JFCS 75 YEARS Helping and Healing 2 0 1 0

JFCS 75 YEARS
Helping and Healing
JE WISH FAMILY & CHIL DREN ’S SERVICe
2010 ANNUAL REPORT
J E WISH FAMILY & CHIL DREN ’ S SERVICE
MISSION
JFCS Leadership and Board of Directors
Jewish Family & Children’s Service is a nonprofit,
nonsectarian organization that strengthens the
community by providing quality behavioral health and
social services to children, families, and adults of all
ages throughout Maricopa County, in accordance with
a Jewish value system that cares about all humanity.
Governance Board of Directors
Jewish Values Guiding Our Mission
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Concern for the community (kehila)
Doing the right thing (tzedakah)
Taking responsibility for fixing what is wrong with the world (tikkun olam)
Acts of kindness (gemilut chasadim)
Values Serving Our Agency
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Quality service is a top priority
People are our most important resource
Employees are culturally competent
Fiscal responsibility ensures JFCS’ viability
Agency-wide commitment to excellence and
continuous improvement
Collaborations support our community
Our vision, mission, values and strategic plan are clearly communicated throughout the agency and
the community
COVER IMAGE: Junior Council of Jewish
Women luncheon, 1936. Courtesy of the Arizona
Jewish Historical Society (AZJHS).
2010 AN N UAL REP O RT
Richard D. Gottlieb, Chairman
Rick Naimark, Vice Chairman
Carol Kern, Secretary
Robert Carr
Steven Friedman
Jerome Gutkin
Michael E. Johnson
Andrew Pacheco
Armando Roman
Carol Seidberg
Leesa Berens Weisz
Emeritus Board Members
Lenore Schupak
Aileen Osofsky*
*Of blessed memory
Executive Leadership Team
Michael R. Zent, Ph.D., President & CEO
Mark Callesen, MD, Chief Medical Officer
Javier Favela, Chief Financial Officer
Carol Felton, Executive Director of Human Resources
Frank Jacobson, Vice President of Marketing
& Development
Martha Miller, Director of Compliance
Kevin Rhode, Director of Information Technology
Ellie Schwartzberg, MC, Vice President of Older Adult Services & Jewish Community Services
Linda Scott, MSW, Vice President of Child &
Family Solutions
Jack Silver, MSW, Director of Jewish Counseling Services
Mary Jo Whitfield, MSW, Vice President of
Behavioral Health
2010 has been an exceptional year for JFCS.
Michael R. Zent
Richard D. Gottlieb
Although the economic downturn continued to increase demand for our services
and strain existing resources, we were able to start several new programs and
expand much-needed services, including our Behavioral Health programs.
This year marks our 75th anniversary as a community service agency, and
we have much to celebrate. JFCS was able to significantly expand services to adults
through its partnership with Magellan Health Services, the Regional Behavioral
Health Authority. We opened additional adult services on both 7th Street in
Phoenix and in the West Valley, and began providing innovative Behavioral
Health counseling to older adults in their homes.
We were also able to make great progress relocating our programs into
better facilities. Over the years, as demand for services has increased, many of our
workplaces have become increasingly inadequate and strained. Our Glendale
Behavioral Health Clinic was relocated after 20 years to a new Glendale location
and an open house was held in May. We also completed plans to move our Mesa
Behavioral Health Clinic and are seeking new space to relocate our West Catalina
Drive Clinic. This means a better environment for both clients and staff.
In 2010, JFCS also launched a revitalized development and marketing
program and sponsored a successful Brighter Tomorrow luncheon in March,
which we plan to make an annual fund- and friend-raising event. We are reaching
out to the community not only to seek support for much-needed programs but to
inform others of our services and the role we play in meeting community needs.
This year, we continued to expand our specialized services to youth with
programs for foster care youth, youth with serious mental health problems who
are likely to continue services as adults, and specialized treatment for youth and
families who struggle with substance abuse issues. As a major provider of services
for children under the state’s Child Protective Services, we strive to improve and
expand services to this very vulnerable group. One example, our youth workforce
training and life-skills program, Real World Job Development, helped youth
further their education and find jobs.
Also in 2010, with the support of a grant from the Virginia G. Piper
Charitable Trust, we proudly launched our new older adult home care program,
Jewish Family Home Care of Arizona. This program provides in-home services
to seniors helping them maintain their independence and quality of life while
continuing to live in the comfort of their own homes.
JFCS continues to provide services to the Jewish community with
increased referrals to our counseling services and more requests for emergency
and short-term financial assistance via our Helping Hands program. Our Aleinu
Network held several successful educational workshops with the Orthodox
Community, offering resources for strengthening individual and family life, and
our Hospital Chaplaincy program provided support and spiritual comfort to
patients and families in 15 hospitals throughout Maricopa County.
Once again, we are grateful for the support we have received and our
ability to meet the emerging needs of the community. Thank you to our partners,
our donors, staff and board of directors who have made a successful 2010 for JFCS.
Michael R. Zent, Ph.D.
President & CEO
Richard D. Gottlieb, Chairman
Governance Board of Directors
J E WISH FAMILY & CHIL DREN ’ S SERVICE
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JFCS 75 YEARS
I
n 2010, Jewish Family & Children’s Service (JFCS) proudly celebrated 75
years of providing care, help and healing to those in need throughout
Maricopa County. From a small group of Jewish women doing their best
to meet the needs of a growing Jewish community in the late 1930s to a
large social service agency that assists approximately 30,000 individuals
of all faiths every year, JFCS has been helping people cope more effectively
with life’s difficult circumstances for three quarters of a century.
“[Rabbi Krohn] was a sincere and intellectual man
who wanted things done on a high plane.”
– sam kiviat, Oral History Transcript, Shema Arizona,
Arizona Jewish Historical Society Oral History Project
CLOCKWISE: Junior Council of
Jewish Women luncheon, 1936
(Courtesy of AZJHS); JFCS’ Board,
December 1963; Florence Frank,
1958(Courtesy of AZJHS); Real
World Job Development participant
intern at Maryvale Hospital, 2010;
Naomi Wagner, J. Barry Moffitt, and
Lois Tuchler at groundbreaking,
1974(Courtesy of AZJHS, Jewish News
Collection); Youth in Transition
participants during a 2009 trip to
Washington, D.C. Center: 4th of
July at the Senior Center. LEFT: Rabbi
Krohn, 1944 (Courtesy of AZJHS).
1935-1940
1938
1940
1944
The Welfare Committee of the
Phoenix chapter of National
Council of Jewish Women
provides social services to needy
Jewish families.
Rabbi Krohn joins the Welfare
Committee to assess and
address the needs of the fewer
than 1,000 members of the
Jewish community.
The Jewish Community
Council is founded.
Welfare Committee Members
form the Jewish Social Service
Committee of the Jewish
Community Council “to
protect and preserve Jewish
family life in this community
by helping people who are in
trouble.”
1940-1944
The Welfare Committee of
NCJW coordinates community
assistance efforts with the
Jewish Community Council.
Rabbi Krohn is named
chairman.
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2010 AN N UAL REP O RT
1946
1947
1950
1955
The Social Service Committee
seeks autonomy as a separate
agency: Jewish Social
Service, Inc.
Florence Frank is JSS’ first
professional social worker.
Hirsch Kaplan is appointed
director of JSS.
Jewish Social Service (JSS)
becomes a member agency of
the Jewish Community Council.
1950s
1954
JSS is a “Red Feather” agency
and receives funding from
the local United Fund and the
United Jewish Welfare Fund.
JSS becomes a licensed foster
home placement agency,
arranges institutional or home
placements for dependent or
neglected children and adults.
JSS is incorporated as a 501(c)3
nonprofit organization—“a
charitable agency for the relief
of the Jewish needy, indigent
and afflicted, and to provide
family welfare services.”
J E WISH FAMILY & CHIL DREN ’ S SERVICE 3
CLOCKWISE: Jeannette Pollack,
Herman Miller, and Mrs. Edgar
Korrick, 1970 (Courtesy of AZJHS,
Jewish News Collection); Judith
Gardenswartz, Sherman and Andi
Minkoff at the 75th Anniversary
Celebration, 2010; Arizona Republic
article, December 1973; Past
presidents of JFCS, c. 1990; Bob
Roth, Ruth Cooper, Sandy Reischfeld
at the JFCS Annual Luncheon, 2010.
Center: Carol Seidberg and Adrien
Herzberg, 1987.
HIS TORY IN THE MAKING
Humble Roots
JFCS traces its roots back to 1935—an uncertain time during the Great Depression when jobs and
resources were scarce. It was during this period of great need that a courageous group of Jewish
women from the Phoenix chapter of the National Council of Jewish Women decided to create
a welfare committee to help those in need. They laid the bedrock for what would eventually
become Jewish Family & Children’s Service of Phoenix, a social service agency that over the years
would change the face of child welfare in Arizona; would lead the fight against child sexual abuse;
would distinguish itself in adoptions, including the adoption of Native American children;
would create the first nursing home for elderly Jews in Arizona; would be a major force in the
resettlement of Russian Jews; and would receive national recognition for its excellence.
Visionary Leaders
“. . . the agency
serves Jewish
individuals and
families of all ages,
as well as the
general population
in fulfillment with
the teachings of
Judaism to be of
service to others.”
JFCS’ rich legacy has been guided by several innovative leaders, all of whom shared a vision for
a brighter tomorrow. Leaders like Rabbi Abraham Krohn, a forward-thinking rabbi who moved
the welfare committee into an agency with the establishment of Jewish Social Service; Florence
Frank, a nurturing social worker, who became the agency’s first director of social services; Hirsch
Kaplan, who incorporated the agency and managed its growth as the first executive director; Lois
Tuchler, a passionate advocate for child welfare in the 1960s and ’70s who launched many JFCS
programs that still exist today; Adrien Herzberg, whose leadership in the late 1980s and early ’90s
helped the agency expand to serve the greater community; Gail Parin (1998-2003), who helped
the agency build a strong nonprofit business model; and Thomas F. Updike (2004-2008), who
furthered new business practices and enhanced services to the Jewish community.
Shared Values
While the agency’s focus has shifted over the years to meet the diverse needs of a growing
community, JFCS’ commitment to the core Jewish values that it was founded upon has remained
constant. Those values include: concern for the community (kehila); doing the right thing
(tzedakah); taking responsibility for fixing what is wrong with the world (tikkun olam); and acts
of kindness (gemilut chasadim). Moving forward, JFCS will continue to rely on these core Jewish
values to guide the programs and services it provides to the Greater Phoenix community.
– jfcs mission statement, 1987–1995
1962
1965
1966
1973
JSS changes its name to Jewish
Family & Children’s Service
(JFCS).
Staff expands to include an
executive director, two fulltime skilled caseworkers, two
part-time skilled caseworkers,
one part-time aide, and two
full-time administrative staff.
JFCS is the first organization in
Arizona to be accredited by
both the Family Service
Association of America and
the Child Welfare League
of America.
JFCS is the first private
adoption agency to facilitate
adoption of Native American
children by Native American
families.
1963
JFCS holds its first Annual
Meeting at the Jewish
Community Center on
Maryland Avenue.
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2010 AN N UAL REP O RT
Lois Tuchler becomes Executive
Director.
1974
1975
1980
1980-1990
Renewed commitment to
serve the “over 60” Jewish
community with special
department for older adults.
JFCS moves into a new
facility at 2033 N. 7th Street.
JFCS serves 2,832 individuals,
including 1,219 families and 72
foster children. Staff consists
of 16 professional caseworkers,
9 group home parents, and 15
clerical and support workers.
1,200 square feet are added to
the 7th Street office.
JFCS establishes the Little Bear
Sexual Abuse Program for
Children. The Board of
Directors affirms that the
agency’s non-sectarian approach
to social service is consistent
with Jewish values.
JFCS ends its adoption program
and adds the Helping Hands
Program, Plays for Living,
Family Life Education, the
Russian Resettlement Program,
People’s Treasure Shoppe, and
Homebased Services.
1978
J E WISH FAMILY & CHIL DREN ’ S SERVICE
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JFCS Y ear in Review
In fiscal year 2010, JFCS served more
than 28,000 individuals of all faiths
and backgrounds in Maricopa County
through programs within our
Behavioral Health, Child & Family
Solutions, Older Adult Services and
Jewish Community Services divisions.
Each day, our caring staff of 300
professionals work toward a future
where families are strong, where our
elders are cared for and where children
are safe.
Our core programs and services include:
BEHAVIORAL HEALTH
OLDER ADULT SERVICES
Adolescent and adult substance
abuse counseling
l Child, youth and adult outpatient mental health services
l Life coaching for teens at-risk
l Transition assistance to youth exiting foster care
l Psychiatric care and medication monitoring for children, youth
and adults
l HIV/AIDS services
l Community information and referral
l Prevention education to increase socialization through peer support
l In-home mental health counseling and care management services
l Private-pay home care providing
skilled caregivers for services such as personal care, meal planning and preparation, transportation, light housekeeping, companionship,
respite care, shopping/errand and home safety enabling clients to
maintain quality of life and
independence
l Center for Senior Enrichment
providing education, kosher lunches and exercise in an intellectually stimulating and social environment
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CHILD & FAMILY SOLUTIONS
l Literacy skills and job training for youth at risk
l Aid to victims of domestic violence
l Family preservation, reunification and parent coaching
l Youth education promoting
positive family dynamics and
character building
JEWISH COMMUNITY SERVICES
Jewish counseling services treating
a range of life’s challenges
l Emergency assistance funds
l Holiday programs for those
touched by financial, physical or emotional hardships*
l In-home counseling and care
management for Jewish older adults
l Mental health education and out
reach to the Orthodox community
l Spiritual care and support to
hospitalized patients and families
l Information, referral and
resource assistance to make
connections with the Greater
Phoenix Jewish community
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*Serves clients throughout agency
1984-1985
1987
1990
1990s
JFCS capital campaign
results in the Milton A. Cohen
Family Center.
Adrien Herzberg becomes
executive director.
JFCS joins with organizations
in the East and West Valley to
create the ElderVention
Program, an innovative
behavioral health-focused
program for seniors Valleywide.
Board develops an “Executive
Leadership Team,” upgrades
computer and accounting
systems, and begins to
implement an electronic
medical records system.
1985
JFCS adds several service sites:
the Phoenix central office, the
Osborn Senior Center, Glendale,
Scottsdale, Sun City, Mesa
and Tempe.
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2010 AN N UAL REP O RT
1989
Helping Hands Program
wins the Belle Latchman
Community Service Award
from the Jewish Federation of
Greater Phoenix.
Demographics
Individuals
Served by JFCS Program Division
Behavioral Health
Child & Family Solutions
Older Adult Services
Jewish Community Services
Total
13,462 8,860 1,463 4,752 28,537 47.2%
31.0%
5.1%
16.7%
100.0%
A Closer Look at Populations Served by JFCS
(based on available data)
Generations Children & Teens
13,812 Adults
9,690 Older Adults & Seniors
1,396 Total
24,898 Diversity (Race/Ethnicity) Asian
166 Black
1,695 Hispanic
4,856 Multi-Racial
483 Native American
371 Pacific Islander
65 White
10,005 Total
17,641 55.5%
38.9%
5.6%
100.0%
0.9%
9.6%
27.5%
2.7%
2.1%
0.4%
56.7%
100.0%
Annual Income
$0-$30,000
$30,000-$60,000
$60,000+
Total
12,495 635 518 13,648 91.6%
4.7%
3.8%
100.0%
“Although social needs have changed
over the decades, the central mission of
JFCS has always been to help others.”
– Michael R. Zent, Ph.D
P resident and CEO, (2008 – Present)
1998
2004
2006-2008
2010
Gail Parin becomes President
and CEO of JFCS.
Dr. Thomas F. Updike
appointed President and CEO.
JFCS creates the Shelter Without
Walls program.
2005
JFCS launches Real World
Job Development, Youth In
Transition, and Center for
Senior Enrichment programs.
JCFS has 300 staff members,
70 volunteers, a $24 million
budget, and serves more than
28,000 individuals and families
in Maricopa County. JFCS
celebrates 75 years of Helping
and Healing in the Valley of
the Sun.
2001
The agency mobilizes to provide
community support after “9/11,”
the World Trade Center tragedy.
JFCS earns the Ability Counts
Award from the Mayor’s
Commission on Disability
Issues and the City of Phoenix
Equal Opportunity Department.
2008
Dr. Michael R. Zent is
appointed President and CEO.
WISH FAMILY
FAMILY && CHIL
CHILDREN
DREN’’SS SERVICE
SERVICE
JJEEWISH
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Financial Snapshot
The following is a summary of the
audited financial statements for fiscal
year 2010 performed by Clifton
Gunderson LLP. A copy of the complete
audit with notes may be obtained by
contacting Javier Favela, JFCS Chief
Financial Officer, at (602)279-7655 or
[email protected]
Jewish Family & Children’s Service & Subsidiaries
Fiscal Year 2010
Assets
Current Assets $7,021,387
Long Term Assets 1,811,062
Total Assets
$8,832,449
Liabilities
Current Liabilities $3,719,187
Long-Term Liabilities 173,874
Total Liabilities
$3,893,061
Total Expense Summary
Net Assets
JFCS Program Services
85%
Unrestricted Assets$4,659,528
Temporarily Restricted 279,860
Total Net Assets
$4,939,388
Total Liabilities and Net Assets
$8,832,449
Support & Revenue
Fundraising
2%
Administration
13%
Regional Behavioral Health Authority$15,249,749 66.86%
Department of Economic Security 3,492,146 15.31%
Other Contracts & Government Funding 1,816,857
7.97%
Contributions and Grants 962,112
4.22%
Jewish Federation of Greater Phoenix 305,285
1.34%
Valley of Sun United Way 385,893
1.69%
Program Fees 400,811
1.76%
Other 194,012
0.85%
Total Support & Revenue
$22,806,865
100.00%
Expense by Program
Behavioral Health Service
$14,940,591 69.22%
Shelter Without Walls 307,474
1.42%
Real World Job Development 605,518
2.81%
Homebased Services 3,232,086 14.97%
Older Adult Services 757,871
3.51%
Center for Senior Enrichment 373,589
1.73%
Jewish Community Services 390,761
1.81%
Prevention Services 138,769
0.64%
Fundraising 387,930
1.80%
Other 449,965
2.09%
Total Expense by Program
$ 21,584,554
100.00%
Change in Net Assets
Unrestricted Surplus $1,118,131
Temporarily Restricted 104,180
Total Change in Net Assets
$1,222,311
Expense Summary
Program Services
$18,367,625
Administration 2,828,999
Fundraising 387,930
Total Expense
$21,584,554
Financial statement from fiscal year 1949
showing total disbursements of $13,905.80.
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2010 AN N UAL REP O RT
85%
13%
2%
100%
Jewish Family & Children’s Service thanks and recognizes our most generous
group of donors, now part of our Family Friends of Distinction, who have made a
significant commitment to JFCS. Lifetime Membership is extended to individuals,
corporations and foundations whose generosity over time reaches, or exceeds,
$25,000, while Annual Membership is extended to those who make a commitment
of $1,000 or more annually.
Lifetime Members
As of June 30, 2010
Family Pacesetter ($500,000 +)
J.E. & Z.B. Butler Foundation
Jewish Federation of Greater Phoenix
Valley of the Sun United Way
Family Visionary ($250,000+)
Arizona Community Foundation
Arizona Republic/12 News Season For Sharing
DBL Distributing
Lenore and Eugene* Schupak
Family Philanthropist ($100,000+)
Anonymous
Child Abuse Prevention License Plate Program
Jewish Community Foundation of Greater Phoenix
Cindy Lubin and David Lorsch
Nina Mason Pulliam
Charitable Trust
Aileen* and Meyer Osofsky
Ruth Pearson
Barbara and Robert Sweet
The Virginia G. Piper
Charitable Trust
Family Champion ($50,000+)
Daron and Ron Barness
Catholic Healthcare West
Estate of E. Louise Gaudet
Marcia and Norman Goodman
The Harry and Jeanette
Weinberg Foundation
Jerry and Meghan Hirsch
Fran and Al Sachs
Ken and Carol Seidberg/
Seidberg Law Offices
The Estate of Dora Sovich
Family Patron ($25,000+)
Acordia of Arizona
Arizona Foundation for
Behavioral Health
Bank of America Charitable Foundation
Basic Needs Collaborative
Judy and Peter Brandeis
Cardinals Charities
Cheryl and Bob Carr
City of Glendale
Dorothy Silverman Rev. Trust
Corinne F. Ehrlich*
Harold & Jean Grossman
Family Foundation
Philip J. Hirsch*
The Jonathan Dreier Foundation
Harriet A. Lakin*
Leisure World Foundation of Arizona Inc.
Buddie and Hank Levkoff*
Betty and Newton* Rosenzweig
Sheila Schwartz
Joel and Mary Shapiro
Paula and Aaron Sherman
Edna and Arthur Sitelman
St. Joseph’s Hospital &
Medical Center
State of Arizona - Arizona Criminal Justice Commission
Sylvia F. Greenfield Trust
Thunderbirds Charities
Barbara and Barry Zemel
Family Benefactor ($5,000+)
Anderman Family Charitable Fund/Richard A. Anderman, Esq.
Arrow Electric, Inc.
City of Glendale
Cox Charities
Desert Schools Federal
Credit Union
Freeport-McMoRan Copper & Gold Foundation
Harriet and Richard Gottlieb
In-n-Out Burger Foundation
Alisa and Charles Jost
Lynn and Larry Kahn
Cindy Lubin and David Lorsch
Lovitt & Touché, Inc.
Barbara and Barry Zemel
Family Guardian ($2,500+)
AG/FP VCC, LLC
American Technion Society
Sally L. Appelbaum
Annual Membership
Arizona Foundation for Women
(gifts given July 1, 2009 through
Cardinals Charities
June 30, 2010)
Susan and Michael Chesin
Clark Hill PLC
Family Visionary ($250,000+)
Paul and Flo Eckstein
Jewish Federation of
Anita and Jerry Gutkin
Greater Phoenix
Harold & Jean Grossman
Valley of the Sun United Way
Family Foundation
Arlene and Michael Lanes
Family Philanthropist ($100,000+)
Sheri and Thomas Levin
The Virginia G. Piper
Lincoln Gives
Charitable Trust
NextGen Healthcare
Information Systems
Family Champion ($50,000+)
Arizona Community Foundation Quality Care Network
Child Abuse Prevention License Salt River Project
Paula and Aaron Sherman
Plate Program
Susan and Ronald Starkman
Joan and Ron Yagoda
Family Patron ($25,000+)
Jewish Community Foundation Family Circle - ($1,000+)
of Greater Phoenix
Cypress Home Care Solutions/ Judy Ackerman and Richard Epstein
Sheldon R. Roth and Family
Sue and David Adatto
Ken and Carol Seidberg/
American Express Company Seidberg Law Offices
Employees
Anonymous
Family Ambassador ($10,000+)
Arnold & Rachel Smith
Anonymous
Arizona Republic/12 News Family Foundation
Robert G. Begam
Season For Sharing
Bank of America Charitable Beth El Congregation
The Brandeis Family Charitable Foundation
Fund/Judy and Peter Brandeis
Cheryl and Bob Carr
State of Arizona - Arizona Patricia and Herbert Dreiseszun
Criminal Justice Commission Judith Engelman, M.D. and Harry Rubinoff
Thunderbirds Charities
Estate of Netta Feuer
Fine Family Foundation
First Baptist Church of Scottsdale
Renee’ and Jonathan Fox
Ursula and Burt Freireich
Friedel Family Foundation
Kimber and Harry Friedman
Meri and Steve Friedman
Gan Bamidbar
Judith Gardenswartz
Vivian and Charles Gealer
Gerald H. Myers Revocable Trust
Heather and Michael Greenbaum
Susan and Nestor Guzman
Helios Education Foundation
Iva and Larry Hirsch
Beth and Sandy Hoffman
Stephanie and Frank Jacobson
Margaret and Chris Johnson
The Joseph & May Winston Foundation
Sue and Bob Karatz
Carol and Allan Kern
Ellen and Bob Kirschenbaum
Helen and Edgar Korrick
Marlene and Lanny Lahr
Lisa and Nelson Lerner
Susan G. Levine
Mesa United Way
Amy J. Myers
Karen and Robert Nagle
Jennifer O’Connor
Aileen* and Meyer Osofsky
Jessica and Andrew Pacheco
Holly and Jeff Packer
Gerald Peiser
Chris Rainer, M.D.
Ann H. Reinking-Talbert and Peter Talbert
Jennifer and Armando Roman
Barbara and Irving Rousso
Fran and Al Sachs
Rana and Joe Schwartz
Sheila Schwartz
Linda and Earl Secore/
Secore & Niedzialek, P.C.
Enid and Michael Seiden
Lola and Jacob Shapiro
Randi J. Sherman
St. Luke’s Health Initiatives
Temple Emanuel of Tempe
Gayle and Jay Weiss
Women’s Independence
Scholarship Program
Terry A. Zamell
Michael R. Zent, Ph.D.
*Of blessed memory
J E WISH FAMILY & CHIL DREN ’ S SERVICE
JFCS is accredited by the National Council on
Accreditation of Services for Families and Children
Constituent Agency of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Phoenix and a Primary Partner of the Valley
of the Sun United Way
Jewish Family & Children’s Service
4747 N. 7th Street
2010 AN N UAL REP O RT
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Suite 100
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Phoenix, AZ 85014
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602-279-7655
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www.jfcsaz.org