Document 60082

The Pacifican
thepacificanonline.com
University of the Pacific’s Newspaper Since 1908
VOLUME 104, ISSUE 9
THURSDAY, October 25,
2012
Holiday ROAR inspiring
literacy in Stockton
Karla Cortez
News Editor
Juliene Sesar
Voices of Light: The Passion of Joan of Arc film screening and musical
performance at Faye Spanos Concert Hall.
In collaboration with
Reach Out and Read (ROAR)
San Joaquin, a local nonprofit organization whose
mission it is to provide
underprivileged
children
with books, President Eibeck
has announced the launch of
Holiday ROAR, a universitywide book drive.
Donation bins, set up
since Monday, Oct. 22 in
Joan of Arc:
the Don and Karen De
Rosa University Center, will
remain until Nov. 27. The
goal is to collect 1,000 gently
used children’s books by the
end date in order for them to
be distributed through ROAR
San Joaquin’s network of
pediatricians who distribute
he books to children in
need, while volunteers work
with families to encourage
reading with their children.
The Holiday ROAR book
drive is a part of Pacific’s
Beyond Our Gates early
literacy campaign, which
aims at addressing the
problem of low literacy rates
among the children of San
Joaquin County. Recent data
on reading proficiency in San
Joaquin County showed that
fewer than half of all local
third graders were reading
at a proficient level for their
Holiday roar
continued ON page 3
Chills and Thrills
Amanda Wynn
Staff Writer
On Saturday, Oct. 20,
University of the Pacific held
a concert entitled Voices of
Light: The Passion of Joan of
Arc at Faye Spanos Concert
Hall. During the past week,
several events were held at
the University to celebrate
the life and memory of Joan
of Arc and all of those lives
she has touched since her
death. During this Joan of
Arc Festival, students were
given the chance to attend
a research conference that
evaluated the great impact
Joan of Arc had on society
as well as attend films and
keynote speakers that told the
story of Joan of Arc.
The final of several events
put on last week by the
University, faculty, alumni
and students of Pacific’s
Conservatory of Music was a
collaboration performance,
which included a score
written in 1995 by Richard
Einhorn. The 1928 silent film,
The Passion of Joan of Arc,
played in the background as
the University Symphony
Orchestra
and
Choral
Ensembles narrated through
music.
The Passion of Joan of
Arc, a film hailed by critics as
having one of the best screen
performances of all time and
compared with other film
classics like Citizen Kane,
had been lost for years until a
copy of the film was found in a
Norwegian mental hospital in
the 1980’s. It was remastered
to be shown for the Voices
of Light performance with
Einhorn’s score played by a
live orchestra.
The Anonymous Four, an
a capella quartet specializing
in
Medieval
music,
accompanied four pacific
soloists. “The Anonymous
4 did an outstanding job
portraying the inner feelings
of Joan of Arc during the
trial, and Pacific’s Choral
Ensembles and the Orchestra
added a beautiful sense of
the pain being played on
screen,” said student Juliene
Sesar ’13, who attended the
event. Einhorn had done a
large amount of research on
Joan of Arc while writing the
piece and even included the
recorded sounds of the bells
News | 2
Japanese art and
culture come to Pacific
Opinion | 4
Pacific Media Relations
President Eibeck next to Pacific’s Holiday Tree.
Unveiling creativity
Juliene Sesar
Editor-in-Chief
Calliope Magazine
The 2011 Calliope cover.
Joan of Arc
continued ON page 3
Inside this issue
Pacific Media Relations
Children being read to.
On diversity: Why
WASC’s recommendation is flawed
Lifestyles | 6
Finding Joan of Arc in
the world of literature
The 2012 edition of the Calliope will be
unveiled tonight. Editor-in-Chief Danielle
Procope ‘14 and staff will host the event in the
River Room on the second floor of the DeRosa
University Center (DUC) from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Food will be catered, and there will also be
performances by students and other activities.
The authors of the short stories featured
in the Calliope journal this year will also be
recognized for their individual contributions
that made this year’s edition possible.
According to the Calliope editorial team,
“all attendees will also receive a free copy of
the journal”.
Sports | 9
Pacific makes history:
Men’s and women’s
swimming competes
Index
Tiger Growls | 4
Staff Information | 5
Event Calander | 6
Sports Calendar | 10
NEWS
2 | THE PACIFICAN
October 25, 2012
Japanese art and culture come to Pacific
Micaela Todd
Flyers for the Japanese Festival at Pacific.
Micaela Todd
Layout Editor
All month long in the Richard
Reynolds Art Gallery, the exhibition
of
5
Contemporary
Japanese
Photographers will be displayed as
part of University of the Pacific’s
Japanese Festival.
The show displays works from
five of Japan’s most well known
photographers: Tetsuya Noda, Toshio
Shibata, Masao Yamamoto, Tokihiro
Sato, and Nobuhiro Fukui. Sato lives
in Omiya, Saitama, Japan, and the
other four photographers reside in
Tokyo.
Exhibited are 40 works of
photography from the typical sense
to a more experimental version of
photography. Sato’s works include
photographic negatives lit up by
light boxes, while Noda’s works mix
autobiographical photographs with
wood block printing on handmade
Japanese papers such as Washi.
As stated in the exhibition
pamphlet, “Our familiarity and
understanding of the diversity and
complexity of contemporary Japanese
photography has matured since the
first critical survey exhibitions of
post-war Japanese photography were
mounted in the United States during
the 1970’s. The slow introduction is in
large measure the result of a dominate
western art market, the scarcity of
recognition within Japanese cultural
institutions, and scant knowledge
about Japanese culture in the West
before the advent of the Internet.”
This show of five internationally
exhibited and emerging artists is an
opportunity to learn about Japanese
culture. The exhibition is open from
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October 1 through Oct. 25. The gallery
is on the south side of campus in the
Jeanette Powell Art Center and is open
from 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. on weekdays.
There are also additional artworks
being displayed at the Muto Room in
the Library until Oct. 27.
The festival itself starts Oct.25,
and continues through the 27. On
Thursday, the event kicked off with a
Lecture Series at 7 p.m. in the William
Knox Memorial Library, followed
by the film Jiro Dreams of Sushi at
8:30 p.m. in the Janet Leigh Theater.
Friday’s events include another free
lecture at 2 p.m. in Faye Spanos
Concert Hall and will be followed by
New Music for Gagaku Instruments
and Video at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday’s events begin with the
free Tea Ceremony at 4:30 p.m. in the
library. At 7:30 p.m. at Faye Spanos
Concert Hall, there will be Traditional
Gagaku Music. Tickets for both of the
music events will be $8 for general
admission and $5 for seniors.
Micaela Todd
5 Contemporary Japanese Photographers exhibit at the Reynolds Art Gallery.
Zumba for cancer
Alyssa Lenart
Contributing Writer
In support of Breast Cancer
Awareness month, the ladies
of Alpha Phi will be hosting
Working Out For A Cure, a
fundraising event for breast
cancer research. The fundraiser
will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 30
in Grace Covell Hall at 7 p.m.
The event will include a
40-minute Zumba workout lead
by Perla from Perla’s Fitness and
Dance Studio and a 15-minute
informational session about
breast cancer. The workout is
open to all Pacific students with
a $5 entrance fee. At the door,
all participants will be given a
raffle ticket for the chance to
win a one-month membership
to Perla’s Fitness and Dance
Studio. Additional raffle tickets
will be available for purchase for
one dollar.
All profits from the events
will be donated to the Breast
Cancer Foundation. For more
information, contact Katie Yakel
at [email protected]
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Email
[email protected]
for more information!
Alpha Phi
Working Out For A Cure event takes place on Oct. 30.
NEWS
October 25, 2012
Pacific’s
Holiday
ROAR
Holiday Roar
continued from page 1
age last year.
According to a study entitled
“Reading on Grade Level in
Third Grade: How is it Related
to High School Performance and
College Enrollment?” done by
Chapin Hall at the University of
Chicago, which conducts policy
research that benefits children,
families, and their communities,
“For
children,
a
critical
transition takes place during
elementary school: until the end
of third grade, most students are
learning to read. Beginning in
fourth grade, however, students
begin reading to learn. Students
who are not reading at grade
level by third grade begin having
difficulty comprehending the
written material that is a central
part of the educational process
in the grades that follow.”
“This is an inexpensive
and fun way for the Pacific
community
to
contribute
directly to Stockton and help
families help their children learn
to love books. The children will
get these books during their
check-ups—I like to think of
them as a form of inoculation.
Instead of giving them a flu or
measles vaccine, we are giving
them a shot of knowledge…” said
Eibeck in regards to the Holiday
ROAR book drive.
During the next month,
students, faculty, and staff have
been asked to donate children’s
books, both new and used,
as long as they do not have
extensive wear and tear. Reach
Out and Read San Joaquin
focuses on providing books to
children between the ages of 6
months and 5 years, but books
for older children are also
welcome. In addition, books in
Spanish and Asian languages are
also in great need.
On Nov. 27, the last day of
the book drive, President Eibeck
will host a holiday party which
will be open to all students,
faculty, staff, and their families.
The event will include comfort
food, music, a crazy holiday
sweater contest (whose winner
will receive $100 to be used for
an on-campus holiday party for
the organization or department
of their choice), the lighting
of Pacific’s holiday tree, and a
ceremony marking the end of
the Holiday ROAR book drive.
THE PACIFICAN | 3
Joan of Arc performance
Joan of Arc
continued from page 1
from Joan’s hometown
into the music.
“However, I wish the
director of The Passion of
Joan of Arc did not make
Joan cry as much as she
did; I think it distracted
from
her
strength,”
continued Sesar.
Voices of Light was a
powerful experience for
the performers as well;
Sarah Phelan ’15 said
about her experience as
a soloist, “It was such
a beautiful experience
watching
almost
the
entire conservatory come
together and help put on
this piece. It made me so
proud to be a conservatory
student here at Pacific.
This was truly a night to
remember!” The orchestra
performed to a soldout crowd, and at the
end of the performance,
Pacific’s Conservatory of
Music received a standing
ovation.
Public Safety
Weekly Report
Oct. 14th - Oct. 20th
Suspicious Person
Desserts and Democracy
Christiana Oatman
Opinion Editor
In order to educate the
Pacific community about
the ballot propositions and
other important election
information, three Pacific
students—Caitlin
Trepp
‘14, Justine Tang ‘14 and
Halima Lucas ‘14—worked
with the League of Women
Voters and the American
Association of University
Women
(AAUW)
to
present
Desserts
and
Democracy last Tuesday.
After
grabbing
desserts,
students
heard
from
speakers
from the two political
women’s
organizations.
They discussed all the
propositions on the ballot,
except for Proposition
40, which is no longer
relevant to voters. Every
proposition is important,
but this article will focus
those considered the most
controversial. For more
information, consult the
Official Voters’ Guide.
The two most relevant
propositions for college
students are Propositions
30 and 38. Because both
raise taxes, only one can
pass; if both have a majority
vote, the proposition with
the most votes will be
passed into law. Both deal
with education funding,
but each pursues the goal
differently. Proposition 30
was created by members
of the California state
government in order to
balance the budget, a
legal requirement passed
by voters in a previous
election. Prop 30 will
temporarily raise the sales
tax and income tax for
the highest tax brackets.
The money gathered from
these taxes will go into the
General Fund; a certain
percentage
of
money
in the General Fund is
guaranteed for education.
If Proposition 30 does
not pass, the state will
have to make massive cuts
to education and other
programs. Many are in
favor of the proposition
because it will solve the
budget crisis and provide
more money for schools;
others are against the
proposition
because
they believe it will only
encourage overspending
and does nothing to
encourage
government
reforms.
Proposition 38 increases
income tax in all but the
very lowest tax bracket. It
will put the money earned
from increasing income
tax into a separate fund
that will go to fund schools
and
early
childhood
education programs. It
has nothing to do with the
General Fund or budget
issues. Proponents argue
that raising taxes will
greatly benefit our school’s
funding and improve our
schools and children’s
access to a good education.
Critics point out that if
Proposition 38 passes, the
government will need to
make massive cuts in order
to balance the budget, and
that increased funding
may or may increase
school quality.
Proposition 32 would,
according to the League of
Women Voters, “prohibit
any corporation, labor
union,
government
contractor or government
employer for using payroll
deductions for political
purposes.”
Proponents
argue that this proposition
will keep people from
having
money
taken
from their paycheck for
political purposes without
their consent. However,
critics point out the
numerous
exemptions
to Prop. 32, such as
Corporate Super Political
Action
Committees
(SuperPACS) ,and claim
the proposition targets
unions, since corporations
and others listed rarely
use payroll deductions.
The
proposition
is
limited to state political
purposes,and has nothing
to do with federal election
funding.
Proposition 34 would
end the death penalty
and change the maximum
sentencing to life in prison
with no chance of parole.
Proponents believe that
this will save millions for
Californians; those on
death row are guarded on
maximum security and
go through a lengthy and
expensive appeals process
before their execution.
The vast majority of those
sentenced to death row
die naturally in prison.
Critics argue that the
death penalty is justice for
vicious crimes.
Proposition 37 would
make labeling foods based
on whether or not they
are genetically modified
mandatory.
Genetic
modification has been
cleared as healthy by
many organizations, such
as the FDA (Food and
Drug Adminstration), but
many consumers are still
suspicious of the process
and want to know more
about what’s in their food.
Proponents argue that it
provides more consumer
education and lets them do
research and make better
decisions about their food
choices. Critics claim the
labeling is not necessary
for people’s health and will
make food more expensive.
After the discussion,
potential
voters were
encouraged to seek out
more information on each
proposition and become as
educated as possible before
voting in November.
Townhouses, Oct. 14
Officers responded to a report
of two subjects jumping off of
the roof and into the pool. The
officers contacted both subjects,
who were warned.
Weapons Violation
PIKE House, Oct. 15
Some officers responded to a
report of a male subject with a
knife in the area. An officer located the subject responsible and
referred him to judicial review.
Theft
Wendell Phillips Center, Oct. 20
Public Safety officers responded
to a report of a suspicious male
yelling obscenities at people.
The officers located the subject, who was interviewed and
revoked from campus.
Suspicious Incident
De Rosa University Center, Oct. 20
Some officers responded to a
report of a suspicious male urinating on the side of a residence.
The officers located the subject
who was removed from the
party.
Aided Stockton PD
De Rosa University Center, Oct. 20
SPD reported a male calling
9-1-1 regarding a disturbance in
the Lair. The caller reported a
subject using racial slurs towards
him. An officer contacted the
caller, who had been previously
contacted on a prior disturbance.
The subject was revoked from
campus.
Burglary Tool Arrest
Off campus, Oct. 20
Public Safety officers responded
to a report of a male subject on a
bicycle carrying another bicycle
under his arms. The officers
located the subject, who was
arrested for possession of burglary tools; both bicycles were
confiscated.
For more information, or to
access the full weekly report,
please visit:
http://www.pacific.edu/Campus-Life/Safety-and-Conduct/
Public-Safety-and-Services/
Crime-Statistics/Crime-onCampus/2012-Weekly-IncidentLog.html
October 25, 2012
OPINION
4 | THE PACIFICAN
OPINION
Why WASC’s recommendation is flawed
Pacific’s diversity still ahead of the competition
What is the best
Halloween costume you
have ever seen?
“The coolest Halloween
costume I have ever seen
was one of my friends who
made a Pac-Man costume
out of cardboard. He could
see out the mouth, and his
arms were on the inside, so it
was basically a Pac-Man with
legs!”
@Emily Marien,
c.o. 2015
“I had a friend in high school
who had a costume called
‘mauled by a lion’.”
@Trust Hilton,
c.o. 2014
“I saw someone dressed as
Mario and thought she was
really cute.”
@Ally Vierra,
c.o. 2015
“Last year, my friend went on
a retreat where all the groups
that go dress up in costumes.
My friend’s group was all
girls, and he was the one guy,
so they did Snow White and
the dwarves. He dressed up
as Snow White and wore a
dress and a bow, and all the
girls dressed up as dwarves;
it was really funny.”
@Eric Takemoto,
c.o. 2014
“The most memorable
costume for me was actually
something that I wore
because I lost a bet. I had to
dress up as a cheerleader,
which was very embarrassing,
but it was fun and I got a lot
of laughs, but I definitely
learned my lesson after that.”
@Andrew Sugano,
c.o. 2014
“A friend of mine once
dressed up as a taco.”
@Ben Contois,
c.o. 2014
“I saw a guy wear a shirt that
said ‘Go Ceilings!’ Turned out
he was a huge ceiling fan.”
@David Searles,
c.o. 2014
Francisco Gonzalez
Contributing WRITER
I don’t know of many undergraduates
who have read the Western Association
of Schools and Colleges (WASC)’s 45page Educational Effectiveness Review
report about the University of the
Pacific, but after taking a break from
Aristotle’s Nichomachean Ethics, I
decided to read it.
WASC
made
specific
recommendations to Pacific at the end
of their review. One recommendation
is on diversity. WASC states, “1. Under
the leadership of the most senior
levels of the administration, the team
recommends that Pacific pursue
diversity relentlessly to be reflective of
its local community and the composition
of the Pacific family.” WASC contends
that Pacific is not doing enough to
bring in underrepresented students
(specifically
African-American
and Hispanics) from Stockton
and the surrounding counties in
the Central Valley. Though well
intentioned, WASC overlooks many
factors that explain Pacific’s alleged
“shortcoming.”
It could be the case that the
majority of local students want to
leave Stockton (and the Central
Valley) to attend other universities.
Most high school students do this.
They leave their parent’s home to
attend a college hours away. That’s
what I did. I left my Southern
California town to come to Pacific
because I wanted to try something
new in northern California.
It could also be the case that
the local schools are not preparing
students for college. This is beyond
the control of our university. Pacific
cannot accept students who are not
prepared for college-level work.
To accept a student simply to meet
“diversity standards” would do more
harm than good. This is why WASC’s
“relentless” pursuit deeply concerns
me. I’m afraid WASC’s stringent
recommendation
may
pressure
our university administration into
admitting applicants that are not
prepared for Pacific. As a Hispanic
student, it would break my heart to
hear of any local student dropping out
because he/she was unable to handle
the rigors of the Pacific curricula.
They will leave with low-self esteem,
possible loan debt, and ire towards
higher education. We cannot let this
happen. WASC needs to back off,
both literally and metaphorically,
from Pacific’s diversity requirements.
The diversity of Pacific’s student
body is not flawless, but it is one of
the best in the U.S. Our campus is
more diverse than most of our peer
institutions. We are more diverse
than Pepperdine, Santa Clara, Loyola
Marymount, University of Redlands,
and University of San Diego. We are
more diverse than all of the UCs except
UC Riverside. According to U.S. News
& World Report, Pacific ranked 17th for
campus diversity. We truly are the envy
of California institutions.
President Eibeck’s ‘Pacific 2020
Vision’ is committed to the “changing
higher education environment.” This
includes campus diversity. However, we
cannot seek diversity “relentlessly” as
recommended by WASC. We must seek
diversity thoughtfully, meticulously,
and avoid being haste. This will ensure
that the students who matriculate,
succeed at Pacific, graduate, and then
go on to lead successful careers and
lives.
As a Hispanic Pacifican, I believe
the Office of the Provost has done an
exceptional job in regards to campus
diversity. Many students may disagree
and think Pacific needs to do more. I
agree that it should do more, but also
believe the administration can only
do so much. That is why I challenge
Pacificans who are passionate about
diversity at Pacific and in higher
education to volunteer in local Stockton
schools by encouraging the youth to
pursue higher education. This is where
it starts. A University of the Pacific
education is the vehicle to a successful
and more prosperous life, but a proper
K-12 education is where students begin
to learn to pilot this vehicle.
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9/17/12 10:35 AM
October 25, 2012
OPINION
Props 30 and 38 affect
education funding
Hiram Johnson IV
seven years, there would
be a higher income tax on
On the night of Oct. 16, people with over $250,000
2012, social norms pertaining of taxable income per year
to politics were set aside for and couples filing jointly
luscious dessert and the well- with over $500,000 of
organized presentations on taxable income per year.
California propositions equate Prop 30 would generate $6
the usually dissociated words, billion in revenue to fund
“sweet politics.” The American K-12, community college,
Association
of
University and public universities.
Women (AAUW) and the Every year for the next
League of Women Voters of five years, these temporary
San Joaquin County (LWVSJ) increases would add an
partnered
with
Pacific estimated 6 billion to the
students and staff to talk about state General Fund.
Propositions 30-39 that will be
If voters do not approve
coming up on the 2012 ballot Prop 30, then the budget
Justine Tang
in less than two weeks.
has required “trigger cuts” The poster for Desserts and Democracy,
The
two
hottest of $6 billion, to public an event which educated those interested
about propositions on the California
propositions on the 2012 education.
ballot.
ballot are Propositions 30 and
Pros: Prop 30 taxes
38. Each proposition deals are temporary, balanced,
control spending, but not
with adding an additional tax and necessary for our state’s make meaningful reforms
for Californians to subsidize students. Prop 30 is the only (stopprop30.com).
funding education. With that initiative
Proposition 38, if passed,
which
protects
being said, a good duration school and safety funding, and would
increase
personal
of the event was spent talking addresses the state’s unending income tax rates on all but the
about the pros and cons of budget mess (yesonprop30. lowest income take bracket.
these propositions.
Tax rates would increase by
com).
Proposition 30, if passed,
Cons:
Prop
30
has 0.4 percent up to 2.2 percent
would temporarily increase no
assurances
that
tax depending on income tax
sales tax and personal income increases will actually benefit bracket. The highest income
tax, to mainly fund educational classrooms. Politicians and tax bracket would be at 11.5
programs. Sales tax would special interest groups want percent. This tax increase
be increased by ¼ cent (0.25 to continue their out-of- would last for 12 years.
percent) for 4 years. For
Initially, 60 percent of the
increased revenues would go
to schools, 10 percent to early
childhood programs, and 30
percent to state debt payments.
PHONE
In 2015-16 and 2016-17, a
Main: (209)946-2155
Ad: (209)946-2193
higher share could be used for
state debt payments, and after
FAX
(209)946-2195
that, roughly 85 percent of the
funds would go to schools, and
MAILING ADDRESS
The Pacifican
roughly 15 percent would go to
3601 Pacific Avenue
Stockton, CA 95211
early childhood programs.
Pros: Prop 38 makes
EMAIL
[email protected]
schools a priority again by
pacific.edu
guaranteeing
to
restore
OFFICE
education
funding.
Early
Smith Lounge
childhood education is much
Grace Covell Hall
ADVISOR
GENERAL MANAGER
underfunded, and Prop 38
Prof. Dave Frederickson
Jesse Voelkert
MEETINGS
helps more students get the
Noon every
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
ADVERTISING MANAGER
Thursday in the
start they need to succeed
Juliene Sesar
Jeremy Hixson
Smith Lounge
(ourchildrenourfuture2012.
NEWS EDITOR
OFFICE MANAGER
com).
Karla Cortez
VACANT
Editorial policy
Editorial comments
Cons: Taxpayers would
OPINION EDITOR
CIRCULATION MANAGER
reflect the views
Christiana Oatman
Tiffany Ting
be locked into higher taxes
and opinions of
the majority of
until 2024, with very little
LIFESTYLES EDITOR
CIRCULATION STAFF
The Pacifican
Kelly Asmus
Tri Nguyen
accountability as to how
editorial board,
unless personally
money is spent. Under Prop 38
SPORTS EDITOR
ADVERTISING REPS.
signed. The views
Ruben Dominguez
Lauren McDermott
of The Pacifican
there are no requirements to
are not reflected in
improve school performance
LAYOUT EDITOR
WEBSITE ADMINISTRATOR
advertising, letters to
Micaela Todd
Tiffany Ting
the editor, or in any
or get ride of bad teachers
articles.
COPY EDITOR
SOCIAL MEDIA
(stopthemiddleclasstaxhike.
Teryn Porter
COORDINATOR
The Pacifican
com).
Natalie B. Compton
reserves the right to
So folks, here are the facts on
edit all submitted
STAFF WRITERS
materials for length,
two
of the most controversial
Jamieson Cox, George Do, Drew Jones, Danielle Procope,
factual information,
Mitchell Woerner, Amanda Wynn
libel, and clarity.
propositions on the 2012
All letters to the
ballot. Do some fact checking
editor must have a
Interested in advertising?
verifiable signature,
and research. No matter which
Contact [email protected]
address, phone
proposition you favor, be sure
number, and email
All advertising submissions must be in each Monday by 5 p.m.
address.
to get out and vote!
unless otherwise negotiated.
STAFF WRITER
The Pacifican
THE PACIFICAN | 5
Instead of guessing, make
an educated decision
Danielle Procope
STAFF WRITER
It is important that we
exercise our right to vote.
It is also important to be
an educated voter. A ballot
may be a piece of paper,
but the choices we choose
amount to real life policy
decisions for Americans.
These
decisions
will
impact all of our lives.
It can be difficult to
become an educated voter
in the midst of partisan
and
special
interest
analyses of candidates
and
propositions.
It
is imperative that we
identify sources of reliable
information.
A
good
source
for
bipartisan
election information is the
Official Voter Information
Guide. This is a great start
because it gives both sides
and an objective analysis
of the issues.
There
are
many
other
sources
for
bipartisan
information
about candidates and
propositions, but many
sources can claim to be
bipartisan and in actual
fact support a specific
agenda.
A
bipartisan
source should state only
the facts. This can include
quoting what partisan
sources have said about the
issue, but this should be
done equally and neither
side should be taken.
Partisan
sources
can provide firsthand
information about the
viewpoints of different
people and why they
support the ideas that
they do. All politicians
and all propositions claim
to be for public good.
Through partisan sources
it is possible to see their
rationale for supporting
their particular views. Then
it is up to us to individually
decide whether or not we
agree. It is always good to
look at the viewpoints of
both sides before a final
decision is made.
As educated voters, we
need to disconnect media
hype and sensationalism
from
the
issues.
Oftentimes, the media will
spend more time focusing
on a politicians’ tone of
voice, attire or simply
misquote them. It is
important to stay focused
on what the politicians say
about the issues and what
their plans are if they are
elected.
We should also be
aware of who supports
various
candidates
and propositions. It is
important to look at who
is
funding
campaign
advertisements,
which
can give a good indication
about who a specific
candidate or proposition
will benefit. We need to
also keep in mind what
communities we are a
part of and what issues
are important to us. For
example, as students we
may have specific concerns
that other Americans who
are not students may not
have.
We are also a part
of
California,
and
more
generally
the
United States. It is our
responsibility as citizens
to support measures that
best support the public
good. This means equal
opportunity and support
for all citizens. We need
to look beyond ourselves
when we vote. We are all
privileged as people who
have access to higher
education,
and
while
it makes sense to vote
from this perspective,
it is also imperative to
consider those who are
less fortunate or those
who have been historically
discriminated against or
are currently members in
marginalized groups.
There
are
many
different
ideas
about
how to obtain a good
society. Not all of these
different viewpoints are
equal. We need to use our
critical thinking abilities
to discern which of these
methods are truly for the
public good, and then it is
our job to educate others
about these issues.
It is also important
to keep in mind that
all issues on the ballot
impact everyone. Every
proposition or law that
does not directly impact
us will impact us indirectly
by virtue of the fact that
is changing the dynamic
of our city, state, and/or
country.
Politicians have the
power to make decisions
that impact both us and
our communities. This is
why it is not only crucial
that we vote, but we do
so in a manner that is
thoroughly educated.
October 25, 2012
LIFESTYLES
6 | THE PACIFICAN
LIFESTYLES
Finding Joan of Arc in the world of literature
Nanxi Tang
Contributing Writer
From Oct. 16 - 20, the William Knox Holt Memorial
Library at The
University of the
Pacific displayed
a Joan of Arc
book exhibition.
This display is a
part of Voices of
Light: The Passion of Joan of
Arc, a Pacific Arts
and Lecture event
for the month
of October. The
Joan of Arc exhibition is located
near the front entrance of the
library and provides a multitude of books about the history, life, and trials of Joan
of Arc. The Maid: A Novel of
Joan of Arc by Kimberley Cutter, Joan
of Arc: the Image of
Female Heroism by
Maria Warner, and
The Trial of Joan
of Arc translated and introduced by Daniel Hobbins,are
just three of the
books that are
provided for curious
readers.
The exhibition is
able to provide
a brief introduction to the history and life of
Joan of Arc.
Nanxi Tang
University of the Pacific’s library exhibit on Joan of Arc.
Upcoming
Student Events
Thursday, Oct. 25
Muto Lecture Series
7 p.m.
Library
Japanese Festival Exhibit
Library
Friday, Oct. 26
Jon Schamber Invitational
Oct. 26 - 28
University of the Pacific
Autumn Wind Lecture
2 p.m.
Faye Spanos Concert Hall
Club DC: Halloween Havoc
10 p.m. - 2 a.m.
DeRosa University Center
Saturday, Oct. 27
Guided Photography Walk
Nanxi Tang
Books on display for the exhibit at William
Knox Holt Memorial Library.
9 a.m. - noon
Burns Tower
Japanese Tea Ceremony
4:30 p.m.
Library
Sunday, Oct. 28
Not that
far to
nature
A little Hocus
Pocus?
Kelly Asmus
Juliene Sesar
Lifestyles Editor
geolocation.ws
Cranes are popular on the Cosumnes River Preserve.
Interested in wildlife?
Like taking photos? Well
this Saturday is your perfect chance to
put those skills to use. Pacific’s Wondrous Outdoor Women are hosting a
Guided Photography Walk this Saturday, Oct. 27 at the Cosumnes River
Preserve.
This trip is free of charge; they just
ask you to bring a camera and take
photos; everyone is welcome. They
will be exploring the Cosumnes River
Preserve with its beautiful cranes and
great views of local nature and wilderness.
For those who need a ride, 8 a.m.
at Burns Tower is the place. If not,
meet at the Cosumnes River preserve
at 8:45 a.m.; the address is listed
on the website that can be found at
http://www.cosumnes.org. At 9 a.m.,
a guided tour will begin that will last
approximately an hour and a half to
two hours, after which snacks will be
provided.
For more information or to
R.S.V.P., contact Jen at [email protected] before Oct. 25, or
look online at their Facebook page
at facebook.com/WondrousOutdoorWomen.
Editor-in-Chief
“Come little children, I’ll take thee
away, into a land of enchantment.”
Halloween can not be properly
celebrated without watching the Disney
classic, Hocus Pocus again and again.
Due to the recent rumor by
Moviehole this summer that there
would be a sequel, Hocus Pocus 2: Rise
of the Elderwitch, the popularity of the
1993 witchcraft movie has been revived.
However, Disney firmly stated that they
are not developing a sequel.
I don’t understand why, after all, they
chose to end the first with a last look
straight into the eye of Winifred’s magic
book and her screaming “book!” before
being turned to stone and exploding
into a puff of green sparkle. That seems
like the implication of a sequel, and
from the response this summer to the
fake rumors, I suspect that it will retain
a large following.
Hocus Pocus is the story of the three
Sanderson sisters, Winifred, Mary, and
Sarah. Winifred has sold her and her
sister’s souls to the devil for the magical
spells and recipes contained in the
human flesh bound book that she uses
to create a potion to suck the lives out of
the children of Salem.
The first time the sisters make the
potion, they suck the soul out of a young
girl named Emily Binks in 1693 as her
brother, a boy named Zachary, looks on
helplessly.
Zachary dumps the rest of the
potion before the sisters can use it on
Hocus Pocus
continued ON page 8
Friends of Chamber Music Intersection Music Trio
2:30 p.m.
Faye Spanos Concert Hall
Monday, Oct. 29
Over Troubled Waters
1:30 p.m.
Janet Leigh Theatre
Tuesday, Oct. 30
Resident Artist Series - Rex
Loper, piano
7:30 p.m.
Faye Spanos Concert Hall
Saturday, Nov. 3
Stravinsky’s “L’histoire du
soldat”
7:30 p.m.
Faye Spanos Concert Hall
Tuesday, Nov. 6
Pacific Election Day Health
Fair
noon
DeRosa University Center
Election Night Coverage
4:30 p.m.
DeRosa University Center,
The Lair
Wednesday, Nov. 7
2012 Etiquette Diner
5 p.m.
Grace Covell Dinning Hall
Friday, Nov. 9
Julis Caesar by William
Shakespeare
7 p.m.
Long Theater
Movies This
Week
Thursday, Oct. 25
Jiro Dreams of Sushi
8:30 p.m.
Friday - Saturday, Oct.
27 - 26
Cabin in the Woods
THE PACIFICAN
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F
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Be Here!
October 25, 2012
THE PACIFICAN | 7
LIFESTYLES
8 | THE PACIFICAN
October 25, 2012
Stay safe this Halloween
Kelly Asmus
Lifestyles Editor
This weekend, and into
early next week, many people
will be out and about causing
a ruckus over the Halloween
celebrations. To help you stay
safe, here are a few things to
keep in mind before heading
out to the party.
without face masks for the
guys help make things a
little easier to move in, but
each person is different,
so just find a costume you
feel most comfortable in.
Also, keep in mind bright
colors help make you more
visible at night, which can
be important if something
What exactly is in that witches’ brew?
Costumes: Your costume
needs to be functional,
nothing is worse when
your entire night is ruined
because
your
costume
was blocking your groove.
Costumes without heels for
the ladies and costumes
squidoo.com
were to go wrong. Defiantly
get creative; Halloween gives
us a unique opportunity to
become somebody else, so
why not make the most of it?
Cars: A lot of people
drive under the influence
of alcohol and other drugs
on Halloween - don’t add
to those numbers. Always
have a designated driver and
make sure they keep to their
promises, it is not just their
own life they are putting at
risk. Also, keep a look out for
children when in residential
areas. There are kids
everywhere, and you never
know when one, all dressed
in black, may all the sudden
run out into the road.
Drinks: It is a party, and
people are going to drink, but
make sure you are making
the right decisions. Here are
a few things to keep in mind.
Make sure to eat before
going out; this will help your
body react better with the
alcohol and possibly prevent
you from getting sick. Also,
don’t forget to space out your
drinks well, and keep an eye
on your drink. This will help
you pace yourself and make
sure that no one is tampering
with your beverage while
you are not looking or are
not there. As always, have
a buddy set up to help you
if things get out of hand,
and never leave that buddy
behind; you never know
what may happen, and it is
the group’s responsibility
to look after its members.
Choose a good friend you
know you want to spend the
whole evening with, so that
no matter how late you stay
out or how much you drink,
you know someone is there
that really cares about your
welfare.
Hocus Pocus
“Come little children, I’ll take thee away, into a land of enchantment.”
Hocus Pocus
continued from page 6
anyone else. Winifred, as
punishment, curses Zachary
to become a cat that can never
die and must live on without
his family ever knowing what
happened to him.
The good townspeople of
Salem hang the sisters, but
before they do, the book falls
open and Winifred declares,
“My ungodly book speaks
to you. On All Hallow’s Eve,
when the moon is round, a
virgin will summon us from
under the ground. Oh Oh! We
shall be back, and the lives of
all the children of Salem will
be mine!”
Of course, the only way to
accomplish this is for a virgin
that doesn’t believe in the
witchcraft to light the black
flame candle.
In walks Max, his sister,
Dani, and Max’s crush, Allison.
Max lights the candle and the
whole movie goes underway
as Zachary Binks the cat leads
them around the city trying to
stop the impossibly ridiculous
Sanderson
sisters
from
succeeding in sucking all the
souls of the children of Salem.
This movie is always
an entertaining watch for
Halloween, and you can get a
copy of it for only $5 at Target
right now. Have fun this
weekend, and beware of the
virgin that lights the candle.
NUTRICAT’S CORNER
Facts: High Fructose Corn Syrup
Alexandra Caspero
Campus dietitian
Facts about High Fructose
Corn Syrup (HFCS)
What is it? HFCS is syrup
made from corn starch. It is
a mixture of two common
sugars, glucose (table sugar)
and fructose. High-fructose
corn syrup, cheaper than
other sweeteners, is used
in yogurts, baked goods,
packaged
foods,
jams,
beverages and many other
foods. Manufactures use
them to prolong product
freshness, product stability,
flavor,
and
enhanced
browning in baked goods.
In the past 20 years, our
consumption of HFCS has
doubled, in line with our
obesity and Type II diabetes
growth. This has caused
some speculation on the
safety of HFCS, but because
of conflicting studies, the
jury is still out.
The position of the
Academy of Nutrition and
Dietetics (AND) is that HFCS
is a safe ingredient; however,
moderation of this and other
sugars are advised. NutriCat
recommends limiting not
only foods containing HFCS,
but all foods containing
added sugars and sweeteners.
Balance is essential! Eating a
variety of nutrient rich foods
in moderate portions will
help in maintaining a healthy
weight. Looking to cut back
your intake of the sweet
stuff? Check your drinks
first, as this is where most
of our unnecessary calories
come from.
Want more information?
Facebook Nutricat or email
[email protected]
ladyjart.deviantart.com
The three Sanderson sisters, Winifred, Mary, and Sarah.
SPORTS
October 25, 2012
THE PACIFICAN | 9
SPORTS
Pacific makes history:
Men’s and women’s swimming competes
Ruben Dominguez
sports editor
Pacific’s men’s swimming
team made history over
the weekend, claiming the
school’s first ever Pacific
Invitational title. In the
twenty-first edition of this
swim meet, the Tigers tallied
1,079 points, good enough
for first place over Stanford
(1,063), BYU (681), and UC
Santa Cruz (179).
Friday’s races commenced
with the 200 Medley Relay,
which saw the Tigers take
second place with a time of
1:33.16 set by Dai Wilson ‘14,
Cameron Franke ‘15, Casey
Fleming ‘15, and Cooper
Rogers ‘15. Rogers capped
off a fantastic first day with a
second place finish in the 200
Free (1:52.39) and third in
the 100 Back (51.80). Oliver
Simkovic ‘14 also came in
second in the 400 IM with a
time of 4:04.74 while placing
fourth in the 100 Back
(52.36).
The second day saw the
Tigers do battle with a very
touch Stanford squad. With
the Cardinal sweeping each
event, Pacific needed to pick
up points where they could.
Though none of the Tigers
finished in the top five in
any races, Friday’s strong
showing was enough to keep
Pacific in first place and claim
the program’s first Pacific
Invitational championship.
Meanwhile, the women’s
swimming team put on an
impressive showing of their
own, taking second place
overall with 706 points. The
Tigers finished behind invite
champion San Diego State
(1,349) and ahead of BYU
(484), UC Davis (422), and
UC Santa Cruz (125).
The first day began with
a second-place finish by the
200 Medley Relay team of
Becca Wyant ‘13, Mallory
McGowan
‘13,
MarElla
Randall ‘14, and Dekel
Shahaff ‘16, who stopped the
clock at 1:44.41. McGowan
earned another top-3 finish
in the 100 Breast (1:04.75),
while Randall finished third
in the 50 Free with a time of
24.20.
Saturday’s races showed
other top performances by
Pacific. Cristina Mardones
‘16
had
a
spectacular
showing, placing third in the
200 Breast at 2:22.00 flat
while also finishing fourth
in the 200 IM with a time of
2.09.14. Allie Vetterlein ‘13
recorded Pacific’s other top-3
finish on the day with a third
place finish in the 100 Fly
(2:09.14).
The men’s team will look to
ride the momentum into this
weekend’s showdown against
CSU Bakersfield and Seattle,
which will take place on the
Bakersfield campus. The
women’s team will remain
at Kjeldsen Pool as they host
Nevada Friday at 1 p.m.
Senior Jonathan Alves (above) racing in the 200 Breast.
Natalie B. Compton
Tennis takes on ITA Regionals
Jamieson Cox
staff writer
This past weekend, St.
Mary’s
College
hosted
the Men’s ITA Northwest
Regional Tennis Tournament
in Moraga, Calif., where nine
members of the men’s tennis
team
competed
against
some of the top teams in the
country.
The field consisted of
teams such as Washington,
Stanford,
Cal
Berkeley,
Gonzaga, and about ten more
teams from the Northwest
region of the United States.
The weekend was a very
positive sign of the Tiger’s
recent hard work on and
off the court with wins
from every member of the
tiger streak. Some of the
highlights include Denis
Stolyarov ‘15 earning a win
over Kyle Koetje from East
Washington, Trevor James
‘16 over Tom Miller from
Sacramento Statem, Daniel
Alameh ‘16 over Roy Brandys
from
Cal-Berkeley,
Ben
Mirkin ‘15 over USF’s Jon
Knowlman, and Sem Verbeek
‘16 beating Dragos Puscalau
of Washington.
With
many
doubles
wins in the mix as well, the
Pacific Tiger stand-out of the
tournament was definitely
Alex Golding ‘13, who made a
run to the round of 16. In the
round of 64, Golding came
back from a one-set deficit
pacific tennis
continued ON page 10
Pacific RecSports
So, you want to get
involved in RecSports?
Micaela Todd
Layout Editor
Intramural sports are a
great way to get involved on
campus, but it is not always
so clear how to get signed
up. So, here are some helpful
hints on how you can get
involved.
RecSports is the name
that Pacific uses for all of our
intramural leagues. There
are two seasons of sports
each semester that offer
a wide variety of options,
including basketball, indoor
and outdoor soccer, indoor
and
outdoor
volleyball,
dodgeball, floor hockey, flag
football, softball, and more.
Within each sport, there are
different divisions for more
competitive or recreational
players as well.
The seasons usually last
about for about a month and
have four to six games plus a
playoff season for the teams
at the tops of their divisions.
Games are played from 7-11
p.m. on mostly weeknights.
The winners of each division
get championship prizes
along with the title.
It
is
important
to
remember that anyone can
make a team! Brackets are
often dominated by Greek
organizations and residence
hall teams, but if you are not
affiliated or in a residence
hall with a team, you can get
any group of people to play.
Try gathering a group of 10
to 12 friends together or get
a club to put together a team.
Once you get a group of
people who are interested,
you can get forms from Baun
Fitness Center to register
your team. Teams can also
now be signed up by creating
an account at http://www.
imleagues.com/Pacific/
Registration. There is a team
fee of $35 for most sports, but
when you split that cost 10-12
ways it is pretty reasonable.
The team fee can also be paid
at Baun Fitness Center.
One person will be
designated as team captain
and will be in charge of
receiving
information
regarding the team and
attending the preseason
meeting. If you ever have any
questions about RecSports,
the staff at the front desk in
Baun are always happy to
help out
If you can’t seem to get
enough interest for one of
the team sports, you can
always enter yourself in
one of the individual or
partner tournaments as
well. RecSports is offering a
doubles badminton season,
as well as singles racquetball,
ping pong, and a bag toss
tournament this season.
Whether you used to be
an athlete and want to play
again or you just want to try
something new, RecSports
are a great way to stay active
and be involved! Forms
for the team sports are due
Oct. 26, 2012, and the other
tournaments are at varying
dates depending on their
competition date. Check the
website or head over to Baun
Fitness for more information.
SPORTS
10 | THE PACIFICAN
Cross country runs
for Big West crown
Drew Jones
Staff Writer
The
women’s
cross
country team will fight
to keep their season
going as they head down
south to Riverside, Calif.
to participate in the Big
West Championships this
weekend. So far, Pacific
has participated in seven
invitational
competitions
this season, placing seventh
overall out of 21 teams in
their most recent outing,
the Bronco Invitational.
Seven out of the nine that
competed in the Bronco
Invitational on Oct. 13th set
a new personal record time
in the 5,000 meter course.
Leading the team, freshman
Lindsay Wourms finished
eighth individually and set a
personal record.
Pacific has a very young
racing team this year
composed of one junior,
two sophomores, and nine
freshmen. “This is a very
good
and
hardworking
group of young ladies.
Being so young hasn’t been
a factor as far as training
and working together,”
stated Coach Joshua Jones
about his team. Pacific has
placed within the top three
overall in two of their seven
invitationals, improving on
last year’s team record.
Looking forward to the
Championship race, Coach
Jones is very optimistic on
how his team will perform.
“As far as team placing
goes, we should do better
than recent years,” Jones
predicted. “This is the best
team Pacific has ever had
and will most likely run
the fastest as a team the
program has ever seen.”
Along
with
Wourms,
freshmen Becky Grabow,
Mia
Knipper,
Lauren
Nakaso, Grace McManus,
and sophomore Rebecca
Tuttle will be representing
Pacific this weekend in the
Championships.
Last year, Pacific placed
last overall in the Big West
Championship; this year,
they look to set the record
straight and run away with
the title.
Tennis strong at ITA Regionals
Pacific tennis
continued from page 9
against Sean Kolar from
Sacramento State, taking the
second set 7-5 and the final set
6-1. After gaining confidence
and using the momentum
from the come-back win,
Golding came back into play
with a major upset against
the number four seed, Marton
Bots from Washington, in
a very quick fashion with
scores of 6-3,6-4. Golding’s
run ended against Tuomas
Manner, a member of Saint
Mary’s College who had some
home-court advantage, with
scores of 6-2,6-4.
Some highlights from
the three members of the
women’s team who competed
in regionals include, Iveta
Massarova ‘15 who faced
Saint Mary’s Danielle Flores
in her first round match.
Here, Masarova won in
straight sets, 7-5, 6-2 ,after
cutting it close in the first
set; she continued to roll
with confidence and took the
second set very handedly. In
the second round, Masarova
faced nationally ranked Klara
Fabikov (12) of California but
fell just short after battling
back in the second set.
During the second day,
Christiana Ferrari ‘16 made a
comeback, defeating Eastern
Washington’s Chelsea Patton
in straight sets, 6-2, 6-1. With
only having a few members
competing due to some
injury setbacks, Head Coach
Charlotte Scatliffe stated, “The
weekend showed some more
steps forward as the women
have been working on playing
more aggressively and being
more active at the net. These
improvements will definitely
help out confidence as we
head to Fresno next weekend
for the Bulldog Classic.
With the many positives
from the weekend, the
Tigers will continue to push
themselves as they prepare
for the Pacific Invitational
here on campus in two
weeks. Be sure to come out
and support your classmates
the weekend of Nov. 3rd.
For more detailed results,
check out Pacifictigers.com
and the Pacific Tigers Tennis
Facebook page.
October 25, 2012
News and Notes
Athletic Media Relations
WOMEN’S VOLLEYBALL: Pacific suffered two tough defeats over
the weekend. Friday, the Tigers battled back from losing the first two
sets to force a fifth set against CSU Northridge, only to fall 3-2 (23-25,
19-25, 25-18, 25-21, 11-15). The following night, Pacific looked to have
its defining win of the season, as the team took a two-set lead over No.
9 Hawai’i. However, in reverse fashion from the previous night, Hawai’i
would come back to force a fifth set and win 3-2 (25-14, 25-22, 16-25,
14-25, 11-15). In defeat, Koala Matsuoka ‘13 (pictured) was spectacular,
grinding out 23 digs against Hawaii and 40 total digs on the weekend.
MEN’S WATER POLO: The No. 5 Tigers began Mountain Pacific
Sports Federation play over the weekend, falling to No. 8 Pepperdine
9-6 at home. A trio of Tigers--Kevin Oliveira ‘14, Casey Fleming ‘16, and
Aleksandar Petrovic ‘16--kept Pacific in the game, scoring a pair of goals
apiece. It was Pacific’s first loss at home this season.
Athletic Media Relations
WOMEN’S SOCCER: Pacific ended its 2012 road schedule over the
weekend. Friday night, the Tigers were felled 6-1 by CSU Northridge
despite outshooting the Matadors 22-19 and having a 5-2 advantage on
corner kicks. In defeat, Kayla Villalpando ‘13 (pictured) scored her first
goal of the season. Sunday night, the Tigers suffered a tough 2-1 defeat
to Hawai’i. After a scoreless first half, Pacific found itself down 1-0 in the
fifty-fifth minute. However, Brittni Beeman ‘14 scored her first on the
year to tie the game 1-1 in the sixty-second minute. Unfortunately for
Pacific, Hawai’i would notch the game-winner in the seventieth minute.
FIELD HOCKEY: The Tigers travelled to No. 14 Stanford over the
weekend in the penultimate game of the regular season. After an opening
score by the Cardinal, Melissa Maultsby ‘14 tied the game up 1-1 in the
fourteenth minute. However, Stanford would proceed to score four
unanswered goals to win by the final count of 5-1.
PACIFIC SPORTS SCHEDULE
HOME GAMES IN BOLD
SATURDAY
@ UC Riverside
Big West Championships
Riverside, Calif.
CROSS COUNTRY
FIELD HOCKEY
NOV. 1-3
NorPac Tournament
Farmville, Virg.
SUNDAY
@ UC Davis
noon
Aggie Stadium
Longwood Athl. Complex
MONDAY-WEDNESDAY
Pacific Invitational
Brookside Country Club
Stockton, Calif.
M. GOLF
W. SOCCER
FRIDAY
UC Riverside
7 p.m.
Knoles Field
SUNDAY
CSU Fullerton
1 p.m.
Knoles Field
M. SWIMMING
SATURDAY
@ CSU Bakersfield
vs. Bakersfield, Seattle
Hillman Aquatic Center
NOV. 17
vs. UC Santa Cruz, Fresno Pacific
noon
Chris Kjeldsen Pool
W. SWIMMING
FRIDAY
vs. Nevada
1 p.m.
Chris Kjeldsen Pool
SATURDAY
@ CSU Bakersfield
vs. Bakersfield, Seattle
Bakersfield, Calif.
W. VOLLEYBALL
FRIDAY
@ UC Riverside
7 p.m.
SRC Arena
SATURDAY
@ CSU Fullerton
7 p.m.
Titan Gym
NOV. 7
vs. Long Beach State
7 p.m.
Spanos Center
M. WATER POLO
OCT. 27
@ USC
2 p.m.
McDonald’s Swim Stad.
NOV. 2
@ UC Irvine
7 p.m.
Aquatics Complex
NOV. 2
@ Long Beach State
noon
Campus Pool
October 25, 2012
THE PACIFICAN
THE PACIFICAN | 11
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THE PACIFICAN
October 25, 2012