June 18-19, 2009 June 20, 2009 CONFERENCE

The only statewide conference for Illinois EMS professionals
CONFERENCE
POST-CONFERENCE COURSES
June 18-19, 2009
June 20, 2009
This conference is for EMS providers, educators, medical directors and all other emergency-care professionals.
Sponsored by the Illinois College of Emergency Physicians
Supported by the Illinois Department of Public Health and an ASPR Grant
CONTENTS
E V E N T H I G H L I G H T S
FAC U LT Y
S C H E D U L E AT A G L A N C E
S E S S I O N D E S C R I P T I O N S
P O S T- C O N F E R E N C E C O U R S E S
C O N T I N U I N G E D U C AT I O N C R E D I T R E G I S T R AT I O N F O R M 4
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This all-new two-day conference gives EMS PROFESSIONALS across Illinois
a powerful forum for learning, information sharing and networking.
This year’s theme—Breaking Down the Barriers—focuses on practical
ways EMS LEADERS can work together across organizational lines to
improve disaster preparedness and emergency response.
With cutting-edge clinical and education-focused content, local, state and national experts will bring you the information you need today. Sessions cover:
+ The rise in helicopter accidents in the U.S. and how we should respond
+ Key laws that affect EMS delivery in Illinois and potential causes of EMS-related litigation
+ Real-life response and preparedness lessons from recent disasters
+ The growing role of tactical EMS and how TEMS units are supporting law enforcement nationwide
+ The strengths, weakness and future of EMS education in Illinois and across the country
+ Responding to the crushing blow of rhabdomyolysis
+ Caring for technology-assisted children
+ The changing role of the EMS medical director—including the impact of the Illinois EMS and Trauma Systems Act
+ New developments from the federal Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response
+ How capnography is improving prehospital care
+ How student evaluators can increase their objectivity
+ Advanced airway management in the toughest scenarios
+ The power of online education for EMS training
+ The unique challenges of agricultural emergencies
+ Common teaching flaws—exposed by “The Karate Kid”
+ The role of the Strategic National Stockpile in a disaster
+ A fresh approach to continuing education
Register for one day or two—with breakfast, lunch and breaks included.
EVENT HIGHLIGHTS
R E S P O N S E + 2 0 0 9
E x hi b its
Exhibitors with the latest products and services in emergency and trauma
care will be on site for extended exhibits hours during the conference.
Exhibits will open on Thursday, June 18, during the continental breakfast
and will close at 2:45 p.m. on Friday, June 19.
E M S M edical D irectors F orum
Illinois EMS medical directors and coordinators are invited to participate in
a special EMS Medical Directors Forum on Thursday, June 18, from 3 p.m.
– 4 p.m. This interactive session will provide a forum for discussing the
controversial issues facing medical directors today.
P ost- conference courses
If two full days of hard-hitting content aren’t enough, join us for the optional
third day of RESPONSE+2009 featuring valuable post-conference courses
that will strengthen your knowledge and skills. Choose from a four-hour
Domestic Preparedness Course, an eight-hour 12-Lead ECG Course or an
eight-hour ITLS Pediatric Provider Course, featuring the new third-edition
textbook.
R egistration is easy
To register by mail, please complete both pages of this registration form
and mail it with a check payable to ICEP or with your Visa, MasterCard,
American Express or Discover information to 3000 Woodcreek Drive, Suite
200, Downers Grove, IL 60515. (No debit or check cards, please.) To register
by phone or online, please call 888-495-ICEP or visit icep.org. You can also
complete the form with your credit card information and fax it to 630-4956404.
If you have questions or need additional information, please call us at 888495-ICEP or e-mail [email protected] We’ll be glad to help.
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A b out your conference hotel
The Crowne Plaza Springfield is a heartland destination perfect for
getaways and conventions.
Situated directly off of Interstate 55, this world-class hotel puts you
close to popular Springfield historic sites, such as Lincoln’s Home
and Tomb, Lincoln’s New Salem State Historic Site, the Old State
Capitol, the Dana Thomas House designed by Frank Lloyd Wright
and the new Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum.
Also nearby are golf courses, Lake Springfield and several great
recreational options, including shops, the Henson Robinson Zoo, an
eight-screen movie complex and numerous restaurants.
The full-service Crowne Plaza Springfield is a non-smoking facility
and offers complimentary wireless high-speed Internet access
in the lobby and business center. Guest room access is available
for $9.95 a day. The hotel provides complimentary parking and
shuttle service to and from the Springfield airport with advance
reservations.
ICEP has arranged a special rate for conference registrants of $110
single/double per night, plus applicable taxes. The cutoff date for
hotel registration is May 27, 2009. Reservations received after the
cutoff date will be accepted based on space and rate availability.
To reserve a room, please call Crowne Plaza reservations at
217-529-7777 or toll free at 800-589-2769. Refer to the rate code
EMS to receive this special rate. Check-in is at 4 p.m., and checkout
is at 11 a.m.
BREAKING DOWN THE BARRIERS
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FACULTY
R E S P O N S E + 2 0 0 9
Damon T. A rnold , MD, MPH, Director of the Illinois Department of
Public Health in Springfield (Invited)
David M aatman , NREMT-P/IC, CCEMT-P, Educator for American
Bryan E . Bledsoe , DO, FACEP, EMT-P, Adjunct Professor of
Emergency Medicine at The George Washington University Medical Center
in Washington, D.C.
C onnie M attera , RN, MS, TNS, EMT-P, Administrative Director
of Northwest Community EMS System and Trauma Nurse Specialist
Coordinator at Northwest Community Hospital in Arlington Heights
I ra Blumen , MD, FACEP, Attending Physician and Medical Director –
J ohn M ohler , RN, Flight Nurse, Rural Outreach Coordinator and
Instructor for Care Flight in Sparks, Nev.
UCAN and Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine, Section of Emergency
Medicine, at the University of Chicago
Medical Response—West Michigan in Grand Rapids, Mich.
C hris N ollette , PhD, EMS Program Director at Riverside Community
Walter Bradley, MD, MBA, FACEP, Senior Medical Administrator of
the Illinois Department of Public Health in Springfield (Invited)
College in Riverside, Calif., and President Elect of the National Association
of EMS Educators
S a b ina Braithwaite , MD, FACEP, NREMT-P, Senior Fellow, Assistant
Bo b Page , AAS, NREMT-P, CCEMT-P, Director of Emergency Education
Secretary for Preparedness and Response/American College of Emergency
Physicians, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine in the Department
of Emergency Medicine at the University of Virginia Health System in
Charlottesville, Va., and Operational Medical Director for Albemarle County
Fire Rescue in Ivy, Va.
at St. John’s Regional Health System and President of Edutainment in
Springfield, Mo.
Health, Office of Preparedness and Response in Springfield (Invited)
Dan R . C arlascio , NREMT-P, CCEMT-P, Clinical Implementation
M att R o b erts , MPH, Volunteer Coordinator for the Illinois Department
Manager at Philips Medical Systems in Maywood
of Public Health in Springfield
M ary C onnelly, BSN, RN, Director of Operations for IMERT/INVENT,
Illinois College of Emergency Physicians in Downers Grove
A ndrew
S cott F rench , MD, FACEP, Chairman of the ICEP EMS Committee, EMS
Medical Director for the St. Francis EMS System, and Vice Chair, Emergency
Medicine at OSF St. Francis Hospital in Evanston
G eorge Z . H evesy, MD, FACEP, Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery
– Emergency Medicine at the University of Illinois College of Medicine at
Peoria and Director of the Department of Emergency Medicine at OSF Saint
Francis Medical Center in Peoria
Davis E . H ill , EMT-P, Program Director of the Managing Agricultural
Emergencies program at Penn State in University Park, Pa.
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W infred C . R awls , Deputy Director of the Illinois Department of Public
R . R osza k , Esq., JD, MPA, EMT-P, Emergency Care
Coordination Center, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and
Response, Department of Health and Human Services in Washington, D.C.
S . R o b ert S eitz , MEd, RN, NREMT-P, Assistant Professor/Study
Coordinator in the Emergency Medicine program of the School of Health
and Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Pittsburgh
E . J ohn W ipfler , I I I , MD, FACEP, Clinical Associate Professor of Surgery
– Emergency Medicine at the University of Illinois College of Medicine at
Peoria and Attending Physician in the Department of Emergency Medicine
at OSF Saint Francis Medical Center in Peoria
T h u r s d ay, J u n e 1 8 , 2 0 0 9
7:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Continental breakfast—Exhibits openEmerald Room
RegistrationPre-function Area
8:30 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.Welcome and opening announcements
Sapphire Room
8:45 a.m. – 10 a.m.General session: Medical Helicopter Accidents
Sapphire Room
10 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.Break—Exhibits openEmerald Room
10:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.
1A Clinical session: Controversies in Aeromedical Transport
Sapphire Room
1B EMS Educator session: Overview of Disaster Law for EMS ProfessionalsPlaza E + F
11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
2A Clinical session: Tactical Medicine—Challenges of the Inner Perimeter
2B EMS Educator session: Imagine All the PeoplePlaza E + F
Sapphire Room
12:15 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.Luncheon session: Changes in EMS EducationDiamond Room
1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
3A Clinical session: The Crushing Blow of Rhabdomyolysis Sapphire Room
3B EMS Educator session: National EMS Educational Standards—
Implications for IllinoisPlaza E + F
2:45 p.m. – 3 p.m.Break—Exhibits openEmerald Room
3 p.m. – 4 p.m.
4A Clinical session: Caring for Technology-Assisted Children
Sapphire Room
4B EMS Educator session: EMS Medical Director ForumPlaza E + F
5 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.ReceptionDiamond/Emerald Room
F r i d ay, J u n e 1 9 , 2 0 0 9
8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.General session: What’s New at ASPR?
Sapphire Room
9:30 a.m. – 11 a.m.
5A Clinical session: Slap the Cap—Capnography and EMS
Sapphire Room
5B EMS Educator session: Did You See That? Inter-Rater Reliability Plaza E + F
11 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.Break—Exhibits openEmerald Room
11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
6A Clinical session: Managing the Difficult Airway
Sapphire Room 6B EMS Educator session: Online Education and EMS—A+ or D-?Plaza E + F
12:15 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.Luncheon in exhibit area Diamond/Emerald Room
1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
7A Clinical session: Down on the Farm—Managing Agricultural Emergencies
Sapphire Room
7B EMS Educator session: Teacher Say, Student DoPlaza E + F
2:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.Break—Exhibits open final timeEmerald Room
2:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
8A Clinical session: Inside the Illinois Strategic National Stockpile Sapphire Room
8B EMS Educator session: A Fresh Look at Refreshers and Continuing EdPlaza E + F
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SCHEDULE AT A GLANCE
BREAKING DOWN THE BARRIERS
SESSION DESCRIPTIONS
R E S P O N S E + 2 0 0 9
Th u rs day, J u n e 1 8 , 20 0 9
8:45 a.m. – 10 a.m.
G eneral session : M edical H elicopter Accidents
More medical helicopters are in use in the U.S. than ever before—and with
this growth has come a marked increase in accidents. The human and
financial costs are especially high in light of scientific evidence that only
a small fraction of patients actually benefit from being transported by air.
Dr. Bledsoe will review the increase in medical helicopter transportation,
common models currently in use and the factors leading to the rise in
helicopter accidents. He’ll also provide fire and safety recommendations for
responding to a helicopter crash.
Instructor: Bryan E. Bledsoe, DO, FACEP, EMT-P
10:15 a .m. – 11:15 a .m.
1 A C linical session : C ontroversies in A eromedical
T ransport
Medical helicopter crashes across the country—including the recent fatal
crash of the Air Angels helicopter in Aurora—are prompting tough questions
about the aeromedical industry. “Are we using medical helicopters
appropriately?” “What standards are medical helicopters required to operate
under?” and “Who regulates medical helicopters?” In a frank discussion, a
panel of local and national medical and aviation experts will address these
and other pressing questions.
Moderator: George Z. Hevesy, MD, FACEP
Panelists: Ira Blumen, MD, FACEP; Bryan E. Bledsoe, DO, FACEP, EMT-P; and a
representative from the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Transport Systems
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10:15 a .m. – 11:15 a .m.
1 B E M S E ducator session : Overview of D isaster L aw
for E M S P rofessionals
This session focuses on recent EMS litigation and legal issues that affect the
delivery of emergency medical care, with a specific emphasis on Illinois law.
In addition to an overview of recent court cases, Mr. Roszak will highlight
specific federal laws applicable to public health emergencies and disasters,
the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act, the Illinois EMS
Act and the Illinois Good Samaritan Act.
Instructor: Andrew R. Roszak, Esq., JD, MPA, EMT-P
1 1 : 1 5 a . m . – 1 2 : 1 5 p. m .
2 A C linical session : Tactical M edicine — C hallenges of
the I nner P erimeter
Tactical medicine and its prehospital component, tactical emergency
medical support, are among the newest and fastest growing areas in
prehospital medicine. The unique and frequently hazardous environment
presents multiple serious challenges to special operations SWAT teams and
the tactical medicine providers—TMPs—that support them. The primary goal
of a TEMS unit is to help the tactical law enforcement team accomplish its
mission—and to provide immediate inner-perimeter access to emergency
medical care for officers, suspects and bystanders. In this session, Dr. Wipfler
will highlight the current status of tactical EMS in Illinois and across the
country, explain important concepts and challenges, and present dynamic
real-world scenarios of TEMS in the field.
Instructor: E. John Wipfler, III, MD, FACEP
1 1 : 1 5 a . m . – 1 2 : 1 5 p. m .
1 : 4 5 p. m . – 2 : 4 5 p. m .
2 B E M S E ducator session : I magine all the P eople
3 B E M S E ducator session : N ational E M S E ducational
Based on real-life stories and lessons learned from recent disasters, this
touching and lively session will illustrate how providers at every level can
play a vital role in mending patients and healing communities. Ms. Connelly
will review key mass casualty response concepts, challenge common
assumptions, and review lessons learned from recent disaster events. She’ll
also highlight the challenges of using an alternate care site in a disaster while
integrating with various responder elements.
S tandards — I mplications for I llinois
In this in-depth panel discussion, national, state and local EMS educators
will explore the impact of new EMS educational standards on programs in
Illinois. Panelists will explain the new standards and identify how they apply
to local EMS programs. They’ll also highlight the criteria used to review local
programs and the kinds of changes needed if standards aren’t being met.
Moderator: Scott French, MD, FACEP
Instructor: Mary Connelly, BSN, RN
1 2 : 1 5 p. m . – 1 : 4 5 p. m . Panelists: Connie Mattera, RN, MS, TNS, EMT-P; Chris Nollette, PhD; and a
representative from the Illinois Department of Public Health
L uncheon session : C hanges in E M S E ducation
Across the country, EMS education has laudable strengths and challenging
weaknesses. During this luncheon session, Dr. Nollette will explore the
advantages and disadvantages of current EMS educational programs,
outline a vision for EMS education and articulate practical steps for
achieving it.
Speaker: Chris Nollette, PhD
1 : 4 5 p. m . – 2 : 4 5 p. m . 3 A C linical S ession : T he C rushing Blow of
R ha b domyolysis
Since it was identified during the London Blitz in 1941 until today,
rhabdomyolysis has ranked as one of disaster’s most devastating injuries. In
this hard-hitting clinical session, Mr. Mohler will explain the pathophysiology,
assessment and classic treatment of crush syndrome. Content will include
common mechanisms that can cause rhabdomyolysis, assessment
parameters for diagnosis, and important lab tests to order when crush
syndrome is suspected.
3 p. m . – 4 p. m . 4 A C linical S ession : C aring for T echnology- A ssisted
C hildren
Tracheostomies, ventilators, cerebral shunts, feeding tubes, indwelling
catheters. Children who rely on these and other health-care technologies
offer unique opportunities and challenges for prehospital providers. In this
session, Mr. Mohler will review how providers can provide excellent care
for patients and their families. He’ll explore the likelihood of encountering a
technology-assisted child and how to care for a TAC patient in distress, with
a special emphasis on creating a plan of care for a potentially obstructed
tracheotomy tube.
Instructor: John Mohler, RN
Instructor: John Mohler, RN
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SESSION DESCRIPTIONS
BREAKING DOWN THE BARRIERS
SESSION DESCRIPTIONS
R E S P O N S E + 2 0 0 9
3 p. m . – 4 p. m .
9 : 3 0 a . m . – 1 1 a . m . 4 B E M S E ducator session — E M S M edical D irectors F orum
5A C linical session : S lap the Cap — Capnography and E M S
Medical directors face unique challenges in medical control and direction
within their systems. This interactive forum—designed for Illinois EMS
medical directors and coordinators—will highlight the role of the medical
director in Illinois EMS systems. Dr. Bradley and Mr. Rawls will discuss a range
of controversial issues, including adoption of standing orders and interfacing
with neighboring systems. They’ll explain the impact of the Illinois EMA and
Trauma Systems Act and review how new technology and innovations,
including STEMI and stroke centers, will affect EMS system operations.
Capnography represents an important upgrade to your clinical assessment
skills. You’ve heard about it, read about it and now it’s time to get down to
it. In this non-stop interactive session, Mr. Page will present an overview and
demonstration that identify the benefits and limitations of capnography as a
tool for intubated and non-intubated patients. Participants will perform real
waveform analysis of actual cases and view incredible real-time video.
Instructors: Walter Bradley, MD, MBA, FACEP (Invited), Winfred C. Rawls (Invited)
9 :30 a . m . – 11 a . m .
Instructor: Bob Page, AAS, NREMT-P, CCEMT-P
5 B E M S E ducator session : D id You S ee T hat ? I nter - R ater
Fr i day, J u n e 1 9, 20 0 9
8 :30 a . m . – 9 :30 a . m . G eneral session : W hat ’ s N ew at A S P R ?
The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response serves
as the HHS Secretary’s principal advisory staff on bioterrorism and other
public health emergencies. Dr. Braithwaite, the ASPR-ACEP senior fellow,
will explain ASPR’s priorities and goals under the Obama administration
and highlight the plans, products and training exercises the office offers
to support effective response to public health issues, medical threats and
other emergencies. She’ll also discuss strategies for effective coordination
on the medical, scientific, research, and public health aspects of emergency
preparedness and response.
Instructor: Sabina Braithwaite, MD, FACEP, NREMT-P
R elia b ility
Do you have the ability to tell it like it is? In this interactive session, Mr.
Maatman will demonstrate the consistencies and inconsistencies that can
exist among evaluators watching the same scenarios for certification. This
bold presentation holds nothing back in teaching techniques for more
objective observations and critique when evaluating student performance.
Instructor: David Maatman, NREMT-P/IC, CCEMT-P
1 1 : 1 5 a . m . – 1 2 : 1 5 p. m .
6A C linical session : M anaging the D ifficult A irway
This session arms emergency responders and instructors with working
knowledge and hands-on experience in recognizing and managing the
difficult airway in the field setting. Mr. Carlascio will review adult and
pediatric respiratory anatomy and identify the major factors that contribute
to a difficult airway situation in the field.
Instructor: Dan R. Carlascio, NREMT-P, CCEMT-P
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1 1 : 1 5 a . m . – 1 2 : 1 5 p. m . 2 : 4 5 p. m . – 3 : 4 5 p. m .
6 B E M S E ducator session : O nline E ducation and E M S — A+
8 A C linical session : I nside the I llinois S trategic
or D -?
N ational S toc k pile
This session will review the successes and challenges of online education
for emergency healthcare professionals. Mr. Seitz will explore current online
options and the equipment they require. He’ll also take a closer look at how
online learning affects understanding of clinical topics—and its potential for
didactic presentations and skill stations.
Antibiotics, chemical antidotes, antitoxins. These and other medical supplies
and equipment are stored away in the Strategic National Stockpile for rapid
deployment in case of disaster. In this fascinating session, Mr. Roberts will
explain the SNS, its components and how it’s to be used. He’ll provide specific
details about dispensing procedures developed by the State of Illinois—and
how those procedures have worked in practice drills statewide.
Instructor: S. Robert Seitz, MEd, RN, NREMT-P
Instructor: Matt Roberts, MPH
1 : 3 0 p. m . – 2 : 3 0 p. m . 7A C linical session : D own on the Farm — M anaging
2 : 4 5 p. m . – 3 : 4 5 p. m .
Agricultural E mergencies
8 B E M S E ducator session : A F resh L oo k at R efreshers
Farm trauma can be very different from other injuries rural emergency
responders are trained to handle every day. The injuries and treatment are
often very similar to those of victims caught in a building collapse. And
because most farmers work alone in very remote areas, several hours can
elapse before a farm trauma victim is even missed. In this important session,
Mr. Seitz and Mr. Hill will highlight the unique aspects of farm injuries and
how they can be managed effectively. They’ll also outline the importance of
specialized training and coordinated response.
and C ontinuing E d
The difference between “refresher training” and “continuing education”
is more than just new medicine. There are many topics areas and ways
to present information in which you can “say it again for the first time.” In
this session, Mr. Maatman will differentiate between refresher training and
continuing education, discuss ways to assess learning needs and suggest
ways to enhance the value and impact of educational opportunities.
Instructor: David Maatman, NREMT-P/IC, CCEMT-P
Instructors: S. Robert Seitz, MEd, RN, NREMT-P; and Davis E. Hill, EMT-P
1 : 3 0 p. m . – 2 : 3 0 p. m . 7 B E M S E ducator session : T eacher S ay, S tudent D o
In “The Karate Kid,” Miyagi tells the young Daniel: ”No such thing bad
student, only bad teacher” and ”Teacher say, student do.” Ever wonder
what he meant and how it applies to EMS educators? In this session, Mr.
Page will invite participants to look at things from the student’s perspective
and take a critical look at themselves as teachers Do we have bad “teaching
habits?” What would it take to be good teacher? Can we learn from the way
we’ve always done it? Are we teaching a test or educating providers? He’ll
share valuable lessons from the movie that can be applied directly to all
learning domains.
Instructor: Bob Page, AAS, NREMT-P, CCEMT-P
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SESSION DESCRIPTIONS
BREAKING DOWN THE BARRIERS
POST-CONFERENCE COURSES
R E S P O N S E + 2 0 0 9
Satu r day, J u n e 20, 20 0 9
7 a.m. – 8 a.m.
R egistration
8 a . m . – 1 2 : 3 0 p. m . D omestic P reparedness : I mproving P rovider R esponse
to C hemical , Biological , R adiological , N uclear and
E x plosive M ass C asualty I ncidents
This four-hour domestic preparedness course will help agencies,
organizations and individuals to improve preparedness for the health-care
consequences of CBRNE events and naturally occurring catastrophes. The
focused content is designed to augment existing preparedness and other
terrorism-related programs.
Objectives
On completion of this course, participants should be able to:
+ List and describe the basic concepts of the scenarios issued by the
Department of Homeland Security: nuclear detonation; biological
outbreak; natural disaster; and chemical, radiological, explosive.
+ Based on the Illinois Hazard Vulnerability Analysis,
+ List and describe the four priority scenarios: tornadoes, earthquakes,
pandemic flu and explosions.
+ Identify challenges of caring for special-needs populations in disasters.
+ Recall the mission, evolution and capabilities of IMERT and INVENT and
how they relate to the Illinois emergency response system.
+ Detail the characteristics of the successful disaster response of first
responders (physicians, nurses, EMT-P, EMT-B, and others).
+ Define the issues related to altered standards of care specific to
disasters.
+ Describe the challenges to recovery after an incident.
Medical Director: Moses S. Lee, MD, FACEP
Faculty: Brian Murphy, EMT-P; Barb Oliff, BA, RN
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8 a . m . – 5 p. m . 1 2 - L ead E C G C ourse
If somebody said you could take a 12-lead ECG class and have fun, would you
believe her? This highly motivating, eight-hour interactive course—taught by
Bob Page, author of “12-Lead ECG for Acute and Critical Care Providers”—
covers proper lead placement, axis and hemiblock determination, bundle
branch blocks, differentiating wide complex tachycardia and recognizing
myocardial infarction recognition. It even covers use of a 15-lead ECG.
The internationally presented course includes a workbook with practice
problems and handy charts for rapid use in the field. Participants will read
approximately 200 12-lead ECGs, gaining both experience and confidence.
There’s also website support for graduates that ensures continual
competency and feedback from the instructor. Mr. Page presents the course
as a state-of-the-art computer presentation enhanced with sound, graphics,
animation, music and video clips. This course is the perfect filler to pick up
where ACLS and Experienced Provider courses left off!
Objectives
On completion of this course, participants should be able to:
+ Describe the difference between monitoring and assessing a patient using
an ECG machine.
+ Demonstrate proper lead placement for 12- and 15-lead ECGs.
+ Using a simple chart and leads I, II, III, determine electrical axis and the
presence of fascicular blocks (hemiblocks).
+ Determine bundle branch blocks using lead V1 (MCL-1).
+ Describe the clinical significance of hemiblocks and bundle branch blocks
in the cardiac patient.
+ Describe a strategy for identifying V-Tach in wide complex tachycardia.
+ On a 12, 15, or Multi-Lead ECG, identify ST and T wave changes relative to
myocardial ischemia, injury and infarction.
+ Describe a systematic “assessment” of a 12-lead ECG.
+ Describe possible complications of various infarct locations.
Instructor: Bob Page, AAS, NREMT-P, CCEMT-P
8 a . m . – 5 p. m .
I T L S P ediatric P rovider C ourse
When a child who dies of injuries, the tragedy has a devastating effect on
family and friends—and also on the prehospital providers who tried to save
the child. For most prehospital providers, there’s nothing more daunting
than caring for a critically injured child. This Pediatric ITLS course is intended
for EMS providers who have already had ITLS or PHTLS training and are
familiar with adult trauma care. It features a new third-edition textbook and
focuses on the practical training needed to help responders feel confident
and competent when faced with caring for the critically injured child.
Objectives
On completion of this course, participants should be able to:
+ Identify factors that are important when dealing with children and their
families.
+ Describe the steps in trauma assessment and management.
+ Correctly perform the ITLS Primary Survey.
+ Describe the major signs and symptoms of pediatric thoracic trauma.
+ Identify indications and contraindications for airway management and
perform pediatric airway assessment.
+ Recognize four early signs and symptoms of hypovolemic shock in the
prehospital setting.
+ Identify two sites for peripheral venous cannulation.
+ Describe the anatomy of the pediatric head and brain.
+ Identify the unique aspects of children with special health care needs.
Medical Director: Art Proust, MD, FACEP
Co-Coordinators: David Maatman, NREMT-P/IC, CCEMT-P; Scot Allen, BS, FFIII/
EMT-P
Faculty: Anthony Cellitti, NREMT-P/FF
Be
among
the
first
to
tak e
the
ITL S
P ediatric
Provider course b efore its official rollout in August.
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POST-CONFERENCE COURSES
BREAKING DOWN THE BARRIERS
CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDIT
R E S P O N S E + 2 0 0 9
F or providers practicing in hospitals with P C C C , E DA P
F or physicians
This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the
Essential Areas and Policies for the Accreditation Council of Continuing
Medical Education through joint sponsorship of the American College of
Emergency Physicians and the Illinois College of Emergency Physicians. The
American College of Emergency Physicians is accredited by the Accreditation
Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical
education for physicians. ACEP designates this educational activity for a
maximum of 19.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits™. Physicians should only
claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the
activity. Approved by the American College of Emergency Physicians for
a maximum of 19.5 hours of ACEP Category I credit. In accordance with
ACCME standards and ACEP policy, all faculty are required to disclose to the
program audience and any real or apparant conflict(s) of interest related to
the content of their presentation.
F or nurses
Application for continuing education hours for nurses has been made to
Illinois Nurses Association.
F or
pre - hospital
personnel ,
including
emergency
medical technicians , pre - hospital registered nurses
and emergency communications registered nurses
The Continuing Education Coordinating Board for Emergency Medical
Services (CECBEMS) has approved this continuing education activity for 12
hours for the conference, seven hours for the post-conference 12-Lead ECG
Course, seven hours for the post-conference ITLS Pediatric Provider Course
and four hours for the post-conference Domestic Preparedness Course.
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or S E D P recognition
For hospitals recognized as a Pediatric Critical Care Center, Emergency
Departments Approved for Pediatrics or Standby Emergency Departments
approved for Pediatrics, the Illinois Emergency Medical Services for Children
program requires 16 hours of continuing medical education in pediatric
emergency topics every two years for physicians and mid-level practitioners;
and eight hours of continuing education in pediatric emergency topics every
two years for nurses. RESPONSE+2009 provides one hour of credit for the
conference and seven hours of credit for the post-conference ITLS Pediatric
Provider Course toward this EMSC requirement.
C ertificate re q uirements
New AMA guidelines require that CME certificates for conference participation
be documented. All participants will need to complete a CME statement of
participation onsite. ICEP will distribute certificates electronically within four
to six weeks after the event.
BREAKING DOWN THE BARRIERS
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R E S P O N S E + 2 0 0 9
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BREAKING DOWN THE BARRIERS
REGISTRATION FORM
Please print clearly and circle or write in your credentials. We’ll use the
information to create your conference badge and other materials.
F irst and last name Please circle:
MD
DO
FACEP
RN
EMT
EMT-I
EMT-P
FF
NREMT-P
PA
O rganization A ddress
C ity
S tate
Z I P code
T elephone num b er
E - mail A ddress
ICEP will fill sessions on a first-come, first-served basis and reserves the right
to cancel or close any session based on registration. If you need to change
your selection after registering, please contact ICEP.
R egistration fees and options
You can register for two days or one day.
T o su b mit your registration
+ Two-day registration—$45 per person. Includes continental
breakfast, breaks and lunch both days and a reception
To register by mail, please complete both pages of this registration form and
mail it with a check payable to ICEP or with your Visa, MasterCard, American
Express or Discover information to:
+ One-day registration—$25 per person. Includes continental
breakfast, breaks and lunch on the day of attendance
3000 Woodcreek Drive, Suite 200
Downers Grove, IL 60515
(No debit or check cards, please.)
To register by phone or online, please call 888-495-ICEP or visit icep.org. You
can also complete the form with your credit card information and fax it to
630-495-6404. If you have questions or need additional information, please
call us at 888-495-ICEP or e-mail [email protected] We’ll be glad to help.
+ Residents and medical students—no charge (Please provide proof of
status before the program begins.)
+ The post-conference courses have separate registration fees ranging
from free to $50.
To register, please complete the section on the back of this page.
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REGISTRATION FORM
R E S P O N S E + 2 0 0 9
C oncurrent session selection
In each time slot, please mark the session you’d like to attend.
C linical S essions
E M S E ducator S essions
10:15 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.
___ 1A Controversies in Aeromedical Transport
___ 1B Overview of Disaster Law for EMS Professionals
11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
___ 2A Tactical Medicine—Challenges of the Inner Perimeter
___ 2B Imagine All the People
1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
___ 3A The Crushing Blow of Rhabdomyolysis
___ 3B National EMS Educational Standards—Implications for Illinois
3 p.m. – 4 p.m.
___ 4A Caring for Technology-Assisted Children
___ 4B EMS Medical Director Forum
T hursday, J une 1 8 , 2 0 0 9
F riday, J une 1 9 , 2 0 0 9
9:30 a.m. – 11 a.m.
___ 5A Slap the Cap—Capnography and EMS
___ 5B Did You See That? Inter-Rater Reliability
9:30 a.m. – 11 a.m.
___ 6A Managing the Difficult Airway
___ 6B Online Education and EMS—A+ or D-?
1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.
___ 7A Down on the Farm—Managing Agricultural Emergencies
___ 7B Teacher Say, Student Do
2:45 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
___ 8A Inside the Illinois Strategic National Stockpile
___ 8B A Fresh Look at Refreshers and Continuing Ed
L uncheon registration
R egistration notification
___ Yes, I will attend the luncheons.
I would prefer to receive my confirmation letter by:
___ No, I will not attend the luncheons.
___ E-mail (to address provided on front)
___ I will require a special vegetarian meal.
___ Standard mail
___ I will require a special meal: ___________________________
P ost- conference course registration
Payment
___ I’d like to register for:
I am paying by:
___ Domestic Preparedness Course­—no charge.
___ Check made payable to ICEP
____________________________________________________
___ 12-Lead ECG Course­—$50, lunch included.
___ Visa credit card
C ard num b er
___ ITLS Pediatric Provider Course—$50, lunch included
___ Mastercard credit card
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___ American Express credit card
___________________________
___ Discover credit card
E x p. date
D isclaimer
The materials presented as a part of this conference are being made available
by the Illinois College of Emergency Physicians for educational purposes
only. The material is not intended to represent the only or necessarily the best
methods or procedures appropriate for the medical situations discussed,
but rather is intended to present an approach, statement or opinion of the
authors or presenters that may be helpful or of interest to the participants.
S pecial assistance
If you require special assistance at any time during RESPONSE+2009 or have
special dietary needs, please see an ICEP staff member at the registration
desk.
C ancellation policy
ICEP will accept refund requests on or before June 10, 2009. Refunds
granted may incur a processing fee.
T o learn more
For more information, please call ICEP at 630-495-6400 or toll-free at 888495-ICEP. You can also visit us online at icep.org.
I l l inois C o l l e g e of E mer g enc y P h y sici a ns
3000 Woodcreek Drive, Suite 200
Downers Grove, Illinois 60515
The only statewide conference for Illinois EMS professionals
This June, take advantage of cutting-edge content from a distinguished roster
of local, state and national experts, including:
+ Bryan E. Bledsoe, DO, FACEP, EMT-P
+ Sabina Braithwaite, MD, FACEP, NREMT-P
+ Connie Mattera, RN, MS, TNS, EMT-P
+ Chris Nollette, PhD
+ Bob Page, AAS, NREMT-P, CCEMT-P
+ E. John Wipfler, III, MD, FACEP
Presorted
First Class
U.S. Postage
PAID
Dallas, TX
Permit No. 2213