New Era of World-Class Cancer Care Dedication . Compassion.

New Era of World-Class Cancer Care
The Center for Children With Cancer and Blood Diseases
Dedication.
Compassion.
Expertise.
WELCOM E TO
UNIVERSITY OF
M I N N ES OTA A M P L AT Z
C H I L D R E N’S H O S P I T A L
I’m a pediatrician who treats children with cancer, and I work with a coordinated team of health-care professionals to help
these children. Cure is our goal. My colleagues and I combine our academic and research backgrounds with determination and
passion to achieve this goal every day.
Currently, we cure cancer in 80 percent of our patients, but we strive for 100 percent. We’re getting there, and the team at
Amplatz Children’s Hospital is leading the way.
Our team of pediatric hematologists and oncologists is known for developing new treatments that have become national
standards for treating childhood cancers. We can assure the doctor in Omaha, the parents in St. Paul, or the grandparents in
Tokyo that their patient or loved one will receive state-of-the-art care at Amplatz Children’s Hospital.
Today, we provide this care in a new, world-class facility. After months of planning, building and anticipation, the
227,000-square-foot University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital opened its doors to patients, families and staff on
April 30, 2011. The positive response from the children, parents and physicians to the facility is inspiring. People tell us that
the building is serene and comfortable. We know the children deserve all the amenities offered.
The new hospital elevates patient and family care to the level of advanced research that people associate with the University of
Minnesota. The hospital embodies the marriage of science and medical care with patient-centered care.
For children with cancer, little things often matter a lot — like the unique décor on each floor at Amplatz Children’s Hospital
or the additional space and privacy patients and families enjoy because every room is private. We also know big things matter
— like having access to a children’s hospital where researchers make groundbreaking discoveries.
When doctors in communities outside the hospital reach out to us on behalf of their patients, we know they want the best care
and treatment for their patients. As physicians, we constantly review pages of computer-generated notes to assess a patient, yet
we know a personal conversation can provide us deeper insight and clues to the diagnosis.
Please feel free to call us. Building relationships is about direct communication. At Amplatz Children’s Hospital, a team of
highly trained pediatric oncologists and hematologists manage each child’s care and treatment. We specialize in world-class
care that makes a world of a difference to a child.
A HOSPITAL INSPIRED BY
AND DESIGNED FOR CHILDREN
The University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital is a 21st century facility,
designed to provide the most comprehensive healing environment for children. It’s the
only children’s hospital in Minnesota that is part of an academic health center, and home
to one of the nation’s top 20 pediatric research programs.
Our compassionate caregivers include renowned doctors and researchers from the
University of Minnesota and its Department of Pediatrics. Their medical breakthroughs
improve the lives of children and adults across the nation and globe.
Brenda Weigel, M.D., M.Sc.
Director of the Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology
Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics
Lehman/Children’s Cancer Research Fund Endowed Chair in Pediatric Cancer
Masonic Cancer Research Center
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Amplatz Children’s Hospital also partners with Fairview Health Services to provide young
patients with leading-edge medical treatments, technologies and services. Our extensive
team of highly experienced health-care professionals offers clinical care in more than 50
pediatric specialties.
Equally groundbreaking is our approach to care. We recognize that loved ones are the
primary source of a child’s strength and support. That’s why collaboration — which
includes the patient, family and staff at every level of our organization — is the
cornerstone of our culture.
University of Minnesota
Amplatz Children's
Hospital
2450 Riverside Ave.
Minneapolis, MN 55454
612-365-1000
888-KIDS-UMN
Discover more:
uofmchildrenshospital.org
“We now have an
outstanding physical
facility that reflects the
quality of care we’ve
provided for years.
This new hospital offers families
a whole new level of service.”
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Joseph Neglia, M.D., M.P.H.
Physician-in-Chief, University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital
Chair, University of Minnesota Medical School, Department of Pediatrics
3
Am
erica’s
Hospitals 2011
in Cancer Care
2
University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital ranks
as one of the best children’s hospitals in the nation for cancer
care. Our hospital’s cancer program is part of the Masonic
Cancer Center at the University of Minnesota, which the National
Cancer Institute designated as a comprehensive cancer center.
In 2011, U.S. News & World Report once again recognized
University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital as among the
nation’s best — topping all other children’s hospitals in Minnesota
with a record of eight specialty services rankings. In cancer care,
Amplatz Children’s Hospital has the highest rankings in Minnesota
and the five-state region for the fourth year in a row.
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Opposite Page: 1. Playroom, Level 5; 2. Main Lobby, Level 2; 3. Staff Corridor, Level 3; 4. Patient Room, Level 3;
5. Family Resource Center, Level 2; 6. Waiting Area, Level 5; 7. Care Team Desk, Level 4
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University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital built its reputation
on breakthrough research programs. Evidence of our research strength
includes the facts that Amplatz Children’s Hospital:
• Maintains a higher rate of enrollment onto clinical trials than any other pediatric
cancer program in the state.
• Offers the only Pediatric Oncology Phase I program in the state.
• Provides patients with relapsed/refractory cancers access to the newest drugs
and therapies.
• Offers a vast portfolio of treatment options for any child with any stage of cancer.
• Participates in national randomized trials for newly diagnosed cancers.
Annually, we offer an average of 95 research studies to patients. Of those studies, nearly
two-thirds are therapeutic cancer trials and half involve investigational drugs only
available at select pediatric centers, such as Amplatz Children’s Hospital.
P E D I A T R I C H E M A T O L O G Y/O N C O L O G Y
PROGR A M OVERVIEW
º VonWillebrand’s disease
– Fanconi anemia
º Factor deficiencies
– Aplastic anemia
º Developed over time due
to liver or kidney disease
– Diamond Blackfan anemia
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– Sickle cell disease
• Neuroblastoma
– Extra-corporal circulation
management
• Germ-cell tumors
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• Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma
– Acute and chronic
anticoagulation
management
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• Leukemia and solid tumors
º Pulmonary embolism
Sa
º Thrombosis
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• Hodgkin’s disease
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º Factor V Leiden
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– Thalassemia
ia
– Hemoglobinopathies
ai
º Thombophilia
Recently, my experience proved true
again when I had a patient with a mass
under the arm, and we needed further
tests to determine malignancy. Amplatz
Children’s Hospital took my call and my
patient right away.
em
– Clotting tendencies
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N
We welcome the opportunity to discuss patient cases and provide
evidence-based advice about treatment choices with referring
physicians. During consultations, we discuss the latest treatments,
clinical trials and availability. We’re happy to talk to patients and
families, and provide expert second opinions that might provide
a measure of comfort about the difficult decisions they face. We
readily provide multidisciplinary reviews and recommendations for
any patient.
• Hematologic conditions
– Anemia
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Br
We’ve equipped our new hospital and clinics to care for children,
adolescents, and young adults who have cancer. For patients and
survivors older than age 25, we partner with our colleagues at the
University of Minnesota Medical Center, Fairview, and Masonic
Cancer Center to ensure the best possible care throughout the
lifespan of patients.
• Blood-Clotting disorders
– Bleeding tendencies
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uk
We offer access to conventional and innovative childhood-cancer
therapies, many developed at the University of Minnesota and now
standard treatments of care. We also offer more clinical trials than
any children’s hospital in the region, as well as one of the nation’s
most advanced survivorship programs.
Learn about our leukemia, bone and soft-tissue
cancer, brain tumor, and survivorship programs on
the pages that follow. Amplatz Children’s Hospital
also provides specialty care for (but not limited to):
I’m a pediatrician in a close-knit
community, so my patients and their
families are my neighbors and friends.
When I have a patient with cancer,
I contact the University of Minnesota
Amplatz Children’s Hospital. That’s
because Amplatz Children’s Hospital is
easy to work with, they see my patient
immediately, they get back to me with
the diagnosis and they update me on
my patient’s progress.
Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Program Patients
2000–2010 (ages 0–25)
Le
The team of pediatric hematologists and oncologists at the
University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital collaborates
with physicians from across the nation and the globe to treat
children who have malignant and non-malignant diseases. Our
specialists have earned a national and international reputation for
their leading-edge research and comprehensive care.
• Wilm’s tumor and other
kidney tumors
• Other rare cancers
• Other conditions
– Hemangiomas
Referrals
Made Easy
WE EVALUATE MORE THAN 100 NEW
PATIENTS EACH YEAR.
Some say university systems are
bureaucratic, but this isn’t the case
with the University of Minnesota
Amplatz Children’s Hospital. If I have
a complicated case, I know that Amplatz
Children’s Hospital offers a quick, easy
and thorough process for my patient
and me.
Michael D. Bateman, D.O.
Affiliated Community Medical Center
Willmar, Minn.
– Langerhan’s cell
histiocytosis
– Mastocytosis
Left: Alexis Maciej, C.N.P., M.S., R.N., and patient Cameron Cleaves Right: Emily Lipsitz, M.D., and patient Ashley Chow
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P E D I AT R I C L EU K E M I A P RO G R A M
The University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital is an international leader
in the treatment of pediatric leukemia, the most common cancer among children.
We offer patients the most advanced treatments — including participation in research
studies — whether the diagnosis is acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid
leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, or Hodgkin’s or non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.
National Leader
Collaboration and Coordination
• University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s
Hospital’s multidisciplinary team includes
leading experts in pediatric oncology,
hematopathology, cytogenetics, and blood
and marrow transplantation.
• The first successful bone-marrow transplant in the United States.
• The team works seamlessly and swiftly to
provide each child with the most effective
treatments, including blood and marrow
transplants within the hospital.
• The use of umbilical-cord blood as a cell source for transplantation for young
children and adolescents.
Clinical Outlook
University of Minnesota medical researchers pioneered many innovative leukemia
treatments that are used widely today, including:
• The discovery that transplants using two umbilical-cord blood units results in
markedly lower rates of leukemia relapse.
Pediatric Leukemia Program Patients
2000–2010 (ages 0–25)
“The doctors and nurses
at Amplatz fixed my
child.” —Mark Lazarchic
• The survival rate for Amplatz Children’s
Hospital patients with relapsed leukemia
(either early or late acute lymphoblastic
leukemia) at five years is 20 percent higher
than the national average.
• Approximately 70 percent of our leukemia
patients — both newly diagnosed and
relapsed — participate in research studies for
their cancer treatment.
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• Our researchers lead the newest trial
for high-risk leukemia sponsored by the
Children’s Oncology Group, the world’s
largest, cooperative children’s cancer research
entity.
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100
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Treatments in One Central Location
Defeating Leukemia with Marrow Transplant
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• Radiation therapy
40
• Chemotherapy
“Take my broken child and make her well again.” Mark
Lazarchic’s remembered those words running through his mind
when the doctors at University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s
Hospital diagnosed his 7-year-old daughter with leukemia in
June 2009.
• Blood and marrow transplants
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• Cellular therapy
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• Combination therapy
• New drug therapy
SINCE THE START OF THE PEDIATRIC LEUKEMIA PROGRAM,
70 PERCENT OF OUR PATIENTS—NEWLY DIAGNOSED OR
REL APSED—WERE ELIGIBLE FOR AND CHOSE TO TAKE PART
IN AVAIL ABLE TRIALS.
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Cecilia’s Story
Two years later, Cecilia is cancer-free, but the experience was
arduous for Cecilia and her family. “My daughter almost died
three times,” Lazarchic said. “But she didn’t because the specialists
at Amplatz Children’s Hospital saved her life.”
Cecilia’s journey with leukemia started with a visit to her
neighborhood clinic in Minneapolis. After evaluating Cecilia,
a nurse at the clinic quickly surmised something was seriously
wrong and recommended immediate follow-up care.
Cecilia’s mother, Gwen Lazarchic, rushed her little girl to
University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital, where the
doctors diagnosed Cecilia with double pneumonia. Tests also
revealed that Cecilia had an extremely high white-blood-cell count.
The next day, doctors told the family that Cecilia had leukemia.
“Cecilia started chemotherapy that night,” said Lazarchic,
who stayed by his daughter’s bed side as much as possible,
while Gwen cared for three of Cecilia’s siblings at home.
During those first weeks in the hospital, Lazarchic researched
everything he could find about his daughter’s disease and her
treatment at the University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s
Hospital. “I discovered that my daughter was receiving the
most advanced care available anywhere,” Lazarchic said.
Cecilia’s disease went into remission at one point, but then
roared back. Doctors concluded that chemotherapy alone
would not defeat the disease; Cecilia’s best chance for a cure
was a bone-marrow transplant. Fortunately, her 18-month-old
brother, Silvio, was a perfectly matched donor. To prepare for the
procedure, Cecilia underwent radiation to kill the cancer cells and
suppress her immune system so the healthy transplanted cells could
take hold.
Today, Cecilia is home and “almost as good as new,” Lazarchic
said. “The doctors and nurses at Amplatz Children’s Hospital fixed
my child.”
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Aeslyn’s Story
P E D I AT R I C B R A I N T U M O R P RO G R A M
“The doctors and nurses
are experts in treating
brain cancer. They also
know how to help kids
and families cope with
the disease.” —Nicole Moy
Brain tumors are the second most common childhood cancer, next to leukemia. Today,
doctors will cure more than half of the approximately 2,200 children who are diagnosed
with a brain tumor in the U.S. But the condition remains highly complex because of the
location of the tumors and the rapid development of children’s brains.
The brain-tumor specialists at University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital
apply the most advanced approaches to treat brain tumors, integrating science with
multispecialty care.
We provide a full spectrum of options for patients with brain and spinal tumors,
retinoblastoma and neurofibromatosis.
Every day, our researchers discover new insights into the root causes of brain tumors.
Continuous Innovation
• Amplatz Children’s Hospital is one of two centers in the nation to provide a
chemotherapy approach that directly delivers therapy to the brain (Blood Brain
Barrier Disruption Program).
• We developed a multispecialty Brain Tumor Program to understand and effectively
treat these cancers.
• Through clinical trials, we translate laboratory discoveries into novel treatments for
the most aggressive tumors.
Oligodendroglioma 6%
Looking back, Nicole Moy realized her daughter had many classic
symptoms of medulloblastoma, the most common type of malignant
brain tumor in children. The usually rambunctious 8-year-old was
lethargic and suffering from headaches. Moy took her daughter to
a walk-in clinic, where the staff suspected Aeslyn had strep throat.
Three days later, Aeslyn attended a party in her Eau Claire, Wis.,
neighborhood.
“At first, Aeslyn was okay, but then she started vomiting horribly,”
Moy recalled. Moy said she saw other disturbing signs in her
daughter. “Aeslyn was walking with an odd gait, like a limp on one
side.”
The next morning, Moy took her daughter back to the walk-in clinic.
Doctors did a CT scan that revealed a mass in Aeslyn’s cerebellum.
A follow-up MRI showed a tumor about the size of a golf ball.
“The doctor told us that she needed to see a pediatric neurosurgeon
at Amplatz Children’s Hospital,” Moy notes. Two hours later, Aeslyn
arrived at the University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital.
The next morning, she underwent surgery to remove the tumor.
10
“In less than 24 hours, they had the tissue samples back and the
diagnosis was medulloblastoma,” her mother recalls. “Of course,
I didn’t know what that was, but I learned from the doctors at
Amplatz Children’s Hospital who took care of Aeslyn. The doctors
and nurses are experts in treating brain cancer. They also know
how to help kids and families cope with the disease.”
Moy said Aeslyn’s neurosurgeon at Amplatz Children’s Hospital
removed the entire tumor. “It was a full resection and we were able
to go home two days later,” she said.
Over the next two months, Aeslyn returned to the hospital for
outpatient radiation treatments, and her chemotherapy lasted
several months more. She received her last chemotherapy treatment
in July 2010.
“Today, Aeslyn is cancer-free,” Moy noted. “We’re in a good place
now, focusing on helping her grow.”
PNET 8%
Medulloblastoma 8%
Retinoblastoma
23%
Glioblastoma 8%
Astrocytoma
22%
Malignant Glioma 9%
• Our pediatric brain-tumor team is led by
pediatric oncologists who are experts in
neuro-oncology, cellular and immunebased therapies, and cancer genetics.
• Our team includes pediatric nurse
practitioners, surgeons, pathologists,
radiologists, neurologists and endocrine
specialists who collaborate on each
patient’s course of treatment.
• Amplatz Children’s Hospital offers the
Minnesota Neurofibromatosis Clinic
Without Walls, in which physicians from
Amplatz Children’s Hospital and Gillette
Children’s Specialty Healthcare in St.
Paul collaborate to offer specialized care
for patients with neurofibromatosis.
• Amplatz Children’s Hospital is a
member of the Children’s Tumor
Foundation Neurofibromatosis Network.
Striving for Breakthroughs
Brain Tumor Program Patients
2000–2010 (ages 0–25)
Surviving a Brain Tumor
Multidisciplinary Collaboration
Ependymoma
16%
• Researchers continuously explore
new drugs, vaccines and radiotherapy
techniques to treat tumors in the brain
and nervous system.
• Amplatz is only one of two centers in
America developing and testing brain
tumor vaccines for children with brain
tumors.
• Options range from national trials for
newly diagnosed patients to Amplatz
Children’s Hospital Phase I trials for
patients with relapsed or refractory
cancers.
• Through the Center for Magnetic
Resonance Imaging, patients have access
to the fastest, newest and largest imaging
technology in the nation.
AMPL ATZ CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL BRAIN
TUMOR PROGRAM HOUSES THE ONLY
MULTIDISCIPLINARY PROGRAM FOR
RETINOBL ASTOMA IN THE REGION.
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BONE AND SOFT TISSUE CANCER
P R O G R A M (S A R C O M A)
The care of a child with bone or soft-tissue cancer poses many challenges.
The detection and treatment of bone and soft-tissue cancers requires a truly
comprehensive approach conducted by multiple specialists.
Search for a Cure
Our Team on Your Side
• Osteosarcoma
The Bone and Soft Tissue Cancer Program at University of Minnesota Amplatz
Children’s Hospital emphasizes a multidisciplinary approach. Our team includes
pediatric oncologists, orthopedic surgeons, radiation oncologists, pathologists,
physical therapists and oncology nurse practitioners.
• Ewing sarcoma
Personalized Patient Care
Translating Research into Therapies
From biopsies to treatment, Amplatz Children’s Hospital offers dedicated
practitioners, the latest technology and a healing environment. Our experts
collaborate to provide a personalized treatment plan for the child, which
might consist of radiation therapy, chemotherapy, surgery, stem-cell therapy or
combination therapy. We’ve received national recognition for our successful limbsalvage procedures.
• Amplatz Children’s Hospital achieved leadership
status for a national rhabdomyosarcoma trial
that demonstrated a 20 percent improvement in
survival for the highest-risk patients.
Bone and Soft Tissue Cancer Program Patients
2000–2010 (ages 0–25)
Other Sarcomas 7%
Neil’s Story
Our goal is a cure for all patients with soft
tissue and bone cancers that include:
• Rhabdomyosarcoma
• Synovial sarcoma
• Other tumors
• The University of Minnesota houses 26 faculty
members across nine departments working on
preclinical to translational/Phase I clinical trial
research related to bone and soft-tissue cancer.
• Amplatz Children’s Hospital enrolled more
patients with osteosarcoma in the current
international trial than any other children’s
hospital in the nation.
Rhabdomyosarcoma 9%
Synovial Sarcoma 10%
Osteosarcoma
40%
Ewing Saracoma
Family of Tumors
34%
AMPL ATZ CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL HAS MORE PATIENTS
WITH OSTEOSARCOMA ENROLLED IN THE CURRENT
INTERNATIONAL TRIAL THAN ANY OTHER CHILDREN’S
HOSPITAL IN THE NATION.
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“We felt confident that we were in the right place after
meeting Dr. Weigel, she had the experience we needed to
feel secure putting Neil’s care in her hands.” —Sarah Egar
Finding the Right Treatment
For most 14-year-olds, pain and swelling in the knee is often the
temporary result of a fall or a slide into home plate. But Neil Egar
had experienced discomfort in his knee at night for several months.
The discomfort progressed into swelling and sharp pain.
“We decided to take him to the doctor because his knee wasn’t
getting better,” says Bill Egar, Neil’s father.
After meeting with several oncologists, Neil and his family decided
to pursue treatment at University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s
Hospital. The family met with pediatric oncologist Brenda Weigel,
M.D., who leads the Bone and Soft Tissue Cancer Program at the
University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s Hospital.
“We felt confident that we were in the right place after meeting Dr.
Weigel,” said Sarah, Neil’s mother. “She had the experience we
needed to feel secure putting Neil’s care in her hands.”
The doctor diagnosed Neil with osteosarcoma, a type of cancer that
typically develops in the bones or soft tissues of the body, and is
often found in the legs. In the United States, sarcomas account for
10 to 15 percent of all newly diagnosed cancers in people under
the age of 20.
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Shari’s Story
CANCER SURVIVORSHIP PROGR A M
Advances in cancer treatment today enable 80 percent of patients to survive at least
five years beyond their diagnosis, but cures sometimes come with long-term medical
consequences.
The specialists at University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s hospital are committed
to helping cancer survivors live full and productive lives, through advanced clinical
programs, therapies, counseling and ongoing research. The Long-Term FollowUp Clinic is available to all cancer survivors regardless of age, diagnosis, or initial
treatment center.
—Shari VanPuyvelde
Our Survivorship Program centers on minimizing long-term health complications
for cancer survivors, which can include cardiac problems, visual and hearing deficits,
endocrinopathies, and secondary cancers.
Coordinated Care
Our Survivorship Program team:
• Provides personal patient treatment summaries to primary-care providers
to ensure coordinated care.
• Screens for delayed complications (late effects), including clinical exams
and laboratory tests.
• Evaluates for adverse general and mental health, functional impairment
and activity limitations.
Number of Follow-up Clinic Visits by Year
Life after Cancer
When Shari VanPuyvelde started feeling pain in her right hip, her
parents thought the 10-year-old gymnast had pulled a muscle.
An MRI, however, showed a type of bone tumor, called Ewing’s
sarcoma, on her hip. Doctors prescribed chemotherapy to treat the
disease.
“My parents explained to me that I had cancer, but I didn’t know
what cancer was,” said Shari, now age 22. “I could tell by my
parents’ and doctors’ reactions that my illness wasn’t going to be
easy to deal with.”
During the next couple of years, Shari and her family became
very familiar with the University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s
Hospital. Shari had chemotherapy for a year, and six weeks of
radiation to shrink the tumor. On January 7, 1998, Shari had a
stem-cell transplant using her own stem cells that physicians had
harvested months earlier to help rebuild healthy cells in her body.
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“My parents call my stem cell transplant my second birthday,
because it was like being born again,” Shari said. Now, more
than a decade from her last day of cancer treatment, Shari feels
good, though she deals with a few late effects of her treatment.
The type of chemotherapy Shari received led to diminished
lung function. “When I go running in the morning, I get short of
breath,” she shared.
In addition to a yearly lung test at the Long-Term Follow-Up Clinic
at the University of Minnesota Masonic Cancer Center, Shari
is also screened for late effects based upon current Children’s
Oncology Group Survivorship Guidelines.
But the residual effects of Shari’s cancer aren’t holding her back.
She’s finishing up her bachelor’s degree at the University of
Wisconsin–Eau Claire, and just landed her “dream job” as an
oncology nurse in Wisconsin.
The Survivorship Program helps cancer survivors
improve their long-term health potential with
tools and counseling on issues regarding:
• Health-risk monitoring
• School and learning disabilities
• Keys for healthy living
• Fertility and sexuality
A Focus on the Child’s Future
“My parents call my stemcell transplant my second
birthday, because it was
like being born again.”
Education for a Lifetime
Leaders in Survivor Research
Our experts:
• Founded the University of Minnesota
Childhood Cancer Survivor Study, a national
database of childhood cancer-survival
research that started in 1993 and continues
today.
• Coauthored the national long-term followup guidelines for survivors of childhood
cancers, which is the national standard for
survivorship programs.
• Pioneered new technologies to understand
early signs of heart damage following
treatment for cancer, ultimately leading to
prevention strategies.
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159
126
117
2007
2008
96
100
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2004
2005
2006
2009
2010
SERVICES PROVIDED BY OUR LONG -TERM FOLLOW- UP
CLINIC TO CANCER SURVIVORS HAVE QUADRUPLED
SINCE THE PROGRAM STARTED IN 2004.
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OUR PHYSICIANS
Michael Burke, M.D.
Emily Lipsitz, M.D.
Christopher Moertel, M.D.
Daniel A. Mulrooney, M.D.
Joseph Neglia, M.D.
Marie Steiner, M.D.
Brenda Weigel, M.D.
612-626-2778
[email protected]
612-626-2778
[email protected]u
612-626-2778
[email protected]
612-626-2778
[email protected]
612-626-2778
[email protected]
612-626-2778
[email protected]
612-626-2778
[email protected]
Medical School
Ross University School
of Medicine Roseau,
Commonwealth of
Dominica, West Indies
Medical School
St. Louis University,
St. Louis, Mo.
Medical School
University of Minnesota
Medical School,
Minneapolis
Medical School
Loyola University Chicago,
Stritch School of Medicine,
Illinois
Medical School
Loma Linda University
School of Medicine,
Loma Linda, California
Medical School
University of Minnesota,
Minneapolis
Medical School
MacMaster University,
Hamilton, Ontario,
Canada
Residency
Baylor College of
Medicine Affiliated
Hospitals, Houston
Residency
University of Minnesota,
Minneapolis (Internal
Medicine and Pediatrics)
Residency
Baylor College of
Medicine, Houston
Fellowship
Mayo Clinic - Rochester,
Minn. (Pediatric
Hematology/Oncology)
Fellowship
University of Minnesota,
Minneapolis (Pediatric
Hematology/Oncology
and Blood Marrow
Transplantation)
Residency
Medical College of
Virginia - Virginia
Commonwealth University,
Richmond, Va.
Fellowship
Children’s Memorial
Hospital - Northwestern
University, Chicago
(Pediatric Hematology/
Oncology and Blood
Marrow Transplantation)
Residency
Children’s Memorial
Hospital - Northwestern
University, Chicago
(Pediatrics)
Fellowship
Children’s Hospital of
Philadelphia-University of
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
(Pediatric Hematology/
Oncology)
Fellowship
University of Minnesota,
Minneapolis (Pediatric
Hematology/Oncology
and Blood Marrow
Transplantation)
OUR NURSE PR ACTITIONERS
Melissa Claar, C.P.N.P.,
M.A.
Jody Dahl, C.N.P., M.S.,
R.N.
Tambra Dahlheimer,
C.N.P., M.S., R.N.
612-626-2778
[email protected]
edu
612-626-2778
[email protected]
edu
612-626-2778
[email protected]
umn.edu
Bachelor of Science in
Nursing
College of St. Catherine,
St. Paul, Minn.
Bachelor of Science in
Nursing
University of Minnesota,
Minneapolis
Bachelor of Science in
Nursing
St. Thomas University,
St. Paul, Minn.
Master of Art in Nursing
and Nurse Practitioner
Program
College of St. Catherine,
St. Paul, Minn.
Master of Science in
Nursing
University of Wisconsin,
Madison, Wis.
Master of Science in
Nursing and Nurse
Practitioner Program
University of Minnesota,
Minneapolis
16
Pediatric Nurse Practitioner
College of St. Catherine,
St. Paul, Minn.
Jill L. Lee, C.P.N.P., AC
612-626-2778
[email protected]
Bachelor of Science in
Nursing
University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill
Master of Science in
Nursing
Duke University,
Durham, N.C.
Lexi Maciej, C.N.P., M.S.,
R.N.
612-626-2778
[email protected]
umn.edu
Bachelor of Science
in Nursing
College of St. Benedict.
St. Joseph, Minn.
Master of Science in
Nursing and Nurse
Practitioner Program
University of Minnesota,
Minneapolis
Residency
University of Minnesota,
Minneapolis (Pediatrics)
Fellowship
University of Minnesota,
Minneapolis (Critical
Care, Pediatric
Hematology/Oncology)
Residency
University of Western
Ontario, London, Ontario,
Canada (Pediatrics)
Fellowship
University of Minnesota,
Minneapolis (Pediatric
Hematology/Oncology
and Blood Marrow
Transplantation)
Responsive
Partners in Care
University of Minnesota Amplatz
Children’s Hospital possesses worldrenowned capabilities for pediatric
oncology and hematology. They house
every subspecialty and have the foremost
blood and marrow transplant program,
so we are confident our patients receive
the best possible care.
Our patients feel the same way. For
example, I have a mother who has
brought her six daughters to me for
years. We found blood abnormalities
with one of the daughters and
immediately sent her to Amplatz
Children’s Hospital for treatment of acute
lymphoblastic leukemia. The mother,
a traditional Lakota woman, is one of
the quietest women I’ve ever met. She
rarely spoke. But when she returned from
Minneapolis, she told me how well the
children’s hospital took care of her little
girl. She talked more after her trip to
Amplatz Children’s Hospital than in all
the years I’ve known her.
The physicians at Amplatz Children’s
Hospital also are fantastic partners —
collegial, respectful and responsive.
They tell us what they’re doing and
what more is needed. I’m never pulling
teeth for more information, which is
critical because we do go back and
forth with patients.
Lynn Simmons, M.D.
Black Hills Pediatrics
Rapid City, S.D.
1
S P E C I A LT Y S E RV I C ES
University of Minnesota Amplatz Children’s
Hospital is designed to provide the most supportive,
comfortable, and clinically advanced environment for
young patients and their loved ones.
Blood and Marrow Transplantation (BMT) Program
• Houses the largest pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplantation Program
in the nation.
• Performs more pediatric cord-blood transplants that any other center in the
nation.
• Equipped with HEPA-filtrated rooms with air exchanged 15 times per hour to
ensure patients breathe the purest air at all times.
• Offers interactive rooms with large-screen televisions where patients can watch
movies, play video games and even explore the outdoors through a zoom camera
on the hospital roof.
Center for Children with Cancer and Blood Diseases (Journey Clinic)
• Houses pediatric infusion center for outpatient chemotherapy
and blood transfusions.
• Provides convenient and child-friendly blood draw stations.
• Includes an outpatient pharmacy for easy patient access.
Pediatric Radiation Therapy Clinic
• Offers the nation’s only dedicated pediatric radiation-therapy clinic associated
with a research university.
• Houses an image-guided Elekta Synergy linear accelerator, which provides
intensity-modulated radiation therapy.
2
Pediatric Imaging
• Offers a full-range of pediatric imaging
services, including ultrasound, CT and
MRI scans.
• Houses Minnesota’s only Dual Source Flash
CT scanner from Siemens in Minnesota,
which works twice as fast as most scanners,
provides better images and reduces required
number of scans.
Pediatric Emergency Department,
Open 24 Hours
• Staffed by national experts in pediatric
emergency medicine and research; pediatric
emergency-medicine nurses who are patient
and family-focused; full time Child-Family
Life specialists and care coordinators.
• Features eight state-of-the-art treatment
rooms where parents have space to remain
with their children.
• Offers two fully equipped trauma rooms that
allow emergency staff to care for children
who have severe illnesses or injuries.
Pediatric Observation
and Sedation Unit
• Led by a pediatric anesthesiologist,
and includes patient and family-focused
pediatric sedation nurses and a full-time
concierge scheduler.
3
Immediate Access to More than 50 Pediatric
Specialties, such as:
• Neonatology
• Pediatric Ophthalmology
• Pediatric Urology
• Pediatric Neurosurgery
• Infectious Disease
4
Family Resource Center and Children’s Library
• Offers professional staff to help families find information
on their child’s medical condition.
• Provides online and print resources geared to young children
and teens.
• Assists with creating a Caring Bridge site, and connecting to
organizations that help kids and their families.
• Pediatric Cardiology
Other Special Features of Amplatz Children’s Hospital
• Endocrinology (including diabetes care)
• Houses all private patient rooms, speeding recovery by reducing
noise and interruptions, while also decreasing the spread of
infection. Rooms offer 35 percent more space than the industry
average, providing space for loved ones to work, share a meal
and sleep next to their child.
• Surgery
• Transplantation
Convenient Family-Centered Services
• Occupational therapists
• Physical therapists
• Provides the latest electronic technology, allowing children to
learn and play during their stay.
Child-Family Life Specialists
• Houses a feeding clinic, where children with eating difficulties
can see a speech therapist, occupational therapist and a dietitian
— all in one convenient visit.
• Offer activities to reduce patient and family stress, including
therapeutic play and child-appropriate hospital tours.
• Offers a therapy gymnasium, including swings, a climbing wall
and a zip line.
• Help families cope with death, dying and bereavement issues.
• Provides interpreter services for more than 150 languages.
Social Workers
Community Outreach Clinics
• Specialize in assessing and helping with the emotional, social
and financial impact of treatment on your family.
• Fairview Maple Grove Clinic, Maple Grove, Minn.
• Speech-language pathologists
• Black Hills Pediatrics, Rapid City, S.D.
• Offer counseling and coping techniques.
• Help children and families adapt to illness and treatment.
• Offers two state-of-the-art procedure
rooms and 10 spacious treatment rooms,
each tailored to provide diagnostic testing,
monitoring or observation for young patients.
1. Jason Albrecht, C.C.L.S., and patient Kyle Cook; 2. Imaging Tech, and patient Tyler Deer;
3. patient Owen Kolbinger and his mother, Bonnie; 4. Family Resource Center, Level 2;
18
19
2450 Riverside Ave.
Minneapolis, MN 55454
612-365-1000
888-KIDS-UMN
Discover more: uofmchildrenshospital.org
©2011 Fairview Health Services. SmartWorks 541201, Marketing 7937.