
taxes on 8/29/2014. Christopher D. Bohrer requests that you be notified a deed
for such real estate will be made on or after 12/8/2014, as provided by law, unless
before that day you redeem such real estate. The amount needed to redeem on or
before 12/8/2014, will be as follows:
Amount equal to the taxes and charges due on the date of the sale,
with interest, to 12/8/2014
$3,044.34
Amount of taxes paid on the property, since the sale, with interest
to 12/8/2014.
$0.00
Amount paid for Title Examination and preparation of the list to be
served and for preparation and service of notice with interest from
to 12/8/2014.
$549.57
Additional Statutory Fees with Interest to 12/8/2014
Total Required
$0.00
$3,593.91
You may redeem at any time before 12/8/ 2014 by paying the above
total less any unearned interest.
11-5-3c
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2014, AT 11:00 A.M.
The herein described real estate of Jeffrey G. Miller and George W. Brent, shall be
sold at public auction on the Courthouse steps in Romney, Hampshire County, West
Virginia, on Friday, November 21, 2014, at 11:00 a.m.
Said real estate will be sold pursuant to the authority vested in the undersigned, by
the provisions of that certain Deed of Trust executed by Jeffrey G. Miller and George
W. Brent, unto H. Charles Carl, III, and/or William C. Keaton, Trustees, to secure unto
The Bank of Romney, a banking corporation, the beneficial owner of that certain
Deed of Trust, dated the 11th day of December, 2007, and of record in the Office of
the Clerk of the County Commission of Hampshire County, West Virginia, in Deed of
Trust Book 466, at Page 517. Default having occurred relative to the covenants and
conditions as set forth in said Deed of Trust, and the undersigned Trustees, having
been instructed in writing by the beneficial owner so to do, will offer the hereinafter
described real estate for sale at public auction to the highest responsible bidder at
the front door of the Courthouse in Romney, Hampshire County, West Virginia, on
Friday, November 21, 2014, at 11:00 a.m., which said property is more particularly
described as follows:
All those certain lots or parcels of real estate, with the improvements and
appurtenances thereunto belonging, situate in the Mill Creek District, Hampshire
HEREFORD & RICCARDI, PLLC-TRUSTEE
By: Philip B. Hereford, Member
405 Capitol Street, Suite 306
Charleston, West Virginia 25301
Phone: 304-346-1800
11-12-2c
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
HAMPSHIRE COUNTY,
WEST VIRGINIA
CIVIL ACTION NO. 14-A-12
11-5-3c
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Notice is hereby given that the City of Romney, a municipal corporation, will hold
a public hearing before the final vote on a proposed ordinance, the principal object
is to amend the classification of an Rl residential district to an R2 residential district
as it relates to the North side of Main Street, East of Antigo Place. The final vote
and public hearing on adoption of said proposed ordinance shall be held in the
Council Chambers of the City of Romney, City Hall, 340 E. Main Street, Romney,
West Virginia on the 1st day of December, 2014 at 6:30 p.m. Interested parties
may appear and be heard at such time with respect to the passage of the proposed
ordinance.
Copies of the proposed ordinance are available at the Office of the Clerk, City
Hall in the City of Romney.
Ordinance of the City of Romney
To Amend an RI Residential District
To an R2 Residential District.
WHEREAS, the City of Romney (City) may and through its council upon
recommendation of its Board of Zoning Appeals amend the Planning and Zoning
Enabling Ordinance; and,
WHEREAS, the City finds it is in the best interest of the City to amend the
classification of zones as it relates to the north side of Main Street, east of Antigo
Place; and,
WHEREAS, the City finds such an amendment of classification will enhance the
use and benefit the City residents as a whole; and,
WHEREAS, the City desires to amend the classification of an R1 residential
district to an R2 residential district.
NOW THEREFORE THE CITY AMENDS the City of Romney Planning and
Zoning Map as follows:
The area zoned as RI Residential District located on the north side of East
Main Street, east of Antigo Place shall be rezoned to an R2 residential district.
First Reading: November 3, 2014
Second Reading: November 3, 2014
JUDGE Charles Parsons
ORDER OF PUBLICATION FOR
ADOPTION
TO: William Mellott, II
It appearing by affidavit that natural
father William Mellott, II has an unknown
residence, it is hereby ordered that
William Mellott, II shall serve upon
Petitioner’s attorney, Kelly Beck,
Esq., at Legal Aid of West Virginia,
Martinsburg, West Virginia, 25402, on or
before December 12, 2014, an answer
including any related counterclaim or
defense that he may have to the petition
filed in this action. You are hereby notified
of a HEARING on Tuesday, December
30, 2014, at the hour of 9:30 a.m.
before Judge Charles Parsons Circuit
Court, Hampshire County Courthouse,
Romney, West Virginia. If you fail to
appear, judgment may be taken against
you that will terminate your parental
rights. This Order shall be published as
a Class II Legal Advertisement in the
Hampshire Review a newspaper in the
publication area of Hampshire County,
West Virginia.
A copy of said petition and notice of
final hearing can be obtained from the
undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Hampshire County, West Virginia.
Entered by the Clerk of said Court
November 10, 2014.
Sonja K. Embrey
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: Jessica L. MacBeth
Deputy Clerk
Beverly Cookman
Recorder, City of Romney
Please make your certified check or money order payable to the
Honorable John Alkire, Sheriff of Hampshire County and return to WV
State Auditor’s Office, County Collections Office, Building 1, Room W-118,
Charleston, West Virginia, 25305.
Questions please call 1-888-509-6568
Given under my hand this 29th day of October, 2014.
BROOKLYN KIERRA MOYERS
Daniel 0. Hileman
Mayor, City of Romney
Given under my hand 10/24/2014
G. Russell Rollyson Jr.
Deputy Commissioner of Delinquent and
Nonentered Lands of Hampshire County, State of West Virginia
1) The property will be conveyed in an “AS IS” physical condition by Deed
containing no warranty, express or implied, subject to the Internal Revenue
Service right of redemption, all property taxes, prior Deeds, liens, reservations,
encumbrances, restrictions, rights-of-ways, easements, covenants, conveyances
and conditions of record in the Clerk’s office or affecting the subject property.
2) The Purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the transfer taxes
imposed by the West Virginia Code § 11-22-2.
3) Real estate taxes due and payable have been paid. All real estate taxes
hereafter will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
4) The Beneficiary and/or the Servicer of the Deed of Trust and Note reserve the
right to submit a bid for the property at sale.
5) The Trustee reserves the right to continue sale of the subject property from
time to time by written or oral proclamation, which continuance shall be in the sole
discretion of the Trustee.
6) The Trustee shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person
occupying the property to vacate the property, and any personal property
and/or belongings remaining at the property after the foreclosure sale will be
deemed to constitute ABANDONED PROPERTY AND WILL BE DISPOSED OF
ACCORDINGLY.
7) The total purchase price is payable to the Trustee by cashier’s check, cash
or the equivalent within thirty (30) days of the date of sale, with ten (10%) of the
total purchase price payable to the Trustee at sale by cashier’s check, cash or the
equivalent. There will be no refund granted of any amount if the third party purchaser
elects not to purchase the property for any reason. Minimum acceptable bid will be
$62,000.00.
8) For more information on this property, please see listing on the PROPERTIES
FOR SALE WEBSITE: http://www.resales.usda.gov/.
IN RE: THE ADOPTION OF THE
MINOR CHILD,
William C. Keaton, Trustee
56 East Main Street
Romney, West Virginia 26757
304-822-4187
WVSB #7182
An Ordinance to Amend the City of Romney Zoning Map
West Virginia State Auditor’s Office
County Collections Division
Building 1 Room W-118
1900 Kanawha Boulevard East
Charleston, WV 25305
TERMS OF SALE:
11-12-2c
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE and Notice of the Beneficiary/Servicer’s election
to sell property is hereby given pursuant to and by virtue of the authority vested
in the Trustee by that certain Deed of Trust dated April 11, 2008, executed by
Cassandra M. Steele to Rickie E. Rice, Trustee, of record in the Office of the Clerk of
the County Commission of Hampshire County, West Virginia, in Book 474, at Page
651. Hereford & Riccardi, PLLC was appointed as Trustee by SUBSTITUTION OF
TRUSTEE dated June 23, 2014, of record in the Clerk’s Office in Book 573, at Page
838. The borrowers defaulted under the Note and Deed of Trust and the Trustee
has been instructed to foreclose under the Deed of Trust. Accordingly, the Trustee
will sell the following described property to the highest bidder at the front door of the
Courthouse of Hampshire County, in Romney, West Virginia, on:
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2014, AT 1:50 O’CLOCK P.M.
All that certain lot or parcel of real estate, together with the improvements thereon
and the appurtenances thereunto, situate in Romney City District, Hampshire County,
West Virginia, and being more particularly bounded and described as follows:
LOT NO. Fifty-five (55) of Savilla-Vale, with the dwelling house and improvements
located thereon, situate in the City of Romney, which said lot is more particularly
described on that certain Plat of Survey of Savilla-Vale, which plat is duly recorded
in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Hampshire County, West
Virginia, in Map Book 1 at Page 24, and which plat by reference is expressly
made a part hereof for all pertinent and proper reasons, and particularly for a
fuller and more complete description of said real estate.
This is the same property conveyed to Cassandra M. Steele by deed dated April
11, 2008, of record in the Clerk’s Office in Book 473, at Page 396.
11-12-2c
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Public Meeting Notice
In accordance with the Code of
West Virginia, 1931, the Hampshire
County Planning Commission will hold
a regular meeting. The regular meeting
of the Hampshire County Planning
Commission will be held on Wednesday,
November 19, 2014, at 7:30 p.m., in the
2nd Floor Courtroom of the Hampshire
County Courthouse, preceded by a
Work Session at 6:30 p.m. The public
is invited to attend.
11-19-1c
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Knobley
Mtn Auction
South East of Keyser
WV, on Rt 50
Fri., Nov. 21
1 p.m.
2nd Annual Healing
Hunger Benefit
100’s of Food, Christmas
& Gen. Merchandise
Fri., Nov. 21
3 p.m.
1800’s Marble Top Sideboard, Huge Nazi Flag,Nazi
Banner, Punched Tin Pie
Safe, Eastlake Dresser w/
Mirror,Curved Glass China
Cupboard, Stack Bookcases, McCoy, Roseville,
Oak Chest of Drawers,
Gov. Winthrop Dropfront
Secretary, Cross Tie
Carriers, Noritake, Tons
Furniture & Glassware
KnobleyMtn.com
Pictures & Listing
Bob Summers WV
#1294
Kathy Brown Bus. Mgr.
304-788-4045
Full Service Auction
Company
Licensed WV & MD Real
Estate Salesperson
The American Real
Estate Co.
Tim Brinkman Broker
304 788 8100
Carolina Carport Super
Sales Center
Rustic Amish Made Log
Furniture Dealer
Continued to page 4d ■
REAL ESTATE AUCTION
THURS., NOV. 20 • 4 p.m.
Directions: From Berkeley Springs,
take Rt. 9 W towards Paw Paw.
Property approx. 1 mile on right —
Look for Hurley Auction signs!
Handyman’s special on 2.3+- Acres
w/2 BR, 1 bath, LR, DR, kitchen,
enclosed front porch.
SOLD TO HIGHEST BIDDER RR 1, Box 67A, Paw Paw, WV 25434
— $22,000 OR ABOVE!
matthew Hurley, WV1830
10% buyers premium added to high
bid to achieve final sale price
717-597-9100
Jay Lawyer #2158A
AuctionZipID1023
4D
n
hampshire review
Wednesday, november 19, 2014
LEGAL ADVERTISEMENTS
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2014, AT 10:00 A.M.
■ Continued from page 3d
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE
Pursuant to the authority vested in the undersigned by deed of trust dated the 7th
day of October, 2009, signed by Wesley Lockhart, a single person, to Chicago Title
Insurance, Trustee, which said deed of trust is of record in the Office of the Clerk
of the County Commission of Hampshire County, West Virginia, in Trust Deed Book
507, at page 114, and Golden & Amos, PLLC, Trustee having been requested so
to do by the Secured Creditor, and default having been made under the terms and
conditions of said deed of trust, and the provisions in said deed of trust concerning
acceleration having been complied with by the Secured Creditor and present holder
of the note, said Trustee will sell at public auction at 8:45 o’clock, a.m. on the
26TH DAY OF NOVEMBER 2014
at the front doors of the Courthouse in Hampshire County in Romney, West Virginia
the following described real estate:
All that parcel of land in Capon District, Hampshire County, State of West Virginia,
as described in Deed Book 416, Page 388, ID# Map 20 Parcel 99, being known
and designated as Tract 12, Section II, Capon Glen, containing 4.96 acres, Map
Book 8 at page 2. Also conveys equal right to use Sycamore Drive.
This conveyance is subject to rights of ways of record and covenants and
conditions of record in Deed Book 362 at page 521.
It is the intention of this notice to sell the secured property by proper description
as was intended to be transferred and conveyed in the aforesaid deed of trust.
The above described real estate is reported to have a mailing address of:
Lot 12 Paw Paw Road, Capon Bridge, West Virginia 26711
TERMS OF SALE: Cash in hand on day of sale or within 30 days of date of
sale upon terms to be agreed upon between Trustee and successful bidder, time
being of the essence; payment for unpaid real estate taxes to be assumed by the
purchaser. The Trustee does not warrant title or fitness to this property; it is being
purchased as is; this is a buyer beware sale and any buyer is advised to retain
counsel before the sale. If there is any part of the process of sale which is found
to be objectionable, the Trustee reserves the right to cancel the sale. No purchaser
should take possession or make improvements in the premises until the Trustee
deed is delivered or recorded. A third party purchaser at sale will be required to pay
the purchase price plus all recording and transfer fees.
Trustee at sale is under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying
the subject property to vacate said property.
FEDERAL TAX LIEN: In the event that there are Federal Tax Liens against the
property, the United States would have the right to redeem the property within a
period of 120 days from the date of such sale or the period allowable for redemption
under local law, whichever is longer.
The party(ies) secured by the Deed of Trust reserve the right to purchase the
property at such sale. If the purchaser at sale is unable to complete the terms of
purchase within 30 days, the Trustee reserves the right to transfer the property to
the next highest bidder.
Any sale hereunder may be adjourned from time to time without any notice other
than oral proclamation at the time and place appointed for this sale or by posting of a
notice of same. Should the Trustee not appear at the time appointed for the sale and
there is no notice posted of a continuance please contact the office of the Trustee
to make further inquiry. Any sale may be conducted or adjourned by the designated
agent or attorney of the Trustee. The undersigned is fully vested with the authority to
sell said property as Trustee by instrument of record.
Should any party have any inquires, objections to the sale or protests regarding
the sale, or requests regarding the sale, please notify the trustee below by one of the
means of communications set forth below.
GOLDEN & AMOS, PLLC, TRUSTEE
543 Fifth Street, P.O. Box 81
Parkersburg, WV 26102
Telephone 304-485-3851
Fax 304-485-0261
E-mail: [email protected]
Lender: Bank of America
Processor: Kristi/Ext. 27
(LockhartWesley.flt/mbaker/finishedforeclosure2014)
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TRUSTEES’ SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE
The undersigned Trustees, by virtue of the authority vested in them by that certain
deed of trust dated November 17, 2004, and duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk
of the County Commission of Hampshire County, West Virginia, in Deed of Trust Book
381, at page 142, Holly A. Ellison and Brian T. Robinson did convey unto George
W. R. Glass, Trustee, certain real property described in said deed of trust; and the
beneficiary has elected to appoint Teays Valley Trustees, LLC as substitute Trustees
by a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office; and default
having been made under the aforementioned deed of trust and the undersigned
Trustees, having been instructed by the secured party to foreclose thereunder, will
offer for sale at public auction at the front door of the Hampshire County Courthouse,
66 N. High Street, Romney, West Virginia 26757 on:
December 19, 2014
At 2:02 p.m.
All of those two certain tracts or parcels of land, together with all rights, rights of
way, privileges, easements, improvements thereon and appurtenances thereunto
belonging, lying and being situate in Capon District, Hampshire County, West
Virginia, Parcel One containing one (1) acre, more or less, and Parcel Two
containing 0.613 acre, more or less, as shown on plat prepared by Edward J.
Mayhew, Professional Surveyor, dated January 13, 2004, of record in the Office
of the Clerk of the County Commission of Hampshire County, West Virginia, in
Deed Book 430, at Page 744, labeled “Russell DB 429/75 TM 37/55”; and by this
reference made a part hereof as if set out in full; AND BEING the same property
conveyed to Brian T. Robinson and Holly A. Ellison by Deeds dated November
17, 2004, as follows; Parcel One from Judy S. Russell and Parcel Two from Glen
W. Russell and Pamela L. Russell, husband and wife, recorded in the aforesaid
Clerk’s Office contemporaneously with the recordation of this Deed of Trust.
HC 87 Box 23-1, Lehew, WV 26865
The aforesaid property is SUBJECT TO any and all easements, rights-of-way,
conditions, covenants and restrictions of record or in existence.
The sale of the foregoing real property will be made subject to all exceptions,
reservations, rights of way, easements, conditions, covenants, restrictions, leases
and other servitudes of record, if any, pertaining to said real estate, subject to all
matters disclosed by an examination and inspection of the property, subject to any
and all unpaid taxes as recorded against said property, and to any further matters
announced at said sale. The property is sold subject to an accurate survey at
purchaser’s expense.
The sale of the foregoing real property will also be made expressly subject to any
and all other deeds of trust, judgments, liens, and all other encumbrances of any
nature whatsoever, if any, having priority over the deed of trust referred to herein.
The Trustees reserve the right to adjourn the sale, for a time, or from time to
time, without further notice, by announcement at the time and place of sale describe
above or any adjournment thereof. The Trustees reserve the right to reject any and
all bids.
The subject property will be sold in “AS IS” condition. The Trustees shall be under
no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying the subject property to
vacate said property. The Trustees will deliver a trustees’ deed to the purchaser
without any covenant or warranty (express or implied) in the form prescribed by W.
Va. Code §38-1-6. The Trustees make no representations and warranties about the
title of the real estate to be conveyed. If the Trustees are unable to convey insurable
or marketable title to purchaser for any reason, purchaser’s sole remedy is return
of deposit.
TERMS OF SALE: $14,950.00 cash in hand at the time of sale in the form of a
certified check or cashier’s check made payable to “Teays Valley Trustees, LLC,”
and the balance in cash closing within 30 days of the date of the sale. Purchaser
shall pay for transfer stamps and recording fees. Additional terms of sale may be
announced prior to the sale.
Teays Valley Trustees, LLC
55 Meridian Parkway, Suite 108
Martinsburg, West Virginia 25404
304-757-7956
http://foreclosure.closingsource.net
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The herein described real estate of the Estate of Ivan D. Dorsey shall be sold
at public auction on the Courthouse steps in Romney, Hampshire County, West
Virginia, on Friday, December 4, 2014, at 10:00 a.m.
Pursuant to the authority vested in the undersigned, by the provisions of that
certain Deed of Trust executed by Ivan D. Dorsey, unto H. Charles Carl, III, and
William C. Keaton, Trustees, to secure unto The Bank of Romney, a Banking
Corporation, the beneficial owner of that certain Deed of Trust dated the 9th day
of April, 2008, and of record in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of
Hampshire County, West Virginia, in Deed of Trust Book 474, at page 668. Default
having occurred relative to the covenants and conditions as set forth in said Deed
of Trust, and the undersigned Trustee, having been instructed in writing by the
beneficial owner so to do, will offer the hereinafter described real estate for sale at
public auction to the highest responsible bidder at the front door of the Courthouse
in Romney, Hampshire County, West Virginia, on Friday, December 4, 2014, at 10:00
a.m., which said property is more particularly described as follows:
All that certain tract or parcel of real estate situate in Gore District, Hampshire
County, West Virginia, said real estate being more fully described according to a
survey made by T. S. Bradfield, Surveyor, as follows:
“Beginning at a cement post on the west side of a public road S 49 E 51 feet from
the SW corner of a dwelling house thence along the west edge of said road S
22 ´ E 105 feet to a cement post thence leaving said road N 59 W 210 feet to a
cement post thence N 22 ´ E 105 feet thence S 59 E 210 feet to the beginning,
containing1/2 acre, more or less.”
Said real estate is depicted on the 2014 Hampshire County Land Books as being
District 05, Tax Map 34 Parcel 5.1.
And being the same real estate which was conveyed unto Ivan D. Dorsey and
Gloria A. Dorsey, his wife, by deed of Kenneth R. Nicholson and Virginia M. Nicholson,
his wife, dated August 15, 1994, and of record in the Office of the Clerk of the County
Commission of Hampshire County, West Virginia, in Deed Book No. 354, at page
662. And further being the same real estate which Gloria A. Dorsey conveyed all of
her right, title and interest, unto Ivan D. Dorsey, by deed dated December 21, 2001,
and of record in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office in Deed Book No. 411 at Page 321. The
said Ivan D. Dorsey died June 3, 2013.
The property will be conveyed in an “AS IS” condition by Deed containing
no warranty, express or implied, subject to the Internal Revenue Service right of
redemption, all property taxes, prior Deeds, liens, reservations, encumbrances,
restrictions, rights-of-ways, easements, covenants, conveyances and conditions of
record in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office or affecting the subject property.
The Beneficiary and/or the Servicer of the Deed of Trust and Note reserves the
right to submit a bid for the property at sale.
The Trustee reserves the right to continue sale of the subject property from
time to time by written or oral proclamation, which continuance shall be in the sole
discretion of the Trustee.
The Trustee shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying
the property to vacate said property, and any personal property and/or belongings
remaining at the property after the foreclosure sale will be deemed to constitute
ABANDONED PROPERTY AND WILL BE DISPOSED OF ACCORDINGLY.
Terms of the sale are l0 percent cash down to be paid on day of sale, and the
balance to be paid by certified or cashiers check within 30 days of the date of the
sale. Further, the successful bidder shall be responsible for all costs associated with
the transfer of said real estate.
For further information and/or viewing, contact William C. Keaton, Attorney at
Law, 56 East Main Street, Romney, West Virginia, 304-822-4187.
All announcements made on the day of sale take precedence over any printed
material.
William C. Keaton, Trustee
56 East Main Street
Romney, West Virginia 26757
304-822-4187
WVSB #7182
TRUSTEES’ SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE
The undersigned Trustees, by virtue of the authority vested in them by that certain
deed of trust dated October 15, 2004, and duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk
of the County Commission of Hampshire County, West Virginia, in Deed of Trust
Book 377, at page 188, Randall K. Marvin did convey unto Carl H. Cather, III, Esq.,
Spilman, Thomas, & Battle, PLLC, Trustee, certain real property described in said
deed of trust; and the beneficiary has elected to appoint Teays Valley Trustees, LLC
as substitute Trustees by a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the aforesaid Clerk’s
Office; and default having been made under the aforementioned deed of trust and
the undersigned Trustees, having been instructed by the secured party to foreclose
thereunder, will offer for sale at public auction at the front door of the Hampshire
County Courthouse, 66 N. High Street, Romney, West Virginia 26757 on:
December 19, 2014
At 2:00 p.m.
All the following described real estate situate, lying and being in Sherman District,
Hampshire County, West Virginia, and which real estate is more particularly
described as follows:
All that certain lot containing approximately one-half acre, more or less, together
with a dwelling and all improvements and rights thereon, although this is a
conveyance in gross and not by the acres, situate on the west side of the road
leading from Augusta to Rio in Sherman District, Hampshire County, West
Virginia, which lot is bounded on the easterly side by said road; on the southerly
side by Wallace Loy; on the west by Lloyd Combs and on the north by Michael and
Lloyd Combs which lot has been surveyed but is described as follows:
“BEGINNING at an iron stake in the boundary of Rio road corner to Lloyd Combs;
thence with bounds of said road S. 31 W. 87 feet to a stake corner of Cessna
(Wallace Loy); thence, with Cessna N. 40 W. 333 feet; thence, N. 31 E. 87 feet to
the line of the grantors (Michael) and Lloyd Combs; thence S. 40 E. and with Lloyd
Combs line 333 feet to the BEGINNING.”
And being the same real estate which was conveyed unto Randall K. Marvin
by deed of E. Olan Spaid and Wanda A. Spaid dated October 15, 2004, to be
recorded immediately prior to the recordation of this instrument in the Office of the
Clerk of the County Commission of Hampshire County, West Virginia.
1 Ford Hill Road, Augusta, WV 26704
The aforesaid property is SUBJECT TO any and all easements, rights-of-way,
conditions, covenants and restrictions of record or in existence.
The sale of the foregoing real property will be made subject to all exceptions,
reservations, rights of way, easements, conditions, covenants, restrictions, leases
and other servitudes of record, if any, pertaining to said real estate, subject to all
matters disclosed by an examination and inspection of the property, subject to any
and all unpaid taxes as recorded against said property, and to any further matters
announced at said sale. The property is sold subject to an accurate survey at
purchaser’s expense.
The sale of the foregoing real property will also be made expressly subject to any
and all other deeds of trust, judgments, liens, and all other encumbrances of any
nature whatsoever, if any, having priority over the deed of trust referred to herein.
The Trustees reserve the right to adjourn the sale, for a time, or from time to
time, without further notice, by announcement at the time and place of sale describe
above or any adjournment thereof. The Trustees reserve the right to reject any and
all bids.
The subject property will be sold in “AS IS” condition. The Trustees shall be under
no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying the subject property to
vacate said property. The Trustees will deliver a trustees’ deed to the purchaser
without any covenant or warranty (express or implied) in the form prescribed by W.
Va. Code §38-1-6. The Trustees make no representations and warranties about the
title of the real estate to be conveyed. If the Trustees are unable to convey insurable
or marketable title to purchaser for any reason, purchaser’s sole remedy is return
of deposit.
TERMS OF SALE: $6,350.00 cash in hand at the time of sale in the form of a
certified check or cashier’s check made payable to “Teays Valley Trustees, LLC,”
and the balance in cash closing within 30 days of the date of the sale. Purchaser
shall pay for transfer stamps and recording fees. Additional terms of sale may be
announced prior to the sale.
Teays Valley Trustees, LLC
55 Meridian Parkway, Suite 108
Martinsburg, West Virginia 25404
304-757-7956
http://foreclosure.closingsource.net
11-12-3c
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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE and Notice of the Beneficiary/Servicer’s election
to sell property is hereby given pursuant to and by virtue of the authority vested in
the Trustee by that certain Deed of Trust dated April 28, 2006, executed by William
T. Morris and Brittany M. Morris to Robert M. Steptoe, III, Trustee, of record in the
Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Hampshire County, West Virginia,
in Book 422, at Page 711 and by that Deed of Trust dated June 4, 2007, executed
by William T. Morris to Robert M. Steptoe, III, Trustee, of record in Clerk’s Office in
Book 453, at Page 152. Hereford & Riccardi, PLLC was appointed as Trustee by
SUBSTITUTION OF TRUSTEE dated October 14, 2014, of record in the Clerk’s
Office in Book 577, at Page 577. The borrowers defaulted under the Note and
Deed of Trust and the Trustee has been instructed to foreclose under the Deed of
Trust. Accordingly, the Trustee will sell the following described property to the highest
bidder at the front door of the Courthouse of Hampshire County, in Romney, West
Virginia, on:
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2014, AT 1:40 O’CLOCK P.M.
All that certain lot or parcel of real estate, together with the improvements thereon
and the appurtenances thereunto, situate in Gore District, Hampshire County, West
Virginia, and being more particularly bounded and described as follows:
11-12-2c
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NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE
NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE and Notice of the Beneficiary/Servicer’s election
to sell property is hereby given pursuant to and by virtue of the authority vested
in the Trustee by that certain Deed of Trust dated September 27, 2010, executed
by Thomas K. Swisher, Jr. and Frankie L. Swisher to Robert D. Lewis, Trustee, of
record in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Hampshire County,
West Virginia, in Book 520, at Page 392. Hereford & Riccardi, PLLC was appointed
as Trustee by SUBSTITUTION OF TRUSTEE dated June 23, 2014, of record in the
Clerk’s Office in Book 573, at Page 840. The borrowers defaulted under the Note
and Deed of Trust and the Trustee has been instructed to foreclose under the Deed
of Trust. Accordingly, the Trustee will sell the following described property to the
highest bidder at the front door of the Courthouse of Hampshire County, in Romney,
West Virginia, on:
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 2014, AT 2:00 O’CLOCK P.M.
All that certain tract or parcel of real estate, together with the improvements
thereon and the appurtenances thereunto, lying in Gore District, Hampshire County,
West Virginia, located and described by metes and bounds as follows:
Containing 2.000 acres, as shown on that certain Plat of Survey for William T.
& Brittany M. Morris, dated April 8, 2006, prepared by Rickie C. Davy, PS No.
535, attached to that certain deed dated April 26, 2006, to be recorded in the
Hampshire County land records immediately preceding this instrument, and
further said Plat of Survey is made a part hereof by reference for all proper and
pertinent reasons, including a more particular metes and bounds description of
the subject 2.000 acre tract.
Containing 2.00 acres and designated as Lot No. 13, Section 1 of Bristol Springs
Subdivision, as shown on that certain plat of survey prepared by H. Bruce Edens,
Licensed Professional Surveyor dated October 8, 2007, which said plat is of
record in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Hampshire County,
West Virginia, in Map Book 11 at Page 53, and which said plat is incorporated
herein by reference, for a more particular metes and bounds description of said
real estate. Said real estate is depicted on the 2010 Hampshire County Land
Books as being Tax Map 24, Parcel 83.
This is the same property conveyed to William T. Morris and Brittany M. Morris by
deed dated April 26, 2006, of record in the Clerk’s Office in Book 454, at Page
776.
This is the same property conveyed to Thomas K. Swisher, Jr. and Frankie L.
Swisher by deed dated September 27, 2010, of record in the Clerk’s Office in
Book 492, at Page 15.
TERMS OF SALE:
TERMS OF SALE:
1) The property will be conveyed in an “AS IS” physical condition by Deed
containing no warranty, express or implied, subject to the Internal Revenue
Service right of redemption, all property taxes, prior Deeds, liens, reservations,
encumbrances, restrictions, rights-of-ways, easements, covenants, conveyances
and conditions of record in the Clerk’s office or affecting the subject property.
2) The Purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the transfer taxes
imposed by the West Virginia Code § 11-22-2.
3) Real estate taxes due and payable have been paid. All real estate taxes
hereafter will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
4) The Beneficiary and/or the Servicer of the Deed of Trust and Note reserve the
right to submit a bid for the property at sale.
5) The Trustee reserves the right to continue sale of the subject property from
time to time by written or oral proclamation, which continuance shall be in the sole
discretion of the Trustee.
6) The Trustee shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person
occupying the property to vacate the property, and any personal property
and/or belongings remaining at the property after the foreclosure sale will be
deemed to constitute ABANDONED PROPERTY AND WILL BE DISPOSED OF
ACCORDINGLY.
7) The total purchase price is payable to the Trustee by cashier’s check, cash
or the equivalent within thirty (30) days of the date of sale, with ten (10%) of the
total purchase price payable to the Trustee at sale by cashier’s check, cash or the
equivalent. There will be no refund granted of any amount if the third party purchaser
elects not to purchase the property for any reason. Minimum acceptable bid will be
$85,000.00.
8) For more information on this property, please see listing on the PROPERTIES
FOR SALE WEBSITE: http://www.resales.usda.gov/.
1) The property will be conveyed in an “AS IS” physical condition by Deed
containing no warranty, express or implied, subject to the Internal Revenue
Service right of redemption, all property taxes, prior Deeds, liens, reservations,
encumbrances, restrictions, rights-of-ways, easements, covenants, conveyances
and conditions of record in the Clerk’s office or affecting the subject property.
2) The Purchaser shall be responsible for the payment of the transfer taxes
imposed by the West Virginia Code § 11-22-2.
3) Real estate taxes due and payable have been paid. All real estate taxes
hereafter will be the responsibility of the purchaser.
4) The Beneficiary and/or the Servicer of the Deed of Trust and Note reserve the
right to submit a bid for the property at sale.
5) The Trustee reserves the right to continue sale of the subject property from
time to time by written or oral proclamation, which continuance shall be in the sole
discretion of the Trustee.
6) The Trustee shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person
occupying the property to vacate the property, and any personal property
and/or belongings remaining at the property after the foreclosure sale will be
deemed to constitute ABANDONED PROPERTY AND WILL BE DISPOSED OF
ACCORDINGLY.
7) The total purchase price is payable to the Trustee by cashier’s check, cash
or the equivalent within thirty (30) days of the date of sale, with ten (10%) of the
total purchase price payable to the Trustee at sale by cashier’s check, cash or the
equivalent. There will be no refund granted of any amount if the third party purchaser
elects not to purchase the property for any reason. Minimum acceptable bid will be
$59,500.00.
8) For more information on this property, please see listing on the PROPERTIES
FOR SALE WEBSITE: http://www.resales.usda.gov/.
Given under my hand this 29th day of October, 2014.
Given under my hand this 29th day of October, 2014.
HEREFORD & RICCARDI, PLLC-TRUSTEE
By: Philip B. Hereford, Member
405 Capitol Street, Suite 306
Charleston, West Virginia 25301
Phone: 304-346-1800
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HEREFORD & RICCARDI, PLLC-TRUSTEE
By: Philip B. Hereford, Member
405 Capitol Street, Suite 306
Charleston, West Virginia 25301
Phone: 304-346-1800
11-12-2c
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Continued to page 5d ■
hampshire review n
Wednesday, november 19, 2014
5d
LEGAL ADVERTISEMENTS
■ Continued from page 4d
TRUSTEE’S SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 2014, AT 10:00 A.M.
The herein described real estate of Joshua R. Miller and Raven A. Miller, and J
& R Miller, LLC, a West Virginia Limited Liability Company, shall be sold at public
auction on the Courthouse steps in Romney, Hampshire County, West Virginia, on
Friday, November 21, 2014, at 10:00 a.m.
Said real estate will be sold pursuant to the authority vested in the undersigned,
by the provisions of that certain Credit Line Deed of Trust executed by Joshua R.
Miller and Raven A. Miller, individually, and in their capacities as Members of J &
R Miller, LLC, a West Virginia Limited Liability Company, unto H. Charles Carl, III,
and/or William C. Keaton, Trustees, to secure unto The Bank of Romney, a banking
corporation, the beneficial owner of that certain Deed of Trust, dated the 23rd day
of April, 2007, and of record in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of
Hampshire County, West Virginia, in Deed of Trust Book 449, at Page 459. Default
having occurred relative to the covenants and conditions as set forth in said Credit
Line Deed of Trust, and the undersigned Trustee, having been instructed in writing
by the beneficial owner so to do, will offer the hereinafter described real estate
for sale at public auction to the highest responsible bidder at the front door of the
Courthouse in Romney, Hampshire County, West Virginia, on Friday, November 21,
2014, at 10:00 a.m., which said property is more particularly described as follows:
PARCEL ONE: All that certain tract or parcel of real estate, containing 7.02
acres, more or less, on the North Side of Hampshire County Route 3 (the Old
North Branch Cacapon Turnpike) about 0.4 miles East of its intersection with
West Virginia Route 28 in Springfield, situate in Springfield District, Hampshire
County, West Virginia, as shown on that certain Description of Survey and Plat
of Survey as prepared by Geoffrey D. Green, Professional Surveyor, a copy of
which said Description of Survey and Plat of Survey are of record in the Office of
the Clerk of the County Commission of Hampshire County, West Virginia, in Deed
Book 453, at pages 709 and 710, respectively, and are, by reference, made a part
hereof for all pertinent and proper reasons, including a more particular metes and
bounds description of said real estate. Said real estate is depicted on the 2014
Hampshire County Land Books as District 10, Tax Map 18, Parcel 121.
And being the same real estate which was conveyed unto J & R Miller, LLC, A
West Virginia Limited Liability Company, by deed of Frederick F. Fields and Judy
A. Fields, his sister, dated April 7, 2006, and which deed is of record in the Office
of the Clerk of the County Commission of Hampshire County, West Virginia, in
Deed Book 453, at page 707.
PARCEL TWO: All those certain tracts or parcels of real estate, together with the
improvements thereon, and all rights, rights of way, easements, waters, minerals,
oil and gas and appurtenances thereunto belonging, situate in the Town of
Springfield, Springfield District, Hampshire County, West Virginia, being all of the
same real estate conveyed unto the grantor herein by deed of Richard L. Grace
by deed dated July 25, 2005, and of record in the Office of the Clerk of the County
Commission of Hampshire County, West Virginia, in Deed Book No. 446, at Page
178, and which said real estate is described in said deed as follows:
FIRST: All those two certain tracts or parcels of real estate known and
designated on the plat of the Town of Springfield, West Virginia, as Lot
No. 24, and both of which parcels are assessed upon the Land Books for
Hampshire County, West Virginia, for 2006, as part of Lot No. 24(store), Map
Book 18B, Parcel 71; and being the same real estate which was conveyed
unto W. L. Grace by deed of W. H. Grace, et als, dated December 16, 1935,
and duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of
Hampshire County, West Virginia, in Deed Book No. 98, at Page 326, and
also being the same real estate which was devised unto Vauda M. Grace
by the Last Will and Testament of W. L. Grace dated May 13, 1983, and
duly recorded in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office in Will Book No. 36, at Page
638.
SECOND: All that certain lot or parcel of real estate known and designated
as Lot No. 7 on the map of the Town of Springfield, and assessed on the
Land Books for Hampshire County, West Virginia, as part of Lot No. 7 (lot
behind garage), Map Book 18B, Parcel 94, and being the same real estate
containing 1484 square feet which was conveyed unto Walter L. Grace, Jr.
and Vauda Grace, his wife, by deed of Katie B. Grace dated November 7,
1960, and duly recorded in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office in Deed Book No.
147, at Page 214, and being the same real estate which was devised unto
Vauda M. Grace by the Last Will and Testament of Walter L. Grace dated
May 13, 1983, and duly recorded in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office in Will Book
No. 36, at Page 638.
THIRD: All that certain lot or parcel of real estate known and designated
on the plat of the Town of Springfield, West Virginia, as Lot No. 7, and
assessed as part of Lot No. 7 on the Land Books for Hampshire County,
West Virginia, for 2006, Map Book 18B, Parcel 94.1, and being the same
real estate which was conveyed unto Walter L. Grace, Jr. by deed of
correction of Cora B. Fields dated October 29, 1953, and duly recorded in
the aforesaid Clerk’s Office in Deed Book No. 132, at Page 350, and also
being the same real estate which was devised unto Vauda M. Grace by the
Last Will and Testament of Walter L. Grace, dated May 13, 1983, and duly
recorded in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office in Will Book No. 36, at Page 638.
And being all the same real estate conveyed unto Joshua R. Miller and
Raven A. Miller, his wife, by deed of Michael E. Brown, dated December 12,
2006, of record in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office in Deed Book 461, at page 32.
The property will be conveyed in an “AS IS” condition by Deed containing
no warranty, express or implied, subject to the Internal Revenue Service right of
redemption, all property taxes, prior Deeds, liens, reservations, encumbrances,
restrictions, rights-of-ways, easements, covenants, conveyances and conditions of
record in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office or affecting the subject property.
The Beneficiary and/or the Servicer of the Deeds of Trust and Note reserve the
right to submit a bid for the property at sale.
The Trustee reserves the right to continue sale of the subject property from
time to time by written or oral proclamation, which continuance shall be in the sole
discretion of the Trustees.
The Trustee shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying
the property to vacate said property, and any personal property and/or belongings
remaining at the property after the foreclosure sale will be deemed to constitute
ABANDONED PROPERTY AND WILL BE DISPOSED OF ACCORDINGLY.
Terms of the sale are 10 percent cash down to be paid on day of sale, and the
balance to be paid by certified or cashiers check within 30 days of the date of the
sale.
For further information and/or viewing, contact William C. Keaton, Attorney at
Law, 56 East Main Street, Romney, West Virginia, 304-822-4187.
All announcements made on the day of sale take precedence over any printed
material.
William C. Keaton, Trustee
56 East Main Street
Romney, West Virginia 26757
304-822-4187
WVSB #7182
11-5-3c
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TRUSTEE’S SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE
The undersigned Substitute Trustees, by virtue of the authority vested in them by
that certain Deed of Trust dated June 26, 2008, and duly recorded in the Office of
the Clerk of the County Commission of Hampshire County, West Virginia, in Deed
of Trust Book 479, at Page 663, Douglas R. Malick did convey unto H. Charles Carl,
III and William C. Keaton, Trustees, certain real property described in said Deed of
Trust; and the beneficiary has elected to appoint Richard A. Pill and David D. Pill as
Substitute Trustees by a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the aforesaid Clerk’s
Office; and default having been made under the aforementioned Deed of Trust, and
the undersigned Substitute Trustees having been instructed by the secured party
to foreclose thereunder, will offer for sale at public auction at the front door of the
Hampshire County Courthouse, in Romney, West Virginia, on
Wednesday, December 3, 2014, at 8:33 a.m.
The following described real estate, with its improvements, easements and
appurtenances thereunto belonging, situate in the Sherman District, Hampshire
County, West Virginia, and more particularly described as follows:
FIRST PARCEL: All that certain tract or parcel of real estate containing 0.768
acres, more or less, situate in Sherman District, Hampshire County, West Virginia,
and being improved by a commercial building. There is a Description of Survey
and Plat of Survey of said parcel of record in the Office of the Clerk of the County
Commission of Hampshire County, West Virginia, in Deed Book No. 303, at Pages
680 and 681, respectively, and said plat is incorporated herein for all pertinent
and proper reasons, including for a more particular description of the real estate
conveyed herein.
The above-described property will be sold subject to any covenants, restrictions,
easements, leases and conditions of record, and subject to any unpaid real estate
taxes.
The subject property will be sold in “AS IS” condition. The Substitute Trustees
shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying the subject
property to vacate said property.
TERMS: Ten percent (10%) of the purchase price as a cash deposit with the
balance due and payable within 30 days of the day of sale.
David D. Pill, Substitute Trustee
Richard A. Pill, Substitute Trustee
P. O. Box 440, 85 Aikens Center, Martinsburg, WV 25404
Phone 304-263-4971, Fax 304-267-5840, E-mail: [email protected]
11-12-3c
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TRUSTEE’S SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 10, 2014, AT 11:00 A.M.
The herein described real estate of the Estate of Carroll D. Schroeder, Jr., who
is one and the same person as Carroll D. Schroeder, and the Estate of Darla J.
Schroeder, shall be sold at public auction on the Courthouse steps in Romney,
Hampshire County, West Virginia, on Wednesday, December 10, 2014, at 11:00 a.m.
Pursuant to the authority vested in the undersigned, by the provisions of that
certain Deed of Trust executed by Carroll D. Schroeder, Jr., who is one and the
same person as Carroll D. Schroeder, and Darla J. Schroeder, his wife, unto Royce
B. Saville, Trustee, to secure unto The Bank of Romney, a Banking Corporation, the
beneficial owner of that certain Deed of Trust dated the 11th day of January, 2007, and
of record in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Hampshire County,
West Virginia, in Deed of Trust Book 442, at Page 672; with the undersigned, William
C. Keaton, as Substitute Trustee, pursuant to that certain Deed of Appointment for
Substitution of Trustee, of record in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office in Deed of Trust
Book 578 at Page 141 . Default having occurred relative to the covenants and
conditions as set forth in said Deed of Trust, and the undersigned Trustee, having
been instructed in writing by the beneficial owner so to do, will offer the hereinafter
described real estate for sale at public auction to the highest responsible bidder
at the front door of the Courthouse in Romney, Hampshire County, West Virginia,
on Wednesday, December 10, 2014, at 11:00 a.m., which said property is more
particularly described as follows:
All those two certain tracts or parcels of real estate, together with the
improvements thereon, known and designated as Lot 15 and Lot 19, of Mill
Mountain Orchard Subdivision, being situate in Gore District of Hampshire County,
West Virginia, containing 4.264 acres, more or less, and 3.000 acres, more or less,
respectively, and which tracts are identified, bounded and described upon the plat of
Mill Mountain Orchard Subdivision, as prepared by Rickie C. Davy, Licensed Land
Surveyor, dated September 17, 1984, and of record in the Office of the Clerk of the
County Commission of Hampshire County, West Virginia, in Map Book 4 at Page 33.
Said Plat of Survey is by reference made a part hereof for all pertinent and proper
reasons. Said real estate is depicted on the 2014 Hampshire County Land Books
as Tax Map 7 Parcel 36.
And being the same real estate which was conveyed unto Carroll D. Schroeder,
who is one and the same person as Carroll D. Schroeder, Jr., and Darla J. Schroeder,
his wife, by deed of Mark A. Smith, Jessi D. Smith, and Casey J. Smith, dated the
3rd day of November, 2003, and of record in the Office of the Clerk of the County
Commission of Hampshire County, West Virginia, in Deed Book 428 at Page 239
The said Ivan D. Dorsey died June 3, 2013. And further being the same real estate
in which full, fee simple title did vest in Carroll D. Schroeder, Jr., who is one and the
same person as Carroll D. Schroeder, upon the death of his wife, Darla J. Schroeder,
on January 7, 2013, per the survivorship clause in said deed. The said Carroll D.
Schroeder, Jr., died on August 30, 2014, leaving as his sole heirs, his three children,
namely, Robin L. Milleker, Kathy Staph, and Steven Schroeder.
The property will be conveyed in an “AS IS” condition by Deed containing
no warranty, express or implied, subject to the Internal Revenue Service right of
redemption, all property taxes, prior Deeds, liens, reservations, encumbrances,
restrictions, rights-of-ways, easements, covenants, conveyances and conditions of
record in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office or affecting the subject property.
The Beneficiary and/or the Servicer of the Deed of Trust and Note reserves the
right to submit a bid for the property at sale.
The Substitute Trustee reserves the right to continue sale of the subject property
from time to time by written or oral proclamation, which continuance shall be in the
sole discretion of the Substitute Trustee.
The Substitute Trustee shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or
person occupying the property to vacate said property, and any personal property
and/or belongings remaining at the property after the foreclosure sale will be
deemed to constitute ABANDONED PROPERTY AND WILL BE DISPOSED OF
ACCORDINGLY.
Terms of the sale are l0 percent cash down to be paid on day of sale, and the
balance to be paid by certified or cashiers check within 30 days of the date of the
sale. Further, the successful bidder shall be responsible for all costs associated with
the transfer of said real estate.
For further information and/or viewing, contact William C. Keaton, Attorney at
Law, 56 East Main Street, Romney, West Virginia, 304-822-4187.
All announcements made on the day of sale take precedence over any printed
material.
William C. Keaton, Substitute Trustee
56 East Main Street
Romney, West Virginia 26757
304-822-4187
WVSB #7182
11-19-3c
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TRUSTEE’S SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE
The undersigned Substitute Trustee, by virtue of the authority vested in him by that
certain Deed of Trust, dated February 2, 2006, and duly recorded in the Office of the
Clerk of the County Commission of Hampshire County, West Virginia, in Document
No. 81415, in Book No. 415, at Page 239, Wade A. Puffinburger did convey unto Jack
C. Barr, ESQ, Trustee(s), certain real property described in said Deed of Trust; and
the beneficiary has elected to appoint Seneca Trustees, Inc., as Substitute Trustee
by a Substitution of Trustee dated October 21, 2014 and recorded in the aforesaid
Clerk’s office; and default having been made under the aforementioned Deed of
Trust, and the undersigned Substitute Trustee having been instructed by Wells Fargo
Bank, N.A. to foreclose thereunder, will offer for sale at public auction at the front
door of the Hampshire County Courthouse in Romney, West Virginia, on
December 4, 2014 at 11:15 a.m.
the following described real estate, together with its improvements, easements
and appurtenances thereunto belonging, situate in Gore District, Hampshire County,
West Virginia, and more particularly described as follows:
ALL THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED TRACT OR PARCEL OF REAL ESTATE
LOCATED WEST OF WEST VIRGINIA ROUTE 2/6, APPROXIMATELY ONE MILE
SOUTH OF PAW PAW, WV, SITUATE IN GORE DISTRICT, HAMPSHIRE COUNTY,
WEST VIRGINIA, AND MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
BEGINNING AT AN IRON PIN FOUND, CORNER TO THE ORIGINAL, AND ALSO
CORNER TO KLINE IN THE WEST BOUNDARY OF WEST VIRGINIA ROUTE 2/6,
SAID IRON PIPE BEING NORTH 30° 48’ 13” EAST FROM AN IRON PIN FOUND,
CORNER TO THE D.C. PUFFINBURGER (LIBER 230, FOLIO 103) PROPERTY ON
THE EAST SIDE OF WV 2/6, THENCE, WITH THE WEST BOUNDARY OF WV 2/6,
S 47° 26’ 40” W 217.678’ TO A NUMBER (NR.) 5 REBAR SET IN SAID BOUNDARY,
THENCE ACROSS THE PARENT TRACT, N 28° 30’ 07” W 139.956’ TO A NR. 5
REBAR SET NORTH EAST OF A DRIVEWAY, THENCE, N 07° 05’ 22” E 51.965’
TO A NR. 5 REBAR SET WEST OF SAID DRIVEWAY, THENCE N 52° 53’ 39” E
162.835 CROSSING SAID DRIVEWAY TO A NR. 5 REBAR SET NORTH WEST
OF A PUMP HOUSE AND S 35° 53’ 04” E 264.15’ FROM A 1-1/2” PIPE FOUND,
THE NORTH EAST CORNER OF THE ORIGINAL, THENCE WITH THE LINE OF
THE ORIGINAL, S 35° 53’ 04” E 155.000’ TO THE BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.76
ACRES, MORE OR LESS, AS SURVEYED BY K.F. SNYDER & ASSOCIATES JULY
2001.
At the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, this property was reported to
have an address of: Bethal Road HC 60 Box 9C, Paw Paw, WV 25434.
The referenced real estate will be conveyed with no covenants of warranty, and
subject to all covenants, restrictions, easements, rights of way and reservations
which may be a matter of record in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office or visible upon the
ground, all prior liens and encumbrances, including, without limitation, liens for real
estate taxes, incinerator, sanitary and sewer charges. The purchasers at the sale
shall be responsible for paying the recording costs and also the tax on the privilege
of transferring real property (the cost of the tax stamp to be affixed to the deed). The
purchasers shall be responsible for payment of all real estate taxes.
The subject property will be sold in “AS IS” condition. The Substitute Trustee
shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying the subject
property to vacate said property.
TERMS: $9,000.00 in cash and/or certified funds as deposit with the balance due
and payable within 30 days of the day of sale.
FEDERAL TAX LIEN: In the event that there are Federal Tax Liens against the
property, the United States would have the right to redeem the property within a
period of 120 days from the date of such sale or the period allowable for redemption
under local law, whichever is longer.
Pursuant to the Deed of Trust, the Trustee may postpone the sale by public
announcement at the time and place designated or by posting a notice of the same,
and act by agent in the execution of the sale. The parties secured by the Deed of
Trust reserve the right to purchase the property at such sale.
SENECA TRUSTEES, INC.
6108 Mid Atlantic Drive
Morgantown, WV 26508
304-413-0044
304-292-2918
Toll free: 888-534-3132
Reference File No. 23712
11-19-2c
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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
HAMPSHIRE COUNTY, WEST
VIRGINIA
50 High Street, Romney, West Virginia,
for a change of name from Megan Erin
O’Keefe to Megan Erin Bradfield.
CASE NO. 14-P-17
IN THE MATTER OF THE PETITION
OF: MEGAN ERIN O’KEEFE
FOR A CHANGE OF NAME TO:
MEGAN ERIN BRADFIELD
ORDER OF PUBLICATION
Please take notice that Megan Erin
O’Keefe, of HC 71, Box 126B,
Augusta, West Virginia 26704, will on
Tuesday, December 30, 2014, at 9:30
a.m., or as soon thereafter as Counsel
can be heard, apply to the Family Court
of Hampshire County, West Virginia, at
the Hampshire County Judicial Center,
Any person or persons who feel
that they are likely to be injured by the
change of name of Megan Erin O’Keefe
to Megan Erin Bradfield, or who know
of any reason why her name should not
be so changed, may appear at the time
and place named in this notice, and
each may be heard in opposition to such
requested change.
The hearing in this matter may be
rescheduled without further notice or
publication.
Sonja K. Embrey
Clerk of the Circuit Court
11-19-1c
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BusinEss BriEfs
Highlands Bankshares’ earnings spike
PETERSBURG — Earnings of Highlands Bankshares Inc.,
the parent company of Capon Valley Bank and the Grant County
Bank, jumped by nearly 50 percent through the 1st 9 months of
2014.
As a result, the board of directors on Oct. 14 declared a quarterly
dividend of 25 cents a share to stockowners of record on Oct. 31.
The quarterly dividend a year earlier was 10 cents.
The company posted earnings of $2.33 million, or $1.74 a
common share, as of Sept. 30, compared to $1.59 million ($1.19
per share) a year earlier.
Contributing to the bottom line was the firm’s move to virtually
eliminate its provision for loan loss. The amount decreased to
$14,000 from $1.55 million a year earlier.
***
Leonard recognized for 25 years of service
ROMNEy — Hampshire County Committee on Aging
recognizes employee Brenda Leonard for her 25 years of
dedicated service to the agency. Leonard has been a resident of
Hampshire County all her life.
She began her caregiving experience when her elderly father
had a stroke, and his health began to deteriorate. She and her
husband took care of him until his death.
Caring for her father, she realized that there is a great need for
senior health care workers, thus she began her career with HCCA.
Leonard provides various services through HCCA for her
clients, such as light housekeeping, taking her clients to their
doctor appointments and grocery shopping. She stated that most
of her clients use a wheelchair, and they need help with everyday
living. She had a client who when his kidneys began to fail,
she would drive him to Cumberland, Md., for dialysis 3 times
a week. She remembers another client whom she transported to
Winchester, Va., for cancer treatment who is now in remission.
Leonard had worked for a husband and wife for 12 years before
they passed away. “your clients become like family members and
good friends. They depend on you coming to work so they will
have help with things that they cannot do themselves. Most of
them live on a meager income; they do not have much and are
so grateful when you show them respect and kindness. It really
makes you feel good that you can help them in their day-to-day
life,” remarked Leonard.
Leonard states, “HCCA has programs to offer clients in a variety
of situations and they also work with their employees when they
need time off to take care of family matters.” She also participates
in the continuing educational training sessions offered by HCCA
to keep up-to-date on state requirements.
Leonard and her husband, Al, have been married for 44 years.
They have a dog named Molly and 5 cats. In her spare time, she
likes to read.
(Editor’s note: Business Briefs are encouraged and intended for
promotions, new employees and opening of new businesses only.
If your business would like to submit a Business Brief, send no
more than 125 words in a press release to the Hampshire Review,
P.O. Box 1036, Romney, WV 26757. Photos are the responsibility
of the business.) q
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Legal Advertisement
6d
n
hampshire review
Wednesday, november 19, 2014
November
clicks in
Jim
KinG
O, it sets my hart a-clickin’
like the tickin’ of a clock
When the frost is on the
punkin and the fodder’s in the
shock.
I once had a friend complain
that August needed a holiday to
break the monotony that built as
summer wound to an end.
Today I’m thinking
November has the reverse
problem, and I’d probably feel
that way even if I wasn’t a
newspaper guy.
In West Virginia the 11th
month is bringing us:
Elections,
Veterans Day,
High school football and
volleyball playoffs,
The start of buck season,
Thanksgiving,
Black Friday and
The advent of … Advent.
That’s a lot. Any 1 or 2 of
them is worth building a whole
month around. The whole kit
and caboodle just makes a
month that should feel great
seem more like we’re rushing
from pillar to post.
We sweep away the starspangled promises and bashings
of the election only to trot out,
less than a week later, starspangled salutes to the men and
women who have served in our
military. Those great Veterans
Day car and furniture sales toss
around more of the red, white
and blue too.
Football and volleyball
have given way to tryouts for
basketball and wrestling.
The schedule beginning about
2 weeks ago went something
like this: sectional volleyball
championship on Thursday
at HHS, final football game
on Friday at Rannells Field,
cheerleading regionals Saturday
at Buckhannon-Upshur along
with volleyball regionals at
Elkins, and basketball and
wrestling practice began on
Monday.
Oh yeah, girls’ basketball,
which began a week earlier.
And swimming started back in
October.
That’s not the most
demanding stretch of the
month, though. That’s next
week.
Next Monday is arguably
the biggest unofficial holiday
in West Virginia — the start of
Buck Season. That’s Buck with
a capital “B” and Season with a
finisHinG up
capital “S.”
you can feel the anticipation
building. We have our special
preview of the season in this
week’s Review. Across the state
hunting supplies are flying off
store shelves and preparations
are being made to be in the
right spot when dawn breaks on
Nov. 24.
Heck, even school is called
off for the week.
Thanksgiving itself almost
becomes an anticlimax in the
Mountain State. Where’s the
excitement in plating a meal
that came from a store —turkey
from the grocery freezer,
cranberry sauce from a can,
pumpkin pie from Miller’s
— when hunters have been
shooting and dressing deer all
week?
If a big meal in the middle
of hunting isn’t enough, how
about the distraction of 3 NFL
games, which only used to be 2,
Reminder
but now more is 3?
Layered over all the Buck
Season-Thanksgiving hubbub is
the specter of Black Friday.
Granted, there’s not the
impending excitement of
just 2 years ago when Black
Friday actually began in the
wee hours of Friday morning.
Instead there’s this weeklong or month-long morass of
rolling Black Friday. The name
signifies a moment in myth,
replaced by Kohl’s opening
Thanksgiving evening, Sears’
jump-the-gun of Monday and
Wal-Mart’s “We’ve been Black
Fridaying since Halloween”
approach.
Who knows when to hit
the stores for the best deals?
But then, maybe that’s the
confusion the retailers are
trying to create so you stop in
more than once just to be sure.
All the shooting and eating
and football and buying sort
of overwhelms the end of
next week and the last day
of the month. It’s the 4th
Sunday before Christmas,
which marks the beginning
of the Christian year in many
churches and turns our hearts
toward preparing for that great
Christmas gift.
Maybe that’s the best day of
all in a jam-packed November.
Tri-Towns Crafts
Christmas Open House
Saturday, November 22
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Christmas Parade, Hampshire Review
74 W. Main St. Romney, WV 26767 or email information to
[email protected], or drop the form off at the
Review office on Main St.
For more information, call Sallie at
304-822-3871 Ext. 35 or G.T. at 304-671-8558.
Sponsored by Hampshire Review and
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