25th Anniversary Edition

A Publication of Schneider Children’s Hospital | Fall 2008 | www.SchneiderChildrensHospital.org
25th
y
Anniversar
Edition
INSIDE: 25 Years of Caring for Kids
1954-1982
How It All Began …
Long Island Jewish Medical Center Department of Pediatrics
Children’s Medical Fund of New York
Founded by Judge Bertram Harnett, the Children’s Medical Fund (CMF)
has a membership that consists of parents, physicians, civic leaders and
other dedicated people. CMF played a key role in the planning process,
raising building funds and advocacy for the children’s hospital and continues its work as a major supporter today.
Long Island Jewish Medical Center
Long Island Jewish (LIJ) Medical Center opened its doors in May 1954.
The five-story, 215-bed facility was built with the most modern equipment and won the Modern Hospital of the Year Award in 1955.
Department of Pediatrics
In the beginning, the Department of Pediatrics consisted of 30 beds and a
“preemie nursery” that accommodated eight babies. By the late 1960’s,
the department grew to 54 beds, including the first four-bed Intensive
Care Unit on Long Island, and a 25-bed Premature Unit. An 18-bed
Adolescent Unit was added in 1969.
Philip Lanzkowsky, MD, was appointed chairman of pediatrics in March
1970, and shortly thereafter thoughts of building a children’s hospital began
to germinate. Dr. Lanzkowsky and Judge Bertram Harnett started the long,
challenging road to the development of Schneider Children’s Hospital.
Members of CMF’s Women’s Division at a potential site for the
children’s hospital.
“We don’t want it …
We don’t need it”
Building the children’s hospital stirred political
controversy in the 1970’s. The struggle was a
bitter, fierce and persistent fight. It was in the
press, in our suburban papers, Newsday, even
the New York Times. It was on television both
locally and nationally. We testified before
agency after agency as they were created by
each new bureaucratic organization.
Children’s Hospital Approved
Finally, in June 1978, permission to build a
children’s hospital was approved by the State
Hospital Review Committee of the State of
New York Department of Health.
Pediatric playroom,
circa 1960’s.
1954
1970
1971
1978
Long Island Jewish Medical Center opens
Philip Lanzkowsky, MD, appointed
chairman of pediatrics
First pediatric transport performed,
using hospital station wagon
Approval granted to build the
children’s hospital
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Schneider Children’s Hospital • New Hyde Park, New York
1983
Children Celebrate the Nearing Completion of the Children’s Hospital in 1983
The children’s hospital opened on September 25, 1983. Its original name
was the Children’s Medical Center of New York and then it came to be
simply called the Children’s Medical Center. Before it opened, the name
was changed to Schneider Children’s Hospital, in honor of its benefactors
Helen and Irving Schneider.
At completion, the sleek five-story glass and cement building consisting
of 150 beds sat gracefully on the Long Island Jewish-Hillside Medical
Center campus in New Hyde Park. The sensitivity of children’s needs was
paramount. Light streamed from the courtyard garden and from a skylight
that looked like a giant building toy. The walls were painted with bold
splashes of color and there were brightly decorated waiting rooms, play
areas and a schoolroom for inpatients.
Time to Celebrate
After 13 years of hard work, planning and justifying
the need over and over — the day had finally come.
Under a sparkling September sun, more than 1,500
guests gathered for the celebration of the new
Schneider Children’s Hospital. Kites bounced
gaily in the sky, children ran around with balloons, clowns wandered through the crowds and
the US Merchant Marine Band sent spirits soaring.
Governor Mario Cuomo, the
Schneider family and Donna
and David Edlinger (hematology
patients) cut the ribbon for the
new Schneider Children’s
Hospital. It was a glorious day!
1980
1981
1982
1983
Groundbreaking of the
children’s hospital
Construction begins for the new
children’s hospital
Philip Lanzkowsky, MD, named chief of
staff of the new children’s hospital
Schneider Children’s Hospital
opens its doors
Schneider Children’s Hospital • New Hyde Park, New York
3
1983
Twenty Five Years
Moving Day: November 1, 1983
Infant/Pediatric Transport Program
Back in the 1970’s, infants and children were transported in the back of a
converted station wagon. Today, state-of-the art ambulances staffed 24/7
by dedicated teams of pediatric critical care specialists transport nearly
3,000 infants and children each year.
C-Day was Children’s Day — the day when patients were moved from
LIJ into their new beds in the Schneider Children’s Hospital (SCH). The
hospital was open for business.
Building on the Dream
The newly opened children’s hospital really was a dream come true. Children
were no longer bedded in the hallways, no longer receiving chemotherapy in
adult waiting areas. Pediatric care could be taken to another level and the
hospital wasted no time doing so.
Satellite Centers
Consultation centers were
opened in several distant areas
from SCH that offer specialized
care for children right in their
own community. These centers
are located at Commack,
Hewlett, Flushing, Williamsburg
and Bensonhurst.
Psychosocial Programs
Staff
Once the hospital was open, the first Child
Life program on Long Island was created
with educational art, music, pets and clown
programs. Magnificent art donated by the
Schneider family filled the halls, transforming the hospital into a child-friendly
atmosphere.
Practicing the art of healing,
our specially trained physicians,
nurses and health professionals provide skilled medical treatment for their
patients. They are united in their love for children and their passionate desire
to make a difference in the lives of young people.
Clinical Programs
In the 25 years that SCH has been open,
major programs have been developed that
have attracted top pediatric specialists from
all over the country and abroad to join our staff. SCH has been in the
forefront of adopting and, in some instances, initiating new treatments
and procedures in neonatology, bone marrow transplantation, cardiology,
neurology and laparoscopic surgery in children, to name just a few. It has
the largest training program in the nation.
1985
1987
1988
1995
Ronald McDonald House opens on the
grounds of Schneider Children’s Hospital
Keith Haring sculpture installed on
the front lawn of the hospital
Bone Marrow Transplant
Program established
First pediatric consultation center
opens in Hauppauge
4
Schneider Children’s Hospital • New Hyde Park, New York
of Caring for Kids
The Art of Schneider Children’s Hospital
The children’s hospital has taken on a different dimension: It has also become a children’s
art gallery and a children’s museum. As far back as 1970, SCH began to design the hospital
with insight and compassion. A place where children are made well — which is most
important — it is a place where smiles, laughter and cheer drive out sadness and fear.
2008
US News & World Report Ranks SCH Among the Best
For the second consecutive year, US News & World Report ranked
SCH among the top children’s hospitals in the nation. This is testament to the quality of care and compassion that is the standard given
at Schneider Children’s Hospital.
1997
2000
2004
2008
Schneider Children’s Hospital designated
New York State Level I Trauma Center
In the wake of 9/11, Pediatric Bereavement
Center opens the Center of HOPE
Children’s Advocacy Center opens in
Queens (affiliated with NYPD and NYC
District Attorney’s and Mayor’s offices)
SCH named one of America’s Best Children’s
Hospitals for the second year in a row
Schneider Children’s Hospital • New Hyde Park, New York
5
2008
Into the Future
Building
Twenty-five years later, Schneider Children’s Hospital is now bursting at the seams. The demand for
our services is growing because of the increased number of patients and the state-of-the-art treatment
required for these children. Scheduled to open in late 2008 are the following: a cutting-edge Neonatal
Intensive Care Unit (NICU) with 24 new beds, which will increase the NICU to 68 beds, one of the
largest units in the nation; a state-of-the-art Chemotherapy Unit; and a 20,000-square-foot, four-story
atrium that will contain a winter garden, performance stage, interactive games and a virtual children’s
art gallery.
Below: Conceptual renderings of the grand lobby and atrium.
Rendering of the new
Chemotherapy Unit.
Bursting with Pride … Bursting at the Seams:
The Campaign for Schneider Children’s Hospital
No parent ever wants to imagine that their child might one day require medical attention due to injury or illness. But life is full of unexpected challenges,
and it’s impossible to predict when an emergency could arise. That’s why it’s so important to have a nationally renowned pediatric hospital like Schneider
Children’s Hospital (SCH) close to home. For nearly 30 years SCH has been tending to the youngest and most vulnerable patients throughout our region
and beyond, but now we must expand to ensure a healthier future for our children, their children and generations to come.
That’s why we’ve embarked on a $130 million fundraising campaign to enhance our original building and construct the brand-new,
four-story, 100,000-square-foot Blumenfeld Center for Pediatric Medicine — and that’s where we need you! We’re relying on the generosity
of compassionate community members and friends who, like SCH, are deeply concerned about the quality and availability of children’s
healthcare. You can make a lasting difference today by supporting Schneider Children’s Hospital as we build for tomorrow.
CHILDREN CAN’T REALLY BUILD A HOSPITAL, BUT YOU CAN
To make a gift now or for more information
about our plans to expand Schneider Children’s Hospital, contact Randee Bloch at (516) 465-2551 or [email protected] Or visit us
online at http://support.northshorelij.com/SCH_Home.
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Schneider Children’s Hospital • New Hyde Park, New York
Our Future
2011
Phase II of construction is scheduled to begin soon and will consist of a four-story inpatient tower — the Blumenfeld Center for Pediatric Medicine. Joining the glass-enclosed
atrium, a bright and airy new lobby will welcome children and their families. This phase
of construction will provide 100,000 square feet of new space to include a 25-bed
Medical/Surgical Unit, a 25-bed Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, a state-of-the-art imaging
center and Long Island’s first stand-alone Rudolph Pediatric Emergency Center. The
new children’s-only emergency department, with is own radiology suite and computed
tomography (CT) scanner, will be a real benefit to sick children and their parents
throughout the region. Construction will be complete in 2011.
Above: View of the Blumenfeld Center for Pediatric Medicine with adjacent existing
SCH building. Below: View of new Rudolph Pediatric Emergency Center. Right: Drawing of
new nursing station and waiting room. Lower right: Patient room in new patient tower.
Schneider Children’s Hospital • New Hyde Park, New York
7
Need to find a d o c to r ? 1 - 8 8 8 - 3 2 1 - D O C S
SCH Book Marks Silver Anniversary
Why Schneider
Children’s Hospital?
Philip Lanzkowsky, MD, recently wrote How It
All Began: The History of a Children’s Hospital.
As leader of SCH since its inception 25 years
ago, Dr. Lanzkowsky has a unique perspective
on how the facility developed from the
Pediatrics Department at LIJ Medical Center
to its own full-fledged entity. How It All Began
tells how, at first, SCH was opposed by
community and medical leaders, but with
persistence these doubters were won over.
The book shows in fascinating detail how
pediatrics has developed from the 1960’s
and 1970’s until now — and where the
future of SCH lies. It is not to be missed.
Copies of the limited-edition book are $65. To order, call (718) 470-3201.
About the Author
our community’s only
children’s hospital
It’s a convenient, central location for
your child’s medical, surgical, dental,
psychiatric and educational needs.
International Recognition
All staff is specially trained in pediatrics.
The hospital’s specialists and patients
come here from all over the world.
educational
center
Access our Web
page for a wealth of
information about
childhood diseases.
Positive learning
experience
www.Schneider
Childrens
Hospital.org
Our playrooms,
school, Clown Program, Pet Therapy
Program, Art Program and Music Program
make the hospital experience a positive one.
On the cutting edge
Leading-edge equipment is designed
specifically for children.
Philip Lanzkowsky, MD, born in Cape Town, South Africa, is executive
director and chief of staff at Schneider Children’s Hospital and
professor of pediatrics at Albert Einstein College of Medicine.
He was instrumental in the development, planning and the
formulation of the philosophy for the Schneider Children’s
Hospital and was instrumental in its implementation. He has
been the chief of staff of the hospital since it opened.
In your backyard
Satellite treatment centers provide
specialists close to home in Commack,
Hewlett, Flushing, Brooklyn and
Manhattan.
we trained your doctors
Doctors come here from all over the
country for valuable training.
NORTH SHORE-LIJ HEALTH SYSTEM HOSPITALS
NORTH SHORE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL • LIJ MEDICAL CENTER • SCHNEIDER CHILDREN’S • ZUCKER HILLSIDE • FRANKLIN •
GLEN COVE • SYOSSET • PLAINVIEW • SOUTHSIDE • HUNTINGTON • FOREST HILLS • STATEN ISLAND UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL •
AFFILIATIONS: PENINSULA • NASSAU UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER
North Shore-Long island
jewish Health System
Schneider Children’s Hospital
269-01 76th Avenue
New Hyde Park, NY 11040
Postmaster: Please deliver within November 3 and 7.
innovative research
Ongoing, up-to-the-minute research on
children ensures leading-edge care.
Non-Profit Org
U.S. Postage
PAID
NSLIJHS
Michael Dowling
President and CEO
North Shore-LIJ Health System
Philip Lanzkowsky, MD, SCD, FRCP
Executive Director
Terry Lynam
VP, Public Relations
Maria Conforti
Publications Editor
Laurie Locastro
Marketing Coordinator
Kids First is published by Schneider
Children’s Hospital. The information is
intended to inform and educate about subjects pertinent to health, not as a substitute
for consultation with a personal physician.
© 2008. Printed in the U.S.A.
Printed on Recyclable Paper
899M