A POTTER'S PARADISE...Westfielder Eugene "

Ad Populos, Non Aditus, Pervenimus
OUR 124th YEAR – ISSUE NO. 47-2014
USPS 680020
Periodical – Postage Paid at Rahway, N.J.
Thursday, November 20, 2014
(908) 232-4407
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Published Every Thursday Since September 3, 1890
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SEVENTY FIVE CENTS
Temple Emanu-El Approved to Use
Adjacent House As Meeting Space
By CHRISTINA M. HINKE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
WESTFIELD — Temple EmanuEl, located at 748 East Broad Street,
was approved, 7 to 0, with conditions,
by the board of adjustment (BOA) Tuesday to use an adjacent house as a smallscale meeting place for a maximum of
30 people. The variances sought were
all pre-existing conditions and the only
change to the exterior structure was to
extend the rear porch to make a handicapped ramp. The temple also sought a
waiver for a new sign.
The house would be named The
Lavy Community House to honor Dr.
Norman W. Lavy, Senior Rabbi Douglas Sagal said. Marion Lavy, Dr. Lavy’s
wife, donated the home to the temple.
“I’m delighted it came into fruition,”
Mrs. Lavy told The Westfield Leader.
“It is going to be wonderful. A lot of
people will be pleased.”
The house is 2,084 square feet and
would require an additional 24 parking
spaces, according to the ordinance. In
2005, the temple had been approved to
expand its lot to 121 parking spaces,
which later changed to 116 when the
plan was implemented, attorney
Christina M. Hinke for The Westfield Leader
APPROVED...Marion Lavy, seated in the fourth row in pink, donated the home
to Temple Emanu-El that was approved Tuesday by the Board of Adjustment
(BOA) to be used as an accessory structure to the Temple. The house will be
named The Lavy Community House to commemorate her late husband, Dr.
Norman W. Lavy. Senior Rabbi Douglas Sagal, far right, of Temple Emanu-El,
was given unanimous approval, with conditions, by the BOA Tuesday to use the
house as a small-scale meeting place for a maximum of 30 people.
BOA OKs Appeals; Upholds
Permit on Boynton Court
By BOBBY O’ROURKE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
WESTFIELD — The board of adjustment (BOA) meeting held last
Wednesday evening was a scene that
began with some comedy and later
entered into heated debate.
A bit of levity was played out during the beginning of the meeting when
several applicants were asked to
present their applications, but each
explained that their attorneys or architects were running late. When the
board moved to the case in which an
architect was present but not the applicant, good-natured laughter and
applause came from both board members and citizens.
“Does anyone have a deck of
cards?” Board Chairman Chris
Masciale joked before calling a short
recess. After reconvening, the board
entertained the application of Jeff
Roush, who wanted to add a first- and
second-story addition to his home at
404 Saint Marks Avenue, which would
include a porch. His application was
approved on condition that the porch
would be constructed as an “open”
porch. After Mr. Roush, the board
entertained the application of Sue and
Jose Tan for 526 Saint Marks Avenue.
The Tans wished to build a one-story
addition onto their residence. Although some questions were raised
by board members about the impact
an addition would have on the Tans’
shared driveway, the application was
approved.
Roberto Olivares of 407 Grove
Street applied for permission to bring
his home up to three stories instead of
the ordinance-allowed two-and-a-half
stories. Mr. Olivares petitioned for
permission to raise the roof on his
walkup attic, and also for permission
to have two bedrooms and a bathroom added to the attic floor. The
roof had sustained damage during
Hurricane Sandy, and Mr. Olivares
saw its repair as an opportunity to
turn the attic into a livable area. His
application was approved by the
board.
The most contentious application
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
Stephen Barcan said. What was proposed Tuesday was a total of 118 spaces,
he said.
In 2003, the temple first went before
the BOA to add a parking lot, which
had neighboring residents up-in-arms.
Residents opposed to the lot argued
that the lot would take away from the
feel of a residential neighborhood.
The driveway would not change, Mr.
Staigar said, “maintaining that residential character rather than a commercial
character.” A commercial driveway
would require it to be widened, striped
and have curbing and be thicker.
There were concerns by the board
that the driveway as it exists makes it
difficult to turn around and exit. As a
condition, the board said a sign would
be erected to denote the driveway is to
be used by staff only.
Architect of Forefront Designs,
David Bailey, said the ramp located in
the rear of the building would be graded
and lead to a covered patio. Inside the
home, a powder room would be made
handicapped accessible. Upstairs, two
bedrooms would be made into one big
room. The exterior would maintain a
residential character and have the same
finishes as the existing building, Mr.
Bailey said.
“We are not planning on gutting the
building,” he stated.
The house would be used for prayer
meetings, youth meetings and counseling services, Rabbi Sagal said.
“We are looking at a program of
something modest,” Rabbi Sagal said.
The youth group typically meets on
Sundays, Rabbi Sagal said.
In addition to holding group meetings, “We’d like to invite one or two
families from the temple to have Sabbath dinner each week,” Rabbi Sagal
said.
The house also would provide a permanent space on Saturdays for a group
of about 10 to 15 people who have had
no designated meeting space.
Rabbi Sagal said he has considered
installing outdoor seating for a nature
class for the nursery school in the backyard area.
“I’m hoping what this might do for
us is give more breathing room for
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
Garwood Council Reviews Regs
For New Sports Complex
By BRIAN TRUSDELL
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
GARWOOD – The Garwood Borough Council held a special meeting
last Thursday to address issues surrounding the borough’s new athletic
field complex, which will officially be
opened on Sunday, December 14, with
a ribbon-cutting ceremony. The longdelayed, $3.2-million complex, located
on the south side of the borough, is
bordered by Rankin and Myrtle Avenues and New Street.
Floodlights for the new athletic field
complex will be shut off at 10 p.m.
under a proposal to revise the regulations governing the borough’s parks
and recreation facilities.
The proposed revisions were
prompted by the creation of the facility,
which will include a youth baseball
field, multi-purpose artificial turf field,
basketball court and field house. The
Board Permits Woman to
Rebuild Two-Fam. Home
By BRIAN TRUSDELL
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
GARWOOD – The planning board
has granted permission to a woman to
rebuild her two-family rental home at
304 Center Street, ending a nearly twoyear campaign that included a dispute
with the borough’s zoning official and
one of her neighbors.
After a nearly 90-minute hearing,
which included shouts by one member
to another, the board decided 7-to-2 to
grant Sandra Sep a certificate of nonconformity. The action will allow her
to rebuild the home as a two-family
structure despite it being in a singlefamily zone.
“Feels good,” Ms. Sep said after the
November 12 meeting. “Honestly, I’m
very happy.”
At issue was the house on the west
side of Center Street between Myrtle
and Spruce Avenues. Ms. Sep inherited
the home from Robert Campbell, a
non-family member, but it was destroyed by fire in November 2012.
Christina Hinke for The Westfield Leader
MAINTENANCE ISSUES…Robert Fico, the new part-time code enforcement
property maintenance officer, discusses a property maintenance issue with the
Cranford Township Committee at the committee’s November 10th meeting.
Paul Lachenauer for The Westfield Leader
ADOPT ME…The Greyhound Friends of New Jersey Craft Show and Pet Expo adoption event was held Saturday at the
Westfield Armory.
Happy Thanksgiving!
Ms. Sep believed that because the
home existed as a two-family structure
at least as far back as the 1950s and was
taxed by the borough as such, she was
entitled to rebuild it as such.
However, her application to rebuild
was denied by Zoning Code Official
Victor Vinegra, whose interpretation of
the land use ordinance determined that
because Ms. Sep never had a certificate
of non-conformity the home did not
meet the requirement of being a “legally existing” structure at the time of
its destruction.
Ms. Sep appeared before the board
several times, including at its September 24 meeting, where she eventually
withdrew her application for an interpretation of the ordinance with the
intention of resubmitting to seek a certificate of non-conformity.
Returning last week, Ms. Sep referred to documents submitted previously that showed the home was taxed
and fire inspected as a two-family as far
back as at least 1974. She presented
two long-time residents of Garwood –
one of whom was a relative of the
former owner – who testified the home
was used as a two-family as far back as
1955.
However, under questioning from
Board Attorney Donald Fraser, Ms.
Sep said she thought the area in which
the home existed was always zoned as
single-family.
While board members were noting a
document showing the home was built
in 1904, the conversation seemed to
floodlights issue was of particular concern to Myrtle Avenue resident Jeff
Breen, whose home borders the complex. He said that he goes to bed at 9:30
p.m.
Councilman Lou Petruzzelli noted
that PSE&G installed 400-watt and
250-watt security lights without notification on November 7, and that he
would request that they be shielded and
aimed more directly to minimize their
impact on surrounding residents.
Councilman Bill Nierstedt and Councilwoman Sara Todisco asked whether
the light shutoff could be moved to
9:30 p.m., or the days restricted to
when the lights could remain on until
10 p.m. Both ideas were rejected.
Mr. Petruzzelli said that requiring a
9:30 p.m. cutoff would cause scheduling issues for activities such as baseball. Games usually are scheduled for
5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., and normal
game time is two hours. The remainder
of the time is used for cleanup.
The regulation changes were the result of a special committee established
by the mayor 18 months ago. It included Council President Ann
Tarantino, Mr. Petruzzelli, Borough
Administrator Christina Ariemma and
several residents, who examined the
practices of several nearby towns with
similar facilities.
Most of the 90-minute meeting, 30
minutes of which were occupied by
questions by Mr. Nierstedt, was spent
defining terms such as “mini bike” and
clarifying language, such as references
to “business” days and “calendar” days.
Other questions revolved around
matters like a provision that prohibits
the harming of wildlife except poisonous snakes, which the regulations permit killing on sight.
Mr. Nierstedt questioned Ms.
Ariemma, who prepared the final draft
document which was reviewed by Borough Attorney Bob Renaud, about a
section that could require a contract in
order use the complex.
The provision reserved the right for
such a contract, but it did not specify
what would trigger the requirement.
Ms. Ariemma explained that one-time
uses, such as using the field house for a
party, probably would not require a
contract, but a repeated, regular use of
the baseball or soccer field would.
However, she said, depending upon
the specifics of the use — such as a
fireworks display (which is banned
under the regulations) — a contract
probably would be needed.
The regulations set fees for the park,
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
Christina M. Hinke for The Westfield Leader
A POTTER’S PARADISE…Westfielder Eugene "Gene" Prial showed his pottery and sculpture at the Potters’ Guild of New Jersey’s annual fall pottery
festival and sale of functional and sculptural ceramics at the Community
Presbyterian Church in Mountainside on Saturday. Mr. Prial is also a Westfield
Leader subscriber and moved to Westfield in 1971. Forty-two potters sold their
work at the sale held Saturday and Sunday.
PAGE INDEX
Regional ........
Editorial ........
Police ............
Community ...
Obituary ........
2-3
4-5, 18
18
6, 8, 18
8
Education ......
Sports ............
Real Estate ....
Classifieds .....
A&E ..............
9
11-17
11-17
18
19-20
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
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Patricia
Plante
For Sales
Beth
Sullivan
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Westfield Leader only
Page 10
Thursday, November 20, 2014
Elm
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Payments For Taxes
By BRIAN TRUSDELL
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
LEADER AT ST. HELEN’S... Gerald Pinney of Westfield celebrated his 50th
birthday by climbing Mount Saint Helen’s in the State of Washington with none
other than his favorite publication, The Westfield Leader.
Garwood Planning Bd.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
turn when Michael Vena uncovered a
1922 zoning map that showed southern sections of Garwood, including the
area of the house, as allowing multifamily dwellings.
Only one person during the public
comment opposed the application, Ms.
Sep’s neighbor, Vincent Kearney, who
purchased the single-family home at
306 Center Street – the adjacent property to the south – in October 2011.
Mr. Kearney, the son of recently
defeated Republican Garwood council
candidate and borough council chamber of commerce liaison Carol Kearney,
stated that granting the application
would exacerbate parking problems on
the street, create a hardship for his
family and lower his property value.
The opposition renewed memories
of a previous dispute in 2012 between
Ms. Sep and Mr. Kearney and his wife,
Veronica, over a dilapidated garage
and shared driveway that straddled both
properties.
The garage was condemned and
eventually razed, and the Kearneys
sought permission from the board to
build a driveway on the opposite side of
their property. That application was
denied, but Mr. Fraser mediated a settlement on the shared driveway in July
2012.
At the November 12 meeting, Mr.
Fraser expressed dismay upon learn-
GW Council
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
which will officially be renamed the
Garwood Sports and Recreation Complex. Based on a four-hour minimum,
Garwood residents would pay $125
plus $25 for any additional hour; nonresidents and for-profit organizations
would pay $250 plus $50 for each
additional hour, and non-profits would
be charged $50 for four hours and $10
for each additional hour.
That is in addition to a $25 application fee and a $250 security deposit.
Additional fees will apply for use of
the youth baseball field and artificial
turf field.
The already existing Garwood Recreation Commission, a seven-member
volunteer board appointed by the mayor
for rotating five-year terms, will be
tasked with managing the complex.
The regulations referred to “attendants” to represent the borough if
needed at events, which Ms. Ariemma
explained would be essentially employees of the commission, paid out of
fees generated by the complex.
A Watchung Communications, Inc. Publication
ing the agreement was never executed
With most board members sounding
convinced that Ms. Sep had proven that
the home existed as a well-understood
two-family home, planning board
member Bill Nierstedt struck a discordant note.
“I have never heard of a certificate of
non-conforming (use) being given to a
structure that no longer exists,” he said.
“I find it incredulous that we’re even
listening to this.
“So my question to my fellow board
members is, I don’t see what we’re
doing here.”
The comment drew a quick and angry response from board member Robert Scherer.
“You were the one who told her to
come back,” Mr. Scherer said, referring to Ms. Sep’s September 24 appearance.
When Mr. Nierstedt said it was not
he but the board that requested she
resubmit, Mr. Scherer seemed more
incensed.
“(The board requested it) because of
what you said,” he snapped. “Don’t
play games.”
Eventually, Mr. Scherer put forth the
motion to grant the certificate of nonconformity with the proviso that Ms.
Sep construct a one-car garage and also
one parking space behind the home.
With Carol Kearney’s close friend,
board member Gene Jannotti, recusing
himself, the request was granted over
the no votes of Mr. Nierstedt and Mayor
Pat Quattrocchi, who recused herself
two years ago from voting on the
Kearney application.
In other matters, the board unanimously approved a much-less-contentious application for a certificate of
non-conformity for Lucille Cepparulo
for her two-family home at 92 Third
Avenue.
Also approved unanimously was a
site plan to allow the new owners of 336
NorthAvenue, the former site of Oliver’s
Family Ristorante, to renovate the building for a Peruvian restaurant on the first
floor and to convert the one 1,600square-foot apartment on the second
floor into two one-bedroom, 800square-foot apartments.
Although the plans included adding
one parking spot behind the building,
negating the need for a variance, board
members strongly urged the new owners, the parents of proposed restaurant
manager Carlos Mendoza, to make
arrangements with St. Anne’s Catholic
Church nearby or the owners of the
shopping plaza across the street for
additional parking.
Courtesy of Sylvie Mulvaney/NJ First Aid Council
OUTSTANDING SERVICE… Fanwood Rescue Squad EMTs, pictured in front
row, from left to right, Steve Siegal, Karolyn Buckridee, Elizabeth Buckridee,
Patty Buckridee and Nancy Mustachio, and back row, Jeff Downing and Tom
Kranz, accept the award for Outstanding Call-of-the-Year during the recent New
Jersey State First Aid Council (NJSFAC) banquet. While responding to a
January 1, 2014 call for a man lying next to the tracks, the EMS volunteers
worked with paramedics to stabilize the critically injured patient, then transported him to the helicopter landing zone. The patient died several days later.
GARWOOD – Borough residents
would be able to make municipal
tax payments online with a credit or
debit card under a proposal to replace the borough’s accounting
computer software.
Councilwoman Sara Todisco, the
governing body’s finance committee chairwoman, reported to the
council at its meeting Tuesday that
the company that currently provides
the software, First Byte of Teaneck,
N.J., would not be able to continue
support due to a health condition of
one of the principals.
Subsequent research resulted in
two offers, including one from
Edmunds and Associates of
Northfield, N.J., that would allow
residents or business owners to remit tax payments via computer.
Edmunds would charge a convenience fee, which was not disclosed,
that would not lessen the tax owed
to the borough.
Ms. Todisco said a measure would
be put forth in upcoming meetings
requesting the council approve
$20,000 in start-up costs to purchase, install and provide 46 hours
in training on the software.
The Edmunds bid was slightly
more than a $16,500 offer from
Municipal Software Inc. (MSI), but
Edmunds was chosen due to its more
common use, Ms. Todisco said, as
well as compatibility with the
borough’s hardware, according to
Borough Administrator Christina
Ariemma.
In other finance committee discussions, Ms. Todisco said the panel
was recommending – at the urging
of the state – the elimination of the
stipend paid to borough employees
who opt to waive health-insurance
coverage.
The stipend, 25 percent of the
premium the borough paid, was recommended by state officials as a
way to encourage employees to decline health insurance and reduce
costs. But since many of those who
opted out did so because employees were required to pay toward the
insurance and/or it was cheaper to
obtain coverage through their
spouse, the stipend is no longer
necessary.
Two borough employees have applied, Ms. Ariemma said. However,
only one was eligible and is receiving the stipend.
The relatively sparsely attended
meeting lasted uncharacteristically
slightly over an hour.
It was announced that the $3.2million Athletic Field Complex in
the southeast corner of the borough
is nearing completion. Ninety percent of the railings, 95 percent of
the plumbing and all of the kitchen
equipment have been installed in
the field house, and shrubbery that
PUBLIC NOTICE
BOROUGH OF GARWOOD
ORDINANCE 14-15
AN ORDINANCE FIXING THE
SALARY FOR CHRISTINA M
ARIEMMA, BOROUGH ADMINISTRATOR/MUNICIPAL
CLERK AS PER THE SETTLEMENT AUTHORIZATION IN
THE MATTER OF ARIEMMA
V. BOROUGH OF GARWOOD
AND AS DIRECTED IN RESOLUTION
NO.
14-279
ADOPTED OCTOBER 28,
2014
BE IT ORDAINED by the Mayor and
Council of the Borough of Garwood, in
the County of Union, State of New Jersey as follows:
SECTION 1.
Christina
M.
Ariemma, Borough Administrator/Municipal Clerk of the Borough of Garwood shall
be entitled to an annual salary hereinafter
set forth opposite respective classification:
SECTION 2. The within salary shall be
retroactive and take effect January 1, 2011.
SECTION 3. All ordinances or parts of
ordinances inconsistent herewith shall be
and they are hereby repealed.
SECTION 4. This ordinance shall take
effect immediately and in the manner prescribed by law.
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that Ordinance
No. 14-15, was introduced and passed on
first reading at a meeting of the Borough
Council of the Borough of Garwood, in the
County of Union, State of New Jersey, held
on the 18th DAY OF NOVEMBER 2014,
and that Ordinance No. 14-15, will be taken
up for further consideration for final passage at the meeting of said Borough Council to be held at its meeting room in the
Municipal Building, 403 South Avenue,
Garwood, New Jersey, on the 9th DAY OF
DECEMBER 2014, at 7:15 p.m., or as
soon thereafter as said matter can be
heard, at which time and place all persons
who may be interested therein will be given
an opportunity to be heard concerning the
same.
ATTEST:
Christina Ariemma
Municipal Clerk
Borough of Garwood
2 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $51.50
needed replacing has been planted.
The ponding on the basketball court
and drainage issues in the baseball
outfield have been rectified.
“Inspections are set for November 25,” said Councilman Lou
Petruzzelli, the council’s liaison to
the project. “They’re starting to take
the plastic off the windows. They’re
starting to clean up.”
The project, 18 months behind
schedule, has been a contentious
issue within the council and was
often cited as an issue in the recent
council and mayoral elections. The
park is scheduled to officially open
Sunday, December 14, with a ribbon-cutting ceremony.
Some matters remain, such as the
aiming and shielding of security
lighting, which Mr. Petruzzelli said
needs to be addressed by PSE&G.
Among other issues discussed included leaf removal, after one resident noted how he had been approached by a Garwood police officer for raking his leaves into the
street. The resident said he raked
the leaves into the street with the
intention of bagging them, as required by a borough ordinance enacted last year.
However, the lateness of the day
and soreness in his back prompted
him to leave them until morning. A
neighbor apparently notified police.
Councilman Bill Nierstedt said the
ordinance does not allow raking the
leaves into the street and advised
the homeowner to leave them in his
yard until bagging them.
That prompted Councilman Mike
Martin, who earlier this year suggested rescinding the law, to question the wisdom of requiring leaf
bagging. But he found no support
on council.
Mr. Nierstedt later advised that
while this was the last week for
scheduled pickup of leaves, the Department of Public Works would
continue to remove leaves left out
between sidewalks and curbs on a
request or as-needed basis.
WF Bd. Adj.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
of the evening was presented by Harry
and Karen Saminski. At the outset, a
legal distinction had to be made about
whether Ms. Saminski was present as
an applicant or legal counsel, as she
is an attorney. Ms. Saminski identified herself as an applicant. The
Saminskis wished to appeal the town
zoning officer’s decision to issue a
construction permit to Joseph and
Steven Buontempo for property at
132 Boynton Court near the
Saminskis’ home, claiming that construction in the lot violated front and
rear lot setback requirements.
Vincent Loughlin, the board’s attorney, interrupted their testimony to
point out that their appeal had not
been filed in the required time period.
When Ms. Saminski began to argue
that she and her husband had no idea
of the construction until the secondfloor framing had been erected, Mr.
Loughlin cut them off, saying the
basis for their appeal was ungrounded.
This argument lasted nearly an hour,
with the Saminskis calling Mr.
Loughlin’s lengthy legal explanation
“confusing,” and Mr. Loughlin accusing the Saminskis of ignoring the
facts and simply “arguing the merits”
of the case.
Other board members also found
the legal precedent confusing, with
board members Andrew Wasserman
and Mark Doherty questioning Mr.
Loughlin more than they did the
Saminskis. In the end, the board offered its sympathy to the Saminskis,
but denied their appeal.
The final applicants of the evening
were Robert and Pamela Newell of
603 Clark Street, who wanted to extend the height of their detached garage to match the roofline of their
1880s Victorian-style home. The
Newells’ application was approved
on the conditions that a new survey of
the property would be ordered and
that the garage would not become a
habitable space. It was agreed that no
utilities besides existing electricity
would be installed in the garage.
Westfield, NJ 07090
Christina Hinke for The Westfield Leader
NATIVE PLANT ENTHUSIASTS…The Native Plant Society of New Jersey held
its annual Fall Conference at the Trailside Nature and Science Center in
Mountainside on Saturday. Local nurseries sold native New Jersey plants outside
and inside gardeners had a seed swap, where seeds were given free-of-charge of
plants that could be planted and thrive in this current cold climate. The
conference recognized native plant research going on around the state and
highlighted individuals and groups working to conserve native plant habitats and
populations.
WF At Or Above Similar
Districts In Test Scores
By DELL SIMEONE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
WESTFIELD – The board of education met Tuesday evening and announced the results of district testing.
The news is good for the students,
tested on par with or higher than the
state average in many tests.
Margaret Dolan, superintendent of
schools, introduced the power point
presentation which was narrated by
Paul Piniero, assistant superintendent
of curriculum.
The presentation included the results of the Student Achievement Tests
(SAT), the American College Tests,
(ACT) and the Advanced Placement
Test (AP), High School Proficiency
Assessment (HSP), New Jersey Assessment of Skills and Knowledge
(NJASK), Language Arts Literacy
(LAL) and Partnership for Assessment
of Readiness for College and Careers
(PARCC).
The students, Mr. Piniero said, are
tested relative to their District Factor
Group (DFG), the classification which
associates academic performance with
community characteristics, such as affluence and parent education. Westfield
is in District I, which includes other
districts with similar characteristics.
Some key terms are, according to the
New Jersey Department of Education
(NJDOE): Scale Score Mean, which is
the average of a group’s scale score;
Partially Proficient, which is scoring
under 200; Proficient, which is scoring
200 or above; Advanced Proficient,
which demonstrates advanced understanding of NJDOE core content standards and scoring 250 to 300; Cluster is
the specific skill set being tested on a
given test. Cluster to grade 11. Cluster
Temple Appl.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
activities,” Rabbi Sagal said.
Elizabeth Lehey, planner for the applicant, noted the master plan recognizes the importance of houses of worship in residential neighborhoods.
The board made conditions upon
approval for Lot 8 to be merged with
the principal structure, the temple; to
provide a landscaping plan on the westerly side to fill in gaps; for the house to
not be used as a residence; for the house
to be used as stated in testimony and for
the sign on the driveway to be installed.
“This accessory structure allows
them to have… a more appropriate
space for smaller groups,” Board Chairman William Heinbokel said. “From
an appearance perspective, the neighborhood doesn’t change at all.”
Categories for all grades are English
Language Arts (ELA) (2014) and Math
2014. The results are based on tests
given in the spring of 2014.
The ELA I-District and state percentage of total passing shows Westfield
grades 3 to high school as surpassing
the state and district average with over
80 percent passing and well above average. The Westfield vs. District and
state ELA percentage of AP showed
Westfield High School as scoring as
high as well as over 60 percent above
the other categories.
In math AP, from grades 3-WHS,
Westfield scored, in many grade levels,
at a much higher score than the state
average and district factor grouping,
particularly in grades, fifth, eighth and
high school.
In math scales score mean, Westfield
vs. I-District and state, grades three
through high school, Westfield scored
consistently above the other two categories.
In NJASK, math and science,
Westfield grades, four and eight,
Westfield matched in grade four and
surpassed competing districts in grade
eight. In AP science, Westfield surpassed, by a percentage point, other
districts in grade 4 and scored lower in
the District Factor Group (DFGI) in
grade eight. In the Science Scale Score
Mean, Westfield vs. District I and state,
Westfield surpassed the other districts
in Grade four and fell slightly below in
grade eight testing.
Westfield, said Mr. Piniero, performs
at or above its District Factor Group
peers with very few exceptions.
In other business, the board voted to
accept gifts from the Westfield Coalition for the Arts to the following
schools:
A gift of $1,250 for the for the
Westfield High School Music Department staff members to attend a conference.
A gift of $350 for the Roosevelt
Intermediate School’sArts Department
to purchase two wire cutters and supplies.
A gift of $2,530 for the Arts To the
Westfield High School and the
Roosevelt and Edison Intermediate
Schools to purchase three drum sets
with hardware and cases.
A gift of $830 for the Roosevelt
Intermediate School Music Department
to purchase three amplifiers.
A gift of $5,000, from an anonymous donor, to the Franklin Elementary School to purchase books, supplies and classroom material.
The next meeting of the board will
be Tuesday, December 9, at 7:30 p.m.
at the administration Building, located
at 103 Elm Street.
Courtesy of Jim Lowney/County of Union
www.goleader.com
A JOB WELL DONE...More than 20 people, including Union County Freeholder
Sergio Granados, who organized the event, Elizabeth Mayor Chris Bollwage,
Elizabeth Board of Education member Stan Neron and retired New York Giants
Stephen Baker and Chris Snee, recently joined members of Univision Radio, Coors
Light, Union County College, the County of Union and the New York Giants
organization in a cleanup of Warinanco Park in Elizabeth, Roselle and Linden.
Serving the community since 1959
OUR 55th YEAR – ISSUE NO. 47-2014
USPS 485200
Periodical – Postage Paid at Rahway, N.J.
Thursday, November 20, 2014
(908) 232-4407
[email protected]
Published Every Thursday Since 1959
www.timesnj.com
SEVENTY FIVE CENTS
Scotch Plains-Fanwood BOE
Approves Spring Trip to Italy
By KIMBERLY A. BROADWELL
Specially Written for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
SCOTCH PLAINS — Approximately one dozen students attended
last Thursday evening’s Scotch PlainsFanwood Board of Education meeting to help and support a presentation
of the 2014-2015 Italian Student Exchange program. Immediately following the presentation, board members
unanimously passed eight field trip
requests, one of them a trip for these
students to study in Italy for 10 days.
The presentation, given by Carmela
Lambert, Giuseppina Della Pietra and
Antonio Gaetano, chronicled the visit
by 17 students from Italy as they
shadowed Scotch Plains-Fanwood
High School (SPFHS) students for 10
days last spring. It was revealed that
there were 30 families willing to host
these students. The Italian students
attended high-school classes with their
host student, visited and interacted
with students from the middle schools
and visited common tourist attractions.
During the presentation, it was
noted that the trips for the Italian
students coming to SPFHS and for
those SPFHS students studying in
Italy give the students a chance to
acquire much more and a better understanding of each other’s language
David B. Corbin for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
STATE SECTIONAL SOCCER CHAMPS...The Scotch Plains-Fanwood High
School boys soccer team defeated Elizabeth, 2-0, to claim the North Jersey,
Section 2, Group 4 championship in Scotch Plains on November 13. See story on
page 15.
Consolidation Panel Has
Raised $9K For Study
By DELL SIMEONE
Specially Written for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
SCOTCH PLAINS – The Fanwood/Scotch Plains Consolidation
Study Commission met last Wednesday evening at the board of education
(BOE) administration offices.
In attendance were Chairman Don
Parisi, Vice-Chairman Anthony
Battista, Fanwood representatives Pat
Hoynes, Matt Juckes and Councilman Jack Molenaar, and Ann
Saltzman, Fred Lange and Philip
Weiner from Scotch Plains. Eugene
McCarthy of the Local Finance Board
of the New Jersey Department of
Community Affairs also was at the
meeting.
The commission, formed in June
2013, is charged with overseeing a
study, by an independent contractor,
on the benefits and costs of consolidating Fanwood and Scotch Plains
into one municipality without either
losing its identity as a community.
At Wednesday’s meeting, Mr. Parisi
said the total amount of money the
commission has now is $9,015. Courage to Connect New Jersey gave the
commission $5,000 for seed money.
The commission was able to raise
$4,075 from local contributors. Those
wishing to contribute can do so on
the commission’s Facebook page
using PayPal. All contributions are
tax-deductible. The suggested donation is between $25 and $50.
The job of doing a study on the
benefits of merging the two towns
went out to bid several months ago.
Two bidders responded; one wanted
$75,000 and another asked for
$100,000. Mr. Parisi said the bidders
have agreed to keep the bids open
throughout 2015.
The meeting was followed by a
brief private session.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
Courtesy of Tom Kranz
LIFETIME HONOR…Bob Kruthers, center, a member of the Fanwood Rescue
Squad since 1957, receives the EMS Volunteer Lifetime Achievement Award last
Friday night at the annual New Jersey Statewide EMS Conference in Atlantic
City. Mr. Kruthers, the rescue squad's treasurer, has answered more than 5,000
calls and provides ongoing leadership and mentoring to squad members. Also
pictured are Micky McCabe, chairman of the New Jersey EMS Council, and
Nancy Kelly-Goodstein, acting director of the New Jersey Office of EMS.
through a “practical immersion.”
Teachers also made the point that
the experiences for both sets of students will help and have helped all
students to accept and understand
different cultural and community perspectives. It was noted that this will
help with students’ analytical and
problem-solving skills as well as help
them mature and build confidence
and self-esteem.
The tentative itinerary for the spring
trip to Italy will span from April 16 to
25, 2015.
It was noted that each student was
expected to pay for his or her own
trip. Board member Karen
Kulikowski asked how much the trip
would be for each student, to which
she was answered approximately
$1,600.
The presentation concluded with
first-hand testimonials from participants who hosted students. SPFHS
senior Rebecca Ames shared her experiences and noted that she visited
her newly made friend from the exchange program in Italy over the summer and had a chance to bond with
her family. She said that during her
summer trip she was able to see her
own knowledge of the Italian language expand because of the immersion process. She ended by saying, “I
am excited to go back.”
Another high-school senior,
Samantha Loop, showed a brief video
of the experiences she and her fellow
students had while hosting the Italian
students. Board members asked the
students to come back after their trip
to Italy to share their experiences.
Newly elected board member Evan
Murray was in attendance at the meeting. When asked, Mr. Murray said he
was happy and honored to be elected
to the board and that he will be sworn
in at the board’s re-organizational
meeting held in January. Newly reelected members of the board, Warren McFall of Scotch Plains and
Jeanne Cleary of Fanwood, also will
be sworn in for another term.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
Courtesy of Sylvie Mulvaney/NJ First Aid Council
OUTSTANDING SERVICE…Fanwood Rescue Squad EMTs, front row, from left to right, Steve Siegal, Karolyn
Buckridee, Elizabeth Buckridee, Patty Buckridee and Nancy Mustachio, and back row, Jeff Downing and Tom Kranz,
accept the award for Outstanding Call-of-the-Year during the recent New Jersey State First Aid Council (NJSFAC)
banquet. While responding to a January 1, 2014 call for a man lying next to the tracks, the EMS volunteers worked with
paramedics to stabilize the critically injured patient, then transported him to the helicopter landing zone. The patient died
several days later.
Council Opts For More Leaf
Pick-Up Equipment Rental
By FRED T. ROSSI
Specially Written for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
SCOTCH PLAINS — With the
township’s leaf pick-up program well
under way, Township Manager Jerry
Giaimis reminded residents last week
that updates on schedules and any
changes are available on the
township’s website and on its
Facebook page. And the pick-up program was the subject of an extended
discussion when the council, at its
meeting on November 12, was considering a resolution awarding a contract not to exceed $112,000 to Ralph
Checchio Inc. for the rental of equipment to be used in the leaf pick-up
program and the brush pick-up efforts in 2015.
FW Close to Settlement On
Environmental Cleanup Suit
By CHRISTINA M. HINKE
Specially Written for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
FANWOOD — The litigation that
began in 2013 between the borough
and three companies for payment for
environmental cleanup involving the
downtown redevelopment is almost
fully settled, Councilman Dan Levine
said Monday at the borough council’s
regular meeting, where Council President Russell Huegel stood in for an
absent Mayor Colleen Mahr.
Two of the three parties, Station
Square and Brinkerhoff, have signed
the settlement papers, while
Livingston-Wilbur has yet to sign off
on the deal, Borough Administrator
Eleanor McGovern told The Scotch
Plains-Fanwood Times. The borough
had bonded over a million dollars in
a low-interest government loan to
pay for cleanup of the site after purchasing it and had an agreement to
share the cost with the companies,
which backed out of the arrangement. The council approved the settlement agreement by resolution.
The governing body also awarded
a contract for engineering services
relevant to the downtown environmental cleanup not to exceed $21,687.
In other business, the Fanwood
Memorial Library has accepted drawings from an architect for major renovations at the library, Councilwoman
Katherine Mitchell said during her
library report. “The library has many,
many deficiencies,” Councilwoman
Mitchell said.
The plans will be presented to the
council on Tuesday, December 2, at
the council’s agenda session, when
council members can discuss if the
project should be done in stages or in
one fell swoop, she said.
The council approved the in-grade
promotion of Elliot Bernard to patrolman b.
The Fanwood Rescue Squad won
the award for Outstanding Call of the
Year at the annual New Jersey State
First Aid Council’s convention in
October, Councilman Tom Kranz
said. The award acknowledged the
squad’s response on January 1 to a
young man with a severed arm found
lying next to the train tracks near
Hetfield Avenue. The squad was able
to stabilize the victim, Mr. Kranz
said. The victim died three days later,
he said.
A host of events were announced
by the council: the interfaith Thanksgiving service will be held Monday,
November 24, at 7:30 p.m., at Temple
Sholom, newly located at 1925 Lake
Avenue, Fanwood. CROP Hunger
Walk donations will be received there
as well. The temple also will hold a
Deputy Mayor Michael Marcus
questioned the size of the contract
and also wondered whether the additional equipment was needed. He
asked Mr. Giaimis whether the leaf
program could be completed without
the additional equipment, and was
told that it could. But in explaining
the need for the equipment, Mr.
Giaimis said, “We’re trying to be
more expedient and more efficient.”
Mr. Marcus said the $112,000 contract, combined with an earlier
$35,000 contract for rental of other
equipment, was more than the total
increase in this year’s municipal budget expenditures. He also said that if
the capital bond ordinance had been
passed during the summer, most of
the equipment that will be rented
would, instead, have been owned by
the municipal government.
“This is money we could save taxpayers,” Mr. Marcus said of the contract award, and later he wondered
why what he described as a “standard
leaf pickup” could not be completed
with the equipment and manpower
already on hand.
Councilwoman Colleen Gialanella,
in an attempt to broker a compromise, proposed reducing the “not to
exceed” amount of the contract from
$112,000. Mr. Marcus was receptive,
saying that it was “so far out of pocket”
to award a bid of such an amount.
Even though the $112,000 figure is a
ceiling that is not necessarily the final amount that will be paid by the
township, Mr. Marcus warned, “If
that kind of expenditure can be approved, then that kind of expenditure
can be paid.”
But Township Attorney Bill Willard
cautioned the council about lowering
the contract amount too much. “It’s
going to be difficult if there are leaves
on the street and there aren’t funds to
pick them up,” he said. Mayor Kevin
Glover agreed, saying that, “people
are going to be angry if the leaves are
not picked up.”
The discussion continued as Mr.
Giaimis calculated possible lower
monetary levels, and finally Mrs.
Gialanella proposed a $90,000 ceiling on the bid award. The council
voted to approve, on a 4-to-1 vote,
with Mr. Marcus dissenting.
In other business, Mr. Giaimis said
the bid documents for the replacement of the clubhouse roof at Shady
Rest Country Club, which were isCONTINUED ON PAGE 10
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
Christina M. Hinke for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
VOLUNTEER OF MONTH…Parthena Rosahl, of the Friends of the Fanwood
Library, was named Volunteer-of-the-Month at the Fanwood Borough Council
regular meeting on Monday. Her daughters, Sophia, wearing hat, and Melissa
presented her with flowers and Carol Campell of the Friends gave a speech.
Borough Administrator Eleanor McGovern presented her with the recognition.
PAGE INDEX
Happy Thanksgiving!
Regional ........
Editorial ........
Police ............
Community ...
Obituary ........
2-3
4-5, 18
18
6, 8, 18
8
Education ......
Sports ............
Real Estate ....
Classifieds .....
A&E ..............
9
11-17
11-17
18
19-20
Congratulations to the October Sales Associates of the Month!
For Listings
Patricia
Plante
For Sales
Beth
Sullivan
! ©2014 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker® and the Coldwell Banker logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.
Scotch Plains - Fanwood Times only
Page 10
Thursday, November 20, 2014
Elm
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
“Local Service at Highway Prices”
70 Years in Westfield
APPLIANCE
Kitchen and Laundry Appliances, TV’s, Grills and A/C’s
220 ELMER STREET
908-233-0400
WF Temple Approved to
Use House As Meeting Space
By CHRISTINA M. HINKE
Specially Written for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
Christina M. Hinke for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
NATIVE PLANT ENTHUSIASTS…The Native Plant Society of New Jersey
held its annual Fall Conference at the Trailside Nature and Science Center in
Mountainside on Saturday. Local nurseries sold native New Jersey plants
outside and inside and gardeners had a seed swap, where seeds were given freeof-charge of plants that could be planted and thrive in this current cold climate.
The conference recognized native plant research going on around the state and
highlighted individuals and groups working to conserve native plant habitats
and populations.
BOA OKs Appeals; Upholds
Permit on Boynton Court
By BOBBY O’ROURKE
Specially Written for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
WESTFIELD — The board of adjustment (BOA) meeting held last
Wednesday evening was a scene that
began with some comedy and later
entered into heated debate.
A bit of levity was played out during the beginning of the meeting when
several applicants were asked to
present their applications, but each
explained that their attorneys or architects were running late. When the board
moved to the case in which an architect was present but not the applicant,
good-natured laughter and applause
came from both board members and
citizens.
“Does anyone have a deck of
cards?” Board Chairman Chris
Masciale joked before calling a short
recess. After reconvening, the board
entertained the application of Jeff
Roush, who wanted to add a first- and
second-story addition to his home at
404 Saint Marks Avenue, which
would include a porch. His application was approved on condition that
the porch would be constructed as an
“open” porch. After Mr. Roush, the
board entertained the application of
Sue and Jose Tan for 526 Saint Marks
Avenue. The Tans wished to build a
one-story addition onto their residence. Although some questions were
raised by board members about the
impact an addition would have on the
Tans’ shared driveway, the application was approved.
Roberto Olivares of 407 Grove
Street applied for permission to bring
his home up to three stories instead of
the ordinance-allowed two-and-a-half
stories. Mr. Olivares petitioned for
permission to raise the roof on his
walkup attic, and also for permission
to have two bedrooms and a bathroom
added to the attic floor. The roof had
sustained damage during Hurricane
Sandy, and Mr. Olivares saw its repair
as an opportunity to turn the attic into
a livable area. His application was
approved by the board.
The most contentious application
of the evening was presented by Harry
and Karen Saminski. At the outset, a
legal distinction had to be made about
whether Ms. Saminski was present as
an applicant or legal counsel, as she is
A Watchung Communications, Inc. Publication
an attorney. Ms. Saminski identified
herself as an applicant. The Saminskis
wished to appeal the town zoning
officer’s decision to issue a construction permit to Joseph and Steven
Buontempo for property at 132
Boynton Court near the Saminskis’
home, claiming that construction in
the lot violated front and rear lot setback requirements.
Vincent Loughlin, the board’s attorney, interrupted their testimony to
point out that their appeal had not
been filed in the required time period.
When Ms. Saminski began to argue
that she and her husband had no idea
of the construction until the secondfloor framing had been erected, Mr.
Loughlin cut them off, saying the basis for their appeal was ungrounded.
This argument lasted nearly an hour,
with the Saminskis calling Mr.
Loughlin’s lengthy legal explanation
“confusing,” and Mr. Loughlin accusing the Saminskis of ignoring the facts
and simply “arguing the merits” of the
case.
Other board members also found
the legal precedent confusing, with
board members Andrew Wasserman
and Mark Doherty questioning Mr.
Loughlin more than they did the
Saminskis. In the end, the board offered its sympathy to the Saminskis,
but denied their appeal.
The final applicants of the evening
were Robert and Pamela Newell of
603 Clark Street, who wanted to extend the height of their detached garage to match the roofline of their
1880s Victorian-style home. The
Newells’ application was approved on
the conditions that a new survey of the
property would be ordered and that
the garage would not become a habitable space. It was agreed that no utilities besides existing electricity would
be installed in the garage.
Consolidation
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
The next meeting of the commission will be on Wednesday, December 10, at 7 p.m., at the BOE administration building, located on Evergreen Avenue in Scotch Plains.
LEADER AT ST. HELEN’S...Gerald Pinney of Westfield celebrated his 50th
birthday climbing Mount Saint Helen’s in the State of Washington with none
other than his favorite publication, The Westfield Leader.
WESTFIELD — Temple EmanuEl, located at 748 East Broad Street,
was approved, 7 to 0, with conditions, by the board of adjustment
(BOA) Tuesday to use an adjacent
house as a small-scale meeting place
for a maximum of 30 people. The
variances sought were all pre-existing conditions and the only change
to the exterior structure was to extend the rear porch to make a handicapped ramp. The temple also sought
a waiver for a new sign.
The house would be named The
Lavy Community House to honor
Dr. Norman W. Lavy, Senior Rabbi
Douglas Sagal said. Marion Lavy,
Dr. Lavy’s wife, donated the home
to the temple.
“I’m delighted it came into fruition,” Mrs. Lavy told The Scotch
Plains-Fanwood Times. “It is going
to be wonderful. A lot of people will
be pleased.”
The house is 2,084 square feet and
would require an additional 24 parking spaces, according to the ordinance. In 2005, the temple had been
approved to expand its lot to 121
parking spaces, which later changed
to 116 when the plan was implemented, attorney Stephen Barcan
said. What was proposed Tuesday
was a total of 118 spaces, he said.
In 2003, the temple first went before the BOA to add a parking lot,
which had neighboring residents upin-arms. Residents opposed to the
lot argued that the lot would take
away from the feel of a residential
neighborhood.
The driveway would not change,
Mr. Staigar said, “maintaining that
residential character rather than a
commercial character.” A commercial driveway would require it to be
widened, striped and have curbing
and be thicker.
There were concerns by the board
that the driveway as it exists makes
it difficult to turn around and exit.
As a condition, the board said a sign
FW Council
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
holiday boutique on Sunday, December 7, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. On
Saturday, December 13, the temple
will have a pray and play event for
children age 5 and younger and their
caregivers; families are asked to call
the temple for the time.
The seniors will hold their holiday
party on Monday, December 8.
On Sunday, December 7, at 3 p.m.
at the northside train station Fanwood will hold its annual holiday
party. At 5 p.m. there will be a tree
lighting ceremony with singing. Santa
will make an appearance, too.
On Saturday, December 13, at 11
a.m. Santa will ride through Fanwood, assisted by the fire department, rescue squad and Police PBA
Local 123, giving gifts to children.
Santa’s elves are accepting gifts at
the firehouse on Saturday and Sunday, November 29 and November
30, from 5 to 9 p.m., and Monday
through Friday, December 1 through
5, from 6 to 9 p.m. This year the fire
department is asking that gifts be no
bigger than a shoebox and to bring
one gift per child.
The Lions Club will begin its
Christmas tree sale on December 1
from 6 to 9 p.m. weeknights and 9
a.m. to 9 p.m. on weekends.
The Tiny Tim Carol Night will be
on Wednesday, December 3. Residents should leave their porch lights
on from 4 to 9 p.m. if they would like
to receive the carolers.
Luminaries will be sold Sunday,
December 7, and Saturdays and Sundays, December 13 and 14 and 20
and 21, at the Fanwood Municipal
Garage at 270 North Avenue across
from the library, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
The police department will set up a
giving tree outside Borough Hall
where residents can take an ornament and return a gift to benefit Parents as Teachers programs of Union
County.
The Handel’s Messiah Concert will
take place December 7 at 9 p.m. at the
Fanwood Presbyterian Church. Tickets are $20.
At the start of the meeting, Parthena
Rosahl, of the Friends of the Fanwood Memorial Library, was named
Volunteer of the Month. Her daughters, Sophia and Melissa, presented
her with flowers, while Carol Campell
of the Friends spoke of Ms. Rosahl’s
commitment to the organization. Mrs.
McGovern presented Ms. Rosahl with
a sketch of the library.
“She does everything you would
want for a library,” Ms. Campell said.
“It takes a village. It is a great town
of people to work with,” Ms. Rosahl
said.
would be erected to denote the driveway is to be used by staff only.
Architect of Forefront Designs,
David Bailey, said the ramp located
in the rear of the building would be
graded and lead to a covered patio.
Inside the home, a powder room
would be made handicapped accessible. Upstairs, two bedrooms would
be made into one big room. The
exterior would maintain a residential character and have the same finishes as the existing building, Mr.
Bailey said.
“We are not planning on gutting
the building,” he stated.
The house would be used for
prayer meetings, youth meetings and
counseling services, Rabbi Sagal
said.
“We are looking at a program of
something modest,” Rabbi Sagal
said.
The youth group typically meets
on Sundays, Rabbi Sagal said.
In addition to holding group meetings, “We’d like to invite one or two
families from the temple to have
Sabbath dinner each week,” Rabbi
Sagal said.
The house also would provide a
permanent space on Saturdays for a
group of about 10 to 15 people who
have had no designated meeting
space.
Rabbi Sagal said he has considered installing outdoor seating for a
nature class for the nursery school in
the backyard area.
“I’m hoping what this might do
for us is give more breathing room
for activities,” Rabbi Sagal said.
Elizabeth Lehey, planner for the
applicant, noted the master plan recognizes the importance of houses of
worship in residential neighborhoods.
The board made conditions upon
approval for Lot 8 to be merged with
the principal structure, the temple;
to provide a landscaping plan on the
westerly side to fill in gaps; for the
house to not be used as a residence;
for the house to be used as stated in
testimony and for the sign on the
driveway to be installed.
“This accessory structure allows
them to have… a more appropriate
space for smaller groups,” Board
Chairman William Heinbokel said.
“From an appearance perspective,
the neighborhood doesn’t change at
all.”
SP-F BOE
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
The next board of education meeting is scheduled for tonight, November 20, at 7:30 p.m., in the administration building on Evergreen Avenue
and Cedar Street in Scotch Plains. It
was noted that a marching band recognition program will precede the
regularly scheduled meeting in the
auditorium of Evergreen School.
PUBLIC NOTICE
BOROUGH OF GARWOOD
ORDINANCE 14-15
AN ORDINANCE FIXING THE
SALARY FOR CHRISTINA M
ARIEMMA, BOROUGH ADMINISTRATOR/MUNICIPAL
CLERK AS PER THE SETTLEMENT AUTHORIZATION IN
THE MATTER OF ARIEMMA
V. BOROUGH OF GARWOOD
AND AS DIRECTED IN RESOLUTION
NO.
14-279
ADOPTED OCTOBER 28,
2014
BE IT ORDAINED by the Mayor and
Council of the Borough of Garwood, in
the County of Union, State of New Jersey as follows:
SECTION 1.
Christina
M.
Ariemma, Borough Administrator/Municipal Clerk of the Borough of Garwood shall
be entitled to an annual salary hereinafter
set forth opposite respective classification:
SECTION 2. The within salary shall be
retroactive and take effect January 1, 2011.
SECTION 3. All ordinances or parts of
ordinances inconsistent herewith shall be
and they are hereby repealed.
SECTION 4. This ordinance shall take
effect immediately and in the manner prescribed by law.
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that Ordinance
No. 14-15, was introduced and passed on
first reading at a meeting of the Borough
Council of the Borough of Garwood, in the
County of Union, State of New Jersey, held
on the 18th DAY OF NOVEMBER 2014,
and that Ordinance No. 14-15, will be taken
up for further consideration for final passage at the meeting of said Borough Council to be held at its meeting room in the
Municipal Building, 403 South Avenue,
Garwood, New Jersey, on the 9th DAY OF
DECEMBER 2014, at 7:15 p.m., or as
soon thereafter as said matter can be
heard, at which time and place all persons
who may be interested therein will be given
an opportunity to be heard concerning the
same.
ATTEST:
Christina Ariemma
Municipal Clerk
Borough of Garwood
2 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $51.50
Westfield, NJ 07090
Christina M. Hinke for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
A POTTER’S PARADISE…Westfielder Eugene "Gene" Prial shows his pottery
and sculpture at the Potters’ Guild of New Jersey’s annual fall pottery festival
and sale of functional and sculptural ceramics at the Community Presbyterian
Church in Mountainside on Saturday. Mr. Prial also is a Westfield Leader
subscriber and moved to Westfield in 1971. Forty-two potters sold their work at
the sale held Saturday and Sunday.
GW Council Reviews Regs
For New Sports Complex
By BRIAN TRUSDELL
Specially Written for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
GARWOOD – The Garwood Borough Council held a special meeting
last Thursday to address issues surrounding the borough’s new athletic
field complex, which will officially be
opened on Sunday, December 14, with
a ribbon-cutting ceremony. The longdelayed, $3.2-million complex, located on the south side of the borough,
is bordered by Rankin and Myrtle
Avenues and New Street.
Floodlights for the new athletic field
complex will be shut off at 10 p.m.
under a proposal to revise the regulations governing the borough’s parks
and recreation facilities.
The proposed revisions were
prompted by the creation of the facility, which will include a youth baseball field, multi-purpose artificial turf
field, basketball court and field house.
The floodlights issue was of particular
concern to Myrtle Avenue resident
Jeff Breen, whose home borders the
complex. He said that he goes to bed at
9:30 p.m.
Councilman Lou Petruzzelli noted
that PSE&G installed 400-watt and
250-watt security lights without notification on November 7, and that he
would request that they be shielded
and aimed more directly to minimize
their impact on surrounding residents.
Councilman Bill Nierstedt and
Councilwoman Sara Todisco asked
whether the light shutoff could be
moved to 9:30 p.m., or the days restricted to when the lights could remain on until 10 p.m. Both ideas were
rejected.
Mr. Petruzzelli said that requiring a
9:30 p.m. cutoff would cause scheduling issues for activities such as baseball. Games usually are scheduled for
5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., and normal
game time is two hours. The remainder of the time is used for cleanup.
The regulation changes were the
result of a special committee established by the mayor 18 months ago. It
included Council President Ann
Tarantino, Mr. Petruzzelli, Borough
Administrator Christina Ariemma and
several residents, who examined the
practices of several nearby towns with
similar facilities.
Most of the 90-minute meeting, 30
minutes of which were occupied by
questions by Mr. Nierstedt, was spent
defining terms such as “mini bike”
and clarifying language, such as references to “business” days and “calendar” days.
Other questions revolved around
matters like a provision that prohibits
the harming of wildlife except poisonous snakes, which the regulations permit killing on sight.
Mr. Nierstedt questioned Ms.
Ariemma, who prepared the final draft
document which was reviewed by
Borough Attorney Bob Renaud, about
a section that could require a contract
in order use the complex.
The provision reserved the right for
such a contract, but it did not specify
what would trigger the requirement.
Ms. Ariemma explained that one-time
uses, such as using the field house for
a party, probably would not require a
contract, but a repeated, regular use of
the baseball or soccer field would.
However, she said, depending upon
the specifics of the use — such as a
fireworks display (which is banned
under the regulations) — a contract
probably would be needed.
The regulations set fees for the park,
which would officially be renamed
the Garwood Sports and Recreation
Complex. Based on a four-hour minimum, Garwood residents would pay
$125 plus $25 for any additional hour;
non-residents and for-profit organizations would pay $250 plus $50 for
each additional hour, and non-profits
would be charged $50 for four hours
and $10 for each additional hour.
That is in addition to a $25 application fee and a $250 security deposit.
Additional fees will apply for use of
the youth baseball field and artificial
turf field.
The already existing Garwood Recreation Commission, a seven-member
volunteer board appointed by the mayor
for rotating five-year terms, will be
tasked with managing the complex.
The regulations referred to “attendants” to represent the borough if
needed at events, which Ms. Ariemma
explained would be essentially employees of the commission, paid out
of fees generated by the complex.
SP Council
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
sued on November 7, are due on
Tuesday, December 9, and that he
anticipates the council voting to
award a contract soon after. Mayor
Glover said that, “Clearly, they can
replace the roof in December” before the brunt of the winter weather
is felt.
The council gave final approval to
an ordinance setting out fees for
people using the golf course at Shady
Rest. A new feature is that activeduty military personnel and veterans
living in Scotch Plains, as well as
members of the local fire department
and rescue squad, will have membership fees and greens fees waived.
In other business, Mayor Glover
appointed Carol Clancy to the library board of trustees, replacing
Joseph Duff, who died recently. The
mayor also reminded residents that
the annual holiday celebration will
take place on Sunday afternoon, December 7, on Park Avenue.
Courtesy of Jim Lowney/County of Union
A JOB WELL DONE...More than 20 people, including Union County Freeholder
Sergio Granados, who organized the event, Elizabeth Mayor Chris Bollwage,
Elizabeth Board of Education member Stan Neron and retired New York Giants
Stephen Baker and Chris Snee, joined members of Univision Radio, Coors Light,
Union County College, the County of Union and the New York Giants organization in a cleanup of Warinanco Park in Elizabeth, Roselle and Linden.
Page
2
Thursday, November 20, 2014
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Civil War Depicted
In Election Calendar
COUNTY– Union County Clerk
Joanne Rajoppi has announced that
her office is offering a free 2015 wall
calendar that commemorates the
150th anniversary of the end of the
Civil War with photographs of local
monuments and Civil War memorabilia. The calendar includes important dates and deadlines of concern to
voters and candidates for office in the
2015 state, county, municipal and
school board elections.
“This coming year will be the 150th
Anniversary of the conclusion of the
Civil War in the United States,” Ms.
Rajoppi said. “It is my hope that this
2015 wall calendar, with its glimpses
into our past, will encourage people
to remember the dedication and sacrifices of Union County residents
during the war and the effect the
1861-1865 conflict had on the families and communities throughout
Union County.”
The November 3rd General Election in 2015 will include elections for
the State Legislature, county, municipal and school board offices. The
calendar highlights many important
dates relating to voter registration,
Vote-By-Mail ballots, candidate petition deadlines, primary elections,
campaign finance reports, and General Election ballot deadlines.
To obtain one of the free 2015
Election Year calendars, visit the
Union County Clerk’s website,
www.ucnj.org/government/countyclerk, where an order form is available. For general information about
elections, contact the County Clerk’s
Election Office at (908) 527-4996.
Cyber Fraud Hotline
Bill Introduced
TRENTON – Assembly Minority
Leader Jon Bramnick (R-21st,
Westfield) has introduced legislation
that is intended to allow residents to
call a hotline number or access a
website when they believe cyber fraud
has been committed. Mr. Bramnick
is combining efforts with the Attorney General’s Statewide Computer
Task Force. The legislation increases
public awareness of computer crime
and provides the public with a phone
number to report suspicious Internet
activity.
“We are constantly observing
fraudulent activity on the Internet
and do not know how to report same,”
Mr. Bramnick stated. “This bill will
provide a one-stop consumer hotline
for New Jersey citizens. The reporting of this fraud will be helpful to our
Homeland Security officials at the
state level.”
Panel OKs Life-Saving
Treatment in Schools
TRENTON – Legislation to increase access to life-saving medicine
for children with sever allergies in
school earned approval Thursday
from the state Senate Education Committee. The bill, A-304, approved by
the General Assembly in May, would
authorize school nurses and trained
personnel to administer epinephrine
to any student having an anaphylactic reaction.
Recent studies suggest that one in
13 children are affected by food allergies. More than 15 percent of
school-aged children with food allergies have had a reaction at school,
according to a Senate Republican
Minority Office press release. Current law requires that parents provide
written authorization for the school
to administer an injection.
The bill also would require that
schools maintain a supply of epinephrine auto-injectors, and amends
the law to provide immunity to school
employees and agents for good faith
acts or omissions concerning the
emergency administration of epinephrine to specifically include a
physician providing a prescription
under a standing protocol for school
epinephrine.
Assisted Suicide Bill
Passes in NJ Assembly
TRENTON — The state Assembly
on Thursday passed a measure, 41 to
31, that would allow doctors to prescribe life-ending drugs to terminally
ill patients, according to media reports.
The legislation now heads to the
state Senate, where a companion bill
has stalled. Reports indicate that
Governor Chris Christie has promised to veto the measure if it reaches
his desk.
Oregon, Washington and Vermont
have passed similar laws.
New Jersey’s bill was introduced a
little over a week 29-year-old Brittany Maynard, who became an advocate for terminally-ill patients ending their lives, died using Oregon’s
doctor-assisted suicide law, according to a Reuters report.
See it all on the Web!
www.goleader.com
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Insert Your Pre-Printed Advertisement into the Leader/Times?
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The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Muñoz Bill to Reduce
Hospital Re-admissions
Signed by Governor
TRENTON – Bipartisan legislation sponsored by Assemblywoman Nancy Muñoz
(R-21st, Summit) that is designed to help
reduce costly hospital re-admissions by
having patients designate a caregiver for
post hospital care was signed into law
Thursday by Governor Chris Christie.
The bill, A-2955, requires hospitals to
provide patients and their legal guardians
with an opportunity to designate a caregiver
following the patient’s entry into the hospital and prior to discharge or transfer to
the patient’s residence. A named caregiver
is not obligated to perform any after-care
assistance for the patient.
According to the AARP, 69 percent of
care recipients did not have a home visit
by a health care professional after discharge from the hospital; 46 percent of
family caregivers perform medical/nursing tasks for loved ones with multiple
chronic physical and cognitive conditions, and most family caregivers report
that they receive little or no training to
perform their tasks. Under the bill, hospitals will be required to provide caregivers
with instructions in all after-care assistance tasks as per the discharge plan.
Red-Light Cameras
Went Dark on Dec. 16
TRENTON — New Jersey red-light cameras at 73 intersections statewide went dark
on December 16 as the state ended its fiveyear program, according to media reports.
The letter from the Department of
Transportation said the towns that have
the cameras would “lack the statutory
authority to continue the operation of
traffic signal monitoring systems … including the issuance of citations for redlight violations.”
Union County has cameras in the towns
of Linden, Springfield, Union, Rahway
and Roselle Park.
Watson-Coleman’s Son
Hired by Mercer Co.
TRENTON — The son of Congresswoman-elect Bonnie Watson Coleman
(D-12th) has been hired by Mercer
County as a laborer in the county parks
commission, The Trentonian has reported.
According to the story, in March 2000,
William Carter-Watson and his stepbrother Jared Coleman, who were 21
and 19 at the time, robbed a Kids-R-Us in
the Mercer Mall in Lawrence with automatic weapons, stealing $1,800 and forcing employees to lie face down on the
floor. Both men pleaded guilty and
served five-a-half years in jail.
“We’re not going to put somebody
down for life because they made one
mistake,” Mercer County Executive Brian
Hughes told The Trentonian. “I’m not
ashamed of hiring Bonnie Watson’s son
or anybody who’s had one encounter
with the law.”
The 12th Congressional District includes most of Scotch Plains and all of
Fanwood.
Thursday, November 20, 2014
Page 3
Freeholders OK Lease Deal
For Runnells Psych Unit
By PAUL J. PEYTON
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
FROM THE FRONT...Union County Freeholders Sergio Granados, second from left, Bette Jane Kowalski , third from left,
and Vernell Wright, right, joined Union County Clerk Joanne Rajoppi , fourth from left, in thanking those who read at
“Letters from the Front,” a memorial ceremony honoring Civil War veterans. The event was hosted by the Union County
Civil War Sesquicentennial Committee at the Union County Courthouse in Elizabeth. The readers, from left to right, were:
poet Tom Plante, Janice Blank, Army veteran Vincent DeTrolio, Navy veteran Lester Sargent, Henry Bassman, commander
of American Legion Lindsey-Street Post 322 in Summit, and Berley Hanna Jr., past-commander of American Legion Post
499 in Rahway. Ms. Blank and County Clerk Joanne Rajoppi, who is also the chairwoman of the committee, both read letters
written by their relatives. The Civil War Exhibition is on display until 2015 in the rotunda of the Union County Courthouse,
2 Broad Street in Elizabeth. The exhibit may be viewed weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
RVSA OKs $26-M Budget; $180K to Be
Returned to Member Municipalities
By WAYNE BAKER
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
RAHWAY — The Rahway Valley
Sewerage Authority’s (RVSA) Board
of Commissioners last Thursday passed
its 2015 budget. Garwood is disputing
the planned distribution of the fees
based on its belief there is a metering
flaw. Issuance of bonds to finance a
digester gas cleaning project also was
approved.
The authority approved its 2015 budget with appropriations of just shy of
$26 million. User fees, the charges
RVSA makes to member municipalities, will drop by about 1 percent. The
exact breakdown by town of these fees
has yet to be determined. An issue has
surfaced with meter readings and user
fees, dating back about a year-and-ahalf. Discussions are underway on how
to equitably resolve this legally within
the authority’s operating agreement.
According to RVSA officials, if current methodologies are applied to next
year’s user fees, without an adjustment,
Garwood would face a 17-percent increase in its charges. The metering
anomaly, which involves the readings of
multiple meters, seems to be a case of a
meter reading low since March of 2013.
According to Stephen Greet, Garwood’s
commissioner, there seems to be no explanation for the lower readings aside
from a malfunctioning meter. The authority is continuing to research the situation and will address allocation of the
user fees at a future meeting.
Commissioners also discussed how
much money the authority should retain
as a reserve. Mr. Greet introduced a budget amendment to return an additional
$150,000 to municipalities more than the
$180,000 already slated to be returned in
the budget. This would have reduced the
retained surplus from $650,000 to
$500,000.
Robert Materna, the authority’s secretary-treasurer, said he felt reducing
the surplus further posed a risk. James
Meehan, the authority’s executive director, also pointed out that the revenue, about $500,000, from processing
the waste from Monmouth County
would likely disappear near year-end
2015 due to a new plant being constructed there. Mr. Greet’s amendment
failed.
A resolution to issue $2.6 million in
subordinate bonds to finance a digester
gas cleaning project also was passed. The
project takes advantage of advantageous
borrowing rates and partial loan forgiveness through the New Jersey Environmental Infrastructure Trust.
The board also passed a resolution
opposing the Water Infrastructure Protection Act, a bill in both the state Senate
(no. 2412) and Assembly (no. 3628) that
would permit privatization of public water-related systems without adequate oversight by either the public or regulators.
The RVSA anticipates that it would, in
cases of privatization, allow corporate
operators ofwater or sewerage systems to
increase user charges to more rapidly
recoup their investments. The resolution
is to be provided to area members of the
state Legislature, the Governor, and municipalities served by RVSA.
A brief closed session also was held. It
was stated that this involved some matters related to finalizing details related to
the Passaic River Litigation (New Jersey
Department of Environmental Protection
versus Occidental Chemical).
REPORTERS NEEDED
Current openings for reporters
to cover town council, BOE,
and recreation commission
meetings. We seek communityminded, detail-oriented writers
with professional demeanor
needed. Must be able to meet
deadlines, know how to write a
lead, and take an active interest
in a regular beat in order to
develop news stories. Great for
stay-at-home moms, a second
income or just for those who
love to write. E-mail resume
and clips to:
[email protected]
The Westfield Leader &
The Scotch Plains-Fanwood
TIMES
COUNTY — The Union County Freeholder Board last Thursday approved an
agreement with Runnells Property, LLC,
an affiliate of Center Management, LLC,
to lease back the 44-bed Cornerstone
psychiatric unit at Runnells Specialized
Hospital after the county completes the
sale of Runnells to Flushing, N.Y.-based
Center Management.
The lease agreement is for 10 years,
with the county paying $4,015,097 in the
first year in addition to 13 percent of
property taxes on the Runnells’ Berkeley
Heights property and 13 percent of shared
area costs.
In its report issued in February 2013,
Complete HealthCare Resources, the
county’s consultant, recommended the
county retain Cornerstone, noting that
the county is reimbursed for 85 percent of
the cost for Union County residents and
100 percent for non-Union County residents in the pysch unit.
The county has been locked in negotiations with Center Management for
months in completing the sale of the
property for $26 million. Center Management was chosen by an evaluation
team put together by the county over four
other nursing home operators that submitted proposals.
The county opted to sell the facility
due to increased operating debt whereby
the county was subsidizing Runnells to
the tune of $13.1 million a year, with that
number to increase as Medicare reimbursements continue to decline.
Barbara Egger, president of the Health
Professionals and Allied Employees
(HPAE) Local 5112, which represents
nurses at Runnells, said her union was
notified “for the first time” last Thursday
of the Cornerstone agreement. She said
the union was told that 25 registered
nurses would be retained to work in the
psychiatric unit.
“That means about 30 nurses will be
laid off,” Ms. Egger said.
She said she heard the county was going
to seek an exemption from the state for
civil service rules so that “seniority would
not be the basis for keeping the nurses.”
“That upsets me a lot because we are
talking two weeks from now (completion
of Runnells sale). I have nurses there
(and) nobody knows who’s working.
Nobody knows who’s got a job yet,” she
told the freeholders.
Ms. Egger accused county officials of
not communicating with the union and
making plans “in a back room,” telling
the board that the county has “an obligation to negotiate with us any change in
working conditions.”
Frank Guzzo, director of human services for the county, responded that, “there
are no backroom deals that are being
cut.” He said Ms. Egger’s comment that
county officials have not talked or responded to the HPAE is “absolutely not
true.” He said he has been in touch with
one of the union’s executive board mem-
bers, responding by e-mail or phone every time the individual has contacted
him. In addition, Kathy Hatfield, the
county’s labor counsel, also was in touch
with the union representative last Thursday.
“We’ve tried to be as open and honest
as we can,” Mr. Guzzo said. “It was
decided that if we could operate Cornerstone we would do that. The fact of the
matter is we worked out an agreement
and approximately 80 employees —
county employees that were going to lose
their jobs — will now not lose their jobs
as a result of that (agreement).”
Norman Albert, director of administrative services for the county, said the
county is not seeking an exemption from
civil service. He said the county did contact civil service to seek “bona fide qualifications for retention in the Cornerstone
unit pursuant to the New Jersey Administrative Code and Civil Service regulations.” He said Runnells’ unions were
“informed in a timely manner” and copied on the county’s submission to civil
service.
In other business, the board approved
a new five-year contract with
KemperSports to manage the Ash Brook
and Galloping Hill golf courses at a cost
of $509,724, which is around $100,000
lower than the previous contract. The
county will receive 7 percent of the gross
revenue from the pro shop and from all
food and beverage sales.
The freeholders also approved a $4.5million budget for golf course operations
for the period November 17, 2014 to
December 31, 2015 for Kemper. Per a
question from John Bury of Kenilworth,
Armando Sanchez, director of recreational facilities, said no county employee
will be doing maintenance work at the
county golf courses under the new contract. He said he will be the only county
employee in golf operations.
Bruce Paterson of Garwood said he
felt the county should have given the
contract to Integrity Golf of Winter Garden, Fla., as its management fee was over
$100,000 less than Kemper’s. Integrity
had the lowest base management fee of
$349,980, but was not given the contract
because it had no experience in the New
Jersey golf industry market.
During the public portion of the meeting, Elizabeth Nelson, a former Cranford
resident, encouraged the freeholders to
pass an ordinance to ban fracking in
Union County, similar to action taken in
Middlesex County.
Freeholder Chairman Chris Hudak said
while the board does have the authority to
ban fracking on all properties in the
county, “the county will support a ban on
county-owned properties and will encourage municipalities to do the same.”
Hydraulic fracking is the process of drilling and injecting fluid into the ground at
a high pressure in order to fracture shale
rocks to release natural gas inside.
Freeholder Hudak said he hopes the freeholders will vote on the measure next month.
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Page
4
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, November 20, 2014
The Westfield Leader
The Scot
ch Plains–F
anwood
Scotch
Plains–Fanwood
Times
Since 1959
— Established 1890 —
Legal Newspaper for the Town of Westfield,
Legal Newspaper for the Borough of Fanwood
Boroughs of Mountainside and Garwood
And the Township of Scotch Plains
And the County of Union, NJ.
Members of:
New Jersey Press Association • National Newspaper Association • Greater Westfield Area Chamber of Commerce
Scotch Plains Business & Professional Association • Fanwood Business & Professional Association
Periodicals – Postage Paid at Rahway, New Jersey
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Westfield, N.J. 07091
P. O. Box 368
Scotch Plains, N.J. 07076
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Appointment Changes Likely
In Scotch Plains and Garwood
Now that elections have occurred, the backroom
politics will begin in some local towns. With Democrat Mayor-elect Charles Lombardo replacing Republican Pat Quattrocchi in Garwood and with
Democrats taking a 4-to-1 majority on the Scotch
Plains governing body come January, we expect to
see a number of Republican-appointed professionals replaced by members of the Democratic Party.
Just two years ago, Scotch Plains Mayor Kevin
Glover and Democrats cleaned house, replacing the
town attorney, prosecutor, public defender, engineer,
insurance risk management consultant and auditor, as
well as the labor relations and tax appeals attorneys.
Last year, with Republicans back in the majority, they
brought back Jeff Lehrer from the law firm of former
GOP Governor and state Senator Donald DiFrancesco
as township attorney; Hatch Mott MacDonald as
township engineer; Pinnacle Risk Solutions as risk
management consultant, and Suplee Clooney & Co.
as auditor. With Democrats in the driver’s seat for the
next two years, will these firms be replaced again?
In Garwood, Municipal Judge Antonio Inacio —
who also serves as judge in Clark and Scotch Plains
— could be replaced unless Mayor Quattrocchi acts
before her term expires to reappoint the judge for
another three years. Judge Inacio, who was ap-
pointed in 2011, was accused by the Advisory Committee on Judicial Conduct of improperly intervening in an underage-drinking case on behalf of Councilman Lou Petruzzelli’s daughter in 2013.
It is likely that Garwood’s municipal prosecutor,
Robert Donovan, will be replaced but that the public
defender, Scott Marinelli, who was retained from
the administration of Democratic Mayor Dennis
McCarthy, will be kept, in our opinion. Borough
Attorney Steven Rogut also appears safe as he was
brought in by Democrats when they took a 4-to-2
majority on the borough council in 2013. Mr. Rogut
was attorney in the McCarthy administration before
being replaced by Mayor Quattrocchi. Judge Inacio’s
term also is up in Scotch Plains.
It is unlikely that there will be any changes in
Cranford as the GOP maintained its 4-to-1 advantage
on the township committee, or in Westfield, which did
not have an election this year and where Republicans
hold the mayor’s office and all eight town council seats.
Besides paid professional appointments, there also
are likely to be changes in Garwood’s and Scotch
Plains’ volunteer boards such as the planning and
zoning boards.
Appointments are done at municipal reorganization meetings in January, so stay tuned.
On Thanksgiving, Be Grateful
For Blessings That We Have
This Thursday, November 27, is Thanksgiving
Day. While the holiday commemorates the Pilgrims
and Wampanoag Indians sharing a feast in Plymouth, Mass. in 1621, in gratitude for a successful
harvest, it also reminds us to appreciate what we
have today.
For people who struggle daily to feed their family
and keep a roof over their head, who are coping
with illness or tragedy, or who live with crime and
poverty daily, experiencing a sense of gratitude
may pose a genuine challenge. Additionally, there
are those who have trouble summoning gratitude
because the dreams or ambitions they once envisioned for themselves failed to materialize. World
circumstances, broadcast and streamed 24/7, also
can leave people feeling more vulnerable or disheartened than thankful.
Nevertheless, we can still find reasons to give
thanks. All of us can focus on what we have, rather
than what we do not; on our blessings, instead of our
misfortunes, and on the quality of our lives rather
than the quantity of our material assets.
We can give thanks for our family, friends and
other special people in our lives; there are those who
are orphaned, estranged or otherwise alone in the
world. We can give thanks for good health; for many,
all their wealth cannot buy it. We can give thanks for
our homes; there are those whose only shelter is a
cardboard box. We can give thanks for the ability to
work, if we have it; there are so many today who
remain unemployed or underemployed.
We can give thanks for being citizens of this
nation, for the opportunities afforded us no matter
who we are, the freedom to worship and to choose
our leaders, and other privileges we enjoy as a free
society. Such opportunities and privileges are unimaginable to millions around the world subsisting
without even basic necessities or living under totalitarian regimes.
For those who find it difficult to feel gratitude
during dangerous and uncertain times, we remind
them that every generation since the dawn of civilization has lived through such times, and have survived and prospered.
This Thanksgiving, let us express and share our
gratitude for our “riches” — not just those preceded
by a dollar sign, but those that enrich our lives and
those of our loved ones — and perhaps “pay it
forward” by helping or just being a friend to someone else in need. We are grateful to be part of this
community, and wish everyone a happy Thanksgiving and a safe, healthy and joyous start to the holiday
season.
Holiday
Schedules
Thanksgiving, Christmas
and New Year's Day are all
Thursday this year. The
Leader/Times will operate
close to normal these weeks,
closing Wednesdays at noon.
The newspapers will be delivered by the post offices on
Friday. Please assist us by being timely with your submittals during these periods.
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Letters to the Editor
Girl Scout Troops Encourage Others
To Help Clean Up Local Parks
On Saturday, October 18, girls from
Girl Scout Troops 40462 and 40451
teamed up to clean up Mindowaskin
Park in Westfield. They were excited
to help make the park a little nicer for
the town that day, but all agreed more
needs to be done.
Scouts approached the park expecting to have fun, but the amount
of trash they actually picked up
shocked them. In just an hour the
girls collected about 10 bags of trash,
which included items from as simple
as gum and straw wrappers, to bottles
half-full of iced tea or perfume, a belt
and a sweatshirt.
The girls’ efforts were recognized
by folks enjoying the park that day.
One kind man asked if they were Girl
Scouts working toward a badge, and
expressed his appreciation for their
efforts. He recounted to one mom,
each day when he walks his dog
through the park, he picks up a lot of
trash, and often wonders if anyone
else ever does the same.
The number of visible bottles and
trash in the pond, unreachable by the
Scouts, was unsettling to them and
their parents, also helping in the effort. Also concerning was the unusually high level of algae present in the
pond. Could this be a symptom of the
amount of trash present? It cannot be
good for the animals inhabiting the
pond and park.
While it may take more than this
letter for the town to improve its
process for cleaning trash in town
parks, the girls in these two local
troops hope this story inspires others
to take a moment to pick up trash
when enjoying parks and playgrounds
in Westfield, or neighboring towns. It
only takes a moment to make a big
difference, and help make the parks
and town a more beautiful place to
enjoy each day.
Kristen Winters
Westfield
To Preserve Colonial Homes and TreeLined Streets,’ Get Involved Locally
I read both the front-page article
on November 6 (WF Planning Bd.
Carries Carleton Subdivision to Dec.),
along with the letter-to-the-editor by
Arlene Gardner, regarding my
parent’s home on Carleton Road. It
seems that there was much contention regarding the tree removal at the
site.
I find it fascinating that Ms.
Gardner, who lives directly across
the street, professes concern about
the diseased and dying trees that were,
albeit sadly, legally removed from
the property. Although she claims to
know what the developer was planning, her reactions were not based on
facts. She has absolutely no idea what
the plans are for the property and it’s
landscaping.
After excessively harassing the tree
removal workers, brazenly photographing my parent’s property while
we watched, and illegally trespassing
on the property to measure tree diameters, I would be so bold to say that
Ms. Gardener has demonstrated far
more concern with how the changes
occurring affect her, and not the Town
of Westfield.
It was a very difficult decision that
my family had to make to have the
home that we had since 1974, razed.
My dad, a life-long resident of
Westfield, was an avid gardener and
is an absolute lover of nature. However, the property, along with its trees,
were beyond saving. It was a sad, but
personal matter.
I’m sure that once Ms. Gardner
sees how two new and beautiful
homes with an abundance of lush
trees and gardens will affect her property values, she’ll feel a sense of
relief.
In the meantime, for residents of
Westfield who want to preserve the
“colonial homes and tree-lined
streets,” I would implore you to get
involved in your local politics. Attend some town meetings, or join the
historical society. I think your efforts
would be much more successful there,
rather harassing elderly neighbors and
getting into other people’s business.
Elyce Bavos
South Plainfield
We Need Dialogue on Improving
Services to Support Family Caregivers
“Please put on your oxygen mask
before helping others...” That’s a
phrase we’re all familiar with onboard
an aircraft, but I believe it is just as
relevant in the world of family
caregiving. November is National
Family Caregivers Month and as we
take time to recognize those who
provide this essential service, I want
to encourage us to ask the question:
Who cares for the caregiver?
My husband, Joe, and I care for our
two children; Jessica, aged 14, and
Andrew, aged 10, both of whom have
autism and significant challenges. We
love our children as much as any
parent, but I’d be the first to admit
that at times we are very tired.
Providing care for a loved one with
a disability can be incredibly hard
work and it often involves a lot of
physical and emotional demands on
your time. We need to recognize that
those providing the care need help
too.
To do that we must take another
look at the types and availability of
respite services for caregivers in New
Jersey. For instance respite, which
provides overnight breaks for parents, the chance to spend time with a
spouse or partner or other children in
the family rejuvenates caregivers and
it’s what carries them forward. I hope
this November we can begin a dialogue about how to expand and improve services to support family
caregivers.
Diane Mirabelli
Westfield
Editor’s Note: Diane Mirabelli is
the mother of two children with Autism. She is a volunteer with The Are
of New Jersey and The Arc of Union
County.
We Are Better When We Care For,
Respect And Help Each Other
While preparing this Thanksgiving
Day message, I was reminded that it
was on October 3, 1863, with the nation embroiled in a bloody Civil War,
that President Abraham Lincoln issued a proclamation setting aside the
last Thursday in November as a national day of thanks. In his Presidential Proclamation he enumerated the
blessings of the American people and
called upon his countrymen to set apart
and observe the last Thursday of November as a day of Thanksgiving and
Praise.
His proclamation began as follows:
“The year that is drawing towards its
close, has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful
skies. To these bounties, which are so
constantly enjoyed that we are prone
to forget the source from which they
come, others have been added, which
are of so extraordinary a nature, that
they cannot fail to penetrate and soften
even the heart which is habitually insensible to the ever watchful providence of Almighty God.”
With Thanksgiving Day just days
away, I’m certain many if not all of us
are deep in preparation to celebrate
this truly authentic American holiday.
As is now tradition, on this day, family
and friends will gather throughout the
nation to reflect and express our gratiState LD-21
Sen. Thomas Kean, Jr. (R)
425 North Ave. E.
Westfield, N.J. 07090
(908) 232-3673
Asm. Jon Bramnick (R)
251 North Ave. West
Westfield, N.J. 07090
(908) 232-2073
Asm. Nancy Munoz (R)
57 Union Place, Suite 310
Summit, N.J. 07901
(908) 918-0414
LD-21 includes Westfield,
Mountainside, Garwood,
Summit and Cranford.
tude for our personal and collective
blessings.
On this day when we give thanks,
I’ve always been mindful and proud of
that which makes our township so
wonderful, as seen in the outpouring
of giving by so many of our citizens to
those in need. I’ve said frequently that
Scotch Plains is a great place to call
home, richer for its ethnic diversity
and family values. A community that
shares a common belief, that we are
better when we care for, respect and
help each other.
So once again, despite everything
that goes on in our lives, let us reflect
and give thanks as President Lincoln
decreed. Let us kindle our national
spirit and give thanks to God for the
blessings of family, friends, community and country. And as always, let us
remember those in service to our nation, our men and women of the armed
forces, serving at home and in distant
lands protecting our freedoms. Let us
pray for their safety and that they may
be reunited with their families soon.
With heartfelt joy, from my family
to yours, I wish you a Happy Thanksgiving. May God bless you all, and
may God always bless the United
States of America.
DD
TM
Diction Deception
Below are four arcane words, each with
four definitions – only one is correct. The
others are made up. Are you sharp enough
to discern this deception of diction?
If you can guess one correctly – good
guess. If you get two – well-read individual. If you get three – word expert. If
you get all four – You must have a lot of
free time!
All words and correct definitions
come from the board game Diction
Deception.
Answers to last week’s arcane words.
1. Cystalgia – Pain in the bladder
2. Rondache – A small circular shield
carried by medieval foot soldiers
3. Cynegetics – Hunting with dogs
4. Angekok – An Eskimo medicine
man
THANATOPSIS
1. To transform completely, especially
in the grotesque manner
2. The removing of venom from poisonous snakes
3. The division of the estate of a deceased thane, soldier or servant of a king
4. A view of or meditation on death
RIDGEL
1. Harsh in taste, acrid
2. A small ridge
3. The half castrated male of any beast
4. Stern
PEENGE
1. A play on words; a pun
2. A sharp, nagging ache
3. The striking part of a hammer
4. To complain in Scottish
INTRATELLURIC
1. Located or occurring deep inside the
earth
2. Existing or occurring outside the
normal knowledge of man
3. The medium or moderator in a seance
4. Occurring within the material world
More letters; pages 5, 9, 18
Letters to
the Editor
The Press, Americans’
Protection of Freedom
It is no accident that the First
Amendment of the U.S. Constitution
addresses its most important rights;
that is Freedoms. I address “… Freedom of Speech, or of The Press…” in
this letter. I encourage every American to seriously consider financially
supporting newspapers by subscribing to or at least occasionally purchasing newspapers. This should be
done even if you do not always agree
with what is printed.
Without a financially healthy press
with multi newspapers, Americans
are giving up their greatest protect of
Freedom.
Increasingly sound bites and self
appointed experts using the Internet
are replacing competitive, in-depth
newspapers as the source vetted information.
Dictators want only one source of
information, the one they control.
Tim Harrington, Madison
(Westfield Property Owner)
A Great Thanks from
The Community Center
The Westfield Community Center
held its first annual “Taste of
Westfield” fund raising event on October 26 at Temple Emanu-el. It was
a great success and we would like to
thank the following restaurants and
merchants who made it such a special
event for us and for all those who
attended: Gennnaro’s Pizza, 16 Prospect, Cosimo’s, Tutti Baci, Jersey
Mike’s, Bovella’s, Helen Murphy of
Helen’s Cakes, Bean Pie Café,
Kulinary Kings, Connie’s Kitchen,
Hershey’s, Sweetwater’s, Eileen
Fisher, NC Jewelers, Chipotle,
Charlie Brown’s, Theresa’s, Mojave
Grille, and all those who made donations. Also, entertainers, Karate N
Motion and GraceFull tunes, who
provided superlative entertainment.
A big thank you to Temple Emanuel for allowing us to use their facilities and to Mike Kenny and his crew
at Temple Emanu-el for all their assistance.
Westfield Community Center
Donnell Carr, President
JETS AND GIANTS
ARE KAPUT
Kevin Glover, Mayor
Scotch Plains
State LD-22
Sen. Nicholas Scutari (D)
1514 E. Saint Georges Ave.
Linden, N.J. 07036
(908) 587-0404
Asw. Linda Stender (D)
1801 East Second St.
Scotch Plains, N.J. 07076
(908) 668-1900
Asm. Jerry Green (D)
17 Watchung Ave.
Plainfield, N.J. 07060
(908) 561-5757
LD-22 includes Scotch Plains,
Fanwood, Plainfield, Clark and
Linden.
7th Congressional District
Representative Leonard Lance (R)
425 North Avenue E., Westfield, NJ 07090
(908) 518-7733
[Westfield, Mountainside, Garwood, Summit and Cranford
are in the 7th Congressional District]
12th Congressional District
Rep. Rush Holt (D)
50 Washington Rd., West Windsor, N.J. 08550
(609) 750-9365
[Fanwood, Plainfield and most of Scotch Plains
are in the 12th Congressional District]
[email protected], [email protected]
[email protected], [email protected]
[email protected], [email protected]
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Berlin Wall’s Collapse:
Freedom’s Great Triumph
Sunday, November 9 marked the
25th anniversary of the fall of the
Berlin Wall. None of our current
Westfield students were alive when
this extraordinary event happened so
its significance is understandably
vague to them, if it even registers at
all. It must read like a surreal Tolkienesque fiction to those who didn’t live
through the Cold War…under the
Soviet communist umbrella over one
hundred million souls were held for
decades in a massive prison that was
the Eastern Block. And there was no
more brazen symbol of the intrinsic
evil of communism — the most murderous ideology of the 20th Century
— than that obscene Wall.
In 2008 then-candidate Barack
Obama offered up his typical vacuous sloganeering to the adoring
throngs of Berlin. Referring to the
Wall’s demise he said, “There is no
challenge too great for a world that
stands as one!”
This was utter nonsense. The fact
is in the 1970s and 1980s, as far as the
Wall was concerned, the world hardly
stood “as one.” Naturally, Moscow’s
puppet thugs who kept the jackboots
on the people of East Germany, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary and
other oppressed countries were quite
happy to keep the Wall as a permanent scar upon the land. But, shamefully, so were many on the other side.
For sheepish politicians, left-leaning pundits, and many indifferent
westerners who saw Reagan’s repeated calling out of the Soviet system as the greater threat, the Wall
simply represented the status quo. In
the era of “détente,” many in the free
world saw it an unpleasant reality we
would just have to learn to live with.
One can easily imagine Mr. Obama
among the go-along-to-get-along
crowd in the mold of Ford, Schmidt,
d’Estaing, Trudeau and others...some
of whom were even considered “conservatives.”
Mr. Obama’s wishful revisionist
speechwriters aside, it was three extraordinary world leaders — Ronald
Reagan, Margaret Thatcher and Pope
John Paul II — who spearheaded the
drive to see communism banished to
its rightful place “on the ash heap of
history” as Reagan declared with a
moral clarity lacking among many of
his contemporaries. Greatness
emerged from behind the Iron Curtain as well in those tumultuous times.
If our young people today seek
Congressman Rush
Holt to Lead AAAS
Rep. Rush Holt (D-12th), ph.d., who
will retire from the U.S. House of Representatives at the end of his eighth
term, has agreed to join the world’s
largest general scientific organization,
the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), as chief
executive officer and executive publisher of the Science family of journals.
He will succeed Alan I. Leshner, ph.d.,
who had previously announced that he
would be stepping down as AAAS CEO.
Mr. Holt, a research physicist and
former teacher, will serve as the 18th
chief executive of the 166-year-old nonprofit, non-partisan AAAS after his legislative term ends, during the
association’s 2015 annual meeting, February 12 to 16, in San Jose, Calif.
Thursday, November 20, 2014
Scouting for Food; Thank You
Westfield for Most Succesful Year
Letters to the Editor
politicians to admire then they should
forget “Hopey McChange” and
Google the names Lech Walesa and
Vaclav Havel —a Polish shipyard
electrician and a Czech play-write
respectively. These men, emboldened
by support from American, British
and Vatican leadership that would
not abandon them, endured prison
and braved the threat of assassination
to lead movements that stood up
against their communist overlords and
ultimately changed the world. (The
Russians did in fact try to assassinate
the Pope. The stakes were that high.)
And, of course, we salute the unnamed millions who took to the streets
in protest, defying the guns trained
on them, to give authority and leverage to Reagan’s stirring challenge to
the head gangster in Moscow: “Mister Gorbachev…tear down this wall!”
Even members of his inner circle
advised Reagan to remove this line
he himself first suggested as way too
provocative. But Reagan understood
that sometimes the forces of freedom
need not stand idly by in the interest
of good relations with a morally decrepit foe while our friends languish
in a prison state.
I ventured to Berlin a year after the
Wall came down and saw its vile
remnants. Spray-painted graffiti remained scrawled on every surface,
still defiantly crying out against the
tyranny it once enabled, endowing its
ruins with sublime power. I cavorted
with young Russian soldiers under
the Brandenburg gate and they all
shared with me a single desire: “We
want to go to America!”
For those on the far left, especially
in academia, for whom America
loathing has a become a masochistic
fetish, I wish they could have talked
with these confused, frightened boys
from the other side of the Wall who
understood more than many in our
own country today how precious a
gift is the freedom we all too often to
take for granted.
Those heady days of post-Soviet
“New Europe” optimism are long
gone I’m sorry to say. As if we’re
engaged in a perpetual game of geopolitical whack-a-mole, no sooner
had communism been defeated than
medieval Islamo facism rose up to
challenge the west anew. But we must
never forget the incredible leap forward for humanity that was the Berlin Wall’s destruction. It did not fall.
It was ripped down by ordinary people
who, under the right leaders at the
right time, courageously declared that
this nonsense had gone on long
enough — and had the guts to do
something about it.
Richness of Public Service Should Be
In Achieving Results For The Public
Present and former elected and
appointed government officials increasingly use their position for financial gain! No reference here to
bribery!
Politics should not be about personal aggrandizement. President
Harry S. Truman nearly went bankrupt because he refused to parlay his
having been President into a financial fortune. He lived on his Army
pension and took out a bank loan,
wrote his memoirs that netted him
only $37,000, and sold some inherited family land to make ends meet.
Quite a contrast to former President Bill Clinton who, according to
CNN, has taken in more than $106
million in public speaking fees since
leaving The Oval Office in 2001!
ABC reports that former Chairman of the Federal Reserve Ben
Bernanke charges between $200,000
and $400,000 as a speaking fee!
Former President Clinton, former Sec.
of State Hillary Clinton, and former
Sec. of the Treasury Tim Geithner
[charge] $200,000. Former President
George W. Bush, and former Sec. of
State Condoleezza Rice charge
$150,000. Former VP Al Gore and
former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin
charge $100,000; former VP Richard
Cheney, $75,000; Mitt Romney,
$68,000, and former House Speaker
Newt Gingrich, $60,000.
[The list goes on]: Ron Paul, Jeb
Bush, Colin Powel, and Madeline
Albright charge $50,000.
Public service is honor enough. Of
course no one should be denied the
right to a good paying job after such
service, but something is very askew
when former Secretary of the Treasury Larry Sommers for just one
speech in 2013 at $135,000 made
well more than the median household income of $51,939 that year! —
when the annual median wage for
judges in 2013 was $105,380; microbiologists, $75,630; social workers,
$46,370; clergy, $47,540; librarians,
$57,550; dieticians and nutritionists,
$56,300; registered nurses, $68,910;
carpenters, $44,980; elementary
school teachers, $56,420; firefighters,
$48,270; police officers, $58,720; air
traffic controllers, $118,650; historians, $60,100; computer programmers, $80,930, barbers, $27,710;
childcare workers, $21,490; agricultural workers, $22,080; electricians,
$53,560, and ship captains, $71,570.
The danger to our democracy is
obvious. When people run for public
office in the knowledge that there is
quite a financial gain during their
Bradley Schaeffer
Westfield
Page 5
term of office or after their term of
office ends then democracy is not
about the will of the people, but rather
about how much elected and appointed government officials can
profit from it!
Lawyers in legislatures, for example, regularly proclaim their title
in order to attract new clients or keep
present ones! At what point is there a
conflict of interest?
Either a person is a good legislator
or is a good lawyer, but such a person
cannot be both at the same time.
The richness of public service
should be in achieving results for the
public.
Stephen Schoeman
Westfield
Thank You Garwood
For the Support
I want to thank all the Garwood
voters who came out to vote for me.
It certainly was a close election with
only six votes out of almost 1,200
keeping me from representing all of
Garwood on the Council. I worked
very hard for each and every vote and
I appreciated the support.
My campaign was always about
what I could do for the future of
Garwood and not about what others
failed to do in the past. I congratulate
the winners of the election and I
pledge to continue to help Garwood
in any way that I can.
I hope that everyone will look forward to enjoying Garwood Rocks
2015, June 7th.
Carol Kearney
Garwood
Deadlines
General News - Friday 4pm
Weekend Sports - Monday 12pm
Ad Reservation - Friday 4pm
To Reach Us
E-Mail - [email protected]
For more information, see
www.goleader.com/help
Thanksgiving Market
Westfield - The Farmers Market, at
the South Ave. train station in
Westfield, presented by The Greater
Westfield Area Chamber of Commerce will have a Special Thanksgiving Market this Saturday, November
22nd from 8:30 until 2:00 pm
A sincere thanks to the residents of
Westfield and the Cub Scout Packs
and Boy Scout Troops in Westfield
who participated in this year’s Scouting for Food, an annual town-wide
service project. In the past two weeks,
cubs and scouts distributed Scouting
for Food bags to each home in
Westfield and last Saturday picked
up donated food and delivered it to
the Westfield Food Pantry at Holy
Trinity.
The food filled the shelves of two
rooms at the food pantry and many
families in need will be served by this
successful food drive. This year’s
Scouting for Food project was the
most successful of the past few years.
All packs and troops participated and
the people of Westfield responded
generously. Our thanks to all who
volunteered their time and to the
people of Westfield who donated
food.
Bob Fromtling
Westfield Troop 73
Scouting for Food Coordinator
Excellent Coverage of Fanwood
Recycling Center Event
Your writer Dell Simeone did an
excellent job of covering our event.
The event was very well attended and
a success in introducing the recycling center to the public and politicians.
In the article, Ms. Simeone mentioned some of the local businesses
who provided refreshments and products; however, she did omit Charlie
Brown’s Steak House in Scotch
Plains, Fanwood Bagels, Fanwood
Liquors, Hershey’s Subs in Westfield,
Home Depot in Watchung, Manhattan Bagel in Westfield, Party Stop in
Westfield, Scotchwood Florist, and
Stop & Shop in Watchung.
Thank you again for the excellent
front-page coverage and photo.
Clay Pierce
Fanwood
Whirlwind, Exhilarating, Fulfilling;
Thank You Voters and Supporters
I would like to take this opportunity to thank the over 37,000 voters
of Union County who supported my
bid for the position of sheriff. As a
newcomer to the political arena, it
was a great boost to both the Republican Party, and evidence of bi-partisan support for this office, which had
been previously filled by a dedicated
law enforcement officer.
Even though the outcome was not
what I had hoped for, the experience
of meeting thousands of county residents at nearly every street fair or
fundraiser, at train stations, and at
various supermarkets over a period
of just eight weeks was outstanding.
The support for my bid was widespread and included Lt. Governor
Kim Guadagno, Congressman
Leonard Lance, Asm. Jon Bramnick,
Asw. Nancy Munoz, and Union
County Republican Party Chairman,
Glenn Mortimer.
In addition, Dan Rumbauskas, our
graphic design artist (responsible for
all of our printed material and other
media outreach), all the Union County
Republican committee members, and
friends, especially Charlie Donnelly
and Joe Bonilla of Union who at-
tended nearly all of our campaign
events (lots of miles in street fair
travel) and Dalida Nigro (our photographer).
We were welcomed by Berkeley
Heights, Clark, Cranford, Fanwood,
Garwood, Kenilworth, Linden,
Mountainside, New Providence,
Rahway (mayoral candidate Pat
Cassio and I campaigned together on
several occasions), Scotch Plains,
Springfield, Summit (Mayor Ellen
Dickson’s fundraising event), Union
and Westfield, all of which had events.
Thank you to all involved!
Finally, a big thank you to all of our
friends and family who campaigned
with us at street fairs, posted signs on
their lawns and all around the county
and even gave financial support to
get my name out there and recognized. It was an “all hands on deck”
effort, a whirlwind, exhilarating and
very fulfilling.
Union County is a wonderful place
to live and raise our families and I am
grateful!
Michael C. Ince
Republican Candidate for
Union County Sheriff
TRIAL LAWYERS
Est. 1984
www.uniquecruiseandtravel.com
Carol Bevere Kearney• Proprietor
207 CENTER STREET, GARWOOD
908-789-3303
AS OF NOVEMBER 24TH
ADVOCARE PEDIATRIC OPHTHALMOLOGY ASSOCIATES,
Work Related Accidents
Workers’ Compensation
Call Jon Bramnick
DR. JAY BERNSTEIN AND DR. MAYUMI MORI
OF 509 EAST BROAD STREET WILL BE MOVING (AROUND THE CORNER)
TO OUR NEW HOME AT 138 SOUTH EUCLID AVENUE WESTFIELD
(OUR PHONE NUMBER IS THE SAME 908-317-9811)
Certified Civil Trial Attorney
908-322-7000
BRAMNICK, RODRIGUEZ, GRABAS & WOODRUFF LLC
1827 East Second Street, Scotch Plains • www.jonbramnick.com
Interiors So Lovely, You’ll Want to Stay Home
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Phone: 908.232.3875
www.superiorinteriorsofnj.com
Page
6
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, November 20, 2014
Tiffany Natural Pharmacy
To Welcome Santa Claus
WESTFIELD — Oh! You better
watch out! You better not cry! You
better not pout, we are telling you
why! Santa Claus will be coming to
Tiffany’s!
Get your Christmas lists ready,
because Santa will be visiting with
all the good girls and boys on Sun-
HO! HO! HO!...Santa Claus is coming
to town!!
day, November 30, from noon to 4
p.m. — avoid the stress of long mall
lines and enjoy your time with Santa
while snacking on free hot chocolate and cookies.
Where: Tiffany Natural Pharmacy, 1115 South Avenue West,
Westfield, N.J. 07090, (908) 2332200, Fax: (908) 233-3975 (across
the street from Peterson’s Wines
Unlimited).
There will be several photo packages, ranging from simple prints to
your holiday photo cards. There is
no purchase necessary to visit with
Santa, so stop on by. We also will be
offering 25 percent off all gift department items in the store, more of
a reason to come and enjoy your
time at Tiffany Natural Pharmacy
this holiday season.
Feel free to contact us at (908)
233-2200 with any questions you
may have about Santa’s visit! Happy
Holidays! Please visit our website:
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Casino Night Set at Armory
Saturday to Benefit Troops
WESTFIELD — Bonds of Courage and the 117th Cavalry Association will host a Support Our Troops
Casino Night and Auction this Saturday, November 22, at 7 p.m. It
will be held at the Westfield Armory, located at 500 Rahway Avenue.
The night will benefit Bonds of
Courage and the Family Readiness
Groups of the 1st Squadron 102nd
Cavalry Regiment, 50th Brigade
Combat Team of the New Jersey
National Guard.
Bonds of Courage is an organization that supports troops, veterans
and their families. It assists in meeting their needs involving jobs,
health, families and finances. The
organization serves as a referral of
resources, offers a career transition
and mentor veterans program, and
provides provisions for deployed
troops, homeless veterans and more.
The Family Readiness Groups assist the commanders in maintaining readiness for service members
and families by promoting self-sufficiency, resiliency and stability during peace and war.
Tickets are $50 per person for
general admission and $40 for senior citizens and veterans. Tickets
include $60 in gaming chips for the
casino, buffet dinner, beer, wine
and music. For more information,
contact Danielle Bracco at (908)
273-4122
or
[email protected], or
visit bondsofcourage.org.
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A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Temple to Welcome Author
Of ‘Bury the Hot’ Sunday
IMAGINING HELPING OTHERS...The newest group of teenagers to train as
facilitators with Imagine look forward to working with youth in grief support
groups. Pictured, from left to right, are: Front row, Briana McGowan, Chelsea
Deegan, Katherine McGowan, Madison Hermann and Steven Zucker, and back
row, Sara Begalman, Corey Wisler of Scotch Plains, training facilitator and
graduate intern; Charlotte Seltzer, Sydney Gordner, Bryanna Reinhardt, Jack
Greiner and Training Facilitator Dan Balassone of Westfield.
Ten Teens Train to Become
Facilitators With Imagine
WESTFIELD — Ten teenagers
spent October 25 at the First United
Methodist Church in Westfield learning how to be support-group facilitators for grieving children. They included Briana McGowan and
Katherine McGowan of Fanwood;
Sara Begalman of Scotch Plains;
Steven Zucker, Charlotte Seltzer,
Sydney Gordner and Bryanna
Reinhardt, all of Westfield; Chelsea
Deegan of Berkeley Heights; Madison Hermann of Short Hills and Jack
Greiner of Chatham. This newest class
of teen volunteers will work with Imagine on its fourth Night of Support
starting in January 2015. The teens
will co-facilitate, with adult volunteers, groups for children ages 3 to 12.
“Through Imagine, I’ve learned how
to listen. It has helped me more than I
ever would have thought. Imagine has
become one of the biggest aspects of
my life,” said current teen facilitator
Meghan Summers of Westfield. “Not
a day goes by that I don’t think about
the kids in my support group as well as
my co-facilitators,” she added.
Imagine, a grief support center located in Westfield and serving all of
Union County and beyond, provides
free, year-round, peer grief support
programs for children and teens ages
3 to 18 and young adults ages 18 to 30
who are coping with loss due to the
death of a parent or sibling and for
families where a child or parent is
living with a life-altering illness. The
program also provides separate support groups for the parents and guardians of the children served. Support
groups meet every other Monday or
Tuesday for an hour-and-a-half. Dinner is provided prior to the group
meeting. For information on Imagine
support
groups,
contact
[email protected] or (908) 2643100.
Volunteers come from all walks
of life and need no special background other than a willingness to
listen, a heart inclined to serve, and
the ability to be with children and
adults in pain without trying to fix,
solve or give advice. No prior experience is necessary.
The next Imagine Volunteer Adult
Facilitator class will be December 5
to 8, 2014, and the next teen training
will be in 2015. For more information, contact Imagine Program Director Mandi Zucker at (908) 2643100 or [email protected], or
visit imaginenj.org.
Sarah Simon Plans
Benefit Swim at JCC
WESTFIELD — Sarah Simon, a
13-year-old resident of Westfield, will
swim laps at the Jewish Community
Center (JCC) of Central New Jersey
in Scotch Plains this Saturday, November 22, to raise money for
Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Cardiac Center (CHOP) as her Bat
Mitzvah project.
Diagnosed a year ago with an irregular heartbeat causing severe palpitations, she underwent a seven-hour
surgical procedure at CHOP. While it
did not cure her, it did strengthen her
resolve. She is swimming to help donate to other kids in her position whose
families may need financial assistance.
She will be joined in the pool by
her brother, Nathan, and members of
her JCC swim team.
The Chelsea at Fanwood invites you to
COME TO AN OPEN HOUSE
SCOTCH PLAINS — Temple
Sholom has announced that it will
host Deb Levy, author of “Bury the
Hot,” to speak to audience members this Sunday, November 23, at
7 p.m., at its new building at 1925
Lake Avenue in Scotch Plains.
“Bury the Hot” is the true Holocaust story and heartbreaking account of Sal Wainberg, who spent
his childhood evading murder at
the hands of the Nazis. The book is
a brutally honest reflection of a
traumatic upbringing and a life lived
trying to escape the memories.
Ms. Levy will read from her book,
answer questions and lead a discussion of memory, truth, history, writing and responsibility. Signed copies of “Bury the Hot” will be available for purchase. Light refreshments will be served. There is no
admission charge for this event
thanks to a grant from the Rabbi
Nathanson Adult Education Fund.
Once a boy named Szulim living in
a Polish shtetl, Mr. Wainberg narrowly missed being herded onto a
train bound for Treblinka. For two
years he hid in a cellar before wandering barefoot for an entire summer,
at the age of 8, through fields of rye.
Born in Miami, Ms. Levy grew
up celebrating holidays with Mr.
Wainberg and his family and sharing other traditions. However, she
was unaware of his childhood experience until, near the end of his
life and feeling a need and a responsibility to bear witness, he
asked her to write a book about it.
The reading of “Bury the Hot” is
part of Temple Sholom’s Eitz
Chayim program — the Adult Education Committee of Temple
Sholom. Eitz Chayim schedules
various themed programs for the
year. This year there will be a total
of five programs that will run
through May 31, 2015. Last month,
the committee screened the movie
Hava Nagila to a packed house.
For more information, call the
temple office at (908) 889-4900 or
consult the temple’s website at
sholomnj.org.
Westfield Area Y to Present
Festive Holiday Fun For All
WESTFIELD — The Westfield
Area Y has unveiled its calendar of
holiday happenings, beginning with
the Westfield Y’s Men’s Club’s annual tree lot sale at the Elm Street
Field in Westfield. All proceeds benefit the Westfield Area Y and other
community organizations.
The lot will open on Saturday,
November 29. Hours are as follows: Weekdays from 5 to 9 p.m.
and weekends from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
until Tuesday, December 23, and 9
a.m. to 4 p.m. on Wednesday, December 24.
Festive family fun is planned during Lunch with Santa at the Main Y
Facility, located at 220 Clark Street,
Westfield, on Sunday, December 7,
from 12:30 to 2 p.m. Participants
will enjoy lunch, take a photo with
Santa, sing Christmas carols and
have fun with their family. Tickets
can be purchased in advance at any
Westfield Area Y location; children
under age 2 may attend for free. All
proceeds will benefit the Y’s financial assistance program. For more
information about this event, call
Janice A. Carthens at (908) 2332700, extension no. 227, or e-mail
[email protected]
Active adults can join friends and
Y staff for food, fun and fellowship
at the Annual Active Adult Holiday
Party at the Main Y on Wednesday,
December 17, from 12:30 to 2 p.m.
There will be entertainment and
gifts for all. Interested persons are
asked to register by Thursday, December 11, at the Member Service
Desk or online at westfieldynj.org.
Further information about this activity is available by calling Jean
White at (908) 233-2700, extension no. 246, or e-mailing
[email protected]
To learn more about holiday happenings at the Westfield Area Y, call
Member Services at (908) 233-2700
or visit westfieldynj.org.
Rosary Altar Society
Schedules Party
SCOTCH PLAINS — The Rosary
Altar Society of St. Bartholomew the
Apostle Roman Catholic Church invites all women of the parish and
their friends to the Annual Christmas
Party on Tuesday, December 9. St.
Bartholomew Church and School are
located at 2032 Westfield Avenue,
Scotch Plains.
The festivities will begin at 7:30
p.m. in the St. Bartholomew School
auditorium and will include refreshments along with entertainment by
the church’s own Joyful Sound
Children’s Choir under the direction
of Joanne Gurske. There also will be
a 50/50 and raffle prizes.
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Fanwood Presbyterian Posts
Advent, Christmas Activities
FANWOOD — The Fanwood Presbyterian Church invites everyone to
its upcoming Advent and Christmas
services and programs. The Advent
Celebration will begin on Sunday,
November 30, with the lighting of
the first Advent candle at the 9:30 and
11:15 a.m. services. The choir will
sing at the early service and the praise
band will play at the second service.
On Sunday, December 7, there will
only be a 9:30 a.m. service. Additionally that day, the church will present
the joyful Christmas portion of
Handel’s Messiah at 4 p.m. in the
sanctuary. More than 80 singers will
be joined by a full orchestra and four
professional vocal soloists led by Thomas Berdos, music director at the
church. Regular worship times of 9:30
and 11:15 a.m. will continue on the
following Sundays, December 14 and
21. Favorite Advent and Christmas
carols will be sung at both services
starting November 30.
On December 21, a “Lessons and
Carols” service, focused on the Angel Gabriel, Mary, Joseph, Elizabeth
and Zechariah, will be presented at
both services.
On Christmas Eve, Wednesday, December 24, the church will offer two
services. The family service will be
at 5 p.m. with the children, 4-yearolds to those in fifth grade, performing a Christmas pageant. A candlelight communion service will be held
at 9 p.m., preceded by special Christmas music beginning at 8:30 p.m.
Correction Is Noted
For FW Santa Ride
St. Bartholomew Giving Tree
To Return on November 22
SCOTCH PLAINS — A cherished
Christmas tradition will get underway this Saturday, November 22, at
St. Bartholomew the Apostle Roman
Catholic Church when the Christmas
Giving Tree appears in the narthex of
the church. The church is located at
2032 Westfield Avenue, Scotch
Plains.
In addition to its sparkling lights,
the tree will be laden with almost
1,000 tags in 10 different colors representing the specific wishes and
needs of children and adults in 10
different service organizations that
provide them vital care.
On a light blue tag from The Arc of
Union County there might be a wish
for a sweater for a handicapped or
disabled male. On a dark blue tag for
Raphael’s Life House of Elizabeth
there might be a wish from an expectant young mother for a sweater set
for her infant-to-be. On a yellow tag
of the Missionaries of Charity of St.
Theresa, Newark, there might be a
wish for a winter jacket for a young
boy and a hat and glove set for a little
girl. On a brown tag from United
Family and Children’s Society,
Plainfield, there might be a wish of a
doll for a little girl and a pair of
slippers for an elderly woman.
The request for a wish list from
these organizations goes out in September so that a group of St.
Bartholomew women can create specifically-detailed tags that will appear on the Christmas Giving Tree.
Parishioners select tags from the tree
and purchase the requested items,
gift-wrap them, and return them to
the narthex of the church, where the
men of the Holy Name Society sort
the packages and deliver them to the
receiving institutions before Christmas Day. The Giving Tree will be up
until Sunday, December 15.
The Law Offices Of
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Page 7
Temple’s Religious School
Has New Education Director
There will only be one service, at
10:30 a.m., on both December 28
and January 4.
The community is invited to attend all or any of these services. The
church is located at the corner of
Martine and La Grande Avenues in
Fanwood. For more information, call
the church office at (908) 889-8891
or e-mail [email protected], or
check the website at fanwoodpc.org.
FANWOOD — Santa’s Ride
through Fanwood will take place on
Saturday, December 13, not Sunday,
December 14, as had been reported
in the borough’s e-mail newsletter.
The annual ride is sponsored by the
Fanwood Fire Department, Fanwood
Rescue Squad and PBA Local No.
123. Packages will be accepted at the
fire house behind Borough Hall for a
week, beginning Saturday, November
29. Drop-off times are 5 to 9 p.m.,
November 29 and 30, and 6 to 9 p.m.,
December 1 to 5. Packages may not be
dropped off at the police department.
Late gifts cannot be accepted.
All packages must include a name,
address and phone number. Gifts
must be no larger than a typical
shoebox and only one gift per child
is permitted. Packages for the same
address must be bundled together.
The rain date is the following Saturday, December 20.
Thursday, November 20, 2014
Allen R. Dwyer, III and Miss Chelsea Carlson
Miss Chelsea Carlson
To Wed Allen R. Dwyer, III
Rich and Kathy Carlson of
Westfield have announced the engagement of their daughter, Miss
Chelsea Carlson, to Allen R. Dwyer,
III. He is the son of Susie and Dave
Fisher of Morris, Conn.
The future bride graduated from
Westfield High School and was
awarded her bachelor’s degree in early
childhood education with honors
from Kean University. She currently
is a pre-school teacher in Egg Harbor
Township, N.J.
Her fiancé graduated from Wamogo
Regional High School in Litchfield,
Conn. and from Eastern Connecticut
State University with a bachelor’s degree in environmental earth science.
In 2009 he enlisted in the United States
Coast Guard and currently is an Avionics Electrical Technician 2nd Class
stationed at Air Station Atlantic City.
The couple is planning an April
2015 wedding.
‘New Jersey Violins’ to Be
Historical Society Topic
SCOTCH PLAINS — The Historical Society of Scotch Plains and
Fanwood will learn about “New Jersey Violins” at its monthly meeting
on Tuesday, November 25, beginning at 8 p.m. It will be held at the
historic Scotch Hills Country Club,
located at Plainfield Avenue and
Jerusalem Road in Scotch Plains.
Scotch Plains resident Ira B.
Kraemer will be the featured speaker.
A professional violist and conductor, Mr. Kraemer serves professional
string players in the New JerseyNew York metropolitan area with
his business, Ira B. Kraemer & Co.
He repairs, restores and sells vio-
lins, violas, cellos, basses and bows.
Time permitting, he will even make
a new violin or viola in house.
From his extensive collection —
one of the largest on the east coast —
Mr. Kraemer will bring a selection
of instruments and teach attendees
about the construction of violins and
the variation in design during the
last 200 years. Mr. Kraemer is listed
in “Who’s Who in America” and
“Who’s Who in the World” because of
his conducting a youth orchestra in
Middlesex County for 13 years.
This meeting will be free and open
to everyone. Fellowship and refreshments will follow the program.
SCOTCH PLAINS — Congrega- Jewish Education and the Jewish
tion Beth Israel has announced that it Educators Assembly.
has hired Gail Beckman Buchbinder
Congregation Beth Israel is an
as the new education director of its egalitarian Conservative synareligious school.
gogue, serving the re“The Search Comligious, cultural, edumittee was unanimous
cational and social
in selecting Gail
needs of congregants
Buchbinder as the best
from Scotch Plains,
candidate to lead our
Fanwood, Westfield
school,” said David
and
surrounding
Feldman, president of
towns. Its religious
Congregation Beth Isschool offers classes
rael. “Gail has a wealth
from
pre-school
of creativity and skills
through 11th grade, as
in teaching, programwell as special-needs
ming and administrainstruction. Religious
tion in a committed
school for grades 3 to
Jewish environment.
7 meets two days per
Gail Buchbinder
We are excited to welweek. Synagogue
come her into our
membership is not reclose-knit synagogue family.”
quired for religious-school classes
Ms. Buchbinder has more than through second grade; alterna35 years of experience in the field tively, young families can join the
of Jewish education. She most re- synagogue at a reduced rate.
cently served for 12 years as eduTo contact Ms. Buchbinder, call
cation director of the Religious (908) 889-1830 or send an e-mail
School/Hebrew High School at to [email protected] CongregaTemple Beth Ahm Yisrael in tion Beth Israel is located at 18
Springfield. During her tenure Shalom Way, at the corner of
there, she incorporated technology Martine Avenue, in Scotch Plains.
into the classroom, created innoGarwood Announces
vative family programs, devised
new programs for special-needs
Tree Lighting Nov. 29
students, enhanced B’nai Mitzvah
GARWOOD — The Borough of
preparation and integrated art and
Garwood will hold its Annual
music into the curriculum.
Ms. Buchbinder is a graduate of Christmas Tree Lighting on SaturRutgers University and McGill Uni- day, November 29, at 5 p.m. It will
versity in Montreal, where she take place in the parking lot at Borearned degrees in Hebraic Studies ough Hall, located at 403 South
and Education. She also attended Avenue, Garwood.
The public is invited to come and
Hebrew University in Jerusalem. She
is an alumna of the Leadership Insti- kick off the holiday season. Santa
tute for Congregational School Prin- will arrive for a visit and pictures.
cipals, a joint project of the Jewish Refreshments will be served.
Theological Seminary and Hebrew
Union College, and an attendee of
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the Conference on Advancements in
Motor Vehicle Traffic Violations?
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8
Thursday, November 20, 2014
Miller-Cory Museum Plans
Thanksgiving Feast Sunday
WESTFIELD — Visitors are invited to experience the atmosphere
of a traditional colonial Thanksgiving this Sunday, November 23,
from 2 to 4 p.m., at the MillerCory House Museum. The museum
is located at 614 Mountain Avenue, Westfield.
Members of the Cooking Committee will demonstrate the preparation of an early American Thanksgiving feast over the museum’s
open-hearth fire, using colonial
recipes and seasonal ingredients.
The program also will include a
presentation on authentic early
Best Friend to Hold
Thanksgiving Sale
SCOTCH PLAINS — Best Friend
Dog and Animal Adoption, Inc. will
hold its popular 50-percent-off sale
on all merchandise in its thrift store.
Some exceptions apply. The store
will be open on Monday and Tuesday, November 24 and 25, and will
be closed Wednesday, November 26,
and Thursday, November 27, for the
Thanksgiving holiday.
The store will reopen on Friday,
November 28, and stay open until 6
p.m. Hours of operation on Saturday, November 29, and all week will
be 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Located
at 1750 East Second Street, Scotch
Plains, the store is normally open
from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. every
day except Sunday and Monday.
An assortment of new merchandise
is available in the store, including
scarves, hats, gloves, headbands and
belts, plus a selection of holiday items.
Store proceeds benefit homeless
animals. For more information, call
(908) 322-2502 or visit pets waiting
for
permanent
homes
at
bestfriend.petfinder.com.
Monetary donations are tax-deductible and are urgently needed by
the rescue group. Donations can be
sent to: Best Friend, P.O. Box 335,
Cranford, N.J. 07016.
AARP Announces
Holiday Luncheon
WESTFIELD — The AARP
Westfield Area Chapter 4137 will
have its holiday luncheon on Monday, December 1, at noon, at
Giovanna’s Restaurant in Plainfield.
The cost is $30. Interested persons
are asked to call Chris Weiss, chairperson, at (908) 322-6198 to get information on the menu, to make a
reservation, or for any questions.
American manners, place settings
and other “table top traditions.”
Museum docents will be available to guide visitors through the
restored, fully furnished colonial
era farmhouse. The gift shop,
which carries a variety of toys,
crafts, cookbooks and educational
materials, will be open. Admission
to the museum and its grounds is
$3 for adults and children age 13
and older, $2 for children ages 3 to
12, and free for those under age 3.
Upcoming Sunday programs include two holiday favorites, “Gingerbread Sunday” on December 7,
from 1:30 to 4 p.m., and “Italian
Christmas Customs” on December
14, from 2 to 4 p.m. “Gingerbread
Sunday” will include making a simple
decorative gingerbread house, another craft, storytelling and refreshments. Admission is $4 per child.
This program requires advance reservations for specific time slots. Requests will be accepted no later than
noon on Thursday, December 4.
A nationally recognized living history museum, the Miller-Cory House
Museum is listed on both the State
and National Registers of Historic
Places and as a site on the New Jersey
Women’s Heritage Trail.
For more information, e-mail
[email protected],com or
call (908) 232-1776. Information also
is posted on Facebook. The museum’s
website is millercoryhouse.org.
– Obituaries –
Joan Dushanek Roll, 89, Had Worked
For National Council of Churches
Joan Alice (née Dushanek) Roll,
89, formerly of Garwood, died on
Sunday, November 9, 2014, in Brooklyn, N.Y., where she had been a resident.
Born in Garwood to the late
Frederick and Ellen Donoughue
Dushanek, Joan was retired from the
National Council of Churches, in New
York, where she had been an executive secretary and program specialist.
She was the beloved wife of the
late Reverend Kenneth E. Roll, Sr.,
who was ordained in St. Paul’s United
Church of Christ in Garwood. He
was a relative of early pioneer Baltus
Roll, an ancestor, whose farm is now
the Baltusrol Golf Club in Springfield, N.J. Joan also was preceded in
CRANFORD — The Cranford Junior Woman’s Club has announced that
its 25th Annual Home for the Holidays
House Tour will be held on Sunday,
December 7, from noon to 4 p.m. This
self-guided tour will showcase four
Cranford homes along with a Hospitality House where refreshments and treats
will be available. The Madrigal Choir
will be on hand to entertain.
This event, for adults and children
over age 12, will be made possible
through the generosity of five Cranford
homeowners, as well as local businesses, organizations and individuals.
Proceeds will benefit local charities.
Tickets, in advance, are $25 each.
They are available at Augusta Mae,
Back to Nature Health Foods, the
Cranford Public Library, the UPS
Store and Periwinkle’s, all in
Cranford. They also are available
online at cranfordjwc.com/
housetour.htm. Tickets will be sold
the day of the tour for $30 each.
from RBdigitial Recorded Books,
will explain this service and go
through all the steps users need to
view and download titles. The workshop will not be hands-on; it will be
an interactive presentation.
Currently, Westfield has 33 magazines available through Zinio, including Cosmopolitan, Men’s
Health, Martha Stewart, O, The
Oprah Magazine, Reader’s Digest,
Esquire, Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, Popular Science, Newsweek
and Rolling Stone.
Awarded Best New Database of
2012 by Library Journal, Zinio is
the world’s largest newsstand, offering multi-user access to popular
publications.
To register for the workshop, visit
wmlnj.org and click on the Calendar
link, or call (908) 789-4090, extension 0. For more information on library programs and services, call (908)
789-4090, visit wmlnj.org and sign up
for the monthly e-newsletter, “Library
Loop,” or stop by the library for a copy
of its award-winning, quarterly newsletter, “Take Note.”
Gray Funeral Homes
Since 1897
November 20, 2014
Begun in 1876 by William Gray, in Cranford and later Incorporated in
1897 as the Gray Burial & Cremation Company.
Today, known by many simply as Gray’s. We continue to provide the
personal service that began with Mr. Gray, whether it be for burial or
cremation.
Gray Memorial Funeral Home
12 Springfield Ave.
Cranford, NJ 07016
Dale R. Schoustra Mgr.
NJ Lic. Number 3707
(908)-276-0092
John-Michael “J.M.” Jones
N.J. Lic. #4869
Director
www.grayfuneralhomes.com
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
IN SESSION
New Challenges or Experiences
Can Help Get Us ‘Unstuck’
By Carol Pedro, Exec. Dir.
Youth & Family Counseling Service
Feeling stuck? This is a phrase
therapists use in treatment. Sometimes after a while clients seem to
reach a plateau, when little movement, change or progress occurs. This
feeling can happen to most anyone at
one time or another. In our personal
and professional lives we sometimes
feel stagnant, blue, flat, etc…we need
to get “unstuck.”
Sometimes, like a car, we need a
tune-up or else risk serious “mechanical” failure. We all have the little
sticker on our windshield for an oil
change, right? Well, it’s time to notice our own “sticker” and take steps
to rev our engines!! When you have
reached the time for your “tune-up,”
here are some things you can do:
Do something (harmless) and out
of character for you, like change your
hairstyle or color, cook an exotic meal,
paint your room a different color!
Do something for someone else.
Pay for a stranger’s coffee. Offer to
help a neighbor walk their dog or
pick up groceries. Go to a shelter,
group home or hospital to volunteer
to read or to play games.
Do something outside – sit at the
park, observe the wildlife, build a
snowman, take a walk or just check
out the stars at night!
Do something that scares you a
little – speak at a group function. Call
an old friend you haven’t had the
courage to call. Tackle a new project:
drawing, knitting, writing, etc…and
throw yourself in it!
Ultimately, the act of doing something will help to recharge your batteries and give you a surge of energy to
get you unstuck. So do something
positive, healthy, fun, and see if you
feel like you could go the next 100,000
miles!
***
Carol M. Pedro is a licensed therapist at Youth and Family Counseling
Service, 233 Prospect Street,
Westfield, N.J.; (908) 233-2042.
Website: yfcsnj.org.
Hope Chest Thrift Store
To Ring In Holiday Season
COLORFUL CREATIONS...Rosemary Clayton, left, and Kris Adams show the
gift bags they made at the November Needle Nite meeting. The next Needle Nite
session will take place on Friday, December 5, at 7:30 p.m., in the dining room of
the Fanwood Presbyterian Church. Individuals who knit or crochet make
various items that are donated to charities. All are welcome. For more information, call (908) 889-8891, e-mail [email protected] or visit fanwoodpc.org.
Needle Nite Session on Tap
December 5 in Fanwood
FANWOOD — The next
monthly Needle Nite session at the
Fanwood Presbyterian Church is
scheduled for Friday, December 5,
at 7:30 p.m., in the dining room.
Participants may enter from Marian
Avenue or use the ramp on
Macdermott Place.
Members will fill the small bags
that were made last month with
toiletries to be given as gifts for
residents under the care of the
Community Support Project located at the Park Hotel in Plainfield.
Additionally, members are asked
to bring finger food to share and to
celebrate the coming holiday season. Knitters and those who cro-
chet are asked to join in this project
and cerebration. All are welcome
to come and see what is being done
and to join the group.
If fabric, batting or yarn is needed,
Needle Niters may e-mail their requests to [email protected]
The donated materials end up in many
forms usable by the charities that
receive them. Needle Nite participants then take their newly-learned
skills for use at home.
For further information about
these projects or directions to the
Fanwood Presbyterian Church, call
the church office at (908) 889-8891,
e-mail [email protected] or
check the website, fanwoodpc.org.
F-SP Service League to Offer
Sale and Holiday Boutique
SCOTCH PLAINS — The Fanwood-Scotch Plains Service
League Thrift Shop, located at
1741 East Second Street, Scotch
Plains, will be closed Thanksgiving week from Tuesday, November 25, to Friday, November 28. It
will reopen on Saturday, November 29, for its 50-percent-off ticketed price sale. Everything in the
store will be offered at 50 percent
off the ticketed price.
The shop’s annual Christmas/
holiday boutique will begin on
Tuesday, December 2, featuring
new, unused items in original packaging that have been carefully
stored throughout the year for this
special event. The gift boutique
table will be replenished daily from
the shop’s large inventory. The
boutique will continue through
Saturday, December 20. The shop
will then close for the remainder
of the holiday season and will reopen on Friday, January 2.
The Fanwood-Scotch Plains Service League is an all-volunteer, nonprofit organization that has served
local communities since 1974. Since
its founding, the League has donated
MASTER
MEMORIALS
Gray Funeral Home
318 East Broad St.
Westfield, NJ 07090
William A. Doyle Mgr.
NJ Lic. Number 2325
(908)-233-0143
death by her daughter, Kathiellen Roll
Gilligan, and her brother, Frederick
Dushanek, and is survived by her
son, Kenneth E. Roll, Jr. of Garwood;
her daughter, Deborah Alice Roll of
Brooklyn Heights, N.Y.; seven grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; her
sister, Jane Limone, and her husband, Tony, along with nieces and
nephews.
Joan’s Life Celebration was held on
Tuesday, November 18, 2014, at Gray
Funeral Home, 318 East Broad Street,
Westfield, where her funeral service
followed. Interment took place at
Fairview Cemetery in Westfield. To
view a tribute of Joan’s life, please go
to: www.grayfuneralhomes.com.
Junior Woman’s Club
Reveals House Tour
Library to Hold Workshop
On Zinio Magazines Dec. 1
WESTFIELD — The Westfield
Memorial Library will host the
workshop “How to Download Zinio
Magazines,” for Westfield residents
only, on Monday, December 1, at
6:30 p.m. The library is located at
550 East Broad Street.
Zinio Magazines is a digital
magazine service that the library
acquired last year in partnership
with RBdigital from Recorded
Books. Zinio’s unique technology
digitally recreates a magazine page
for page, including full color pictures, intuitive navigation, key word
article search and interactive elements such as audio and video.
Zinio is accessible through PCs,
MACs, iPhones, iPads, Androids,
Kindle Fire/FireHD, Nook HD/
HD+, and BlackBerry Playbook.
Through the library’s website,
wmlnj.org, patrons of Westfield have
unlimited, simultaneous access to
complete digital magazines, which
can easily be viewed on any Internetenabled device inside or outside of
the library.
Andrew Gross, a representative
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
524 Central Avenue
Westfield, NJ (908) 233-2350
www.mastermemorials.com
Designer • Builders of fine
MONUMENTS
MARKERS
MAUSOLEUMS
Lettered • Cleaned
Tim Doerr
Sally Bauer Doerr
(established 1939)
Also: 300 Rt. 37 East
Toms River, NJ
(732) 349-2350
more than $1.1 million to local causes.
Anyone interested in learning more
about the League or membership may
call (908) 322-5420, visit its website,
scotchplainsthriftshop.weebly.com,
or speak to any volunteers at the
shop. Interested persons also are invited to check out the League’s
Facebook page, “Fanwood-Scotch
Plains Service League,” and give a
“Like.”
Store hours are Tuesday,
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday,
10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., and Saturday,
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Gently-used donations are always welcome during business hours at the shop. Free
parking is available on the street
and at the rear of the building.
Visitors may enter the parking lot
via Willow Avenue.
Prayer to
The Blessed Virgin
(Never known to fail)
Oh most beautiful Flower of
Mount Carmel, Fruitful Vine,
Splendor of Heaven, Blessed
Mother of the Son of God, Immaculate Virgin, assist me in my
necessity. Oh, Star of the Sea, help
me! Show me herein you are my
mother. Oh Holy Mary, Mother of
God, Queen of Heaven and Earth,
I humbly beseech you from the
bottom of my heart to succor me in
this necessity. There are none who
can withstand your power. Show
me herein you are my mother. Oh
Mary, conceived without sin, pray
for us who have recourse to thee.
Holy Mother, I place this cause in
your hands (3x).
Holy Spirit, You who solve all
problems, light all roads so that I
may attain my goal. You who gave
me the divine gift to forgive and
forget all evil against me and that in
all instances in my life You are with
me. I want in this short prayer to
thank You as I confirm once again
that I never want to be separated
from You in eternal glory. Thank
you for your mercy towards me
and mine. Amen.
Say this prayer on three consecutive days. Publish this prayer
after the favor is granted.
K.A.G.
WESTFIELD — The Hope Chest
Thrift Store, located at 26 Prospect
Street, Westfield, will welcome in the
holidays on Monday, December 1,
with a sale of new and gently used
holiday toys, decorations, clothing
and essentials.
A large selection of toys and
children’s items will be featured, with
Hospice Auxiliary members having
all donated toys. To help shoppers get
their homes ready for the holidays,
there will be candles, linens,
housewares, china and glassware available for purchase. Additionally, there
will be seasonal jewelry and clothing
for all members of the family to wear
to those special holiday events and
parties. Scarves, mittens, gloves and
hats, plus a large selection of winter
coats, will be offered as well.
The Hope Chest is run by volunteers from the Center for Hope Hos-
pice and Palliative Care Auxiliary.
It is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The
Auxiliary supports the Center for
Hope Hospice and Palliative Care,
a non-profit organization located in
Scotch Plains, which cares for terminally ill patients and their families in two residential facilities or in
a patient’s home.
Anyone interested in information
regarding the Center for Hope or its
Auxiliary can visit the Hope Chest
and speak with a volunteer, call the
center at (908) 889-7780 or visit its
website at centerforhope.com. The
Auxiliary is always eager to welcome new members.
Donations of new and gently used
items such as clothing, books, jewelry, housewares and toys are welcome at the Hope Chest on Tuesdays
and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Furniture Assist, Inc.
Needs Toys For Holidays
By C. Dawson Yeomans (President) and
Peggy A. Rothbaum, Ph.D.
(Westfield volunteer)
Furniture Assist, Inc. needs toys
to distribute to our clients. Please
help by donating new or gently
used toys at this important time of
year. Toys, as well as other donations, can be dropped off at our
location in Kenilworth on Sundays.
Please see our website,
www.furnitureassist.com, for
drop-off times and directions to
our facility.
In addition, a Westfield toy drop-
off location graciously has been
provided again this year by Mr.
Ron Bansky, Allstate Insurance
Agent. His office is at 519 South
Avenue West, Westfield. Donations
can be made there Monday through
Friday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
through Thursday, December 11.
We are grateful for the generosity
of spirit of Ron and his staff.
As always, FA appreciates the
generosity of individuals, community organizations, and public and
private foundations in Westfield and
the surrounding areas. Thank you.
SCOUTS HELP MINDOWASKIN...Girl Scout Troops 40462 and 40451 team up
October 18 to clean up Mindowaskin Park in downtown Westfield, taking one
step in their Girl Scout Journey to help make the world a better place. While
surprised at some of the unique items they found that day, the Scouts were proud
to take an active role in beautifying their town’s park for all to enjoy.
NAMI Union County to Host
New Beginnings Ctr. Staff
WESTFIELD — Staff members
of the New Beginnings Self-Help
Center in Elizabeth will discuss their
program at the NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Union
County chapter’s public presentation on Tuesday, November 25, at
7:30 p.m. It will take place at American Legion Post No. 3, located at
1003 North Avenue, West, Westfield.
New Beginnings staff manager
Joyce Haberer and site supervisor
Judy Baines, along with Lawrence
Alford and two other members,
will be the guest speakers. A selfhelp drop-in center operated for
and by mental-health consumers,
New Beginnings was the first selfhelp center in Union County. It
offers self-help, advocacy, support
and socialization.
New Beginnings’ mission is to
enable participants to become part
of a team, to have new dreams and
to be able to live those dreams.
New Beginnings believes consumers have the capacity to help themselves and each other. It believes
in self-determination and responsibility, partnerships and recovery.
The New Beginnings Self-Help
Center is located at 516 Morris
Avenue, Elizabeth, near Kean University. It is open Sunday through
Thursday from 2 to 7 p.m.
NAMI Union County offers a
supportive and informational environment at its meetings, and audience participation is welcome.
Snacks and free literature are provided. There is no charge to attend. For more information, or in
the event of inclement weather,
call (908) 233-1628 or e-mail
[email protected]
See it all on the Web!
www.goleader.com
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, November 20, 2014
Page 9
Westfield High Class of ’64
Celebrates 50th Reunion
HONORING VETERANS...Westfield’s Franklin Elementary School commemorated Veterans Day by inviting veterans, from left, Michael Addis, Robert Hanna,
Paul Russo, Bill Kessinger, Jim Gildea and Bud Brown, to a school-wide
assembly, where students and staff dressed in red, white and blue in their honor.
Vocal music teacher Robert Geyer led patriotic songs, fourth- and fifth-grade
students gave a presentation about the meaning of Veterans Day, and Achieve
teacher Joanne Ply played "Taps" on the trumpet along with instrumental music
teacher Barry Furrer, who explained the song's significance. Afterwards, the
veterans spoke in individual classrooms about their experiences. The event was
organized by second-grade teacher Katherine Dibble and fifth-grade teacher
Kelly Feeley.
Union Catholic High School
Celebrates Veterans Day
SCOTCH PLAINS – On November 11, Union Catholic (UC) High
School in Scotch Plains held its
first annual Veterans Day Ceremony at the site of the Veterans
Memorial, dedicated last November on the school’s front lawn. Tim
Breza, history teacher, moderator
of UC’s Hearts for Heroes club,
Air Force veteran and master of
ceremonies, dedicated this year’s
ceremony to Captain Joseph W.
Duff, USNR (Ret.), UC alumni
parent and Blue and Gold Officer
for a number of UC alumni. Captain Duff passed away this September and was represented by his
wife, Kay; his daughters, Kathy
Duff ’73 and Ellen Duff Berka ’74,
and his granddaughter, Katharine
Berka.
UC alumnus David Thornton ’75
played the bagpipes at the beginning and end of the program. The
ceremony opened with a prayer by
Alice Polini ’16 of Westfield, a
member of UC’s Peer Ministry
group, and the singing of the National Anthem by members of UC’s
Performing Arts Company. Sean
Brennan ’15 of Westfield, a member of UC’s Hearts for Heroes club,
read a dedication in honor of all
American veterans. Closing remarks were made by Katherine
Sheldon ’15 of Clark, another
member of UC’s Hearts for Heroes
club. Brandan Schuster ’16 of
Roselle Park, a Peer Minister, read
the final prayer.
Union Catholic’s Veterans Memorial was completed by Michael
Eastman ’13 in September of 2012.
Michael decided during his sophomore year that he wanted his Eagle
Scout Project to make a big impact
and he began the planning phase
that year. Close to 1,000 man-hours
went into the planning and execution of the project and funding
came from donations. Michael
wanted this to be a space for members of the UC community who
know or knew someone in the
armed forces to reflect.
To purchase an engraved paver
in the Veterans Memorial walkway, contact Susan Dyckman, Director of Development, at
[email protected]
or (908) 889-1600, extension no.
309. UC alumni who served in the
military are invited to e-mail
[email protected]
WESTFIELD — The first wave
of Baby Boomers has come of age
and across the country; Boomers
are in celebration mode. Former
classmates and old friends are gathering at their 50-year high school
reunions, and the Westfield High
School (WHS) Class of 1964 is no
exception. In late October 120 classmates and their guests returned to
town to reminisce about growing
up in a great class, in a great town,
at a great time and to reconnect
during three days packed with
events.
A weekend highlight was the initiation of a scholarship fund that
grew out of a gift from Grover and
Patricia
Connell,
whose son, Ted, a member of the class of 1964,
died in 2012. The
scholarship originated
serendipitously when
Joe Wiendl informed
the class that the senior
Connell had offered to
help defray the travel
expenses of the 12
classmates from the
West Coast and Alaska
who lived the farthest from
Westfield.
When some winners expressed
their desire to contribute some or
all of their gift back to the class for
a meaningful purpose, representatives from the class joined forces
with WHS and agreed upon the
creation of the WHS Class of ‘64
Ted Connell Scholarship to celebrate the current and historical
achievements of athletes at WHS.
Each year for the next three to five
years, a graduating senior athlete
will receive $3,000 for college tuition and books. The award, based
on need, will be made by a fiveperson committee that includes a
WHS staff person or teacher, the
WHS director of athletics or a
coach, a current WHS senior, a
representative from the Class of
1964 and a representative of the
Connell family.
In addition to the meaningful
initiation of the scholarship fund,
members of the class of 1964
agreed there was no shortage of
reunion fun. Pizza, a sixties favorite, and a Good Humor truck,
topped the billing at the launch
party hosted by Karleen Villa
Burns. A Doo Wop band, the Backtracks, performed at the dinner
dance and played songs from the
’60s that motivated party-goers to
sing along, rock ‘n’ roll, twist and
do the stroll.
Doug Eakeley, class president,
and his wife, Priscilla, hosted the
culminating event, a Sunday morning brunch at their home in Green
Village. Interested
classmates toured
WHS and attended the
Westfield-Immaculata
football game Saturday
afternoon.
Barbara Coats, whose
husband, John, is a 1964
graduate, applauded the
reunion committee for
a job well-done. “The
planners and doers outdid themselves and should take gigantic bows for such a great successful event.”
In fact, plans for the 50th were in the
works for three years. Headed by James
Smith Bancroft, the reunion committee included: Bette Ann Bierwirth,
Bruce Zimmermann Burdett, Ms. Villa
Burns, Joy Carrigan, Mr. Eakeley,
Victoria Hsu, Patricia Danco Lindberg,
Barbara Di Trolio Mannino, Grier
Stewart Novinger, Cathie Bell Runyon,
Barbara Newman Taylor and Carol
Davis Yunker.
Class member Rob Schram termed
the reunion a grand three-day event.
“My only regret was that I did not
get time to talk to everyone. Time
went much too fast...50 years is a
long time to get caught up,” he said.
But Mr. Bancroft assured Mr.
Schram and others there is no need
to worry, saying, “there’s already
scuttlebutt of planning for our
55th!”
Westfield Library to Present
Two Creativity Workshops
WESTFIELD – The Westfield
Memorial Library will present two
workshops by creativity coach Wendy
Rosenberg. They will take place on
consecutive Wednesdays, December 3 and December 10, at 7 p.m.
each evening. The library is located
at 550 East Broad Street.
During the first workshop, entitled “Memories in Full Color,”
Ms. Rosenberg will guide participants through a process that uses
color to help them re-connect to
significant memories in their lives
and to see them through a different
lens or viewpoint.
After exploring memories
through word games and simple
creative exercises, participants will
create a piece of art that honors
their memories and brings them to
the forefront of the mind to create a
greater sense of meaning, gratitude
and personal connection this holiday season.
The second workshop, entitled
“The Art of the Mini-Memoir:
Honor Your Life Story in Six
Words,” is built around the book
“Not Quite What I was Planning:
Six-word Memoirs from Writers
Famous & Obscure,” edited by
Larry Smith.
The six-word memoir is a selfdiscovery exercise that helps participants get to the heart of what
matters most in their lives. Ms.
Rosenberg will introduce this deceptively simple art form through
different exercises and techniques,
inviting personal reflection, gratitude and a new perspective on life's
journey.
These programs will be free and
open to Westfield Memorial Library and MURAL cardholders.
MURAL cardholders belong to libraries that are part of the
Middlesex Union Reciprocal
Agreement Libraries. To see if a
library participates, call the
Westfield Memorial Library at
(908) 789-4090. To register for either or both programs, visit the
library’s website at wmlnj.org and
click on the Online Calendar, or
call (908) 789-4090, extension 0.
Registration is strongly suggested,
as these workshops have limited
seating.
Library hours are 9:30 a.m. to 9
p.m., Monday through Thursday;
9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday and
Saturday, and 1 to 5 p.m. on Sunday.
For more information about library
programs and services, call (908) 7894090, visit wmlnj.org and sign up for
the monthly e-newsletter, “Library
Loop,” or stop by the library for a copy
of its award-winning, quarterly newsletter, “Take Note.”
TRIBUTE...On Veterans Day, eighth grader Sophia Vera reads to a full assembly
of students and teachers at Edison Intermediate School, while Patrick Tuohy and
Dr. Derrick Nelson -- both having served in the Middle East – prepare to address
the audience. Principal Matthew Bolton, seated in distance, thanked the speakers
and reminded the students of the importance of respecting and appreciating the
men and women who serve our country.
CELEBRATING A SEASON...Members of the girls’ Middle School soccer team
at The Wardlaw-Hartridge School in Edison received participation certificates
along with the other fall athletic teams at an assembly on November 12. The girls,
coached by Lee Nicholls, finished the season with an 8-3 record and 36-13 goal
differential.
Westfield BOE Candidate
Langhart Thanks Voters
I would like to thank my wife, my
family, my friends and all the voters of Westfield whose efforts allowed me to be elected to the Board
of Education this past November 4.
The help and support I received
during the campaign was very much
appreciated and very humbling. I
would also like to congratulate
Peggy Oster and Mark Friedman on
their election. I would also hope
that Michael Bielen and David Sexton would consider running for the
board again in the future. It seemed
to me that everyone had certain
experience and expertise that would
have benefitted the board.
I now look forward to repaying
this effort by diligently working
with the district officials, teachers,
administrators, staff and professionals to maintain the excellent standards we have achieved for the ben-
efit of our children. I take the responsibility of providing the best
possible education for all of our
children quite seriously and I would
encourage anyone to e-mail me at
the district with any questions or
concerns you might have once I am
sworn in on January 6, 2015.
I won’t forget the people who
took the time to talk to me at the
train station or when I knocked on
their door these past few weeks. It
made me realize how many of us in
town are vested in the belief that a
good education is paramount for
the continued success of our children and how determined we are to
make that a reality. I now look forward to working towards that goal
as a member of the Westfield Board
of Education.
Christopher B. Langhart
Westfield
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FIND THE RIGHT WORDS...Last week the Mountainside Rotary Club gave a
dictionary to each Deerfield School third grader and a thesaurus to each fourth
grader.
Veterans Honored In
Westfield Public Schools
WESTFIELD – Students in
Roosevelt and Edison Intermediate
Schools in Westfield learned firsthand the experiences of military veterans who were invited guests of the
schools during Veterans Day celebrations. School-wide assemblies were
held at both schools.
On November 10, following the
presentation of colors by members of
the United States Marine Corps, student speeches and musical performances, World War II veteran Dr.
Frank Freer addressed the filled
Roosevelt gymnasium. He discussed
both growing up during the Great
Depression era and his military role
in the Second World War.
Brian Vieth, Social Studies teacher,
presented Dr. Freer with the school’s
“The Heroes Among Us” award, and
Principal Stewart Carey concluded
the assembly with his gratitude for all
veterans.
On Veterans Day, November 11,
WHS Grad to Attend
Program in France
CLINTON, N.Y. – Ryan M.
Hobson, son of Mark and Traecy
Hobson of Westfield, is participating
in Hamilton College’s academic program in France for the 2014-2015
academic year.
Hamilton in France provides students a solid academic experience
based on the deep Hamilton College
commitment to a liberal arts education and personal exploration.
Founded in 1957 as Hamilton College Junior Year in France, the program is supervised and directed by
professors of the department of
French at Hamilton and is open to
qualified students at American colleges and universities. Each resident
director brings extensive personal
experience to directing study abroad
programs and a deep knowledge of
the educational system and of cultural and daily life in France.
A junior majoring in biology at
Hamilton, Ryan is a graduate of
Westfield High School.
Hamilton College is a highly selective residential college offering a
rigorous liberal arts curriculum. Students are challenged to think, write
and speak critically, creatively and
analytically so that upon graduation
they may distinguish themselves in
both their professions and their communities.
the Edison student body and staff
heard from two guest speakers –
Patrick Tuohy, former U.S. Marine,
and Dr. Derrick Nelson, Reservist in
the U.S. Army who recently returned
from the Middle East.
Mr. Tuohy, a graduate of Westfield
High School who served two tours in
Iraq, suggested ways in which students could honor and assist veterans, including through the Wounded
Warrior Project.
Dr. Nelson, who is an assistant
principal at Westfield High School,
cited the uplifting of spirits resulting
from donations of coffee and candy
that was sent to him and his unit in the
Middle East from Westfield. He stated
that even though he was thousands of
miles away, he never felt closer to the
Westfield community.
Musical performances by the
eighth-grade chorus and concert band
during the assembly were followed
by remarks from Social Studies
teacher John Stasi and Roosevelt Principal Matthew Bolton.
Christopher Academy
To Host Language
Materials Workshop
SCOTCH PLAINS – Christopher
Academy, The Montessori School,
has announced a free Language Materials Workshop for parents this
evening, Thursday, November 20, at
6:30 p.m., at its Scotch Plains campus, located at 1390 Terrill Road.
Language is an instrument of expression. Communication helps in
bringing ideas and thoughts into action. It separates human species from
all others.
Participants will have an opportunity to explore Montessori language
materials, learning to encode and
decode with the moveable alphabet.
They will be introduced to the philosophy behind and the sequence of
the Montessori Language Materials
and will have a chance to have a
lesson on the Sandpaper Letters,
Metal Insets and the Moveable Alphabet.
With campuses in Westfield and
Scotch Plains, Christopher Academy
presents an exceptional learning environment tailored to the individual
child aged two-and-a-half through
first grade. Christopher Academy
holds true to the holistic approach to
education as set forth by Dr. Maria
Montessori in 1906 at the first Casa
dei Bambini in Rome, Italy.
For additional information on
Christopher Academy or Montessori
education, contact Christopher Academy at (908) 233-7447 or (908) 3224652 or visit its website at
christopheracademy.com and on
Facebook.
THE
WARDLAW-HARTRIDGE
SCHOOL
1295 Inman Avenue, North Edison, NJ
Pre-Kindergarten to Grade 12 independent,
co-educational, college-preparatory school
Take advantage of our Ninth Grade Scholarship
opportunities for incoming students,
awarded for merit and achievement
Prepare for a global world in a global learning environment
Visit us online at www.WHschool.org
or contact us for a Personal Tour
For more information, call (908) 754-1882, Ext. 155
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
See it all in color at!
www.goleader.com
THE WEEK
IN
Thursday, November 20, 2014
SPORTS
Sports Section
Pages 11-17
CORNWELL NOTCHES WINNER ON BALIATICO’S ASSIST
More photos – goleader.com
Ballyhoo Sports
Lady Raiders Skin Ridge, 3-2,
In OT for Section Soccer Title
By DAVID B. CORBIN
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
Co-captain Tori Baliatico slipped
the ball into co-captain Jodi Cornwell,
who tapped it into the net with 3:49
remaining in the second overtime to
earn the top-seeded Scotch PlainsFanwood High School girls soccer
team the North Jersey, Section 2,
Group 4 championship with a 3-2
victory over second-seeded Ridge at
Scotch Plains on November 14.
The Raiders scored first off a header
by Caroline Babis after a long free
kick into the box by sophomore Christina Rodgers. The 21-0-2 Raiders outshot the 17-3-1 Red Devils, 5-3, in
the first half. Raider goalkeeper Andrea Leitner made three saves, while
Ridge keeper Samantha Carney made
Page 11
four saves.
Eleven minutes into the second half,
the strong foot of Rodgers banged
another free kick from 50-yards out,
this time into sophomore Alyssa
DiFrancesco, who also headed the
ball into the net to give the Raiders a
seemingly comfortable, 2-0 lead.
“Christina Rodgers has a very good
CONTINUED ON PAGE 12
More photos – goleader.com
Ballyhoo Sports
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
DEFENDING THE PASS...Blue Devil cornerback Brett Robertshaw, No. 20, successfully defends against a Panthers’ pass
near the end zone. The Blue Devils defeated Bridgewater-Raritan, 24-14, at Kehler Stadium on November 15.
CURRY, BUONTEMPO, SIMCOX GET TDs; MORIARTY FG
Blue Devil ‘D’ Halts Panthers
In 24-14 Playoff Grid Victory
By DAVID B. CORBIN
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
HEAD ON COLLISION...Raider senior Paige Heiden gets her head on the ball in the North Jersey, Section 2, Group 4
championship game against Ridge in Scotch Plains on November 14. The Raiders won 3-2 in the second overtime.
Defense did its job as the fourthseeded Westfield High School football team, despite a few miscues from
the offense and special teams, still
managed to halt the fifth-seeded
Bridgewater-Raritan Panthers, 24-14,
in the first round of the North Jersey,
Section 2, Group 5 tournament at
Gary Kehler Stadium in Westfield on
November 15.
The 6-4 Panthers’ two touchdowns
(TD) came on an 86-yard kickoff
return by Jon Kaye three minutes into
the second quarter and via interception by Joey Barletta that he returned
20 yards for a TD late in the second
quarter.
Blue Devil linebacker Luke
Prybylski sent an immediate message to Panther quarterback Eric
Nickel when he tossed him for a 10yard sack on their first series, forcing
a punt. Westfield’s defense held the
Panthers’ running game to just 22
yards in the first half and 21 yards in
the second half, which forced them to
go into an almost completely passing
mode in their last three series in the
second half.
“Our defense had a great week of
preparation with this game plan. And
we all believe in each other. We know
that if one of us makes a mistake,
another guy will make the tackle, and
you saw it, we got after the quarterback with the ‘D’ line. That set me up
with some nice tackles. We got off
blocks, our linebackers and corner
backs played great,” Prybylski said.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 12
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email: [email protected] • Office: 908-233-5555 x 202 • Direct: 908-301-2038 • www.frankdisoldi.com
© 2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.
Page 12
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, November 20, 2014
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Lady Raiders Skin Ridge, 3-2, for Soccer Crown
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
TOUCHING THE PYLON...Blue Devil running back Jack Curry, No. 27, reaches for and touches the pylon for a
touchdown in the first quarter against the Panthers at Kehler Stadium on November 15.
Blue Devil ‘D’ Halts Panthers, 24-14, in Playoffs
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11
Senior linebacker Jackson Simcox,
along with defensive linemen Cotter
Spurlock, Harry Williamson, Fred
Gladis and Owen Kessler were also
key in keeping the Panthers’ running
game in check, while safety Owen
Colwell and cornerbacks Brett
Robertshaw and Matt Catanzaro stymied the passing game.
“The defensive line did an unbelievable job. Without the defensive
line, I’m not making plays. Cotter
was unbelievable and ‘Big Cat’[Harry
Williamson] is the unsung hero of the
defensive line. He does such a good
job of taking out blockers. He is an
unselfish player. You look at the stats
with this guy, this guy and you don’t
see Harry, but we know how important he is,” Simcox said.
The 6-3 Blue Devils scored on their
second series and junior running back
Jack Curry played a big role in it with
a 24-yard TD run with 6:44 left in the
first quarter. Curry finished with 147
yards on 30 carries.
On the Blue Devils’ next series,
quarterback Zack Kelly (10 completions, 14 attempts for 111 yards, one
interception) mixed six passes with
13 runs to cover 97 yards, ending on
a three-yard TD strike to fullback
Nick Buontempo (2 receptions, 18
yards) with 9:07 left in the half.
“They dropped back. They had an
extra safety or linebacker on coverage, so Zach may have had some
trouble trying to find the wide receivers, but when we needed big throws,
they stepped up,” Curry said.
Then, like in several of their previous games, the Blue Devils began to
shoot themselves in the foot, yielding
the 86-yard kickoff return for a TD,
followed by the 20-yard interception
for a TD to knot the score.
“We had a really rough week last
week. We came out flat. All week we
said we have to work harder. We have
to put points on the board. We came
out and we wanted to run the ball
right down their throat. That’s what
Hunterdon Central took away from
us,” Curry said.
“We make it interesting. That’s for
sure. Our defense backs us up all the
time. When we get screwy on special
teams, when we get screwy on offense, it’s our defense that steps it up.
The defense pitched a shutout. I was
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
BECOMING A BOILERMAKER...Cranford High School (CHS) senior Gavin
Murray has signed to wrestle for Perdue University next fall. Pictured, left to
right, are: CHS Director of Athletics Darren Torsone, Assistant wrestling Coach
Justin Bonitatis, Murray and Head Coach Pat Gorman. Gavin’s parents Kevin
and Jennifer, along with siblings Maggie, Colin and Logan, are in the back.
fearful of their run game. I thought
they ran the ball really well against
Ridge. That’s what scared me the
most, and the kids just took it away
from them,” Blue Devil Head Coach
Jim DeSarno said.
With 1:20 left in the half, Prybylski
forced a fumble that Owen Colwell
recovered at the Panther 17 that set up
Mike Moriarty’s 31-yard field goal
with 28 seconds remaining.
“Colwell recovered it. I just got in.
The quarterback handed off a little
high. The running back didn’t see me
coming and I just ripped it out. We
were practicing that all week and it
paid off,” Prybylski explained.
Just before halftime, Robertshaw
recovered another Panther fumble.
After a scoreless third quarter, the
Blue Devils got possession at their own
43. Nine plays and a few penalties later,
Simcox barreled eight yards for an
insurance TD with 5:54 on the clock.
The Panthers made one final effort,
but the Blue Devil defense stopped
their drive at the one.
Next on the list will be a rematch
with top-seeded Linden, who nicked
the Blue Devils, 15-14 in overtime in
the third game of the season. The
showdown is set for tomorrow night
in Linden at 7 p.m.
“Now we get a chance and our
linebacker corps are all healthy now.
We have Mike O’Connor and Owen
Kessler back and now we are ready.
We wanted this game from the getgo,” Prybylski said.
“We had a great first half. We had a
couple of bad calls. We had a penalty.
We got stopped short. We missed two
great defensive players. I think we
are healthy and we are ready to go
with them,” Curry said.
“We have been working so hard.
The senior class, everyone has been
working unbelievable. This is just
one part of the reward. Another reward is the state championship. We
can’t wait for Linden,” Simcox said.
“They are excited. That’s what they
wanted. Let’s go after it. We are throwing it all out there,” Coach DeSarno
said.
BrH2O-Raritan
Westfield
0 14
14 3
0
0
0
7
14
24
kick. She’s sharp and she has a strong
foot. When she crosses it in, we always have Caroline Babis in the box,
getting it because she is very good
with headers. Second one, we had
Alyssa DiFran[cesco] get the head on
the end of that one,” Baliatico said.
“Christina is pretty accurate with
her free kicks. We have been preaching to the girls to follow up with the
kind of balls that she sends in. Caroline
and Alyssa were able to finish off the
shots,” Raider Head Coach Kevin
Ewing said.
However, less than eight minutes
later, the margin tightened to 2-1 when
Olivia Melnyk found the back of the
net. Eight minutes later, Melnik scored
again with a long hooking shot to
knot the score and, later, send the
game into overtime.
“They caught us back on our heels.
We got a little unorganized and they
got both of their goals. Ridge is a
good team. They made some changes
and we didn’t adjust to those changes
and that is why they got back into this
game,” Coach Ewing said.
Less than three minutes into the
second overtime, the Raiders nearly
put the game away when Baliatico
and Kyla Diggs broke away down the
middle and set up a shot that just
missed to the left.
“We had many opportunities where
we bring the ball up and fire it to the
middle and there’s always someone
open. I would take it up, because I am
one who has speed on the team and
pass it into the middle,” Baliatico said.
Four minutes later, the magic moment arrived and the Raiders became
sectional champions.
“That was a good thing. Tori and
Jodi, can’t say enough about them.
Jodi is a three-year varsity player.
She has been out the last couple of
weeks and to come in and score the
winning goal in the final is pretty
impressive and says a lot about her
character,” Coach Ewing said.
“Tori brought it right down to the
corner. She slipped it right past all the
defenders. The goalie tapped it out
Probitas Verus Honos
and I was able to get my body on it
and put it in the net,” Cornwell explained.
“I think we all were kind of surprised that they could come back. We
ended up panicking a little bit, but
then we got it under control. It shows
the depth of our team that we kept
fighting and we came back to win at
the end,” Co-captain Sarah DiIorio
said. “When we came off before the
sure on them all over the field. We
possessed. Those are things that we
are good at.”
The last time the Raiders won the
section title was in 2008 with a 4-1
conquest of Mendham.
“It’s just an awesome feeling proving that we can play as well as a team
with players like Allie Hambleton,
Lauren Mains and everybody [including her sister Bridget],” Cornwell said.
Jim O’Connor njsportpics.com for The Westfield Leader and The Times
TRYING TO GET AROUND...Raider Tori Baliatico, No. 20, tries to get around
Red Devil Julia Lindsey, No. 13. More photos – goleader.com Ballyhoo Sports
first overtime, we were all talking and
saying that we needed to keep fighting and not let them get the momentum.”
“All year long the girls may have
thought that other teams disrespected
them, because they thought that they
weren’t that good. People in Union
County obviously think it but elsewhere they don’t,” Coach Ewing said.
“We just wanted to go out and show
that we are and go out and play our
type of game, which we did today.
That was the difference. We put pres-
“This is one of the best feelings I
have ever had as a senior and captain,
winning the section and going on to
the states,” Baliatico said.
The Raiders would next face
Montclair in the Group semifinals at
Somerville High School rescheduled
for November 19.
“We are definitely looking forward
to that. None of us have ever experienced something like this before,”
DiIorio said.
Ridge
Sc. Pl-Fanwood
0
1
2
1
0
0
0
1
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
STEPPING UP A NOTCH...Three Lady Blue Devils have signed to continue their lacrosse career at a higher level. Pictured,
left to right are: front row; Samantha Paoletti (Boston College), Mallory Weisse (Northwestern) and Alyssa Cox (Virginia
Tech); back row, Westfield High School Principal Peter Renwick, Girls Lacrosse Head Coach Samantha Warner and
Director of Athletics Sandy Mamary.
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A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, November 20, 2014
Page 13
QUARTERBACK TAYLOR SCORES TWO TOUCHDOWNS
Raider Football Season Ends
With 48-13 Loss at Colonia
By ALEX LOWE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
Scotch Plains-Fanwood football’s
up-and-down season came to an unceremonious end in a 48-13 setback
at the hands of undefeated and topseeded Colonia on November 14 in
the opening round of the NJSIAA
North 2, Group IV playoffs in Colonia.
Sam Perro ran for 148 yards on 21
carries and scored four touchdowns
as the host Patriots gashed the Raiders’ defense for 284 yards on the
ground. Colonia had the game well in
hand by halftime with a 34-6 lead.
“The read option gave us fits tonight,” said Raider Head Coach Jon
Still, the Raiders got off to a fast
start when Colonia misjudged the
opening kickoff, allowing the Raiders to recover an untouched loose ball
deep inside of Patriot territory. Junior
quarterback Marquel Taylor quickly
took advantage scoring the first of his
two TDs on a one-yard plunge. After
a missed extra point, the underdog
Raiders held a 6-0 lead.
Hopes for a stunning upset quickly
vanished as the Patriots took their
next possession and easily marched
60 yards to pay dirt, scoring on Perro’s
eight-yard sweep. The Raiders sputtered on its next possession and punted
back to Colonia. Once again, the Pa-
Alex Lowe for The Westfield Leader and The Times
TALKING WITH THE DEFENSE...Raider Head Coach Jon Stack goes over
strategy with his defense in the playoff game against top-seeded Colonia.
Stack. “To put it simply, they were
faster than we were. They beat us to
the edges and we just could not deal
with their team speed in this game.”
Scotch Plains-Fanwood limped into
the playoffs physically without the
benefit of star senior running back
Kobe White, who was unavailable after getting injured a week earlier at
Phillipsburg. Without White (1,184
yards rushing, 12 TDs) in the lineup,
the Raiders turned to senior Emendo
Thomas as the featured ball carrier.
However Thomas, who figured to play
a major role in the Raiders’ attack this
season, has been hobbled all year by
various leg injuries. Thomas never got
established against Colonia and finished with 55 yards on just six carries.
triots and their buttoned up offense
marched effortlessly down the field,
driving 82 yards before Perro scored
his second TD, this one coming from
15 yards out. After the extra point,
Colonia had a 14-6 lead with 2:05 left
in the first quarter.
After the Raider offense was forced
to punt again, the Patriots knifed
through their defense on their way to
another score. Perro’s third TD came
on a three-yard run around the left
side and upped the margin to 21-6
with 6:14 remaining in the half. The
killer play on the drive came with
Colonia facing a third-and-11 situation at the Raider 40. Quarterback
Tenni Adewusi hit Chase Barneys on
a bubble screen down the left side for
a first down. On the play, a late hit
penalty against the Raiders set up
Colonia with a first-and-goal at the
Raider nine-yard line.
“Their no huddle offense gave us
problems tonight,” said senior Andrew Ciccarino. “We were a little
banged up but their fast pace really
kept us on our heels.”
Things got even worse for the Raiders. Colonia tacked on two more TDs
before the half. The first came on a
one-yard sneak by Adewusi with 2:35
on the clock. The score was set up by
Taylor’s fumble. The second score
was the back breaker and came when
James Corbett jumped in front of
Taylor’s pass and returned it 40 yards
for a TD giving the Patriots a 34-6
lead at the half.
“We certainly did not help ourselves with the mistakes and turnovers,” said Stack. “We needed to
play error free football to even have a
chance and we did not do that tonight.”
The Raiders mounted their best
drive of the game to start the second
half. The Raiders took the opening
kickoff and started from their own 31
yard line. From there, Taylor found
Ciccarino deep downfield for a 32
yard gain.
“It was a deep post route,” said
Ciccarino. “Marquel laid it out there
and gave me a chance to make a play
on it.”
From there, Thomas broke free
through the middle of the defense for
a 30 yard run to the Colonia three.
Taylor did the rest by sneaking the ball
in from one yard out for a TD. The
score narrowed the deficit to 34-13.
Minutes later, Perro answered with
a four-yard TD run, making it 41-13,
effectively ending the competitive
phase of the contest. Another TD was
added in the final quarter.
For Scotch Plains-Fanwood, the
season ended with a 3-7 record that
represented a one-game improvement
from last season’s win total. At times
this year, the Raider running game,
featuring a deep and talented backfield
of White, Thomas, Taylor and Kevin
Maxwell, could be nothing short of
sensational. But an inconsistent defense usually contributed to losses.
Scotch Plains finished out the season
against the top two seeds in the North
2, Group IV bracket, losing to
Phillipsburg, 61-0, and Colonia.
“Colonia plays at a high tempo,”
said senior Kevin Maxwell. “But
P’burg is like a machine. They are
just playing at a whole different level.”
Sc. Pl.-Fanwood
Colonia
6 0
14 20
7
7
0
7
13
48
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SHERIFF’S SALE
SHERIFF’S FILE NO.: CH-14004748
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-047197-13
Plaintiff: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC
VS.
Defendant: MARY CLARK A/K/A MARY C.
CLARK; KENNY WARDEN; JOSEPH A.
RACANELLI
Sale Date: 12/03/2014
Writ of Execution: 08/07/2014
By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution
to me directed I shall expose for sale by public
vendue, at the UNION COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, 1ST FLOOR, 10 ELIZABETHTOWN PLAZA, Elizabeth, New Jersey on
WEDNESDAY, at two o’clock in the afternoon of
said day. All successful bidders must have 20%
of their bid available in cash or certified check at
the conclusion of the sales.
The judgment amount is: ***One Hundred
Eighty-One Thousand Seventy-Nine and 64/
100*** $181,079.64.
Property to be sold is located in: Township of
Scotch Plains, County of Union, State of New
Jersey.
Premises Commonly known as: 441 Farley
Avenue, Scotch Plains, New Jersey 07076.
Tax Lot # 22, Block # 501
Nearest Cross Street: East Second Street.
Approximate Dimensions: 50 X 106
Total Upset: ***One Hundred Eighty-Eight
Thousand Seven Hundred Eleven and 65/100***
$188,711.65 together with lawful interest and
costs.
The sale is subject to any unpaid taxes and
assessments, tax, water, and sewer liens and
other municipal assessments. The amount due
can be obtained from the local taxing authority.
All interested parties are to conduct and rely
upon their own independent investigation to ascertain whether or not any outstanding interests
remain of record and/or have priority over the lien
being foreclosed and, if so, the current amount
due thereon. **If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall only be
entitled to a return of the deposit paid. The
Purchaser shall have no further recourse against
the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney.**
Subject to tax sale certificate #: 12-1238.
Surplus Money: If after the sale and satisfaction of the mortgage debt, including costs and
expenses, there remains any surplus money, the
money will be deposited into the Superior Court
Trust Fund and any person claiming the surplus,
or any part thereof, may file a motion pursuant to
Court Rules 4:64-3 and 4:57-2 stating the nature
and extent of that person’s claim and asking for
an order directing payment of the surplus money.
The Sheriff or other person conducting the sale
will have information regarding the surplus, if
any.
There is a full legal description on file in the
Union County Sheriff’s Office.
The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this
sale for any length of time without further advertisement.
Joseph Cryan
Acting Sheriff
Attorney:
MILSTEAD & ASSOCIATES, LLC
1 EAST STOW ROAD
MARLTON, NEW JERSEY 08053
(856) 482-1400
4 T - 11/06, 11/13, 11/20
& 11/27/14
Fee: $191.76
SHERIFF’S SALE
SHERIFF’S FILE NO.: CH-14004984
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-001872-14
Plaintiff: LANDMARK COMMUNITY BANK
VS.
Defendant: DANIEL SANTRY A/K/A DANIEL
J. SANTRY AND LINDA SANTRAY A/K/A LINDA
M. SANTRY, HUSBAND AND WIFE; SPENCER
SAVINGS BANK, SLA; DEMARIO-RLJTNER
ORAL & MAX LLC
Sale Date: 12/17/2014
Writ of Execution: 08/28/2014
By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution
to me directed I shall expose for sale by public
vendue, at the UNION COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, 1ST FLOOR, 10 ELIZABETHTOWN PLAZA, Elizabeth, New Jersey on
WEDNESDAY, at two o’clock in the afternoon of
said day. All successful bidders must have 20%
of their bid available in cash or certified check at
the conclusion of the sales.
The judgment amount is: ***Four Hundred
Seventy-Six Thousand Seven Hundred Thirty
and 91/100*** $476,730.91.
The property to be sold is located in the TOWN
of WESTFIELD in the County of UNION, and the
State of New Jersey.
Tax LOT 16, BLOCK 907 F/K/A LOT 14, BLOCK
112
COMMONLY KNOWN AS 412 WEST
DUDLEY AVENUE, WESTFIELD, NEW JERSEY 07090
Dimensions of the Lot are (Approximately)
175.00 feet wide by 60.00 feet long.
Nearest Cross Street: Situated on the northwesterly side of Dudley Avenue West, 126.72
feet from the North side of North Avenue.
The sale is subject to unpaid taxes and assessments, tax, water and sewer liens and other
municipal assessments. The amount due can be
obtained from the local taxing authority. Pursuant to NJSA 46:8B-21 the sale may also be
subject to the limited lien priority of any condominium/homeowner association liens which may
exist.
Total Upset: ***Four Hundred Ninety-One
Thousand One Hundred Three and 08/100***
$491,103.08 together with lawful interest and
costs.
Surplus Money: If after the sale and satisfaction of the mortgage debt, including costs and
expenses, there remains any surplus money, the
money will be deposited into the Superior Court
Trust Fund and any person claiming the surplus,
or any part thereof, may file a motion pursuant to
Court Rules 4:64-3 and 4:57-2 stating the nature
and extent of that person’s claim and asking for
an order directing payment of the surplus money.
The Sheriff or other person conducting the sale
will have information regarding the surplus, if
any.
There is a full legal description on file in the
Union County Sheriff’s Office.
The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this
sale for any length of time without further advertisement.
Joseph Cryan
Acting Sheriff
Attorney:
SHAPIRO & DENARDO, LLC - ATTORNEYS
14000 COMMERCE PARKWAY
SUITE B
MOUNT LAUREL, NEW JERSEY 08054
(856) 793-3080
4 T - 11/20, 11/27, 12/04
& 12/11/14
Fee: $193.80
Raiders Nip Blue Devils, 1-0,
In OT in Section Soccer Semi
By DAVID B. CORBIN
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
Senior Tori Baliatico received a
pass from senior Corina Checchio
and, despite being situated amongst
several defenders, managed to deflect a shot into the goal 3:20 into the
first overtime to give the top-seeded
Scotch Plains-Fanwood High School
girls soccer team a 1-0 victory over
fourth-seeded Westfield in the semifinal round of the North Jersey, Section 2, Group 4 tournament in Scotch
Plains on November 11 (Veterans’
Day).
The Lady Raiders were to face
Ridge, 2-0 winners over Watchung
Hills, for the title on November 14. In
2012, the Raiders suffered a stinging,
4-3 shootout defeat to Ridge in the
finals. The last time the Raiders won
the section title was in 2008 when
they silenced Mendham, 4-1,
This was the fourth match-up between the two rivals and the Raiders
won three of them by 1-0 scores (September 20 in the regular season and
October 25 in the Union County Tournament semifinals). The two teams
tied 0-0 in double overtime on October 9 in Westfield.
The first half of this fourth show-
down was similar to the previous three
with the Raiders’ offense putting pressure on the Blue Devils defense, but
there were no real threatening shots
on goal, even though the Raiders took
three and Westfield took one. The
Raiders did take four corner kicks in
the half.
The most dangerous shot in regulation came within the first minute when
Baliatico hooked from the right side
into the box and ripped a shot that
Blue Devil keeper Lizzi Brucia saved.
Brucia made two saves in the first
half, added six more in the second
CONTINUED ON PAGE 14
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Blue Devils Place 6th in State Gymnastics
The Westfield High School gymnastics team placed sixth at the
NJSIAA team gymnastics tournament in Hillsborough with a total of
108.675. Red Bank Catholic took top
honors with a 111.925, followed by
Ramapo at 110.7, Watchung Hills at
109.4, Hillsborough at 108.85 and
Ocean Township at 108.825.
The top three Blue Devils in the
BALIATICO SLIPS IN WINNING GOAL IN 1ST OVERTIME
Sales Associate
Probitas Verus Honos
Reading is Good For You
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
TRYING TO PLAY KEEPAWAY...Blue Devil Hannah Hawkins, No. 13, tries to keep the ball away from Raider Kyla
Diggs, No. 24, in the North Jersey, Section 2, Group 4 semifinal. See more photos at goleader.com Ballyhoo Sports
vault were Jenna Rizkalla with a
9.675, Megan Melillo at 8.825 and
Hannah Prieto at 8.8. Rizkalla had a
9.525 on the floor exercise, followed
by Melillo at 9.4 and Hannah
Goldring at 9.375. Rizkalla scored a
9.275 on the balance beam, followed
by Goldring at 8.85 and Prieto at
8.55. Rizkalla had a 9.3 on the uneven bars, followed by Goldring and
Melillo at 8.55.
In the individual tournament,
Rizkall placed 10th all-around with a
total of 37.2. She placed fifth on floor
at 9.475, ninth on uneven bars at
9.325 and 10th on beam at 9.4
Email: [email protected]
Direct: (908) 301-2015
Cell: (908) 938-9248
Westfield East Office: 209 Central Avenue, Westfield, NJ 07090 • (908) 233-5555
ColdwellBankerMoves.com
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Congratulations
to our Top Ten Club for October 2014
WW
Julie Murphy
Sales Associate
Beth Sullivan
Sales Associate
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Sales Associate
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Sales Associate
Janice Tittel
Sales Associate
Louann Sullivan
Sales Associate
Anne Weber
Sales Associate
Joyce Taylor
Sales Associate
Patricia Plante
Broker Sales Associate
Diane Kontra
Sales Associate
Westfield West Office
600 North Avenue West, Westfield, NJ 07090 • (908) 233-0065
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Page 14
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, November 20, 2014
Devil’s Den
McKeon Proves You
Can Come Home Again
By BRUCE JOHNSON
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
Liz McKeon, one of the best basketball players and all-around athletes in
WHS history, is the new girls basketball
coach. She was the second 1,000-point
scorer in school girls basketball history,
also lettering in field hockey and softball. She also earned three letters in
basketball at Lafayette.
McKeon (’99) took her BA in English
from Lafayette and a Masters in Broadcast Journalism from Boston University
and had turned that into a career in sports
marketing that saw her work for two of
the giants in sports – ESPN and the NFL.
But it turns out that her dream job wasn’t
in the business end of sports.
“Coaching crossed my mind as a
player but I never thought I would change
my career to become a coach,” said
McKeon, who has indeed changed her
career to a part-time Paraprofessional at
Chatham Middle School, while pursuing a teaching certificate, and working
at Pure Barre, too.
But then her brother James (’02) –
himself a three-sport standout at WHS –
got a job as WHS’s jayvee boys basketball coach in 2011-12. That’s when Liz
started getting the itch to switch careers.
“Attending his games made me realize how much I missed basketball,” she
said. “Once you’re a player it’s hard to
sit in the stands and watch as a spectator.
I wanted to be part of the game again.”
McKeon’s hiring should quiet the
vocal minority that (still shockingly)
managed to convince the Board of Education to not rehire longtime coach Joe
Marino. Hopefully McKeon, who spent
last year as a volunteer assistant under
Marino, can get the girls to concentrate
on the job that lies ahead, because all
signs point to an historic season.
“I’m ready!” she said. “I can’t wait to
get things started. Last year was a wonderful experience. Coaching with Joe
was a great start to my coaching career
and I’m thankful for everything I
learned. I look forward to learning even
more as the season goes on. We have a
great group of girls. I’m excited to see
what we can do.”
Thousand-point scorers Lil Scott and
Jackie Knapp will be joined by veterans
Olivia Luzzi, Hannah Liddy, Rachel
Mattesich, Jamie Miller, Anne-Sophie
Koglin, Amalia Montes, Shannon Devitt,
Danielle Rinaldi, Liz Brucia and Abby
Demers. And the program produced
unbeaten jayvees, freshman and eighthgrade teams, so there’s plenty more
upcoming talent.
Having a pair of 1,000-point scorers
on one team could affect the dynamics
of the “team first” concept in basket-
ball, but that will not happen here. Scott
and Knapp both have outstanding court
awareness. They currently rank Nos. 3
and 4 all-time at WHS in assists, so if
somebody is open, they’ll get the ball.
Knapp and Scott also rank Nos. 2 and 4
all-time in steals. So in addition to scoring and passing, they create non-stop
chaos on defense.
The depth of quality talent is at a level
unknown to the WHS girls basketball
program. If they can stay healthy and
injury-free (see next section), good
things could follow.
STATE TITLES AREN’T EASY
Westfield High has won 120 state
team championships, more than any
New Jersey school not named
Haddonfield or Moorestown. And the
Blue Devils have won 281 individual
and relay state championships, way more
than any school in state history. Playing
on big stages is almost a rite of passage
for WHS athletes.
Nine WHS teams entered the
postseason with a state championship
on their to-do list. But first girls tennis
and field hockey were eliminated, followed by the boys soccer and girls crosscountry teams. Last week girls soccer
and volleyball were ousted; last Thursday it was gymnastics, and Saturday
boys cross-country. Football is the last
sport standing.
It’s just not that easy to be a state
champion. Nor should it be. Sandy
Mamary has seen 14 teams achieve the
ultimate during her five years as WHS’s
director of athletics.
“It’s just very, very hard to win a state
championship,” she said. “So much has
to go right. It really makes you appreciate them when they happen.”
WHS and Mamary experienced a wild
72-hour period last week. The boys
cross-country team surprised her Saturday morning by winning another sectional title, its 24th overall. Hours later
the gymnastics team won its second
straight sectional crown. The thrill of
victory. Then the football team dropped
a gut-wrenching 7-6 regular-season
game to Hunterdon Central. The girls
soccer team dropped a 1-0 overtime
PUBLIC NOTICE
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-004877-14
FILE NO. 18034-13
NOTICE TO REDEEM
New girls basketball coach Liz McKeon (right) poses with (from left) all-time
scoring leader Erin Miller, and current 1,000-point scorers Lil Scott and Jackie
Knapp.
SBMUNICUST%LBNJ;
PLAINTIFF VS. LEE P.
TOUCHEQUE; MRS. LEE P.
TOUCHEQUE, WIFE OF LEE
P. TOUCHEQUE; ALFREDO
R. FONSECA; NORMA
FONSECA,
WIFE
OF
ALFREDO R. FONSECA;
GMAC N/K/A ALLY FINANCIAL INC.; FIRST RESOLUTION CORP; RAB PERFORMANCE RECOVERIES LLC;
MIDLAND FUNDING LLC;
VANZ LLC SEPTEMBER1 O
SERIES02; STATE OF NEW
JERSEY; DEFENDANT(S)
WF Boys Finish 6th at Group 4 X-C
The Westfield High School boys
cross-country team finished sixth
at the NJSIAA Group 4 Tournament in Holmdel on November 15
with a total of 188. Matt Russo was
the first Blue Devil to cross the
finish line at 16:22, which was good
enough for 11th place.
Andrew Harting-Smith finished
31st with a personal record (PR)
16:44. Alex Campbell finished 42nd
with a PR 17:01. Ryan Siegel placed
65th at 17:18. Will Chandler fin-
ished 71st at 17:20. Bryan Jackler
finished 77th at 17:26 and Gabe
Givelber finished 84th at 17:30.
The Blue Devil girls placed ninth
with Natalie Marcotullio finishing
49th at 20:39. Gabrielle Brennan
finished 55th at 20:47, Julia Myers
finished 63rd with a PR 20:57 and
Caroline Stocking took 66th with a
PR 21:00. Noelle Blackford,
Charlie O’Brien and Meghan
O’Dwyer finished 81-95-136, respectively.
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DAVID
TO: FIRST RESOLUTION CORP;
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that an order
made on November 10, 2014, the Superior Court Fixed December 26, 2014 between the hours of nine o’clock in the
forenoon and four o’clock in the afternoon,
prevailing time, at the office of the Tax
Collector of HILLSIDE, located at 1409
LIBERTY AVENUE, HILLSIDE, NEW JERSEY 07205 as the time and place when
and where you may pay to the plaintiff the
amount so found due for principal and
interest on its certificate of tax sale as
follows:
LOT 3 BLOCK 505 on the tax duplicate
of HILLSIDE. Total amount required to
redeem tax sale certificate no. 111088 is
$27,450.35, together with interest from
June 30, 2014 and costs of $1,405.30.
And that unless, at the same time and
place, you or one of you redeem by paying
the aforesaid sum so found due to plaintiff,
then you, and each of you shall be debarred and foreclosed of and from all right
and equity of redemption of, in and to the
lands and premises above set out and
described in the complaint and every part
thereof, and that the plaintiff be vested with
an absolute and indefeasible estate of
inheritance in fee simple in said lands and
premises.
Anything to the contrary notwithstanding, redemption shall be permitted up until
the entry of final judgment including the
whole of the last date upon which judgment is entered.
Michael G. Pellegrino, Esq.
Attorney for Plaintiff
PELLEGRINO & FELDSTEIN, L.L.C.
290 Route 46 West
Denville, New Jersey 07834
(973) 586-2300
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $54.57
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& decision at Scotch Plains on Tuesday in
the sectional semis. Hours later the volleyball team dropped a closer-than-itsounds 28-26, 25-23 decision at
Hunterdon Central in the Group 4
quarterfinals. The agony of defeat.
When you get to this point in a season, there are many outside things that
can affect the end result. Who is healthy?
Who is sick? Who is injured? Who just
broke up with their boyfriend/girlfriend?
Who got a bad grade on a test or a big
paper? Who got a letter that day telling
them they didn’t get in to their firstchoice college? There’s so much that
can factor into it besides talent and
coaching. The bottom line: win and
advance, or lose and go home.
State titles are precious, memorable,
historic, and rarely easy. Last week was
deep into a half-dozen state tournaments and WHS was heavily involved
in most of them.
“We may not win, but we’re usually
right there,” Mamary said. “We’re in the
conversation.”
FOOTBALL UPDATE
It’s over to Tiger Stadium tomorrow
night for the North 2 Group 5 semifinals
against Linden, which downed WHS
15-14 in overtime back in Week 3. Before that OT loss, WHS had won five
straight meetings with the Tigers; the
Blue Devils hold a 24-19-1 lead in a
series that started in 1922.
Westfield earned the rematch with a
24-14 win last Saturday against
Bridgewater-Raritan. Junior Jack Curry
ran for 151 yards, making him the 11th
Blue Devil to reach 1,000 yards in a
season – he now has 1,137.
COLLEGE UPDATE
A couple years back Pat Gray (’10)
set WHS records – since broken – for
receptions (32) and yards receiving (610)
in a single season. He was recruited as
a wide receiver at Massachusetts by
head coach, and WHS graduate, Kevin
Morris (’82). When Morris wasn’t rehired, Gray ended up at Monmouth,
where he was a starting safety for three
years before an injury sidelined him this
year. As fate would have it, Morris was
hired by Monmouth as its offensive
coordinator, and Gray, who is taking a
redshirt year this fall, will come back in
2015 for the Hawks … this time as a
wide receiver.
THIS AND THAT
The combined record of WHS’s varsity teams this fall is 86-50-3, a winning
percentage of 63.2. There have been
two Union County championships, two
sectional titles (and possibly football),
and two Group 4 titles. At most schools
those numbers would be historic.
But this fall, for the first season since
joining the Watchung Conference in the
fall of 1960 (160 total seasons), the
Blue Devils had a losing record in headto-head matchups with Scotch Plains.
Since Scotch Plains opened its doors
(at Park Avenue School) in 1926, the
Blue Devils won nearly three out of four
(72.0 percent) of the 1,283 head-toheads (895 wins, 348 losses, 40 ties into
this school year). But in 15 match-ups
this fall it was the Raiders winning 8,
losing 6, with 1 tie.
Six of those SP-F wins were in soccer
(three each by the boys and girls), all by
a single goal and half in overtime, and
the two tennis victories were by a 3-2
margin. But this isn’t horseshoes.
HALL OF FAME DINNER
Last call for tickets for Monday’s
11th Westfield Athletic Hall of Fame
dinner, 6 p.m., at the Westwood. Tickets, which will be available at the door,
can be purchased in advance by contacting Sandy Mamary at the high
school’s athletic office, or by calling
Bill Jordan at (732 535-8047) or (908)
232-6463.
In addition to the 11th class of inductees, Monday will mark the 20th anniversary of the first WAHOF induction
dinner. Those being honored this year
are: Jimmy Byrd, Sam Arbes, Jack
Reydel, Don Feeley, Steve McCoy,
Eddie Morton, Paul Healy, Andrew Cary,
Lynne Cassidy, Erin Allebaugh, Stephen
Cheek, Megan Sheehy, Pete Giordano,
Maggie McFadden, the 1987-89 girls
swim teams, and the 1995 baseball team.
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWN OF WESTFIELD
BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT
NOTICE OF DECISION
On November 12, 2014, the Zoning
Board of Adjustment of the Town of
Westfield adopted a Resolution granting
variances to the Applicants/Owners,
Michael & Jennifer Basta, for property located at 431 Colonial Avenue, Block 511,
Lot 7 on the Tax Map of the Town of
Westfield. The variance approvals will permit the construction of additions to the first
and second floors, new third floor habitable space, a new entrance portico and
raised rear terrace. The Resolution is on
file and available for PUBLIC INSPECTION in the office of the Town Engineer,
959 North Avenue West, Westfield, New
Jersey, during that office’s normal business hours.
HEHL & HEHL, P.C.
Attorneys for the Applicants/Owners
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $21.42
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Westfield/Plainfield Rivalry
Westfield 57, Plainfield 45, Tie 7
1900
1901
1903
1905
1907
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1908
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1909
1910
1911
1912
1913
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—
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—
1914
1915
—
—
1916
—
1917
1919
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939
1940
1941
1944
1945
1946
1947
1948
1949
1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
—
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—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
Westfield
Westfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Tie
Westfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Westfield
Plainfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Westfield
Tie
Plainfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Westfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Westfield
Westfield
Tie
Westfield
Plainfield
Tie
Tie
Plainfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Plainfield
Westfield
Westfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Westfield
26-0
NA
15-0
24-0
6-6
11-0
12-6
5-0
35-6
6-0
37-6
19-7
20-6
26-7
19-0
7-0
6-0
0-0
7-3
39-0
6-0
28-0
19-0
3-0
18-0
7-2
20-0
21-0
13-6
0-0
7-6
7-0
0-0
0-0
13-0
20-0
13-0
1-0
12-6
12-0
6-0
32-12
14-6
19-6
33-7
14-6
27-14
25-6
6-0
21-0
19-6
19-12
21-0
7-0
13-7
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969
1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
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1977
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
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––
Westfield
Plainfield
Westfield
Plainfield
Westfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Tie
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Plainfield
Tie
Westfield
Westfield
Plainfield
Westfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Plainfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Westfield
Plainfield
Westfield
Westfield
13-6
27-7
14-12
13-7
21-0
33-12
12-7
25-21
45-0
49-6
12-6
27-6
20-0
31-14
9-6
34-0
14-0
38-0
6-2
3-2
14-0
28-6
21-3
14-6
14-0
0-0
27-14
35-6
7-6
14-7
21-6
28-0
14-9
0-0
20-7
28-20
38-7
22-7
21-7
20-14
42-25
24-21
14-6
9-7
40-0
9-0
17-7
28-27
21-19
26-6
35-6
22-21
30-16
34-0
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
GETTING A FOOT ON THE BALL...Raider Corina Checchio, No. 5, and Blue
Devil Natalie Bond, No. 6, boot the ball as Raider Sarah DiIorio looks on.
Raiders Nip Blue Devils in OT
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13
and made one more in overtime.
“I got the ball out wide, and I
brought it up to the defender and
crossed it in and the goalie came out
an caught it,” Baliatico said. “If I
passed it back more and had someone
in the middle, it would have been a
much easier opportunity instead of
me trying to take it myself, but I did
what I could.”
Baliatico did add more shots on
goal but her next most dangerous
shot was blocked by Blue Devil
sophomore defender Sonya Peregrim.
Blue Devils Lil Scott and Taylor
Morgan got off a couple of shots in
the half, but Raider keeper Andrea
Leitner (3 saves) stopped them. With
30 seconds remaining in regulation,
Raider Christina Rodgers ripped a
shot that Brucia knocked out of
bounds, setting up the final corner
kick.
Checchio took the first shot in overtime then with 6:40 on the clock
Baliatico tapped the ball into the left
corner.
“Corina Checchio passed me the
ball and I had time to turn, because
they backed off of me. Someone
stepped and I just moved into the
space and kicked it. It deflected off
one of them and it strolled into the
corner,” Baliatico explained.
“She’s our leading scorer. She’s
fast. She’s tough. She plays hard. I’m
am just really proud of my whole
team,” Raider Head Coach Kevin
Ewing said.
“After that long game, I think it was
a double deflection. Tori cut it then
she cut it again and she shot it into our
girls. It was a weird goal,” Blue Devil
Head Coach Alex Schmidt said. “After the Union County game, to put on
this performance was much better. In
the first half and pretty much the
second half too, there’s no quit. I am
proud of these girls. Congratulations
to Scotch Plains and that’s why they
are 20-0-2. That’s impressive. They
run the gamut.”
“Alex does a great job at Westfield
and the Westfield girls are a good
team. It’s a big rivalry. It stinks that
one team has to lose, because they
played excellent. Both teams played
a hard fought game. I’m glad we
won, but it’s too bad somebody has to
lose,” Coach Ewing said.
“It was frustrating not getting to
play them in the county finals. We
love to see Westfield/Scotch Plains in
the finals. It was frustrating seeing
them on the same side of the bracket,
because we would have loved to play
them in the sectional finals, but I said
to Kevin, I hope he finally wins one,”
Coach Schmidt said.
Westfield
Sc. Pl-Fanwood
0
0
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PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWN OF WESTFIELD
PLANNING BOARD
Notice is hereby given that the Westfield
Planning Board, at its meeting on November 3, 2014, adopted resolutions memorializing the following actions taken at that
meeting:
1) A Second Amendment to the 2013
Housing Plan Element and Fair Share
Plan of the Town of Westfield Master Plan.
Adopted.
2) A Second Amendment to the 2013
Land Use Plan Element of the Town of
Westfield Master Plan. Adopted.
3) New Housing Plan Element and Fair
Share Plan for Third Round Obligation
from 2014 to 2024. Adopted.
Documents are on file in the office of the
Planning Department, 959 North Avenue
West, Westfield, New Jersey and may be
seen Monday through Friday from 8:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Kathleen Nemeth
Administrative Secretary
Town of Westfield Planning Board
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $23.97
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, November 20, 2014
SCHETELICH 3TDs, CHRISTIANO 86-YD KO TD RETURN
More photos at goleader.com
Ballyhoo Sports
Cougars Rap Canucks, 46-6,
In Grid Sectional First Round
By DAVID B. CORBIN
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
One week after drudging North
Plainfield, 52-20, in the final regularseason game, the top-seeded Cranford
High School football team did it again
with a 46-6 thrashing of the Canucks
in the first round of the North Jersey,
Section 2, Group 3 tournament at
Memorial Field in Cranford on November 14.
Unlike in their previous meeting
when the Canucks got a quick jump
on the Cougars by scoring on their
first drive with 13 running plays then
adding another quick touchdown
(TD) to take a 14-3 lead, the Cougar
defense permitted only one TD in the
playoff game when the Canucks covered 69 yards on 15 plays, including
six pass attempts with 12.8 seconds
remaining in the first half. The Cougars’ team attitude coming into the
game was more than ready.
“It’s not to like underestimate them,
because we played them last week
and had a big win. So we didn’t want
to treat them lighter than they were.
We had to take it very serious, not like
any other game, and keep focused,”
Cougar linebacker Niko Cappello
said.
“I think that it is more weird than
anything else. You make adjustments,
they make adjustments and they did a
good job against us in the first half,”
Cougar Head Coach Erik Rosenmeier
said. “They did a good job moving
the football. They did a good job
keeping the ball away from us. We
made adjustments in the second half
and took the game away.”
“I was happy about that. That wasn’t
fun them getting a run on us in the
first drive last game, but we did a
good job stopping them,” Cappello
said.
Cappello made five solo tackles,
including a pair of shattering sacks
on quarterback Nick Cherasaro, and
assisted on five more.
“It was kind of hard, because the
quarterback likes to cut back into us.
I was trying to make sure he didn’t cut
back on me,” Cappello said.
Ahmad Davis added four solo tack-
les and an assist, while defensive back
Kevin Trotter made four solos and
two assists. Defensive back Sean
Leonard made three solos and two
assisted. Linebacker Ethan Tom made
two throws for a loss and four assists.
Defensive back Eric Donahue had
two solos with a throw for a loss and
an assist. Luke Christiano had two
solos and three assists.
The 10-0 Cougars sent the message on the opening kickoff when
Christiano got the ball on the 14 and
returned it 86 yards for the TD with
just 18 seconds off the clock.
“We have a number of set plays that
we run on the kickoff and that was
one of them. Adjusting the blocking
was something we worked on hard
this week. We did a good job blocking up front, and Luke is good when
he has the football in his hands,”
Coach Rosenmeier said.
On the second play of the second
quarter, junior quarterback Jack
Schetelich scored the first of his three
TDs with a 16-yard sprint. A twoCONTINUED ON PAGE 16
More photos at goleader.com
Ballyhoo Sports
Jim O’Connor njsportpics.com for The Westfield Leader and The Times
WHOOPS!...Raider co-captain Zach Lipshitz, No. 4, watches as Elizabeth MinutemanEduardo Fuentes, No. 10, loses his
balance while attempting to kick the ball in the North Jersey, Section 2, Group 4 championship game on November 13.
WAHTUSE SCORES, LONGO-TO-J. ROD-TO PETERSON
Raiders Stop Minutemen, 2-0
For Boys Soccer Section Title
By DAVID B. CORBIN
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
TACKLING A CANUCK...Cougar defensive back Donavin Walker, No. 36, brings down Canuck running back Naim
Hanks, No. 4, as teammates Eric Donahue, No. 44, Niko Cappello, No. 32 and Sean Leonard, No. 23, close in.
Page 15
Senior Jassiem Wahtuse sent a clear
message very early in the game then
a 1-2-3 punch that resulted in a goal
by sophomore Ryan Peterson
awarded the Scotch Plains-Fanwood
High School boys soccer team the
North Jersey, Section 2, Group 4
championship after shutting out Elizabeth, 2-0, in Scotch Plains on November 13. Although the Raiders have
won numerous sectional titles, it was
the first one at the Group 4 level.
The Raiders took nine shots on goal,
seven in the second half, and Minuteman goalkeeper Diego Pellejero made
six saves. The Minuteman took only
two shots on goal and Raider keeper
Tyler O’Brien made both saves. The
Raiders took four corner kicks and the
Minutemen took two.
The Raiders’ soccer version of
“small ball” had the Minutemen running around in circles throughout the
game. As a Minuteman approached a
Raider, he would simply give a light
tap to a teammate, who would con-
tinue the elusive process until an opening was found.
“That’s the way the game’s supposed to be played. Most high school
teams do a lot of kick-and-chase.
We’ve preached this, and preached
this and preached this and we are one
of the best teams in the state in terms
of keeping possession. They call it in
Spain ‘Tiki Taca’. The Spanish national team goes touch, touch, touch,
touch. We are not quite there, but I
think we do a pretty good job of it on
the high school level,” Raider Head
Coach Tom Breznitsky said.
“A lot of the teams that we play are
looking to kick the ball over the top
and we try to take advantage of that
by trying to play through them instead of over them. That’s what we do
by playing small ball,” Co-captain
Dan Babis said.
Jassiem Wahtuse’s goal with 36:48
on the clock in the first half set the pace.
“I gave the ball to him. It was right
down the middle. He has really good
control of the ball. It was a really
enjoyable goal,” Co-captain Justin
Rodriques said.
After a constant shelling throughout the second half, Rodriques slid a
ball into co-captain Jake Longo, who
slid the ball back to Rodriques on the
left. Rodrigues then spotted Peterson
in the center and slid the ball to him.
Peterson banged the ball into the net
with 16:01 on the clock.
“Justin had popped it out to me and
the only thought that was going
through my mind was to hold the ball
up. Justin was making a run toward
the corner. I played him in and he
served a perfect ball to Peterson,”
Longo said.
“I passed to him [Longo] and I told
him to hold it. I just saw Peterson
wide open, I gave it to him and he
finished it,” Rodriques said. “It was
the best feeling again. Having an
assist in the final is the best experience. I will never forget.”
“I had a gut feeling. That’s why I
got him up and I put him in. He’s only
a sophomore, but he knows how to
score goals,” Coach Breznitsky said.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 16
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© 2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.
An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.
Page 16
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, November 20, 2014
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Cougar Gridders Rap Canucks
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
WILD ACTION INSIDE...Raider Conor Danik, No. 2, tries to head the ball and
teammate Brian Howard, No. 14, attempts to get a foot on it while amongst a
group of Elizabeth Minutemen at Scotch Plains.
Raiders Stop Minutemen, 2-0
point conversion attempt came up a
yard short. Schetelich finished with
119 rushing yards and added TD runs
of two yards and eight yards. He also
completed three of six passes for 62
yards, including a 10-yard TD strike
to Joe Norton.
With 7:37 left in the first half,
Schetelich scored from the two to
complete a six-play, 36-yard drive. A
bad snap on the PAT kept the score at
19-0. The Canucks then scored their
only TD just before halftime.
The Canucks went three-and-out
to start the third quarter then the
Cougars answered with a four-play,
62-yard scoring drive when
Schetelich slipped in from the eight
with 8:00 on the clock. After
Cappello’s first sack forced a punt,
the Cougars came back with a six-
Canuck 47. Four plays later with 0:00
left in the third, Donavin Walker (7
carries, 61 yards) hooked in from the
11yard line.
On the ensuing kickoff, the Cougars forced a fumble and Brian
McGovern recovered it at the Canuck
34. Sophomore quarterback Brian
Oblachinski (2 carries, 26 yards, PAT)
engineered a six-play drive that ended
with Jake Palumbo plunging in from
the three for the TD with 8:21 remaining and setting up the “Mercy
Rule” timer.
In 10 games, the Cougars have
outscored opponents 406-129.
“That’s pretty impressive. Our offense is very good. We put like 40
points up per game. We [defense] try
to keep them on the field so they can
score,” Cappello said.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15
When needed, the Raiders’ defense
stepped up to the challenge and succeeded. Junior Joey Bianco managed
to knock away the Minutemen’s most
dangerous shot on goal.
“The real leader back there is Joey
Bianco. He has to be one of the finest
defenders in the state. He sees the
game very, very well. We haven’t
given up a goal in the state tournament. That was the 16th shutout of
the season. We’ve scored 82 and only
given up 10,” Coach Breznitsky
pointed out.
The victory was the third triumph
over the Minutemen this season with
respective, 1-0, and 3-0, wins during
the regular season.
“It’s always a tough fight against
Elizabeth. They’re always a good side,
but somehow we always find a way to
get it done,” Babis said. “It’s all about
the ‘W’.”
“It was a big game, last home game
for all the seniors. Very special! Plus
beating Elizabeth for the third time. I
didn’t want to go out any other way
other than beating them,” Lipshitz said.
The victory put the Raiders’ record
at 20-2-3. According to Coach
Breznitsky, “According to The StarLedger for state purposes, it’s 20-23, but that is only because we had a
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWN OF WESTFIELD
BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT
NOTICE OF DECISION
On November 12, 2014, the Zoning
Board of Adjustment of the Town of
Westfield adopted a Resolution granting
variances to the Applicants/Owners, John
& Courtney Mackin, for property located at
1070 Wychwood Road, Block 1404, Lot
1.01 on the Tax Map of the Town of
Westfield. The variance approvals will permit the construction of a 400 square foot
addition to the second story of the existing
single-family home. The Resolution is on
file and available for PUBLIC INSPECTION in the office of the Town Engineer,
959 North Avenue West, Westfield, New
Jersey, during that office’s normal business hours.
HEHL & HEHL, P.C.
Attorneys for the Applicants/Owners
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $20.40
PUBLIC NOTICE
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-037312-14
FILE NO. 18989-14
NOTICE TO ABSENT DEFENDANT
(L.S.) STATE OF NEW JERSEY TO:
DEBORAH FOWLER;
YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED AND
REQUIRED to serve upon PELLEGRINO
AND FELDSTEIN, LLC, plaintiff’s attorneys, whose address is 290 Route 46
West, Denville, New Jersey, an Answer to
the Complaint filed in a Civil Action, in
which US BANK AS CUST FOR TOWER
DBW II is the plaintiff and DEL INTERNATIONAL ENTERPRISES, INC., ET ALS;
are defendants, pending in the Superior
Court of New Jersey, Chancery Division,
UNION County and bearing Docket No. F037312-14 within thirty-five (35) days after
November 20, 2014 exclusive of such
date. If you fail to answer or appear in
accordance with Rule 4:4-6, Judgment by
Default may be rendered against you for
relief demanded in the Complaint. You
shall file your Answer and Proof of Service
in duplicate with the Clerk of the Superior
Court of New Jersey, Hughes Justice Complex - CN 971, Trenton, New Jersey 08625,
in accordance with the Rules of Civil Practice and Procedure.
You are further advised that if you are
unable to obtain an attorney you may communicate with the Lawyer Referral Service
of the County of Venue and that if you
cannot afford an attorney, you may communicate with the Legal Services Office of
the County of Venue. The telephone number of such agencies are as follows: Lawyer Referral Service 908-353-4715 - Legal
Services Office 908-354-4340.
THE ACTION has been instituted for the
purpose of foreclosing the following tax
sale certificate:
1. A certain tax certificate 12-0859, sold
on 6/14/2012, dated 6/20/2012, and was
recorded on 8/15/2012 in Book 13391 at
Page 242, made by MARIA GLAVAN,
Collector of Taxes of PLAINFIELD, and
State of New Jersey to US BANK AS CUST
FOR TOWER DBW II and subsequently
assigned to plaintiff, US BANK AS CUST
FOR TOWER DBW II. This covers real
estate located in PLAINFIELD, County of
UNION, and State of New Jersey, known
as LOT 19 BLOCK 231 as shown on the
Tax Assessment Map and Tax Map duplicate of PLAINFIELD and concerns premises commonly known as 709-11 WEST
FRONT SREET, PLAINFIELD, New Jersey.
YOU, DEBORAH FOWLER, are made
party defendant to the above foreclosure
action because on July 9, 2013, a judgment was entered in the Superior Court of
New Jersey, Union County, by Deborah
Fowler against Del International Enterprises disclosing a debt in the amount of
$5,820.00, plus costs. Said judgment was
entered as Judgment No. J-128742-2013.
Said judgment is subordinate to the
Plaintiff’s lien.
DATED: November 13, 2014
Michelle M. Smith, Clerk
Superior Court of New Jersey
PELLEGRINO & FELDSTEIN, L.L.C.
Denville Law Center
290 Route 46 West
Denville, New Jersey 07834
(973) 586-2300
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $68.34
forfeit against Union [first game of
season] because the referee at the end
of last season, put down the wrong
number for a kid and we ended up
forfeiting that game.”
The Raiders last won a section tournament in 2011 (Group 3), and after
suffering a shootout loss to the Millburn
Millers in the 2012 finals and a 1-0 loss
to them again in the 2013 semifinals,
this victory was sweet.
“It’s incredible, but the season
means nothing if we don’t win the
state championship,” Babis said. “We
got two more.”
“This year, we have a very mature
squad. We come out to practice and
business is business. It’s not a lot of
goofing off. Once we get to the game,
it’s all seriousness. We came out here
knowing what we had to get done and
we did it. There’s one left to do. The
state finals,” Longo said.
Lipshitz added, “Union County
championship, sectional championship
would mean nothing if we don’t win a
state championship. That’s our goal.
We put our minds to it. All the hard
work we did in Costa Rica, running
after scrimmages, running basically all
of preseason was for this moment.”
Elizabeth
Sc. Pl-Fanwood
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PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWN OF WESTFIELD
BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT
Notice is hereby given that Westfield
Board of Adjustment adopted resolutions
at its meeting on November 12, 2014 for
the following applications decided upon at
its meeting held on October 15, 2014.
Mark & Heather McMahill, 614 Kimball
Avenue. Applicant sought approval to
construct a front porch contrary to 12.04F
and 12.03D of the Land Use Ordinance to
allow a building coverage of 21.4% where
a maximum of 20% is allowed and to allow
a front yard setback of 29.13 feet where a
setback of 30.13 is required. Application
approved with conditions.
Joseph & Christine Ruberto, 302
Belmar Place. Applicant sought approval
to construct a second story dormer contrary to Section 11.09E6 and 11.09E5 of
the Land Use Ordinance to allow a side
yard setback of 8.5 feet where a minimum
of 10 feet is required and to allow a street
side yard setback of 15.5 feet where a
minimum of 20 feet is required. Application
approved with conditions.
Jason & Lori Lamonica, 435 Topping
Hill Road. Applicant sought approval to
construct a first story addition, a second
story addition and a deck over 4 feet in
height contrary to Sections 11.07E7 and
12.04F of the Land Use Ordinance to allow
a rear yard setback of 31.1 feet where a
minimum of 35 feet is required and to allow
a building coverage of 24.7% where a
maximum of 20% is allowed. Application
approved with conditions.
David & Lori Schlewitt, 1249 Boulevard. Applicant sought approval to construct a front porch contrary to Section
12.04F3 of the Land Use Ordinance to
allow a building coverage with a porch of
24.9% where a maximum of 23.5%. Application approved with conditions.
Shingshan Liu, 5 Sunnywood Drive.
Applicant sought approval to construct a
single family home contrary to Section
11.05.E6 of the Land Use Ordinance to
allow a side yard setback of 13 feet where
a minimum of 15 feet is required. Application denied.
Mathew & Rachael Swiat, 816 Tice
Place. Applicant sought approval to add a
carport to the existing detached garage
contrary to Sections 12.04F1 and
13.01G1b of the Land Use Ordinance to
allow a building coverage of 21% where a
maximum of 20% is allowed and to allow a
setback of 2.4 feet where a minimum of 10
feet is required. Application approved with
conditions.
Michael & Jennifer Basta, 431 Colonial Avenue. Applicant sought approval
to construct first and second floor additions, third floor habitable space, a new
entrance portico and a raised rear terrace
contrary to Sections 11.08E5, 11.08E10,
and 11.08E8 of the Land Use Ordinance to
allow a front yard setback of 35.7 feet
where 37.35 feet is required; to allow a
building coverage of 21.97%/2.470.35
square feet where a maximum of 20%/
2,250 square feet is allowed; to allow a
building height of 33.5 feet where a maximum of 32 feet is allowed and to allow 3
stories where a maximum of 2.5 is allowed.
Application approved with conditions.
Kalina Warmington, 201 Linden Avenue. Applicant sought approval to demolish the existing detached garage and
construct a two car garage contrary to
Section 11.06E14 of the Land Use Ordinance to allow a front facing garage to be
set forward of the main façade 5.5 feet
where a minimum set back of 2 feet from
the front façade is required. Application
denied.
John & Courtney Mackin, 1070
Wychwood Road. Applicant sought approval to construct a second story addition
contrary to Section 12.04E1 of the Land
Use Ordinance to allow a habitable floor
area of 4,421 square feet where a maximum of 4,000 square feet is allowed. Application approved with conditions.
Plans and applications are on file in the
office of the Town Engineer, 959 North
Avenue West, Westfield, New Jersey and
may be seen Monday through Friday from
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Kathleen Nemeth
Secretary, Board of Adjustment
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $88.74
Courtesy of Laura Ortiz for The Westfield Leader and The Times
SACKED...Westfield Freshman football team linebacker Shea Elliott, No. 43,
sacks the quarterback and forces a fumble (recovered by Fran Alliegro, not
pictured) in the 22-6 victory over Plainfield on November 15. The win capped off
a 7-2-1 season for the Freshman team.
SPF PAL ‘A’ Knocks Off
Richmond Boro in Semi, 22-12
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
ABOUT TO DODGE A DEFENDER...Cougar running back Luke Christiano,
No. 21, figures to slip around Canuck defensive back Naim Hanks, No. 4.
play, 60-yard drive, capped with
Schetelich’s 10-yard TD strike to
Norton, who also added his third PAT
of the game to make the score, 32-6.
Cappello came through with his
second sack on a fourth down, allowing the Cougars to take over at the
Reading is Good For You
The Cougars will host West Essex,
victors over Voorhees, in the semifinal round tomorrow, Friday, November 21 at 7:00 p.m.
“Everybody knows who West
Essex is and the program’s success
that they had. We knew they were
going to be a tough out for anyone
based on the schedule that they
played. None of the A teams are scared
of anybody in the playoffs. It’s going
to be a great challenge for us. It’s
great that they are coming here because of the familiarity of playing at
home,” Coach Rosenmeier said.
North Plainfield
Cranford
0 6 0
7 12 20
0
7
6
46
Probitas Verus Honos
goleader.com/subscribe
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Scotch Plains-Fanwood PAL
A team will attempt to cap an outstanding five-year run with a league
championship when the Raiders meet
Summit in the New Jersey Suburban
Youth Football League’s Super Bowl
this Sunday, November 23, in Perth
Amboy at 2 p.m.
The Raiders knocked off rival Richmond Boro of Staten Island, 22-12,
in the semifinals on November 16 in
Bloomfield. Summit recorded a 40-0
triumph over Sayre Woods South in
the other semifinal.
Since the Raiders under head coach
Luke Fugett began play in the
NJSYFL in 2010, they have amassed
a 41-4-3 record. That five-year surge
was highlighted by the 2011 D team
that won the Super Bowl and ended
with an 11-0 record. This year’s A
team stands at 9-0-1. Summit boasts
a 10-0 record.
It is only fitting that SPF and Summit meet in this Super Bowl since the
players on these two teams are the
only programs that won Super Bowls
since they began competing in the
league playoffs. The Raiders won
that D level championship in 2011
and then Summit has won the past
two Super Bowls – C level in 2012
and B level last fall.
The Raiders hit Richmond on the
first play in the semifinal when
Jonathan Ramos took a handoff and
then cut to his left and dashed 65
yards for a touchdown. Charlie
Fugett’s conversion kick made the
score 8-0.
Richmond cut the lead to 8-6 with
a touchdown, but the Raiders rebounded on the ensuing play from
scrimmage when Alex Oslislo zipped
65 yards up the middle to the end
zone.
Richmond added another touchdown, but Oslislo took a pitch around
end, picked up a solid block from
receiver Nick Merkel and was off on
41-yard TD run. Fugett’s PAT kick
gave made the score 22-12 at the half.
The Raider defense ruled in the
second half, stopping Richmond twice
on fourth-down conversions. Oslislo,
a linebacker, ended with seven and a
half tackles and an interception, while
he was the leading rusher with 136
yards on 12 carries. Ramos ran 12
times for 118 yards and also delivered
key hits and finished with six tackles
in the secondary.
Two-way tackle Nicky Smith, who
anchored a sturdy offensive line, concluded with seven and a half tackles,
while linebacker Ryan Johnson, who
came through a key TD a week earlier in the playoff victory over Perth
Amboy, had five tackles, and end
Tom Nakonechny collected four tackles. Tackle Billy Root, linebacker
Noah Costanzo and backs Mateo
Velez, Antony Porter and Danny
Wright also provided strong defense.
Linemen Gianni Caro Esposito, Jay
Jay Sistrunk, Matt Fazzino, Doug
Tibbals and Root produced solid
blocking.
The win was the second victory
over Richmond this season, having
recorded a 7-0 shutout on September
28 in Scotch Plains.
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWN OF WESTFIELD
NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL ESTATE FOR NON-PAYMENT OF TAXES AND
ASSESSMENTS AND/OR OTHER MUNICIPAL LIENS
Public notice is hereby given that I, The Collector of Taxes of the Town of Westfield,
Union County, New Jersey, will sell at public auction on the 12th day of December, 2014
in the Tax Collector’s office in the Municipal Building, 425 East Broad Street, Westfield,
New Jersey, at nine o’clock in the morning, the following described lands:
The said lands will be sold to make the amount of Municipal liens chargeable against
that same on the 12th day of December, 2014, together with interest and cost of sale,
exclusive however, of the lien for taxes for the year 2014.
The said lands will be sold in fee to such persons as will purchase the same, subject
to redemption at the lowest rate of interest, but in no case in excess of eighteen percent
(18%) per annum. Payments for the sale shall be made by cash or certified check before
conclusion of the sale or the property will be resold.
Any parcel of real property for which there shall be no other purchaser will be struck off
and sold to the Municipality in fee for redemption at eighteen percent (18%) per annum
and the Municipality shall have the right to bar or foreclose the right of redemption.
The sale will be made and conducted in accordance with the provisions of Article 4 of
Chapter 5 of Title 54, Revised Statutes of New Jersey , 1937, and amendments thereto.
At any time before the sale the undersigned will receive payment of the amount due on
the property, with interest and costs incurred up to the time of payments, by certified check
or cash.
Industrial properties may be subject to the Spill Compensation and Control Act
(N.J.S.A. 58:10-23.11 et seq.), the Water Pollution Control Act (N.J.S.A 58:10A-1 et seq.)
and the Industrial Site Recovery Act (N.J.S.A. 13:1K-6 et seq.) In addition, the municipality
is precluded from issuing a tax sale certificate to any prospective purchaser who is or may
be in any way connected to the prior owner or operator of the site.
The said lands so subject to sale, described in accordance with the tax duplicate,
including the name of the owner as shown on the last duplicate and the total amount due
thereon respectively on the 12th day of December, 2014, exclusive of the lien for the year
2014 are as listed below:
Susan Noon
Collector of Taxes
Westfield, New Jersey
BK/LT/QUAL
OWNER
PROPERTY LOCATION
AMOUNT
2512 27
2606 1
4805 4
TAX & SEWER
Centennial Lodge #400 IBOP Elks 440 West Broad Street
$5,053.29
Mormile Brothers
1144 South Avenue West $6,438.78
Billing, Glen A.
923 Columbus Avenue
$13,918.77
2510
2802
3006
3405
3906
4004
4104
4301
4803
4901
5504
Buontempo, Richard A.
Aguirre, Donna Contreras M.
C F G R, LLC
Matos, Nelson
Cacici, Charles J.
Winsor, Barbara Franklin
Vavrica, Anthony J.
Buontempo, Richard
C F G R, LLC
Willoughby, Harry
Kania, Joseph & Suzanne
TAX
10
1
5
7
6
43
11
35
2
45
17
716-718 South Avenue W $5,955.25
601 First Street
$10,628.48
430 Central Avenue
$4,598.83
727 Fourth Avenue
$455.00
299 Springfield Avenue $3,815.24
229 Windsor Avenue
$1,492.22
218 Grove Street West
$5,998.37
670 Vermont Street
$960.23
214 Grove Street East
$54,364.59
1103 Boynton Avenue
$2,495.36
154 Summit Court
$6,311.67
SEWER
703/5 - 831-10
Donofrio, Michael J.
705/10 - 868-0
Maset, Jennifer & Timothy
707/20.01- 919-0 Barham, Patrick A. & Charleen
907/18 - 1378-0 Nuber, Paul T & Mary E
1002/4 - 1420-0 Giere, John P. & Kimberly K. Koivisto
1005/18- 1564-0 Kudlick, Catherine O.
1005/24 - 1570-0 Greene, Desmond & Janice
1111/3- 1792-0 Carey, William & Dallenback, Alison
1203/33- 1877-0 Finter, Steven W.
1304/48- 2130-0 Fitzpatrick, Brian & Jennifer
2003/56-2492-0 Stern- Su-Ellyn
2701/7-3706-0
Robustelli, Christopher & Lorraine
2804/2-4005-0
Schappel, Mark & Kathy
2904/5-4443-0
Fisher, Bruce, Estate of
3002/16-4678-0 Calavano, Joseph & Nina
3506/36-5792-0 Schiff, Jeffery & Joyce M.
4001/5-6138-0
Weiner, Lawrence
4001/22-6155-0 Bolaji, Karen A.
4001/65-6197-0 Cooper, Frederick & Paulette
4002/2-6260-0
Clairborne, Vanita
4002/5-6263-0
Wilkerson, Aman& Friend, Martha
4005/5-6347-0
Todisco, Frank III & Diana
4504/20-7194-0 Konstantinidis,John-Stojcic,Snezana
4801/1- 7608-0 Schuman, Regina
4905/5-8005-0
Lombardo, Jennifer &Francisco,Pinho
5204/24-8827-0 Desapio, Antonio & Martin
5502/13.01-9036-0 Lopes,James & Wisehart, Dana
5504/2-9081-0
Whitman,Andrew E & Victoria L
5505/6-9115-0
Ondi, Peter & Dawn
5714/6-9582-0
113 Connecticut Street Trust
928 Everts Avenue
$208.08
937 Fanwood Avenue
$208.08
215 Brightwood Avenue $199.47
420 Dudley Avenue West $199.62
641 Elm Street
$208.08
150 Dudley Avenue West $208.08
534 Clark Street
$207.84
408 Dudley Avenue East $197.80
601 Chestnut Street North$208.08
711 Girard Avenue
$199.88
128 Woodland Avenue
$208.08
786 West Broad Street
$208.08
702 Shadowlawn Drive
$208.08
614 Dorian Road
$208.08
356 First Street
$151.02
733 Marcellus Drive
$197.39
122 Cacciola Place
$182.55
204 Livingston Street
$208.08
242 Windsor Avenue
$201.17
612 Ripley Place
$158.07
620 Ripley Place
$207.21
313 Myrtle Avenue
$208.08
7 Willow Grove Parkway $208.08
120 Greene Place
$362.48
233 Avon Road
$200.53
25 North Wickom Drive
$208.08
42 Moss Avenue
$208.08
74 Summit Court
$197.40
113 Summit Court
$208.08
113 Connecticut Street
$208.08
In the event that the owner of the property is on Active Duty in the Military Service, the
Tax Collector should be notified immediately.
4 T - 11/13, 11/20, 11/27 & 12/04/14, The Leader
Fee: $579.36
UNDEFEATED IN SOCCER...The 8-0-2 Westfield U11 Girls Team Power were
Flight 1 Champs in Mid New Jersey. Pictured, left to right, are: bottom row;
Avery Hoeft, Kelly Sullivan, Zhana Velkov, Chloe Kreusser, Megan Sandstedt
and Elise Fox; second row, Arden Meyer, Gillian Strout, Ali Verga, Katey
Peretz, Isabelle Gauthier, Meghan O’Connor and Ellie Sherman; third row,
Assistant Coach Chris Kreusser, Coach/Trainer Neil Radley and Assistant
Coach Evgeniy Velkov.
PUBLIC NOTICE
BOROUGH OF GARWOOD
ORDINANCE 14-13
THIS ORDINANCE REPEALS
THE EXISTING CHAPTER 126
OF THE CODE OF THE BOROUGH OF GARWOOD PERTAINING TO PARKS, FACILITIES, PLAYGROUNDS AND
RECREATION AND REPLACES IT WITH A NEW
CHAPTER 126 PERTAINING
TO PARK, FACILITIES, PLAYGROUNDS AND RECREATION. THE ORDINANCE
GOVERNS USE OF THE
PARKS, FACILITIES AND
PLAYGROUNDS, ESTABLISHES A PERMIT PROCEDURE AND FEES FOR
PARKS, FACILITIES AND
PLAYGROUNDS,
SETS
FORTH REQUIREMENTS
FOR CRIMINAL HISTORY
BACKGROUND CHECKS
FOR VOLUNTEERS AND
PUBLIC EMPLOYEES AND
ESTABLISHES A PROCEDURE FOR THE SETTING OF
FEES FOR RECREATION
PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES.
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that Ordinance
No. 14-13, was introduced and passed on
first reading at a meeting of the Borough
Council of the Borough of Garwood, in the
County of Union, State of New Jersey, held
on the 18th DAY OF NOVEMBER 2014,
and that Ordinance No. 14-13, will be taken
up for further consideration for final passage at the meeting of said Borough Council to be held at its meeting room in the
Municipal Building, 403 South Avenue,
Garwood, New Jersey, on the 9th DAY OF
DECEMBER 2014, at 7:15 p.m., or as
soon thereafter as said matter can be
heard, at which time and place all persons
who may be interested therein will be given
an opportunity to be heard concerning the
same.
ATTEST:
Christina Ariemma
Municipal Clerk
Borough of Garwood
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $46.92
PUBLIC NOTICE
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-023065-14
FILE NO. 18691-14
NOTICE TO REDEEM
US BANK CUST/EMP IV CAP
ONE;
PLAINTIFF
VS.
PASQUALE MEGARO; JODY
MEGARO; DEFENDANT(S)
TO: JODY MEGARO;
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that an order
made on November 13, 2014, the Superior Court Fixed December 29, 2014 between the hours of nine o’clock in the
forenoon and four o’clock in the afternoon,
prevailing time, at the office of the Tax
Collector of RAHWAY, located at 1 CITY
HALL PLAZA, RAHWAY, NEW JERSEY
07065 as the time and place when and
where you may pay to the plaintiff the
amount so found due for principal and
interest on its certificate of tax sale as
follows:
LOT 7 BLOCK 153 on the tax duplicate
of RAHWAY. Total amount required to
redeem tax sale certificate no. 20120105
is $35,512.01, together with interest from
September 30, 2014 and costs of
$1,220.27.
And that unless, at the same time and
place, you or one of you redeem by paying
the aforesaid sum so found due to plaintiff,
then you, and each of you shall be debarred and foreclosed of and from all right
and equity of redemption of, in and to the
lands and premises above set out and
described in the complaint and every part
thereof, and that the plaintiff be vested with
an absolute and indefeasible estate of
inheritance in fee simple in said lands and
premises.
Anything to the contrary notwithstanding, redemption shall be permitted up until
the entry of final judgment including the
whole of the last date upon which judgment is entered.
Michael G. Pellegrino, Esq.
Attorney for Plaintiff
PELLEGRINO & FELDSTEIN, L.L.C.
290 Route 46 West
Denville, New Jersey 07834
(973) 586-2300
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $45.90
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, November 20, 2014
Page 17
Westfield Boosters Upgrade
Locker Room at Kehler
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
WESTFIELD — The Westfield
Boosters, in collaboration with the
Westfield Board of Education, have
provided a $100,000 upgrade to the
Kehler Stadium Fieldhouse locker
room facility that is used by participants of multiple sports programs,
including football, soccer, lacrosse,
cross-country and track.
The Westfield Boosters’ Locker
Room Project replaced the 30-plusyear-old lockers in both the Varsity
and Visitors locker rooms with new
metal lockers complete with built-in
The improvements also included
new lighting in both locker rooms,
new locker cement pads, new black/
blue rubber flooring throughout the
facility and the repainting of all walls
and ceilings.
The Boosters included a new
speaker and sound system that was
installed for the athletes’ enjoyment,
along with a blue game clock. As a
finishing touch, over the doorway
from the locker room out to the field,
a sign was placed inscribed with “Play
like a Blue Devil Today!” All players
HEADING TO THE ROCKIES...Cranford Cougar Dan Fay, flanked by his
parents Kelley and Dan, with his sister Delaney on the left, will be heading to the
Rockies next fall to play lacrosse at Colorado Mesa. Pictured in the back are
Director of Athletics Darren Torsone and Assistant Coach Nick Filipone.
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
BUCKNELL BOUND...Cranford senior Julie Byrnes flanked by her sister
Lauren, left, and parents Mary Beth and Jim on the right, will continue her swim
career at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pa. in the fall. Pictured in the back
are Director of Athletics Darren Torsone and Barb Kolesa.
Westfield PAL D Shuts Out
Richmond Grid Kids, 21-0
The Westfield PAL D football team
scored a decisive 21-0 victory over
Richmond Boro at in Bloomfield on
November 16 in a rematch played on
October 26 that Westfield won 13-6.
“Richmond Boro is a very tough
team,” noted coach Peter Gialluisi.
“We were fortunate to escape with
the victory earlier this season and
knew we would have our hands full
this go-around.”
Each team’s defense halted the
other in the first half. However, with
:30 seconds remaining until halftime,
quarterback Steven Angeli and receiver James Haley hooked up on a
60-yard pitch and catch that gave
Westfield a 7-0 lead.
Westfield got its ground game
untracked and began moving the ball
with more success in the second half.
“Our offensive line really did a
nice job of sticking their blocks, and
our running backs were punishing
them as well,” added Gialluisi. “We
were in better condition and we simply wore them down.”
Jaylen Simpson (TD) and Justin
Colby paced a ground attack that saw
eight different players run the football.
The other ground gainers were Angeli,
Jack Barker, James Haley, Tyler Sontz,
David Link and Nick Deis. In the passing game, TE Barker (TD) and SE Link
added key receptions.
The Blue Devil defense played even
better, holding Richmond Boro without a first down for the entire game.
“Richmond pushed us around a little
bit in our first match-up,” noted defensive assistant Keith Sheper. “Today, our
boys were prepared for the physical
style of play and showed great determination in securing the shout out.”
Sheper highlighted the play of DT
Nick Schoen for his defensive efforts.
The Blue Devils will now face
Sayer Woods South in the NJSYFL
Super Bowl on November 23 at Perth
Amboy at 10 a.m.
Westfield PAL ‘B’ Defeats
Sparta Grid Kids, 46-24
GREAT NEW LOOK...Members of the Westfield Boosters are joined by representatives of the Westfield athletics program to celebrate the success of the
Westfield Boosters’ Locker Room Project, which upgraded the Varsity and
Visitors locker room facilities at the Kehler Stadium Fieldhouse. Pictured, from
left to right, are: Head Football Coach Jim DeSarno, Booster Frank Fusaro,
President of the Boosters Jeff Bryk, Westfield Athletics Supervisor Sandy
Mamary and Booster Steve Simcox.
benches wide enough to fit and secure
athletes’ book bags. In total, 180 lockers were installed, including 96 large
open front lockers — 76 in the Varsity
locker room and 20 in the Visitors
locker room — and an additional 84
double tier lockers in the Visitors locker
room, replacing 130 antiquated lockers. It took 10 days to “cut” the old
lockers out of the facility.
PUBLIC NOTICE
UNION COUNTY BOARD
OF CHOSEN FREEHOLDERS
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARD
Date Adopted: 11/13/14
Public Notice is hereby given that the
Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders has awarded a contract without competitive bidding as an Professional service
pursuant to N.J.S.A.40A:11-5(1)(a) (i). This
contract and the resolution authorizing it is
available for public inspection in the Office
of the Clerk of the Board.
RESOLUTION NO: 2014-913
REWARDED TO: Richard Hogans,
Rahway, New Jersey
SERVICES: to provide 10 hours of religious services and counseling per week
for the Protestant inmates in the Union
County Jail
PERIOD: January 1, 2015- December
31, 2015
COSTS: in an amount not to exceed
$6,438.00
James E. Pellettiere, Clerk
of the Board Chosen Freeholders
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $22.95
AMERICAN CONFERENCE CHAMPIONS...The Westfield PAL D Team celebrates their victory over Richmond Boro, which earned them the NJSYFL
American Conference title and a trip to the NJSYFL Super Bowl.
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
UNION COUNTY BOARD
OF CHOSEN FREEHOLDERS
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARD
Date Adopted: 11/13/14
Public Notice is hereby given that the
Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders has awarded a contract without competitive bidding as an Professional service
pursuant to N.J.S.A.40A:11-5(1)(a) (i). This
contract and the resolution authorizing it is
available for public inspection in the Office
of the Clerk of the Board.
UNION COUNTY BOARD
OF CHOSEN FREEHOLDERS
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARD
Date Adopted: 11/13/14
Public Notice is hereby given that the
Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders has awarded a contract without competitive bidding as an Professional service
pursuant to N.J.S.A.40A:11-5(1)(a) (i). This
contract and the resolution authorizing it is
available for public inspection in the Office
of the Clerk of the Board.
RESOLUTION NO: 2014-931
amending (Resolution No. 2014-622)
REWARDED TO: Kologi Simitz of Linden, New Jersey
SERVICES: in the matter entitled:
Shiquon Fowler v. UC, et als.
COSTS: in an amount not to exceed
$10,000.00 for a sum not to exceed
$20,000.00
James E. Pellettiere, Clerk
of the Board Chosen Freeholders
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $21.42
RESOLUTION NO: 2014-929
amending (Resolution No. 2014-621)
REWARDED TO: Antonelli Minchello,
PC of Union, New Jersey
SERVICES: in the matter entitled:
Shiquon Fowler v. UC, et als.
COSTS: in an amount not to exceed
$10,000.00 for a sum not to exceed
$20,000.00
James E. Pellettiere, Clerk
of the Board Chosen Freeholders
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $21.42
PUBLIC NOTICE
UNION COUNTY BOARD
OF CHOSEN FREEHOLDERS
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARD
Date Adopted: 11/13/14
Public Notice is hereby given that the
Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders has awarded a contract without competitive bidding as an Professional service
pursuant to N.J.S.A.40A:11-5(1)(a) (i). This
contract and the resolution authorizing it is
available for public inspection in the Office
of the Clerk of the Board.
traditionally touch it on the way out
to Kehler Field, as it connects them to
all the Westfield players who have
come before them.
The Westfield PAL “B” football
team continued its winning ways in
the NJSYFL playoffs with a decisive,
46-24 victory over Sparta on November 16.
Timmy Alliegro started the scoring on the first play of the game by
running 65 yards for a score behind
some great blocking from Bryan
Felter, Declan McCauley, Jonny
Bracco, Joe Muselli, Matt O’Connor,
Colin Freer, Jake Zrebiec and Henry
Meiselman. Alliegro would tally five
touchdowns in total in catching a 45yard TD screen pass and also running
15, 65, and 75 yards for scores.
Griffin Rooney added another
touchdown on a two-yard run that
was set up by his 35-yard scamper
and Colin Elliott hauled in a 15-yard
touchdown pass from Hank Shapiro.
In all, Westfield racked up over 425
yards of total offense.
As well as the offense performed,
the defense was also up to the task.
The Blue Devils stifled the Bears’
attack with a swarming defense that
recorded many great sacks and tackles. Notable plays were by Sean Link,
Nick Martini, Brendan Harrington,
Reid Colwell, John Czarnecki, Colin
Freer and Doug Moore.
Next up for the team will be a trip
to the NJSYFL Superbowl.
PUBLIC NOTICE
UNION COUNTY BOARD
OF CHOSEN FREEHOLDERS
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARD
Date Adopted: 11/13/14
Public Notice is hereby given that the
Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders has awarded a contract without competitive bidding as an Professional service
pursuant to N.J.S.A.40A:11-5(1)(a) (i). This
contract and the resolution authorizing it is
available for public inspection in the Office
of the Clerk of the Board.
RESOLUTION NO: 2014-928
amending (Resolution No. 2014-626)
REWARDED TO: Florio & Kenny, LLP
of Hoboken, New Jersey
SERVICES: in the matter entitled:
Shiquon Fowler v. UC, et als.
COSTS: in an amount not to exceed
$10,000.00 for a sum not to exceed
$20,000.00
James E. Pellettiere, Clerk
of the Board Chosen Freeholders
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $21.42
BREAKING THROUGH FOR A TD…Timmy Alliegro breaks through the
defense for a touchdown in the Westfield PAL “B” team’s victory over Sparta.
Mary McEnerney, CRS, GRI, SRES
NJAR Circle of Excellence Award: 1977-2013
Direct Line: (908) 301-2052
Cell: (908) 578-8198
Email: [email protected]
OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, November 23rd • 1-4 PM
RESOLUTION NO: 2014-915
REWARDED TO: Patricia Kane, Newark, New Jersey
SERVICES: to provide 5 hours of religious services and counseling per week
for the Islamic female inmates in the Union
County Jail
PERIOD: January 1, 2015- December
31, 2015
COSTS: in an amount not to exceed
$3,218.00
James E. Pellettiere, Clerk
of the Board Chosen Freeholders
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $22.95
PUBLIC NOTICE
UNION COUNTY BOARD
OF CHOSEN FREEHOLDERS
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARD
Date Adopted: 11/13/14
Public Notice is hereby given that the
Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders has awarded a contract without competitive bidding as an Professional service
pursuant to N.J.S.A.40A:11-5(1)(a) (i). This
contract and the resolution authorizing it is
available for public inspection in the Office
of the Clerk of the Board.
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
UNION COUNTY BOARD
OF CHOSEN FREEHOLDERS
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARD
Date Adopted: 11/13/14
Public Notice is hereby given that the
Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders has awarded a contract without competitive bidding as an Professional service
pursuant to N.J.S.A.40A:11-5(1)(a) (i). This
contract and the resolution authorizing it is
available for public inspection in the Office
of the Clerk of the Board.
UNION COUNTY BOARD
OF CHOSEN FREEHOLDERS
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARD
Date Adopted: 11/13/14
Public Notice is hereby given that the
Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders has awarded a contract without competitive bidding as an Professional service
pursuant to N.J.S.A.40A:11-5(1)(a) (i). This
contract and the resolution authorizing it is
available for public inspection in the Office
of the Clerk of the Board.
RESOLUTION NO: 2014-938
amending (Resolution No. 2014-362)
REWARDED TO: Palumbo & Renaud
of Cranford, New Jersey
SERVICES: in the matter entitled: Richmond Lapolla v. UC, et als.
COSTS: in an amount not to exceed
$15,000.00 for a sum not to exceed
$55,000.00
James E. Pellettiere, Clerk
of the Board Chosen Freeholders
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $21.42
RESOLUTION NO: 2014-937
amending (Resolution No. 2014-620)
REWARDED TO: Palumbo & Renaud
of Cranford, New Jersey
SERVICES: in the matter entitled:
Shiquon Fowler v. UC, et als.
COSTS: in an amount not to exceed
$10,000.00 for a sum not to exceed
$20,000.00
James E. Pellettiere, Clerk
of the Board Chosen Freeholders
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $21.42
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
UNION COUNTY BOARD
OF CHOSEN FREEHOLDERS
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARD
Date Adopted: 11/13/14
Public Notice is hereby given that the
Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders has awarded a contract without competitive bidding as an Professional service
pursuant to N.J.S.A.40A:11-5(1)(a) (i). This
contract and the resolution authorizing it is
available for public inspection in the Office
of the Clerk of the Board.
UNION COUNTY BOARD
OF CHOSEN FREEHOLDERS
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARD
Date Adopted: 11/13/14
Public Notice is hereby given that the
Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders has awarded a contract without competitive bidding as an Professional service
pursuant to N.J.S.A.40A:11-5(1)(a) (i). This
contract and the resolution authorizing it is
available for public inspection in the Office
of the Clerk of the Board.
UNION COUNTY BOARD
OF CHOSEN FREEHOLDERS
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARD
Date Adopted: 11/13/14
Public Notice is hereby given that the
Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders has awarded a contract without competitive bidding as an extraordinary
unspecifiable service pursuant to N.J.S.A.
40A:11-5(1)(a) (11). This contract and the
resolution authorizing it is available for
public inspection in the Office of the Clerk
of the Board.
RESOLUTION NO: 2014-927
amending (Resolution No. 2014-361)
REWARDED TO: Bauch, Zucker,
Hatfield, LLC of Springfield, New Jersey
SERVICES: in the matter entitled:
Beverly Figueroa v. UC, et als.
COSTS: in an amount not to exceed
$25,000.00 for a sum not to exceed
$190,000.00
James E. Pellettiere, Clerk
of the Board Chosen Freeholders
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $22.44
RESOLUTION NO: 2014-926
amending (Resolution No. 2014-363)
REWARDED TO: LaCorte, Bundy,
Varady & Kinsella of Union, New Jersey
SERVICES: in the matter entitled: Richmond Lapolla v. UC, et als.
COSTS: in an amount not to exceed
$10,000.00 for a sum not to exceed
$40,000.00
James E. Pellettiere, Clerk
of the Board Chosen Freeholders
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $22.44
RESOLUTION NO: 2014-897
amending (Resolution No. 2014-576)
AWARDED TO: Catholic Charities
Archdiocese of Newark
SERVICES: to provide services to existing Catholic Charities Program
PERIOD: March 1, 2014- August 31,
2015
COSTS: in the amount of $300,000 for a
new total amount of $1,415,193.20
James E. Pellettiere, Clerk
of the Board Chosen Freeholders
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $22.95
RESOLUTION NO: 2014-916
REWARDED TO: Aramark Correctional Service, Atlanta, GA
SERVICES: to provide food services for
the Union County Jail and the Juvenile
Detention Center
PERIOD: January 1, 2015- November
12, 2015
COSTS: in an amount not to exceed
$1,050,000.00
James E. Pellettiere, Clerk
of the Board Chosen Freeholders
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $22.44
PUBLIC NOTICE
18 BREEZE KNOLL
Mountainside...Spectacular 6 bedroom, 4.3 bath Center Hall Colonial, set on .63 acre property,
offers a fabulous floor plan with sophisticated elegance. Four levels of living space may be
accessed via the home’s elevator. Grand foyer opens to the formal living room with fireplace and
spacious dining room. Stunning two-story great room with a second fireplace and custom builtins. Adjacent large eat-in kitchen with center island, wet bar and separate dining area overlooks
the expansive grounds/deck. Library, office, mud room complete the first level. The second level
features a Master “retreat” with sitting room and luxurious spa bath plus three other bedrooms.
The third level has two additional bedrooms. Beautifully finished lower level. Three car garage
and an abundance of amenities throughout. Private setting yet close to Westfield restaurants,
shopping and commuter transportation. Offered at $2,000,000.
COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE
WESTFIELD EAST OFFICE • 209 CENTRAL AVENUE • (908) 233-5555 EXT. 189
© 2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.
An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.
Page 18
Thursday, November 20, 2014
CLASSIFIEDS
HELP WANTED
HOME HEALTH AIDE NEEDED
Looking for reliable, responsible
pet loving adult for pet sitting/
dog walking position. Must be
available days 11am-3pm. Start
immediately. Call (908) 928-1748
or (908) 416-7434.
Polish/German person needed
to care for elderly woman. Own
Transportation a must.
Call (908) 838-5478
CONDO RENTAL-CRANFORD
Cranford-1Brd/1bath in park-like
setting; walk to train; available Jan
1: $1,300/mos + 1.5 mo security
plus credit check; no pets;
(908) 317-9788
CHILDCARE NEEDED
Nannies - Housekeepers
BabyNurses Needed
Live-in / -out, Full/Part-time
Solid References Required.
CALL (732) 972-4090
www.absolutebestcare.com
FIREWOOD
Split hardwood. Our stock is
90% oak, seasoned for min. of
7 months. Full Cord $180/Half
Cord $100. Free local delivery.
Heron's Tree Service
(908) 757-3318
Probitas Verus Honos
Garwood Knights
Holding Food Drive
GARWOOD — The Garwood
Knights of Columbus are collecting
canned and dry food goods, turkeys
and hams for their holiday food drives.
Food baskets will be distributed to
needy families in Garwood and the
surrounding areas during November
and December.
Donations can be dropped off after
4 p.m. weekdays at the Knights’
Council Hall, located at 37 South
Avenue, Garwood, opposite
Pathmark. On weekends, individuals
are asked to first call (908) 789-9809.
Parking is located behind the hall
off Willow Avenue. Visitors are asked
to use the side-door entrance. Monetary donations, made payable to the
Garwood K of C Food Drive, also
would be appreciated. For more information, call the Knights at (908)
789-9809 after 4 p.m. The Knights
express appreciation to the community for supporting its past food drives.
PUBLIC NOTICE
HOUSE CLEANING
Portuguese Cleaning Ladies
Sandra and Christina
Honesty, Excellent References,
Lots of Experience.
Home or Office.
(908) 966-2423
COUNSELING IN WESTFIELD
Evening and weekend
appointments available. Horizon
BCBS, Cigna, Qualcare, and
MultiPlan accepted. Convenient
scheduling online with
reminders. Teen-friendly.
Visit amyarmstronglpc.com
or call Amy at (908) 913-0581.
FOR SALE
Bassett Solid Wood Crib, No
Recall, Black Finish, Converts to
Full-Sized Headboard. Sealy
Premium Crib Mattress with
Protective Cover. Crib & Mattress
Set $150. Evenflo High Chair,
$30. All Excellent Condition.
Call (908) 654-6091
WSL Seeks Applicants
For 2015 Grants
WESTFIELD — The Westfield Service League (WSL) currently is accepting requests for grant applications
for 2015. The submission deadline is
Monday, February 2, 2015. Information about the types of projects eligible
for grants and/or an application can be
requested by e-mail from
[email protected]
or by writing to: Donations Chair,
Westfield Service League, 114 Elmer
Street, Westfield, N.J. 07090. All completed applications must be sent in hard
copy to the address listed on the form.
In 2014, the WSL donated approximately $55,000 to local agencies and
organizations. The grant funds result
from the profits of the WSL Thrift
and Consignment Shop, located at
114 Elmer Street, Westfield. The WSL
has provided services to Union
County for over 81 years. During this
time, WSL has donated more than $2
million to various local organizations.
BOROUGH OF GARWOOD
PUBLIC NOTICE
ORDINANCE 14-14
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-039029-14
FILE NO. 18988-14
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND
ARTICLE VI (SMOKING) IN
CHAPTER 99 (HEALTH AND
SANITATION) OF THE CODE
OF THE BOROUGH OF
GARWOOD TO PROHIBIT
SMOKING AT PUBLIC PARKS
AND PLAYGROUNDS.
WHEREAS, the Legislature of the State
of New Jersey has found and declared that
tobacco is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the State and
the nation, and that tobacco smoke constitutes a substantial health hazard to the
non-smoking majority of the public; and
WHEREAS, the Mayor and Council of
the Borough of Garwood concurs in these
findings and declarations and determines
that smoking at parks and playgrounds of
the Borough of Garwood is inimical to the
public health and safety; and
WHEREAS, enactment of this ordinance
is authorized by N.J.S.A. 40:48-2 and
N.J.S.A. 26:3D-63;
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT ORDAINED
by the Mayor and Council of the Borough
of Garwood:
SECTION 1. Article VI (Smoking) in
Chapter 99 (Health and Sanitation) of the
Code of the Borough of Garwood is hereby
amended to read as follows:
§99-38. Smoking prohibited in Borough
Hall.
Smoking in the Garwood Borough Hall,
403 South Avenue, in the Borough of
Garwood, is hereby prohibited.
§99-38.1. Smoking prohibited in parks
and playgrounds.
Smoking is hereby prohibited in the following public parks or playgrounds of the
Borough of Garwood:
A. Harry Hartman Park, located at the
westerly end of Second Avenue.
B. Garwood Sports and Recreation Complex, located at the easterly end of Myrtle
Avenue.
C. Georgiana Gurrieri Memorial Park,
located at the westerly end of Fourth Avenue.
§99-38.2. Definition.
As used in this article, “smoking” means
the burning of, inhaling from, exhaling the
smoke from, or the possession of a lighted
cigar, cigarette, pipe or any other matter or
substance which contains tobacco or any
other matter that can be smoked.
SECTION 2. The posting of appropriate
signs indicating that smoking is prohibited
as provided in this article is hereby authorized and directed.
SECTION 3. All ordinances or parts of
ordinances inconsistent herewith are
hereby repealed to the extent of such
inconsistency.
SECTION 4. If any portion of this ordinance shall be determined to be invalid,
such determination shall not affect the
validity of the remaining portions of said
ordinance.
SECTION 5. This ordinance shall take
effect upon final passage and publication
in accordance with law.
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that Ordinance
No. 14-14, was introduced and passed on
first reading at a meeting of the Borough
Council of the Borough of Garwood, in the
County of Union, State of New Jersey, held
on the 18th DAY OF NOVEMBER 2014,
and that Ordinance No. 14-14, will be taken
up for further consideration for final passage at the meeting of said Borough Council to be held at its meeting room in the
Municipal Building, 403 South Avenue,
Garwood, New Jersey, on the 9th DAY OF
DECEMBER 2014, at 7:15 p.m., or as
soon thereafter as said matter can be
heard, at which time and place all persons
who may be interested therein will be given
an opportunity to be heard concerning the
same.
ATTEST:
Christina Ariemma
Municipal Clerk
Borough of Garwood
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $81.60
NOTICE TO ABSENT DEFENDANT
(L.S.) STATE OF NEW JERSEY TO:
ROBERT WASHINGTON, JR.;
ZIRMAK INVESTMENTS LP A/
K/A ZIRMARK INVESTMENTS
LP, ASSIGNEE NEW YORK
METRO POSTAL CREDIT
UNION;
YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED AND
REQUIRED to serve upon PELLEGRINO
AND FELDSTEIN, LLC, plaintiff’s attorneys, whose address is 290 Route 46
West, Denville, New Jersey, an Answer to
the Complaint filed in a Civil Action, in
which US BANK AS CUST FOR TOWER
DBW II is the plaintiff and ROBERT WASHINGTON, JR., ET ALS; are defendants,
pending in the Superior Court of New Jersey, Chancery Division, UNION County
and bearing Docket No. F-039029-14 within
thirty-five (35) days after November 20,
2014 exclusive of such date. If you fail to
answer or appear in accordance with Rule
4:4-6, Judgment by Default may be rendered against you for relief demanded in
the Complaint. You shall file your Answer
and Proof of Service in duplicate with the
Clerk of the Superior Court of New Jersey,
Hughes Justice Complex - CN 971, Trenton, New Jersey 08625, in accordance
with the Rules of Civil Practice and Procedure.
You are further advised that if you are
unable to obtain an attorney you may communicate with the Lawyer Referral Service
of the County of Venue and that if you
cannot afford an attorney, you may communicate with the Legal Services Office of
the County of Venue. The telephone number of such agencies are as follows: Lawyer Referral Service 908-353-4715 - Legal
Services Office 908-354-4340.
THE ACTION has been instituted for the
purpose of foreclosing the following tax
sale certificate:
1. A certain tax certificate 12-0507, sold
on 6/14/2012 dated 6/20/2012, and was
recorded on 8/15/2012 in Book 13391 at
Page 198, made by MARIA GLAVAN,
Collector of Taxes of PLAINFIELD, and
State of New Jersey to US BANK AS CUST
FOR TOWER DBW II and subsequently
assigned to plaintiff, US BANK AS CUST
FOR TOWER DBW II. This covers real
estate located in PLAINFIELD, County of
UNION, and State of New Jersey, known
as LOT 29 BLOCK 7 as shown on the Tax
Assessment Map and Tax Map duplicate
of PLAINFIELD and concerns premises
commonly
known
as
1801-11
RANGEWOOD COURT, PLAINFIELD,
New Jersey.
YOU, ROBERT WASHINGTON, JR., are
made party defendant to the above foreclosure action because you are the owner
of a property which is the subject of the
above entitled action.
YOU, ZIRMAK INVESTMENTS LP A/K/
A ZIRMARK INVESTMENTS LP, ASSIGNEE NEW YORK METRO POSTAL
CREDIT UNION, are made party defendant to the above foreclosure action because on October 4, 2002, a judgment was
entered in the Superior Court of New Jersey, Bergen County, by Zirmak Investments LP a/k/a Zirmak Investments LP,
Assignee New York Metro Postal Credit
Union against Robert Washington a/k/a
Robert W. Washington disclosing a debt in
the amount of $17,075.71, plus costs. Said
judgment was entered as Judgment No. J232769-2002. Said judgment is subordinate to the Plaintiff’s lien.
DATED: November 13, 2014
Michelle M. Smith, Clerk
Superior Court of New Jersey
PELLEGRINO & FELDSTEIN, L.L.C.
Denville Law Center
290 Route 46 West
Denville, New Jersey 07834
(973) 586-2300
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $80.58
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Letters to the Editor
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 4
The Absence of Honor, Honesty,
Loyalty, Integrity, Character
In light of the truth finally coming out
about this President who can’t seem to
ever tell the truth, I thought a reprint
might be timely.
Honor, honesty, loyalty, integrity,
character; where did it go? Why do we
rationalize the absence of these traits in
our political leaders, society and our
American culture today?
The Portrait of George Washington
once held a prominent place in our
nation’s schools. In 1932, to celebrate
the 200th anniversary of his birth, Congress mandated that the Presidential Portrait of George Washington be displayed
in every classroom in every school in
America.
The federal government printed a series of 12 booklets on the life of George
Washington to be used as a teaching tool
in the schools as well as the Presidential
Portrait of George Washington. They
were distributed by our Congressman
and Senators to all of the schools, towns,
villages and hamlets across the country.
Today, you have to look at half the
people elected to the House and Senate,
and wonder how they ever got elected to
office.
Over the past 50 years, the portraits of
George Washington have been removed,
and so has most of the history from our
children’s history books. There is no
longer a Washington’s Birthday holiday
for the one man who gave birth to our
nation and our individual freedom, who
presided over the Constitutional Convention and guided our new nation as
our first president. Upon his death, President John Adams said, “His example is
now complete, and it will teach wisdom
and virtue to magistrates, citizens and
men, not only in the present age, but in
future generations, as long as our history shall be read.”
Today, you have to wonder what this
bunch in the White House is going to try
to “control” or “cover up” next.
In 1998, I started Portraits of Patriots,
a project to put the Presidential Portrait
of George Washington back into our
nations schools as December 14, 1999
was the 200th Anniversary of George
Washington’s death.
I started the effort in New Jersey, my
home state, (Crossroads of the American Revolution). Well… the effort
brought out the NEA (Teachers Union
Leadership) and the American Civil Liberties Union, in force to fight against it.
It was like the site of the Portrait of
George Washington set them a blaze
with smoke coming out of their ears.
In 2002, the New Jersey Department
of Education tried to remove George
Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Ben
PUBLIC NOTICE
UNION COUNTY BOARD
OF CHOSEN FREEHOLDERS
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARD
Date Adopted: 11/13/14
Public Notice is hereby given that the
Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders has awarded a contract without competitive bidding as an extraordinary
unspecifiable service pursuant to N.J.S.A.
40A:11-5(1)(a) (11). This contract and the
resolution authorizing it is available for
public inspection in the Office of the Clerk
of the Board.
RESOLUTION NO: 2014-881
AWARDED TO: Kemper Sports Management for Golf
SERVICES: to provide necessary golf
course management services
PERIOD: November 17, 2014- November 16, 2019
COSTS: in the total amount not to exceed $509,724.00
James E. Pellettiere, Clerk
of the Board Chosen Freeholders
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $22.44
PUBLIC NOTICE
UNION COUNTY BOARD
OF CHOSEN FREEHOLDERS
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARD
Date Adopted: 11/13/14
Public Notice is hereby given that the
Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders has awarded a contract without competitive bidding as an Professional service
pursuant to N.J.S.A.40A:11-5(1)(a) (i). This
contract and the resolution authorizing it is
available for public inspection in the Office
of the Clerk of the Board.
RESOLUTION NO: 2014-912
amending (Resolution No. 2014-138)
REWARDED TO: Practice Associates
Medical Group
SERVICES: to provide pre-employment
medical examinations and related medical
services for the Office of the County Sheriff
PERIOD: January 1, 2014- December
31, 2014
COSTS: for a contract amount not to
exceed $18,000.00
James E. Pellettiere, Clerk
of the Board Chosen Freeholders
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $22.95
PUBLIC NOTICE
UNION COUNTY BOARD
OF CHOSEN FREEHOLDERS
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARD
Date Adopted: 11/13/14
Public Notice is hereby given that the
Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders has awarded a contract without competitive bidding as an extraordinary
unspecifiable service pursuant to N.J.S.A.
40A:11-5(1)(a) (11). This contract and the
resolution authorizing it is available for
public inspection in the Office of the Clerk
of the Board.
RESOLUTION NO: 2014-899
amending (Resolution No. 2014-800)
AWARDED TO: Various Agencies
Bridgeway Rehabilitation Services
$25,350.00
Central Jersey Legal Services
$7,687.00
Elizabeth Coalition to House the Homeless
$75,586.91
Family Promise
$15,139.00
Homefirst
$30,747.00
Plainfield Area YMCA
$43,443.00
PRODEED
$28,778.00
The Salvation Army (Elizabeth)
$41,923.00
YMCA of Eastern Union County
$53,805.00
YMCA of Eastern Union County
$14,486.00
SERVICES: to provide essential social
services to help prevent homeless
PERIOD: August1, 2014- July 31, 2015
COSTS: in the amount of $22,073.91 for
a new total amount of $336,944.91
James E. Pellettiere, Clerk
of the Board Chosen Freeholders
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $34.17
Franklin, the Pilgrims, and the World
War from the core history curriculum.
This would mean that the textbook publishers could remove all references to
our founding as a nation.
You have to wonder... who are the
people in positions of power pushing
this agenda? Next, seriously question
who put them there and why.
The teachings of George Washington
are as timely today as they were when
Lt. Colonel U.S. Grant III, gave a speech
to the National Convention of the National Education Association (NEA) on
July 2, 1930. He closed his speech with
the quote “teach your pupils to know
and admire George Washington, to carry
his example and companionship in their
hearts, and the country’s destinies will
be safe in the hands of the next generation.”
Symbols and images are important
because they remind us of who we are,
what we are, and what we hope to be.
The image of George Washington reminds us of what it means to be an
American and of the ideals, devotion,
and love of country that were so strongly
exemplified by our nation’s first president. Perhaps it is why the radical left
has been fighting so hard to erase him
from our history books and our children’s
minds.
Last July, I was contacted by National
Geographic when they began filming
the docudrama, “Killing Lincoln,” based
on Bill O’Reilly’s new book. The George
Washington Presidential Portrait done
by William E. Marshall is the subject of
my project and is the portrait that hung
in the presidential box at Fords’ Theatre
the night President Lincoln was shot. I
supplied the portrait for the movie.
That night was the first time the
President’s Box was ever decorated at
Fords’ Theatre. The Civil War had just
ended, General Lee had surrendered and
it was decorated in celebration of the
event. That portrait of George Washington was hung prominently on the box
draped with stars and stripes. Abraham
Lincoln revered George Washington.
It was George Washington who gave
meaning to the words… Honor, Honesty, Loyalty, Integrity, Character… leading by his example.
I think historian David McCullough,
author of 1776, said it best when he said,
“If you don’t know George Washington
you don’t know your country.”
Think about that…It only takes two
generations of ignorance to forget where
we came from as a nation. Our children
will never truly understand.
Over the past 15 years we have placed
500 framed George Washington Presidential Portraits in schools around the
country. This has been coordinated and
funded through various individuals, and
organizations at the most local level.
Most schools would have an assembly
and the presentations were made in a
patriotic format. The children would
realize why this was an important event.
They would also learn an important lesson... that no matter what they choose to
do in life... as long as they live there lives
by those five very important words -Honor, Honesty, Loyalty, Integrity, Character -- they would be successful in there
endeavors and be respected as individuals.
Our goal is to get the remaining 1,900
George Washington Presidential Portraits into schools through civic-minded
individuals and organizations.
William Sanders
Portraits of Patriots
Bernardsville
PUBLIC NOTICE
UNION COUNTY BOARD
OF CHOSEN FREEHOLDERS
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARD
Date Adopted: 11/13/14
Public Notice is hereby given that the
Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders has awarded a contract without competitive bidding as an Professional service
pursuant to N.J.S.A.40A:11-5(1)(a) (i). This
contract and the resolution authorizing it is
available for public inspection in the Office
of the Clerk of the Board.
RESOLUTION NO: 2014-914
REWARDED TO: Deacon Michael
DeRoberts, Union, New Jersey
SERVICES: to provide 5 hours of religious services and counseling per week
for the Catholic inmates in the Union County
Jail
PERIOD: January 1, 2015- December
31, 2015
COSTS: in an amount not to exceed
$3,218.00
James E. Pellettiere, Clerk
of the Board Chosen Freeholders
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $22.95
PUBLIC NOTICE
UNION COUNTY BOARD
OF CHOSEN FREEHOLDERS
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARD
Date Adopted: 11/13/14
Public Notice is hereby given that the
Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders has awarded a contract without competitive bidding as an extraordinary
unspecifiable service pursuant to N.J.S.A.
40A:11-5(1)(a) (11). This contract and the
resolution authorizing it is available for
public inspection in the Office of the Clerk
of the Board.
RESOLUTION NO: 2014-896
AWARDED TO: Various Agencies
Alfre/Mrs. Wilson’s
$6,317.00
Bridgeway Rehab
$43,128.00
CURA, Inc.
$33,082.00
JFK-STEPS at Muhlenberg Campus
$42,022.00
New Hope Foundation
$97,429.00
Organization for Recovery $17,705.00
Prevention Links
$84,139.00
PROCEED
$96,868.00
Sunrise House/Dudley House
$50,569.00
Sunrise House
$47,434.00
Trinitas Hospital
$211,880.00
Turning Point
$36,140.00
UC Educ. Services Comm. $2,894.00
UCPC
$42,846.00
SERVICES: to provide treatment programs to serve medically indigent lowincome Union County families
PERIOD: January 1, 2015-December
31, 2015
COSTS: in the total amount not to exceed $883,874.00
James E. Pellettiere, Clerk
of the Board Chosen Freeholders
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $35.19
Westfield
Sunday, November 9, Gina August, 20, of Union was arrested on
charges of possession of a controlled
dangerous substance (CDS)/less than
50 grams of suspected marijuana,
possession of drug paraphernalia and
underage possession of alcohol pursuant to a motor vehicle stop at
Springfield Avenue and Michael
Drive. August was transported to
police headquarters, processed and
released with a summons pending a
Westfield Municipal Court date.
Monday, November 10, six large
compressed air tanks were reported
stolen from an establishment on the
1500 block of Lamberts Mill Road.
Tuesday, November 11, Gabriel
Segura, 26, of Westfield was arrested
on two outstanding warrants, one from
Kearny, for $1,000, and the other from
Palisades Park, for $250, following an
investigation on the 1200 block of
West South Avenue. He was released
on his own recognizance on both warrants pending court appearances.
Tuesday, November 11, James
Linder, 31, of Elizabeth was arrested
on an outstanding Westfield warrant
after turning himself in at police headquarters. He posted $114 bail and
was released.
Tuesday, November 11, police filed
a report alleging the theft of a cell
phone from a business on the 200
block of East Broad Street.
Wednesday, November 12, a resident of the 900 block of Cranford
Avenue reported that an employee
was responsible for the theft of
$64,475. The theft, which police said
involved check fraud, was reported to
have occurred over a two-year period.
Wednesday, November 12, a female victim reported that she was
assaulted on the 400 block of South
Avenue West by someone who was
known to her. No serious injuries
were sustained, according to police.
Wednesday, November 12, Damon
Hicks, 21, of Scotch Plains was arrested and charged with driving while
intoxicated (DWI) pursuant to a motor vehicle stop in the area of West
North Avenue and Crossway Place.
He was transported to police headquarters, where he was processed and
released to a sober adult.
Friday, November 14, Rachel
Ferrier, 18, of Point Pleasant was
arrested on an outstanding Wall Township traffic warrant pursuant to a traffic stop on Springfield Avenue near
Mill Lane for an observed motor vehicle violation. She was transported
to police headquarters for processing
and was released after posting the
requisite $239 bail.
Friday, November 14, Keith
Destefano, 31, of Plainfield was arrested at the Somerset County jail on
an active Westfield warrant for $299.
He was transported to police headquarters, where he was processed,
posted bail and released.
Garwood
Saturday, October 25, Miguel
Perkins, 19, of Elizabeth was charged
with criminal trespassing, burglary and
possession of stolen property after
police investigated a report of a suspicious male looking into cars on Myrtle
Avenue. According to police, Perkins
was found in possession of iPads and
iPhones that were stolen from parked
motor vehicles in Westfield.
Friday, October 31, Johnathan
Rivera, 23, of Roselle was charged
with driving while intoxicated (DWI)
following a motor vehicle stop.
Saturday, November 1, Pestine
Allen, Jr., 19, of Westfield was charged
with underage consumption of alcohol following a motor vehicle stop.
Monday, November 3, Deidra
Glasgow, 34, of Westfield was
charged with DWI following a motor
vehicle stop.
Monday, November 3, Jose Velez,
III, 22, of Roselle was charged with
eluding police and DWI after a brief
police chase. He was released on
$25,000 bond.
Thursday, November 6, a 22-yearold male Garwood resident was
charged with two counts of burglary
and two counts of theft after two
Locust Avenue residents reported that
$5,500 in cash and jewelry were missing from their homes. Authorities
withheld the suspect’s identity, citing
an ongoing investigation.
Mountainside
Wednesday, November 12, a business on Sheffield Street reported the
theft of scrap metal. According to
police, a male suspect was observed
on security cameras putting the metal
into a pickup truck.
Wednesday, November 12, Hasson
Mosley, 40, of Plainfield was charged
with driving with a suspended license following a motor vehicle stop.
Wednesday, November 12, Luis
Arevalo, 36, of Linden was arrested
following a motor vehicle stop and
charged with driving with a suspended
license. Arevalo also was found to have
an active no-bail detainer warrant from
the Union County Sheriff’s Office.
Thursday, November 13, Rosbin
Oliva-Milian, 19, of Plainfield was
charged with possession of a false
identification following a motor vehicle stop.
Friday, November 14, Elmer
Figeuroa, 40, of Paterson was charged
with driving while intoxicated and
driving with a suspended license following a motor vehicle stop.
Man Charged With
Impersonating Officer
WESTFIELD — Chief David
Wayman of the Westfield Police Department announced the arrest on
November 10 of Jonathan Tiger, 35,
of Cranford on the charge of impersonating a public servant (police officer) fourth degree.
The arrest stemmed from an incident that occurred on September 27,
2014 at the intersection of East Broad
Street and Karen Terrace in
Westfield. According to a statement
by Chief Wayman, at approximately
9:35 a.m. that day the alleged suspect represented himself as a police
officer while operating a motor vehicle and attempted to gather information from the victim, who also
was operating a motor vehicle. Tiger
was released on his own recognizance pending a court date.
Nature Craft Show on Tap
At Trailside December 7
MOUNTAINSIDE – Area residents are invited to usher in the holidays with the sights and sounds of
the season at the 31st Annual Holiday Nature Craft Show at Trailside
Nature and Science Center.
The Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders and the Department of Parks and Recreation will
present this seasonal craft show and
charity drive on Sunday, December
7, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The price
of admission is an item of dry or
canned food or a new, unwrapped
toy to be distributed through local
charities.
“This is a wonderful opportunity
for visitors to find unique gifts for
friends and family while enjoying a
festive afternoon of activities, including greetings from Santa and
Mrs. Claus,” said Freeholder Chairman Christopher Hudak. “The Nature Craft Show provides a holiday
atmosphere that encourages visitors
to sing along with carolers as they
mingle among the decorated trees
on display.”
Staff from various Union County
departments and community organizations will decorate trees in the
Trailside Visitor Center. All the trees,
ornaments and gift cards collected
will be distributed to Union County
families in need. Visitors are encouraged to stop by each holiday
tree and vote on their favorite decoration theme.
A large selection of handcrafted
items will be available at the show.
More than 40 vendors will sell nature-themed items such as ornaments, home décor, jewelry, pottery,
stained glass and recycled items,
among other merchandise. Light refreshments will be available for purchase throughout the day.
Children will be able to visit with
Santa and Mrs. Claus from noon to
4:30 p.m., and free children’s facepainting will be offered. The day’s
activities in Trailside’s auditorium
will include illuminating seasonal
lights of the Union County tree and
menorah at 4:30 p.m.
For additional information about
the Holiday Nature Craft Show, call
Trailside at (908) 789-3670 or go to
ucnj.org/trailside. Trailside Nature
and Science Center is located at 452
New Providence Road, at Coles Avenue, in Mountainside, and is a service of the Union County Board of
Chosen Freeholders.
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
UNION COUNTY BOARD
OF CHOSEN FREEHOLDERS
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARD
Date Adopted: 11/13/14
Public Notice is hereby given that the
Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders has awarded a contract without competitive bidding as an Professional service
pursuant to N.J.S.A.40A:11-5(1)(a) (i). This
contract and the resolution authorizing it is
available for public inspection in the Office
of the Clerk of the Board.
UNION COUNTY BOARD
OF CHOSEN FREEHOLDERS
NOTICE OF CONTRACT AWARD
Date Adopted: 11/13/14
Public Notice is hereby given that the
Union County Board of Chosen Freeholders has awarded a contract without competitive bidding as an Professional service
pursuant to N.J.S.A.40A:11-5(1)(a) (i). This
contract and the resolution authorizing it is
available for public inspection in the Office
of the Clerk of the Board.
RESOLUTION NO: 2014- 932
amending (Resolution No. 2014-623)
REWARDED TO: Florio, Perrucci,
Steinhardt & Fader of Rochelle Park,
New Jersey
SERVICES: in the matter entitled:
Shiquon Fowler v. UC, et als.
COSTS: in an amount not to exceed
$10,000.00
James E. Pellettiere, Clerk
of the Board Chosen Freeholders
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $21.42
RESOLUTION NO: 2014-930
amending (Resolution No. 2014-688)
REWARDED TO: Weber Dowd Law of
Woodland Park, New Jersey
SERVICES: in the matter entitled:
Beverly Figueroa v. UC, et als.
COSTS: in an amount not to exceed
$20,000.00 for a sum not to exceed
$110,000.00
James E. Pellettiere, Clerk
of the Board Chosen Freeholders
1 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $21.42
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Thursday, November 20, 2014
Page 19
Jen Chapin Trio to Perform
At Union Co. Arts Center
CLASSICAL COSTUMES…Latin students Max Needle of Scotch Plains, Salman
Mansuri of Edison, Astitva Soni of Edison, Lauren Yates of Piscataway, Charlotte
Sweeney of Cranford and Ciara Varley of Woodbridge, juniors from The
Wardlaw-Hartridge School in Edison, traveled to Montclair State University on
Halloween for Classics Day. They attended lectures on the Ancient Greek Chorus,
Roman Ghosts and Ghouls before competing against 14 New Jersey schools in a
Latin contest.
POPCORN
RAHWAY – The Jen Chapin Trio
will perform at The Loft at Union
County Performing Arts Center
(UCPAC) in Rahway on Saturday,
December 6 at 8 p.m. Advance tickets
are $20 and can be purchased at
www.ucpac.org. The concert is part
of the on-going Split Level Concert
Series which highlights critically acclaimed singer-songwriters in a
uniquely intimate setting.
Jen Chapin's music is urban folk
soul - story songs that search for community and shared meaning, powered
by the funk and improvisation of New
York City. Critics have hailed her work
as "brilliant.. soulfully poetic" (NPR)
and "thoughtful . worth-savoring"
(People). Ms. Chapin's music reflects
a diversity of experience. She is an
activist, with a life-long involvement
in WhyHunger (founded in 1975 by
her late father, Harry Chapin), an organization that champions innovative,
community-based solutions to hunger
and poverty.
Owen Danoff will open the December 6 show. He is a New York
City-based singer/songwriter whose
music blends the catchiness of pop,
the lyrical emphasis of folk, and the
energy of rock n' roll. His influences
include John Mayer, Paul Simon, and
the Wallflowers, though the resulting
style is all his own.
Upcoming Split Level Concerts include Willie Nile on Saturday, December 13 at UCPAC's Hamilton Stage,
Lisa Bouchelle with special guest Luke
Elliot on Wednesday, December 31st at
UCPAC's Hamilton Stage and Susan
Werner on Friday, January 9th at
UCPAC's Hamilton Stage.
For a full listing of shows, visit the
Split Level Concerts website at
www.splitlevelconcerts.com and the
Union County Performing Arts Center website at www.ucpac.org.
Pushcart Players to Present
A Season of Miracles
“Interstellar”
Relatively Far Out
3 & ½ popcorns
One Popcorn, Poor — Two Popcorns, Fair — Three Popcorns, Good — Four Popcorns, Excellent
By MICHAEL S. GOLDBERGER
film critic
I contemplated the critiquing task
that lay ahead with trepidation. Christopher Nolan’s “Interstellar,” taking
us once more into the breach of apocalyptic rumination and adventure,
boasted a daunting length of 169 minutes. That’s 2.81 human hours. I feared
I’d be an old man when I exited…the
world will have changed; no one
would know me, nor I them. But then
this is what I signed up for when I
took the hypocritical oath at Olde Ivy
Film Criticism College. Maybe I’d
bring hot dogs, Sterno, a sleeping bag
and a change of clothes.
What I should have brought was
my old pal Albert Einstein, though
that would be a bit difficult, or maybe
not, considering the space time continuum hypotheses postulated in Mr.
Nolan’s grand, ambitious, captivating and frighteningly smart film. Hey,
I don’t even know what quantum
mechanics is. But I’ll tell you this: If
Matthew McConaughey’s Captain
Cooper and his cohorts who travel
into space to find us Earthlings a
suitable place to live don’t discover
some secret about it, the human race
can kiss its molecular structure
goodbye.
Yep, shades of the last Dust Bowl,
the terra firma depicted in this by now
familiar near future can no longer
sustain life. So, it’s a real good time
for the sort of once-in-a-millennium
hero to step up and save us poor
suckers. Courtesy of NASA in exile,
Cooper, a farmer who was the space
agency’s golden boy until a mission
went kablooey, is drafted for the really big redemption.
Adding a touchy-feely component
to the estimably challenging science
fiction notions, this assignment
doesn’t sit well with the widower’s
10-year-old daughter, Murphy, nicely
exacted by Mackenzie Foy. To heck
with saving the world. Theirs is an
especially spiritual relationship, and
she wants Dad to stay home. This
plays out quite intriguingly and lends
dramatic balance to the intellectual
thriller.
Director Nolan (“Memento,”
“Batman Begins”), who co-wrote “Interstellar” with his brother, Jonathan,
has never taken the path of least resistance to success in Hollywood, but
instead plies those routes aimed at
exercising if not entirely confounding our gray matter. What’s more, he
has the uncanny ability of finagling us
into thinking we sort of understand
the mind-boggling complexities in
which he delves.
I mean, c’mon: In this delirious
traipse, he has us there right along
with Cooper and his colleague/physicist Dr. Amelia Brand, played by Anne
Hathaway, mulling the advantages and
risks of slipping through this or that
wormhole in order to scoot through
the black hole that might lead to the
new New World. But, just in case you
couldn’t care less about any of that
E=MC2 stuff, fasten your seatbelts
anyway. Mr. McConaughey the action figure sure can pilot a spaceship.
Oh, but beware. There’s treachery
afoot.
Only problem is, it’s often hard to
understand what Coop is saying. The
esoteric theorization and space flight
jargon would be perplexing enough,
but McConaughey ups the difficulty
exponentially thanks to a Texas twang
delivered with his signature mumble.
I don’t know if the affliction is catching or not, but Miss Hathaway often
complements the verbal haze with a
too soft-spoken charm. So O.K., I say
to myself, you inevitably get the gist
when you watch silent films, and you
can do that here. Still, how did this
irritation get past the studio?
But no sense dwelling on it. There’s
a civilization to be saved, the grand
plan clandestinely engineered by Dr.
Brand’s father, also Dr. Brand, portrayed by Michael Caine with his
usual aplomb. It’s a longshot. But as
Flash Gordon once said in an episode
when the Earth’s fate hung on his
heroism, it’s worth a try. So off we go
into the wild black yonder, untethered,
uncertain, and as much dependent on
mathematics and far-flung faith as on
gut determination.
In a cozy scene aboard the hurtling
spacecraft, Cooper puts it in perspective whilst discussing the journey with
Amelia and crew members Romilly
(David Gyasi) and Doyle (Wes
Bentley). We dig the pageantry and
grok the all-encompassing raison
d’être when he proclaims, “We’re
explorers.” Taking this all in is TARS,
a refrigerator-sized computer/robot
voiced by Bill Irwin. He supplies the
tale with a philosophical idea of how
far we’ve progressed since his progenitor, HAL, flaunted the whims and
wiles of artificial intelligence in
“2001: A Space Odyssey”(1968).
Now, insofar as my aforementioned
fears regarding the length of this
movie, kindly note it’s indeed all relative. Absorbed in Cooper’s anxiety
that hours spent in different gravities
will spell lost decades back on Earth
(if he should ever return), we are
ironically transfixed in time and, even
when nature calls, reluctant to leave
the controls. Hence, although you’ll
be 2.8166 hours older when exiting
“Interstellar,” it’s little price to pay
for the out of this world experience.
***
“Interstellar,” rated PG-13, is a
Paramount Pictures release directed
by Christopher Nolan and stars Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway
and Michael Caine. Running time:
169 minutes
MILLBURN – Pushcart Players,
New Jersey’s Emmy nominated and
award-winning touring theatre for young
audiences presents “A Season of
Miracles” at the Paper Mill Playhouse
in Millburn on Wednesday, December
3 at 10 am. This magically musical
production warms the hearts of family
audiences as they reflect on the true
meaning and spirit of the holidays.
“A Season of Miracles” is a multicultural collection of tales that celebrate Christmas, Kwanzaa and
Chanukah. Stories within this delightful musical include O. Henry’s ‘The
Gift of the Magi;’ an original scene in
Nigeria entitled ‘The Kwanzaa Kite;’
a story based on the folklore of Chelm
called ‘The Chanukah Miracle’ and
E.T.A. Hoffmann’s ‘The Nutcracker.’
Pushcart Players artistic director
Paul Whelihan is directing the production, based on original staging
and choreography by Ms. Fost and
Susie Paplow. “A Season of Miracles”
cast features Melanie Beck, Melissa
Cox, JD Lynch and Anthony M.
Schwarz to Conduct Arco
Ensemble at Enlow Hall
UNION – Arco Ensemble will perform under the baton of native New
Jerseyan Gerard Schwarz, on November 23 at 3:00 p.m. The performance will be the first of this season’s
“Concert and Café” series at Gene
and Shelley Enlow Recital Hall on
the East Campus of Kean University
Gerard Schwarz serves as Music
Director of the famed All-Star Orchestra (currently seen on PBS) and
the Eastern Music Festival. Schwarz
recently completed his 26th and final
season as Seattle Symphony Music
Director and now serves as its Conductor Laureate. His previous positions as Music Director include New
York’s Mostly Mozart Festival, the
Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, the
Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra and
the New York Chamber Symphony.
The New Jersey-based virtuoso
string orchestra Arco Ensemble, in
cooperation with Enlow Hall, is pre-
WHS Marching Band Takes
6th Place at Yamaha Cup
EAST RUTHERFORD – The
Westfield High School (WHS) Marching Band walked out onto New Jersey’s
biggest stage to take part in a major
competition earlier this month.
The Yamaha Cup at the MetLife
Stadium, home of the Giants and the
Jets, played host to 66 bands in less
than hospitable weather conditions.
Undeterred by the rain, the Marching Blue Devils rose to the occasion to
achieve their best score of the season.
Band Director Christopher Vitale
said, “This was a true culmination of
the band’s competitive season. Their
level of professionalism and composure throughout uncomfortable
weather combined with performing
inside of an NFL stadium were key to
what was a truly memorable performance.”
The band took 6th place with the top
six bands separated by just a couple of
points.
“Placing 6th was a great accomplishment,” said Mr Vitale. “Our group
is the largest group in the circuit (groups
are based on band size) and we were
very pleased with finishing in the upper half amongst our competitors.”
“We talk all season with the students
about the role that competition plays
within our activity. Yes, we compete
and do our best to place well at competitions but, in the end, the most important opinion that matters is theirs. In
the end, the students felt great about
their performance at MetLife. It was
by far their best performance of the
season and that was justification for all
of us that the 2014 season was truly a
success,” Mr. Vitale said.
The band will be playing next at the
WHS Pep Rally and Homecoming
Bonfire and then performing their halftime show for the final time this season
at the varsity football team’s Thanksgiving Day game at Plainfield.
simply...
creative framing
creative framing
Stokes.
Pushcart Players has traveled over
2 million miles nationally and abroad
since 1974 to serve more than 8 million children and their families with
meaningful theatre. From the White
House to the little red schoolhouse,
this dynamic company has been nominated for an Emmy, and has received
numerous state and private awards
for excellence and innovation. A cast
of professional Equity actors and stage
managers come with complete scenery, lighting and sound systems, making every performance adaptable to
any location.
Paper Mill Playhouse is located at
22 Brookside Drive in Millburn. Tickets for “A Season of Miracles” can be
ordered by calling (973) 315-1680 or
by visiting www.papermill.org. Group
sale and other discounts apply.
For further information on this or
any of Pushcart’s programs and services, contact Pushcart Players at
(973) 857-1115 or visit the website at
www.pushcartplayers.org.
Art • Framing • Gifts • Home Accents • Unique Jewelry
Conservation Framing • Sports Memorabilia & Jerseys
Shadow Boxes • Graduation Diplomas • Mirrors
Corporate & Home Consultations
Holiday Jazz Night
Friday, Dec. 5th, 7pm - 9pm
6th Annual Boutique Show
Saturday, Dec. 6 & Sunday, Dec. 7th
10am - 5pm
11 North Union Avenue, Cranford
908-272-3030
Visit our website to view merchandise &
upcoming events: www.simplyartandframes.com
Mon 12-4; Tues, Wed & Fri 10-6; Thurs 10-7; Sat 10-5
senting its second season of “Concerts and Café”, hour-long classical
music performances followed by light
refreshment and informal discussion
with the performers. The November
23rd event will feature masterpieces
of the string orchestra repertory, including Tchaikovsky’s Serenade for
Strings, Grieg’s Holberg Suite, and
Schwarz’s own arrangement for string
orchestra of the Sextet from Strauss’s
opera Capriccio.
Situated on Kean University’s East
Campus (215 North Avenue in Hillside, NJ), Enlow Hall is renowned for
its superb acoustics and elegant design. With just 300 spectacular seats,
Enlow Hall has been praised by noted
performers and patrons for its intimate ambiance and close proximity
between musicians and audience
members. Free onsite parking is available at every concert.
Tickets to Arco Ensemble conducted
by Gerard Schwarz are $25 and include access to the post performance
café with complimentary coffee, tea,
Prosecco and light refreshments.
Tickets can be purchased by calling Kean Stage Box Office at
908.737.SHOW (7469), online at
http://EnlowHall.kean.edu or in person at Kean University’s Wilkins
Theater Box Office (1000 Morris
Avenue in Union, NJ).
For more information about Arco
Ensemble season at Enlow Hall,
please visit http://arcoensemble.org/
For complete Enlow Hall 2013-14
Season information, please visit
enlowhall.kean.edu.
HORNS OF PLENTY...The Solid Brass ensemble, a high-performance/highenergy group of 10 dedicated instrumentalists, plus percussion, will top off the
Thanksgiving weekend with a fun concert on Sunday, November 30 at 7 p.m. at
St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Westfield.
St. Paul’s Concert to
Feature Solid Brass
WESTFIELD – The sweet, golden
sounds of tempered horns will be
heard on Sunday, November 30 at 7
p.m., when the Solid Brass (SB) ensemble takes the concert stage at St.
Paul’s Episcopal Church in Westfield.
This group of 10 professional instrumentalists, plus percussion, has been
wowing audiences throughout North
America since 1982. Their versatile
concert programs feature a wide range
of musical styles, everything from
medieval to opera to Gershwin, Big
Band, Sousa, the Beach Boys and
Christmas.
Comprised of four trumpets, four
trombones, one French horn and a
tuba, plus percussion, SB’s unique
instrumentation articulates, according to one reviewer, “a broader sound
spectrum than most brass ensembles
on the road.” Added to this, the group
is praised for their “[i]nformative and
amusing verbal chatter [that] brings
Humorist Ted Slate to
Appear at Book Store
WESTFIELD – The Town Book
Store is hosting a meet and greet for
humorist Ted Slate, author of “My
Life and Other Aggravations” on Saturday, November 22 from 2 to 4 p.m.
Mr. Slate’s book is a collection of
essays dealing with the frustrations of
his life: the computer age, his health,
the medical profession, the treatment
of seniors and the inability to deal
with mechanical problems by someone with absolutely no mechanical
ability. Whatever the subject, you’ll
find his collection of 65 essays written in an engaging, and often humorous voice. On the less humorous side,
his heart-rending trip to Vietnam and
the endearing description of a tour to
the Southwest with two of his grandchildren are stories you’ll not soon
forget.
After 31 years with The New York
Times and Newsweek, Mr. Slate left
to embark on a new career as a Tour
Director; 15 years later, he began
writing a humor column for The Warren Reporter, the county newspaper
of Warren County. After five years,
he retired once again, this time to
write “My Life and Other Aggravations” his first book.
If you are unable to attend this
event, call The Town Book Store at
(908) 233-3535 to reserve an
autographed copy of “My Life and
Other Aggravations”.
the audience into the act and makes
for a most entertaining and sonically
stunning evening.”
Solid Brass players are recognized
as some the finest musicians in the tristate area. The group has performed in
concert venues throughout North
America, including Lincoln Center’s
Alice Tully Hall in New York City and
the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los
Angeles. They have performed on numerous Broadway shows, and with the
orchestras of the Metropolitan and
New York City Operas and the New
York City Ballet. Their radio broadcasts include live concerts on WQXR
in NYC and WQED in Pittsburgh, and
their half-hour Christmas special was
featured on PBS-TV’s “The State of
the Arts” on the East Coast.
SB has also developed and performed musical programs for more
than 200,000 students and educators
in 300 schools nationwide, programs
designed to educate, illuminate, and
entertain. Their audience friendly,
eclectic approach sparks interest by
energizing their music with cultural
history and story-telling.
SB’s 7 p.m. concert at St. Paul’s on
November 30 is made possible by a
grant from the Westfield Foundation.
St. Paul’s Episcopal Church is located at 414 E. Broad Street (near
Euclid Avenue) in Westfield. Area
parking is free. Concert tickets are
$20 for adults and may be purchased
at the door. Students are welcome at
no charge. Attendees are invited to a
reception following the event.
For more information, call Charles
Banks at (908) 451-5082 or email
[email protected]
Essex Water Color
Club to Meet
LIVINGSTON – The Essex Water
Color Club, now in the 83rd year of
continuous activity in the watercolor
painting community, will host their
monthly meeting with a demonstration by New Jersey artist, Lisa Bud.
The meeting will be held on Sunday, December 14 from 2 to 4 p.m. at
the Livingston Senior Community
Center, 204 Hillside Avenue,
Livingston. The demonstration is open
to the public and is free to members
and $5 for non-members and guests.
Refreshments will be served.
For further information contact
John Wolff at (973) 994-1597 or visit
www.ewcclub.com.
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AMERICAN REPERTORY BALLET’S
A Holiday Tradition Since 1964
November 22December 21, 2014
Union County Performing Arts Center, Rahway
McCarter Theatre, Princeton
Patriots Theater at the War Memorial, Trenton
Algonquin ARTS Theatre, Manasquan
State Theatre, New Brunswick
www.arballet.org/Nutcracker
Page 20
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, November 20, 2014
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Paper Mill Playhouse Announces
Rising Star Applications Available
MILLBURN – Since their inception in 1996, The Paper Mill Playhouse Rising Star Awards for Excellence in High School Musical Theater have ignited the careers of many
notable performers, all of whom attended high school in New Jersey.
Among the early nominees and
winners are Academy Award winner
Anne Hathaway, Tony award winners
Laura Benanti and Nikki M. James,
and Tony award nominee and star of
Broadway’s Chaplin and Honeymoon
in Vegas, Rob McClure.
Paper Mill Playhouse’s program is
modeled after the Tony® Awards and
serves the entire state of New Jersey
with 100 entered productions from
public, private and parochial high
schools. Paper Mill Playhouse conceived and created the awards in 1996
to provide schools the opportunity to
showcase their musical arts programs
on a state level. The musicals are
adjudicated by Paper Mill Playhouse
throughout the spring by a group of
seventy evaluators with each school
receiving four independent evaluations.
The 2015 Rising Star Awards gala
ceremony at Paper Mill Playhouse is
set for Tuesday, June 2, 2015 when
the nominees perform and recipients
are presented with a crystal award.
Any accredited New Jersey school
that produces a musical between
Thursday, January 15 and Sunday,
April 12, 2015, is eligible to participate. Only the first one-hundred
schools to apply will be entered into
the program. Applications are available on the Paper Mill Playhouse’s
website www.papermill.org. The
deadline for submissions is
Wednesday,January 7, 2015 at 5 p.m.
“What’s happening in high school
musical productions here in New Jersey and around the country is remarkable. Programs like the Rising Star
Awards have raised the bar and create
opportunities for student performers
and theater technicians to be recognized for their achievements, while
giving them access to thousands of
dollars in scholarship money,” commented Paper Mill Director of Education, Lisa Cooney. “Many of Paper
Mill’s Rising Star nominees and winners are now working professionally
and we consistently hear from top tier
colleges and casting directors that the
Paper Mill Rising Star Award is a
significant accolade for an aspiring
theater artist.”
In addition to honors in performance, design and production categories, the Rising Star Awards recognize other aspects of the production process. Student Achievement
Awards (based on nominations made
by teachers and evaluations by a select committee) and an Educational
Impact Award (recognizing a school’s
effort to connect their musicals production to the district’s curriculum)
are presented each year. In addition,
the Rising Star “Theater for Everyone” Inclusion & Access Award is
presented to a school that recognizes
excellence in the promotion and practice of creative inclusion of students
and adults with disabilities as performers, designers, musicians and
production staff. Additionally, this
award also seeks to recognize and
reward a school that takes steps to
ensure their performances are accessible to audiences with disabilities.
This award is co-sponsored by VSA
New Jersey and the New Jersey Theater Alliance.
Paper Mill Playhouse also awards
over $50,000 in scholarships at the
Rising Star Awards. Five $1,000 cash
scholarships are awarded to outstanding individual students participating
in entered Rising Star Award productions, who plan to continue studying
theater performance or technical theater in college. Students receiving
final nominations in leading actor and
leading actress categories receive a
full scholarship to attend Paper Mill
Playhouse’s competitive Summer
Musical Theater Conservatory, a professional training program, which
along with advanced classes in singing, acting and dance, offers the nominees an opportunity to perform on the
stage at Paper Mill in our August
season finale concert, “New Voices
of 2015” Additionally, students receiving final nominations in supporting actor and supporting actress cat-
egories will receive a 50 percent scholarship to attend the program.
“There is amazing energy and excitement for high school musical theater right now.” commented Mark S.
Hoebee, Paper Mill Playhouse’s Producing Artistic Director. “Seeing so
many past Rising Star nominees and
winners working professionally on
Broadway, in national tours and at
regional theaters around the nation is
a huge validation of the extensive
process our Paper Mill team has designed to locate and identify the best
young talent from all corners of the
great state of New Jersey. The culmination for many New Jersey high
schools is the prestigious honor of a
Paper Mill Playhouse Rising Star
nomination and we are proud to
present these awards to the schools in
our community”
Rising Star scholarships are made
possible by Ruth Bedford in memory
of Jane Burgio, Walt Santner in honor
of Janet Sovey, and the Douglas
Michael Krueger Scholarship Fund
Trust. The Theatre for Everyone Inclusion and Access Award is supported by VSA New Jersey and the
New Jersey Theatre Alliance.
MARCHING GIANTS...The Westfield High School Marching Band walked out onto New Jersey’s biggest stage to take part
in The Yamaha Cup at the MetLife Stadium, home of the Giants and the Jets. The band took 6th place with the top six bands
separated by just a couple of points. See story on Page 19.
Concert to Feature Organist Shea Velloso at
Westfield Methodist Church in November
As Director of Music at the United
Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers
University where he earned his Methodist Church at Milltown, he is
bachelor's degree in organ perfor- the organist, director of the church's
four choirs and is responsible for
mance.
For the concert Mr. Velloso will planning the church's concert series
and Lenten Recital Secreate "organ stereo" as
ries. Mr. Velloso also
he plays on two sanctuserves on the executive
ary organs - the 1959 56
board of the Middlesex
rank Æolian- Skinner
chapter of the American
chancel organ and the
Guild of Organists. Mr.
1974 12 rank Möller anVelloso along with his
tiphonal organ located
wife, Jody, currently rehigh up in the rear galside in Milltown where
lery. He will showcase
he has constructed a 10
striking and impressive
rank pipe organ in their
works by composers
home.
Herbert Howells, Sigfrid
This performance,
Karg-Elert, Louis Vierne
and Charles Marie Organist Shea Velloso along with the fall
Wednesday series of Mid
Widor.
In 2004, Mr. Velloso was the re- Day organ recitals, will help to bencipient of the Elizabeth W. Durham efit the restoration of FUMC's
Award for Excellence in Perfor- Æolian-Skinner chancelorgan, a clasmance. He has performed recitals sic instrument which is one of the
throughout New Jersey and New finest examples of 20th century
York City. A special highlight was American organ building. The sughis appearence in concert on Na- gested donation for this event is $15
tional Public Radio's "Pipe Dreams," for adults and $10 for students. The
a performance which can be heard church is located at One East Broad
on the internet by logging onto Street on the Plaza with parking off
Pipedreams.org. He has also ap- Ferris Place. For further information
peared on Metuchen cable televi- call the church office at (908) 233sion.
4211 daily from 12 to 4 p.m.
WESTFIELD – Organist Shea
Velloso will appear in concert on
Friday, November 21 at 7:30 p.m. at
the Westfield Methodist Church. Mr.
Velloso, a multi-talented musician
and organist, hails from central New
Jersey. He is a graduate of the Mason
Christina Hinke for The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
BEAUTIFUL POTTERY...The Potter's Guild of New Jersey had 42 potters sell
their pottery at the Community Presbyterian Church in Mountainside Saturday.
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Thursday, November 20, 2014
goleader.com/ballyhoo
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
Story on page 15
of The Westfield Leader
SCHETELICH SCORES 3TDs, CHRISTIANO 86-YD KO TD RETURN, WALKER TD, PALUMBO TD
Cougars Rap Canucks, 46-6, in Grid Sectional First Round
By DAVID B. CORBIN
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
One week after drudging North
Plainfield, 52-20, in the final regular-season game, the top-seeded
Cranford High School football
team did it again with a 46-6
thrashing of the Canucks in the
first round of the North Jersey,
Section 2, Group 3 tournament
at Memorial Field in Cranford on
November 14.
Unlike in their previous meeting when the Canucks got a quick
jump on the Cougars by scoring
on their first drive with 13 run-
Ballyhoo
ning plays then adding another
quick touchdown (TD) to take a
14-3 lead, the Cougar defense
permitted only one TD in the
playoff game when the Canucks
covered 69 yards on 15 plays,
including six pass attempts with
12.8 seconds remaining in the
first half. The Cougars’ team attitude coming into the game was
more than ready.
“It’s not to like underestimate
them, because we played them
last week and had a big win. So
we didn’t want to treat them
lighter than they were. We had to
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take it very serious, not like any
other game, and keep focused,”
Cougar linebacker Niko Cappello
said.
“I think that it is more weird
than anything else. You make
adjustments, they make adjustments and they did a good job
against us in the first half,” Cougar Head Coach Erik Rosenmeier
said. “They did a good job moving the football. They did a good
job keeping the ball away from
us. We made adjustments in the
second half and took the game
away.”
“I was happy about that. That
wasn’t fun them getting a run on
us in the first drive last game, but
we did a good job stopping them,”
Cappello said.
l'ennemi du journaliste
Cappello made five solo tackles, including a pair of shattering
sacks on quarterback Nick
Cherasaro, and assisted on five
more.
“It was kind of hard, because
the quarterback likes to cut back
into us. I was trying to make sure
he didn’t cut back on me,”
Cappello said.
Ahmad Davis added four solo
tackles and an assist, while defensive back Kevin Trotter made
four solos and two assists. Defensive back Sean Leonard made
three solos and two assisted.
Linebacker Ethan Tom made two
throws for a loss and four assists.
Defensive back Eric Donahue had
two solos with a throw for a loss
and an assist. Luke Christiano
had two solos and three assists.
The 10-0 Cougars sent the mes-
sage on the opening kickoff when
Christiano got the ball on the 14
and returned it 86 yards for the
TD with just 18 seconds off the
clock.
“We have a number of set plays
that we run on the kickoff and
that was one of them. Adjusting
the blocking was something we
worked on hard this week. We
did a good job blocking up front,
and Luke is good when he has the
football in his hands,” Coach
Rosenmeier said.
On the second play of the second quarter, junior quarterback
Jack Schetelich scored the first
of his three TDs with a 16-yard
sprint. A two-point conversion
attempt came up a yard short.
Schetelich finished with 119 rushing yards and added TD runs of
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Thursday, November 20, 2014
goleader.com/ballyhoo
two yards and eight yards. He
also completed three of six passes
for 62 yards, including a 10-yard
TD strike to Joe Norton.
With 7:37 left in the first half,
Schetelich scored from the two
to complete a six-play, 36-yard
drive. A bad snap on the PAT kept
the score at 19-0. The Canucks
then scored their only TD just
before halftime.
The Canucks went three-andout to start the third quarter then
the Cougars answered with a
four-play, 62-yard scoring drive
when Schetelich slipped in from
the eight with 8:00 on the clock.
After Cappello’s first sack forced
a punt, the Cougars came back
with a six-play, 60-yard drive,
Ballyhoo
capped with Schetelich’s 10-yard
TD strike to Norton, who also
added his third PAT of the game
to make the score, 32-6.
Cappello came through with his
second sack on a fourth down,
allowing the Cougars to take over
at the Canuck 47. Four plays
later with 0:00 left in the third,
Donavin Walker (7 carries, 61
yards) hooked in from the 11.
On the ensuing kickoff, the Cougars forced a fumble and Brian
McGovern recovered it at the
Canuck 34. Sophomore quarterback Brian Oblachinski (2 carries, 26 yards, PAT) engineered
a six-play drive that ended with
Jake Palumbo plunging in from
the three for the TD with 8:21
remaining and setting up the
“Mercy Rule” timer.
In 10 games, the Cougars have
outscored opponents 406-129.
“That’s pretty impressive. Our
offense is very good. We put like
40 points up per game. We [defense] try to keep them on the
field so they can score,” Cappello
said.
The Cougars will host West
Essex, victors over Voorhees, in
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
the semifinal round tomorrow,
Friday, November 21 at 7:00
p.m.
“Everybody knows who West
Essex is and the program’s success that they had. We knew
they were going to be a tough
out for anyone based on the
schedule that they played. None
of the A teams are scared of
anybody in the playoffs. It’s going to be a great challenge for us.
It’s great that they are coming
here because of the familiarity of
playing at home,” Coach
Rosenmeier said.
North Plainfield
Cranford
0 6 0
7 12 20
0
7
6
46
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Thursday, November 20, 2014
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Ballyhoo
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
BECOMING A BOILERMAKER...Cranford High School (CHS) senior Gavin Murray has signed STEPPING UP A NOTCH...Three Lady Blue Devils have signed to continue their lacrosse career at
to wrestle for Perdue University next fall. All four photos have been placed on various sports pages of a higher level. Pictured, left to right are: front row; Samantha Paoletti (Boston College), Mallory
Weisse (Northwestern) and Alyssa Cox (Virginia Tech).
The Westfield Leader and The Times.
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
HEADING TO THE ROCKIES...Cranford Cougar Dan Fay will be heading to the Rockies next fall BUCKNELL BOUND...Cranford senior Julie Byrnes will continue her swim career at Bucknell
to play lacrosse at Colorado Mesa.
University in Lewisburg, Pa. in the fall.
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Ballyhoo
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
Lady Raiders Rap Ridge, 3-2, for Sectional Soccer Championship – photos by David B. Corbin
Page S-5
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Ballyhoo
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
More football on next page
Blue Devils’ ‘D’ Stops Bridgewater-Raritan Gridders in First Round of Playoffs, 24-14
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Thursday, November 20, 2014
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Ballyhoo
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
Blue Devils’ ‘D’ Stops Bridgewater-Raritan Gridders in First Round of Playoffs, 24-14
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Thursday, November 20, 2014
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Ballyhoo
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
See Jim O’Connor photos on next page
Raider Boys Clock Minutemen, 2-0, for North Jersey, Section 2, Group 4 Soccer Title
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Ballyhoo
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
More on next page
Raider Boys Clock Minutemen, 2-0, for Section Soccer Title – by Jim O’Connor njsportpics.com
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Ballyhoo
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
Raider Boys Clock Minutemen, 2-0, for Section Soccer Title – by Jim O’Connor njsportpics.com
Ballyhoo
Garwood Council Reviews Regs
For New Sports Complex
Page S-10
New Jersey
Thursday, November 20, 2014
goleader.com/ballyhoo
By BRIAN TRUSDELL
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
GARWOOD – The Garwood Borough Council held a special meeting last Thursday to address issues surrounding the borough’s
new athletic field complex, which
will officially be opened on Sunday, December 14, with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. The longdelayed, $3.2-million complex,
located on the south side of the
borough, is bordered by Rankin
and Myrtle Avenues and New
Street.
Floodlights for the new athletic
field complex will be shut off at
10 p.m. under a proposal to revise the regulations governing
the borough’s parks and recreation facilities.
The proposed revisions were
prompted by the creation of the
facility, which will include a youth
baseball field, multi-purpose artificial turf field, basketball court
and field house. The floodlights
issue was of particular concern
to Myrtle Avenue resident Jeff
Breen, whose home borders the
complex. He said that he goes to
bed at 9:30 p.m.
Councilman Lou Petruzzelli
noted that PSE&G installed 400watt and 250-watt security lights
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without notification on November 7, and that he would request
that they be shielded and aimed
more directly to minimize their
impact on surrounding residents.
Councilman Bill Nierstedt and
Councilwoman Sara Todisco
asked whether the light shutoff
could be moved to 9:30 p.m., or
the days restricted to when the
lights could remain on until 10
p.m. Both ideas were rejected.
Mr. Petruzzelli said that requiring a 9:30 p.m. cutoff would
cause scheduling issues for activities such as baseball. Games
usually are scheduled for 5:30
p.m. and 7:30 p.m., and normal
game time is two hours. The
remainder of the time is used for
cleanup.
The regulation changes were
the result of a special committee
established by the mayor 18
months ago. It included Council
President Ann Tarantino, Mr.
Petruzzelli, Borough Administrator Christina Ariemma and several residents, who examined the
practices of several nearby towns
with similar facilities.
Most of the 90-minute meeting, 30 minutes of which were
occupied by questions by Mr.
Nierstedt, was spent defining
terms such as “mini bike” and
clarifying language, such as references to “business” days and
“calendar” days.
Other questions revolved
around matters like a provision
that prohibits the harming of wildlife except poisonous snakes,
which the regulations permit killing on sight.
Mr. Nierstedt questioned Ms.
Ariemma, who prepared the final
draft document which was reviewed by Borough Attorney Bob
Renaud, about a section that
could require a contract in order
use the complex.
The provision reserved the right
for such a contract, but it did not
specify what would trigger the
requirement. Ms. Ariemma explained that one-time uses, such
as using the field house for a
party, probably would not require a contract, but a repeated,
regular use of the baseball or
soccer field would.
However, she said, depending
upon the specifics of the use —
such as a fireworks display (which
is banned under the regulations)
— a contract probably would be
needed.
The regulations set fees for the
park, which will officially be renamed the Garwood Sports and
Recreation Complex. Based on a
four-hour minimum, Garwood
residents would pay $125 plus
$25 for any additional hour; nonresidents and for-profit organizations would pay $250 plus $50
for each additional hour, and nonprofits would be charged $50 for
four hours and $10 for each additional hour.
That is in addition to a $25
application fee and a $250 security deposit. Additional fees will
apply for use of the youth baseball field and artificial turf field.
The already existing Garwood
Recreation Commission, a sevenmember volunteer board appointed by the mayor for rotating five-year terms, will be tasked
with managing the complex.
The regulations referred to “attendants” to represent the borough if needed at events, which
Ms. Ariemma explained would be
essentially employees of the commission, paid out of fees generated by the complex.
Probitas Verus Honos
Sports, Humor and Commentary
Christina Hinke for The Westfield Leader
MAINTENANCE ISSUES…Robert Fico, the new part-time code enforcement
property maintenance officer, discusses a property maintenance issue with the
Cranford Township Committee at the committee’s November 10th meeting.
Board Permits Woman to
Rebuild Two-Fam. Home
By BRIAN TRUSDELL
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
GARWOOD – The planning
board has granted permission to
a woman to rebuild her twofamily rental home at 304 Center
Street, ending a nearly two-year
campaign that included a dispute with the borough’s zoning
official and one of her neighbors.
After a nearly 90-minute hearing, which included shouts by
one member to another, the
board decided 7-to-2 to grant
Sandra Sep a certificate of nonconformity. The action will allow
her to rebuild the home as a twofamily structure despite it being
in a single-family zone.
“Feels good,” Ms. Sep said after the November 12 meeting.
“Honestly, I’m very happy.”
At issue was the house on the
west side of Center Street between Myrtle and Spruce Avenues. Ms. Sep inherited the
home from Robert Campbell, a
non-family member, but it was
destroyed by fire in November
2012.
Ms. Sep believed that because
the home existed as a two-family
structure at least as far back as
the 1950s and was taxed by the
borough as such, she was entitled to rebuild it as such.
However, her application to rebuild was denied by Zoning Code
Official Victor Vinegra, whose interpretation of the land use ordinance determined that because
Ms. Sep never had a certificate of
non-conformity the home did not
meet the requirement of being a
“legally existing” structure at the
time of its destruction.
Ms. Sep appeared before the
board several times, including at
its September 24 meeting, where
she eventually withdrew her application for an interpretation of
the ordinance with the intention
of resubmitting to seek a certifiCONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
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Thursday, November 20, 2014
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Ballyhoo
Board Permits Woman to Rebuild Two-Fam. Home
cate of non-conformity.
Returning last week, Ms. Sep
referred to documents submitted
previously that showed the home
was taxed and fire inspected as a
two-family as far back as at least
1974. She presented two longtime residents of Garwood – one
of whom was a relative of the
former owner – who testified the
home was used as a two-family
as far back as 1955.
However, under questioning from
Board Attorney Donald Fraser, Ms.
Sep said she thought the area in
which the home existed was always zoned as single-family.
While board members were noting a document showing the home
was built in 1904, the conversation seemed to turn when Michael
Vena uncovered a 1922 zoning
map that showed southern sections of Garwood, including the
area of the house, as allowing
multi-family dwellings.
Only one person during the public comment opposed the application, Ms. Sep’s neighbor, Vincent
Kearney, who purchased the
single-family home at 306 Center
Street – the adjacent property to
the south – in October 2011.
Mr. Kearney, the son of recently defeated Republican
Garwood council candidate and
borough council chamber of commerce liaison Carol Kearney,
stated that granting the application would exacerbate parking
problems on the street, create a
hardship for his family and lower
his property value.
The opposition renewed memories of a previous dispute in 2012
between Ms. Sep and Mr. Kearney
and his wife, Veronica, over a
dilapidated garage and shared
driveway that straddled both
properties.
The garage was condemned and
eventually razed, and the
Kearneys sought permission from
the board to build a driveway on
the opposite side of their property. That application was de-
nied, but Mr. Fraser mediated a
settlement on the shared driveway in July 2012.
At the November 12 meeting,
Mr. Fraser expressed dismay
upon learning the agreement was
never executed With most board
members sounding convinced
that Ms. Sep had proven that the
home existed as a well-understood two-family home, planning
board member Bill Nierstedt
struck a discordant note.
“I have never heard of a certificate of non-conforming (use)
being given to a structure that no
longer exists,” he said. “I find it
incredulous that we’re even listening to this.
“So my question to my fellow
board members is, I don’t see
what we’re doing here.”
The comment drew a quick and
angry response from board member Robert Scherer.
“You were the one who told her
to come back,” Mr. Scherer said,
referring to Ms. Sep’s September 24 appearance.
When Mr. Nierstedt said it was
not he but the board that requested she resubmit, Mr.
Scherer seemed more incensed.
“(The board requested it) because of what you said,” he
snapped. “Don’t play games.”
Eventually, Mr. Scherer put forth
the motion to grant the certificate
of non-conformity with the proviso that Ms. Sep construct a onecar garage and also one parking
space behind the home.
With Carol Kearney’s close
friend, board member Gene
Jannotti, recusing himself, the
request was granted over the no
votes of Mr. Nierstedt and Mayor
Pat Quattrocchi, who recused herself two years ago from voting on
the Kearney application.
In other matters, the board
unanimously approved a muchless-contentious application for
a certificate of non-conformity
for Lucille Cepparulo for her twofamily home at 92 Third Avenue.
Also approved unanimously was
a site plan to allow the new owners of 336 North Avenue, the
former site of Oliver’s Family
Ristorante, to renovate the building for a Peruvian restaurant on
the first floor and to convert the
one 1,600-square-foot apartment on the second floor into
two one-bedroom, 800-squarefoot apartments.
Although the plans included
adding one parking spot behind
the building, negating the need
for a variance, board members
strongly urged the new owners,
the parents of proposed restaurant manager Carlos Mendoza,
to make arrangements with St.
Anne’s Catholic Church nearby
or the owners of the shopping
plaza across the street for additional parking.
Junior Woman’s Club
Reveals House Tour
CRANFORD — The Cranford
Junior Woman’s Club has announced that its 25th Annual
Home for the Holidays House
Tour will be held on Sunday,
December 7, from noon to 4 p.m.
This self-guided tour will showcase four Cranford homes along
with a Hospitality House where
refreshments and treats will be
available. The Madrigal Choir will
be on hand to entertain.
This event, for adults and children over age 12, will be made
possible through the generosity
of five Cranford homeowners, as
well as local businesses, organizations and individuals. Proceeds
will benefit local charities.
Tickets, in advance, are $25
each. They are available at Augusta Mae, Back to Nature Health
Foods, the Cranford Public Library,
the UPS Store and Periwinkle’s,
all in Cranford. They also are
available
online
at
cranfordjwc.com/housetour.htm.
Tickets will be sold the day of the
tour for $30 each.
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
Borough Considers Online
Payments For Taxes
By BRIAN TRUSDELL
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
GARWOOD – Borough residents
would be able to make municipal
tax payments online with a credit
or debit card under a proposal to
replace the borough’s accounting computer software.
Councilwoman Sara Todisco,
the governing body’s finance
committee chairwoman, reported
to the council at its meeting Tuesday that the company that currently provides the software, First
Byte of Teaneck, N.J., would not
be able to continue support due
to a health condition of one of the
principals.
Subsequent research resulted
in two offers, including one from
Edmunds and Associates of
Northfield, N.J., that would allow
residents or business owners to
remit tax payments via computer.
Edmunds would charge a convenience fee, which was not disclosed, that would not lessen the
tax owed to the borough.
Ms. Todisco said a measure
would be put forth in upcoming
meetings requesting the council
approve $20,000 in start-up costs
to purchase, install and provide
46 hours in training on the software.
The Edmunds bid was slightly
more than a $16,500 offer from
Municipal Software Inc. (MSI),
but Edmunds was chosen due to
its more common use, Ms.
Todisco said, as well as compatibility with the borough’s hardware, according to Borough Administrator Christina Ariemma.
In other finance committee discussions, Ms. Todisco said the
panel was recommending – at the
urging of the state – the elimination of the stipend paid to borough employees who opt to waive
health-insurance coverage.
The stipend, 25 percent of the
premium the borough paid, was
recommended by state officials
as a way to encourage employees to decline health insurance
and reduce costs. But since many
of those who opted out did so
because employees were required to pay toward the insurance and/or it was cheaper to
obtain coverage through their
spouse, the stipend is no longer
necessary.
Two borough employees have
applied, Ms. Ariemma said. However, only one was eligible and is
receiving the stipend.
The relatively sparsely attended
meeting lasted uncharacteristically slightly over an hour.
It was announced that the $3.2million Athletic Field Complex in
the southeast corner of the borough is nearing completion.
Ninety percent of the railings, 95
percent of the plumbing and all
of the kitchen equipment have
been installed in the field house,
and shrubbery that needed replacing has been planted. The
ponding on the basketball court
and drainage issues in the baseball outfield have been rectified.
“Inspections are set for November 25,” said Councilman Lou
Petruzzelli, the council’s liaison
to the project. “They’re starting
to take the plastic off the windows. They’re starting to clean
up.”
The project, 18 months behind
schedule, has been a contentious issue within the council and
was often cited as an issue in the
recent council and mayoral elections. The park is scheduled to
officially open Sunday, December 14, with a ribbon-cutting ceremony.
Some matters remain, such as
the aiming and shielding of security lighting, which Mr. Petruzzelli
said needs to be addressed by
PSE&G.
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Thursday, November 20, 2014
goleader.com/ballyhoo
Borough Considers Online Payments
Among other issues discussed
included leaf removal, after one
resident noted how he had been
approached by a Garwood police
officer for raking his leaves into
the street. The resident said he
raked the leaves into the street
with the intention of bagging
them, as required by a borough
ordinance enacted last year.
However, the lateness of the
day and soreness in his back
prompted him to leave them until
morning. A neighbor apparently
notified police. Councilman Bill
Nierstedt said the ordinance does
not allow raking the leaves into
the street and advised the homeowner to leave them in his
yard until bagging them.
That prompted Councilman
Mike Martin, who earlier this year
suggested rescinding the law, to
question the wisdom of requiring
Garwood Knights
Holding Food Drive
GARWOOD — The Garwood
Knights of Columbus are collecting canned and dry food goods,
turkeys and hams for their holiday food drives. Food baskets
will be distributed to needy families in Garwood and the surrounding areas during November and December.
Donations can be dropped off
after 4 p.m. weekdays at the
Knights’ Council Hall, located at
37 South Avenue, Garwood, opposite Pathmark. On weekends,
individuals are asked to first call
(908) 789-9809.
Parking is located behind the
hall off Willow Avenue. Visitors
are asked to use the side-door
entrance. Monetary donations,
made payable to the Garwood K
of C Food Drive, also would be
appreciated. For more information, call the Knights at (908)
789-9809 after 4 p.m. The
Knights express appreciation to
the community for supporting its
past food drives.
leaf bagging. But he found no
support on council.
Mr. Nierstedt later advised that
while this was the last week for
scheduled pickup of leaves, the
Department of Public Works
would continue to remove leaves
left out between sidewalks and
curbs on a request or as-needed
basis.
Ballyhoo
I want to thank all the Garwood
voters who came out to vote for
me. It certainly was a close election with only six votes out of
almost 1,200 keeping me from
representing all of Garwood on
the Council. I worked very hard
for each and every vote and I
appreciated the support.
My campaign was always about
what I could do for the future of
Garwood and not about what
others failed to do in the past. I
congratulate the winners of the
election and I pledge to continue
to help Garwood in any way that
I can.
I hope that everyone will look
forward to enjoying Garwood
Rocks 2015, June 7th.
Carol Kearney
Garwood
Garwood Announces
Tree Lighting Nov. 29
GARWOOD — The Borough of
Garwood will hold its Annual
Christmas Tree Lighting on Saturday, November 29, at 5 p.m. It
will take place in the parking lot
at Borough Hall, located at 403
South Avenue, Garwood.
The public is invited to come
and kick off the holiday season.
Santa will arrive for a visit and
pictures. Refreshments will be
served.
Sports, Humor and Commentary
– Local Obituaries –
Joan Dushanek Roll, 89, Had Worked
For National Council of Churches
Joan Alice (née Dushanek) Roll,
89, formerly of Garwood, died on
Sunday, November 9, 2014, in
Brooklyn, N.Y., where she had
been a resident.
Letter to the Editor
Thank You Garwood
For the Support
New Jersey
GARWOOD
Saturday, October 25, Miguel
Perkins, 19, of Elizabeth was
charged with criminal trespassing, burglary and possession of
stolen property after police investigated a report of a suspicious male looking into cars on
Myrtle Avenue. According to police, Perkins was found in possession of iPads and iPhones that
were stolen from parked motor
vehicles in Westfield.
Friday, October 31, Johnathan
Rivera, 23, of Roselle was charged
with driving while intoxicated (DWI)
following a motor vehicle stop.
Saturday, November 1, Pestine
Allen, Jr., 19, of Westfield was
charged with underage consumption of alcohol following a motor
vehicle stop.
Monday, November 3, Deidra
Glasgow, 34, of Westfield was
charged with DWI following a
motor vehicle stop.
Monday, November 3, Jose
Velez, III, 22, of Roselle was
charged with eluding police and
DWI after a brief police chase. He
was released on $25,000 bond.
Thursday, November 6, a 22year-old male Garwood resident
was charged with two counts of
burglary and two counts of theft
after two Locust Avenue residents reported that $5,500 in
cash and jewelry were missing
from their homes. Authorities
withheld the suspect’s identity,
citing an ongoing investigation.
Born in Garwood to the late
Frederick and Ellen Donoughue
Dushanek, Joan was retired from
the National Council of Churches,
in New York, where she had been
an executive secretary and program specialist.
She was the beloved wife of the
late Reverend Kenneth E. Roll,
Sr., who was ordained in St.
Paul’s United Church of Christ in
Garwood. He was a relative of
early pioneer Baltus Roll, an ancestor, whose farm is now the
Baltusrol Golf Club in Springfield, N.J. Joan also was preceded in death by her daughter,
Kathiellen Roll Gilligan, and her
brother, Frederick Dushanek, and
is survived by her son, Kenneth
E. Roll, Jr. of Garwood; her daughter, Deborah Alice Roll of Brooklyn Heights, N.Y.; seven grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; her sister, Jane Limone,
and her husband, Tony, along
with nieces and nephews.
Joan’s Life Celebration was held
on Tuesday, November 18, 2014,
at Gray Funeral Home, 318 East
Broad Street, Westfield, where
her funeral service followed. Interment took place at Fairview
Cemetery in Westfield. To view a
tribute of Joan’s life, please go
to: www.grayfuneralhomes.com.
November 20, 2014
Reading is Good For You
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Probitas Verus Honos
PUBLIC NOTICE
BOROUGH OF GARWOOD
ORDINANCE 14-15
AN ORDINANCE FIXING THE
SALARY FOR CHRISTINA M
ARIEMMA, BOROUGH ADMINISTRATOR/MUNICIPAL
CLERK AS PER THE SETTLEMENT AUTHORIZATION IN
THE MATTER OF ARIEMMA
V. BOROUGH OF GARWOOD
AND AS DIRECTED IN RESOLUTION
NO.
14-279
ADOPTED OCTOBER 28,
2014
BE IT ORDAINED by the Mayor and
Council of the Borough of Garwood, in
the County of Union, State of New Jersey as follows:
SECTION 1.
Christina
M.
Ariemma, Borough Administrator/Municipal Clerk of the Borough of Garwood shall
be entitled to an annual salary hereinafter
set forth opposite respective classification:
SECTION 2. The within salary shall be
retroactive and take effect January 1, 2011.
SECTION 3. All ordinances or parts of
ordinances inconsistent herewith shall be
and they are hereby repealed.
SECTION 4. This ordinance shall take
effect immediately and in the manner prescribed by law.
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that Ordinance
No. 14-15, was introduced and passed on
first reading at a meeting of the Borough
Council of the Borough of Garwood, in the
County of Union, State of New Jersey, held
on the 18th DAY OF NOVEMBER 2014,
and that Ordinance No. 14-15, will be taken
up for further consideration for final passage at the meeting of said Borough Council to be held at its meeting room in the
Municipal Building, 403 South Avenue,
Garwood, New Jersey, on the 9th DAY OF
DECEMBER 2014, at 7:15 p.m., or as
soon thereafter as said matter can be
heard, at which time and place all persons
who may be interested therein will be given
an opportunity to be heard concerning the
same.
ATTEST:
Christina Ariemma
Municipal Clerk
Borough of Garwood
2 T - 11/20/14, The Leader Fee: $51.50
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