GCSE English Reading Non-fiction Travel and Adventure

GCSE English
Reading Non-fiction
Travel and Adventure
Reading ‘between the lines’
GCSE English
Reading Non-fiction
Lessons 1&2
LO: Can I explore how writers
convey thoughts, feelings and ideas
in descriptive writing?
Key words: Infer, Description, Tone, Mood
The children’s writer C.S. Lewis once gave this advice to a
child who had written him a letter about becoming a writer…
“
In writing, don’t use adjectives which merely tell us how you
want us to feel about the thing you are describing. I mean,
instead of telling us a thing was “terrible,” describe it so that
we'll be terrified. Don't say it was “delightful”; make us say
“delightful” when we've read the description. You see, all
those words (horrifying, wonderful, hideous, exquisite) are
only like saying to your readers, “Please will you do my job
for me.”
What does Lewis mean?
Is this good advice?
”
Which are commonly found in descriptive writing?
• 1st, 2nd or 3rd person
(narrative viewpoint)
• Directly addressing the
reader
• Imperatives (commands)
• Rhetorical questions
• Register - formal/informal
language
• Diction - simple/complex
vocabulary
• Figurative language &
imagery: similes/metaphor/
personification etc.
• Word play & puns
• Alliteration
•
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•
•
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•
•
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•
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•
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Rhyme & rhythm
Anecdote & allusion
Slogan & catchphrase
Statistics & facts
Exaggeration & hyperbole
Repetition
Humour
Sensory language
Emotive language
Punctuation type
Expert advice
Short sentences
Superlatives
Lists
1. The Grand Canyon
1.You felt excited when approaching
the place
2.You were amazed – you hadn’t
expected it to be so huge
3.You felt overwhelmed
(i.e. the experience had a strong emotional effect)
IN GROUPS
1. The Grand Canyon
2. Favelas, Brazil
1.You felt shocked on seeing the
favelas for the first time
2.You felt sympathy for young children
living in poor conditions
3.You felt inspired by the children’s
cheerfulness and resilience
IN GROUPS
2. Favelas, Brazil
3. London’s backstreets
1.You realised you had become lost
2.You felt panicked and scared
3.You felt trapped
IN GROUPS
3. London’s backstreets
4. Bora Bora Island
1.You were impressed by the island’s
beauty
2.You felt calm, happy and relaxed
3.You got bored after a while – it was
too quiet
IN GROUPS
4. Bora Bora Island
5. New York City
1.You felt disbelief at the size of the
many skyscrapers
2.You thought the food was incredible
3.You thought the fashion in the city
was the best thing about it
IN GROUPS
5. New York City
6. Tuscany, Italy
1.You were interested in the history of
this place
2.You thought the weather was great
3.You felt embarrassed – you couldn’t
communicate with anyone
IN GROUPS
6. Tuscany, Italy
Text 1: From The Telegraph’s Just Back: Memories of Auschwitz
GCSE English
Reading Non-fiction
Lessons 3&4
LO: Can I read for inference and
write a detailed response to a nonfiction text?
Key words: Infer, Description, Tone, Mood
GCSE English Language
exam, you are expected to both read and write
In the
different kinds of non-fiction. This unit focuses on the
reading section of the paper, which asks you to read and
respond to texts in certain ways. You are asked…
retrieve
explain
1. To
information and
it to
show you’ve fully understood a text (usually a
newspaper article)
analyse a text’s presentational features,
such as headlines and images, and link them to
2. To
the text (again – usually a newspaper article)
infer
3. To
meanings, ideas, thoughts, feelings etc.
from a text – to ‘read between the lines’ (usually a
descriptive piece)
compare the use of language in two non-
4. To
fiction texts.
IN PAIRS
Describe some of the thoughts and feelings experienced by
Kate Giles during her visit to a former concentration camp.
In Text 3, Kate Giles describes to readers her visit to Auschwitz, a former
concentration camp. She expresses various thoughts and feelings during
this overwhelming and life-changing visit.
At the beginning of the extract, the narrator expresses some uncertainty
about the visit. Although her mother has told her that everyone should
visit this place at one time in their life, Kate says, “I didn’t know what she
meant”. This implies that she is confused about her mother’s claim;
perhaps she is not prepared for the moving experience she is about to face.
On entering Auschwitz, the place clearly immediately has an effect on
Kate. As she visits innocent looking buildings, she is faced with “exhibits
and photos detailing the atrocities” that happened where she stands. This
clearly has an impact on Kate; she walks around “slowly and quietly,
talking only in hushed whispers” which suggests that she is probably
thinking about the terrible history of the buildings. We know she is
reflecting on the awful things that happened as she says being silent
“feels like the right thing to do”.
Activity: Complete this answer. It needs another 2-3 short paragraphs…
IN GROUPS
Text 2: An extract from A Cook's
Tour by Anthony Bourdain
Text 3: An Extract from Black
Earth City by Charlotte Hobson
Text 4: From The Telegraph’s
Just Back: A gruelling trek in
Nepal
1.
•Highlight the key words in the question. Usually, the question
asks you to explain some thoughts and feelings of a first-person
narrator.
•Be aware, however, that you may be asked to infer and deduce in
a different way. PAY CAREFUL ATTENTION TO THE QUESTION.
Describe some of the thoughts and feelings experienced
by Anthony Bourdain as he witnesses the slaughter of a
pig.
Explain some of the thoughts and feelings experienced
by the narrator of Black Heart City.
Explain some of the thoughts and feelings experienced
by Denis Spencer during his gruelling trek in Nepal.
2.
Ferry Across the Lake: Explain some of the thoughts and feelings
Christopher Ondaatje has about his experience of Lake Victoria.
•Actively read the text: You are looking for particular parts of
the text which you’ve been asked to write about in the question.
•Next, go through the text, highlighting
you answer the question.
sections that will help
annotate the article very briefly with ideas that will
•You might like to
help you answer the question.
2.
Jigsaw Activity
The opening sentences convey
the narrator’s guilt.
The repetition of ‘I’ll always
remember’ emphasises the
significance of the event.
The vivid sensory descriptions
of decay and neglect imply the
writer felt disgust.
The mood of the narrator
changes drastically.
3.
Connective
Firstly
Secondly
Thirdly
As well as this
Furthermore
Moreover
Finally
Lastly
Likewise
Similarly
The author / language in the
text…
Builds
Connotes
Contrasts
Conveys
Creates
Demonstrates
Describes
Depicts
Emphasises
Evokes
Exaggerates
Expresses
Gives the impression
Gives a sense
Highlights
Informs
Implies
Indicates
Narrates
Realises
Recognises
Refers to
Reflects
Reveals
Signifies
Suggests
Shows
Tells
The reader…
(or ‘we’…)
Is made aware
Is informed
Is told
Learns
Discovers
Realises
USEFUL WORDS & PHRASES
Explain which parts of
Bill Bryson’s A Walk in
the Woods you find
tense and exciting.
IN GROUPS
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