The Global Fund for Children beautiful 2007–2008 Annual Report & Resource Guide

The Global Fund for Children
2007–2008 Annual Report & Resource Guide
small is
beautiful
In a world where bigger is assumed to be better,
it is an act of courage to nurture the small.
Children are the planet’s smallest citizens—a
fact that makes them vulnerable and easy to
overlook. But children have boundless energy
and potential, with powerful dreams for the
future. Small investments in their daily lives
yield tremendous results over time.
Small organizations—often the most nimble
and creative at solving problems—are the
best suited to nurture these investments.
Their innovative projects provide inspiring
examples for others to follow. Small groups
with limited resources but limitless vision
and heart can change communities.
Children are small, but with opportunities,
their future is infinite. That’s why small is
mighty . . . and
beautiful.
THE GLOBAL FUND FOR CHILDREN
Our Vision,
Our Mission
At The Global Fund for Children, we
envision a world where all children grow up
to be productive, caring citizens of a global
society. To this end, we work to advance the
dignity of young people worldwide.
We Pursue Our Mission By:
Making small grants to innovative
community-based organizations working with
many of the world’s most vulnerable children
and youth;
Harnessing the power of children’s books,
films, and documentary photography to
promote global understanding.
the GLOBAL FUND FOR CHILDREN
Contents
6 Message from the Board Chair & President
68 Global Media Ventures
8 Grantmaking
74 Giving
16 Portfolios
16 Learning
19 Grantee Partner: Tbilisi Youth House Foundation
22 Enterprise
25 Grantee Partner: Ação Forte
28 Safety
31 Grantee Partner: Association of People for
Practical Life Education
34 Healthy Minds & Bodies
37 Grantee Partner: Ascensions Community Services
40 Responding to Crisis
43 Grantee Partner: Interfaith Dialogue
& Research Center
76 Our Donors
46 Sustainability Awards
51 Grantee Partner: Vikramshila Education Resource Society
54 Special Partnerships
54 Goldman Sachs Foundation
55 Grantee Partner: Dream A Dream
56 Nike Foundation
57 Grantee Partner: Yanapanakusun
58 Johnson & Johnson
59 Grantee Partner: Women’s Education for
Advancement & Empowerment
60 Clinton Global Initiative: Under-8
61 Grantee Partner: Monduli
Pastoralist Development Initiative
62 A Closer Look: Vulnerability & Gender
65 Grantee Partner: Society Undertaking Poor
People’s Onus for Rehabilitation
84 2007–2008 Grants
84 Selecting Our Grantee Partners
86 Learning
98 Enterprise
104 Safety
111 Healthy Minds & Bodies
116 Creative Opportunities
118 Responding to Crisis
121 Financials
125 Directors
126 Staff
127 Index & Credits
Message
Board Chair
& President
Great opportunities to make a difference may be
rare, but small ones surround us every day. Since its
creation in 1994, The Global Fund for Children has
sought to notice and nurture young organizations that
advance the dignity of children and youth. We have
done this by making small grants to big innovators
and by helping our grantee partners grow strategically.
We have also made an impact by publishing a collection of thoughtful, quality books for children—the
world’s smallest readers.
Over time, we’ve discovered that small is beautiful—
and powerful, too.
GFC is not the first organization to learn this lesson.
In Bangladesh, an economist named Muhammad
Yunus launched a project in 1976 to see if small loans
could make a dramatic difference in the lives of the
poor. What would later become Grameen Bank started out with $27 loans to 42 families. Since then, the
bank has become a small giant in the banking industry, extending $7.1 billion in microcredit to people in
more than 82,000 villages and 40 countries.
Children themselves can act as small but powerful
agents of change. In 1907, Robert Baden-Powell
began the world scouting movement with 20 boys
and an experimental camp in Dorset, England. Girls
later demanded to be included, and with time, both
boys and girls began organizing themselves into what
would become the world’s largest volunteer youth
movement. Today, more than 28 million scouts are
active in 160 countries, organized in small, locally
based troops with strong global connections.
Many successful organizations choose to be great
instead of big—a phenomenon documented in the
best-selling business book Small Giants. We believe
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Becoming a Small Giant
The Global Fund for Children can count itself among
the small giants in the philanthropic world for several
reasons. First, we have opted to support communitybased organizations that serve hundreds of vulnerable
children and youth, often with extraordinary compassion and effectiveness. Second, our small grants go a
long way in developing countries, so a relatively little
amount of money can have a big impact. Third, our
grantee partners are part of a growing global network
of organizations whose knowledge, influence, and
capacity for innovation make them small giants both
in and beyond their own countries.
Among our grantee partners are many small giants.
In 2002, we made a $5,000 grant to Asociación Solas
y Unidas (Alone and United Association), one of
the first community-based groups in Latin America
run by and for women with HIV/AIDS. Our grant,
renewed each year, supported a day school for these
women’s children. Over time, Solas y Unidas expanded its budget, developed a model children’s program,
and replicated its work. With a Sustainability Award
from GFC in 2006, the group purchased a building,
gaining a long-term asset and organizational stability. And Solas y Unidas has become a leading partner
in a United Nations–supported consortium to fight
HIV/AIDS in Peru.
In this annual report, we invite you to read about
other small giants that we’ve had the privilege to learn
from and support. We hope you’ll savor the images
that bring their stories to life—including photographs by Tadej Znidarcic, the recipient of this year’s
Global Fund for Children / International Center of
Photography Fellowship. A Slovenian photographer
based in New York, Znidarcic documented the efforts
of some of our most inspiring grantee partners on
trips to India, Bangladesh, and Romania.
We also invite you to celebrate this year’s accomplishments, which are anything but small:
• We awarded 541 grants valued at nearly $3.2 million
to grassroots groups all over the world. That’s a drop
in the bucket compared to global philanthropy, but
it represents a hundred-fold increase from our inaugural year of grantmaking in 1997, when we made
three awards totaling $3,100.
• Launched at the third annual meeting of the
Clinton Global Initiative, our new Under-8
Initiative will invest $10 million in early childhood
development and education programs for children 8
years and under.
• To better understand and measure our grantmaking
effectiveness, we developed and refined a core set of
metrics indicators. Building on the best practices of
peer organizations and our commitment to learning from our grantee partners, this cutting-edge
framework will enable us to evaluate the outcomes
of programs and services more systematically. The
ultimate goal is to help our grantee partners expand
their reach and deepen their impact.
• O ur Global Media Ventures work is thriving. Our
delightful board book Global Babies has become a
best seller, and we published our most anticipated
title, Children of the U.S.A., in February. Two documentary films we invested in, War Child and Journey
of a Red Fridge, were screened at major film festivals
to critical acclaim.
of communications. We were also thrilled to welcome
Sarah Perot of Dallas, Texas, to our board of directors
and David Kowitz, managing partner and founder of
Indus Capital, to the burgeoning board of trustees of
The Global Fund for Children UK Trust. This year’s
creation of both the UK Trust (now a registered charity
in the United Kingdom) and our new Silicon Valley
Leadership Council represent bold, strategic steps
toward our goal of advancing the dignity of children
and youth worldwide.
The stories in this report prove the power and beauty
of small things. Small amounts of money, targeted to
innovative groups, can make a vast difference in the
lives of marginalized young people around the world.
Your support has a tremendous multiplier effect when
joined with the contributions of others. We are truly
grateful for the gifts, ideas, and commitment of all
of our donors and partners. Each of you helps us to
appreciate the small—while dreaming big.
With our deepest thanks,
Juliette Gimon
Chair, Board of Directors
Maya Ajmera
President & Founder
The Global Fund for Children could not aspire to
“small giant” status without the daily contributions
of talented staff and board members. (Please consult
the end of this report for a complete list.) This year,
we welcomed the newest member of our senior
management team, Jerry Irvine, as vice president
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7
Our Impact Around the World
Grantmaking
266
310
447
541
20
20
183
20
2,651,566 3,165,188
2.5
400
2.0
300
1.5
200
1.0
0.5
100
0
0
75
103
128
157
206
228
250
48
58
61
65
8
300*
-0
Growth in Countries Served
Total Number of Countries to Date 66
07
7
-0
06
6
-0
05
5
-0
04
4
-0
03
20
8
-0
07
20
7
-0
06
20
6
-0
05
20
5
-0
04
Growth in Grantee Partners
Total Number of Grantee Partners to Date 323
66
60
200
45
150
30
100
50
15
0
0
8
-0
07
20
7
-0
06
20
6
-0
05
20
5
-0
04
20
4
-0
03
20
8
-0
07
20
7
-0
06
20
6
-0
05
20
5
-0
04
20
4
www.globalfundforchildren.org
1,819,500
500
-0
03
8
3.0
20
• 21 percent in the number of grants, for a
total of 541
We gave the following grants this fiscal
year in these areas:
• Learning
$1,014,000 to 86 grassroots groups
• Enterprise
$466,500 to 40 grassroots groups
• Safety
$532,500 to 45 grassroots groups
• Healthy Minds and Bodies
$318,500 to 33 grassroots groups
• Creative Opportunities
$37,500 to 5 grassroots groups
• Responding to Crisis
$317,300 to 49 grassroots groups
• Sustainability Awards
$325,000 to 13 grassroots groups
• Johnson & Johnson Health and
Well-Being Grants
$203,000 to 203 grassroots groups
• Tracking grants
$17,000 to 17 grassroots groups
• Opportunity grants
$24,779 to 20 grassroots groups
• Organizational development awards
$75,000 to 10 grassroots groups
• Affinity grants
$16,835 to 7 peer organizations
• Presidential Innovation Fund grants
$11,700 to 4 allied grassroots groups
• Miscellaneous grants
$8,574 to 9 grassroots groups
1,504,508
20
• 11 percent in the number of active grantee
partners, for a total of 228
600
815,300
4
• 19 percent in the value of grants, for a
total of $3,165,188
$3.5
-0
Our total grants and grantee partners continue to increase. Since last fiscal year, we
have grown by:
Number of Grants
Total Number of Grants to Date 1,958
03
This approach to grantmaking gives us flexibility to respond to the needs of the world’s
most vulnerable children in a more nuanced
way and in a variety of contexts. The core
areas where we work have high potential
for social return, and they have models
and mechanisms in place that can produce
immense gains even from small investments.
Growth in Grantmaking (in millions)
Total Value of Grants to Date 10,809,422
20
Guided by this philosophy, The Global
Fund for Children has four core program
portfolios: Learning, Enterprise, Safety,
and Healthy Minds and Bodies. We also
maintain a Creative Opportunities portfolio to fund innovative programs that do
not fit into these four major emphases and
a Responding to Crisis portfolio for emergencies and recovery and renewal work.
Since our first three grants totaling $3,100
in 1997, we have awarded 1,958 grants
valued at $10,809,422 to 323 grantee
partners in 66 countries.
20
We believe that in order to thrive in childhood and develop into contributing adults,
children and youth must be engaged in
the learning process wherever they may
be. They must also be productive, safe, and
healthy. These elements provide the basis
for children’s development and positive
engagement with the world around them.
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9
We estimate that, through our grantee
partners, we have directly served well over
1 million children since 1997.
Our Model
Since community-based programs need
more than just funding, we also invest in
the people and organizations that make
these programs successful. For this reason,
our grantmaking and capacity-building
model has three strategic components:
grants, value-added services, and knowledge initiatives.
Grants
We believe that the best way to reach the
world’s most vulnerable children is through
the programs and services of communitybased organizations. Grants that support and
strengthen effective, innovative communitybased organizations can improve the lives of
the children, youth, and families they serve at
a critical juncture.
Although all of our grantee partners are
unique, they share certain key characteristics. All are grassroots organizations
that offer community-based solutions to
challenges facing the vulnerable children
and youth who are their direct beneficiaries. Our grantee partners often pioneer
groundbreaking approaches that earn them
recognition as local resources and models.
In addition, they have excellent leadership,
sound management, and effective programs, which means the small seed that our
grant represents falls on fertile ground.
Detailed descriptions of our grantmaking
by portfolio and a comprehensive list of
grants made this fiscal year are provided
throughout this report.
Value-Added Services
Value-added services are offered to our
grantee partners to strengthen their organizations, make them more sustainable, and
help them optimize the use of their grants.
Organizational Development Support
Ten grantee partners from five countries
received organizational development assistance totaling $75,000 this year. The awards
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enabled five organizations in India and five
in Latin America (in Bolivia, Colombia,
Ecuador, and Peru) to obtain technical
assistance and consulting services from a
consulting partner in their region. Awardees
also participated in peer learning exchanges
with other GFC grantee partners.
Eastern Europe & Central Asia
North America
East Asia
& the Pacific
In the past few years, our regional consultants have provided diverse services,
including the following, to organizational
development grant recipients.
• Mexico’s El Caracol helped Centro San
Juan Bosco in Honduras to define job
roles and responsibilities for staff, court a
larger array of funders, create a five-year
strategic plan, and improve communication methods.
South Asia
Middle East
& North Africa
Africa
Latin America
& the Caribbean
• In India, Dasra created a template to
improve management information systems
at Agastya International Foundation and
helped Agastya design a model to assess the
impact of its science education programs.
• Goals and Performance Analysts assisted
fellow South African grantee partner
Ikamva Labantu in preparing a financial
procedures manual.
Leveraging
Our leveraging work helps grantee partners identify and pursue opportunities for
additional funding in order to promote
sustainability and growth. These efforts are
crucial since our support is often the first
significant contact our partners have with
international donors.
We play an active role as advocates of our
partners’ work, helping them achieve recognition and visibility. We often facilitate
introductions to government, multilateral,
and private donors through our networks
and strong reputation for finding great
groups operating under the radar.
Since 1997, we have leveraged over $2.6
million for our grantee partners. This
year, Gender Education, Research and
Technologies Foundation (Bulgaria) and
Challenging Heights (Ghana) leveraged
East Asia
& Pacific Cambodia
China
Indonesia
Laos
Mongolia
Philippines
Thailand
Timor-Leste
Vietnam
Total
2
7
4
1
3
4
5
1
1
28
Europe
& Central Asia Bosnia and
Herzegovina
Bulgaria
Georgia
Romania
Serbia
Turkey
Ukraine
Total
1
2
3
4
5
2
3
20
Latin America
& Caribbean Bolivia
Brazil
Colombia
Dominican Republic
Ecuador
Guatemala
Haiti
Honduras
Jamaica
Mexico
Nicaragua
Panama
Paraguay
Peru
Total
Middle East
& North Africa 5
7
6
4
3
5
4
2
1
5
4
1
1
5
53
Egypt
Lebanon
Total
Sub-Saharan Africa
1
1
2
North America
United States
Total
11
11
South Asia
Afghanistan
Bangladesh
India
Nepal
Pakistan
Sri Lanka
Total
1
2
40
2
6
4
55
Benin
Burkina Faso
Congo, Dem. Rep.
Ethiopia
Ghana
Kenya
Liberia
Malawi
Mali
Mauritius
Mozambique
Nigeria
Rwanda
Senegal
Sierra Leone
South Africa
Tanzania
Togo
Uganda
Zambia
Zimbabwe
Total
1
3
1
6
2
2
3
2
1
1
1
5
2
4
2
7
5
1
3
6
1
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www.globalfundforchildren.org
11
significant grants and awards with our help.
And our networking with peer funding
organizations—American Jewish World
Service, Global Fund for Women, EMpower,
Third Millennium Foundation, and the
Fund for Global Human Rights—led to
additional or follow-on funding for several
other grantee partners.
KLARA Network
The KLARA (Knowledge, Learning, and
Resource Access) Network was launched in
2007 to provide our grantee partners with
a space to engage in continuous dialogue,
identify other GFC partners, search for
funding sources, and link to resources to
strengthen their organizations.
Legal Assistance:
Lex Mundi Pro Bono Foundation
Our grantee partners can access pro bono
services from 160 independent law firms
through our collaboration with the Lex
Mundi Pro Bono Foundation. Ethiopian
grantee partner Prei Effort for Those Who
Are in Need established 501(c)(3) status in
the United States with Lex Mundi’s help,
greatly expanding its capacity to fundraise.
In Honduras, a Lex Mundi member law
firm assisted our partner Sociedad Amigos
de los Niños (Friends of Children Society)
with employment contracts.
Knowledge Initiatives
Our knowledge initiatives gather, distill, and
disseminate experiences and lessons among
grantee partners and the wider development
and philanthropic communities.
Measuring Outcomes
This year, responding to internal need and
external encouragement, we began taking
a more systematic approach to evaluating
the outputs, outcomes, and impact of our
grantmaking. We developed and refined a
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core set of metrics indicators that will help
us to better understand and assess our own
effectiveness and to measure the value of
our grantee partners’ programs and services.
Grounded in the best practices of peer
organizations and in our own extensive
experience, this cutting-edge framework
will allow our grantee partners to expand
the reach and depth of their work.
Our metrics framework includes eight
indicators that measure grantmaking
effectiveness, organizational capacity, and
program effectiveness. While still in its
early stages, and in an emerging field, this
work is breaking new ground for measurement in the sectors of grassroots philanthropy and community-level program
evaluation. We are especially proud of our
newly developed Global Fund for Children
Organizational Capacity Index, a diagnostic tool that helps assess organizational
growth and development by classifying
organizations as nascent, emerging, developing, strengthening, or thriving. Early
feedback indicates that with this tool, we
are building new knowledge in our sector,
as well as providing grantee partners with
a space for learning about and contributing to their organizations’ development.
Knowledge Exchange Workshops
These workshops facilitate the direct
exchange of experiences in serving the
most vulnerable children at the community
level. This year, we held three Knowledge
Exchange workshops: our first ever for
South American grantee partners, held in
November 2007 in Peru; one for African
partners working within the Learning portfolio, held in March 2008 in Tanzania; and
another as part of our collaboration with the
Goldman Sachs Foundation, held in June
2008 in India. Each event lasted three days.
In Cusco, the Peru workshop gathered
20 grantee partners from six countries to
discuss common issues, interests, and strategies. Whether the topic was best practices and how to define them, improving
project monitoring and evaluation, or
encouraging “horizontal” community organization, participants benefited from the
honest dialogue and lively networking.
Participants left the workshop with personalized resource guides and work plans to
assist their home organizations in building
networks and increasing knowledge.
In Tanzania, we brought together 21 grantee
partners representing 11 countries to share
their experiences with Learning initiatives.
Topics for discussion included the role that
advocacy plays in education, best practices for
increasing program effectiveness, and ways
grantees can incorporate new models for
culturally adapted early childhood development programs. Several of the organizations
that participated in the exchange produced
a concrete proposal for future collaboration,
including joint work to develop enrichment
camps and mobile libraries.
In India, 22 organizations from across the
country came together for a successful
exchange on Enterprise and Learning
initiatives, hosted by grantee partner Magic
Bus. Participants shared best practices for
helping vulnerable youth benefit from
and participate in India’s economic boom.
Prior to that gathering, we sponsored a
networking event in Mumbai with grantee
partners from our GFC / Goldman Sachs
Foundation Initiative and professionals
from Goldman Sachs India. They discussed
strategies for improving the skills of
marginalized youth to help them compete
in the employment market, and ideas for
harnessing the resources and knowledge of
the private sector to achieve social goals.
Tracking Grants
All of our past grantee partners are
eligible for a $1,000 tracking grant every
two years in exchange for basic information on their current status. This allows
us to monitor their development and
evaluate our record in making “good bets”
on emerging organizations. Seventeen
tracking grants were awarded this year,
bringing the total to 55 since 2003.
Fellowships
This was the second year of our international fellows program, which enables practitioners to spend time conducting research
in Washington, DC. This year’s international fellow was Pamela Kola, a Kenyan
expert on early childhood development
and the founder and director of the Centre
for Research, Communication and Gender
in Early Childhood Education, located in
Nairobi. During her tenure at GFC, Kola
studied our grantmaking in early childhood
development and education. She produced
an insightful survey of knowledge and
grantee partner programs in this sector,
adding an international grassroots perspective to our work and drawing lessons that
will benefit her own organization.
This year’s William Ascher summer fellow
was Matthew Levy, a 2008 graduate of the
Elliott School of International Affairs at
The George Washington University. At
GFC, he analyzed the process, implementation, and evaluation of our Sustainability
Awards to provide recommendations for
improvement and to identify what has
worked well. This fellowship was created
to honor our founding chairman, William
Ascher, currently the Donald C. McKenna
Professor of Government and Economics
at Claremont McKenna College.
www.globalfundforchildren.org
13
small victories
portfolio
Our priorities
Learning
We believe that every child everywhere
deserves access to a quality education. Not
only is education every child’s right, it is also
one of the keys to creating a healthier, more
caring, and more productive global society.
Despite overall gains in providing access
to and increasing the quality of education
in the last decade, the most marginalized
and vulnerable children and youth remain
underserved or not served at all. The
desperately poor; those living in remote,
conflict-torn, or marginalized communities;
ethnic minorities; groups disenfranchised
by gender or social stigma; and the disabled
continue to have little access to education.
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Our priorities include
safety-net schools, early
childhood education, and
providing complementary
and supplementary learning.
Small, community-based organizations
are often best positioned to serve these
difficult-to-reach populations. Unlike
large institutions, they can be nimble and
responsive, tailoring programs to local
needs and circumstances. They often
promote creative approaches that give
children opportunities to learn in small,
informal groups.
Our priority areas under this portfolio are
safety-net schools that catch and reintegrate
those who have drifted away from the
formal school system and those who never
had the chance to go to school; early
childhood development; and providing
complementary and supplemental learning
through such initiatives as tutoring centers,
children’s libraries, and literacy assistance.
This fiscal year, we awarded grants valued
at $1,014,000 to 86 grantee partners within
the Learning portfolio:
In the bayous of southeastern Louisiana,
Native American children can attend
summer enrichment programs with the
support of United Houma Nation and The
Global Fund for Children. Houma tribal
communities were hard hit by Hurricane
Katrina in 2005 and have traditionally
struggled with poverty and lack of access to
education. Our grant invests in leadership
training and cultural awareness programs for
youth in grades 6 to 12, who are most at risk
of dropping out of school, turning to drugs
and alcohol, or becoming single parents.
In a poor neighborhood in New Delhi,
India, a small, attentive group of kids
sits under shady trees in a graveyard,
confidently reciting the alphabet and
solving basic math problems. To the staff
and teachers of Chintan Environmental
Research and Action Group, the scene
is typical. Chintan sponsors afternoon
classes outdoors to accommodate children
who work as waste pickers in city garbage
dumps. Our grant supports the flexible
education program, which gives wastepicking children opportunities to leave
behind this hazardous work.
www.globalfundforchildren.org
17
Profile
grantee partner
location
Ready for His
Close-Up
Tbilisi Youth House
Foundation
Tbilisi, Georgia
Whether he’s behind the camera or in
front of it, Kakha exudes warmth and
confidence. Teaching a video class to kids
at the Tbilisi Youth House Foundation
(TYHF), the 21-year-old Georgian has no
trouble connecting with his audience. He
understands their challenges because he’s
faced them himself.
Four young Tibetans founded Kham Kampo
Association (KKA) in 2005 to improve
living conditions among impoverished rural
people in the area of Tibet traditionally
known as Kham. Responding to a direct
request from local teachers, KKA helped to
create a school library in Reda Township,
Sichuan Province, China, last year. With
our grant, teachers purchased 4,000 books
as well as musical instruments, maps, globes,
and other teaching aids. The effort shows
that a single library, strategically placed, has
unlimited potential to expand horizons.
Teboho Trust is an innovative group that
serves over 200 vulnerable and orphaned
children aged 4 to 19 living in and
around Soweto Township, South Africa.
A Saturday School and other activities
to promote children’s educational, social,
economic, and personal development are
helping kids from poor schools to beat
the odds and pass the country’s rigorous
university entrance examination. Our
grant this year helped Teboho Trust pay
its volunteer staff, expand programs, and
network with other grantees and donors.
When Kakha was a child, he and his family
joined hundreds of thousands of people
displaced by armed conflict in the Abkhazia
region. When the war forced them to leave
home and move to Tbilisi, the capital, he
remembers, “My parents were unemployed
and we had no place to live. . . . I really
needed someplace to go where people
would listen to my problems and would
tell me how to change my life.”
At 13, Kakha discovered the Tbilisi
Youth House. There, he supplemented
his formal schooling with English and
computer classes and received counseling.
“Also, youth leadership training helped
me to know about human rights and
civic responsibilities and to obtain all
those necessary life skills which could
help me become an active member of my
community. This ‘House’ became my
second home,” Kakha says.
Launched in 1997, TYHF reaches 2,000
displaced and vulnerable youth annually
with its programs. Since 2003, The Global
Fund for Children has supported a project
that identifies adolescents whose behavior
and school participation indicate the
greatest risk of their dropping out of school.
18
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The program served nearly 600 youth this
year in Tbilisi and remote areas, offering
tutoring, psychological assistance, and afterschool activities.
That kind of support puts young people
like Kakha on the right path. When TYHF
began offering video classes, he says, “I was
one of the first students to register. It was an
absolutely new experience.” Kakha learned
to develop scripts, shoot films, and create
montages. He started a video club that
produced one-minute films on children’s
rights issues, with two films winning special
prizes at an international festival.
“It was an unforgettable feeling to know
I did something to promote the work of
TYHF,” Kakha remembers. “I even chose
cinematography as my future profession.”
After high school, he studied cinema at
Tbilisi State University and landed a job as
a cameraman with a Georgian TV channel.
Kakha teaches a TV and video class in
TYHF’s dropout prevention program.
He is one of over 50 youth leaders giving
back to the organization that invested in
them—a sign of Georgia’s increasingly
vibrant civil society.
“When I look at my students, I remember
myself when I first came to the class like
them, full of fears and uncertainty,” Kakha
says. “I am so thankful to TYHF for the
help and care, for the warmth and light
once given to me. And I hope that TYHF
will never stop giving this warmth to many,
many other children.”
www.globalfundforchildren.org
19
Carry Promise
small investments
portfolio
Our priorities
Enterprise
Our priorities include
youth-led enterprise,
children’s banking and
savings, leadership
development, and
comprehensive
livelihood programs.
We believe that enterprise programs must
meet working children where they are
and acknowledge their need to earn an
income, while promoting a more supportive
work environment. Such an environment
guarantees safety and dignity, balances
work with learning and recreation, provides
opportunities for growth and advancement,
and gives youth a degree of control over
their time and their earnings.
We support comprehensive programs
that recognize the range of educational,
economic, and social skills that vulnerable
children and youth require in order to
develop into productive adults. Rather than
opposing involvement in any type of labor,
we promote opportunities for adolescents
to engage in enterprise and entrepreneurial
training that promote their personal
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growth and development and respect their
fundamental dignity and rights.
Our Enterprise portfolio is rooted in the
concept of asset building—helping young
people accumulate and protect assets that
will allow them to pursue a better future.
Through our grantees’ experience, we have
learned that relatively small amounts of
money, strategically invested, can have a
big impact on a young person’s ability to
get ahead. And small enterprises are often
more able to innovate and adapt creatively
to local circumstances.
Our priorities for this portfolio include
youth-led enterprise; children’s banking
and savings; entrepreneurship and
leadership development; and comprehensive
livelihood programs.
This fiscal year, we awarded grants valued
at $466,500 to 40 grantee partners under
the Enterprise portfolio:
Following their parents’ example, children
from coffee-farming families in Veracruz,
Mexico, are saving small amounts of money
that may add up to a better future. Through
Desarrollo Autogestionario (Self-Managed
Development), we support a program that
has created 21 children’s savings groups
involving 620 working kids, more than
half of whom are girls. Whether they put
aside money for education, a future home
purchase, or lending to poorer community
members, the children are learning
important habits and values at an early
age. Collectively, the kids saved more than
$26,000 this year.
Men on the Side of the Road (MSR), just
outside of Cape Town, South Africa, has
developed a simple, thoughtful approach
to providing employment opportunities to
boys and men who stand on street corners
and along highways in search of day labor.
MSR collects and refurbishes used tools
in the community; trains boys and men in
skill areas like gardening, plumbing, and
painting; and works with local businesses
to find job placements for program
participants. Since 2005, our grants have
supported this innovative model, which
MSR plans to replicate in other provinces
and even neighboring countries.
Founded in 2003, an organization called
Women in Social Entrepreneurship (WISE)
inspires, empowers, and equips Tanzanian
www.globalfundforchildren.org
23
Profile
Generation
Next
grantee partner
location
Ação Forte
Campinas, Brazil
Despite the odds, young people from disadvantaged backgrounds can get ahead in Brazil.
All it takes is some strong action.
Ação Forte (Strong Action) is helping teens
from low-income neighborhoods develop
their academic potential and take active roles
in improving their communities—the Vila
Boa Vista and Parque Norte neighborhoods
of Campinas, in São Paulo State. Through the
organization’s Young Entrepreneurs Program,
kids aged 14 to 17 learn skills that give them
an edge in the job market.
youth through entrepreneurship and
leadership training. The process begins with
general sessions on starting, running, and
marketing small businesses; continues with
training in industry-specific skills such as
poultry keeping and catering; and culminates
with awards of in-kind capital to help
trainees start their own microenterprises.
This year, our grant provided training and
seed money to help 60 young people start
their own small businesses, which are already
earning income.
In rural Romania, our partner Fundatia Noi
Orizonturi (New Horizons Foundation)
is working to instill in young people a
commitment to community service and a
feeling of confidence about the future. Our
grant supports five Impact Clubs, which
bring together local youth for leadership
training and service projects. Noi Orizonturi
also organizes outdoor adventure camps to
help build students’ team spirit, self-esteem,
and trust—assets that help teenagers grow
into productive adults.
Most of the teens served by Ação Forte live
below the national poverty line, and most of
their parents never completed high school.
In competing for jobs, they face an uphill
battle. While primary-school enrollment in
Brazil is nearly universal, and 70 percent of
15- to 19-year-olds attend high school, the
poor quality of public instruction puts lowincome students at a disadvantage. Those who
graduate lack access to training and contacts
that can help them succeed professionally.
As Brazil reaps the benefits of globalization,
these kids are in danger of being left behind.
Ação Forte is breaking that cycle with an
innovative, practical approach. For one year,
participants in the Young Entrepreneurs
Program attend free, intensive classes in business management, entrepreneurship, information technology, citizenship, and English.
Together, they create a microenterprise, with
help from finance, marketing, and human
resources professionals.
Last year, the teens launched a jewelrymaking business that generated profits and
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valuable lessons. They wrote a business plan
and collaborated to market their products.
And because Ação Forte aims to prepare
young people for responsible citizenship, they
implemented a community recycling project,
drawing ideas from the United Nations’
Millennium Development Goals.
“What I learned here, I’ll keep for the
rest of my life,” says Caroline, a 15-yearold who recently completed the Young
Entrepreneurs Program. “I see the world
in a different way. I’d like to have my own
business, be a college graduate, and get a
master’s and a doctoral degree.”
Saulo, 15, says the program prepared him
for job interviews and effective teamwork.
In college, he wants to study mechatronics,
a field that combines mechanical, electronic,
and software engineering. “Ação Forte made
all of us different,” he says. “We think about
the future more—where we’re going to
school, where we’re going to work, and how
we’re going to get there.”
The Global Fund for Children was the
first US-based institutional funder of the
program, which also receives support from
the Brazilian private sector. Our grants
helped Ação Forte upgrade its computer
classroom, where students and their parents
learn to use the Internet.
“The world has opened up for these kids,”
says Élide Augusto, coordinator of the
program. “They arrive thinking some other
person or the government is going to solve
their problems. They end up realizing that the
solution is in their hands.”
www.globalfundforchildren.org
25
Create Oceans
small streams
portfolio
Our priorities
Safety
Our priorities include
organizations that intercede
on behalf of children in
immediate danger or harmful
circumstances, and those that
create safe passage for children.
We believe that children’s futures can be
secured only when children are protected
from threats to their safety and insulated
from exploitation, violence, abuse, and
neglect. A safe environment enables
children to participate fully in their
communities, to exercise their skills and
talents, and to pursue their dreams.
Providing children with safe environments
in which to learn, play, live, and grow is
a fundamental tenet of our work. Our
concept of safety is broadly drawn because
the diversity of problems facing children is
vast: victimization by the criminal justice
system, precarious shelter, exposure to
violence and exploitation in a multitude of
contexts—armed conflicts, child trafficking,
hazardous labor—and many more.
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Children are more deeply affected by these
dangers than any other population segment,
and those in economically distressed
circumstances are even more vulnerable.
We remain committed to identifying and
supporting grassroots groups working to
ensure the safety of boys and girls. These
small organizations can often grasp a problem
more quickly and look out for the safety of
individual children more easily than can big
agencies. And while they may serve relatively
small numbers of children, the impact on the
lives of those helped is dramatic.
We give priority to organizations that
intercede on behalf of children already in
immediate danger or harmful circumstances,
and to those that create safe passage for
children at risk of becoming involved in
unsafe pursuits.
This fiscal year, we awarded grants valued
at $532,500 to 45 grantee partners under
the Safety portfolio:
Orphans and street children have a
determined ally in Centar za Integraciju
Mladih (Center for Youth Integration) in
Belgrade, Serbia. Our grant is enabling the
organization’s trained volunteers—many
of whom are orphans themselves or come
from war-torn homes—to educate more
than 300 street children about their rights,
help them obtain legal documents and
medical services, and teach them practical
skills. Few organizations in Serbia serve
this population. The group also runs the
country’s first 24/7 drop-in center.
One of Lebanon’s leading nongovernmental
organizations, Association du Foyer de
l’Enfant Libanais (Lebanese Child Home
Association) has assisted orphans and other
children affected by civil conflict in Beirut
for over 30 years. Since 2004, we have
supported the group’s Juvenile Delinquency
Prevention Program, which targets children
at the greatest risk of resorting to criminal
pursuits or being exploited on the streets.
The program gives these children the skills
they need to resume their schooling while
simultaneously stabilizing their personal
lives through psychological counseling,
legal support, and other interventions.
www.globalfundforchildren.org
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Profile
grantee partner
location
Reaching
Home Again
Association of People for
Practical Life Education
Accra, Ghana
The stories of Ghana’s trafficked children
are achingly similar.
In Mumbai, India, hundreds of juvenile
offenders and neglected children languish in
state-run juvenile detention centers. Aangan
Trust provides psychological rehabilitation
services for these children, helping them to
deal with past trauma and to create positive,
permanent change in their lives. This year,
our grant supported rehabilitation work
with more than 500 boys in the Bhiwandi
Observation Home and also helped Aangan
reach more boys in detention centers in the
state of Maharashtra, where poverty, child
labor, youth crime, and violence are rampant.
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Working in northern Burkina Faso,
Association d’Appui et d’Eveil Pugsada
(Association of Support and Coming
of Age) strives to change attitudes and
behaviors regarding the treatment and
status of girls. Since 2005, our grants have
supported a project to break the silence
surrounding sexual harassment of girls
in schools, a widespread problem. The
group has organized community theater
performances, radio broadcasts, and schoolbased workshops with approximately 2,000
children to tackle the topic, involving
parents and teachers in the process.
Yaovi, now 17, spent seven years as a
bonded laborer in the cattle and fishing
industries. He was first lured away from his
village with promises of attending school
in the big city. Doris, who is 9, became
a domestic servant when she was only 4.
Working long hours for no pay, she was
beaten and poorly fed. Sefam left home to
work in a fishing village, hoping to add to
his family’s income. Instead, he spent ten
years in dangerous, slavery-like conditions,
untangling nets, diving for fish, and bailing
out precarious boats.
While hard statistics are elusive, UNICEF
reports that about 1.2 million children are sold
into slavery each year worldwide. One-sixth of
these children live in Africa, with thousands
in Ghana. Far from their homes and families,
the children are easily exploited and abused,
and many develop serious illnesses. Poverty,
unemployment, and the desperation of
parents who want a better life for their
children contribute to the problem.
Focusing its rescue work in over 70 fishing
villages around Lake Volta and raising
awareness in more than 40 communities
targeted by human traffickers, the
Association of People for Practical Life
Education (APPLE) is effectively fighting
child trafficking in Ghana’s fishing industry.
Grants from The Global Fund for Children
have supported these activities since 2006.
APPLE works at the grassroots level
to educate parents and fishermen about
the dangers and legal consequences of
trafficking, and collaborates with local
community leaders and law enforcement
agencies to identify and free child laborers.
Most rescued children are brought to
APPLE’s own shelter, where they receive
medical care, counseling, basic education,
and child rights education. After rejoining
their families, they return to school, with a
team of APPLE community coordinators
monitoring their progress.
Since 2005, APPLE has rescued over 100
boys and girls. That number may seem
small, given the magnitude of the problem,
but the lives of the rescued children have
changed immeasurably. Today, their stories
are similarly hopeful. “I am now in school,
feeling so good and happy indeed,” says
Sefam, who wants to be a professional driver.
“I spent five years away from home before
I was rescued by APPLE,” says Catherine,
who worked in the fishing villages of Yeji.
“I am now attending school at my village
at Atitekpo. I am with my parents. I would
like to become a hairdresser.”
APPLE strives to address the underlying
causes of child trafficking and has become a
leading voice in national prevention efforts
by engaging local people and governments
to press for enforcement of Ghana’s 2005
Human Trafficking Act. APPLE also plans
to collaborate with local and international
organizations to rescue other children still
in bonded labor in the fishing communities
of Lake Volta.
www.globalfundforchildren.org
31
Spread Happiness
small joys
Our priorities
We focus on programs
that complement, fill the
gaps in, and strengthen
conventional healthcare
systems, institutions,
and infrastructure.
We recognize that healthy minds and
bodies are an important path to dignity and
productivity. When children are not healthy,
they are unable to meet all their basic needs,
let alone pursue their dreams.
Good health is not merely the absence of illness
and disease. In order to grow, learn, and be
active members of their communities, children
must also be well nourished and protected from
harmful substances, and they must have access
to information, adequate social and emotional
support, and a clean environment.
Our grantee partners operate innovative
programs that address the health and
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well-being of children and youth in their
communities. Our priority areas in this
portfolio are HIV/AIDS prevention and
support, psychosocial health, reproductive
health, and improved nutrition. We focus
on programs that complement, fill the gaps
in, and strengthen conventional healthcare
systems, institutions, and infrastructure.
Small organizations are often best positioned
to identify and meet children’s health needs
in this way.
This fiscal year, we awarded grants valued at
$318,500 to 33 grantee partners under the
Healthy Minds and Bodies portfolio:
A mobile dental clinic that visits poor
neighborhoods in Bogotá, Colombia, offers
free, quality dental care to children whose
families cannot otherwise afford it. The
Boquitas Sanas (Healthy Little Mouths)
program is the brainchild of dentist Lida
Alarcón, the founder of Fundación Simsa
(Simsa Foundation). Our grant has allowed
the Boquitas Sanas clinic to expand services
to more communities, providing as many as
160 children a day with dental treatment and
education about dental health and hygiene.
Throughout Africa, HIV/AIDS has
disintegrated many families, leaving children
vulnerable and orphaned. Since 2003, our
grants to Education as a Vaccine against
AIDS have helped the organization fight the
spread of the virus through workshops with
orphaned and street-working children in
Benue State, Nigeria. In order to foster hope
and positive habits in a community where 10
percent of the population is HIV-positive,
these prevention efforts are complemented
by educational support and livelihood
opportunities for young people.
www.globalfundforchildren.org
35
Profile
grantee partner
location
Lifting Others
As They Climb
Ascensions
Community Services
Washington, DC, United States
According to the African proverb, it takes
a village to raise a child. Dr. Satira Streeter
would agree—adding that a healthy,
supported family is the crucial but often
missing link between a village and its children.
Streeter works in the low-income neighborhoods east of the Anacostia River in
Washington, DC. There, children and
families face the daunting challenges of
poverty, violence, drug use, delinquency, and
school failure. Despite the need, access to
community-based mental health services
is extremely limited. Streeter is the only
licensed clinical psychologist practicing in
the city’s Seventh Ward.
Sometimes the best health advocates come
in small packages. Our grant to Action
pour la Promotion des Droits de l’Enfant
au Burkina Faso (Action for the Promotion
of the Rights of the Burkinabe Child)
supports the child-to-child program,
which trains school kids to promote the
importance of education, nutrition, and
vaccination to their younger and out-ofschool peers. Last year, over 600 children
benefited from the group’s nutrition
program, which includes regular weight
and growth checks (often performed using
a portable hanging scale mounted on a tree
limb) and counseling for caregivers.
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Teenage pregnancy is a serious public
health problem in Brazil. In the megacity of
São Paulo, Associação de Apoio às Meninas
e Meninos da Região Sé (Association for
the Support of Boys and Girls of the Sé
Region) works directly with teen mothers
in poverty. Since 2005, our grants have
helped fund the organization’s Ser Mulher
(To Be a Woman) program, which provides
nonformal education, counseling, and
support to adolescent mothers so they can
leave the streets and care for themselves
and their children.
In 2004, she founded Ascensions
Community Services, the only free,
comprehensive community mental health
provider in the area. Offering individual
and group therapy, parenting groups,
clinical evaluations, home and school
visits, and other interventions, Ascensions
helps clients improve their self-image
and interpersonal relationships and make
positive contributions to their community.
“I have to do this work,” Streeter says simply.
“I’m from a community very similar to this
one and have dealt with many of the same
issues. I know the importance of having a
few strategically placed people that care.”
Ascensions serves about 375 families, 85
percent of which are headed by single
mothers. The Global Fund for Children
supports the Ascending Families program,
which uses a “therapy without walls”
approach to decrease the incidence of child
abuse, academic failure, and substance
abuse. The idea is that healing a child
requires the involvement of the whole
family unit and close partnerships with
“village” institutions like schools, workplaces, and churches.
Teresa, a sixth grader, attends a school-based
girls’ leadership group as part of the program.
Her mother—who has a teenage son in juvenile detention—goes to therapy at Ascensions.
“My mom says she feels less stressed out when
she has another grown-up to talk to,” says
Teresa. “Dr. Streeter is also helping my mom
put a plan together to help my brother so he
won’t end up going back to ‘juvie’ when he gets
out. We all have to work together.”
By providing effective and culturally relevant
services, Ascensions has lessened the stigma
sometimes associated with therapy in the
African American community. The organization’s Anacostia office is a warm converted
home filled with African art and comfortable furnishings—a setting that promotes
reflection, relaxation, and wellness.
As mothers gain self-esteem through
therapy, they are encouraged to “lift others
up as they climb,” explains Streeter. “Once
a mother starts thinking of herself in better
terms, she can think of her children in
better terms and believe that she and they
can amount to something.”
Last year, Ascensions was honored by the
Catalogue for Philanthropy as one of the
best small nonprofits in Washington, DC.
www.globalfundforchildren.org
37
small steps
portfolio
Our priorities
Responding
to Crisis
We believe that in times of crisis,
community-based groups are in the best
position to respond immediately since they
know the people and the local areas affected.
In long-term recovery and renewal work,
these groups play a key role in reknitting
their communities and creating a safety net
for children and youth affected by crisis.
We offer two funding mechanisms for
community-level crisis response, whether
the crisis is a natural disaster, public health
crisis, or violent conflict. Rapid Response
Grants are given to existing grantee partners
or affiliates that are addressing an immediate
crisis. Recovery and Renewal Grants
are awarded to new and existing grantee
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We support our grantee
partners’ responses to crises
brought about by severe
weather, political instability,
and conflict, and we help
communities recover from
natural disasters.
partners that are working in areas where
the crisis has been declared over, but where
reconstruction is either ongoing or has failed.
This fiscal year, we awarded grants valued at
$317,300 to 49 grantee partners under the
Responding to Crisis portfolio. We supported
our grantee partners as they dealt with crises
brought about by severe weather, earthquakes,
and political instability. We also helped
communities in their recovery and renewal
efforts resulting from three natural disasters
in 2004 and 2005 that have had a profound,
long-term impact on children and families.
In crisis situations, small organizations often
act to meet local needs with great speed and
flexibility, getting resources to people and
places where the need is most urgent.
Rapid Response Grants
Grantee partners in 14 countries
responded to the crises brought about by
severe monsoons and flooding, cyclones,
earthquakes, political unrest, fire, and
a hurricane. In Pakistan, we disbursed
emergency grants to four grantee partners
who were able to provide beds, clothing,
medical supplies, and food to families in
provinces hit by tropical cyclone Yemyin. In
Bangladesh, in Nepal, and on the ThailandMyanmar border—where heavy monsoon
rains, flooding, and cyclones caused
unprecedented human suffering—grantee
partners reached out to survivors with food,
medicine, and school supplies.
After devastating earthquakes struck
Peru in August 2007 and Indonesia in
September 2007, we quickly disbursed
grants to organizations there. In Peru,
our partners used the grants to repair
their earthquake-damaged buildings
and to purchase emergency supplies for
local residents. In Indonesia, grant funds
helped provide psychosocial support to
the earthquake-affected community of
Bengkulu, Sumatra.
www.globalfundforchildren.org
41
When Hurricane Dean passed through
the Caribbean in August 2007, our grantee
partners in the Dominican Republic, Haiti,
and Jamaica used emergency funds to
get food, shelter, clothing, medicine, and
potable water to needy families. Dominican
partner Niños con una Esperanza (Children
with a Hope) used the grant to repair
the homes of six families whose children
participate in their programs.
Political unrest erupted in many parts
of western Kenya in late December
2007, following that country’s disputed
presidential election. Minority ethnic
groups bore the brunt of the violence. Two
community-based organizations received
emergency grants in the aftermath. Centre
for Research, Communication and Gender
in Early Childhood Education used the
funds to pay for food, clothing, blankets,
educational activities, and other expenses
in identified communities. Carolina for
Kibera received a grant to cover the school
fees and school supply costs of adolescent
girls whose families were displaced by the
turmoil, helping the girls stay in school.
The massive earthquake that struck China’s
Sichuan Province in May 2008 affected
countless people in the region. However,
upon contacting our grantee partners
immediately after the earthquake, we found
that none required emergency assistance.
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Recovery and Renewal Grants
Long after international aid agencies pack
up their relief efforts, community-based
organizations are left to deal with long-term
recovery and renewal efforts. Our grantee
partners are still helping communities
recover from natural disasters that occurred
up to four years ago.
In India, Indonesia, Thailand, and Sri
Lanka, nine of our grantee partners are
working with the communities hardest hit
by the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. These
partners include child- and youth-serving
organizations that help children address the
psychosocial aftereffects of the trauma and
reestablish normal, productive routines in
their daily lives.
In Pakistan, five of our grantee partners
continue recovery and renewal work with
the populations most affected by the
October 2005 earthquake in the Kashmir
region, including women and children in
difficult-to-reach, low-income areas.
Three years after Hurricane Katrina
devastated the US Gulf Coast, we continue
to support the recovery and renewal efforts
of five of our grantee partners in Louisiana
and Mississippi.
Profile
grantee partner
location
Returning
to Life
Interfaith Dialogue and
Research Center
Islamabad, Pakistan
On the morning of October 8, 2005, the
world came crashing down for the children
of Balakot, in northern Pakistan. A powerful
earthquake measuring 7.6 on the Richter
scale struck just as the school day began.
Walls and ceilings collapsed, crushing
children and teachers in their classrooms.
Thousands were killed, and the town was
almost completely destroyed. Throughout
the earthquake region, at least 73,000 people
died and 3.3 million were left homeless.
It was the worst natural disaster in
Pakistan’s history.
Children like Surayya, now 14, are still
struggling to recover. “The 2005 quake
devastated my life, destroying my house
and taking away my family,” she says. “My
parents and two siblings were buried under
the debris of our house. I was partially
hurt. There were casualties all around the
neighborhood, and my schoolmates also
perished. If I hadn’t stayed home with a fever
that day, I too could have died at school
along with my friends and teachers.”
After the earthquake, the Interfaith
Dialogue and Research Center (IDRC),
based in Islamabad, was one of many local
organizations to join the recovery effort,
helping to establish relief camps throughout
the region. IDRC’s mission is to advance
the study of different faith traditions and
initiate interfaith dialogue to promote peace,
primarily among youth. Since the earthquake
shattered the lives of so many young people—
leaving them orphaned, homeless, physically
injured, and mentally traumatized—IDRC
focused its efforts on assisting them.
In 2007, The Global Fund for Children
made a grant to IDRC to support its relief
and rehabilitation work in the earthquakestricken cities of Balakot and Muzaffarabad.
Funds helped provide 5,000 in-school
counseling sessions to children who had
returned to class. Because fun and learning
also speed recovery, IDRC organized sports
tournaments for hundreds of boys and girls
and took 100 young earthquake survivors
to mosques and churches to learn about
different faith traditions.
Most importantly, IDRC has trained 100
young people in post-trauma counseling
and disaster management, facilitating the
rebuilding of hearts, homes, and lives.
“Big international organizations could
not do what the IDRC did,” says Azhar, a
16-year-old earthquake survivor who plays
cricket for an IDRC-sponsored team in
Balakot. “It’s all right to provide buildings,
shelter, education, and health, but unless
you pull quake-stricken people out of their
tragedy and fear, life cannot return to them.”
Surayya, whom IDRC trained to be a youth
leader in her village, says, “I think boys and
girls like me, who lost everything in the
earthquake, were bereaved and hopeless.
But training encourages me to take on the
odds. We will inspire others with what we’ve
learned and with the courage we’ve plucked
up . . . and we will help people return to life.”
www.globalfundforchildren.org
43
Cover Miles
small leaps
Grantmaking
Sustainability
Awards
The Sustainability Award is part of our
unique grantmaking model that allows for
a dignified and fair exit from our funding
relationship. It rewards Global Fund for
Children grantee partners for their success
and growth and represents an important
investment in their long-term sustainability.
Thirteen of our most successful grantee
partners were each given a $25,000
Sustainability Award this year, bringing the
total to 37 since we established the award four
years ago. Of this total, 11 awardees were in
Latin America, ten in Africa, ten in South
Asia, three in East and Southeast Asia, two in
the United States, and one in Eastern Europe.
Recipients of the Sustainability Award should:
• Have received our funding for at least two years
• Be representative of the organizations
that we support due to their innovations
and effectiveness
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• Have arrived at a critical stage in their
organizational development
• Have demonstrated organizational
development in budget growth,
program expansion, and/or diversifying
funding sources over the course of their
relationship with us
• Have increased their public profile and
ability to leverage additional funds through
prizes or awards, government recognition,
and/or increased financial support
• Have affected broader issues related to
children, education, and/or development
through advocacy, training, and/or replication
• Have proved their management capacity
to administer this large, strategic grant
• Have maintained strong communication
with our program staff, leadership,
and representatives
Although small by some grantmakers’
standards, Sustainability Awards are our
largest award and serve to recognize grantee
partners that have been singularly effective
in their efforts to improve the lives of
vulnerable children. Winners use the award
in a variety of ways, including investing
in facilities or improvements, building
institutional capacity in fundraising and
communications, creating reserve and
revolving funds, and implementing incomegeneration and self-sufficiency initiatives.
Attaining a Sustainability Award does
not mean the end of the grantee partner’s
relationship with us. Awardees remain active
in our network as lifetime GFC grantee
partners, attending our Knowledge Exchange
workshops, participating in our online
community (KLARA) and other knowledgesharing initiatives, and receiving our help in
leveraging funds from other sources. They
are also eligible to receive tracking grants,
which allow us to follow their progress as
they continue to grow and develop.
This fiscal year, 13 grantee partners received
a $25,000 Sustainability Award, for a total
of $325,000:
Ark Foundation of Africa (AFA)
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Director: Rhoi Wangila
Total support from GFC: $82,000 since 2002
AFA works to alleviate the impact of
poverty and HIV/AIDS in Tanzania
through its health, education, and
community development activities.
Since 2002, we have supported AFA’s
One Stop Center, which provides free
secondary-school education to orphaned
and vulnerable children. With 15 years of
experience, diversified funding sources,
and an increased organizational budget,
AFA is poised to expand and replicate its
work in neighboring African countries.
The Sustainability Award will enable AFA
to hire a resource development director
to support and spearhead the group’s
development strategy.
Asociación Civil Pro Niño Intimo
(Pro-Child Civil Association)
Villa El Salvador, Peru
Director: Sara Diestro
Total support from GFC: $80,500 since 2002
Asociación Civil Pro Niño Intimo, more
commonly known by its primary program,
Escuelas Deporte y Vida (Sports and Life
Schools), provides young people living in
the slum of Villa El Salvador in Lima with
the opportunity to play soccer, volleyball,
and other sports in order to promote their
participation in formal education and life
skills programs. Since receiving its first
GFC grant in 2002, Deporte y Vida has
doubled its budget and grown in national
and international influence and visibility.
The organization will use its Sustainability
Award to create a sustainability fund that
will allow it to pursue priorities identified
in its ongoing strategic planning process.
Asociación de Defensa de la Vida (ADEVI)
(Association for the Defense of Life)
Huachipa, Peru
Director: Ezequiel Robles Hurtado
Total support from GFC: $77,500 since 2002
ADEVI works to eradicate child labor
in the brick-making kilns of Huachipa
by providing nonformal schooling,
preventive health education, skills training,
microenterprise development, and Andean
cultural awareness programs. Since our
initial grant in 2002, ADEVI’s budget
has almost quintupled, from $67,500 to
$329,180. During that time, ADEVI has
expanded beyond direct service provision
to become an effective advocate for child
workers at the local and national levels.
The Sustainability Award will help
ADEVI implement a range of initiatives
to strengthen internal capacity and
external visibility, including staff training,
communications, equipment purchases,
and the creation of a reserve fund.
www.globalfundforchildren.org
47
Asociatia Ovidiu Rom
(ovidiu rom association)
Girls Educational and
Mentoring Services (GEMS)
Bacau, Romania
Directors: Leslie Hawke and Maria Gherghiu
Total support from GFC: $71,000 since 2003
New York, New York, United States
Director: Rachel Lloyd
Total support from GFC: $41,500 since 2004
Ovidiu Rom provides employment for
impoverished Roma women and access
to education for their children, and works
closely with the Romanian government to
provide critical social services. Our first three
grants supported an early childhood education program when Ovidiu Rom was just
beginning its work. More recent grants have
helped the organization transition from a
service provider to a policy-driven organization. Over the last five years, Ovidiu Rom
has increased its budget fourfold and established an endowment. Equally impressive is
the growth in the number of children served,
from 150 at three sites in 2003 to 1,700 at
60 sites this year. With its Sustainability
Award, Ovidiu Rom will create a reserve
fund that will allow it to take advantage of
new, timely, and strategic opportunities to
increase its organizational visibility and its
influence on education reform measures.
GEMS provides preventive and transitional
services to girls and young women who
are at risk of or experiencing sexual
exploitation and violence. Since our first
grant in 2004, GEMS has grown from
exclusively providing crisis and transitional
services to conducting preventive education
and outreach to at-risk young women.
GEMS has also begun working with law
enforcement, has designed a trainingof-trainers curriculum, and has garnered
national recognition for its efforts to raise
awareness about sexual exploitation. GEMS
will use the Sustainability Award to support
a strong information technology system,
identified as an emerging need in its
planning and evaluation processes.
Centro de Estudios y Apoyo para el
Desarrollo Local (CEADEL)
(Center for Study and Support
for Local Development)
Chimaltenango, Guatemala
Director: Gabriel Zelada
Total support from GFC: $60,500 since 2003
CEADEL works to eliminate the use of
child laborers and to improve conditions
for young people who work in Guatemala’s
agribusiness industry. Our grants have
supported a scholarship program for girls
as well as workshops on labor rights,
reproductive rights, and gender issues.
In addition to providing academic and
vocational support to hundreds of adolescent
girls, CEADEL has become one of the
region’s foremost advocates for the rights
of working adolescent girls. CEADEL will
use the Sustainability Award to construct
its own building, which it views as crucial to
organizational stability.
48
www.globalfundforchildren.org
Ikamva Labantu
(The Future of Our Nation)
Cape Town, South Africa
Director: Isherne Davids
Total support from GFC: $79,000 since 2002
Ikamva Labantu partners with local
residents to improve the quality of life
in Cape Town’s townships by addressing
a range of issues, including education,
economic empowerment, and homebased care. Although Ikamva was already
an established institution at the time of
our initial grant, we were drawn to the
organization because of its interest in
the needs of vulnerable boys. With our
support, Ikamva launched the Boys/Men
Kindness Program to promote the positive
development of boys living in townships;
it has become fully sustainable in just four
years. The Sustainability Award will help
create a staff incentive fund to increase staff
satisfaction, reduce turnover, and eliminate
disruptions to Ikamva’s programs.
Jifunze (Learning) Project
Kibaya, Tanzania
Director: J. Carrie Oelberger
Total support from GFC: $54,000 since 2002
Based in a remote, rural region of Tanzania,
Jifunze works alongside community
members and schools to encourage the
use of effective and innovative educational
resources and techniques. Over the past
five years, we have witnessed the evolution
of the group’s Community Education
Resource Center into a nationally
recognized, community-owned, and
community-managed program. Jifunze will
use its Sustainability Award to document
its experiences and disseminate the report
within the wider development community
in East Africa.
Luna Nueva
(New Moon)
Asunción, Paraguay
Director: Raquel Fernández
Total support from GFC: $77,000 since 2002
Luna Nueva works to eradicate violence
against women and children by developing
and implementing programs in education,
healthcare, self-esteem, human rights
awareness, and violence prevention. The
organization seeks to improve the quality
of life and defend the fundamental rights
of commercial sex workers and adolescent
victims of commercial sexual exploitation.
Since our initial grant in 2002, Luna Nueva
has doubled its budget and expanded its
advocacy work to press for a more effective
governmental and societal response to
child sexual exploitation. The Sustainability
Award will be used to create a revolving fund
to cover the short-term cash flow constraints
that arise when funder commitments do not
align with program operation dates.
Phulki
(Spark)
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Director: Suraiya Haque
Total support from GFC: $70,500 since 2002
Phulki implements innovative factory-based
childcare centers as it strives to create a
world where working women do not have to
sacrifice their children’s well-being in order
to achieve economic emancipation. Phulki’s
five-year partnership with us has enabled
the organization to scale up its innovative
childcare and child-to-child programs, which
have been replicated by public- and privatesector organizations in Bangladesh. The
Sustainability Award will be used to construct
Phulki’s own office building in Dhaka and
to launch an income-generating project
to produce affordable sanitary napkins for
women workers in garment factories.
Shidhulai Swanirvar Sangstha
(Village Self-Reliance)
Pabna District, Bangladesh
Director: A. H. M. Rezwan
Total support from GFC: $74,500 since 2003
Shidhulai Swanirvar Sangstha works to
improve the lives of economically vulnerable rural families in Bangladesh through
education initiatives, including a mobile
boat school program that brings classrooms,
Internet access, libraries, and appropriate
technologies to villagers in remote, floodprone areas. We were a proud early investor
in the boat schools, which have precipitated
Shidhulai’s exponential growth in budget,
operations, and influence over the last five
years. Organizations throughout the region
have replicated this innovative model, which
has earned Shidhulai international recognition. The Sustainability Award will help
Shidhulai purchase office space in the capital
city of Dhaka, contributing to the organization’s visibility and long-term stability.
www.globalfundforchildren.org
49
Profile
The Little
School That
Could
grantee partner
location
Vikramshila Education
Resource Society
Bigha, India
The village of Bigha—population 6,000—
is typical of many rural communities in
West Bengal, India. Hard to reach by
road or rail, with few public services and
a struggling agrarian economy, Bigha has
suffered from the exodus of its educated
population. Vast disparities divide rich and
poor, especially when it comes to education.
Sociedad Amigos de los Niños (SAN)
(Friends of Children Society)
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Director: Sister Maria Rosa Leggol
Total support from GFC: $56,000 since 2003
SAN protects the rights of young domestic
workers in Honduras and provides these
girls and young women with alternative
skills and means of supporting themselves.
Our grants have helped to fund the Reyes
Irene Valenzuela Support Center, which
provides technical training and nonformal
education to 400 female domestic workers
aged 12 to 17. Since 2003, SAN has
doubled its budget, expanded its donor base
and visibility, and launched new initiatives,
including a savings and credit cooperative
that allows girls to accumulate assets for the
future and start their own small businesses.
The Sustainability Award will be used to
improve accounting services and develop a
broader resource base for the organization.
50
www.globalfundforchildren.org
Vikramshila Education Resource Society
Bigha, India
Director: Shubhra Chatterji
Total support from GFC: $67,000 since 2002
Vikramshila establishes model education
programs and trains government-school
teachers in its effort to bring quality
education to marginalized sectors of Indian
society in order to lessen the disparity of
educational standards between the wealthy
and the poor. Since 2002, we have been a
strong supporter of Vikramshila’s model
school and resource center in the village
of Bigha. The school places education
at the center of community life, making
learning more accessible and engaging
to students and their families. Its impact
on the local people and government, and
on neighboring government schools,
has been substantial. Vikramshila will
use its Sustainability Award for resource
mobilization activities that build a secure
future for the school.
Shubhra Chatterji is the founder of
Vikramshila Education Resource Society,
an organization that began working in
Bigha more than a decade ago. “Although
the government of West Bengal had
declared the district to be 100 percent
literate, we found it otherwise,” she recalls.
“Bigha had a government primary school
for 60 years, but Muslims and lower-caste
Hindus stayed away, as they were given a
strong nonverbal message that education
was not for them. This is a common story.”
In 1996, Vikramshila created a model school
in Bigha to prove that a quality education
could be made accessible to all sectors of
Indian society. “We felt if we could show
some results here, then the good practices
could be replicated easily in villages facing
similar conditions,” says Chatterji. The
school’s main innovation was to replace
rote learning in traditional subjects with
participatory, locally relevant approaches.
“The most important step is to link the life
situations of the children from working-class
homes to the world of academics.”
Bigha model school has since become a
vibrant hub of community life. Everyone from
students to vegetable vendors uses the school’s
mobile library. Awareness of health, sanitation,
and environmental issues has increased. Most
importantly, close to 100 percent of graduates
go on to secondary school, where they thrive
academically and socially.
The school has also emerged as a regional
and national resource center, influencing the
quality of education far beyond the village
through teacher training efforts. Vikramshila
volunteers have trained 7,500 teachers—
mostly from government schools—in
ten Indian states. The organization has
lobbied state governments and the federal
government to improve the formal education
system, advocating successfully for a bill to
make education a fundamental right in India.
Since 2002, The Global Fund for Children
has supported Bigha model school with a
total of $67,000 in grants. Grantee partners
from four countries have visited the school to
learn about its pioneering community-based
approach. In 2008, GFC gave Vikramshila
a Sustainability Award to help build a
more stable long-term financial future for
the school. Funds cover operating costs,
a fundraiser’s salary, low-risk investments
that can generate interest income, and other
revenue-generating activities.
For Chatterji, a former teacher in India’s
elite private schools, the school’s success has
broader implications. “India has some of the
best schools and some of the worst. Since
education is the only guarantee for social
uplift, my dream is to see that all children,
rich or poor, are able to access the same
quality of education.”
www.globalfundforchildren.org
51
Forge Mountains
small stones
Special Partner
Goldman Sachs
Foundation
Profile
Despite India’s booming economic growth,
the poorest and most vulnerable Indians
still have vast unmet needs. The country’s
burgeoning population includes more than
400 million young people under 18, and
India accounts for a fifth of the world’s
out-of-school children. India also has the
largest number of working children in the
world, with nearly one-third of children
under 16 involved in some form of work.
To benefit from the new economy, Indian
youth must be prepared with a strong educational foundation, vocational training,
English proficiency, mentoring, social and
employment networks, and opportunities
to develop leadership skills and a healthy
work ethic. The Global Fund for Children’s
grantee partners understand these needs
and are often among the first to recognize
and cultivate the untapped assets of young
people who may be invisible to or dismissed by others.
Two years ago, the Goldman Sachs
Foundation awarded us a three-year grant
of $1.2 million to help ensure that young
Indians participate productively in the
country’s economic advancement. This
partnership, the Global Fund for Children /
Goldman Sachs Foundation Initiative, supports community-based efforts to develop
the leadership, entrepreneurial, and academic skills of marginalized Indian youth,
particularly in Mumbai and Bengaluru.
54
A Bridge to
Adulthood
Investing in the Potential
of India’s Youth
www.globalfundforchildren.org
grantee partner
location
Dream A Dream
Bengaluru, India
When the initiative is complete, we will
have supported 25 community-based organizations with as many as 80 grants. This
year, we invested in 21 groups through our
partnership with Goldman Sachs.
Meet Hamsa, a 19-year-old dreamer.
Among them is Door Step School, which
embraces the idea that schools should be
brought to vulnerable children rather than
the other way around. The organization’s
innovative programs bring nonformal
education to working children and youth in
slum areas in and around Mumbai, successfully transitioning them into formal schools
where they can learn the academic skills
necessary to find quality employment.
They were brought together by Dream A
Dream, a community-based organization in
Bengaluru (formerly Bangalore), India, that
pairs disadvantaged teenagers with older
volunteers during the crucial transition to
young adulthood.
In rural Rajasthan, Gramin Mahila Sikshan
Sansthan provides quality education for
secondary-school girls who would otherwise
be unable to attend school, and as part of
its curriculum offers a science program that
empowers its students to find work as professors, teachers, scientists, and researchers.
Shaishav works with youth on financial
literacy, including savings, banking, goal
setting, and leadership skills. Sujaya
Foundation and the Institute of Leadership
and Institutional Development help develop the computer and spoken English language skills of marginalized youth to give
them an edge in the job market.
And while you’re at it, meet his mentor,
Shashank. His job is to encourage Hamsa
to keep dreaming, but with his feet planted
firmly on the ground.
“I am from Bangalore,” says Hamsa. “My
mother left home when I was young, as
my parents had a lot of problems at home.
I used to be a drifter and a rag picker. But I
dreamed of studying and doing something
more with my life.”
Years ago, Hamsa joined a field hockey team
through Dream A Dream, where he made
friends and learned teamwork and discipline.
“I dream of playing for my school, state,
and—who knows—even for the national
level. I’m a great goalkeeper,” he says. Hamsa
stayed in school and now works as an intern
at Dream A Dream. He thinks about getting
married and working to benefit children
someday. But he admits to needing support
as he navigates the big decisions ahead.
That’s where Shashank comes in. A
30-year-old project leader at a software
company, he has volunteered with at-risk
kids at Dream A Dream for several years.
“No matter what effort a teenager makes
growing up, it’s always possible for him to
make a drastic decision one fine day that
takes him back to the life he came from,”
says Shashank. “During this time, it’s
important for young adults to share their
thoughts and feelings with someone.”
A grant from The Global Fund for
Children has funded the mentoring
program’s pilot phase. Participating pairs
meet on a weekly basis—going out to a
movie, taking walks, shopping, creating a
study plan, or working together on a job
application. Over time, they talk through
life choices and build a friendship. The
relationship fills an important need for
participating teens, since their parents
usually are not able to assist them
emotionally or financially.
When kids are young, Dream A Dream
offers them opportunities to learn life skills
and have fun through sports, creative arts,
reading, computers, and outdoor activities.
As they transition toward adulthood, the
mentoring program provides a bridge to
the future. Partnering with six nonprofit
organizations, Dream A Dream has attracted
hundreds of volunteers to run its programs.
Most, like Shashank, are young professionals
from Bengaluru’s corporate sector who say
they learn and grow from the experience.
“Adolescents have all the wisdom in the
world,” says Shashank. “They are good at
making decisions, and they know a lot about
introspection and change. . . . They just need
a few pointers to put their wisdom, action,
decision, and introspection together. This is
what I do when I’m with Hamsa.”
www.globalfundforchildren.org
55
Special Partner
Nike
Foundation
Profile
The Global Fund for Children is part of the
Grassroots Girls Initiative (GGI), funded by
the Nike Foundation. GGI aims to empower
adolescent girls by supporting grassroots
organizations in implementing programs,
conducting advocacy, strengthening their
organizational and programmatic capacities,
and collaborating with other partners.
Like the other organizations involved in GGI,
we believe that when girls receive support and
recognize the many opportunities available
to them, they can become a powerful force in
transforming their families, their communities,
and the world.
The other grantmakers in GGI are American
Jewish World Service, EMpower–The
Emerging Markets Foundation, Firelight
Foundation, Global Fund for Women, and
Mama Cash. The initiative also includes two
partners that provide support and input: the
International Center for Research on Women
(ICRW) and the Nike Foundation.
Our grants under GGI provide both
program-based and organizational support
to a wide range of local groups. This year, we
supported 20 community-based organizations
working with adolescent girls all over the
world. Six groups are in India; three in
Brazil; two each in Bangladesh, Ethiopia,
and Zambia; and one each in Burkina Faso,
Egypt, Guatemala, Nigeria, and Pakistan.
56
Part of
the Plan
Grassroots Girls Initiative
www.globalfundforchildren.org
These partners empower girls through a
number of groundbreaking efforts:
In Nigeria, the Kudirat Initiative for
Democracy has launched a school-based
program to support and educate girls aged
13 to 17 about sexual abuse and prepare
them for leadership roles.
Love in Action, an Ethiopian organization
working in the Hadiya region, provides
culturally relevant microenterprise training
for girls aged 12 to 21.
Centro de Estudios y Apoyo para el
Desarrollo Local (Center for Study and
Support for Local Development) in
Guatemala offers scholarships to girls who
are working in or are at risk of entering the
agribusiness industry, and holds workshops
on health, labor rights, and gender issues.
In the slums of Hyderabad, India, a group
called Mahita (Regeneration) offers
nonformal education and skills training
opportunities to adolescent girls in
Muslim communities.
This fiscal year, we awarded a total of
$180,000 in direct grants to our 20 grantee
partners under the Grassroots Girls Initiative.
grantee partner
location
Yanapanakusun
Cusco, Peru
At least 5 percent of all girls in Peru—or
560,000 girls—work as domestic laborers,
according to a recent estimate. Each has
a unique story, but they share many
common challenges.
Ask Maximiliana, who at age 9 left her rural
village in the Andean highlands to work in
the city of Cusco. “Girls are mistreated by
their employers in many ways. Sometimes
they’re not allowed to go to school. They’re
not given a day off. They have problems
communicating because they leave their
villages speaking Quechua and don’t know
Spanish well. They have to learn how to
make others respect them.”
Isolated from their families and unaware
of their rights, girl domestics often work
long hours for little pay. Physical and sexual
abuse is widespread. Many girls suffer alone,
behind closed doors, but public awareness of
their plight is growing.
Founded in 2001, a grassroots organization
called Yanapanakusun (which means “let’s
help each other” in Quechua) offers support
to girls employed as household workers
in Cusco. The group provides 1,200
girls annually with shelter, medical care,
counseling, formal education, and other
assistance. Most of the girls are migrants
from poor indigenous villages, and when
possible, the group helps them reestablish
contact with their families. Activities are
partly financed through Yanapanakusun’s
operation of a small hostel and a tourist
service in the region, which includes Machu
Picchu and the Inca Trail.
In 2006, The Global Fund for Children
became the first US-based institutional
funder for a new program that is helping
150 girls to develop life plans. With a
social worker’s guidance, each participant
acknowledges her past, evaluates her
current situation, and defines future goals.
The girls track their emotional, educational,
health, and work progress for five years,
using the life plan as a guide. Staff members
provide encouragement and links to outside
resources to help each girl succeed.
Maximiliana, who is now 14, was abused by
her Cusco employers and is estranged from
her family. She has lived at Yanapanakusun’s
shelter for many years. Like other girls in
the life plan program, she is now making
academic progress, enjoying better health and
self-esteem, and learning to handle conflict.
As part of her life plan, she will work
part-time; children as young as 12 can
legally work in Peru, and many need paid
employment. “But it’s not going to be like
it was before, because I’m going to sign a
contract where they respect my rights and I
know my obligations. And the teachers will
always be checking on how I’m doing,” says
Maximiliana. “My life has changed because
I’m not mistreated anymore. I can go to
school, and there are people who love me
and show me how to get better. I’ve learned
to respect and trust people.”
www.globalfundforchildren.org
57
Special Partner
Johnson &
Johnson
Health and
Well-Being Grants
Our Johnson & Johnson Health and WellBeing supplemental grants enable our
grantee partners to provide basic healthcare
interventions and supplies to the children
they serve. This additional support ensures
a more holistic and integrated approach to
the children’s well-being.
Since we started the program four years
ago with funding from Johnson & Johnson,
nearly 100 percent of our grantee partners
have availed themselves of this supplementary
grant. This fiscal year, we awarded 203 Health
and Well-Being grants totaling $203,000.
Our grantee partners apply these $1,000
grants in the most appropriate way to improve
the health, hygiene, and nutrition of children
in their care. Often the money pays for simple
necessities that dramatically improve the daily
quality of life for these children.
Health and Well-Being grants were used in
a variety of ways this fiscal year, including:
• Providing nutritious food for HIV-positive
children in Kigali, Rwanda, to supplement
life-saving anti-retroviral drugs
(Amahoro Association)
• Offering family-based health education to
young female scholarship recipients and their
parents in San Francisco Libre, Nicaragua
(Asociación Mujer y Comunidad)
• Educating child laborers in the Kailali district
of Nepal on HIV/AIDS and personal
hygiene through health checkup camps and
a video (Backward Society Education)
• Providing nutrition shakes to vulnerable
children in early childhood development
58
www.globalfundforchildren.org
centers in Cape Town, South Africa
(Ikamva Labantu)
• Offering reproductive health education and
counseling, mosquito nets, and seeds for
fruit and vegetable gardens to vulnerable
children in Lusaka, Zambia (International
Trust for the Education of Zambia Orphans)
• Purchasing fitness equipment for a
gymnasium for underprivileged urban
youth in Mumbai, India (Kherwadi Social
Welfare Association)
• Training mothers in proper infant care
through cooperative neighborhood
programs in Diyarbakir, Turkey (Umut Isigi)
• Helping underprivileged families to access
free government healthcare in May Pen,
Jamaica, by obtaining birth certificates
for undocumented children (Rural Family
Support Organization)
• Teaching nutrition and offering healthy
cooking classes and meals to underprivileged children in Washington, DC,
United States (Words, Beats, Life)
• Providing a daily glass of milk to children
of prisoners participating in youth literacy
and support programs in Cochabamba,
Bolivia (Biblioteca Th’uruchapitas)
• Serving fruit to children at rural book
parties for youth in Luang Prabang, Laos
(Big Brother Mouse)
• Providing health training and necessities
such as soap, toothbrushes, and nit combs
to ethnic Tibetan children in Nangchen
County, China ( Jinpa Project)
Profile
grantee partner
location
What’s for
Lunch?
Women’s Education
for Advancement and
Empowerment
Chiang Mai, Thailand
A little soy milk. An egg. Fresh vegetables
and fruit. Lunchtime foods that many kids
take for granted are making a big difference
in the health of nursery-school children who
live in refugee camps along the ThailandMyanmar border.
Most of the children, ages 2 to 5, were born
in the camps. Their parents—members of
the Karen and Karenni ethnic groups—fled
fighting and oppression in Myanmar over
the last two decades. According to human
rights groups, about 150,000 refugees live in
nine camps along the Thailand-Myanmar
border. Around 15,000 people have been
resettled in third-party countries in the
last two years. The rest, who still await
resettlement abroad, are not allowed by
the Thai government to leave the camps in
the meantime. They depend completely on
international agencies and local NGOs for
protection, schooling, healthcare, and food.
They are a neglected people, and the small
children among them are unsurprisingly the
most vulnerable group of all. The quantity
and quality of food in the refugee camps is
limited, with a diet meant more for shortterm survival than long-term health. Rice,
oil, fish paste, chili, salt, and yellow beans are
available—but little else. This means that
lactating mothers and young children lack
essential vitamins, nutrients, protein, and fat
at a crucial time in the children’s development.
A recent report on nutrition in the refugee
camps shows that 34.4 percent of the children
under age 5 suffer from chronic malnutrition.
Most 2- to 5-year-olds are underweight and
disadvantaged when it comes to fighting
disease. Physical and learning disabilities
are increasingly common.
That’s why a little extra food at lunch can
have a big impact. An organization called
Women’s Education for Advancement and
Empowerment (WEAVE) has worked
inside the refugee camps since 1990,
ensuring that displaced women and children
have the education and skills they need to
participate in the future development of
their communities. The Global Fund for
Children has helped to support WEAVE’s
early childhood development program since
2005, with grants to train teachers, trainers,
and parents working in 30 preschools inside
three camps.
For the past two years, WEAVE has used its
Johnson & Johnson Health and Well-Being
supplemental grants to give preschoolers a
nutritional boost at lunchtime. WEAVE’s
midday meal program feeds nearly 3,000
kids in 25 preschools—with 600 covered
by GFC funding. Parent volunteers come
to each nursery school daily to help cooks
prepare a variety of fresh, healthy food for
the children. Two local partners—the Karen
Women’s Organization and the Karenni
National Women’s Organization—manage
the lunch and preschool programs.
Best of all, WEAVE has leveraged these
two small grants to obtain funding for the
lunch program from other donors. So more
kids are eating right, and they are healthier,
more active, and ready to learn.
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Clinton Global Initiative
Profile
grantee partner
location
Under-8
Bright Moon
Rising
Monduli Pastoralist
Development Initiative
Monduli, Tanzania
More than 200 million young children in
the developing world are not fulfilling their
potential due to poverty, poor nutrition, and
insufficient care. Early intervention is needed
to ensure that these children—the majority of
whom are in sub-Saharan Africa and South
Asia—develop their cognitive, social, and
emotional abilities so that they are prepared
to take on the challenge of formal schooling.
Nimble, responsive community organizations
are best poised to reach and serve the most
vulnerable children, who are often missed by
mainstream initiatives. With our Under-8
Initiative, we seek out promising models that
build the skills of both children and their
parents, and we strengthen these communitybased organizations through a combination of
financial, organizational, and technical support.
Through our new Under-8 Initiative, The
Global Fund for Children has committed
to investing $10 million in early childhood
development and education for children
who are 8 years old or younger. Over a
five-year period, we will fund 100 innovative community-based organizations in 20
impoverished countries throughout Africa,
Asia, and Latin America, touching the lives
of as many as 500,000 vulnerable children.
This fiscal year, we awarded a total of $478,300
in grants to 29 GFC grantee partners
under the Under-8 Initiative. Our funding
supported the work of many innovators:
Announced at the third annual meeting of
the Clinton Global Initiative, the Under-8
Initiative will:
• Support and strengthen organizations
providing successful, high-quality early
childhood development programs that
ensure the healthy psychosocial and physical development of children aged 8 and
under, preparing them for formal schooling
• Invest in children’s books (including translations), documentary films, and photography
that raise awareness about the importance of
early childhood education in the developing
world and highlight innovative grassroots
organizations with model programs
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In Johannesburg, South Africa, Lapeng Child
and Family Resource Service runs a model
preschool program for 70 children, as well as
vibrant arts, health, and nutrition education
activities for community youth and parents.
Phulki (Spark), a Bangladeshi organization,
operates a unique child-to-child program
that trains youth leaders to educate their
peers about sexual abuse, child labor, health,
and other issues.
To keep the children of migrant construction workers safe and healthy, Mumbai
Mobile Crèches in India sets up mobile
daycare centers at construction sites so kids
can learn and play while their parents work.
In Ukraine, the Early Intervention Institute
for Children with Developmental Delays and
Disabilities provides medical and psychosocial
support to infants and young children who
might otherwise be institutionalized, helping
them integrate into schools and communities.
“Children are the bright moon,” say the
Maasai people of Africa, meaning that
kids bring light into homes and families.
In traditional Maasai culture, the best
education of these bright youngsters comes
from their elders, and small children learn
their earliest lessons through inclusion in
everyday activities.
with local resources, the preschools include
community-nominated teachers and
grandparents who serve as resource people.
MPDI’s coordinator, Erasto Ole Sanare,
was born and raised in Monduli District
and attended school there. He has extensive
teaching experience and a deep commitment to the well-being of his community.
“Children’s confidence is built with their
culture,” says a Maasai teacher. “Culture
provides the foundation for formal education.”
Kids and parents sing the praises of the
preschools. “We have time for other activities because we have a place to leave our
children. We can fetch water, collect firewood, and do other duties and return to find
them very safe and well fed,” says a Maasai
mother. “I have a lot of new friends and we
play together,” says Joseph, a child attending
Armaroroi ECD center. “I am also learning
another language than Maasai,” he adds. The
centers run activities in the children’s native
language but also introduce them to Swahili
to prepare them for primary school.
Close to 900,000 Maasai people live in
northern Tanzania and southern Kenya.
Nomadic herders of cattle and sheep, they
have fought to preserve their traditional lifestyle in the face of dwindling access to land
and clean water, conflicts over wildlife preservation, and a dire need for healthcare and for
education that can prepare the next generation
to interact successfully with the outside world.
Since 2004, the Monduli Pastoralist Development Initiative (MPDI) has worked
to help Maasai communities maintain
their traditional beliefs and systems while
ensuring that children receive a modern
education. A grant from The Global Fund
for Children helps to support the organization’s innovative Early Childhood Development (ECD) program, targeting Maasai
children from birth to age 8 in Sepeko
Ward, Monduli District, northern Tanzania.
Two years ago, Sepeko Ward had just two
preschools. Thanks to MPDI, there are
now 34 culturally appropriate, communitybased ECD centers serving over 2,000 children close to home. Created and managed
The ECD centers serve as a crucial bridge
between the Maasai communities and
the outside world, between the informal
learning that children receive at home and
the formal education that will come later.
Recognizing the value of this approach,
the Tanzanian government has designated
some of the centers as “satellite schools” and
has provided trained teachers.
The preschools have also become community hubs. Local healthcare providers send
nurses there to give medical attention and
advice to the children and their families,
and the centers are also used for adult
classes and community activities.
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61
A closer look
Vulnerability
& Gender
A young boy of 14 arrives in the glittering
downtown of the big city. Having stowed
away on a luggage car of a train that passes
his rural village weekly, he finds himself at
the busy central station with a vague plan—
get a job, support himself, and send money
home to his struggling family. With a few
coins in his pocket, he begins to ask nearby
retail stores and small shops for work, but he
has no luck. Some other boys provide support
and guidance, but they are equally low on
luck and strategy, and their advice leads
to few results. Begging, pickpocketing, and
street life are meant as a temporary plan for
survival before the big break, but big breaks
are few and far between, and the boy begins
to use alcohol and drugs to temporarily escape
from this harsh reality. A frustrating downward spiral begins as hope dissipates.
Vulnerabilities come in many forms, as do
opportunities. While recent research shows
that overall, young people in developing
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countries are entering adolescence with better
health and with more opportunities than
previous generations, their gains are uneven
across countries and regions. A child may
be vulnerable because he or she is poor or
orphaned, a member of a minority ethnic
group, displaced from home or community, or
suffering from disease or a physical handicap.
Opportunities may come in the form of a
chance to go to school, the offer of a new
job, a mentor, or a strategically made loan.
Sometimes adults provide these opportunities; sometimes children actively seek them
out through independent initiative and
drive. With 1.5 billion people between the
ages of 10 and 24 now living in developing
countries—a figure that represents 86
percent of the world’s youth—opportunities
for education and employment are increasingly crucial to personal advancement,
economic growth, and security.
In developing countries, girls often face
education and health inequities compared
to their male peers. They may never enroll
in school, or may be withdrawn from
school when resources are scarce or household chores are numerous. They are less
likely than boys to successfully transition to
secondary school. They are at risk of early
marriage or forced sex. Other health and
safety vulnerabilities, especially related to
teenage pregnancy and childbirth, abound.
While media reports and academic studies
have drawn attention to girls’ vulnerability,
the distinct vulnerabilities of boys and
young men earn far less attention. In the
last 20 years, the percentage of boys aged 10
to 14 who have never attended school has
dropped from 21 percent to 11 percent—a
positive step. Yet educational access and
quality are unequal, affecting a young male’s
ability to prepare for productive, well-paid
work. School attendance rates for boys
in sub-Saharan Africa have fallen, for
example. And in Tunisia, Egypt, Turkey,
Malaysia, and Thailand, employment for
young men aged 15 to 24 has dropped by
nearly 20 percent in recent years.
Acute frustration, a lack of role models,
and limited emotional and social outlets
put boys at risk of engaging in violence,
pursuing illicit economic activity, escaping
reality through alcohol and drugs, or
seeking a misguided sense of belonging
through gang membership or inscription
as child soldiers. According to the World
Bank, 300,000 young people under the age
of 18 have recently been involved in armed
conflict, and another 500,000 boys and
girls have been recruited into military or
paramilitary forces.
www.globalfundforchildren.org
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Profile
Success Stories
from Mumbai’s
Streets
grantee partner
location
Society Undertaking
Poor People’s Onus for
Rehabilitation
Mumbai, India
Just for today, I should be free from drugs. I
will listen to positive voices. I understand that
I can change. I can transform failure to success.
I will enjoy my day.
This simple pledge is the basis for
the transformative work of Society
Undertaking Poor People’s Onus for
Rehabilitation (SUPPORT), a communitybased organization working with drugaddicted street children in a gritty
neighborhood outside Mumbai.
Street life, gangs, domestic violence, and
aggression are essentially cries for support.
Ultimately, the pressure on a young man to
earn and provide for himself or his family—
especially where unemployment is high and
chances to learn practical skills are few—
places additional pressure on him to prove
his identity and recognize the purpose and
value of his life.
For impoverished young men, life in a rural
village or urban slum can be spare and slow,
with few economic prospects or outlets for
creative self-expression. The draw of the
globalized city—its shops and neighborhoods
that cater to the wealthy, its crowds, its energy,
and its promise of infinite opportunity—
is difficult to resist. The hard times of the
streets, however, are usually a grim reality
check on the distant illusion of upward
mobility. Even when a young man finds urban
work, it is often hazardous and poorly paid,
making it difficult to earn a livelihood.
Within a poverty environment, the dual
challenges of urban migration and gender
disparity can present tremendous obstacles
in a young boy’s life. As young men seek to
compensate for vulnerabilities and to meet
external expectations, the progress they hope
for often proves elusive, and the outcomes
are potentially dire. Safety nets, second
chances, and real and relevant opportunities are critically needed to mitigate these
poor outcomes. In train stations and dark
alleys, many community-based organizations
are working to provide alternatives. Local,
contextual, adaptable, and flexible, they can
harness and facilitate real opportunity, ultimately transforming vulnerabilities to assets.
Sources:
Martine, George. The State of World Population 2007: Unleashing the Potential of Urban Growth. New York: United Nations, 2007.
Lloyd, Cynthia B., ed. Growing Up Global: The Changing Transitions to Adulthood in Developing Countries. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 2005.
World Bank. World Development Report 2007: Development and the Next Generation. Washington, DC: The World Bank, 2006.
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Beginning with just five children in 1993,
SUPPORT has since involved hundreds
in its programs. The only organization
in Mumbai providing detoxification and
rehabilitation services to drug-using street
children and youth, it is also one of the
very few groups in India offering residential rehabilitation programs. SUPPORT’s
success owes much to the dedication and
compassion of director Sujata Ganega, a
social worker, and Hoshang Irani, a former
banker who runs the day-to-day operations.
In Mumbai, a megacity of 18 million, over
100,000 impoverished children live on the
streets. They leave home for many reasons—
acute poverty, abusive parents, the lure of bigcity life—but often find that living on their
own only presents new problems. Girls can
be vulnerable to sexual abuse or forced into
sex work. Boys face police harassment, gang
exploitation, and violence. All struggle with
hunger, substance abuse, illness, and despair.
Targeting street children aged 8 to 18,
SUPPORT operates daytime drop-in
centers near Mumbai’s busiest train stations,
offering a safe haven, medical care, and a
sympathetic ear. Drug-addicted children are
encouraged to move to SUPPORT’s residential detoxification center, where trained
medical and counseling staff guide them
through a 15- to 30-day detox regimen that
includes checkups and therapy.
Boys continue treatment at residential
rehabilitation facilities in Santacruz, a
suburb of Mumbai, while girls are housed
in a peaceful, rural setting outside the city.
At both centers, children have access to
schooling, personal coaching, recreation,
and vocational activities. They do laundry
and prepare daily meals—routines that
build pride and discipline. The Global Fund
for Children has helped to fund the boys’
rehabilitation center since 2006, allowing
50 boys to pursue formal schooling and
vocational skills training each year.
Some children remain in SUPPORT’s care
for a decade or more, moving from crisis
to recovery to self-sufficiency. Their stories
inspire hope. There’s Jagdish, who went from
sniffing glue on the streets of Mumbai to
detoxification, success at school, and college
studies, with plans to become a banker.
There’s Pappi, who first came to SUPPORT
at age 8 and now, in his last year of high
school, dreams of leading the organization.
And there’s Ashok, who ran away from an
abusive father to live on the streets outside
Mumbai’s Dadar railway station. He became
a peer educator at SUPPORT, looking after
sick children in the medical room, and eventually joined the staff.
www.globalfundforchildren.org
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Inspire History
small tales
Global Media
Ventures
Through the power of books, documentary
photography, films, and online media, the
Global Media Ventures program celebrates
the community and diversity of children
and young people all over the world.
Our vibrant photo-illustrated children’s
books present the many common experiences that young people around the world
share, while also highlighting their varied
cultural backgrounds. Our documentary
photography illuminates the daily lives of
young people served by the communitybased organizations we fund.
The films we support focus on the resilience of young people and raise awareness
of the issues confronting them.
As we narrate their stories through our
books, pictures, films, and online media, we
promote the dignity of vulnerable children
and youth and advance global citizenship.
Global Fund for Children Books
At the heart of Global Media Ventures is the
children’s book program, published under the
imprint Global Fund for Children Books.
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Celebrating Community
We have 23 children’s books in publication
and more than 500,000 copies in circulation.
Our books have been read by over 1.5 million
readers and have collectively won 27 awards.
The latest addition to the collection is
Children of the U.S.A., showcasing children
of different ethnic, religious, and geographical backgrounds in 51 towns and
cities across the country. This book tells a
hopeful story of American children sharing their many gifts and unique histories
with their neighbors and the world. School
Library Journal says the book “give[s] children the opportunity to learn about tolerance and respect as they discover many
common threads.”
Global Babies, published in 2007, has been a
huge success in bookstores everywhere. This
charming board book, which Booklist called
“stunning in its simplicity and effectiveness,” conveys the universal love for babies
through intimate portraits from the world
over. The book is so popular that it will soon
be released in an English-Spanish bilingual
edition as Global Babies / Bebés del Mundo.
In 2009, we anticipate the release of Faith,
a beautiful celebration of religious diversity
expressed in images of children practicing
their faith worldwide. With full-page photographs, a glossary of religious terms, and representations of faiths from around the globe,
this is an important addition to the growing
Global Fund for ChildrenBooks collection.
Additional books are in development with
Charlesbridge Publishing, a for-profit
children’s book company that has been our
partner since 1997. When we published
our first book, Children from Australia to
Zimbabwe, a portion of the royalties went
to fund our grantmaking. This practice
continues today.
Books for Kids
The Books for Kids project donates Global
Fund for Children books and resource
guides to community-based literacy groups
worldwide. In targeting local groups that
demonstrate a pressing need for educational materials, Books for Kids hopes to
reach children who may not otherwise
have access to new and quality books.
Since 1996, our Books for Kids project has
donated over 77,000 books to organizations
and programs promoting children’s literacy
all over the world.
From May 2006 through this fiscal year,
Books for Kids boosted its worldwide distribution with a $50,000 Book Club Award
from Oprah’s Angel Network. The grant,
given in honor of Nobel laureate Elie
Wiesel, funded shipments of over 15,000
children’s books to vulnerable young people
around the world, with a concentration of
donations reaching organizations in remote
or post-conflict locations.
Recipients included the Sam-Kam
Institute in the West African country of
Sierra Leone, which is recovering from
decades of civil war. The books help
strengthen the institute’s English and
literacy programs for war victims and excombatants. Our Bolivian grantee partner
Biblioteca Th’uruchapitas (Th’uruchapitas
Library) received 232 of our Spanishlanguage books for its program that teaches
children of prisoners how to read and write
and provides them with emotional support.
In addition to the book donations made
possible by Oprah’s Angel Network, this
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69
fiscal year we shipped 1,412 books with a
retail value of $13,720 to grassroots groups
working with children in underserved
communities, primarily in the United States.
These organizations included the Franklin–
Grand Isle Bookmobile, a traveling library
serving rural communities in Vermont, and
our grantee partner KID smART, an artsin-education initiative in New Orleans that
has played a key role in facilitating children’s
psychosocial recovery after Hurricane Katrina.
Documentary Photography
The Global Fund for Children /
International Center of Photography
Fellowship uses the power of photography
to highlight the hope and opportunity our
grantee partners cultivate in the children
they serve. It is also designed to inspire a
new generation of photographers to document social change all over the world. The
fellowship, created in 2004 in partnership
with the New York–based International
Center of Photography, has since been
awarded to four young photographers.
This year’s awardee was Tadej Znidarcic,
a Slovenian photographer based in New
York City. Znidarcic documented the work
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of four of our grantee partners. He traveled
to India to photograph the dance and
movement programs of Kolkata Sanved
(Kolkata Sensitivity) and the leadership
trainings at Phulki (Spark). In Bangladesh,
he documented children learning on the boat
schools of Shidhulai Swanirvar Sangstha
(Village Self-Reliance), and in Romania, he
captured Roma and orphan populations at
Children on the Edge and Asociatia Ovidiu
Rom (Ovidiu Rom Association).
Several of the photographs illustrating this
annual report were taken during his fellowship.
Global Fund for Children Films
This year, we promoted our investments in
two important films, War Child and Journey
of a Red Fridge.
War Child is a feature-length documentary
on the life of Emmanuel Jal, a Sudanese
child soldier turned hip-hop artist in the
United Kingdom. Jal’s story mirrors his
homeland: tragedy and terror mingled with
hope and restoration. His dream of gua, or
peace, for Sudan and the rest of Africa is
told in his own words and music.
War Child had its international debut at the
Berlin Film Festival and won the Cadillac
Award at the Tribeca Film Festival in New
York City. At Tribeca, we presented a $5,000
grant to GUA Africa, an organization founded by Jal to help rebuild war victims’ lives.
GUA Africa is currently raising funds to build
a school in Jal’s hometown of Leer, Sudan.
Journey of a Red Fridge focuses on a young
Nepali student, Hari Rai, who works as a
porter so he can pay his school fees and
cover his living expenses. He is asked to
carry a defective refrigerator from the top
of a mountain to town for repairs. During
this four-day journey, we learn about his
life and those of other porters. Produced
by the award-winning Serbian production company Lunam Productions, Journey
of a Red Fridge won the audience award
at the CRONOGRAF International
Documentary Film Festival in Chisinau,
Moldova, and made its North American
premiere at the SILVERDOCS: AFI /
Discovery Channel Documentary Festival.
Blog: On the Road
One of the most popular features of our
redesigned website is our blog, On the Road
(www.gfcontheroad.org). This online journal
gives readers a taste of our journeys as we
scout for pioneering community-based organizations. Readers learn about our grantee
partners’ innovative methods, as well as the
challenging environments in which they
work. This year, staff members shared their
impressions of the 2008 Enterprise and
Learning Knowledge Exchange in India,
blogging about their travels, the hope inspired
by our grantee partners, and the value of
sharing knowledge among organizations
working for children around the world.
We are expanding our efforts in this area
through a grant from the MacArthur
Foundation. Selected from a pool of 1,010
applications, GFC was one of just 17 winners of the first-ever Digital Media and
Learning Competition. We are utilizing
video, audio, online surveys, and blogging
to share knowledge among organizations
working for children around the world.
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71
Grow Futures
small seeds
Giving
To spread awareness of our work and raise
resources to support more grantee partners
around the world, we have created two strategic groups of prominent philanthropists.
The Global Fund for Children UK Trust,
an independently registered charity in the
United Kingdom, began operations this
year. UK Trust board members act as global
ambassadors for our work and cooperate
with us to raise funds in the United States
and across Europe. The group raised over
$800,000 for GFC this year through its
networks and peers. Not only will this collaboration further our mission of advancing
the dignity of children and young people
throughout the world, but it will also build
our organizational sustainability.
In the United States, we launched the Silicon
Valley Leadership Council, a select group of
dedicated, informed leaders with expertise in
business, technology, and philanthropy who
raise awareness in their communities about
the challenges facing vulnerable children,
engage others to support us, and participate
in GFC briefing sessions. In January 2008,
the council inaugurated this partnership
by hosting a photography exhibit at SPUR
Projects in Portola Valley, California, featuring the work of Malin Fezehai, last year’s
Global Fund for Children / International
Center of Photography fellow.
For a complete list of those on the GFC
board of directors, the UK Trust board of
trustees, and the Silicon Valley Leadership
Council, please consult page 125.
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Global Leadership,
Global Philanthropy
Nurturing Global Citizens
As part of our effort to mobilize youth to
bring a global lens to their own communities, we seek out strategic partnerships that
bring our mission to schools across the
United States.
We are excited to continue our important
partnership with New Global Citizens,
working to empower American high-school
students to make a difference in the world.
Each New Global Citizens team chooses to
learn about, educate their community about,
and raise money for one of our grantee
partners. This year, we worked with teams
from six high schools that raised money for
our grantee partners. We keep in touch with
these future global leaders by updating them
on our grantees’ progress, providing photos
and blogs from program officer visits to the
field, and giving them background information about the region and the issues their
selected grantee partner addresses.
This year, New Global Citizens teams raised
money to support Challenging Heights in
Ghana, Chintan Environmental Research
and Action Group in India, Association des
Artistes et Artisans contre le VIH/SIDA et
les Stupifiants (Association of Artists and
Artisans against HIV/AIDS and Drugs)
in Burkina Faso, Centar za Integraciju
Mladih (Center for Youth Integration) in
Serbia, Skolta’el Yu’un Jlumaltic (Service to
Our People) in Mexico, and Movimiento
para el Auto-Desarrollo Internacional de la
Solidaridad (Movement for International
Self-Development and Solidarity) in the
Dominican Republic.
Our longstanding partnership with The
Mirman School in Los Angeles continued this year as elementary-school students held their annual read-a-thon to
raise money for Ruchika Social Service
Organization in India and Ethiopian
Books for Children and Educational
Foundation in Ethiopia. Since 1999, The
Mirman School has raised over $60,000 to
support our programs around the world.
Fashionable Giving
Tea Collection’s adorable clothing line carries
our message to children and families around
the world. The special GFC collection of children’s tees and bodysuits is imprinted with the
phrase “For Little Citizens of the World.”
This year, Tea Collection sponsored a competition for children under age 8 to contribute original artwork to be put on next year’s
collection. These inspired tees will be available in spring 2009 at www.teacollection.com.
Since the beginning of our partnership
in 2006, Tea Collection’s garments have
raised over $57,000 for our work with
children and youth.
We were pleased this year to partner with
TONIC, an innovative company connect-
ing top designers with nonprofits to create
stylish, cause-inspired clothes for adults.
TONIC signed on London-based designer
Luella Bartley to design a special, limitededition T-shirt for GFC and Boquitas Sanas
(Healthy Little Mouths), a program of our
grantee partner Fundación Simsa (Simsa
Foundation). Each T-shirt purchase supports
dental care for children in Colombia.
Special Initiatives
Our partnerships with Working Assets and
CIBC World Markets Miracle Day allow
individuals to support GFC initiatives in
simple yet meaningful ways without altering
their daily routines.
Working Assets sends a donation to its
nonprofit partners each time a client uses
its mobile telephone services. The CREDO
Mobile partnership program makes it easy for
people to incorporate philanthropy into their
daily lives. Since 2005, our partnership with
Working Assets has raised over $100,000.
On the first Wednesday of each December,
CIBC World Markets donates 100 percent
of the fees and commissions of its traders, advisors, and sales staff to children’s
charities. We have been a recipient of these
commissions for the past two years. This
year, many individual traders took advantage of this special day, making trades and
purchases that brought in $42,000 for our
Books for Kids program.
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75
2007–2008
Our
Donors
Individuals
Anonymous (51)
Henele Adams
Brenda Adderly
Maya Ajmera and David Hollander Jr.
Richa and Ravi Ajmera
Roopa and Ramesh Ajmera
Barbara Anderson
Antonella Antonini and Alan Stein
Joseph H. Arcidiacono
Barbara and William Ascher
Sandra and Shane Atherholt
Latha Baddigam
Christine Baker
Denise Baldwin
Marion Ballard
Dorothy and Andrew Barnes
Thomas C. Barry
Adrienne and John Beckmann
Deborah Beckmann-Kotzubei
and Jacob Kotzubei
Marilyn Beller
Susan and Barry Berman
Sharmeela Binwani
Margaret R. Blake
Robert L. Bletcher
Bethany Bond
Tammy and Michael Borosky
Tod Breslau
Ellen Breslow
Darcy and Brady Brewer
Joey Brewer
Devon and Peter Briger
Kathryn Briger
Marisa Brown
Michael Burkes
India and Michael Bush
Jacqueline Campbell
Amy and Charles Carter
Tracy Carter
Bonnie Cary-Freitas and Alex Freitas
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Mike Cavanaugh
Katherine Alice Chang
and Thomas Einstein
Frank Chau
David Chow
Annette Clear and Michael Begert
Richard Clemmer
Michelle Cline
Becky and Munroe Cobey
Susan and Peter Colby
Julie Conrad
Julia Candace Corliss
Katelena Hernandez Cowles
and James Cowles
Paula and James Crown
Blake and Michael Daffey
Mary and Matt Davidson-Seiden
Linda Davis
Sebastian and Benjamin Davis
Roxanne Dawson
Alice M. De Guzman
Arlene M. De Guzman
Diane and Howard Deshong
Jeanette and Howard Deshong
Jodi Ecker Detjen
and Michael J. Detjen
Saraswathi Devi
and C. K. Hiranya Gowda
Andy Diamondstein
Valerie Dockendorff
Bill Drayton
John P. Driscoll
Constance and Arthur Driver
Stanley Druckenmiller
Suzanne Duryea
and Timothy Waidmann
Viretta and Edwin Edwards
Jennifer Enoch and Michael Wilmore
Sarah G. Epstein
Sean Erickson
Brent Farmer
Kate and Henry Faulkner
Evelina Feinberg
Ann Felber
Penelope Fetsch
Gary Finch
Jeanne Donovan Fisher
Diane Flannery
Ana Fong
Stacey L. Foran
Charlotte and Bill Ford
Connie L. Formby
The Fox family
John Hope Franklin
Patricia Freedman
Mary Jo Freshley
Randi Frisch and Paul Green
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Claire Reade
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and Roy Salamé
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and Rinaldo Veseliza
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Nike Zachmanoglou Tirman
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Corporate Giving
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development
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Elsevier Ltd.
GMAC Financial Services
Goldman Sachs Foundation
IBM Employee Services Center
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J.E. Robert Companies
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Family of Companies
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Nike Foundation
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Project, Inc.
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Hollander Jr. Fund of the
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Community Foundation
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Monterey Fund, Inc.
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Community Foundation
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Trust Alliance Bernstein Foundation Fund
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(Los Angeles, CA)
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Charity Gift Certificates
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and Frank Meister
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If we have left out or misspelled your name,
please accept our apology and contact us so
that we may correct our records.
Leaving a Legacy
Ensure the future of The Global Fund for Children’s
work around the world by becoming a member of the
GFC Children’s Legacy Fund.
will continue to be strong long into the future,
bringing hope and opportunity to millions of children
around the world.
By naming The Global Fund for Children as a beneficiary of your will, retirement plan, or life insurance policy,
you will automatically become a member of the Children’s Legacy Fund. Your gifts will have meaningful and
lasting benefits for vulnerable children and youth.
We welcome present gifts of securities and other
property that we can use now. We also encourage future
gifts, such as bequests, beneficiary designations, and
trusts. These gifts increase our organizational stability
and make long-range planning possible.
As a member of the Children’s Legacy Fund, you
can be certain that we will use your gift to continue
and expand our important work. We have been a
leader in grassroots grantmaking for over a decade.
Our grantmaking model has proved effective and
successful, and you can be assured that our mission
For information about arranging such gifts, please
contact The Global Fund for Children’s Investor
Relations Office at 202-222-0804. We recommend
that you consult with legal and financial advisors when
considering a planned gift.
www.globalfundforchildren.org
81
Shape Waves
small splashes
All black-and-white photographs were taken by Tadej Znidarcic during his
2007–2008 GFC / ICP Fellowship trip to India, Bangladesh, and Romania.
Eligibility Criteria and Selection guidelines
Selecting Our
Grantee Partners
The Global Fund for Children selects
grantee partners based on their demonstrated potential to produce sustainable
improvement in the lives of vulnerable
children and youth and to serve as a
resource or model for other organizations.
Eligibility Criteria
Prospective grantee partners must meet
the following eligibility criteria in order
to be considered for support.
Appropriate size and stage of development
With rare exceptions, a prospective grantee
partner’s annual budget should not exceed
$200,000. In most cases, new grantee partners have budgets in the $25,000 to $75,000
range. Our aim is to identify organizations at
a relatively early stage in their development.
Direct involvement with children and youth
Prospective grantee partners must work
directly with children and youth. We do
not support groups engaged exclusively
in advocacy or research. (We do, however,
support organizations that perform both
advocacy and direct service.)
Capable management
Prospective grantee partners must have systems and processes for ensuring responsible
management of funds. At a minimum, an
84
www.globalfundforchildren.org
organization must have basic accounting
and reporting systems as well as phone
and email access.
Local leadership
Prospective grantee partners must be led
by individuals who live and work in the
community. We prioritize organizations
whose leaders were born and raised in
the community. We do not fund the
local offices or affiliates of national or
international organizations.
Legal status
A prospective grantee partner must be registered with the local or national government
as a nonprofit organization. If the political
context makes legal registration unfeasible,
the organization must demonstrate nonprofit
equivalency. We do not provide start-up
funding for the creation of new organizations.
Selection Guidelines
Beyond these basic eligibility criteria, we use
the following selection guidelines in identifying organizations that are truly exceptional.
A focus on the most vulnerable
We give priority to organizations that
reach children of “the last mile”—those
who are economically and socially outside the reach of mainstream services and
support, including street children, child
laborers, AIDS orphans, sex workers,
hard-to-reach rural populations, and other
vulnerable or marginalized groups.
Strong leadership
We give priority to organizations that have
committed, respected, and dynamic leadership with a vision for change.
Community involvement
Adaptability
We give priority to organizations that are
rooted in their community and operate with
community input, involvement, and investment, embracing the community as an integral part of their success.
We give priority to organizations that generate models, methodologies, and practices
that can be adapted and applied to similar
issues and challenges in other communities.
Effectiveness
We give priority to organizations that can
demonstrate sustained, meaningful improvement in the lives of the children and youth
they serve.
Empowerment
We give priority to organizations that engage
children and youth as active participants in
their own growth and development, rather
than as passive recipients of services.
Innovation and creativity
We give priority to organizations that tackle
old problems in new ways, demonstrating
innovation and creativity in their program
strategies and approaches.
Potential for sustainability
We give priority to organizations that have a
strategy for ensuring the long-term sustainability of their programs through donor diversification, mobilization of government funding,
community investment, income-generating
activities, and other creative measures.
Reputation
We give priority to organizations that are recognized and trusted in their communities.
The Global Fund for Children does not accept
unsolicited proposals. Those interested in applying
may inquire online at our website:
www.globalfundforchildren.org.
www.globalfundforchildren.org
85
2007–2008 Grants list
Learning
Ark Foundation of Africa (AFA)
$21,000/26,145 Tanzanian shillings
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Director: Rhoi Wangila
[email protected]
www.arkafrica.org
Asociación Civil Wará
(Wará Civil Association)
$3,500/9,450 Peruvian nuevos soles
Huayllarcocha, Peru
Director: Williar Vargas
[email protected]
Through educational, health, and community development programs, AFA works to enhance the well-being
of East African children and families whose lives have
been devastated by war, poverty, and HIV/AIDS.
Previous funding: $86,000 since 2002
Asociación Civil Wará works in a rural indigenous
community outside of Cusco to provide sports and
educational activities for children who frequently
work long, hard days in the fields.
Asanble Vwazen Jakè (AVJ)
( Jakè Neighborhood Association)
$8,000/385,200 Haitian gourdes
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Director: Reagan Lolo
[email protected]
We believe that every child everywhere deserves access
to a quality education. This fiscal year, we awarded
grants valued at $1,014,000 to 86 grantee partners
under this portfolio.
Aarambh
(To Start)
$7,000/280,000 Indian rupees
Mumbai, India
Director: Shobha Murthy
[email protected]
www.aarambh.org
Aarambh empowers disadvantaged communities
through participatory and collective action that
secures improved educational opportunities for children and expands health and livelihood opportunities.
Achlal (Caring Kindness)
Child Development Center
$14,000/16,646,000 Mongolian tugriks
Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia
Director: Azzayaa Davaanyamyn
[email protected]
Achlal provides community-based support for
poor and disabled children and their families
in Bayankhoshuu, one of the poorest slums of
Ulaanbaatar.
Previous funding: $28,000 since 2004
Agastya International Foundation
$16,000/636,800 Indian rupees
Chittoor district, India
Director: Rama Raghavan
[email protected]
www.agastya.org
Agastya makes education creative, practical, and
responsive to students’ needs through mobile science
labs, science fairs, teacher training, and communications and information technology programs.
Previous funding: $35,000 since 2004
Anandan
(Happiness)
$8,000/320,000 Indian rupees
Kolkata, India
Director: Indrani Ghosh
[email protected]
www.geocities.com/anandan_kolkata
Anandan provides functional, remedial, and holistic
education to slum-dwelling children and directs their
individual talents and dispositions toward suitable
earning opportunities.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2007
Ananya Trust
$7,000/280,000 Indian rupees
Bengaluru, India
Director: Shashi Rao
[email protected]
www.ananyatrust.com
Ananya Trust fulfills the academic, social, emotional,
and physical needs of migrant children through its
school, Ananya Shikshana Kendra.
86
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AVJ provides basic education to children and youth
in the very poor Jakè neighborhood of Port-au-Prince
and promotes their participation in improving the
community as a whole.
Previous funding: $7,500 since 2006
Asociación de Promotores de Educación Inicial y
Preprimaria Bilingüe Maya-Ixil (APEDIBIMI)
(Maya-Ixil Association of Promoters of Bilingual
Early Education)
$17,000/129,200 Guatemalan quetzales
Nebaj, Guatemala
Director: Benito Terraza Cedillo
[email protected]
APEDIBIMI provides bilingual early childhood education in the Ixil and Spanish languages to more than 1,300
indigenous Ixil Maya children in 14 remote villages.
Previous funding: $59,167 since 2003
Asanble Vwazen Solino (AVS)
(Solino Neighborhood Association)
$2,500/95,000 Haitian gourdes
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
Director: Jeremy Dupin
[email protected]
Asociación Mujer y Comunidad
(Women and Community Association)
$15,000/278,700 Nicaraguan córdobas
San Francisco Libre, Nicaragua
Director: Zoraida Soza
[email protected]
AVS, a grassroots neighborhood organization, runs
a free school serving 150 children living in Solino, a
poor and violent neighborhood in Port-au-Prince.
Previous funding: $1,000 in crisis funding since 2008
Mujer y Comunidad promotes the health, education, and
safety of women and girls in rural Nicaragua and provides
scholarships for children to attend formal schools.
Previous funding: $41,000 since 2003
Asociación Civil Pro Niño Íntimo
(Pro-Child Civil Association)
$19,000/59,090 Peruvian nuevos soles
Villa El Salvador, Peru
Director: Sara Diestro
[email protected]
Asociación para los Derechos de la Niñez “Monseñor
Oscar Romero”
(Monsignor Oscar Romero Association for
Children’s Rights)
$14,000/107,940 Guatemalan quetzales
Guatemala City, Guatemala
Director: Elisa Marroquin
[email protected]
www.losromeritos.com
Asociación Civil Pro Niño Íntimo, popularly known
as Escuelas Deporte y Vida (Sports and Life Schools),
provides young people living in the slum of Villa El
Salvador with the opportunity to play sports, promoting their integration into the organization’s formal
education and life skills programs.
Previous funding: $86,500 since 2002
Los Romeritos, as this organization is locally known,
works with the children of sex workers, street vendors,
and underemployed single mothers to prevent secondgeneration prostitution by providing access to education
and support services.
Previous funding: $36,000 since 2003
www.globalfundforchildren.org
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Asociación Promoción y Desarrollo
de la Mujer Nicaragüense Acahual
(Acahual Association for the Promotion and
Development of Nicaraguan Women)
$15,000/304,000 Nicaraguan córdobas
Managua, Nicaragua
Director: Norma Villalta
[email protected]
Acahual improves the lives of women and girls in
the impoverished neighborhood of Acahualinca
through education, integrated health services, and
the strengthening of community structures.
Previous funding: $42,500 since 2004
Asociatia Ovidiu Rom
(Ovidiu Rom Association)
$21,000/50,400 Romanian new lei
Bacau, Romania
Director: Maria Gheorghiu
[email protected]
www.alexfund.org
Children in the Wilderness (CITW)
$14,000/1,960,000 Malawian kwachas
Lilongwe, Malawi
Director: Gladys Msonda
[email protected]
www.childreninthewilderness.com
Door Step School
$15,000/640,000 Indian rupees
Mumbai, India
Director: Bina Lashkari
[email protected]
www.doorstepschool.org
Through school scholarships, skills training, and other
programs, Benishyaka promotes the development and
empowerment of widows, orphans, and vulnerable
families affected by Rwanda’s civil war, the 1994
genocide, and the ongoing AIDS epidemic.
Previous funding: $33,000 since 2005
CITW offers orphaned and vulnerable children life
skills education and alternative educational opportunities through experiential learning camps held at safari
sites during the commercial off-season.
Previous funding: $20,000 since 2006
Door Step School serves working, slum-dwelling, and
street children through community preschools, classes
for both school-going and out-of-school children, and
mobile libraries and literacy classes.
Previous funding: $51,050 since 2004
Chintan Environmental Research and Action Group
$11,000/440,000 Indian rupees
Delhi, India
Director: Bharati Chaturvedi
[email protected]
www.chintan-india.org
Durbar Mahila Samanwaya Committee (DMSC)
$11,000/440,000 Indian rupees
Kolkata, India
Director: Bharati Dey
[email protected]
www.durbar.org
Chintan promotes social and environmental justice for
waste-picking communities, particularly for women
and children, by helping them gain access to better
education and livelihood opportunities.
Previous funding: $20,500 since 2006
DMSC, a forum of approximately 65,000 sex workers, works in red-light districts throughout Kolkata to
promote and protect the civil and human rights of its
members and to expand educational opportunities for
its members and their children.
Previous funding: $21,000 since 2005
Biblioteca Th’uruchapitas
(Th’uruchapitas Library)
$7,000/51,800 Bolivian bolivianos
Cochabamba, Bolivia
Director: Gaby Vallejo
[email protected]
Ovidiu Rom provides Roma children with access
to education and works closely with the Romanian
government to offer critical social services.
Previous funding: $75,000 since 2003
Biblioteca Th’uruchapitas provides a safe, supportive,
educational space for the most disadvantaged children in Bolivian society, namely street children, child
laborers, and children living in prison with their
incarcerated parents.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2007
Association for Community Development Services
(ACDS)
$18,000/716,400 Indian rupees
Kundrathur area, India
Director: N. Vidhyadharan
[email protected]
www.acdsindia.org
Centro Cultural Batahola Norte (CCBN)
(Cultural Center of Batahola Norte)
$13,000/241,540 Nicaraguan córdobas
Managua, Nicaragua
Director: Jennifer Marshall
[email protected]
www.friendsofbatahola.org
ACDS seeks to end child labor in the stone quarries
of the Kanchipuram district and to give the children
of quarry workers access to free, high-quality education and healthcare.
Previous funding: $75,000 since 2003
CCBN promotes opportunities for vulnerable women
and children through more than 20 courses in basic
education and domestic and technical skills.
Previous funding: $19,000 since 2005
Backward Society Education (BASE)
$11,000/707,300 Nepalese rupees
Kailali district, Nepal
Director: Dip Lal Chaudhary
[email protected]
BASE offers general education, healthcare, income
generation assistance, legal rights education, and other
services to former bonded laborers in Nepal, particularly to members of the ethnic Tharu community
and to women, and works to prevent child labor and
improve access to education for girls.
Previous funding: $19,500 since 2005
88
Benishyaka Association
$16,000/8,656,000 Rwandan francs
Kigali, Rwanda
Director: Betty Gahima
[email protected]; [email protected]
www.benishyaka.org
www.globalfundforchildren.org
Challenging Heights
$8,000/7,920 Ghanaian cedis
Sankor, Ghana
Director: James Annan
[email protected]
www.challengingheight.org
Challenging Heights addresses the needs and aspirations of children and youth in Sankor and Winneba
through educational support, awareness-raising activities on child labor and trafficking, and policy advocacy.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2007
Chiricli (Bird) International Roma Women’s
Charitable Fund
$11,000/55,000 Ukrainian hryvnia
Kiev, Ukraine
Director: Yuliya Kondur
[email protected]
Chiricli provides assistance to Ukraine’s vulnerable
Roma population, with an emphasis on increasing
educational opportunities and school attendance
among Roma children and youth.
Previous funding: $38,000 since 2003
Community Sanitation and Recycling Organization
(CSARO)
$6,000/23,544,000 Cambodian riels
Phnom Penh, Cambodia
Director: Heng Yon Kora
[email protected]
www.online.com.kh/users/csaro
CSARO addresses the needs of Phnom Penh’s waste
pickers through a community development program,
a solid waste management program, and a mobile
education program for children.
Early Intervention Institute for Children with
Developmental Delays and Disabilities (EII)
$8,000/40,000 Ukrainian hryvnia
Kharkiv, Ukraine
Director: Anna Kukuruza
[email protected]
www.ei-kharkov.org
EII works to prevent the institutionalization of children
who have developmental delays and disabilities and to
integrate them into their families, schools, and communities through therapeutic and educational services.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2007
Espacio Cultural Creativo
(Cultural Creative Space)
$17,000/131,920 Bolivian bolivianos
La Paz, Bolivia
Director: Maria Carmen Schulze
[email protected]
[email protected]
Espacio Cultural Creativo serves working and street children by helping formal schools adapt to their needs and
circumstances and by creating non-school-related opportunities for cognitive development and creative expression.
Previous funding: $46,430 since 2002
www.globalfundforchildren.org
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Fundación Junto con los Niños ( JUCONI)
(Together with Children Foundation)
$16,000
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Director: Silvia Reyes
JUCONI provides support to children working on
the streets, with the aim of reducing or eliminating
their street work, reintegrating them into school, and
rebuilding the family environment.
Previous funding: $28,500 since 2004
Ethiopian Books for Children and Educational
Foundation (EBCEF)
$18,000/162,000 Ethiopian birr
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Director: Yohannes Gebregeorgis
[email protected]; [email protected]
www.ethiopiareads.org
EBCEF promotes children’s literacy in Ethiopia
through in-school, community, and mobile libraries;
awareness-raising campaigns; and children’s book
publishing programs.
Previous funding: $30,000 since 2003
Free Minds Book Club and Writing Workshop
$12,000
Washington, DC, United States
Director: Kelli Taylor
[email protected]
www.freemindsbookclub.org
Free Minds introduces young male inmates at the DC
Jail to the transformative power of books and creative
writing by mentoring them and connecting them to
supportive services throughout their incarceration and
after their reentry into the community.
Previous funding: $10,000 since 2006
Friends for Street Children (FFSC)
$16,000/257,840,000 Vietnamese dong
Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Director: Sr. Marie Le Thi Thao
[email protected]
www.olivierdumonde.com
FFSC’s seven development centers provide street children with nonformal education, vocational training,
shelter, and healthcare, with additional training in life
skills, child rights awareness, and HIV/AIDS.
Previous funding: $67,500 since 2000
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www.globalfundforchildren.org
Fundación Alfonso Casas Morales para la
Promoción Humana
(Alfonso Casas Morales Foundation for
Human Advancement)
$9,000/18,279,000 Colombian pesos
Bogotá, Colombia
Director: Pablo Henao Mejia
[email protected]
www.promocionhumana.org
Fundación Alfonso Casas Morales para la Promoción
Humana helps at-risk children on the northern outskirts of Bogotá succeed in school through an accelerated learning program, a tutoring program, a free
cafeteria, a computer center, and a community library.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2006
Fundación Crecer
(Growth Foundation)
$7,000
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Director: Pastora Castro de Moran
[email protected]
[email protected]
www.fundacioncrecer.org
Fundación Crecer reintegrates street-working children
into school, family, and community life through a
comprehensive program of basic education, health,
nutrition, vocational and life skills training, and cultural and recreational activities.
Fundación Nuestros Sueños
(Our Dreams Foundation)
$6,000/12,186,000 Colombian pesos
Quibdó, Colombia
Director: Millis Moya
[email protected];
[email protected]
Fundación Nuestros Sueños provides early childhood
education to children in a Quibdó slum community,
utilizing a curriculum that promotes health, nutrition,
cognitive and motor skills development, psychosocial
well-being, positive values, cultural identity, and environmental awareness.
Girl Child Concern (GCC)
$6,000/702,000 Nigerian nairas
Kaduna, Nigeria
Director: Mairo Mandra
[email protected]
GCC empowers adolescent girls through scholarships,
mentorships, and leadership development programs.
Gramin Mahila Sikshan Sansthan (GMSS)
(Sikar Girls Education Initiative)
$15,000/600,000 Indian rupees
Sikar, India
Director: Chain Arya
[email protected]
GMSS provides quality education for girls in
rural Rajasthan who would otherwise be unable
to attend school.
Previous funding: $56,000 since 2001
Halley Movement
$16,000/488,000 Mauritian rupees
Batimarais, Mauritius
Director: Mahendranath Busgopaul
[email protected]
[email protected]
www.halleymovement.org
Halley Movement offers a variety of educational, counseling, and supportive services to help the children of
Mauritius stay in or return to the formal school system.
Previous funding: $45,000 since 2003
Hope for Children Organization (HFC)
$14,000/133,000 Ethiopian birr
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Director: Yewoinshet Masresha
[email protected]
www.hopeforchildrenorganization.org
HFC provides psychosocial support, livelihood promotion, community resource mobilization, health education, life skills training, and material support to orphans
and other vulnerable children in Addis Ababa.
Previous funding: $20,000 since 2005
Ikamva Labantu
(The Future of Our Nation)
$21,000/147,000 South African rand
Cape Town, South Africa
Director: Ishrene Davids
[email protected]
www.ikamva.org
Ikamva Labantu works in partnership with local
residents to improve the quality of community life
by addressing a range of issues, including education,
economic empowerment, and home-based care.
Previous funding: $90,534 since 2003
Institute of Leadership and Institutional
Development (ILID)
$10,000/400,000 Indian rupees
Bengaluru, India
Director: G. K. Jayaram
[email protected]
www.ilid.org
ILID’s Project Pygmalion uses computer-aided instruction, role-playing, and interactive games to teach English
and computer technology to children and youth from
poor communities in Bengaluru as a means of increasing
their readiness for the global economy.
Previous funding: $9,000 since 2007
www.globalfundforchildren.org
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Instituto para la Superación de la Miseria Urbana
(ISMU)
(Institute for Overcoming Urban Poverty)
$19,000/146,490 Guatemalan quetzales
Guatemala City, Guatemala
Director: María Elvira Sánchez Toscano
[email protected]
ISMU, a coalition of grassroots organizations, helps
communities confront the lack of quality daycare and
early childhood development opportunities by establishing community children’s centers for children from
poor working families.
Previous funding: $50,000 since 2003
International Trust for the Education
of Zambia Orphans (ITEZO)
$6,000/23,220 Zambian kwacha
Lusaka, Zambia
Director: Alexander Chola Fundafunda
[email protected]
ITEZO empowers orphaned and vulnerable children
and youth through educational support and vocational
skills training programs.
Kamitei Foundation
$18,000/22,410,000 Tanzanian shillings
Masai and Mbulu communities, Tanzania
Director: Jeroen Harderwijk
[email protected]
www.kamitei.org
The Kamitei Foundation’s Community Education
Improvement Program works closely with rural communities in western Tanzania to improve education
by investing in facilities and teaching materials at the
primary level and by providing scholarships for students to pursue postprimary vocational education.
Previous funding: $44,000 since 2003
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Kindle Orphan Outreach
$8,000/1,120,00 Malawian kwachas
Salima district, Malawi
Director: Andrew Barr
[email protected]
www.kindleorphanoutreach.org
Kindle offers comprehensive educational, counseling,
healthcare, and spiritual support services to orphaned
and vulnerable children in the Salima district.
Previous funding: $7,000 since 2006
Lapeng (Home) Child and Family Resource Service
$8,000/64,000 South African rand
Johannesburg, South Africa
Director: Mathibedi Nthite
[email protected]
Lapeng serves one of the most violent neighborhoods in Johannesburg by running a model preschool,
providing capacity-building support for community
crèches, and holding weekly drop-in arts workshops
for children and youth.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2007
Light for All (LiFA)
$12,000/456,000 Haitian gourdes
Lhomond, Haiti
Director: Gerry Delaquis
[email protected]
www.lightforall.org
LiFA helps rural Haitian communities strengthen
their schools through a school sponsorship program
that covers basic costs, provides administrative and
financial training for school administrators, educates
parents on the importance of education, and helps the
community plan for long-term self-sufficiency.
Previous funding: $40,500 since 2004
Kham Kampo Association (KKA)
$9,000/63,000 Chinese yuan
Sichuan Province, China
Director: Tobkey
[email protected]
www.khamkampo.org
Mahita
(Regeneration)
$8,000/318,400 Indian rupees
Hyderabad, India
Director: Ramesh Reddy
[email protected]
www.mahita.org
Working in one of the poorest regions of China, KKA
operates programs in education, livelihood development, healthcare, environmental conservation, and
cultural preservation.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2007
Focusing on vulnerable children in the slums, and
working in particular with girls and Muslim communities, Mahita creates opportunities through education, income generation programs, and skills training.
Previous funding: $7,000 since 2006
www.globalfundforchildren.org
Monduli Pastoralist Development Initiative (MPDI)
$8,000/9,816,000 Tanzanian shillings
Monduli, Tanzania
Director: Erasto Sanare
[email protected]
Nehemiah AIDS Relief Project
$12,000/360,000,000 Zimbabwean dollars
Bulawayo, Zimbabwe
Director: Daisy Mutimba
[email protected]
MPDI helps Maasai pastoralist communities maintain
their traditional beliefs and systems while also ensuring that their children receive a modern education.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2007
Nehemiah is a faith-based nongovernmental organization that facilitates the church and community
response to HIV/AIDS, providing a variety of educational, material, and social support services to 200
child beneficiaries annually.
Previous funding: $23,534 since 2005
Movimiento de Mujeres Dominico-Haitianas
(MUDHA)
(Movement of Dominican-Haitian Women)
$9,000/306,000 Dominican pesos
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
Director: Sonia Pierre
[email protected]
MUDHA promotes the advancement of Dominicans
of Haitian descent through independent community
schools and programs on education, health, human
rights, gender, domestic violence, and identity.
Previous funding: $8,500 since 2007
Muktangan
(Open Courtyard)
$7,000/278,600 Indian rupees
Mumbai, India
Director: Elizabeth Mehta
[email protected]
www.muktanganedu.org
Muktangan addresses the learning needs of underprivileged children and their families by offering
low-cost, high-quality, child-centered education.
Mumbai Mobile Crèches
$10,000/398,000 Indian rupees
Mumbai, India
Director: Devika Mahadevan
[email protected]
www.mobilecreches.org
To protect children of migrant construction workers from the dangers of construction sites, Mumbai
Mobile Crèches sets up mobile daycare centers at
construction sites, providing a supervised place for
children to learn and play while their parents work.
Previous funding: $8,000 since 2006
Network of Entrepreneurship and
Economic Development (NEED)
$14,000/560,000 Indian rupees
Lucknow, India
Director: Anil Singh
[email protected]
www.indianeed.org
NEED facilitates the development of grassroots selfhelp groups that respond to the needs of rural women
throughout Uttar Pradesh and empowers these groups
to organize and teach nonformal education classes for
community children.
Previous funding: $46,400 since 2003
New Horizon Ministries (NHM)
$14,000/49,210,000 Zambian kwacha
Lusaka, Zambia
Director: Juliet Chilengi
[email protected]
www.nho.kabissa.org
NHM works with girls who are orphaned, impoverished, or living with HIV/AIDS to promote their
positive involvement in the community and in activities
that reduce their vulnerability to sexual and other forms
of exploitation.
Previous funding: $39,534 since 2005
Nyaka School
$14,000/24,472,000 Ugandan shillings
Nyakagyezi, Uganda
Director: Twesigye Jackson Kaguri
[email protected]
www.nyakaschool.org
Nyaka School provides AIDS orphans with a free,
high-quality education and extracurricular activities
as a way to combat pervasive hunger, poverty, and
systemic deprivation.
Previous funding: $17,000 since 2005
www.globalfundforchildren.org
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Rural China Education Foundation (RCEF)
$6,000/42,000 Chinese yuan
Beijing, China
Directors: Diane Geng and Sara Lam
[email protected]; [email protected]
www.ruralchina.org
RCEF places long-term volunteers in schools to partner with local teachers and develop effective curricula
and teaching approaches for the rural context, with
the aim of promoting learner-centered education in
rural China that is relevant to the children’s life needs.
Salesian Sisters
$8,000/316,350,000 Zambian kwacha
Lusaka, Zambia
Director: Sr. Ryszarda Piejko
[email protected]
Oruj Learning Center
$6,000/297,600 Afghan afghanis
Kabul, Afghanistan
Director: Sadiqa Basiri
[email protected]
Oruj Learning Center works collaboratively to run four
girls’ schools in the rural Wardak and Nangarhar provinces of Afghanistan, partnering with other nonprofits to
confront the educational challenges facing girls, advocate
for the expansion of primary education into villages, and
lobby for the elimination of gender-based violence.
Poder Joven
(Youth Power)
$14,000/28,434,000 Colombian pesos
Medellín, Colombia
Director: Clared Patricia Jaramillo Duque
[email protected]
www.poderjoven.org
Poder Joven offers programs that promote literacy,
life skills, critical thinking, and personal responsibility,
with the aim of preventing children living in the violent and impoverished neighborhoods of downtown
Medellín from abandoning their homes for the streets.
Previous funding: $26,000 since 2004
Prei Effort for Those Who Are in Need (PEFAN)
$8,000/27,000 Ethiopian birr
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Director: Fisha Tadesse
[email protected]
[email protected]
www.pefan.org
PEFAN works to keep vulnerable children off the
streets through holistic services that include educational
support, access to healthcare, counseling, mentoring,
and training in the performing arts.
Previous funding: $6,500 since 2006
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Prerana
(Inspiration)
$20,000/796,000 Indian rupees
Mumbai, India
Director: Priti Patkar
[email protected]
www.preranaatc.org
Prerana offers a range of educational activities, antitrafficking initiatives, and support programs to protect
the human rights of sexually exploited women and
their children.
Previous funding: $82,250 since 2001
Puririsun
(Let’s Journey Together)
$9,000/69,840 Bolivian bolivianos
La Paz, Bolivia
Director: Jim José Obando
[email protected];
[email protected]
Puririsun promotes dignity and opportunity for poor
children in La Paz in the areas of education, health,
nutrition, and life skills.
Previous funding: $8,800 since 2006
Raza Educational and Social Welfare Society
(RESWS)
$7,000/280,000 Indian rupees
Bengaluru, India
Director: Benazeer Baig
[email protected]
www.benazeer.org
RESWS seeks to eradicate child labor by bringing
children from economically deprived localities to
RESWS’s formal school, which serves 500 students.
City of Hope, run by the Salesian Sisters of Zambia,
provides holistic support services, including a transitional shelter, a successful community school, and a
vocational skills training program, to adolescent girls
who are survivors of neglect and sexual abuse.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2007
Shidhulai Swanirvar Sangstha
(Village Self-Reliance)
$20,000/1,376,000 Bangladeshi takas
Pabna district, Bangladesh
Director: A. H. M. Rezwan
[email protected]
www.interconnection.org/sss
Shidhulai focuses on the improvement of isolated
rural communities in Bangladesh, with an emphasis
on bringing environmental training, human rights
awareness, and basic education to children, especially
girls, who would otherwise be unable to attend school.
Previous funding: $84,500 since 2003
Shilpa Children’s Trust (SCT)
$9,000/1,021,500 Sri Lankan rupees
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Director: Nita Gunesekera
[email protected]
SCT provides shelter and quality basic education to
children made destitute by war and terrorism, in addition to offering stimulating activities such as painting
classes, nature walks, and music training.
Previous funding: $116,643 since 2002
Skolta’el Yu’un Jlumaltic (SYJAC)
(Service to Our People)
$10,000/100,000 Mexican pesos
San Cristóbal, Mexico
Director: Sabas Garcia
[email protected]
www.syjac.org.mx
SYJAC works to improve living conditions and
opportunities in the indigenous slums around San
Cristóbal through programs in early childhood development, basic education, health, housing, sanitation,
vocational training, and values.
Previous funding: $8,000 since 2007
Snowland Service Group (SSG)
$10,000/70,000 Chinese yuan
Yushu County, Qinghai Province, China
Director: Rinchen Dawa
[email protected]
www.snowlandsgroup.org
SSG empowers Tibetan communities through sustainable community development projects in education, renewable energy, and basic infrastructure.
Previous funding: $14,000 since 2006
Sociedad Dominico-Haitiana de Apoyo Integral para
el Desarrollo y la Salud (SODHAIDESA)
(Dominican-Haitian Society of Comprehensive
Assistance for Health and Development)
$12,000/394,920 Dominican pesos
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
Director: Frantz Compere
[email protected]
SODHAIDESA works to improve living conditions for
immigrant Haitians and their descendants living in the
Dominican Republic by focusing on the community’s
health and educational needs, especially those of children.
Previous funding: $22,575 since 2005
Society Biliki
(Path Society)
$18,000/25,200 Georgian lari
Gori, Georgia
Director: Mari Mgebrishvili
[email protected]
www.biliki.ge
Biliki assists underprivileged, special-needs, and internally displaced children from the conflict zones of
Abkhazia and South Ossetia.
Previous funding: $61,500 since 2003
www.globalfundforchildren.org
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Society for Education and Action (SEA)
$14,000/560,000 Indian rupees
Mamallapuram, India
Director: S. Desingu
[email protected]
www.seaorg.in
Tbilisi Youth House Foundation (TYHF)
$19,000/33,440 Georgian lari
Tbilisi, Georgia
Director: Nana Doliashvili
[email protected]
www.youthhouses.net
SEA promotes school enrollment and retention for
children in the impoverished fishing communities
south of Chennai, preventing their initial or
continued work on fishing boats or docks.
Previous funding: $67,750 since 2004
TYHF provides a variety of programs that help internally displaced children stay in or return to school,
attend nonformal classes, and practice volunteerism.
Previous funding: $44,000 since 2003
Sujaya Foundation
$6,000/238,800 Indian rupees
Mumbai, India
Director: Neelambari Rao
[email protected]
www.sujayafoundation.org
Sujaya Foundation strives to bridge the digital and
linguistic divide through education and employment
for underprivileged children and youth.
Talented Young People Everywhere (TYPE)
$6,000/17,610,000 Sierra Leonean leones
Port Loko, Sierra Leone
Director: Ibrahim Shaid
[email protected]
TYPE promotes education and academic excellence in Port Loko through mentoring, tutoring,
and material support.
Tanadgoma (Assistance) Library and
Cultural Center for People with Disabilities
$14,000/25,540 Georgian lari
Tbilisi, Georgia
Director: Nana Alexidze
[email protected]
Tanadgoma promotes integrative and inclusive education for children with disabilities by providing them
with basic educational and extracurricular activity programs; facilitating their transition into the mainstream
school system; and educating teachers, parents, and
government officials on issues related to disability.
Previous funding: $28,000 since 2004
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Teboho Trust
$9,000/72,000 South African rand
Johannesburg, South Africa
Director: Jose Bright
[email protected]
www.teboho.com
The Teboho Trust provides academic and psychosocial support to orphaned and vulnerable children
in Soweto and nearby townships through education,
leadership development, personal and social development, and economic empowerment programs.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2007
Ubumi Children’s Project
$7,000/27,090 Zambian kwacha
Kitwe, Zambia
Director: Richard Phiri
[email protected]
www.ubumi.org
Ubumi ensures that community members, rather
than institutions, remain the primary providers for
and caretakers of Kitwe’s orphaned and vulnerable
children by providing a community school, a transitional home for street children, and skills training in
income-generating activities.
Uganda Integrated Child and Youth Care Foundation
$21,000/36,708,000 Ugandan shillings
Kitemu, Uganda
Director: Sserwanga Stephen
[email protected]
www.kitemisch.itgo.com
Uganda Integrated Child and Youth Care Foundation,
formerly known as Kitemu Integrated School, is dedicated to providing quality education and enhanced life
opportunities to children with special needs, orphans,
and low-income students living in the shantytowns on
the outskirts of Kampala.
Previous funding: $58,000 since 2001
Umut Işiği: Kadin, Çevre, Kültür, ve İşletme Kooperatifi
(Light of Hope: Women, Environment, Culture, and
Enterprise Cooperative)
$7,000/8,400 Turkish new lira
Diyarbakir, Turkey
Director: Naside Buluttekin
[email protected]
Umut Işiği provides support, training, and education
to women and children in low-income neighborhoods
and offers early childhood education services for children from infancy to age 6.
United Houma Nation
$8,000
Golden Meadow, Louisiana, United States
Director: Brenda Robichaux
[email protected]
www.unitedhoumanation.org
The United Houma Nation operates youth programs, cultural classes, and community events, as
well as employment training courses and heritage
preservation programs.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2007
Vikasini Girl Child Education Trust
$8,000/318,400 Indian rupees
Secunderabad, India
Director: Indira Jena
[email protected]
www.vikasini.org
Vikasini, through its multidimensional curriculum
and extracurricular activities, promotes self-confidence
among girls by providing them with the chance to
become self-sustaining individuals and informed participants in changing their lives.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2006
Vikramshila Education Resource Society
$15,000/597,000 Indian rupees
Bigha, India
Director: Shubhra Chatterji
[email protected]
www.vikramshila.org
Vikramshila establishes model education programs and
trains government-school teachers in its effort to make
quality education accessible to marginalized sectors of
Indian society, thereby lessening the disparity in educational standards between the wealthy and the poor.
Previous funding: $89,643 since 2002
Women’s Education for Advancement
and Empowerment (WEAVE)
$17,000/542,300 Thai baht
Chiang Mai, Thailand
Director: Maria Urgel
[email protected]
www.weave-women.org
WEAVE works to ensure that displaced Burmese
women and children living in Thailand possess sufficient education for them to participate fully in community life and influence the future development of
their communities.
Previous funding: $22,000 since 2005
Young Playwrights’ Theater (YPT)
$10,000
Washington, DC, United States
Director: David Snider
[email protected]
www.yptdc.org.
YPT fosters literacy, facilitates dialogue on tolerance
and respect, and teaches arts education and conflict
resolution to youth in low-income schools.
Previous funding: $15,000 since 2006
www.globalfundforchildren.org
97
Association for the Development and Enhancement
of Women (ADEW)
$19,000/106,400 Egyptian pounds
Cairo, Egypt
Director: Iman Bibars
[email protected]
www.adew.org
2007–2008 Grants list
Enterprise
We believe that enterprise programs must meet working
children where they are and acknowledge their need to
earn an income, while promoting a more supportive work
environment. This fiscal year, we awarded grants valued
at $466,500 to 40 grantee partners under this portfolio.
Asociación de Comunidades Eclesiales de Base (CEB)
(Association of Grassroots Christian Communities)
$10,000/190,000 Nicaraguan córdobas
Managua, Nicaragua
Director: Jenny Mayorga
[email protected]
Ação Forte
(Strong Action)
$8,000/14,880 Brazilian reais
Campinas, Brazil
Director: Lia Ferreira
[email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]
CEB helps working children in the shantytowns of
Managua reach their full potential by providing scholarships, tutoring, vocational training, and workshops
on leadership and community service.
Previous funding: $23,167 since 2006
Ação Forte helps young people from low-income
neighborhoods in Campinas to complete their formal
education and to develop the skills necessary to transition successfully into the work world.
Previous funding: $6,830 since 2006
Asociación de Defensa de la Vida (ADEVI)
(Association for the Defense of Life)
$18,000/55,980 Peruvian nuevos soles
Huachipa, Peru
Director: Ezequiel Hurtado
[email protected]
www.geocities.com/adeviperu
Alliance for Children and Youth
$9,000/12,600 Bulgarian leva
Sofia, Bulgaria
Director: Mariana Pisarska
[email protected]
www.acybg.org
Recognized as one of the authorities in Bulgaria on
vulnerable children’s issues, the Alliance for Children
and Youth’s 16+ Center offers comprehensive services,
including healthcare, counseling, and educational and
vocational training, to vulnerable, marginalized, unemployed, and homeless youth, 95 percent of whom are
of Roma descent.
Previous funding: $9,000 since 2006
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ADEW provides a safe haven for adolescent girls
and young women in Cairo’s squatter communities to
openly discuss women’s and children’s rights, marriage,
reproductive health, and domestic violence, and ensures
that program participants are able to attain the skills
they need to become self-reliant.
Previous funding: $36,000 since 2004
www.globalfundforchildren.org
ADEVI works to eradicate child labor in the brickmaking kilns of Huachipa by providing child laborers
with nonformal schooling, preventive health education, skills training, and microenterprise development
and cultural awareness programs.
Previous funding: $84,500 since 2002
Association of Community Movements for Social
Action (ACMSA)
$7,000/280,000 Indian rupees
Chennai, India
Director: John Manogaran
[email protected]
Centro Transitorio de Capacitación y Educación
Recreativa El Caracol
(El Caracol Transitional Center for Training and
Recreational Education)
$16,000/160,000 Mexican pesos
Mexico City, Mexico
Director: Juan Martín García
[email protected]; [email protected]
www.elcaracol.org
El Caracol uses a combination of street outreach and
education; life skills workshops; computer training;
enterprise and vocational training; and graphic design,
radio, and print media initiatives to help street children
and youth acquire the skills, attitudes, and assets to
enable them to leave the streets and transform their lives.
Previous funding: $33,800 since 2005
Desarrollo Autogestionario (AUGE)
(Self-Managed Development)
$11,000/110,000 Mexican pesos
San Cristóbal, Mexico
Director: Gloria Agueda García García
ACMSA builds the capacity of and provides vocational [email protected]
www.auge.org.mx
training for Dalit women and adolescent girls in rural
Tamil Nadu, many of whom are unemployed, have
dropped out of school, and live below the poverty line. AUGE promotes women’s economic empowerment
and income generation through self-managed savings
groups, technical training, and leadership workshops,
Center for Women and Children Empowerment (CEWCE) and works with more than 500 working children to
promote asset building, financial literacy, and life plan$6,000/750,000 Liberian dollars
ning, while educating them on issues such as family
Monrovia, Liberia
relations, domestic violence, and drug addiction.
Director: Patience Blay-Attoh
Previous funding: $15,000 since 2006
[email protected]
www.cwcevision.org
CEWCE supports vulnerable children and women
through skills training, leadership development activities, and education, including children’s resource centers
and after-school activities.
Centro de Apoyo al Niño de la Calle de Oaxaca (CANICA)
(Center for the Support of Street Children of Oaxaca)
$15,000/150,000 Mexican pesos
Oaxaca, Mexico
Director: María del Carmen Espinosa
[email protected]
canicadeoaxaca.org
Dream A Dream
$11,000/440,000 Indian rupees
Bengaluru, India
Director: Vishal Talreja
[email protected]
www.dreamadream.org
Dream A Dream empowers vulnerable children and
youth by teaching them the requisite skills to make their
own decisions in life, while concurrently sensitizing the
surrounding community through active volunteering.
Previous funding: $8,970 since 2007
CANICA works with children living and working on
the streets of Oaxaca, primarily from migrant indigenous
families, to promote school enrollment, skills development, health and nutrition, and emotional well-being,
and to ultimately transition these children off the streets.
Previous funding: $32,500 since 2005
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99
Kalinga Mission for Indigenous Children
and Youth Development (KAMICYDI)
$8,000/336,000 Philippine pesos
Gapan City, Philippines
Director: Donato Bumacas
[email protected]
www.freewebs.com/kalingamission
KAMICYDI promotes a cultural and ecologically
sustainable future for indigenous Kalinga communities
in the northern Philippines by using traditional techniques to address the impacts of poverty and environmental degradation and by empowering Kalinga youth
with the skills they need to be productive and to lead
their communities.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2007
Frente de Salud Infantil y Reproductiva de Guatemala
(FESIRGUA)
(Guatemalan Foundation for Child and
Reproductive Health)
$11,000/83,600 Guatemalan quetzales
Chimaltenango, Guatemala
Director: Miguel Cap Patal
[email protected]; [email protected]
FESIRGUA works with poor indigenous communities in the rural highlands of Guatemala to improve
health, education, and overall quality of life, with a
particular focus on child and reproductive health.
Previous funding: $15,000 since 2006
Fundatia Noi Orizonturi
(New Horizons Foundation)
$10,000/23,000 Romanian new lei
Lupeni, Romania
Director: Dana Bates
[email protected]
www.new-horizons.ro
Noi Orizonturi provides youth with adventure education
and service learning to address the lack of interpersonal
trust and the deep culture of corruption in Romania.
Previous funding: $15,000 since 2006
Going to School (GTS)
$20,000/796,000 Indian rupees
New Delhi, India
Director: Lisa Heydlauff
[email protected]
www.goingtoschool.com
GTS is a multimedia project for children that celebrates
every child’s right to go to school and participate in an
inspiring education that is relevant to the child’s life.
Previous funding: $48,500 since 2004
100
www.globalfundforchildren.org
Guaruma
$11,000/209,000 Honduran lempiras
Las Mangas, Honduras
Director: Jimmy Andino
[email protected]; [email protected]
Guaruma uses photography, digital imaging, graphic
design, website design, creative writing, and media
technology to help children living in the endangered
Rio Cangregal watershed develop marketable skills.
Previous funding: $18,000 since 2006
Instituto Fazer Acontecer (IFA)
(Make It Happen Institute)
$13,000/22,100 Brazilian reais
Salvador da Bahia, Brazil
Director: Renato Paes de Andrade
[email protected]
www.fazeracontecer.org.br
IFA offers a combination of sports and citizenship
training to promote teamwork, discipline, and physical
well-being among youth in some of the poorest areas
of Salvador and works to increase their awareness of
the rights and responsibilities of citizens as protagonists in their communities.
Previous funding: $21,500 since 2006
Jeeva Jyothi
(Everlasting Light)
$18,000/720,000 Indian rupees
Thiruvallar district, Chennai, India
Director: Susai Raj
[email protected]
www.jeevajyothi.org
Karm Marg
(Progress through Work)
$11,000/437,800 Indian rupees
Faridabad, India
Director: Veena Lal
[email protected]
www.karmmarg.org
Karm Gaon, a home built by Karm Marg for former
street children, is a model for child-friendly institutions and a place where children and youth learn to
cook, work or study, receive vocational training, play,
and take responsibility for their own lives.
Previous funding: $15,500 since 2005
Kherwadi Social Welfare Association (KSWA)
$7,000/278,600 Indian rupees
Mumbai, India
Director: Kishore Kher
[email protected]
www.yuvaparivartan.org
KSWA provides educational, health, and vocational
training programs to underprivileged youth living in
Mumbai and the surrounding suburbs.
Kudirat Initiative for Democracy (KIND)
$11,000/1,379,400 Nigerian nairas
Lagos, Nigeria
Director: Hafsat Abiola-Costello
[email protected]
www.kind.org
KIND works to empower future generations of Nigerian
women leaders through leadership development and
advocacy programs for girls and young women.
Previous funding: $7,000 since 2006
Love in Action Ethiopia (LIA)
$9,000/81,000 Ethiopian birr
Southern Nations, Nationalities, and Peoples’ Regional
State, Ethiopia
Director: Yohannes Amado
[email protected]
LIA works to bring about sustainable change in the
Hadiya region of Ethiopia through a comprehensive
community development model that focuses on educational opportunities, entrepreneurship training, and
health education for children and youth.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2006
Magic Bus Connect
$13,500/537,300 Indian rupees
Mumbai, India
Director: Matthew Spacie
[email protected]
www.magicbusindia.org
Magic Bus empowers young people growing up in
the slums and streets of India to discover their innate
potential through sports.
Previous funding: $54,500 since 2002
Makkala Jagriti
(Children’s Awareness)
$6,000/238,800 Indian rupees
Bengaluru, India
Director: Joy Srinivasan
[email protected]
www.makkalajagriti.org
Makkala Jagriti focuses on educational and developmental issues and seeks to build a holistic learning environment for emotionally and economically
deprived children.
Men on the Side of the Road (MSR)
$20,000/160,000 South African rand
Woodstock, South Africa
Director: Peter Kratz
[email protected]
www.unemploymen.co.za
MSR provides employment and educational services to
adolescent boys and men who spend their days waiting
for short-term employment opportunities along the
shoulders of major roadways in the Western Cape region.
Previous funding: $42,000 since 2005
Jeeva Jyothi treats both the consequences and the underlying causes of child labor in rice mills near Chennai
through workplace-based nonformal education for children, adult literacy classes, and income generation training.
Previous funding: $76,500 since 2002
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101
Mujejego-Loka (Dawn Light) Women
Development Association
$8,000/27,000 Ethiopian birr
Beninshangul-Gumuz, Ethiopia
Director: Negusu Yifrashewa
[email protected]
Mujejego-Loka works to end the marginalization of
Gumuz women and children by providing nonformal
education programs and training sessions on gender
equality, HIV/AIDS prevention, and effective farming
and marketing techniques for agricultural goods.
Previous funding: $7,000 since 2006
Phulki
(Spark)
$17,000/1,173,000 Bangladeshi taka
Dhaka, Bangladesh
Director: Suraiya Haque
[email protected]
www.phulki.org
Phulki’s child-to-child program trains child leaders
to spread information to other children about sexual
abuse and exploitation, trafficking, child labor, child
rights, gender equality, health and hygiene, and social
values, and provides computer training and other educational support to participants.
Previous funding: $110,143 since 2002
Pravah
(Flow)
$9,000/358,200 Indian rupees
New Delhi, India
Director: Meenu Venkateswaran
[email protected]
www.younginfluencers.com
Started by young professionals, Pravah encourages young
people to become social entrepreneurs and agents of
change and to facilitate positive change in society.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2006
Rural Family Support Organization (RuFamSO)
$12,000/836,040 Jamaican dollars
May Pen, Jamaica
Director: Utealia Burrell
[email protected]
RuFamSO offers guidance, educational support, life
skills training, vocational training, and workshops
on nutrition and personal health to adolescents in
Jamaica’s rural communities.
Previous funding: $28,500 since 2004
102
www.globalfundforchildren.org
Sam-Kam Institute (SKI)
$18,000/52,830,000 Sierra Leonean leones
Freetown, Sierra Leone
Director: Peter Samura
[email protected]
SKI expands career opportunities for vulnerable children and youth through skills training courses and
business development training.
Previous funding: $46,000 since 2003
Sanghamitra Service Society
$17,000/676,600 Indian rupees
Vijayawada, India
Director: Sivaji
[email protected]
www.interconnection.org/sss
Sanghamitra works in more than 100 rural villages in
Andhra Pradesh to help the most marginalized members of Indian society, generally members of the lowest
caste, women, and children, improve their well-being
through increased skills and greater social awareness.
Previous funding: $112,500 since 2003
Shaishav (Childhood) Trust
$11,000/440,000 Indian rupees
Bhavnagar, Gujarat, India
Director: Parul Sheth
[email protected]
www.shaishavchildrights.org
Shaishav helps children understand and actively
defend their basic rights through nonformal education
programs, a mobile library, a children’s collective, and a
financial education program.
Previous funding: $8,000 since 2007
Society for Awareness, Harmony and Equal Rights
(SAHER)
$7,000/280,000 Indian rupees
Mumbai, India
Director: Sheikh Akhtar
[email protected]
SAHER works with youth in the Mumbai suburb of
Jogeshwari to help them accept human differences
and to promote equal rights, justice, and social peace.
Sree Guruvayurappan Bhajan Samaj Trust
(SGBS Trust)
$6,000/238,800 Indian rupees
Bengaluru, India
Director: Ramesh Swamy
[email protected]
www.unnatiblr.org
SGBS Trust delivers far-reaching benefits to economically underprivileged communities by providing
primary education, vocational training for youth, and
cultural enrichment.
Supporting Orphans and Vulnerable for Better
Health, Education, and Nutrition (SOVHEN)
$7,000/8,176,000 Ugandan shillings
Kampala, Uganda
Director: Richard Bbaale
[email protected]; [email protected]
SOVHEN helps orphaned and vulnerable children
attain a better quality of life and an increased life
expectancy through programs in financial literacy,
income generation, education, health, nutrition, and
environmental preservation.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2007
Synapse Network Center
$19,000/7,885,000 CFA francs
Dakar, Senegal
Director: Ciré Kane
[email protected]
www.synapsecenter.org
The Synapse Network Center unleashes the entrepreneurial leadership potential of youth by encouraging
them to start and grow their own initiatives and to
take greater responsibility in their communities.
Previous funding: $68,500 since 2002
Women Development Association (WDA)
$15,000/58,860,000 Cambodian riels
Saang District, Cambodia
Director: Soreach Sereithida
[email protected]
WDA addresses the development needs of impoverished women, youth, and children by working with
communities to achieve long-term sustainable development through capacity building.
Previous funding: $41,000 since 2004
Women in Social Entrepreneurship (WISE)
$8,000/9,816,000 Tanzanian shillings
Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Director: Astronaut Bagile
[email protected]
WISE inspires, empowers, and equips Tanzanian
youth and women leaders through entrepreneurship
and leadership training in the economic, governmental, and social sectors.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2007
YouthWorks
$6,000/252,000 Philippine pesos
Pasig City, Philippines
Director: Audrey Codera
[email protected]
www.youthmicrofinance.com
YouthWorks provides microfinance loans to underprivileged youth entrepreneurs and women in the Philippines
in order to promote economic self-sufficiency.
Warma Tarinakuy
(Assembly of the Children)
$8,000/24,880 Peruvian nuevos soles
Lima, Peru
Director: Ana Vivanco
[email protected]
Warma Tarinakuy, a self-empowerment initiative
managed by 100 adolescent boys who work in the
local wholesale produce market, focuses on achieving
safe and fair working conditions, increasing access to
education and educational support, improving health,
and ensuring adequate nutrition.
Previous funding: $7,000 since 2006
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Associação Beneficente da Criança e do Adolescente
em Situação de Risco
(Beneficent Association for At-Risk Children
and Adolescents)
$6,000/10,200 Brazilian reais
Fortaleza, Brazil
Director: Francisca Nobre
[email protected]
2007–2008 Grants list
Safety
We believe that children’s futures can be secured only
when children are protected from threats to their safety
and insulated from exploitation, violence, abuse, and
neglect. This fiscal year, we awarded grants valued at
$532,500 to 45 grantee partners under this portfolio.
Aangan Trust
$18,000/720,000 Indian rupees
Mumbai, India
Director: Suparna Gupta
[email protected]
www.aanganindia.org
Aangan Trust provides psychological rehabilitation to
juvenile offenders and neglected children in juvenile
detention centers, helping them to deal with past
trauma, resolve their emotional and behavioral problems, and create sustainable change in their lives.
Previous funding: $56,750 since 2004
Ankuram (Sprout) Woman and Child
Development Society
$8,000/318,400 Indian rupees
Hyperabad, India
Director: M. Sumitra
[email protected]
Using a rights-based approach, Ankuram creates a
safe and empowering space for women and children to
strengthen their skills and capacity through education,
shelter, and livelihood opportunities.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2006
104
www.globalfundforchildren.org
Pastoral do Menor (Pastoral Care of the Child), as this
organization is locally known, offers teaching and counseling to street-dwelling children in Fortaleza, helping
them decide for themselves to leave the streets and enter
a safer environment.
Asociatia pentru Libertatea si Egalitatea de Gen
(ALEG)
(Association for Liberty and Gender Equality)
$9,000/21,600 Romanian new lei
Sibiu, Romania
Director: Camelia Blaga
[email protected]
www.aleg-romania.eu
ALEG promotes gender equality and fights genderbased violence and discrimination in Romania through
inclusive, empowering, and supportive programs for
young people.
Previous funding: $7,000 since 2006
Associação Barraca da Amizade
(Shelter of Friendship Association)
$11,000/18,700 Brazilian reais
Fortaleza, Brazil
Director: Brigitte Louchez
[email protected]
Barraca da Amizade offers transitional housing, psychosocial counseling, academic tutoring, and vocational
training to boys who live on the streets and often engage
in high-risk behaviors such as gang activity, substance
abuse, and petty crime.
Previous funding: $15,000 since 2006
Association d’Appui et d’Eveil Pugsada (ADEP)
(Association of Support and Coming of Age)
$16,000/6,640,000 CFA francs
Yatenga Province, Burkina Faso
Director: Marie Léa Gama Zongo
[email protected]
ADEP fights exploitation and violence against girls,
educating them about AIDS and reproductive health and
helping society better understand the effects on girls of
early and forced marriages, the dangers of female circumcision, and the importance of girls’ education.
Previous funding: $32,000 since 2005
Association des Jeunes pour le Développement
Intégré–Kakundu (AJEDI–Ka)
(Youth Association for Integrated Development–Kakundu)
$13,000/7,280,000 Congolese francs
Uvira, Democratic Republic of the Congo
Director: Bukeni Tete Waruzi Beck
[email protected]; [email protected]
AJEDI–Ka works to protect children affected by conflict—
including former child soldiers—through its demobilization, rehabilitation, and reintegration programs.
Previous funding: $20,500 since 2005
Association du Foyer de l’Enfant Libanais (AFEL)
(Lebanese Child Home Association)
$14,000/21,182,000 Lebanese pounds
Beirut, Lebanon
Director: Simone Warde
[email protected]; [email protected]
www.afelonline.org
AFEL serves orphans, at-risk children, and struggling
families through literacy classes, youth clubs, summer
camps, workshops, and a public-education program
aimed at strengthening family ties.
Previous funding: $27,500 since 2004
Association Jeunesse Actions Mali (AJA Mali)
(Youth Action Association of Mali)
$16,000/16,000 CFA francs
Bamako, Mali
Director: Souleymane Sarr
[email protected]
www.cyberbamako.org.ml/aja
AJA Mali provides basic education and life skills training
to out-of-school and working youth, including long-term
apprenticeships in carpentry, masonry, plumbing, metalworking, and mechanics.
Previous funding: $41,000 since 2003
Association La Lumière
(The Light Association)
$16,000/6,640,000 CFA francs
Tambacounda, Senegal
Director: Ibrahima Diallo
[email protected]
La Lumière promotes the well-being of street children,
female domestic workers, migrant families, and other
marginalized populations living in rural and underdeveloped areas.
Previous funding: $33,000 since 2005
www.globalfundforchildren.org
105
Association of People for Practical
Life Education (APPLE)
$10,000/94,550,000 Ghanaian cedis
Accra, Ghana
Director: Jack Dawson
[email protected]
APPLE offers community outreach, health, and education programs designed to end child trafficking in fishing villages in Ghana’s Lake Volta region.
Previous funding: $7,000 since 2006
Atina
$6,000/358,200 Serbian dinars
Belgrade, Serbia
Director: Ksenija Burzan Mandic
[email protected]
www.atina.org.yu
Atina provides long-term, direct assistance to women and
children who are victims of trafficking and sexual or labor
exploitation, helping them overcome their trauma and
gain the confidence to successfully reenter community life.
Avenir de l’Enfant (ADE)
(Future of the Child)
$13,000/5,395,000 CFA francs
Rufisque, Senegal
Director: Moussa Sow
[email protected]
ADE works in the city of Rufisque to safeguard children living on the streets and other at-risk youth from
sexual abuse and other forms of exploitation.
Previous funding: $18,000 since 2006
Center for Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect
(CPCAN)
$8,000/9,328,000 Mongolian tugriks
Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia
Director: Baigalmaa Sunren
[email protected]
www.stopchildabuse.org.mn
CPCAN provides legal, rehabilitative, and psychosocial support for children who have been victims of
violence and abuse.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2007
CDR promotes local development, economic opportunity, and improved quality of life for vulnerable women
and children in the mining region of Potosí and works
to prevent child labor in the mines by providing viable
economic and educational alternatives.
Previous funding: $17,500 since 2006
ESC offers a range of integrated programs for vulnerable children and focuses on child safety, child education, and child rights and health training.
Children on the Edge (COTE)
$11,000/25,300 Romanian new lei
Iasi, Romania
Director: Iulian Mocanu
[email protected]
www.childrenontheedge.org
CEADEL works to eliminate the use of child laborers
and to improve conditions and educational opportunities for young people who work in Guatemala’s agribusiness industry.
Previous funding: $67,500 since 2003
COTE offers social assistance, counseling, and support to children and teenagers who are in or who have
recently left state-run orphanages in the impoverished
region of Moldavia.
Previous funding: $14,000 since 2006
Centro de Estudos e Ação em Atenção à Infância
e as Drogas Excola
(Excola Center for Research and Action on Childhood
and Drug Use)
$11,000/18,700 Brazilian reais
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Director: Elizabeth Oliveira
[email protected]; [email protected]
Children’s Legal Rights and Development Center
(CLRD)
$10,000/420,000 Philippine pesos
Quezon City, Philippines
Director: Rowena Legaspi
[email protected]
Centar za Integraciju Mladih (CIM)
(Center for Youth Integration)
$10,000/597,000 Serbian dinars
Belgrade, Serbia
Director: Milica Djordjevic
[email protected]
www.cim.org.yu
Excola helps youth living on the streets of Rio de
Janeiro—including teenage mothers—to change their
lives through basic education, technical and vocational
training, counseling, transitional housing, and a youthrun community radio program.
Previous funding: $14,000 since 2006
CIM works to empower and fully integrate orphans
and street children into their communities by offering
outreach and intervention that provides access to shelter,
healthcare, and social services; educates the children on
their rights; and teaches them practical skills.
Previous funding: $7,000 since 2006
Centro Interdisciplinario para el Desarrollo Social
(CIDES)
(Interdisciplinary Center for Social Development)
$14,000/153,020 Mexican pesos
Mexico City, Mexico
Director: Carlos Romero
[email protected]
www.globalfundforchildren.org
Equal Step Centre (ESC)
$7,500/8,917,500 Mongolian tugriks
Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia
Director: T. S. Battuya
[email protected]
www.equalstepcentre.blogspot.com
Centro de Estudios y Apoyo para el Desarrollo Local
(CEADEL)
(Center for Study and Support for Local Development)
$18,000/138,780 Guatemalan quetzales
Chimaltenango, Guatemala
Director: José Gabriel Zelada Ortiz
[email protected]
CIDES supports indigenous migrant children in
Mexico City through programs in education, community mobilization, and social intervention.
Previous funding: $21,000 since 2005
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Centro para el Desarrollo Regional (CDR)
(Center for Regional Development)
$13,000/96,200 Bolivian bolivianos
Potosí, Bolivia
Director: Wilhelm Pierola Iturralde
[email protected]
CLRD provides legal assistance to juvenile offenders,
documentation for advocacy purposes, rehabilitation and
welfare support for released juvenile detainees, and training and education.
Previous funding: $27,500 since 2004
Community Outreach Programme (CORP)
$8,000/320,000 Indian rupees
Mumbai, India
Director: Anna Fernandes
[email protected]
www.corpindia.org
CORP assists children living in the slums of Mumbai
and reaches out to girls living on the streets through
rehabilitation and reintegration programs.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2007
Gender Education, Research and Technologies
Foundation (GERT)
$14,000/16,800 Bulgarian leva
Sofia, Bulgaria
Director: Jivka Marinova
[email protected]
www.gert.ngo-bg.org
GERT raises public awareness on issues linked to
gender stereotypes, teaches young people about
reproductive rights and HIV/AIDS, and improves
gender relations among youth to reduce gender-based
violence and sexual exploitation.
Previous funding: $37,000 since 2004
Girls Educational and Mentoring Services (GEMS)
$17,000
New York, New York, United States
Director: Rachel Lloyd
[email protected]
www.gems-girls.org
GEMS provides educational, transitional, vocational,
and counseling services to sexually exploited young
women in order to empower them to exit unsafe or
abusive situations.
Previous funding: $66,500 since 2004
Instituto para el Desarrollo de la Mujer y la Infancia
(IDEMI)
(Institute for the Development of Women and Children)
$8,000
Panama City, Panama
Director: Bertha Vargas
[email protected]
IDEMI works with vulnerable children and youth to
supplement their formal education and raise awareness
about child labor, preventive healthcare, gender equity,
and civic participation.
Previous funding: $7,500 since 2006
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Jabala Action Research Organisation
$13,000/517,400 Indian rupees
Kolkata, India
Director: Baitali Ganguly
[email protected]
www.jabala.org
Laura Vicuña Foundation (LVF)
$13,000/546,000 Philippine pesos
Negros Occidental, Philippines
Director: Maria Victoria Santa Ana
[email protected]
www.lauravicuna.com
Through educational support, healthcare, and
rights awareness programs, Jabala Action Research
Organisation helps children in the red-light districts
of Kolkata and surrounding areas to better integrate
into mainstream society.
Previous funding: $26,143 since 2005
LVF builds children’s capacities through educational
and development programs, including drop-in centers,
vocational and employment training, and a residential
program for sexually abused and exploited girls.
Previous funding: $29,000 since 2004
Kiev Children and Youth Support Center
$8,000/40,000 Ukrainian hryvnia
Kiev, Ukraine
Director: Bogdan Bashtovy
[email protected]
The Support Center, founded by orphanage graduates
and staff, serves young people who age out of Kiev’s
orphanages and offers them legal, medical, psychological, and financial assistance.
Previous funding: $5,000 since 2007
La Conscience
(Conscience)
$19,000/7,885,000 CFA francs
Tsévié, Togo
Director: Kodjo Djissenou
[email protected]
La Conscience works to prevent the trafficking and
exploitation of Togo’s impoverished children, who are
easily lured away by traffickers and put to work on agricultural plantations in neighboring countries.
Previous funding: $60,000 since 2003
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Ministerio Tiempo Decisivo
(Decisive Time Ministry)
$9,000/306,000 Dominican pesos
Santiago, Dominican Republic
Director: Pablo Ureña Rodriguez
[email protected]
Prisoners Assistance Program (PAP)
$12,000/750,000 Liberian dollars
Monrovia, Liberia
Director: R. Jarwlee Geegbe
[email protected]
www.pap.kabissa.org
Ministerio Tiempo Decisivo created the Children with
a Hope program to provide academic support, life skills
training, health education, and personal development
opportunities to more than 200 kids who previously lived
and worked in the Santiago garbage dump.
Previous funding: $10,000 since 2007
PAP advocates against torture and for human rights and
prison reform, while working to keep first-time offenders from entering prison and preparing incarcerated
male juveniles for adult life outside of prison.
Previous funding: $17,250 since 2005
Movimiento para el Auto-Desarrollo Internacional
de la Solidaridad (MAIS)
(Movement for International Self-Development
and Solidarity)
$14,000/476,000 Dominican pesos
Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic
Director: Maria Josefina Paulino
[email protected]
MAIS keeps girls and young women in Puerto Plata
out of the sex tourism industry by promoting school
enrollment; offering academic support, vocational training, and psychosocial services; and strengthening family
and community support structures.
Previous funding: $49,700 since 2001
Luna Nueva
(New Moon)
$18,000/89,550,000 Paraguayan guaranies
Asunción, Paraguay
Director: Raquel Fernandez
[email protected]
www.grupolunanueva.com.py
New Life Community Projects
$8,000/64,000 South African rand
Stellenbosch, South Africa
Director: Gerrie Smit
[email protected]
www.sun.ac.za/newlife
Luna Nueva works to eradicate violence against
women and children through programs in education,
healthcare, self-esteem, human rights awareness, and
violence prevention.
Previous funding: $84,000 since 2002
New Life assists children who live on the streets in
Cape Town’s informal settlements through communitybased home schools, psychosocial support groups, and
partnerships with the public school system.
Previous funding: $5,000 since 2007
Media Concern Initiative
$7,000/877,800 Nigerian nairas
Lagos, Nigeria
Director: Princess Olufemi-Kayode
[email protected]
www.mediaconcern.kabissa.org
Prisoners Assistance Nepal (PA Nepal)
$6,000/385,800 Nepalese rupees
Kathmandu, Nepal
Director: Indira Ranamagar
[email protected]
www.panepal.org
Media Concern Initiative works to prevent and respond
to the sexual abuse of children and youth through education, direct services, and advocacy initiatives.
By introducing the concept of community parenting
and by working with prisoners and their children, PA
Nepal implements reform, rehabilitation, and welfare
programs in Nepal’s prisons.
Protecting Environment and Children Everywhere
(PEACE)
$16,000/1,728,000 Sri Lankan rupees
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Director: Maureen Seneviratne
[email protected]
www.lanka.net.charity/peace
PEACE works to prevent children from entering the
commercial sex trade by offering nonformal-education
and skills training programs and increases community
awareness of child abuse and exploitation.
Previous funding: $105,143 since 2000
Ser Paz
(Being Peace)
$8,000
Guayaquil, Ecuador
Director: Nelsa Curbelo
[email protected]
www.serpaz.org
Ser Paz works with boys and young men in
Guayaquil’s gangs to promote a culture of peace and
to provide constructive alternatives to gang violence
and crime, through training in leadership, citizenship, conflict resolution, information technology, and
microenterprise management.
SIN-DO
$16,000/6,640,000 CFA francs
Cotonou, Benin
Director: Flore-Emma Mongbo
[email protected]
SIN-DO promotes health and hygiene awareness; supports quality education; and provides training in civic
participation, economic development, and HIV/AIDS
prevention to women and children living in marginalized communities in and around Cotonou.
Previous funding: $32,000 since 2005
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2007–2008 Grants list
Sociedad Amigos de los Niños (SAN)
(Friends of Children Society)
$17,000/320,280 Honduran lempiras
Tegucigalpa, Honduras
Director: Nina Rodriguez
[email protected]
www.saninos.org
Uasdruzenje Nova Generacija
(New Generation Association)
$6,000/7,200 Bosnia and Herzegovina convertible marka
Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina
Director: Bojan Arula
[email protected]
www.newgeneration.cfsites.org
SAN protects the rights of young domestic workers in
Honduras and provides these girls and young women with
alternative skills and means of supporting themselves.
Previous funding: $64,000 since 2003
Based in Bosnia’s Serb territories, Nova Generacija
operates a mentoring program for vulnerable children
and youth, many of whom are living with foster families,
in orphanages, on the streets, in medical institutions, or
in juvenile delinquent halls.
Previous funding: $5,000 since 2007
Society Undertaking Poor People’s Onus for
Rehabilitation (SUPPORT)
$10,000/398,000 Indian rupees
Mumbai, India
Director: Sujata Ganega
[email protected]
www.supportstreetchildren.org
SUPPORT offers treatment and rehabilitation for street
children who are drug users through residential programs
that give boys and girls shelter, food, healthcare,
vocational training, and education.
Previous funding: $8,000 since 2006
Tasintha (Deeper Transformation) Programme
$18,000/63,270,000 Zambian kwacha
Lusaka, Zambia
Director: Clotilda Phiri
[email protected]
Yanapanakusun
(Let’s Help Each Other)
$9,000/27,990 Peruvian nuevos soles
Cusco, Peru
Director: Ronald Herrera
[email protected]
Yanapanakusun helps girls working as domestic
servants in Peru to reclaim their lives by providing
temporary and longer-term shelter, formal education, healthcare, legal identification, and programs
that reinforce their self-esteem, cultural identity, and
understanding of their rights.
Previous funding: $8,500 since 2006
We recognize that healthy minds and bodies are an
important path to dignity and productivity. This fiscal
year, we awarded grants valued at $318,500 to 33
grantee partners under this portfolio.
Action pour la Promotion des Droits de l’Enfant au
Burkina Faso (APRODEB)
(Action for the Promotion of the Rights of the
Burkinabe Child)
$16,000/7,520,000 CFA francs
Gorgadji, Burkina Faso
Director: Kabore Goamwaoga
[email protected]
APRODEB provides working children and their families with skills training, literacy programs, and healthcare
initiatives and assists young people in developing their
own strategies to promote and protect children’s rights.
Previous funding: $33,000 since 2004
Amahoro Association
$9,000/4,896,000 Rwandan francs
Kigali, Rwanda
Directors: Eric Rwabuhihi and Kayitare Wayitare Dembe
[email protected]
www.chabha.org
Amahoro Association offers home-based care and support to orphaned and vulnerable children in Rwanda
through education programs, post-trauma counseling,
skills workshops, and microenterprise training.
Previous funding: $7,000 since 2006
Ascensions Community Services
$9,000
Washington, DC, United States
Director: Satira Streeter
[email protected]
www.2ascend.org
Ascensions provides disadvantaged and low-income
children living east of the Anacostia River with individualized, culturally relevant assistance that helps them
to improve their interpersonal relationships and make
positive contributions to their communities.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2007
Asociación Civil Hamiraya
(Hamiraya Civil Association)
$6,000/44,400 Bolivian bolivianos
Cochabamba, Bolivia
Director: Veronica Bustillos de Guerra
[email protected];
[email protected]
Asociación Civil Hamiraya’s community center offers
art, music, sports, nutrition programs, and academic
and psychosocial support to the most marginalized
children in Cochabamba, many of whom are either
abandoned or live in the nearby San Sebastian prison
with an incarcerated parent.
Tasintha prevents women and children from entering the sex trade by giving them alternative incomegeneration skills and by raising community awareness
about sexual exploitation.
Previous funding: $65,534 since 2003
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Associação de Apoio às Meninas e Meninos da Região
Sé (AA Criança)
(Association for Support of Girls and Boys of the
Sé Region)
$13,000/22,440 Brazilian reais
São Paulo, Brazil
Director: Everaldo Santos Oliveira
[email protected]
www.aacrianca.org.br
AA Criança defends the rights of the poorest and most
marginalized children and youth of central São Paulo
by offering a comprehensive range of legal, educational,
psychological, social, and health-related services.
Previous funding: $26,000 since 2005
Association des Artistes et Artisans contre le
VIH/SIDA et les Stupifiants (AARCOSIS)
(Association of Artists and Artisans against
HIV/AIDS and Drugs)
$7,000/2,905,000 CFA francs
Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Director: Pyanne Djire
[email protected]
AARCOSIS engages musicians, artists, and artisans in
the battle against HIV/AIDS and drug abuse by helping them integrate anti-AIDS and anti-drug messages
into their work.
Previous funding: $8,500 since 2006
Ba Futuru
(For the Future)
$12,000
Dili, Timor-Leste
Director: Sierra James
[email protected]
www.bafuturu.org
Ba Futuru works to create a positive future for children
in orphanages by using creative arts, including roleplaying, trust exercises, art, and drama, for the psychological and emotional rehabilitation of the children.
Previous funding: $10,000 since 2006
Carolina for Kibera
$16,000/992,000 Kenyan shillings
Nairobi, Kenya
Director: Salim Mohammed
[email protected]
http://cfk.unc.edu/binti-pamoja
Carolina for Kibera promotes youth leadership and ethnic
and gender cooperation through sports, young women’s
empowerment, and community development in the
densely populated and impoverished Kibera urban slum.
Previous funding: $23,000 since 2006
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Center for the Protection of Children’s Rights (CPCR)
$19,000/606,100 Thai baht
Bangkok, Thailand
Director: Sanphasit Koompraphant
[email protected]
CPCR works to prevent and confront the physical
abuse, sexual exploitation, and neglect of children
throughout Southeast Asia and to reintegrate affected
children into society.
Previous funding: $42,000 since 2003
Centro de Documentação e Informação Coisa
de Mulher (CEDOICOM)
(Center for Documentation and Information
on Women’s Issues)
$12,000/22,320 Brazilian reais
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
Director: Neusa das Dores Pereira
[email protected]
www.coisademulher.org.br
CEDOICOM provides education on reproductive
health, commercial sexual exploitation, child labor,
and HIV/AIDS for women and girls who face discrimination due to gender, race, sexual orientation,
or socioeconomic status.
Previous funding: $25,000 since 2004
Club 21–Udruženja za Pozitivnu Komunikaciju
(Association for Positive Communication)
$5,000/298,500 Serbian dinars
Subotica, Serbia
Director: Dezso Kiss
[email protected]
www.mesecina.subotica.net
Club 21 strengthens the communication skills of
young people from diverse backgrounds, including
out-of-school, impoverished, and minority children,
and empowers them to express their thoughts, personalities, and creativity.
Dreamcatchers Foundation
$10,000/400,000 Indian rupees
Mumbai, India
Director: Sonali Ojha
dreamcatc[email protected]
Dreamcatchers uses a participatory, child-centered
methodology that helps children coping with grief,
destruction, and violence to see the possibilities in life
and to find healing, strength, and confidence.
Previous funding: $8,000 since 2007
Education as a Vaccine against AIDS (EVA)
$18,000/2,106,000 Nigerian nairas
Abuja, Nigeria
Director: Fadekemi Akinfaderin
[email protected]
www.evanigeria.org
Incest Trauma Center (ITC)
$9,000/46,800 Serbian dinars
Belgrade, Serbia
Director: Dusica Popadic
[email protected]
www.incesttraumacentar.org.yu
EVA works to empower Nigerian youth living with
HIV/AIDS and to raise awareness and foster positive
habits among those who are uninfected.
Previous funding: $59,000 since 2003
Targeting the most vulnerable citizens—Roma, refugee,
and orphaned children—ITC provides counseling for
children and female victims of domestic violence and
sexual assault and operates a 24-hour crisis hotline.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2007
Fundación Chocó Joven
(Young Chocó Foundation)
$6,000/12,186,000 Colombian pesos
Quibdó, Colombia
Director: Jose Murillo
[email protected]; [email protected]
[email protected]; [email protected]
Fundación Chocó Joven employs a combination of
educational, vocational, cultural, health, and human
rights programs in the slum communities around
Quibdó to promote leadership and empowerment
among local youth, most of whom were displaced by
Colombia’s armed conflict.
Fundación Simsa
(Simsa Foundation)
$7,000/14,217,000 Colombian pesos
Bogotá, Colombia
Director: Lida Alarcon
[email protected]
Through its flagship Boquitas Sanas (Healthy Little
Mouths) program, Fundación Simsa operates one-day
mobile dental clinics for children in poor neighborhoods throughout Bogotá.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2006
Grandmothers against Poverty and AIDS (GAPA)
$6,000/48,000 South African rand
Cape Town, South Africa
Director: Kathleen Brodrick
[email protected]
www.gapa.org.za
GAPA coordinates HIV/AIDS education, skills training,
and community-based psychosocial support groups for
grandmothers affected by the AIDS epidemic, many of
whom are raising grandchildren orphaned by AIDS, and
offers after-school tutoring, mentoring, and support to
orphaned and vulnerable children.
Integrated Community Health Services (INCHES)
$10,000/620,000 Kenyan shillings
Kisumu, Kenya
Director: Kitche Magak
[email protected]
INCHES provides quality integrated healthcare services to vulnerable children and youth living on the shores
and remote islands of Lake Victoria, trains teachers
in basic counseling, and provides in-school counseling
services for children.
Previous funding: $14,000 since 2006
Jinpa Project
$13,000/91,000 Chinese yuan
Nangchen, China
Director: Tashi Tsering
[email protected]
www.jinpa.org
The Jinpa Project works in the most remote areas of
Yushu Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture to relieve the
poverty of nomadic and semi-nomadic communities
by creating physical infrastructure, increasing access to
education and healthcare, and providing health education to primary-school children.
Previous funding: $27,000 since 2005
Kolkata Sanved
(Kolkata Sensitivity)
$9,000/360,000 Indian rupees
Kolkata, India
Director: Sohini Chakroborty
[email protected]
http://kolkatasanved.org
Kolkata Sanved promotes dance movement as a therapeutic tool for the most vulnerable and underprivileged
segments of society, including street children, victims of
trafficking or violence, children of prostitutes, youth living in slum areas, and other at-risk children.
Previous funding: $7,376 since 2007
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Reginald Orsmond Counselling Services (ROCS)
$7,500/52,500 South African rand
Johannesburg, South Africa
Director: Johanna Kistner
[email protected]
ROCS offers community-based psychosocial support to
vulnerable populations in Johannesburg, including children
and families affected by HIV/AIDS, women who are
victims of domestic violence, and displaced populations.
Rozan
$10,000/630,000 Pakistani rupees
Islamabad, Pakistan
Director: Zehra Kamal
[email protected]
www.rozan.org
LovingSource Information Center (LSIC)
$6,000/42,000 Chinese yuan
Beijing, China
Director: Xiang Yang Cheng
[email protected]
www.aids-care.org
LSIC works to defend and enhance the human dignity
of people infected or affected by HIV/AIDS in China
by improving basic health conditions and psychosocial
care and by addressing the psychosocial needs of HIV/
AIDS-affected children.
Neng Guan Performing Arts Training Center
$8,000/56,000 Chinese yuan
Ruili, China
Director: Ying Zhong Zhang
[email protected]
www.nengguan.com
Neng Guan raises awareness of the dangers of drug
use and reduces stigma against HIV/AIDS among
rural and ethnic communities through public outreach
performances carried out by underprivileged minority
youth trained by Neng Guang in traditional arts such
as singing and dancing.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2007
Nia Foundation
$8,000/27,000 Ethiopian birr
Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Director: Zemi Yenus
[email protected]
Nia Foundation supports vulnerable children through
programs for girls involved in commercial sex work,
comprehensive services for children with mental challenges, and a support group for parents.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2006
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Pazapa
(Step by Step)
$9,000/342,000 Haitian gourdes
Jacmel, Haiti
Director: Marika MacRae
[email protected]
www.pazapa.org
Pazapa serves children with physical and mental disabilities by providing formal schooling, physical therapy,
psychosocial support, orthopedic surgery, nutritious
meals, and family counseling and training.
Previous funding: $7,000 since 2007
Physicians for Social Justice (PSJ)
$6,000/702,000 Nigerian nairas
Kontagora, Nigeria
Director: Chukwumuanya Igboekwu
[email protected]
PSJ promotes community health by advancing human
rights and social justice and works to provide rural
communities in Niger State with essential health services through initiatives such as mobile health units
that educate and serve children.
Projecto de Vida para Crianças e Jovens (PROVIDA)
(Life Project for Children and Youth)
$6,000/122,500 Mozambican meticais
Maputo, Mozambique
Director: Cremildo Gonçalves
[email protected]; [email protected]
www.providamz.blogspot.com
Rozan’s Youth Help Line program provides a safe
avenue for young people to learn about emotional,
sexual, and reproductive health issues, enabling them
to make informed and healthy decisions in their lives.
Previous funding: $32,000 since 2004
Ruili Women and Children Development Center
(RWCDC)
$14,000/150,000 Chinese yuan
Ruili, China
Director: Chen Guilan
[email protected]
RWCDC works to improve the overall well-being of
neglected or sexually exploited women and children
living in Ruili County, which borders Myanmar, with a
particular focus on raising awareness about HIV/AIDS
and other sexually transmitted diseases.
Previous funding: $24,000 since 2004
Synergie pour l’Enfance
(Synergy for Childhood)
$10,000/4,700,000 CFA francs
Thiaroye, Senegal
Director: Ngagne Mbaye
[email protected]
Synergie pour l’Enfance offers comprehensive prevention and treatment services to children affected or
infected by HIV/AIDS, with targeted services to children in rural regions and to street children.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2006
Youth Activist Organization
$8,000/28,120,000 Zambian kwacha
Lusaka, Zambia
Director: Matauka Muliokela
[email protected]
Youth Activist Organization organizes children’s and
youth soccer teams that raise community awareness
about reproductive health and HIV/AIDS.
Previous funding: $5,000 since 2007
Yugoslav Association for Culture
and Education of Roma ( JAK-ER)
$6,000/312,000 Serbian dinars
Leskovac, Serbia
Director: Marjan Muratovic
[email protected]
www.jaker.org.yu
Located in isolated and impoverished southern Serbia,
JAK-ER was founded by a Roma doctor and works
for the advancement of health education in the Roma
population, providing healthcare to youth and health
education to youth, pregnant women, new mothers, and
those at increased risk of contracting HIV.
Salus
$8,000/16,248,000 Colombian pesos
Urabá, Colombia
Director: Loren Callejas
[email protected]
Salus provides psychosocial support to children and
youth displaced by Colombia’s armed conflict, many of
whom were either victims or witnesses of unspeakable
violence and destruction.
Previous funding: $6,000 since 2006
PROVIDA uses sports, arts, and culture to teach children and youth about health, with a focus on HIV/
AIDS prevention.
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2007–2008 Grants list
Creative
Opportunities
We believe in exploring innovative solutions to the
varied problems that young people face and in using
creative arts to raise public awareness of issues affecting
children and youth. This fiscal year, we awarded grants
valued at $37,500 to 5 grantee partners under this portfolio. An additional $11,700 for 4 special grants was
given under the Presidential Innovation Fund.
Big Brother Mouse
$6,000/52,416,000 Laotian kips
Luang Prabang, Laos
Director: Khamla Panyasouk
[email protected]
www.bigbrothermouse.com
Big Brother Mouse offers opportunities for local talents to create and publish books in the Lao language
and brings books to rural children, many of whom
have not seen or owned a book that is not part of
their school curriculum.
Çocuklar Ayni Çati Altinda Dernegi (ÇAÇA)
(Children Under the Same Roof Association)
$8,000/9,600 Turkish new lira
Diyarbakir, Turkey
Director: Azize Leygara
[email protected]
ÇAÇA seeks to reduce the number of children working on the streets in conflict-torn areas of southeastern Turkey by operating a mentoring and creative-arts
program that incorporates role-playing, dance, visual
arts, and theater.
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Rural Human Rights Activists Program (RHRAP)
$6,000/375,000 Liberian dollars
Monrovia, Liberia
Director: Lorma Baysah
[email protected]
RHRAP works to promote ethnic tolerance, human
rights, and democracy in Liberia through advocacy
and peace education programs for children and adults.
Sanggar Anak Akar
(Workshop, Child, Root)
$7,500/68,370,000 Indonesian rupiahs
Jakarta, Indonesia
Director: Ivone Terri
[email protected]
Sanggar Anak Akar teaches children to respect one
another and strives to create a safe space to nurture
the physical and emotional well-being of marginalized
young people, specifically those living in slums, near
garbage dumps, and on the streets.
Words, Beats, Life
$10,000
Washington, DC, United States
Director: Mazi Mutafa
[email protected] www.wblinc.org
Presidential Innovation Fund
Breakthrough DC
$2,500
Washington, DC, United States
Director: Jessica Heard
[email protected]
www.breakthroughcollaborative.org
Breakthrough creates youth-led educational spaces to
help underserved middle-school students build their
academic skills and get on the path to college, while
providing high-school and college students with the
opportunity to explore the teaching profession.
Global Goods Partners (GGP)
$3,000
New York, NY, United States
Directors: Joan Shifrin and Catherine Shimony
[email protected]
www.globalgoodspartners.org
GGP’s Global Classroom initiative educates US students about the marginalized communities worldwide
with which GGP works and about global issues such
as fair trade, women’s and children’s rights, peace
building, poverty, and ecology.
Previous funding: $15,000 since 2006
GUA (Peace) Africa
$5,000
Wiltshire, United Kingdom
Director: Ruth Gumm
[email protected]
www.guaafricaonline.com
GUA Africa was founded by former child soldier
Emmanuel Jal to bring educational opportunities to
children in Sudan and sub-Saharan Africa whose
lives, families, and communities have been devastated
by war and poverty.
Washington Youth Choir (WYC)
$1,200
Washington, DC, United States
Director: Megan Cheek
[email protected]
www.washingtonyouthchoir.org
WYC targets DC-area youth who have little or no access
to in-school arts programs or after-school extracurricular
activities and uses the rigorous study and performance of
music to enhance students’ educational experience and
facilitate their transition out of high school.
Words, Beats, Life aims to transform communities
through hip-hop culture and provides job training and
enterprise support to prepare youth for employment.
www.globalfundforchildren.org
117
Pakistan Earthquake
2007–2008 Grants list
Responding
to Crisis
We believe that in times of crisis, community-based
groups are in the best position to respond immediately
since they know the people and the local areas affected.
This fiscal year, we awarded grants valued at $317, 300
to 49 grantee partners under this portfolio.
Recovery and Renewal grants
This fiscal year, we awarded 19 grants valued at
$256,000 to existing grantee partners or affiliates
working in areas where a crisis has been declared
over but where reconstruction is ongoing.
Moore Community House (MCH)
$10,000
Biloxi, Mississippi, United States
Director: Carol Burnett
[email protected]
www.moorecommunityhouse.org
A longstanding provider of early childhood education
to low-income children in economically depressed
Biloxi, MCH was devastated by Hurricane Katrina
and is still rebuilding and renovating its buildings.
Previous funding: $8,500 since 2007
Hurricane Katrina
118
Awesome Girls Mentoring Program
$19,000
New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
Director: James Rogers
[email protected]
Vietnamese Initiative in Economic Training (VIET)
$10,000
New Orleans East, Louisiana, United States
Director: Cyndi Nguyen
[email protected]
www.vietno.org
Awesome Girls provides a safe space in the Treme
neighborhood of New Orleans for African American
girls to learn and practice leadership, conflict management, and decision-making skills that will help them
become self-sufficient and self-confident adults.
Previous funding: $19,000 since 2006
VIET, a community and youth development organization, serves the predominantly Vietnamese American
community in New Orleans East through education
and job-training programs and by providing disaster
recovery assistance to neighborhood residents.
Previous funding: $8,500 since 2006
KID smART
$12,000
New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
Director: Echo Olander
[email protected]
Zion Travelers Cooperative Center (ZTCC)
$14,500
Phoenix, Louisiana, United States
Director: Tyronne Edwards
[email protected]
www.ziontcc.org
Through artists in residence, after-school programs,
and summer camps, KID smART offers students in
New Orleans’s struggling public schools a robust arts
program that includes visual arts, poetry, dance, circus
arts, and acting components.
Previous funding: $18,000 since 2006
Based in rural Louisiana, ZTCC works hand in hand
with community members to help them obtain basic
material goods and rebuild their lives.
Previous funding: $19,000 since 2007
www.globalfundforchildren.org
De Laas Gul (Hand-Embroidered Flower)
Welfare Programme (DLG)
$13,500/850,000 Pakistani rupees
Peshawar, Pakistan
Director: Meraj Khan
[email protected]
www.dlg.org.pk
Founded in 1976 as a microenterprise organization for
women, DLG has since developed into a leading voice
against child labor and for women’s empowerment,
and offers literacy and skills training programs for
earthquake-affected youth in Mansehra.
Previous funding: $57,143 since 2004
Doosti Pakistan
$8,000/504,000 Pakistani rupees
Peshawar, Pakistan
Director: Mr. Tassawar
[email protected]
One of the few organizations in the North-West
Frontier Province of Pakistan with staff trained in
a variety of psychological methods and techniques,
Doosti Pakistan has helped over 3,000 children, youth,
and women move beyond the 2005 Pakistan earthquake disaster and rebuild their lives.
Previous funding: $11,000 since 2007
Interfaith Dialogue and Research Center (IDRC)
$8,000/504,000 Pakistani rupees
Islamabad, Pakistan
Director: Robin Daniel
[email protected]
IDRC advances the study of different faith traditions
and initiates interfaith dialogue to promote peace,
while cultivating positive opportunities for youth in the
earthquake-affected areas of Balakot and Muzaffarabad.
Previous funding: $10,500 since 2007
Potohar Organization for Development Advocacy
(PODA)
$18,500/1,165,500 Pakistani rupees
Nara Mughlan, Pakistan
Director: Sameena Nazir
[email protected]
PODA works to build the capacity of rural communities and provides skills training to youth in the
earthquake-affected area of Muzaffarabad in an effort
to restore livelihoods and preserve a local art form.
Previous funding: $61,800 since 2004
Shangla Development Society (SDS)
$8,000/504,000 Pakistani rupees
Alpuri, Shangla District, Pakistan
Director: Iftikhar Hussain
[email protected]
SDS works for the development and rehabilitation of
the Shangla district and has played a crucial role in the
aftermath of the earthquake, advocating for a greater
budget allocation for education in the earthquakeaffected areas.
Previous funding: $8,000 since 2007
2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami
Fatayat Nahdlatul Ulama NAD
$14,000/128,660,000 Indonesian rupiahs
Aceh Province, Indonesia
Director: Abriati Yusuf
[email protected]
Fatayat Nahdlatul Ulama NAD offered immediate
relief following the tsunami by distributing supplies to
children in orphanages and now provides educational
support, including scholarships that enable separated
and orphaned children to attend boarding schools.
Previous funding: $27,000 since 2006
Himpunan Psikologi Indonesia (HIMPSI)
(Indonesian Psychological Association)
$14,000/128,660,000 Indonesian rupiahs
Aceh Province, Indonesia
Director: Retno Suhapti
[email protected]
www.himpsi.org
HIMPSI, a professional association of psychologists,
set up a “tsunami team” of member psychologists
to offer ongoing psychosocial services to people in
tsunami-affected areas.
Previous funding: $33,000 since 2005
Kinniya Vision (KV)
$19,000/2,158,210 Sri Lankan rupees
Kinniya, Sri Lanka
Director: A. R. Saifullah
[email protected]
www.kinniyavision.org
KV runs educational and vocational training programs
for children, promotes education, advocates for human
rights, and works to reduce gender imbalances and
conserve the environment in the Trincomalee district
of northeastern Sri Lanka, an area heavily affected
by both the country’s decades-long civil war and the
December 2004 tsunami.
Previous funding: $37,500 since 2005
www.globalfundforchildren.org
119
Life Home Project Foundation
$10,000/316,000 Thai baht
Phuket, Thailand
Director: Rattakhet Pongpud
[email protected]
www.lifehomeproject.org
Tsunami Volunteer Center
$19,000/606,290 Thai baht
Takua Pa district, Thailand
Director: Sombat Boonngamanong
[email protected]
www.tsunamivolunteer.net
Working in a tourist area especially hard hit by the
2004 tsunami, Life Home Project Foundation provides
services and support to the high number of women and
children infected or affected by HIV/AIDS.
Previous funding: $20,000 since 2006
The Mirror Foundation launched the Tsunami Volunteer
Center to channel the volunteers and resources assembled after the tsunami toward helping affected communities rebuild their lives, and sponsors a special program
to train and encourage youth volunteers.
Previous funding: $34,000 since 2005
Muhammadiyah ’Aisyiyah
$14,000/128,660,000 Indonesian rupiahs
Aceh Province, Indonesia
Director: Siti Chamamah Soeratno
[email protected]
www.aisyiyah_pusat.org
Muhammadiyah ’Aisyiyah is continuing to implement
relief and rehabilitation programs for children affected
by the tsunami, offering nutritional supplements, clothes,
health services, and counseling at its children’s centers.
Previous funding: $30,500 since 2006
Sanghamitra Service Society
$12,000/480,000 Indian rupees
Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh, India
Director: Sivaji Sivaji
[email protected]
Sanghamitra Service Society has been working with
fishing communities for over a decade and developed the
Tsunami Rehabilitation Program to rebuild livelihoods,
initiate community savings plans, and assist children and
families in communities devastated by the 2004 tsunami.
Previous funding: $117,500 since 2003
Sunera Foundation
$17,500/1,987,825 Sri Lankan rupees
Matara district, Sri Lanka
Director: Sunethra Bandaranaike
[email protected]
www.sunerafoundation.org
Sunera Foundation trains marginalized children and
young people in the performing arts, sponsoring a
drama and performance-art therapy program to address
post-tsunami trauma and emotional-health issues
among children and youth living in relief camps.
Previous funding: $32,500 since 2005
120
www.globalfundforchildren.org
Women Lawyers’ Association of Thailand (WLAT)
$15,000/478,650 Thai baht
Ranong, Phang Nga, Phuket,
and Krabi Provinces, Thailand
Director: Suthinee Meteeprapa
[email protected]; [email protected]
www.wlat.org
Founded by a group of women lawyers, WLAT is a
legal aid organization that has expanded its work to
protect the rights of tsunami victims, addressing legal
issues related to adoption, property rights for orphans,
and commercial sex trafficking.
Previous funding: $31,000 since 2005
Rapid response grants
This fiscal year, we awarded 30 emergency grants valued at $61,300 to existing grantee partners or affiliates
dealing with crises brought about by severe weather,
earthquakes, and political instability.
THE Global Fund for children
Financials
2007–2008
The Global Fund for Children achieved
strong financial results in fiscal year
2007–2008.
Net assets increased by 47 percent during
the year, led by a $1.7 million increase in
revenue over the previous fiscal year, to
nearly $8.5 million. The majority of this
growth in revenue came from income
from foundations, which rose by 160
percent to $2.6 million, trailing only gifts
from individual donors at $3.6 million.
Our budget grew by 22 percent to $6.2
million. Nearly half of this increase came
from new direct grants, along with the
related cost of adding staff to facilitate
our grantmaking growth. In addition, we
incurred costs related to a metrics initiative
we launched to better understand and
measure the beneficial impact of our grants.
Our budgetary ratio of funds directed
to program services remained high, with
86 percent of expenditures directed to
programs and 14 percent going to general,
administrative, and fundraising costs. GFC
was awarded a four-star rating by Charity
Navigator (www.charitynavigator.com)
for the fourth consecutive year, meaning
that our performance “exceeds industry
standards and outperforms most charities
in [our] Cause.”
This past fiscal year, The Global Fund for
Children UK Trust, a registered charity
(charitable number 1119544) in the United
Kingdom, began operations. The Global
Fund for Children and The Global Fund for
Children UK Trust cooperate to raise funds
in the United States and across Europe
to further our joint mission of advancing
the dignity of children and young people
throughout the world through the provision
of grants and other forms of assistance.
In fiscal year 2008–2009, we envision
continued growth in grants and in the
necessary support expenses. We have recently
more than doubled our office space, giving
us the long-awaited opportunity to bolster
staff resources to provide more value-added
services to our grantee partners, increase
fundraising activities, and continue to grow
our books program. We start the year with a
large cash balance and nearly $3 million in
pledges to fund operations.
All financial information in this annual report
relates to The Global Fund for Children and
does not include figures for The Global Fund for
Children UK Trust, which is a separate legal
entity. For consolidated financials, please visit
our website.
www.globalfundforchildren.org
121
Revenues 2007–2008
• Individual Donors
• Foundations
• Corporate
• Interest and Others
• Matching Gifts
• Book Revenue Expenditures 2007–2008
• Total Program
Expenses
86%
• Fundraising
8%
• Total Management
and Administration 6%
42%
31%
23%
2%
1%
1%
Statement of Financial Position
June 30, 2008 and 2007
Assets Current Assets Cash and Cash Equivalents
Certificates of Deposit Accounts Receivable: Promises to Give
Other
2007
$4,040,427 -
$1,886,768
200,000
1,801,149 18,436 2,301,663
4,993
Total Accounts Receivable
Inventory
Prepaid Expenses
1,819,585 12,855 32,461 2,306,656
Total Current Assets
Promises to Give, Net of Current Portion
Property and Equipment Office Equipment
Leasehold Improvements
Computer Software
5,905,328 4,422,439
1,125,480 612,381
127,428 376,030 77,161 89,806
39,593
13,750
Less: Accumulated Depreciation and Amortization
Total Property and Equipment
Deposits
580,619 (101,532)
479,087 14,304 143,149
(64,132)
79,017
12,446
Total Assets
Liabilities and Net Assets Current Liabilities Accounts Payable and Accrued Expenses
Accrued Vacation and Bonuses
Due to UK Trust 7,524,199 5,126,283
270,416 53,323 -
196,601
60,280
173,808
323,739 430,689
290,670 -
614,409 430,689
1,344,849 4,487,505 1,077,436 6,909,790 1,167,539
3,211,055
317,000
4,695,594
$7,524,199 $5,126,283
Total Current Liabilities
Deferred Leasehold Allowance
Total Liabilities
Commitments and Contingencies Net Assets Unrestricted
Temporarily Restricted
Permanently Restricted
Total Net Assets
Total Liabilities and Net Assets
122
2008
www.globalfundforchildren.org
29,015
Statement of Activities
June 30, 2008 and 2007
Temporarily Permanently Unrestricted Restricted Restricted
2008
Temporarily Permanently Total Unrestricted Restricted Restricted 2007 Total
Revenue Gifts and Grants $2,422,182 $5,092,953 $760,436 $8,275,571 $1,976,827 $4,303,089 $267,000 $6,546,916
Book Revenues
and Royalties 53,037 -
-
53,037 43,698 -
-
43,698
Investment Income 129,861 -
-
129,861 128,620 -
-
128,620 Other 5,322 -
-
5,332 12 - - 12
Net Assets Released
from Restrictions 3,816,503 (3,816,503)
-
- 2,628,187 (2,628,187)
-
Total Revenue 6,426,905 Expenses Program Services: Global Media
Ventures 586,131 Grantmaking 4,761,864 Total Program
Services 5,347,995 Supporting Services: Management and
General 379,614 Fundraising 521,987 Total Supporting
Services 901,601 Total Expenses 6,249,596 Change in Net Assets 177,309 Net Assets
Beginning of Year 1,167,539 Net Assets
End of Year $1,344,848 1,276,450 760,436 8,463,791 4,777,344 1,674,902 267,000 6,719,246 -
-
-
586,131 659,144 - 4,761,864 3,807,589 -
-
-
659,144
- 3,807,589
- - 5,347,995
- - 4,466,733
-
-
-
-
379,614 521,987 4,466,733 154,087 494,348 -
-
-
-
- - 648,435 - - 5,115,168
- - 901,601 648,435 - - 6,249,596 5,115,168 1,276,450 760,436 2,214,195 (337,824)
3,211,055 317,000 4,695,594 1,505,363 154,087
494,348
1,674,902 267,000 1,604,078
1,536,153 50,000 3,091,516 $4,487,505 $1,077,436 $ 6,909,789 $1,167,539 $3,211,055 $317,000 $4,695,594
www.globalfundforchildren.org
123
THE Global Fund for children
Directors
Statement of Cash Flows
Board of Directors
June 30, 2008 and 2007
Cash Flows from Operating Activities
Change in Net Assets
Adjustment to Reconcile Change in Net Assets
to Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities
Depreciation and Amortization
Permanently Restricted Contributions
Changes in Assets and Liabilities
Accounts Receivable/Promises to Give
Prepaid Expenses
Inventory
Deposits
Accounts Payable and Accrued Expenses
Accrued Vacation and Bonuses
Due to UK Trust
Deferred Leasehold Allowance
Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities
Cash from Investing Activities
Sales/Redemptions of Certificates of Deposit
Purchases of Property and Equipment
Net Cash Provided (Used) by Investing Activities
Cash from Financing Activities
Proceeds from Permanently Restricted Contributions
Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities
Net Increase in Cash and Cash Equivalents
Cash and Cash Equivalents - Beginning of Year
Cash and Cash Equivalents - End of Year
2008
2007
$2,214,196 $1,580,270
37,401 (760,436)
21,451
(267,000)
(26,028)
(3,446)
(12,855)
(1,858)
73,815 (6,957)
(173,808)
290,670 (1,549,084)
(5,678)
125,282
23,754
173,808
-
1,630,094 102,803
200,000 (437,471)
400,000
(25,999)
(237,471)
374,001
760,436 267,000
760,436 267,000
2,153,659 743,804
1,886,768 1,142,964
$4,040,427 $1,886,768
Juliette Gimon, Chair
Team Member, Google.org
The Flora Family Foundation
New York, NY
Maya Ajmera
Founder and President
The Global Fund for Children
Washington, DC
Peter Briger
Principal
Fortress Investment Group LLC
New York, NY
Sanjiv Khattri
New York, NY
Mark McGoldrick
Founder and Managing Partner
Mount Kellett Capital Management LP
United Kingdom
Sarah Perot
Sarah and Ross Perot Jr. Foundation
Dallas, TX
Sandra Pinnavaia
Senior Vice President
Business Talent Group
New York, NY
Patricia Rosenfield
Chair, Carnegie Scholars Program
Carnegie Corporation of New York
New York, NY
Roy Salamé
Managing Director
JPMorgan Chase & Co.
New York, NY
Robert Scully, Vice Chair
Office of the Chairman
Morgan Stanley
New York, NY
Raj Singh
Co-founder and President
Telcom Ventures LLC
Miami, FL
124
www.globalfundforchildren.org
Isabel Carter Stewart, Secretary
Chicago, IL
Robert Stillman, Treasurer
President
Millbridge Capital Management
Chevy Chase, MD
Directors Emeriti
William Ascher
Donald C. McKenna Professor of
Government and Economics
Claremont McKenna College
Dena Blank
Trustee, Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation
Laura Bernstein Luger
Vice President and General Counsel
University of North Carolina
Adele Richardson Ray
Trustee, Smith Richardson Foundation
UK Trust Board of Trustees
Silicon Valley
Leadership Council
Susan Carter Harrington and
Tom Harrington
Harrington Family Foundation
On-Site.com, CEO
Wende and Tom Hutton
Canaan Partners, Partner
Thompson Hutton, LLC, Managing Partner
Stacey Keare and John Hodge
Keare/Hodge Family Foundation
The Blackstone Group, Partner
Teresa Luchsinger
Unger Family Fund
Joan Platt
Joan and Lewis Platt Foundation
Leigh Rawdon and David Rolf
Tea Collection, CEO and Co-founder
VantagePoint Venture Partners,
Vice President
Mark McGoldrick, Chair
Founder and Managing Partner
Mount Kellett Capital Management LP
Michael Daffey
Managing Director
Goldman Sachs and Company
Dina de Angelo
Director
Pictet
John K. Hepburn
Senior Advisor
Morgan Stanley (Europe) Ltd.
David Kowitz
Founder and Managing Partner
Indus Capital Partners, LLC
Dirk Ormoneit
Head, Modelling-Systematic Trading
Bluecrest Capital Management
James Sheridan
James and Chantal Sheridan Foundation
www.globalfundforchildren.org
125
The Global Fund for children
Index
Staff
The Global Fund for
Children Staff
Maya Ajmera
Founder and President
Victoria Dunning
Vice President, Programs
Mitchell Fenster
Vice President, Finance
and Operations
Jerry Irvine
Vice President, Communications
Andrew Barnes
Grants Manager
Michael Bush
Controller
Lynn Grone
Human Resources (TPO, Inc.)
Vineeta Gupta
Program Officer, South Asia
Sarah Ireland
Associate Program Officer,
Special Grants
Parie Kadir
Database Coordinator
Solome Lemma
Program Officer, Africa
Katy Love
Assistant Program Officer, Eastern
Europe and the United States
Meheret Mellese
Director, Information Technology
Cynthia Pon
Director, Children’s Books
Tamar Schiffman
Investor Relations Officer
Susanna Shapiro
Program Officer, Latin America
and the Caribbean
Lu Shen
Program Officer, East and
Southeast Asia
Anne Sorensen
Foundation and Corporate Relations
Officer
Shana Weinberg
Grant Writer
Nardos Worku
Administrative Assistant
International Fellows
Nicholas Kauffman
2007 International Fellow
Chicago, IL
Pamela Kola
2008 International Fellow
Nairobi, Kenya
William Ascher Summer Fellow
Matt Levy
George Washington University
Interns
Hayley Crown
The Latin School of Chicago
Molly Cunningham
Stanford University
Stephanie Davis
University of Indiana
Fnot Gebremicael
Georgetown University
Lisette Plankin
School of Advanced International Studies
The Johns Hopkins University
Daniel Robles
Georgetown University
Annie Shafran
The Taft School
UK TRUST STAFF
Heather Brandon
Director
Kate Collins
Fundraising / Communications Officer
Aangan Trust, 30, 104
Aarambh (To Start), 86
Ação Forte (Strong Action), 25, 98
accounting policies, 123–124
Achlal (Caring Kindness) Child Development
Center, 86
Action pour la Promotion des Droits de l’Enfant au
Burkina Faso (APRODEB) (Action for the Promotion of the Rights of the Burkinabe Child), 36, 111
Agastya International Foundation, 10, 86
Alliance for Children and Youth, 98
Amahoro Association, 58, 111
American Jewish World Service, 12, 56
Anandan (Happiness), 86
Ananya Trust, 86
Ankuram (Sprout) Woman and Child Development
Society, 104
Ark Foundation of Africa (AFA), 47, 87
Asanble Vwazen Jakè (AVJ) ( Jakè Neighborhood
Association), 87
Asanble Vwazen Solino (AVS) (Solino Neighborhood
Association), 87
Ascensions Community Services, 37, 111
Asociación Civil Hamiraya (Hamiraya Civil
Association), 111
Asociación Civil Pro Niño Íntimo (Pro-Child Civil
Association), 47, 87
Asociación Civil Wará (Wará Civil Association), 87
Asociación de Comunidades Eclesiales de Base
(CEB) (Association of Grassroots Christian
Communities), 98
Asociación de Defensa de la Vida (ADEVI) (Association for the Defense of Life), 47, 98
Asociación de Promotores de Educación Inicial y
Preprimaria Bilingüe Maya-Ixil (APEDIBIMI)
(Maya-Ixil Association of Promoters of Bilingual
Early Education), 87
Asociación Mujer y Comunidad (Women and
Community Association), 58, 87
Asociación para los Derechos de la Niñez “Monseñor Oscar Romero” (Monsignor Oscar Romero
Association for Children’s Rights), 87
Asociación Promoción y Desarrollo de la Mujer
Nicaragüense Acahual (Acahual Association for
the Promotion and Development of Nicaraguan
Women), 88
Asociación Solas y Unidas (Alone and United
Association), 6
Asociatia Ovidiu Rom (Ovidiu Rom Association),
48, 70, 88
Asociatia pentru Libertatea si Egalitatea de Gen
(ALEG) (Association for Liberty and Gender
Equality), 104
Associação Barraca da Amizade (Shelter of Friendship
Association), 104
Associação Beneficente da Criança e do Adolescente
em Situação de Risco (Beneficent Association for
At-Risk Children and Adolescents), 105
Associação de Apoio às Meninas e Meninos da Região
Sé (AA Criança) (Association for the Support of
Boys and Girls of the Sé Region), 36, 112
Association d’Appui et d’Eveil Pugsada (ADEP) (Association of Support and Coming of Age), 30, 105
Association des Artistes et Artisans contre le VIH/
SIDA et les Stupifiants (AARCOSIS) (Association
of Artists and Artisans against HIV/AIDS and
Drugs), 74, 112
Association des Jeunes pour le Développement
Intégré–Kakundu (AJEDI–Ka) (Youth Association for Integrated Development–Kakundu), 105
Association du Foyer de l’Enfant Libanais (AFEL)
(Lebanese Child Home Association), 29, 105
Association for Community Development Services
(ACDS), 88
Association for the Development and Enhancement of
Women (ADEW), 99
Association Jeunesse Actions Mali (AJA Mali) (Youth
Action Association of Mali), 105
Association La Lumière (The Light Association), 105
Association of Community Movements for Social
Action (ACMSA), 99
Association of People for Practical Life Education
(APPLE), 31, 106
Atina, 106
Avenir de l’Enfant (ADE) (Future of the Child), 106
Awesome Girls Mentoring Program, 118
Ba Futuru (For the Future), 112
Backward Society Education (BASE), 88
Benishyaka Association, 88
Biblioteca Th’uruchapitas (Th’uruchapitas Library),
58, 69, 88
Big Brother Mouse, 58, 116
board of directors, 125
Books for Kids project, 69–70
Boquitas Sanas (Healthy Little Mouths) program, 35, 75
boys, vulnerabilities of, 62–65
Breakthrough DC, 117
126
www.globalfundforchildren.org
Carolina for Kibera, 42, 112
Centar za Integraciju Mladih (CIM) (Center for Youth
Integration), 29, 74, 106
Center for Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect
(CPCAN), 106
Center for the Protection of Children’s Rights
(CPCR), 112
Center for Women and Children Empowerment
(CEWCE), 99
Centre for Research, Communication and Gender in
Early Childhood Education, 13, 42
Centro Cultural Batahola Norte (CCBN) (Cultural
Center of Batahola Norte), 88
Centro de Apoyo al Niño de la Calle de Oaxaca
(CANICA) (Center for the Support of Street
Children of Oaxaca), 99
Centro de Documentação e Informação Coisa de Mulher (CEDOICOM) (Center for Documentation
and Information on Women’s Issues), 112
Centro de Estudios y Apoyo para el Desarrollo Local
(CEADEL) (Center for Study and Support for
Local Development), 48, 56, 106
Centro de Estudos e Ação em Atenção à Infância e as
Drogas Excola (Excola Center for Research and
Action on Childhood and Drug Use), 106
Centro Interdisciplinario para el Desarrollo Social
(CIDES) (Interdisciplinary Center for Social
Development), 106
Centro para el Desarrollo Regional (CDR) (Center for
Regional Development), 107
Centro San Juan Bosco, 10
Centro Transitorio de Capacitación y Educación Recreativa El Caracol (El Caracol Transitional Center
for Training and Recreational Education), 10, 99
Challenging Heights, 10, 74, 88
Charity Navigator rating, 121
Charlesbridge Publishing, 69
Children in the Wilderness (CITW), 89
Children of the U.S.A., 7, 68
Children on the Edge (COTE), 70, 107
children’s book program, 68–70
Children’s Legacy Fund, 81
Children’s Legal Rights and Development Center
(CLRD), 107
Chintan Environmental Research and Action Group,
17, 74, 89
Chiricli (Bird) International Roma Women’s Charitable Fund, 89
CIBC World Markets Miracle Day partnership, 75
Clinton Global Initiative, 60
Club 21–Udruženja za Pozitivnu Komunikaciju (Association for Positive Communication), 112
Çocuklar Ayni Çati Altinda Dernegi (ÇAÇA) (Children Under the Same Roof Association), 116
Community Outreach Programme (CORP), 107
Community Sanitation and Recycling Organization
(CSARO), 89
countries served, 11
growth in, 9
Creative Opportunities portfolio, 8
2007–2008 grants, 116–117
Dasra, 10
De Laas Gul (Hand-Embroidered Flower) Welfare
Programme (DLG), 119
Desarrollo Autogestionario (AUGE) (Self-Managed
Development), 23, 99
directors, 125
documentary photography, 70
donors, list of, 76–81
Door Step School, 54, 89
Doosti Pakistan, 119
Dream A Dream, 55, 99
Dreamcatchers Foundation, 112
Durbar Mahila Samanwaya Committee (DMSC), 89
Early Intervention Institute for Children with Developmental Delays and Disabilities (EII), 60, 89
Education as a Vaccine against AIDS (EVA), 35, 113
eligibility criteria for grantee partners, 84–85
EMpower, 12, 56
Enterprise portfolio, 8, 22–25
2007–2008 grants, 98–103
Equal Step Centre (ESC), 107
Espacio Cultural Creativo (Cultural Creative Space), 89
Ethiopian Books for Children and Educational
Foundation (EBCEF), 75, 90
Faith, 69
Fatayat Nahdlatul Ulama NAD, 119
fellowships, 13, 70
Fezehai, Malin, 74
films, 70–71
financials, 121–124
Fireflight Foundation, 56
Franklin–Grand Isle Bookmobile, 70
Free Minds Book Club and Writing Workshop, 90
Frente de Salud Infantil y Reproductiva de Guatemala
(FESIRGUA) (Guatemalan Foundation for Child
and Reproductive Health), 100
Friends for Street Children (FFSC), 90
Fund for Global Human Rights, 12
Fundación Alfonso Casas Morales para la Promoción
Humana (Alfonso Casas Morales Foundation for
Human Advancement), 90
Fundación Chocó Joven (Young Chocó Foundation), 113
Fundación Crecer (Growth Foundation), 90
Fundación Junto con los Niños ( JUCONI) (Together
with Children Foundation), 91
Fundación Nuestros Sueños (Our Dreams Foundation), 91
Fundación Simsa (Simsa Foundation), 35, 75, 113
Fundatia Noi Orizonturi (New Horizons Foundation),
24, 100
gender and vulnerability, 62–65
Gender Education, Research and Technologies Foundation (GERT), 10, 107
Girl Child Concern (GCC), 91
girls, vulnerabilities of, 63
Girls Educational and Mentoring Services (GEMS),
48, 107
Global Babies, 7, 68
Global Fund for Children UK Trust, 7, 74, 121
directors, 125
Global Fund for Children Books, 68–70
Global Fund for Women, 12, 56
Global Goods Partners (GGP), 117
Global Media Ventures program, 7, 68–71
Going to School, 100
Goldman Sachs Foundation Initiative, 12, 13, 54
Grameen Bank, 6
Gramin Mahila Sikshan Sansthan (GMSS) (Sikar
Girls Education Initiative), 54, 91
Grandmothers Against Poverty and AIDS (GAPA), 113
grantee partners, 6
eligibility and selection criteria, 84–85
growth in, 9
value-added services for, 10
grantmaking, 8–13
grants, 10
growth in, 9
model, 10
grants, 10
number of, 9
tracking, 13
Grassroots Girls Initiative (GGI), 56
GUA (Peace) Africa, 117
Guaruma, 100
Halley Movement, 91
Health and Well-Being grants, 8, 58
healthcare interventions, 58, 59
Healthy Minds and Bodies portfolio, 8, 34–37
2007–2008 grants, 111–115
Himpunan Psikologi Indonesia (HIMPSI) (Indonesian
Psychological Association), 119
Hope for Children Organization (HFC), 91
Hurricane Katrina crisis grants, 118–119
Ikamva Labantu (The Future of Our Nation), 10,
48, 58, 91
Incest Trauma Center (ITC), 113
Indian Ocean tsunami crisis grants, 119–120
Institute of Leadership and Institutional Development
(ILID), 54, 91
Instituto Fazer Acontecer (IFA) (Make It Happen
Institute), 100
Instituto para el Desarrollo de la Mujer y la Infancia
(IDEMI) (Institute for the Development of
Women and Children), 107
Instituto para la Superación de la Miseria Urbana (ISMU)
(Institute for Overcoming Urban Poverty), 92
Integrated Community Health Services (INCHES), 113
Interfaith Dialogue and Research Center (IDRC), 43, 119
International Center for Research on Women
(ICRW), 56
International Center of Photography, 6, 70
international fellows, 126
International Trust for the Education of Zambia
Orphans (ITEZO), 58, 92
interns, 126
Jabala Action Research Organisation, 108
Jal, Emmanuel, 70
Jeeva Jyothi (Everlasting Light), 100
Jifunze (Learning) Project, 49
Jinpa Project, 58, 113
Johnson & Johnson Health and Well- Being supplemental grants, 8, 58
Journey of a Red Fridge, 7, 70–71
Kalinga Mission for Indigenous Children and Youth
Development (KAMICYDI), 101
Kamitei Foundation, 92
Karm Marg (Progress through Work), 101
Kham Kampo Association (KKA), 18, 92
Kherwadi Social Welfare Association (KSWA), 58, 101
KID smART, 70, 118
Kiev Children and Youth Support Center, 108
www.globalfundforchildren.org
127
Kindle Orphan Outreach, 92
Kinniya Vision (KV), 120
KLARA (Knowledge, Learning, and Resource Access)
Network, 12
Knowledge Exchange workshops, 12–13
knowledge initiatives, 12–13
Kolkata Sanved (Kolkata Sensitivity), 70, 113
Kudirat Initiative for Democracy (KIND), 56, 101
La Conscience (Conscience), 108
Lapeng (Home) Child and Family Resource Service,
60, 92
Laura Vicuña Foundation (LVF), 108
Learning portfolio, 8, 16–19
2007–2008 grants, 86–97
legal assistance, 12
leveraging, 10, 12
Lex Mundi Pro Bono Foundation, 12
Life Home Project Foundation, 120
Light for All (LiFA), 92
Love in Action Ethiopia (LIA), 56, 101
LovingSource Information Center (LSIC), 114
Luna Nueva (New Moon), 49, 108
Lunam Productions, 71
MacArthur Foundation grant, 71
Magic Bus Connect, 13, 101
Mahita (Regeneration), 56, 92
Makkala Jagriti (Children’s Awareness), 101
Mama Cash, 56
Media Concern Initiative, 108
Men on the Side of the Road (MSR), 23, 101
metrics indicators, 7
Ministerio Tiempo Decisivo (Decisive Time
Ministry), 109
Mirman School partnership, 75
mission, 4
Monduli Pastoralist Development Initiative (MPDI),
61, 93
Moore Community House (MCH), 118
Movimiento de Mujeres Dominico-Haitianas
(MUDHA) (Movement of Dominican-Haitian
Women), 93
Movimiento para el Auto-Desarrollo Internacional de
la Solidaridad (MAIS) (Movement for International Self-Development and Solidarity), 74, 109
Muhammadiyah ’Aisyiyah, 120
Mujejego-Loka (Dawn Light) Women Development
Association, 102
Muktangan (Open Courtyard), 93
Mumbai Mobile Crèches, 60, 93
Nehemiah AIDS Relief Project, 93
Neng Guan Performing Arts Training Center, 114
Network of Entrepreneurship and Economic Development (NEED), 93
New Global Citizens, 74
New Horizon Ministries (NHM), 93
New Life Community Projects, 109
Nia Foundation, 114
Nike Foundation partnership, 56
Niños con una Esperanza (Children with a Hope), 42
Nyaka School, 93
On the Road blog, 71
opportunity grants, 8
Organizational Capacity Index, 12
organizational development
awards, 8
support, 10
Oruj Learning Center, 94
outcomes, measuring, 12
Pakistan earthquake crisis grants, 119
Pazapa (Step by Step), 114
Phulki (Spark), 49, 60, 70, 102
Physicians for Social Justice (PSJ), 114
Poder Joven (Youth Power), 94
Potohar Organization for Development Advocacy
(PODA), 119
Pravah (Flow), 102
Prei Effort for Those Who Are in Need (PEFAN),
12, 94
Prerana (Inspiration), 94
Presidential Innovation Fund, 8, 117
Prisoners Assistance Nepal (PA Nepal), 109
Prisoners Assistance Program (PAP), 109
Projecto de Vida para Crianças e Jovens (PROVIDA)
(Life Project for Children and Youth), 114
Protecting Environment and Children Everywhere
(PEACE), 109
Puririsun (Let’s Journey Together), 94
Rapid Response grants, 40–42, 120
Raza Educational and Social Welfare Society
(RESWS), 94
Recovery and Renewal grants, 40, 42, 118–120
Reginald Orsmond Counselling Services (ROCS), 115
Responding to Crisis portfolio, 8, 40–43
2007–2008 grants, 118–120
Rozan, 115
Ruchika Social Service Organization, 75
Ruili Women and Children Development Center
(RWCDC), 115
Rural China Education Foundation (RCEF), 95
Rural Family Support Organization (RuFamSO),
58, 102
Rural Human Rights Activists Program (RHRAP), 116
Safety portfolio, 8, 28–31
2007–2008 grants, 104–110
Salesian Sisters, 95
Salus, 115
Sam-Kam Institute (SKI), 69, 102
Sanggar Anak Akar (Workshop, Child, Root), 116
Sanghamitra Service Society, 102, 120
selection criteria for grantee partners, 84–85
Ser Paz (Being Peace), 109
Shaishav (Childhood) Trust, 54, 102
Shangla Development Society (SDS), 119
Shidhulai Swanirvar Sangstha (Village Self-Reliance),
49, 70, 95
Shilpa Children’s Trust (SCT), 95
Silicon Valley Leadership Council, 7, 74
directors, 125
SIN-DO, 109
Skolta’el Yu’un Jlumaltic (SYJAC) (Service to Our
People), 74, 95
Snowland Service Group (SSG), 95
Sociedad Amigos de los Niños (SAN) (Friends of
Children Society), 12, 50, 110
Sociedad Dominico-Haitiana de Apoyo Integral
para el Desarrollo y la Salud (SODHAIDESA)
(Dominican-Haitian Society of Comprehensive
Assistance for Health and Development), 95
Society Biliki (Path Society), 95
Editorial Team: Maya Ajmera, Andrew Barnes, Hayley Crown, Elise Derstine,
Victoria Dunning, Mitchell Fenster, Vineeta Gupta, Josette Haddad (Copy
Editor), Sarah Ireland, Jerry Irvine (Managing Editor), Solome Lemma, Katy
Love, Cynthia Pon, Tamar Schiffman, Susanna Shapiro, Elizabeth Station
(Senior Writer), Wordfirm (Index)
Design: Design Army
Printed by: Fannon Fine Printing, using wind-power-manufactured paper stocks
and vegetable-based inks
This annual report was funded by a portion of the royalties from Global Fund for
Children books. © The Global Fund for Children.
Photo Credits: Cover: © Frans Lemmens / Getty Images, Inside Front
Cover: © Ric Ergenbright / DanitaDelimont.com, Page 3: © Ric Ergenbright
/ DanitaDelimont.com, Page 4: © Darcy Kiefel / kiefelphotography.com,
Page 9: © John Warburton-Lee / DanitaDelimont.com, Pages 14-15: © Tadej
Znidarcic, Page 17: © vario images GmbH & Co.KG / Alamy, Page 18: ©
Kazuyoshi Nomachi / HAGA / The Image Works, Page 19: © Tbilisi Youth
House Foundation, Pages 20-21: © Keren Su / DanitaDelimont.com, Page 23:
© John Warburton-Lee / DanitaDelimont.com, Page 24: © Jeff Greenberg /
The Image Works, Page 25: © Ação Forte, Pages 26-27: © Nazeem Junggee,
Page 29: © Sean Sprague – SpraguePhoto.com, Page 30: © Sue Cunningham /
Society for Awareness, Harmony and Equal Rights
(SAHER), 102
Society for Education and Action (SEA), 96
Society Undertaking Poor People’s Onus for Rehabilitation (SUPPORT), 65, 110
Sree Guruvayurappan Bhajan Samaj Trust (SGBS
Trust), 103
staff, 126
Sujaya Foundation, 54, 96
Sunera Foundation, 120
Supporting Orphans and Vulnerable for Better Health,
Education, and Nutrition (SOVHEN), 103
Sustainability Awards, 8, 46–49
criteria for, 46
Synapse Network Center, 103
Synergie pour l’Enfance (Synergy for Childhood), 115
Talented Young People Everywhere (TYPE), 96
Tanadgoma (Assistance) Library and Cultural Center
for People with Disabilities, 96
Tasintha (Deeper Transformation) Programme, 110
Tbilisi Youth House Foundation (TYHF), 19, 96
Tea Collection, 75
Teboho Trust, 18, 96
Third Millennium Foundation, 12
Tonic Generation partnership, 75
tracking grants, 8
Tsunami Volunteer Center, 120
Uasdruzenje Nova Generacija (New Generation
Association), 110
Ubumi Children’s Project, 96
Uganda Integrated Child and Youth Care Foundation, 96
Umut Işiği: Kadin, Çevre, Kültür, ve İşletme
Kooperatifi (Light of Hope: Women, Environment,
Culture, and Enterprise Cooperative), 58, 97
Under-8 Initiative, 7, 60
United Houma Nation, 17, 97
value-added services, 10
Vietnamese Initiative in Economic Training (VIET), 118
Vikasini Girl Child Education Trust, 97
Vikramshila Education Resource Society, 50, 51, 97
vision, 4
vulnerability and gender, 62–65
War Child, 7, 70–71
Warma Tarinakuy (Assembly of the Children), 103
Washington Youth Choir (WYC), 117
William Ascher Summer Fellow, 13, 126
Women Development Association (WDA), 103
Women in Social Entrepreneurship (WISE), 23–24, 103
Women Lawyers’ Association of Thailand (WLAT), 120
Women’s Education for Advancement and Empowerment (WEAVE), 59, 97
Words, Beats, Life, 58, 116
Working Assets partnership, 75
Yanapanakusun (Let’s Help Each Other), 57, 110
Young Playwrights’ Theater (YPT), 97
Youth Activist Organization, 115
YouthWorks, 103
Yugoslav Association for Culture and Education of
Roma ( JAK-ER), 115
Zion Travelers Cooperative Center (ZTCC), 119
Znidarcic, Tadej, 6, 70, 82
DanitaDelimont.com, Page 31: © Free the Slaves, Pages 32-33: © Manfred
Gottschalk / Lonely Planet Images, Page 35: © Dennis Kirkland / Jaynes Gallery /
DanitaDelimont.com, Page 36: © Bruce Yuan-Yue Bi / Lonely Planet Images,
Page 37: © Colella Photography 2008, courtesy Ascensions, Pages 38-39:
© Darcy Kiefel / kiefelphotography.com, Page 41: © Shahidul Alam / Drik /
Majority World / The Image Works, Page 42: © Darcy Kiefel / kiefelphotography.
com, Page 43: © John Moore / Getty Images, Pages 44-45: © Peter Beavis / Getty
Images, Page 50: © John Warburton-Lee / DanitaDelimont.com, Page 51: ©
Stacey Keare, Pages 52-53: © Penny Tweedie / Getty Images, Page 55: © Dream
A Dream, Page 57: © Yanapanakusun, Page 59: © Women’s Education for
Advancement and Empowerment (WEAVE), Page 61: © Lu Shen / The Global
Fund for Children, Page 63: © Robert Fried / Alamy, Page 64: © Vineeta Gupta /
The Global Fund for Children, Page 65: © Vineeta Gupta / The Global Fund for
Children, Pages 66-67: © Tadej Znidarcic, Page 69: © Jack Gordon / The Global
Fund for Children, © Jack Gordon / The Global Fund for Children , Page 70: ©
18th Street Films, © LUNAM DOCS, Page 71: © Jack Gordon / The Global
Fund for Children, Pages 72-73: © K.M. Asad / Drik / Majority World / The
Image Works, Page 75: © Laurie Frankel, Pages 84-85: © Tadej Znidarcic, Page
90: © Tadej Znidarcic, Page 94: © Tadej Znidarcic, Page 97: © Tadej Znidarcic,
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