UAB MHRC Inaugural Gala a Total Success

WINTER 2006
UAB MHRC Inaugural Gala a Total Success
The September 30 black-tie reception and
dinner
at
the
Wynfrey
Hotel
in
Birmingham, hosted by former NBA all-star
Charles Barkley, drew some 525 attendees—twice the original goal—and raised
more than $150,000 to support the
MHRC’s efforts to eliminate health disparities among Alabama’s minority citizens.
Among guests were Barkley’s mother,
Charcey Glenn of Leeds, and Lucille O’Neil,
mother of NBA superstar Shaquille O’Neil.
For the first time UAB offered the
Norm Davis, Mona Fouad, Carol Garrison, Charles Barkley, Cathy Freidman, Selwyn Vickers and Edward Partridge
the funds donated by Barkley. Edward
thanked Barkley for his vision.
Disparities
Partridge, MD, co-director of the MHRC,
Barkley’s generous gift to the MHRC
Research Awards made possible through
called the gala “an amazing event” and
kick-started the gala and provided funds for
Charles
Barkley
Health
(continued on page 3)
No Boundaries
Alabama Black Belt and the Mississippi
Published in The Birmingham News
Sunday, September 25, 2005
MONA FOUAD, MD, MPH
Delta.
Consider these New Orleans statistics,
before the disaster: 28 percent of the peo-
On a good day, people living in poverty
ple are living below the poverty level, and
have little or no access to health care and
the per-capita income is $13,400; 70 per-
few resources to help them cope. Can you
cent of the population are African
imagine their misery in the wake of one of
(continued on page 2)
the largest disasters in U.S. history?
IN THIS ISSUE
As my eyes and ears filled with images
and sounds out of the poorest part of New
Orleans, the frustrated, desperate stares of
Take away the floodwaters and the strand-
young and old reminded me that poverty
ed mothers and children, switch gritty
creates the same conditions everywhere.
urban for red-dirt rural—and you are in the
MINORITY HEALTH & RESEARCH CENTER | WINTER 2006
• MHRC Inaugural Gala
• No Boundaries
• MHRC Hispanic/Latino
Working Group
• Coming Events
B U I L D I N G T R U S T, S H A R I N G P O W E R , A N D E L I M I N A T I N
No Boundaries
(continued from page 1)
American and other minorities; and 28 percent of those 5 years and older have a
physical disability.
Where you see statistics like these, you
portionately represented in the people liv-
neighbors, carrying health-promoting mes-
ing below the poverty line, Alabama and
sages to their communities through
other Deep South states have an enor-
churches, exercise classes, and other ven-
mous challenge in bringing better health to
ues. Many units at UAB are involved in the
them. Our mission at the UAB Minority
overall outreach to poor communities; for
Health and Research Center is to find ways
example, the School of Dentistry is the top
to improve their health.
provider of dental care to Alabama
almost always also see lack of transportation, high unemployment, low education,
low rate of health insurance, and high disease burden (diabetes, cancer, hypertension, etc.).
On top of that, the high rate of uninsured
people, combined with other factors, keeps
doctors and other health-care professionals, not to mention clinics and hospitals,
from establishing practice locations in the
region. For example, in Lowndes County,
there are only 4 doctors per 10,000
people.
Some counties don’t have adequate
911 systems, emergency response plans,
ambulances, or trained emergency person-
The work is almost overwhelming, but
Medicaid patients. The School of Nursing is
the past few years have shown some posi-
using a federal grant to prepare nurse prac-
tive change in the efforts to improve health
titioners to deliver primary care in rural
care and other indices of poverty in the
areas. There is much more work to be
Black Belt and elsewhere. Some eyes have
done, sleeves to be rolled up, and purpose-
been opened to the poverty of the area and
ful action to be taken by a united phalanx of
how it drags down Alabama’s economy
people who share a commitment to lift the
and afflicts our hearts. Federal money has
burdens of those among us who are poor.
been found to fund entities such as UAB’s
We have seen in the media spotlight the
Minority Health and Research Center. Gov.
horrific results of a disaster exacerbated by
Bob Riley and U.S. Rep. Artur Davis, D-
poverty. If there is one silver lining from the
Birmingham, among others, are trying to
terrible storm clouds, it is that the citizens
bring forces to bear on the problem by
of the United States have seen the poverty
establishing the Black Belt Action
that exists in our own country, not just in
Commission.
faraway places, and have been moved to
Private citizens have stepped up, too,
action. We must now move beyond the dis-
among them Alabamian Charles Barkley,
aster to repair the Gulf Coast damage. And
the former NBA all-star. Upon hearing the
we must also plan and act to prevent other
For many years, I have seen the face of
stark statistics of poor health among our
tragedies by addressing the poverty in the
poverty in my work as a doctor here and
region’s minorities and how that diminish-
Black Belt and elsewhere in Alabama.
abroad. I’ve been intimately involved in
es everyone’s prospects, Barkley donated a
Good health, woven into a matrix like a
studying the conditions that are present in
considerable sum toward ending these dis-
supportive basket, is a significant basis of
poor communities and regions in Alabama
parities and signed up as spokesperson for
hope, for it leads to jobs, to the ability of
and across the South. I have catalogued
our efforts. The Barkley Health Disparities
people to be self-sustaining, and to the abil-
the conditions, listened to the troubles, and
Initiative at UAB supports research into
ity—when disaster does play its stunningly
given myself over almost to despair about
these problems and funds hands-on pro-
capricious hand—for them to withstand the
how to deal with and improve the straits of
grams to address them.
blows and to pick themselves up from the
nel. This further illustrates the magnitude of
health-provider shortage in rural Alabama.
poverty.
UAB has more than 20 collaborative
wreckage afterward to recover, repair,
rebuild, and move forward.
I found out that poor people cannot
programs in the Black Belt, addressing
afford to get sick. But, unfortunately, they
stroke, hypertension, glaucoma, diabetes,
Mona N. Fouad, MD, MPH is professor
do get sick. It is almost axiomatic that peo-
and other diseases. We and our partners
and director of UAB’s Minority Health and
ple in poverty are in worse health than the
have trained more than 1,000 community
Research Center. E-mail: [email protected]
rest of us. As African Americans are dispro-
members to be health advisers to their
MINORITY HEALTH & RESEARCH CENTER | WINTER 2006
page 2
I N G R A C I A L A N D E T H N I C B I A S A N D D I S C R I M I N AT I O N
UAB MHRC Inaugural Gala a Total Success
(continued from page 1)
three research grants designed to promote
companies, foundations, and individuals
research in health disparities and encour-
joined the effort at the $5,000 Leader,
age young investigators and junior faculty
$2,500 Supporter, and $1,000 Sir
to pursue careers in minority-health
Charles’ Court levels.
research.
UAB president Carol Z. Garrison, who
MHRC co-director Selwyn M. Vickers,
introduced Barkley at the dinner, lauded
MD said, “These awards highlight the
the MHRC for bringing together 200 facul-
excellence in research by minority investi-
ty scientists who have attracted more than
gators and provide a forum for us to be
$22 million in funding. “With this team,
mentors and show to ourselves and the
and in partnership with the community and
community that minority does not mean
Monica Baskin, PhD, Department of Health Behavior,
School of Public Health, received award for her work
“Childhood Obesity Intervention at the Chris McNair
Health Department.”
mediocrity.”
Event co-chairs Norman B. Davis Jr.,
Executive Vice President of First American
West Alabama, including the Black Belt.
Bank, and Cathy O. Friedman of City Paper
That region of the state brings into sharp
Company headed a host committee of 30
focus the compelling need for better
leaders from UAB and the local community
access to health care for all Alabamians.
in an effort to secure financial support for
MHRC director Mona N. Fouad said,
the MHRC’s mission. Alabama Power
“We are extremely gratified by this success.
Company provided lead sponsorship at the
It gives us a great base to build upon for
$10,000 Champion level. Numerous other
future years as we create the pipeline of
Jamy Ard, MD, Department of Nutrition Sciences,
received award for his work “Enhancing Weight Loss
Outcomes in African Americans Using a Modified
Eat-Right Approach.”
minority professionals in the biomedical
fields.”
the state, they are working together to dispel health disparities in
the state, the region, and nationally,” she said.
Other speakers included the
Honorable Congressmen Artur
Davis, who represents Alabama’s
Lucy Annang, PhD, Department of Health Behavior in
the UAB School of Public Health, received award for
her work “Peer Education to Promote Sexually
Transmitted Infection Prevention among Young Adult
African American Women.”
page 3
Seventh Congressional District,
which covers parts of Birmingham
as well as much of Central and
Charles Barkley, UAB MHRC spokesperson and Gala Chair,
congratulates some of the investigators who won Minority
Research Day awards.
MINORITY HEALTH & RESEARCH CENTER | WINTER 2006
B U I L D I N G T R U S T, S H A R I N G P O W E R , A N D E L I M I N A T I N
Minority Health & Research Center Charles Barkley Inaugural Gala
Charles Barkley with
Mr. and Mrs. Gerald
Johnson
Lucille O’Neal and
Charcey Glenn
“This gala is just the first of many to further the
Center’s efforts to improve the health status of
minorities throughout our state, region, and
nation. UAB has a very strong commitment to
closing the gap in health disparities by conducting leading-edge research, by working at the
grassroots level with underserved communities,
and by educating and mentoring promising
minority students who are future physicians and
researchers. The MHRC is at the vanguard of
these efforts.”
Dr. and Mrs. Isaac Ravizee, Charles Barkley, and
Dr. and Mrs. Norman Walton
- Carol Garrison
President, University of Alabama at Birmingham
Charles Barkley with Joanice Thompson, Yvette
Spencer, and Dr. Sharon Spencer
Charles Barkley with Dr. and Mrs. Eli Capilouto
Charles Barkley with Mr. and Mrs. Earl Foust
Charles Barkley with President Garrison and Cathy
Friedman
Mr. and Mrs. Norm Davis with President Garrison
“I am very blessed, I have had a great life. But I
think fame is really overrated… I do. You say to
yourself… you get famous, you get a lot of
money… then you realize there are more important things in life… So I thank God for the life I have
but I understand that it is not about being famous
and rich. You are blessed with a special gift and
you are supposed to make great things with
that… This is a great time in my life.”
Dr. and Mrs. Selwyn Vickers, Charles Barkley, and
Dr. and Mrs. Kirby Bland
- Charles Barkley, MHRC spokesperson
MINORITY HEALTH & RESEARCH CENTER | WINTER 2006
Dr. Edward Partridge
page 4
I N G R A C I A L A N D E T H N I C B I A S A N D D I S C R I M I N AT I O N
Cathy Friedman and Norm Davis, Gala co-chairs
Master of Ceremony, Linda Mays
U.S. representative Artur Davis
Charles Barkley with Mona Fouad
“We need to reach out to our communities to
work together with them, build their capacity,
give them the knowledge, the skills, and empower them so that they have health as a top priority.
Your support is very important. This is not just a
UAB Center. We want it to be your Center. Take
ownership of it and take this opportunity and use
it as a venue to help your underserved communities. Give us your feedback and let us know how
we can work together to improve the health of
our communities.”
Dr. Mona Fouad
- Mona Fouad
Director, UAB Minority Health and Research Center
Charles Barkley with Dr. Louis Dale and Dr. Annice
Yarber
Charles Barkley with Angela Williams (mother and
daughter)
Dr. Shirley Salloway Kahn and
Charles Barkley
Bob and Virginia Loftin with Charles Barkley
Charles Barkley and Mr. Mark Jerald
Charles Barkley and Mrs. Andria Hurst
Dr. John Amos with Charles Barkley
page 5
Dr. and Mrs. Hernan Moreno and Dr. and Dr. Alejandro
Aldana with Charles Barkley
MINORITY HEALTH & RESEARCH CENTER | WINTER 2006
B U I L D I N G T R U S T, S H A R I N G P O W E R , A N D E L I M I N A T I N
Special Thank You to Our Sponsors
Gala Pictures
Champion
(continued from pages 4 and 5)
Alabama Power Company Foundation
Hughes Capital Management
Jefferson County Committee on Economic
Leaders
Birmingham News
First American Bank
McWane, Inc.
Protective Life Foundation
Raymond James & Associates, Inc.
UAB Administration
UAB Department of Medicine
Opportunity
Jon and Sheryl Kimerling
KHAFRA
Publix Super Markets Charities
Mr. Gerald Johnson
Turner Sports Network
UAB Health System
UAB School of Health Related Professions
UAB School of Social and Behavioral
Sciences
UAB Department of Obstetrics and
Gynecology
UAB Department of Surgery
Vines & Waldrep, LLC
UAB School of Dentistry
Mr. Anthony Barnes
UAB School of Medicine
Volkert and Associates
Vulcan Materials Company
Supporters
Wachovia Securities, LLC
Dr. Norman W. Walton III
Alabama Gas Corporation
American Cast Iron Pipe Corporation
BellSouth
Brasfield & Gorrie, LLC
Bruno Event Team
Sir Charles’ Court
Doris Strode and Judge John England with Charles
Barkley
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Foust
Dr. Sharon Spencer
Buffalo Rock Company
Citizens Trust Bank
Special Thanks
City of Leeds
ABC 33/40
Daniel Corporation
FitzMartin Advertising
Drummond Company, Inc.
The Birmingham News
FitzMartin Advertising
The UAB Events Staff
Haskell Slaughter Young & Rediker, LLC
MINORITY HEALTH & RESEARCH CENTER | WINTER 2006
Mr. and Mrs. Loder and Gail Cunningham
The MHRC Gala pictures published in
this newsletter and many more are posted on the MHRC website. Pictures can
be viewed online and prints can be
ordered at www.uabmhrc.com. Go to
GALA on the home page.
page 6
I N G R A C I A L A N D E T H N I C B I A S A N D D I S C R I M I N AT I O N
The MHRC Hispanic/Latino Working Group
Celebrates Two Years of Growth
“The UAB Minority Health and Research
Program for Latinas; and HPV Vaccine
discussing research ideas and assisting
Center celebrates the important develop-
Acceptability: an Exploratory Study.
with grant submissions, writing, and statis-
ment and growth of its Hispanic/Latino
Most of the above studies have identi-
tical support.
Working Group, an MHRC initiative that
fied a number of health needs as well as
Members
started in January 2003 under the leader-
barriers to health care among Latinos in
Working Group have also been involved in
ship of Isabel Scarinci, PhD, MPH and
Alabama, and the findings are being
the Career Development Support Group
Graciela Alarcon, MD, MPH with the partic-
shared with faculty in the Hispanic/Latino
organized by Dr. Mona Fouad, where they
ipation of the UAB Hispanic/Latino faculty
Working Group.
have given monthly presentations on cur-
and faculty interested in Hispanic/Latino
of
the
Hispanic/Latino
The group has promoted recruitment
rent research efforts. An abstract regarding
and training of bilingual investigators and
the group as an example for academic part-
staff by sharing research priorities with
nerships was accepted for presentation at
deans and administration. A number of
the annual meeting of the American Public
resources, such as Spanish-translated
Health Association in November, 2005
The group composed of 55 faculty
measures, new research findings, funding
under the title “Latino/Hispanic Working
members meets monthly to discuss
opportunities, and useful references, are
Group: an Academic Solution to Respond
progress under its three programmatic
continually posted on the MHRC website,
to
goals of research, training, and community
www.uabmhrc.com, and sent to MHRC
Latino/Hispanic Immigrants.”
outreach.
members through eNews.
issues from all disciplines and schools
across campus,” says Mona Fouad, MD,
MPH, Director of the UAB Minority Health
and Research Center (MHRC).
Emerging
Health
Needs
of
The group promotes sensitivity in deal-
In the field of research, the group identi-
One of the main priorities of the
ing with the Latino community and aware-
fied 11 current research projects at UAB
Hispanic/Latino Working Group has been
ness of its needs, preferences, and culture.
that focus on Hispanics/Latinos. Among
to develop the pipeline of Hispanic stu-
During the past year a number of presenta-
these are LUMINA (LUpus in MInorities:
dents at UAB. Under the training goal, the
tions on Hispanic culture and health needs
NAture versus Nurture), by Dr. Graciela
group has established a mentorship pro-
were given around campus, among them a
Alarcón; Child Health Needs of Rural
gram for Hispanic/Latino freshman stu-
presentation by Drs. Scarinci and Saenz to
Alabama Latino Families, by Dr. Lynda
dents. The program, MANOS JUNTAS,
students and faculty in the Department of
Harrison;
Latino
held its inaugural meeting to match 19
Pediatrics and a presentation before the
Community: Attitudes, Beliefs, and a Plan
UAB freshman students who self-identified
School of Dentistry Grand Rounds by Dr.
of Action, by Dr. Jewell Halanych; AMERI-
as Hispanics with 19 faculty members who
Scarinci.
CO (Admixture Mapping for Ethnic and
volunteered to mentor these students
An exchange visitor program between
Racial Differences on Insulin Complex
throughout college. In addition the group
UAB and investigators from Central and
Outcomes), by Dr. José Fernandez; and
compiled a list of
South America has been another achieve-
Barriers to Seeking Further Eye Care after
the school systems
ment of the Hispanic/Latino Working
Vision Screenings in Hispanic Children in
across the state of
Group. Hispanic Research Fellows, among
Jefferson County, by Dr. Marcela Frazier. Dr.
Alabama with a
them Dr. Rosa Andrade from Peru and Dr.
Isabel Scarinici has several research proj-
large number of
Mónica Fernandes from Mexico, have
ects: Cervical Cancer Screening in
Hispanics.
been recruited to work on the LUMINA
Diabetes
and
the
Hispanics; Cervical Cancer Prevention in
Through the MHRC the Hispanic/Latino
study. Previous trainees have come from
Latina Immigrants; Sowing the Seeds of
Working Group has been instrumental in
Argentina (Dr. Ann Bertoli) and Spain (Dr.
Health: a Program for Lay Health
the development and support of a number
Janine Calvo Alén). From July to
Promoters; Sowing the Seeds of Health: a
of Latino-focused research proposals by
(continued on page 8)
page 7
MINORITY HEALTH & RESEARCH CENTER | WINTER 2006
Coming Events
Hispanic/Latino Working Group
(continued from page 7)
December, 2005 the group hosted Dr.
and training in issues related to them,” said
Andréa F. Silveira, a visiting scholar from
Scarinci.
the Pontifícia Universidade Católica do
Paraná, Brazil.
about Latino health issues, Dr. Scarinci has
Understanding the importance of involv-
given lectures about Hispanic culture and
ing community leaders for the success of
Latino health needs to social services agen-
community outreach initiatives, the group
cies, health departments, Birmingham
identified leaders in the Latino community
Leadership Program, local funders, etc.
and established collaborations. One such
September 29, 2006 MHRC Charles Barkley Gala 2006
www.uabmhrc.com
To promote education and awareness
Members
of
the
Hispanic/Latino
example is the training of “natural
Working Group volunteered their time to
helpers/leaders” in the Latino community
provide health information in a monthly
to be lay health promoters. The program
radio show organized by the lay health pro-
was developed as a partnership between
moters. Every month two local Latino news-
the MHRC and St. Vincent’s Hospital.
papers publish a health-related article free
“We have collaborated with local hospi-
of charge; some of the articles are written
tals and clinics in Latino-targeted outreach
by members of the Hispanic/Latino
activities (e.g., breast and cervical screen-
Working Group. Finally, Dr. Karen Saenz
ing, raising awareness of skin cancer and
provides health education and nursing serv-
sexually transmitted infections) to support
ices to low-income Latinos one day per
the Latino community with information
week at the Multicultural Center in Hoover.
Non-profit Org.
WINTER 2006
U.S. Postage
PAID
Permit No. 1256
Birmingham, AL
Minority Health and Research Center
The University of Alabama at Birmingham
1530 3rd Avenue South, MT618
Birmingham, Alabama 35294-4410
(205) 996-2880
[email protected]
www.uabmhrc.com
Editor in Chief: Mona Fouad, MD, MPH
Associate Editors:
Edward Partridge, MD
Selwyn M. Vickers, MD
Managing Editor: Maria Claudia Norena
Contributors:
Denise Bristow
Randi Gilinson
Cynthia Gilliom
Ann Smith
Joanice Thompson
PS-15654