Cincinnati Museum Center 2013 Annual Report

2013 Annual Report
July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013
Cincinnati
Museum
Center
looking
at
what’s
inside
Vision
Mission
Cincinnati Museum Center
will be known for its commitment
to understanding the richness
of our past, present and future
by providing world-class learning
experiences for children and adults.
Cincinnati Museum Center
inspires people of all ages to
learn more about our world
through science; regional history;
and educational, engaging and
meaningful experiences.
Profile
Cincinnati Museum Center is a one-of-a-kind, multi-museum complex housed
in Union Terminal, a historic Art Deco train station and National Historic
Landmark. Museum Center’s major offerings at Union Terminal include:
Cincinnati History Museum
Cincinnati History Library & Archives
Duke Energy Children’s Museum Museum of Natural History & Science
Robert D. Lindner Family OMNIMAX® Theater
Museum Center is the largest cultural institution in the city of Cincinnati, with more
than 1.3 million visitors per year. Our permanent and temporary exhibits are
supported and complemented by a state-of-the-art collections and research facility, In 2009, Cincinnati Museum
Center received the National
Medal for Museum and Library
Service, the nation’s highest honor
for museums and libraries.
The award, given by the
Institute of Museum and Library
Services, recognizes institutions
for extraordinary civic, educational,
environmental, economic,
and social contributions to
their communities.
Geier Collections & Research Center, educational programs, teacher professional
development programs, day and overnight camps, public lectures and programs,
tours of historic sites and community-wide cultural events. In addition,
Museum Center has been working with our collaborative partner, the Ohio Chapter
of The Nature Conservancy, to protect Richard & Lucile Durrell Edge of Appalachia
Preserve System for more than 50 years. The Preserve is the largest privately-owned
protected natural area in Ohio at 16,000 acres. It provides critical habitat for more
than 100 rare plant and animal species. The Eulett Center is Museum Center’s
research and education facility at The Preserve. It has increased staff research
capabilities, greatly expanded opportunities for educational programming and has
enhanced The Preserve’s relationship with the Adams County community.
Cincinnati Museum Center is
one of only 16 museums in
the United States to receive both
the Institute of Museum & Library
Services National Medal and
American Alliance of
Museums Accreditation (2012).
Smithsonian Affiliations facilitate
a two-way relationship with
the Smithsonian Institution to
inspire lifelong learning in
communities across America.
Photographs by Sarah Brancato.
Pg. 5
Strong Roots for STEM Learning
Pg. 6
Putting Energy to the Test
Pg. 8
The Egg Drop Project
Pg. 10
On the Cutting Edge
Pg. 14
More than a Film
Pg. 16
Unearthing Buried Treasure
Pg. 20
Bringing the World to Cincinnati
Pg. 24
The Marriage of Art and Science
Pg. 26
Community Connections
Pg. 28
Making a Difference for Youth,
Year after Year.
Pg. 30
Play Time = STEM Time
Pg. 32
Turning Union Terminal into
a Concert Hall
Pg. 34
Lasting Impressions: In Memoriam
Pg. 38
STEM: Not Just Now, But in the Past
Pg. 42
National Underground Railroad
Freedom Center
Board Chair
Trustees
Emeriti Trustees
Francie S. Hiltz
Civic Leader
Phillip J. Castellini
Chief Operations Officer, Cincinnati Reds
Dr. Compton Allyn
Past Chair
Martiné R. Dunn
Attorney at Law, Dinsmore & Shohl LLP
Helen C. Black
Otto M. Budig, Jr.
President, Budco Group, Inc.
James C. Ellerhorst
Office Managing Partner, Deloitte
Catharine W. Chapman
Vice Chair
Susan B. Esler
VP & Chief H.R. & Communications Officer , Ashland Inc.
John Q. Baumann
President and CEO, Ampac
David E. Foxx
Chief Executive Officer, d.e. Foxx & Associates
John F. Crowley
Robert L. Fregolle, Jr.
Global Customer Business Development Officer
Procter & Gamble
John Diehl
Vice Chair
Hon. Jeffery P. Hopkins
U.S. Bankruptcy Judge, U.S. Bankruptcy Court
Vice Chair
Cynthia Walker Kenny
Owner, Cynthia Kenny Creative
Vice Chair
Reverend Damon Lynch, Jr.
Pastor, New Jerusalem Baptist Church
Vice Chair
John M. Tew, Jr., M.D.
Prof. of Neurosurgery, The Mayfield Clinic,
University of Cincinnati Neuroscience Institute
David L. Hausrath
Retired Sr. VP & General Counsel, Ashland Inc.
Benjamin L. Bethell
Hazeleen P. Brewster
Frank Corbin
Martiné R. Dunn
Theodore H. Emmerich
Jane Garvey
Priscilla G. Haffner
Jeffrey P. Hinebaugh
Partner, Dinsmore & Shohl LLP
Timothy E. Hoberg
Allison H. Kropp
Attorney at Law, Dinsmore & Shohl LLP
Gregory B. Kenny
Gary Z. Lindgren
Executive Director, Cincinnati Business Committee
Kenneth W. Lowe
James J. Johnson
Robert D. Lindner, Jr.
Craig F. Maier
John E. Pepper, Jr.
Retired Chairman & CEO, Procter & Gamble ; Honorary
Co-Chairman, National Underground Railroad Freedom
Center; Retired Chairman, The Walt Disney Co.
Jennifer P. Mooney
Mary Zalla
CEO, Landor Associates
Treasurer
Thomas H. Quinn, Jr.
President, Bardes Corporation
H.C. Buck Niehoff
Johnna Reeder
VP, Community Relations & Economic Development,
Duke Energy
John A. O’Steen
Secretary
Edward D. Diller
Partner-in-Charge, Cincinnati Office,
Taft Stettinius & Hollister LLP
President and CEO
Douglass W. McDonald
President and CEO, Cincinnati Museum Center
General Counsel
George H. Vincent
Managing Partner, Dinsmore and Shohl LLP
Edwin J. Rigaud
Co-Director, Taft Business Consulting LLC;
President & CEO, Enova Premier LLC
George H. Musekamp, III
Valerie L. Newell
Robert W. Olson
Jack W. Partridge
John Weld Peck
George H. Perbix
Yvonne C. Robertson
Civic Leader
Carole T. Rigaud
Matthew A. Sheakley
President, The Sheakley Group
George A. Schaefer, Jr.
William C. Portman, III
John A. Ruthven
Gratefully,
Elizabeth Y. Schiff
Michael O. Stough
Ronald Tysoe
Judith K. Stein, M.D.
Civic Leader
Dean Windgassen
Anne Drackett Thomas
Civic Leader
Directors Emeriti
Kevin Ward
President, Western Ohio, Chase Bank
As an institution, Museum Center is always aware of how
decisions affect our relationship with you. Being good
stewards of your time, talent and treasure is one way to
show that we value you. We are proud to report that we
didn’t just balance the budget this fiscal year; we ended
with a surplus. We invite you to see how YOU are making
a difference. Your involvement truly enables us to inspire
people of all ages to learn more about our world. Thank you!
Dr. O’dell M. Owens
David C. Phillips
Albert W. Vontz III
Co-Chairman, Heidelberg Distributing Company
2
Daniel Meyer
J. Scott Robertson
Chairman, RCF Group
Keith P. Spiller
Partner, Executive Committee Member,
Thompson Hine LLP
As we considered what accomplishments to highlight in
this report, we decided to focus on how Museum Center
advances learning in Science, Technology, Engineering and
Mathematics. STEM is a hot topic these days because it
affects all of us. Yes, we need to prepare more STEM
workers for the 21st century economy, from preschool
children through college interns. We must also develop
STEM-literate citizens of all ages, able to make wise
decisions about the future of our region, our nation and
our world.
Alice H. Lytle
Cortland J. Meader
Steven C. Steinman
Chairman & CEO, Sims-Lohman
Where learning springs to life!
This phrase captures our common purpose. Together we strive
to create meaningful experiences, inspiration and lasting
memories for all throughout Museum Center. You are an
important part of that teamwork!
John W. Hauck
Phillip C. Long
Director Emeritus, Taft Museum of Art
Vice Chair
You – and other loyal friends – are the reason we are
celebrating another successful year. Without tremendous
support from our donors, volunteers, members and
community, Cincinnati Museum Center could not make so
many learning opportunities happen every day.
Francis G. Davis
Carrie K. Hayden
Civic Leader
Mitchel D. Livingston, Ph.D.
VP Student Affairs & Chief Diversity Officer, Emeritus, UC
Dear Friends,
Phillip Cox
DeVere Burt
Douglass W. McDonald, President and CEO, and
Francie S. Hiltz, Board Chair, check out the 1930s phone
in the historic Harold C. Schott Union Terminal President’s Office.
Douglass W. McDonald
President and CEO
Francie S. Hiltz
Chair, Board of Trustees
Dr. John Fleming
Dr. Gale Peterson
Photograph by Sarah Brancato.
3
Children’s Museum
Advisory Board
Cincinnati History
Advisory Board
Natural History
Advisory Board
President’s African American
Advisory Council
Allison Hiltz Kropp, Chair
David Hausrath, Chair
Henry Alexander
Claudia Abercrumbie
Brad Arnett
Hazeleen Brewster
Bob Bergstein
Amin Akbar
Alison Bushman
Edward D. Diller
Helen Black
Donna Jones Baker
Stephanie Byrd
Ashley L. Ford
David Bohl
Cynthia Booth
Vicki Calonge
J. Franklin Hall
DeVere E. Burt
DeAsa Brown
Jason M. Farler, CFA
Jeff Hinebaugh
Brian Carley
Calvin Harper
Shawn Gilreath
Timothy E. Hoberg
Catharine W. Chapman
Roderick D. Hinton
Consuelo W. Harris
Thomas E. Huenefeld
Stanley Hedeen
Myron Hughes
Brett Heekin
Eric Jackson
Dr. Jay A. Johannigman
Eric Jackson
Willie Hill
Phillip Long
Gene Kritsky
Jan-Michele Lemon Kearney
Julie Hoffman
Ed Loyd
Steve Love
Robert Killins
Peter Horton
Gale E. Peterson
David Meyer
William J. Madison
Jenny C. Laster
Todd M. Schild
Kevin Pape
William Mallory
Tina R. Macon
Judith Spraul-Schmidt
Nilesh Patel
Mona Harrison Morrow
Mark McAndrew
Merrie Stewart Stillpass
John A. Ruthven
Monica Posey
Elsira (Elsie) Pina
Tony Strike
Keith Spiller
Gwen Robinson
Robert C. Roberts
Robert Vitz
Judith K. Stein, M.D.
Sean Rugless
Matt Sheakley
Jennifer Walke
Steve Steinman
Chris Smitherman
Lamont Taylor
Richard Wilhelm
John M. Tew, M.D
Dwight Tillery
Robin Wilson
Carla Walker
Donna Zaring
Janice Walker
David Weaver
Dan Yount
Strong Roots for
STEM Learning
With three museums,
special exhibits, nature preserve,
history library & archives and
OMNIMAX theater, we are
meeting our community’s need for
STEM education as only we can.
®
So what is STEM anyway? First, it’s more than one of – or even the sum of – its parts:
Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. STEM education takes these
four areas and applies them to real-world problem solving and innovation. It centers
on projects that cross disciplines.
To design possible solutions, STEM learners work together, developing the
analytical and creative skills they need to succeed in today’s economy. Those skills
are good for everyone.
Our informal environment is ideal for sparking interest and curiosity about STEMrelated ideas. As a multi-museum complex, we offer more options for self-directed,
hands-on learning than any other place in our region. We help people of all ages
explore, wonder and think about our world in new ways. Sometimes, in gaining more
insights about STEM topics, visitors also discover more about themselves!
4
Photographs by Michael E. Keating and Sarah Brancato.
5
Hands-on Discovery in the LITE Lab
makes STEM learning fun for
students and visitors of all ages.
Putting
Energy
to the
Test
The LITE Lab stands for Learning, Innovation, Technology and Education. It’s the place
to go for fun and firsthand experiences in creativity and problem solving – the tools
of real scientists and innovators.
Take Fantastic Physics, for instance. This LITE Lab STEM Experience is tailored to
meet state educational standards for fourth through twelfth graders. It lets students
experiment on their own, offering multiple stations for small group engagement.
Examples of stations include Create an Anti-gravity Fluid, Explore Nanoscience
Applications, and Engineer a Tabletop Trebuchet (a medieval artillery machine used to
throw objects at the enemy).
Students don’t just build a small-scale version of the trebuchet. Through measuring
the machine’s distance, energy and force, the project raises a modern-day question:
How do different designs affect the outcome?
“
Museum Center provides Duke Energy with an
ideal venue to share important messages about
energy efficiency, the environment and economic
development. We are delighted with our partnership
because it enables us to reach customers in an
engaging way.
”
- Karen Monday,
Vice President, Foundation & Business Management, Duke Energy
But you don’t have to be on a school visit to enjoy the LITE Lab. Anyone can come!
Some of our visitors’ favorite challenges are part of a unique “content partnership”
between Museum Center and Duke Energy. Duke Energy has worked closely with
us to develop the Duke E-Squares Program, sharing the latest information from their
industry with Museum Center staff –and through the program, with our visitors.
Through inquiry-based, hands-on activities in the LITE Lab and on the museum floor,
anyone can explore how the Duke Energy “4-Es” (Education, Environment,
Energy-Efficiency and Economic Development) impact our world. Learn how to make
energy using the sun, wind, water or steam—and experiment with different ways to
do it more effectively. Discover how people’s everyday actions can make a difference
in the environment. Figure out your “carbon footprint” and then investigate how to
reduce it. What can you do differently to become part of the solution?
Left: Students hone their innovation and problem-solving skills in the LITE Lab,
“experiment central” in the Museum of Natural History & Science.
6
Photographs by Michael E. Keating and Sarah Brancato.
7
The Egg Drop Project:
Anonymous (3)
Romola N. Allen
Mrs. Charles Wm. Anness
Mr. & Mrs. David T. Bohl
Mrs. Lela C. Brown
Mrs. Walter M. Chapman
Mrs. Caroline H. Davidson
Mr. & Mrs. Lyle Everingham
Mr. & Mrs. W. Roger Fry
Jane Garvey & John Lanier
Mrs. Philip O. Geier, Jr.
Mr. James D. Geier & Mr. Gregory Smith
Mr. & Mrs. Chas Goering
Priscilla Garrison Haffner
Timothy E. Hoberg & Caryl A. Yzenbaard
Mrs. Margot Jacobs
Linda Busken & Andrew MacAoidh Jergens
Dr. & Mrs. Richard A. Jolson
Mr. Lawrence A. Leser
Mr. & Mrs. Robert D. Lindner, Sr.
Mr. & Mrs. Robert D. Lindner, Jr.
Mr. & Mrs. David C. Lindner
Mr. & Mrs. Alan B. Lindner
Dr. & Mrs. James D. Lytle
Mr. & Mrs. John P. March
Mrs. Debra R. McMillan-Ash & Mr. William F. Ash
Bonnie & Dan Meyer
Mrs. Arthur E. Motch, Jr.
Dr. & Mrs. Keith A. Murrell
Valerie L. Newell & Timothy A. Smith
Mr. & Mrs. H. C. Buck Niehoff
Mr. & Mrs. John A. O’Steen
Mr. & Mrs. George H. Perbix
Wym & Jan Portman
Mr. & Mrs. Edwin J. Rigaud, Jr.
Cynthia S. Robertson
Mr. John A. Ruthven
Mr. & Mrs. Gerald Skidmore
Mr. & Mrs. Steven C. Steinman
Dr. & Mrs. John M. Tew, Jr.
Dr. Jerry W. Warner
Sonja A. Wilson
Mr. Dean L. Windgassen & Ms. Susan G. Stanton
Jo Ann F. Withrow
Mr. & Mrs. Craig S. Young
Museum Center, part of the
Greater Cincinnati STEM
Collaborative, helps schools and
corporate engineers come together.
suggests the Egg Drop experience
“argues for a shift in pedagogy here at
Silverton.” In short, Museum Center’s approach to STEM could change not just
individual students’ interests but even
how schools go about teaching!
Our day at Museum Center provided an exemplary model for
y feels like and sounds like.
what STEM learning looks like,
Several days later, eighth graders from
Hughes STEM High School repeated
the exercise.
Both times you could feel the tension
as each group watched their carefully
engineered package fall. Then excited
cheers resounded whenever a carefully
unwrapped bundle revealed the
precious cargo was safe. Next came
time for some critical thinking.
Museum staff, teachers and a Toyota
engineer joined forces to get students
talking about what they had learned.
Afterwards, students also spent several
hours exploring the Museum of Natural
History & Science to sample its many
informal, hands-on learning options.
Photograph by Regina Hall
”
- Linda Johnson-Towles,
Community/Museum Resource Center Coordinator, Silverton Paideia Academy
Before the crucial experiment, Toyota
engineers Nicole Salimi and Restie
Corpuz had visited the school, asking
key questions to spark students’
curiosity and excitement. Then, working
in small teams, students decided how to
use their supplies. The goal? Keep a
raw egg from breaking when dropped
from 25 feet up!
Investor Clubs are associations of the $1,000+ donors
who take special interest in events and programming
related to the Cincinnati History Museum and Cincinnati
History Library & Archives (1788 Club), the Museum of
Natural History & Science (Hopewell Council), the Duke
Energy Children’s Museum (Tree House Club) and in igniting
curiosity in the next generation (Grandparents Club).
8
On May 24th sixth graders from
Silverton Paideia Academy tested their
problem solving, creativity and design
skills in Union Terminal’s Rotunda.
The United States needs more STEM
professionals, and that means improving
STEM education. We also know middle
school is a critical time to capture the
interest of students and build their
confidence in STEM learning.
“
^ Indicates donor has recently passed away.
Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy. If you
have a change or correction, please contact the Office of
Philanthropy at (513) 287-7074.
It wasn’t your usual school day.
So that’s what our STEM experiences
are designed to do.
According to Linda Johnson-Towles
from Silverton Paideia Academy,
Museum Center is making a difference.
Johnson-Towles notes how the project
used “active learning” to engage
students and “an informal setting
outside the school,” adding depth to
their classroom experience. She even
“
To meet the anticipated needs of business and
industry, the U.S. must double the number of STEM
bachelor’s degrees from about 200,000 now to
400,000 annually by 2020.
”
- The Business and Industry STEM Education Coalition (2012)
9
On the
Cutting Edge
Naturalists at the
open-air classroom
Edge of Appalachia use a living,
to deliver award-winning STEM education.
“Wow! Look what I found!” It’s the
excitement of school children discovering
some of nature’s secrets. What better place
to do it than the region’s largest and most
unique preserve. For 25 years, the Edge
of Appalachia naturalists have served the
Ohio Valley and Manchester school districts
in Adams County. This year the Board of
Governors of the Southern Ohio Educational
Service Center honored The Edge for
“commitment and service to our schools.”
Annually Director Chris Bedel and his team
reach 1,800 students, helping them
experience nature firsthand and personally
observe how it works. Adams County
students start coming as fourth graders.
Their first task: Learn to design and conduct
a simple scientific experiment using a
pond community. Hands-on activities teach
students to identify animal habitats and
use the proper tools to collect simple
data. Then they write a short report on
their findings.
The class also hikes through the forest,
learning about different tree characteristics
and how to identify plants. Then lessons
continue during the winter, with the
naturalists coming to the students’ schools.
In the spring, students and their teachers
head out to their “living” classroom again.
Each year through seventh grade, students
return to The Edge, building on what they
studied the year before. They experience
key aspects of ecology, water systems and
conservation. They even follow a “geology
compass course” to find out what makes
the Preserve’s geology, plants and wildlife
so unique. While hunting fossils, they also
uncover what can lead to extinction.
“
What students encounter at The Edge cannot be found in
textbooks or online, as The Preserve is the most biologically
rich area in the state of Ohio. It’s the perfect land lab.
10
”
- Karen Young,
Coordinator of Gifted (Retired), Adams County/Ohio Valley School District
Chris
Bedel
Eric
Davenport
Mark
Zioba
Preserve
Director
Chief
Naturalist
Ecological
Manager
11
Annual Fund and
Mission Support
$1,000,000 and up
Anonymous
$100,000-$999,999
City of Cincinnati
The Duke Energy Foundation
Lucile & Richard Durrell Special Fund II *
Great American Insurance Group
Taxpayers of Hamilton County
The John Hauck Foundation
Paul C. Keidel Revocable Trust
The PNC Foundation
Robert & Adele Schiff Family Foundation
Harold C. Schott Foundation
Francie & Tom Hiltz
The State of Ohio
Procter & Gamble *
$50,000-$99,999
The Andrew Jergens Foundation
Cincinnati Bell
Lucile & Richard Durrell Special Fund III *
The Carol Ann & Ralph V. Haile, Jr.,/U.S. Bank Foundation
Mr. & Mrs. Mark J. Hauser
The Jewish Foundation of Cincinnati
The Dorothy M. M. Kersten Trust
Time Warner Cable
Jo Ann F. Withrow
Mr. John B. Goering
Mr. & Mrs. Gary Greenberg
Priscilla Garrison Haffner
Timothy E. Hoberg & Caryl A. Yzenbaard
James T. & Ellen M. Hatfield Memorial Trust
Johnson Investment Counsel, Inc.
Kinstler Family Revocable Trust
Florence and Ron Koetters
Mrs. Andrea Levenson
Lewis & Marjorie Daniel Foundation
Lola Louise Bonnell Trust
Louise Taft Semple Foundation
Mr. & Mrs. Douglass W. McDonald
Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. McDonald
Ohio Casualty Foundation
Ohio National Financial Services
Mr. & Mrs. Richard D. Oliver
Paycor, Inc.
Francie & John Pepper *
John D. Rice, in honor of Jo Ann Rice
Richard F. Schaengold Charitable Remainder Annuity Trust
Dr. George P. Rizzi
Mr. & Mrs. J. Scott Robertson
Mr. & Mrs. Jack T. Rouse*
A.T. Folger, Jr. - Lowe Simpson Fund |P Jeremy F. Simpson
Mr. & Mrs. Steven C. Steinman
John McNeil Tate ^ Trust
John & Susan Tew - Museum Center Fund
UBS
Validex Employment Screening Services
Mr. & Mrs. George H. Vincent
Mr. & Mrs. Eric B. Yeiser
$25,000-$49,999
$5,000-$9,999
Archdiocese of Cincinnati
Ashland Inc. Advised Fund *
Mrs. Lela C. Brown
Otto M. Budig, Jr.
Anonymous (2)
Dr. & Mrs. Compton Allyn
Anthem Blue Cross & Blue Shield
Beech Acres Parenting Center
Best Buy Foundation
Catholic Health Partners
Charles & Ruth Seligman Family Foundation, Inc.
Chemed Corporation
Coca-Cola Bottling Company
Convergys Corporation
The Corbett Foundation
Digital Media Group, Inc.
Friedlander Family Fund
Frederick A. & Juliet Esselborn Geier Memorial Fund*
Mr. & Mrs. R. Keith Harrison, Jr.
David & Debra Hausrath
Heidelberg Distributing Company
Helen B. Vogel Trust
Israel Ministry of Tourism
The Jeanann Gray Dunlap Foundation
Kenneth A. Scott Charitable Trust, a KeyBank Trust
Mr. & Mrs. Gregory B. Kenny
Mr. & Mrs. Alan B. Lindner
Mr. Joe Mendelsohn III
The Midland Company Foundation
Dr. & Mrs. Keith A. Murrell *
Malcolm & Ruth Myers Family Fund *
Valerie L. Newell & Timothy A. Smith
Mr. & Mrs. Robert W. Olson
Mr. & Mrs. George H. Perbix
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph A. Pichler *
Ridgeway Foundation
Saint Xavier Church
Mr. & Mrs. Eugene A. Schwoeppe
The Sheakley Group of Companies
Dr. Judith & Mr. Steven Stein
Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Sullivan
The Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Social Innovation Fund
The Diocese of Southern Ohio
Frisch’s Restaurants
Greater Cincinnati Water Works
Robert W. & Isabel Yeatman Gwinner Fund *
Mr. & Mrs. Robert D. Lindner, Jr.
Mr. & Mrs. John A. O’Steen
SC Ministry Foundation
Anne Drackett Thomas
Mr. & Mrs. Ronald W. Tysoe
University of Cincinnati
Mr. & Mrs. Albert W. Vontz III
Xavier University
$10,000-$24,999
Anonymous Fund *
Mrs. Charles Wm. Anness
Association of Children’s Museums
Banfield Pet Hospital
Bartlett & Co.
Rosemary H. & Frank Bloom Special Fund *
Mr. & Mrs. David T. Bohl
Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Castellini
Charles H. Dater Foundation
Cincinnati Museum Center Guests (Gifts to the Wishing Well)
Mr. Wilbur Cohen
Mr. & Mrs. Edward D. Diller
Bill & Carol Eckerle
Harry & Linda Fath
Fifth Third Foundation
Ashley & Bobbie Ford
Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Fregolle, Jr.
William A. Friedlander Fund #2 *
glaserworks
12
Toyota Motor Engineering & Manufacturing
North America, Inc.
Mr. & Mrs. David W. Warner
Welchwood Foundation, Inc.
The Willard & Jean Mulford Fund of the
Cambridge Charitable Foundation
Wodecroft Foundation
Woodward Trust
$2,500-$4,999
Anonymous (4)
Advance Pierre Foods Inc.
AT&T
August A. Rendigs, Jr. Foundation
Mr. & Mrs. John Q. Baumann
Berenfield Containers, Inc.
The Bill Muster Foundation
E. Lucy Braun Endowment Fund *
Building Healthy Lives Foundation
Drs. John L. & Ruth C. Carter
Edward & Susan Castleberry
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
Clark, Schaefer, Hackett & Co.
CLH Foundation
Corporex Companies
Mr. & Mrs. Martiné R. Dunn
Ms. Susan B. Esler & Mr. Steve Skibo **
Gallagher SKS
GE Elfun Organization
Mrs. Philip O. Geier, Jr.
Mr. & Mrs. J. Franklin Hall
Jeff & Erika Hinebaugh
Mr. & Mrs. Lee Knose
Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence A. Leser *
Mr. & Mrs. Phillip C. Long
Dr. & Mrs. James D. Lytle
Mr. & Mrs. Timothy L. Mathile
Bonnie & Dan Meyer
Miller-Valentine Group
Ms. Megan Murray & Mr. Joe Willke
Mr. Bill Motto & Ms. Barbara Gould
Ohio CAT
Mr. & Mrs. James F. Orr
Mrs. Dorothy A. Pandorf
PNC Bank
Wym & Jan Portman *
R.C. Durr Foundation, Inc.
Mr. & Mrs. Daniel P. Randolph
Mrs. George Rieveschl, Jr.
Mr. & Mrs. Edwin J. Rigaud
Mr. & Mrs. David Rosenberg
Ms. Melody Sawyer Richardson
Rosemary & Mark Schlachter
Mr. & Mrs. Gerald Skidmore
Mr. & Mrs. David G. Smith
Tom & Dee Stegman
Sunny Delight Beverages Co.
Bruce S. & Caroline C. Taylor Fund *
The Warrington Foundation
Mr. & Mrs. Kevin Ward
Mr. Dean L. Windgassen & Ms. Susan G. Stanton
Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey L. Wyler
Ms. Mary E. Zalla
$1,500-$2,499
Anonymous Fund *
Albert B. Cord Foundation
Mr. & Mrs. Peter A. Alpaugh
Dr. Diane S. Babcock
Bernard & Pamela Barbash Family Foundation
Mr. & Mrs. Troy Blackburn
Ms. Elizabeth Brown, M.D. & Dr. Dwight R. Kulwin
Mr. & Mrs. William P. Butler
Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth R. Campbell
Cincinnati-Hamilton County Community Action Agency
Clever Crazes for Kids
Creative Dimensions
Mrs. Caroline H. Davidson
Martha & Stuart Dornette
Mr. & Mrs. David J. Duszynski
Mr. & Mrs. James C. Ellerhorst
Emerson Industrial Automation
Enterprise Holdings Foundation
Mr. & Mrs. Gene Gardner
Shelly & Michael Gerson
Sharon & Robert Gill Family Fund *
Mr. & Mrs. Gary Gleason
Ms. H. Drewry Gores & Mr. George H. Warrington
Dr. Bruce Halpryn & Mr. Chas Riebe
Cathy Hansel
Wm G. & Mary Jane Helms Charitable Trust,
Leonard A. Weakley, Jr., TEE
Dr. Ching Ho & Mr. Stephan Keller
Mr. & Mrs. David D. Hoguet
John Leshy Fund for Adams County *
Mr. & Mrs. Charles S. Kamine
Mr. & Mrs. Robert Kanter
Dr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Kereiakes
Dr. & Mrs. Richard S. Kerstine
Mr. Scott E. Knox & Mr. Raymond C. Pater
Mr. & Mrs. S. George Kurz
Mr. & Mrs. Polk Laffoon IV
Mrs. Debra R. McMillan-Ash & Mr. William F. Ash
Mr. & Mrs. Michael Oestreicher, Esq
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas H. Quinn, Jr.
Cynthia S. Robertson
Mr. & Mrs. James E. Schwab
Mr. & Mrs. Keith P. Spiller
Ms. Elizabeth A. Stone *
Success by Six
Towne Properties, Inc.
Dr. & Mrs. Mark T. Tsuang, MD
Carol & Robert Vidal
Mr. & Mrs. Alexander Warm
Dr. Susan G. Weinberg & Dr. Nolan L. Weinberg
Mr. John H. White, Jr.
Christie & Gregory Wolf
Mr. David M. York
$1,000-$1,499
Anonymous (3)
Mr. & Mrs. J. Wickliffe Ach
Romola N. Allen
Andrew MacAoidh Jergens Fund *
Mr. & Mrs. Andrew P. Barton, Jr.
Mr. & Mrs. Harvey Bergman **
David & Elaine Billmire
John & Mary Ann Boorn
Mr. & Mrs. Elroy E. Bourgraf
Mr. & Mrs. Frederick E. Bryan, II
Burke, Inc.
Mr. & Mrs. James E. Bushman
Mr. & Mrs. Phillip Castellini
Cast-Fab Technologies Inc.
Mr. & Mrs. John F. Cassidy
Mrs. Walter M. Chapman
Museum Center Guests
(gifts to the Add-A-Dollar Campaign)
Mr. & Ms. Michael L. Cioffi
Ms. Diana Collins
Mr. Charles Comins & Ms. Audrey Green-Comins
Mr. & Mrs. C. Wesley Cowan
Mr. & Mrs. David Dillon
Anne G. & Robert W. Dorsey
Duke Realty Corp.
Mr. & Mrs. Theodore H. Emmerich
Mr. & Mrs. Fred W. Erschell *
Mr. & Mrs. Lyle Everingham
Mr. & Mrs. Jason M. Farler, CFA
Mr. & Mrs. Kurtis B. Finch
Mr. & Mrs. David E. Foxx
Dr. & Mrs. Harry F. Fry *
Mr. James D. Geier & Mr. Gregory Smith
Genji Fund *
Mr. & Mrs. Michael H. Giuliani
Mr. & Mrs. Richard M. Glover
William H. & Jane A. Graver
Ms. Consuelo W. Harris
Mr. & Mrs. John W. Hayden
Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Heimann, Sr.
Mrs. Phyllis S. Hopple
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Huenefeld
Mr. James J. Jenny
Mr. James C. Johnson & Ms. Dale Cheek
Dr. Candace Kendle & Mr. Christopher Bergen
Tom & Tara Knipper
Janet C. Kreider
Mr. & Mrs. J. Brian Kropp
Mr. & Mrs. Robert Lafkas
Mr. & Mrs. Carl H. Lindner III
Mr. & Mrs. David C. Lindner
Mr. & Mrs. Raymond H. Matlock
Mr. & Mrs. Raymond H. Matlock II
Cortland & Annette Meader
Mr. & Mrs. Harold A. Merten
James A. Miller
Mr. Michael H. Miller & Mr. Thomas E. Lawson
Dave & Diane Moccia
Mr. & Mrs. David L. Morgan
Mrs. Arthur E. Motch, Jr.
Dean & Catherine Moulas
Neyer Properties
James & Mary Nordlund
Dr. Gale E. E. Peterson
Mr. Harley V. Piltingsrud
Dr. & Mrs. Robert H. Preston
Ms. Johnna Reeder
Daniel & Beverly Reigle
Robert A. & Marion K. Kennedy Charitable Trust
Mr. & Mrs. William T. Robinson III
Snowden & Marianne Rowe
Rumpke Waste, Inc.
Ruttle Design Group, Inc.
Mr. & Mrs. George A. Schaefer, Jr.
Mr. Thomas R. Schiff
Mrs. Nancy L. Schlemmer
Mr. Clifford R. Scholes & Mr. Peter Scholes
Mr. & Mrs.^ James P. Schubert
Doris J. Schurrenberger ^ Trust
Marvin and Betsy Schwartz Fund *
Mr. & Mrs. Matthew A. Sheakley
Mr. & Mrs. Robert N. Sibcy
Mr. & Mrs. Morton Spitz
Mrs. Joseph S. Stern, Sr.
Ms. Elizabeth E. Stoehr
Summertime Kids Fund *
Mr. Brian A. Tippett & Dr. Aletha W. Tippett
Margaret & Michael Valentine
JoAnn & Paul Ward
Dr. Jerry W. Warner
Mrs. Harris K. Weston
Mr. & Mrs. W. Joseph Williams, Jr.
Sonja A. Wilson
Edward Jay Wohlgemuth
Woodward Family Charitable Foundation
The Craig Young Family Foundation *
$500-$999
Anonymous (2)
4C for Children
Liz & Hank Alexander
Mr. & Mrs. Ron Arlinghaus
Bill Atkins
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas B. Avril
Dr. Judith C. Bausher & Dr. Herbert Y. Gilliam
Mrs. Thomas S. Benjamin
Mr. & Mrs. Peter M. Bloch
Ms. Eleanor A. Botts
Mr. & Mrs. Albert L. Brown, Jr.
Mr. Ralph R. Carruthers
Cassidy Turley
Cincinnati Union Bethel
Communicating Arts Credit Union
Mr. & Mrs. Edward G. Connelly
CSX Transportation
Dr. & Mrs. Fuheid S. Daoud
Dental Care Plus, Inc.
Dr. & Mrs. Paul L. Diamond
Ms. Janice Ferguson & Mr. Don Angel
The Honorable & Mrs. Richard H. Finan
Flying Pig Marathon
Dr. Christopher A. Ford
Mr. & Mrs. Edward Foss, Jr.
Mr. & Mrs. Hugh Frost
Mrs. Frances H. Goldman
Mr. & Mrs. James Goldman
Mr. & Mrs. T. Richard Halberstadt
Ms. Margaret E. Hallas
Hamilton County Juvenile Court
Harry & Elsie Knighton Memorial Fund of the Scioto Foundation
Mrs. Robert F. Hartkemeier
Hewlett-Packard Co.
Joan Portman Edge of Appalachia Education Fund *
The Honorable Nathaniel R. Jones
Mr. John Keegan
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Lippert *
Mr. & Mrs. Robert S. Maxwell
Dr. Michael E. Miller & Dr. Chris Modrall
Richard & Crescent Miller
Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission
Dr. & Mrs. Richard Park
Mr. & Mrs. Morris H. Passer
George and Jean Perbix Fund *
Mr. Bertie Ray II & Dr. Marcia Irving-Ray
Safari Club International
Recie & Jim Scott
Sims-Lohman Fine Kitchens and Granite
Mr. & Mrs. John E. Stillpass
Taft, Stettinius & Hollister LLP
TechBrite
United Maier Signs, Inc
Ms. Hedda W. von Goeben
Mr. & Mrs. William M. Weber
Miss Mariam A. Zabel
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Zemboch
* Indicates a gift made via The Greater Cincinnati Foundation
** Indicates a gift made via Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund
*** Indicates a gift made via Fifth Third Bank
**** Indicates a gift made via PNC Bank
^ Indicates a donor has recently passed away
List recognizes contributions made July 1, 2012 through
June 30, 2013. Every effort has been made to ensure
accuracy. If you have a change or correction, please
contact the Office of Philanthropy.at (513) 287-7074.
13
More Than a Film
“
With Flight of the Butterflies, Museum Center reached beyond the OMNIMAX® Theater,
issuing a call to action that connected the Monarch butterfly to our STEM initiatives.
The film’s an interconnected scientific
adventure! It’s the true story of Dr. Fred
Urquhart’s lifelong quest to solve a mystery:
Where do Monarch butterflies go each
winter? It’s about this species’ amazing
migration. It takes four generations to
complete the cycle—including a “Super
Generation” that travels 2,000 kilometers,
from the northern U.S. and southern
Canada to the Transvolcanic mountains
of central Mexico.
We hear how Dr. Urquhart founded the
Insect Migration Association in the 1950s,
enlisting thousands of “citizen scientists”
to help him tag butterflies’ wings and
track the Monarchs’ journey. We also learn
that Monarchs can’t survive without the
milkweed plant. It’s the only place females
lay their eggs and the only food Monarch
caterpillars eat!
This once plentiful plant is getting harder
to find these days. So Museum Center
decided to enlist a new generation of citizen
scientists to solve this 21st century problem.
And we used 21st century tools to make
it happen! Through electronic media, we
spread the word: Not Enough Milkweed
= Less Monarch Caterpillar Food = Fewer
Monarch Butterflies. We hosted events like
Butterfly Fest and the #MonarchMania
Twitter Party. We also partnered with the
Krohn Conservatory to help get even more
people involved.
Plenty of people heard the call. We set an
example by planting a butterfly garden at the
Museum of Natural History & Science. And
supplemented the movie with many activities,
including packets of milkweed seeds for our
citizen scientists to plant their own butterfly
gardens. A local “mom blogger” reports on
abirdandabean.com, “The kids each receive
seed packets to plant milkweed, to help
attract Monarch butterflies to your yard.
(Mine, ages 3 and 5,) have asked me almost
every single day since then if we can plant
them yet, to help the butterflies….I think it
made an impression.”
”
Seeing the metamorphosis under the OMNIMAX®giant dome is amazing!
- Bridgett
Excerpts from “storifying” the #MonarchMania Twitter Party
“
”
I LOVED the movie. My kids and I talked about it for days.
“
- Erin
”
Can’t wait to start my own garden!
- Trenton
The result? Increased awareness of an
environmental need and the chance to
see firsthand part of the Monarch miracle.
STEM happening in backyards throughout
the region!
from top, clockwise:
(1) Monarch Mania at entrance of Flight of the Butterflies.
(2) Chalk art of Monarch butterfly at the top of the Union
Terminal Fountain, created by Jesse Kramer.
(3) Monarch Mania at the 2013 Opening Day Parade.
(4) Temporary tattoos made their way throughout Cincinnati.
(5) Volunteer artists creating butterfly face-painting
kicked-off Monarch Mania in the Rotunda.
14
Photographs by Mike Howard, Jenna Kehrt, Hilairy Begley and Sarah Brancato.
15
Unearthing
Buried
Treasure
Ohio Valley
rich in fossils
and artifacts
Jane
MacKnight
David C.
Conzett
Senior
Registrar
Curator
History
Collections
& Fine Art
16
Revealing Regional History
Rich in fossils and prehistoric artifacts,
the Ohio Valley yields scientific finds for
Geier curators to share with the world.
Question: What is Ohio’s state fossil?
Answer: Isoletus Maximus, the genus
of trilobites that lived in the shallow
ocean covering most of Ohio from
451 to 444 million years ago, during
the Ordovician. Now extinct,
trilobites were part of a larger animal
classification called Phylum Arthropoda,
which includes crabs, lobsters, spiders,
insects and other creatures living today.
So what’s special about trilobites and
Museum Center? You can see examples
of trilobite fossils in museums all over
the world, including our Museum of
Natural History & Science, but the world’s
largest and best collection of Upper
Ordovician fossils, including trilobites, is
at the Geier Research & Collections
Center. It’s scientifically important.
Scholars come from all over the world
to study our invertebrate paleontology
collection because of its scope and
quality. “These amazing rocks include
the North American Upper Ordovician
Type Standard,” explains Curator
Brenda Hunda, Ph.D.. “That means
they’re the best examples known
for this period, against which others
are compared.” With 95% of our
collection catalogued, they are also
unusually accessible.
Herman
Mays
Ph.D.
Bob
Genheimer
M.A.
Brenda
Hunda
Ph.D.
Glenn W.
Storrs
Ph.D.
Curator
of
Zoology
George
Rieveschl
Curator of
Archaeology
Curator of
Invertibrate
Paleontology
Asst. VP for
Collections & Research,
Withrow Farney
Curator of Vertebrate
Paleontology
Museum Center’s unique
resource continues to make
important contributions to
understanding Earth’s past.
“For anyone studying Earth’s
history 450 million years ago,
the best paleontology for the
Upper Ordovician Period of
North America is in Cincinnati,”
says Hunda. “That’s why our
rocks are called the
Cincinnatian Series!”
The Cincinnati area is also a terrific
place to investigate prehistoric Eastern
Woodlands cultures. Since 2008, Bob
Genheimer, George Rieveschl Curator
of Archaeology, and his team (pictured
below) have spent summer months at
the Hahn Field Site in Anderson
Township. And the rest of the year
processing what they found! According
to Genheimer, the Archaeology
Collection’s greatest strength comes
from excavations of late prehistoric Fort
Ancient culture (A.D. 1000-1650).
“The Fort Ancient people had large
villages of 100 to 500 residents.
We’ve uncovered evidence of their diet,
cooking techniques, weaponry and
housing. In July 2012, we began
investigating earth ovens—in-ground
pits where food was baked above
fire-heated rocks. No thermostats.
They learned how to use the insulating
properties of the ground. Our site is a
treasure trove of information on
Cincinnati’s first true farmers!”
Background Image:
This slab of fossils from the
Cincinnatian Series (Late Ordovician
Period, ca. 450 million years ago)
contains over 300 nearly complete
Glyptocrnus crinoids.
Bob Genheimer shows a Fort Ancient earth oven.
17
Legacy Society
Planning for your future, providing for
Museum Center’s tomorrow
The Legacy Society recognizes in
perpetuity Cincinnati Museum Center’s very
special friends who have helped to secure
our future when they planned their own.
Donors of all income levels have named
Museum Center as a beneficiary in their wills
or trusts, made life-income gifts, or other
deferred giving arrangements. These gifts
benefit Museum Center as a whole or are
designated to support a particular Museum,
department or program.
These families and individuals have pledged
generous, lasting gifts to Cincinnati Museum
Center that extend beyond a lifetime:
Anonymous (6)
Mr. & Mrs. Patrick R. Abbott
Ms. Nancy Barbour
Mary Jo Bazeley
Barb & Dave Beato
Mr. & Mrs. Frank Bloom
Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence R. Burkart
Drs. John L. and Ruth C. Carter
Catharine & Walter ^ Chapman
Ms. Joan Cochran
Ms. Caroline S. DeMar
Mr. John A. Diehl
Bill & Carol Eckerle
Ashley & Bobbie Ford
Susan & William Friedlander
Oliver M. Gale ^
Dr. James M. Garvey, Jr.
Jane Garvey & John Lanier
Mr. & Mrs. William Haller
Charles ^ & Edith ^ Harper
David & Debra Hausrath
Timothy E. Hoberg
Mrs. Nelson M. Hoffman
Dr. Robert T. Howe ^
Mr. James J. Jenny
Mr. Paul C. Keidel ^
Richard C. ^ & Jean G. ^ Kinstler
Mr. & Mrs. Frederick G. Koehler
Mr. & Mrs. Randolph L. Krumm
Jean E. Lemon
Thomas & Adele Lippert
Mr. Franklin O. Loveland III
Mr. David Mason
Mr. & Mrs. Douglass W. McDonald
Mr. & Mrs. Howard Melvin
Ms. Victoria Memmel ^
Mr. & Mrs. Charles F. Miller
Richard & Crescent Miller
Dave & Diane Moccia
Mr. & Mrs. Frederick Moore, Jr.
The Reverend Christopher F. Neely
Mr. & Mrs. H.C. Buck Niehoff
Mr. & Mrs. George H. Perbix
Dr. Aaron W. Perlman ^
Dr. ^ & Mrs. George Rieveschl, Jr.
Dr. George P. Rizzi
Mr. ^ & Mrs. John W. Ross, Sr.
Snowden & Marianne Rowe
Mr. & Mrs. Paul W. Schuch
Ms. Amy Scrivner & Mr. Chris Scott
Mr. & Mrs. John L. Shields
18
Ms. Sandra L. Shipley
Mr. & Mrs. Charles R. Specter
Mr. & Mrs. Timothy M. Sullivan
Mr. John McNeil Tate ^
Mr. G. Richard Thomas
Dr. Jerry W. Warner
Mr. Mark A. Watkins
Mr. John H. White, Jr.
Sonja A. Wilson
Miss Mariam A. Zabel
^ Indicates a Legacy Society member is deceased.
If you have made arrangements to support Cincinnati
Museum Center in your estate plans, please contact the
Office of Planned Giving at (513) 287-7060 to be
included as a member of the Legacy Society.
Cumulative Giving
Recognizing our investors who have contributed
$100,000 or more to Cincinnati Museum Center.
Anonymous (11)
Dr. & Mrs. Compton Allyn
American Association of Museums
American Financial Group
The Andrew Jergens Foundation
August A. Rendigs, Jr. Foundation
Barb & Dave Beato
Rosemary H. & Frank Bloom Special Fund *
Mr. & Mrs. David T. Bohl
Mrs. Lela C. Brown
The Otto M. Budig Family Foundation
Otto M. Budig, Jr.
Charles H. Dater Foundation
William R. Chase ^
Cincinnati Bell
Cincinnati Empowerment Corporation
The Cincinnati Enquirer
Cincinnati Financial Corporation
Cincinnati Microwave
Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Social Innovation Fund
Cintas Corporation
City of Cincinnati
Coca-Cola Bottling Company
Wallace T. Collett ^
Columbia Tristar Television
Convergys Corporation
The Corbett Foundation
Ann Taylor Deupree ^
The Dorothy M. M. Kersten Trust
The Duke Energy Foundation
Lucile & Richard Durrell Special Fund II
Lucile & Richard Durrell Special Fund III
Ernst & Young LLP
The E.W. Scripps Company
Mr. & Mrs. Richard T. Farmer
Adelaide R. Farny ^
Fifth Third Foundation
Ashley & Bobbie Ford
The Ford Motor Company Fund
Franklin L. Folger Trust
Mr. & Mrs. William A. Friedlander
Frisch’s Restaurants
Estate of Oliver M. Gale
Gallagher SKS
Jane Garvey & John Lanier
GE Aviation
Mrs. James A.D. Geier ^
Mrs. Paul E. Geier ^
Great American Insurance Group
The Greater Cincinnati Foundation
Greater Cincinnati Water Works
Robert W. & Isabel Yeatman Gwinner Fund
Priscilla Garrison Haffner
The Carol Ann & Ralph V. Haile, Jr.,/U.S. Bank
Foundation
Mr. & Mrs. William Haller
Taxpayers of Hamilton County
Estate of Francis S. Hanneford
Mr. & Mrs. R. Keith Harrison, Jr.
Hasbro, Inc.
Frederick A. Hauck ^
Mr. & Mrs. Mark J. Hauser
Heidelberg Distributing Company
Helen G., Henry F. & Louise Tuechter Dornette
Foundation, Fifth Third Bank, Trustee
Helen Steiner Rice Foundation *
Helen T. Ehlers Irrevocable Trust
John Z. Herschede ^
Hewlett-Packard Co.
The History Channel
Hoechst Marion Roussel, Inc.
HSR Business to Business Inc.
Institute of Museum & Library Services
Jacob G. Schmidlapp Trusts No. 1 and 2
The John Hauck Foundation
JPMorgan Chase Foundation
The Josephine Schell Russell Charitable Trust
Mr. George C. Juilfs
The Juilfs Foundation
Estate of Paul c. Keidel
Keating, Muething & Klekamp LLP
The Kroger Company
Landor Associates
Mr. & Mrs. Alan B. Lindner
Mrs. Carl H. Lindner, Jr.
Mr. & Mrs. David C. Lindner
Mr. & Mrs. Robert D. Lindner, Jr.
Mr. & Mrs. Robert D. Lindner, Sr.
Louise Taft Semple Foundation
Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth W. Lowe
H.B., E.W. & F.R. Luther Foundation, Fifth Third Bank, Co-Trustee
Macy’s, Inc.
Manuel D. & Rhoda Mayerson Foundation *
Margaret A. Kung Trust
Marjorie G. Riley Trust
Meijer Stores
Metropolitan Sewer District of Greater Cincinnati
Microsoft Corporation
Milacron Inc.
Mr. & Mrs. Frederick Moore, Jr.
Mr. William S. Nagel
National Endowment for the Arts
National Science Foundation
Mr. & Mrs. H. C. Buck Niehoff
The State of Ohio
Ohio Casualty Group
Ohio Cultural Facilities Commission
Ohio National Foundation
Mr. & Mrs. Robert W. Olson
Mr. & Mrs. John A. O’Steen
Paul C. Keidel Revocable Trust
Mr. & Mrs. George H. Perbix
Mr. & Mrs. David C. Phillips
PNC Bank
Estate of Mrs. Ned Pritchard
Procter & Gamble *
Richard F. Schaengold Charitable Remainder Annuity Trust
Mrs. George Rieveschl, Jr.
The Estate of Dr. George Rieveschl, Jr.
Robert Campeau Family Foundation
The Robert H. Reakirt Foundation
Lois & Richard Rosenthal
Estate of Mrs. Martha P. Rowe
Snowden & Marianne Rowe
Sara Lee Corporation
SC Ministry Foundation
Estate of Harry J. Schaleman
Robert C. & Adele R. Schiff Foundation
Estate of Mary Louise Schroth
Scripps Howard Foundation
Sencorp
Jeremy F. Simpson
The Spaulding Foundation
Stillson Foundation, Fifth Third Bank, Trustee
Mrs. John J. Strader IV
Subaru of America, Inc
Estate of Mr. Edward M. Thayer
Time Warner Cable
Mr. & Mrs. Ronald W. Tysoe
U.S. Bank
United Dairy Farmers
US Department of Housing and Urban Development
US Department of Energy
Mr. & Mrs. George H. Vincent
Mr. & Mrs. Albert W. Vontz III
Mrs. Elsie H. Warrington ^
Elizabeth A. Weber ^
Western & Southern Financial Group
Estate of Charles I. Westheimer
Mrs. Harris K. Weston
William P. Anderson Foundation
Consecutive Giving
Recognizing our committed investors who have
made contributions consistently each of the last
ten fiscal years.
Anonymous (4)
Albert B. Cord Foundation
Mrs. Barbara R. R. Alexander
Dr. & Mrs. Compton Allyn
Alpaugh Foundation
Miss Elisabeth T. Anger
Mr. & Mrs. Allan J. Bailey
Mr. & Mrs. Terry Bailey
Mr. & Mrs. Norman A. Bates
Mr. & Mrs. Allan B. Beach
Mrs. Thomas S. Benjamin
Mrs. Richard C. Berghamer
Mr. & Mrs. Harvey Bergman **
Ms. Audrey B. Blum & Ms. Marie Blum
Mr. & Mrs. Elroy E. Bourgraf
Mrs. Lela C. Brown
Mr. & Mrs. James P. Bruckmann
Mr. & Mrs. William Bryan
Dr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Bunnell
Mr. & Mrs. Michael W. Burlingham
Mr. & Mrs. James E. Bushman
Dr. & Mrs. John F. Cardosi
Mrs. Mary E. Carroll
Mr. Ralph R. Carruthers
Linda & Dan Carter
Mrs. Walter M. Chapman
Charles H. Dater Foundation
Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Clippard
Ms. Lesta J. Cooper-Freytag
Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Corley
Mrs. Richard T. Crawford
Mr. Ralph A. Damico & Mrs. Darrina Turner Damico
Mrs. Caroline H. Davidson
Mr. & Mrs. Bob Defoor
Ms. Sally H. Dessauer
Mr. & Mrs. Albert C. Dierckes, Jr.
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas R. Dietz
Anne G. & Robert W. Dorsey
The Dorothy M. M. Kersten Trust
E. Lucy Braun Endowment Fund *
Mr. & Mrs. Jerome H. Eichert
Mrs. Jacob S. Epstein
Mr. & Mrs. Fred Ervin
Ms. Susan B. Esler & Mr. Steve Skibo **
Mr. & Mrs. Sterling Euster
Mr. & Mrs. Lyle Everingham
Harry & Linda Fath
Mrs. Fay M. Fischesser
Mr. & Mrs. Robert B. Foley
Ashley & Bobbie Ford
Mr. &Mrs. Gregory Foster
Mrs. Joyce V. Frame
Frederick A. & Juliet Esselborn Geier Memorial Fund *
Mr. & Mrs. Lewis French
Mr. & Mrs. James M. Freson
Mr. & Mrs. Dave Freytag
Mr. & Mrs. Richard Fuchs
Frank & Tara Gardner
Mr. & Mrs. James R. Gardner
Mrs. Deliaan Gettler
Mr. Michel Ghastine & Ms. Ghada Khalife
Dr. Lawrence A. Gilbert
Mr. Ralph P. Ginocchio
Ms. Jocelyn Glass
Dr. Tracy Glauser & Dr. Lisa Lewis
Mr. & Mrs. Robert W. Gloeckler
Katherine Glover & Megan Glover
Mrs. Richard J. Goettle III
Mrs. Martha Gramss & Ms. Christina Turner
Mr. & Mrs. Melvin J. Gravely, II
William H. & Jane A. Graver
Mr. Michael Gressel & Ms. Sheila Kelly
Ms. Lynda Groh & Mr. Thad Karbowsky
Mr. Jeffrey T. Grothaus & Ms. Stephanie M. Kovalcik
Mr. & Mrs. Jason Haap
Mr. & Mrs. R.C. Haberstroh
Priscilla Garrison Haffner
Mr. & Mrs. John R. Hammer
Mr. & Mrs. Gordon G. Hammergren
Cathy Hansel
Mr. Greg Harris & Ms. Elisabeth Mager
Mr. & Mrs. Cornelius W. Hauck
Mr. & Mrs. Otto J. Hausknecht
David & Debra Hausrath
Mr. & Mrs. Charles R. Heath
Mary Hinton
Dr. & Mrs. Leroy J. Honkomp
Mr. Stanley A. Hooker III
Mr. & Mrs. Henry N. Horne
Ms. Catherine M. Huebner
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Huenefeld
Ms. Rosemary M. Huhn
James T. & Ellen M. Hatfield Memorial Trust
Ms. Dottie L. Janson
Joan Portman Edge of Appalachia Education Fund *
Ms. Margaret M. Joering
George & Jean Perbix Fund *
Mr. & Mrs. John Allen King
Mr. Steven R. Kirschner
Ms. Wilma D. Kispert
Mr. Robert G. Kraft, Jr.
Mr. Russell Lascelles & Ms. Janet Schultz
Mr. Kevin Leahy & Ms. Joyce Steiner
Mr. Mark S. Lewis
Betty Jane Lillie
Mr. & Mrs. Scott Litwin
Lola Louise Bonnell Trust
Dr. & Mrs. John R. Loughrey
Lucile & Richard Durrell Special Fund II *
Lucile & Richard Durrell Special Fund III *
Mr. David Mason
Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth J. McWhorter
Cortland & Annette Meader
Mrs. Suzanne B. Mehne
Bonnie & Dan Meyer
Dr. Michael E. Miller & Dr. Chris Modrall
Dave & Diane Moccia
Mrs. William W. Mohr
Mr. Joel K. Monteith & Mrs. Barbara S. Mustoe-Monteith
Mr. & Mrs. Frederick Moore, Jr.
Mrs. Janet A. Morgan
Dr. & Mrs. Charles M. Myer, III
Mr. & Mrs. Fred W. Oliver
Ms. Sylvia E. Osterday
Mr. & Mrs. Greg Page
Mr. & Mrs. George H. Perbix
Mr. & Mrs. George H. Perbix, Jr.
Dr. Gale E. E. Peterson
Ms. Nancy L. Phelan
Joseph A. & Susan E. Pichler Fund *
Mr. James J. Pies
Miss Janice Popp
Phil & Susan Price
Mr. Gerald J. Rapien & Ms. Cheryl Johnson
Dr. Mitchell C. Rashkin & Dr. Karen B. Ohlbaum
Richard & Irlene Rastani
Daniel & Beverly Reigle
The Richard & Dorothy Pandorf Foundation
Richard F. Schaengold Charitable Remainder Annuity Trust
Mr. & Mrs. Gerhard W. Ricter
Ridgeway Foundation
Robert W. & Isabel Yeatman Gwinner Fund *
Dr. & Mrs. John M. Roberts V
Mr. & Mrs. Nicholas S. Ryder
Mr. & Mrs. Clarence P. Sampson
Ms. Anna Marie Sander & Mr. Kuimilk Mohan
Dr. & Mrs. Michael Schaen
Mr. & Mrs. Frederick R. Schneider
Mary D. Schweitzer
Mr. & Mrs. Eugene A. Schwoeppe
Recie & Jim Scott
Mrs. Pollyanna Sedziol
Mr. & Mrs. Jon L. Seymour
Mr. & Mrs. David Sharp
Mr. & Mrs. Laurence A. Shiplett
Mr. Eli E. Shupe, Jr. & Ms. Kay Ruben
Dr. Ruth H. Sosis
Mr. & Mrs. Robert Chad Spangler
Mr. & Mrs. William Spiegel
Mr. & Mrs. John M. Stein
Mr. & Mrs. John E. Stillpass
Mrs. George P. Stimson
Mr. & Mrs. Ron Supe
Mr. Charlie Sutkamp & Dr. Donna Lambers
Mr. Jerry R. Swormstedt
Ms. Margaret M. Taske
Dr. Paul Tenkotte & Mr. John C. Schlipp
Mr. & Mrs. William H. Thaman
Mrs. Florence E. Thompson
Margaret & Michael Valentine
Miss Madge Van Buskirk & Ms. Clara Dantic
Mr. John E. Ventre
Carol & Robert Vidal
Dr. & Mrs. Robert C. Vitz, PhD
Mr. Cedric W. Vogel
Mr. James Volker
Mrs. Joan C. Walson
JoAnn & Paul Ward
Dr. Jerry W. Warner
Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Watkins
Mr. & Mrs. William M. Weber
Mr. & Mrs. Donald R. Welti
Mr. & Mrs. James Wheatley
Mr. & Mrs. Craig Whistler
Mr. John H. White, Jr.
Sonja A. Wilson
Wodecroft Foundation
Ms. Carol A. Wolf & Ms. Jan Smith
Mr. Jonathan Worstell
Mr. & Mrs. Eric B. Yeiser
Miss Mariam A. Zabel
Mr. & Mrs. Clifford Zepf, II
Lists as of June 30, 2013. Every effort has been made to
ensure accuracy. If you have a change or correction, please
contact the Office of Philanthropy at (513) 287-7074.
19
Bringing
the World
to Cincinnati
Artifacts and Hebrew Union College
connected in Dead Sea Scrolls History
During the last 17 days of
the Dead Sea Scrolls exhibit,
a special gift from
Great American Insurance Group
brought the best-preserved
parchment manuscript of
the Ten Commandments
to Museum Center.
The Israel Antiquities Authority
only allows the Deuteronomy Scroll
out of the country once a year
because of the scroll’s universal
importance, fragility and age. The circular “Scroll Table,” with carefully regulated climate and light control, contained the Dead Sea Scroll segments. A new set of ten segments
replaced the first ten halfway through the exhibition.
Before the Dead Sea Scrolls came
to Cincinnati, only a handful of people
knew much about their connection
to Hebrew Union College (HUC).
Now more than 100,000 people
know the story!
the most important archaeological finds
of the 20th century. In 1947, Bedouin
nomads had discovered the ancient
fragments in caves near the Dead Sea.
“
”
- Dr. Risa Levitt Kohn, professor at San Diego State University and exhibition co-curator
It’s part of Cincinnati Museum Center’s
mission to inspire people of all ages
to learn more about regional history.
Museum Center staff partnered with
key HUC faculty and administrators to
tell visitors about Cincinnati’s unique
and multi-layered connection to one of
20
While researching HUC’s historical connection to the scrolls, I discovered…
that HUC President Nelson Glueck was involved in the Scrolls’ story almost from the
moment they were discovered, even though his name rarely, if ever, appears in
published accounts.
Of all the laws presented in the Hebrew Bible, the most famous are
the Ten Commandments. These precepts have influenced Judaism and
Christianity for centuries, and comprise some of the most famous
religious and ethical rules in the western world.
“
The first link was the late Dr. Nelson
Glueck, former president of HUC
(1947-1971). Previously director of the
American Schools of Oriental Research
in Jerusalem, he helped Israel recover
and authenticate some of the scrolls that
nomads had sold to antiquities dealers.
”
- Jason Kalman,
Associate Professor of Classical Hebrew Literature and Interpretation, Hebrew Union College, Special Exhibit Partner
The second link was forged in 1969.
HUC raised $10,000 to obtain the first
“security copy” of the Dead Sea Scrolls,
promising not to tell others. By 1989,
the secret had leaked out. Scholars
around the world wanted to see the
photographic negatives and prints but
were denied access. (These negatives
were on public display at Museum Center
for the first time!)
Forty years after the Scrolls’ discovery,
scholars like HUC Professor Dr. Ben
Zion Wacholder were still waiting to study
the texts. Meanwhile, Wacholder learned
about a Scrolls concordance and in
1988 was allowed to make a copy, with
no restrictions. Using an early Macintosh
computer – also part of Museum Center’s
display – Wacholder and his research
assistant, Martin Abegg, were able to
assemble the actual Scrolls text. “After
entering every entry with its corresponding
reference into a data base, I programmed
the computer to sort the material by
manuscript, fragment column and line
number. I then wrote a program to
recognize overlapping phrases in each
line and to perform the ‘cut and paste’
job,” explained Abegg in 1991.
That’s the third link. HUC was
instrumental in releasing some of
the Scrolls texts so that scholars
everywhere could study them.
The Israel Antiquities Authority then
accelerated release of all the texts.
Today, anyone can see images of the
Dead Sea Scrolls on the Internet, but
visitors still flocked to see the
“real thing” when Dead Sea Scrolls:
Life and Faith in Ancient Times came
to Museum Center.
Photograph by Sarah Brancato.
21
Adding “something extra” sets
Museum Center apart; staff and volunteers
offer visitors hands-on experiences,
outstanding public lectures and more.
Exhibit + Programming = Learning for All Ages
Incense and myrrh? You read about them
in the Hebrew Bible, but what do they
actually smell like? Visitors to Dead Sea
Scrolls: Life and Faith in Ancient Times
could do more than look at religious
articles, artwork, weapons and everyday
household items from long ago. They
could use their senses of touch and
smell to learn about spices and herbs
from ancient times, or see how DNA
helps scholars match sections of a
document together, or practice making
Iron Gall Ink and parchment. At the gala
Premiere, co-chaired by Judith Stein, MD,
and Carol Rigaud, a feast of
Middle Eastern delicacies tempted
guests’ palate.
Presenting Sponsor:
The Jewish Foundation of Cincinnati
“
The Jewish Foundation of Cincinnati is delighted to be the Presenting Sponsor of the Dead Sea
Scrolls exhibit... We believe that this exhibit will enrich our community as it showcases these precious
artifacts so full of significance in Judeo-Christian tradition. Dead Sea Scrolls will engage people from
many different backgrounds, faiths and cultures.
- Michael R. Oestreicher, President, The Jewish Foundation of Cincinnati
”
Thank you to our exhibition sponsors!
Deuteronomy Scroll Sponsor:
Great American Insurance Group
“
It is a privilege to support Cincinnati Museum Center in their extraordinary efforts to provide our
community with this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to witness one of the most esteemed
religious artifacts known to man.
”
- S. Craig Lindner, Co-president and Co-CEO, Great American Insurance Group
Associate Sponsors: Archdiocese
“
of Cincinnati
An exhibit of this wondrous treasure to be available to the people of the Cincinnati area through our
Cincinnati Museum Center is both exciting and sobering: Exciting because since Bedouins found the
first scrolls in 1947 in caves near the Dead Sea, they have inspired extraordinary drama and debate;
sobering because these rare antiquities authenticate foundational scriptures for three of the great world
religions – Judaism, Christianity and Islam – and therefore open broad inspirational intellectual vistas
to people of faith. We of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati are proud to be sponsors of this extraordinary
cultural and educational opportunity.
”
- Reverend Dennis M. Schnurr, Archbishop of Cincinnati
The Diocese of Southern Ohio
“
The Dead Sea Scrolls Exhibit provides a powerful doorway for all people of faith into the history of
God with a particular people in a particular place. This history is crucial for Jews, Christians and
Muslims, as we seek to understand our common roots and to find common ground today.
A live guide sets the stage for Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Ancient Times in the
Desert Orientation Theater.
- Tom Breidenthal, Bishop, Diocese of Southern Ohio
”
SC Ministry Foundation
Students whose teacher booked the
Excavations of Qumran Learning Lab
could even take part in a mock “dig.”
Picture a class of middle schoolers,
divided into teams, each gathered
around tubs full of sand with the tools
of archeologists. Each tub contains
replicas of artifacts found at the city
where scholars believe scribes wrote
what we know today as the Dead Sea
Scrolls. The students’ assignment:
Find all the artifacts in their tub (some
sifting required) and compare them to
research displayed on tables around the
room. Then conclude where their finds
probably came from and present their
hypothesis. Were they from a kitchen,
a scriptorium (where scribes copied
manuscripts) or the city’s trash heap?
What a great way to prepare for seeing
the most comprehensive collection of
ancient Israeli artifacts ever organized!
22
“
SC Ministry Foundation promotes the mission and ministry of the Sisters of Charity of Cincinnati.
... May what we learn from this magnificent exhibit translate into shared appreciation and understanding,
and further our actions to give all people in our region and in our world the dignity and shared
membership they deserve.
The exhibition painted an inspiring
overview spanning more than a
thousand years, from Biblical to
Byzantine times. For those wanting to
explore the Scrolls in-depth, Museum
Center had many partners:
Interfaith Community Engagement with
Xavier University, Departments of
Classics and Judaic Studies - University
of Cincinnati, University of Notre Dame
Alumni Club and Mayerson Jewish
Community Center.
The result? A round-the-clock reading
of the Hebrew Bible and a world-class
line-up of speakers for the Insights
series. Offered as part of University
of Cincinnati’s Lichter Lecture Series,
the six Dead Sea Scrolls lectures
drew rave reviews and nearly 1,300
listeners. Many scholars spoke to
standing-room-only audiences.
”
- Sister Sally Duffy, SC, President of SC Ministry Foundation
Office of the Provost, University of Cincinnati
“
The University of Cincinnati is truly honored to be a part of this historic endeavor to bring an
international treasure to the region.
”
- Santa J. Ono, President, University of Cincinnati
Xavier University
“
Xavier University’s commitment to the education of the whole person includes the opportunity
to grow through an appreciation of the Word and of how history has shaped our understanding of
the world.
Dr. Judy Stein and Carole T. Rigaud led
the organizing committee for The Exclusive
Premiere for Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and
Faith in Ancient Times on November 15,
2012. Key sponsors for the event included:
Bartlett & Co., Rosemary & Frank Bloom,
Cohen Brothers, Linda and Gary Greenberg,
Harold C. Schott Foundation, Francie &
Tom Hiltz, Andrea Levenson and Anne
Drackett Thomas.
Photographs by Sarah Brancato.
”
- Rabbi Abie Ingber, Founding Director, Interfaith Community Engagement, Xavier University
Special Exhibit Partner:
Hebrew Union College
“
Since 1948 Hebrew Union College has played an important role in the acquisition, preservation and
study of the Dead Sea Scrolls. In 1991, after four decades of limited access to the scrolls, scholars on
the HUC-JIR Cincinnati campus helped make the content of these ancient texts available to the public
at large. The arrival of the exhibition Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Ancient Times provides a
special opportunity for HUC-JIR and the greater Cincinnati community to continue their unique relationship
with these historical treasures from the period that saw the rise of Rabbinic Judaism and Christianity.
- Jason Kalman, Gottschalk-Slade chair in Jewish Intellectual History, associate
professor of classical Hebrew literature and interpretation, Hebrew Union
College – Jewish Institute of Religion.
”
The Marriage
of Art and
Science
“
Curators protect and preserve our collections, ... researchers use our collections
to advance science and create human knowledge, and ...we disburse that knowledge
by creating exhibits and education programs based on our collections.
A special exhibit united
Museum Center’s outstanding
nature art collection and
specimens depicted by the art,
showcasing “treasures” from
the Geier Center.
Treasures of the Natural World offered more than the usual art exhibit.
Along with framed paintings and prints you could check out real wildlife specimens
related to the artwork. A carefully preserved Great Auk shared space with three
different artists’ renderings of this now extinct arctic bird!
”
- DeVere Burt, Honorary Guest Curator and Director Emeritus of Museum of Natural History & Science.
Top, left to right:
Great Auk with Great Auk painting by
Charley Harper
Great Horned Owl with Great Horned
Owl painting by John Ruthven
Golden Eagle with Eagle sketch by
John Ruthven.
Exhibit committee pictured below from
left to right:
Steven C. Steinman
David L. Hausrath
Honorary Guest Curator DeVere Burt
Alice Lytle
Phillip C. Long
Honorary Guest Curator John A. Ruthven.
“It’s wonderful to see the artwork and science in combination,” said guest curator and
featured wildlife artist John Ruthven. Works by John James Audubon, Charley Harper
and Robert Verity Clem were also on display. All have strong Cincinnati ties.
Ruthven and Harper made their home here. Local philanthropist Julius Fleischmann
“discovered” Clem, a Massachusetts native, and helped launch his career.
Audubon was hired by the Western Museum Society, forerunner of the Museum
of Natural History & Science, back in 1818.
Audubon’s artistic adventures “all began here” in Cincinnati, explained the exhibit’s
other guest curator, DeVere Burt, Director Emeritus of the Museum of Natural
History & Science. “I loved getting back into the collections,” said Burt, noting that
they include hundreds of paintings as well as more than 78,000 bird skins.
It was a chance to examine real feathers and then the incredible brushwork
portraying them. You could see a passenger pigeon perched right next to Ruthven’s
rendition and around the corner from Audubon’s. Our collection even includes
duck paintings selected for the U.S. Post Office stamp series. Ruthven credits
that choice with launching his national career!
Top: Kentucky Landscape by
James Barton.
Bottom: Herondipity by
Charley Harper.
Photographs by Sarah Brancato.
24
25
Community
Connections
Museum Center partners with
others to increase access and
promote our shared vision.
2012 Difference Maker
Award Winners:
Community Honoree:
Darlene Green Kamine, Executive Director, Community Learning Center Institute
Adult Individual Honorees:
Karen D’Agostino, Executive Director and
Founder, Music Resource Center-Cincinnati;
and Vanessa Sparks, Leader for Youth
Opportunities Over-the-Rhine/West End
and Community Love Garden
Youth Individual Honorees:
Alexander & Hannah Laman, Founders of
Adopt-a-Book and Kayla Nunn, Volunteer
through YMCA Black & Latino Achievers,
Camp Invention, Freestore Foodbank,
Kids Against Hunger and her school
Organization Honorees:
The Dragon Foundation
Faces Without Places
Above: 2012 Difference Maker Nominees.
During the Celtic Culture Fest (March 9 & 10, 2013), tartans, crafts, bagpipes and dance transformed the Rotunda of Union Terminal.
Below: On Free Friday, visitors of all ages and from all backgrounds roam the cobblestones
on the Public Landing (ca. 1860) in the Cincinnati History Museum.
The Rotunda tends to be pretty empty
at 5 pm, when the museums usually
close, but not on Free Fridays! A father,
bringing his daughter for the first time,
exclaims, “This is exciting!” A young couple
decides to have “a different kind of
date.” (He used to bring his summer day
campers a lot, but she hasn’t come since
a fourth-grade field trip.) “The hardest
part,” sighs the grandmother in a threegeneration group, “is deciding where
to go.” She gazes longingly toward the
history exhibits while her granddaughter
begs to “do the Energy Museum” and
the girl’s older brothers eye the
mastodon skeleton just inside the
Museum of Natural History & Science.
Thanks to generous partners in the
community, more than 12,000 visitors—
26
a 25% increase over the previous year—
got free admission to all three museums
in 2012. One Friday a month, June
through October, Museum Center was
hopping from 4 to 8 pm!
With the help of volunteers, clubs, small
businesses and sponsors, we offer a
variety of public events each year.
BatFest and BugFest help visitors
learn why these often misunderstood
creatures are important to our world’s
health—and invite the daring to taste
mealworm Caesar salad or chocolate
chirp brownies (with crickets). To honor
our community’s diversity, the Passport
to the World Culture Fest series fills the
Rotunda with ethnic music, dance,
costumes and crafts. Celebrating a
different heritage on each weekend,
we bring the African, Appalachian,
Asian, Celtic and Latino cultures to
Union Terminal. It’s the next best thing
to traveling the world!
Our community is also front and center
for the Difference Makers Awards.
Since 2007, we have annually
recognized youth, adults, businesses
and agencies that share our
mission to better the lives of children.
In October 2012 we had more than
50 nominees—from Alexander &
Hannah Laman, nine-year-old twins
who founded Adopt-a-Book, to
Darlene Green Kamine, our first
Community Honoree and a founder of
Cincinnati’s first children’s museum.
Photographs by David Savage and Sarah Brancato.
27
Offering depth and breadth of experience, our Youth Programs
continue to achieve remarkable success in changing young people’s lives.
“
Making a Difference for Youth
Year after Year
Support from the Youth Programs
has molded me into a great student.
”
- Micaiala Hammer, Class of 2013, Museum of Natural History & Science
Attending Palm Beach Atlantic University, West Palm Beach, FL, in Fall 2013
100% high school graduates
99% enrolled in a 4-year college
“
80% received some form
of scholarship
I have become a different person—more outgoing, more
responsible and taking on leadership roles.
”
- Evan Harris, Class of 2014, Cincinnati History Museum
Planning to attend The Ohio State University or University of Cincinnati
“
59% African American
I would never have considered going to college
if it weren’t for the Youth Programs. My family just
didn’t encourage me to think like that.
53% Female
”
- Sarah Stigler, Class of 2003, Completed Bachelor of Science in Biology,
University of Cincinnati, and Master of Science in Health Care Administration,
Ohio University, Athens, OH; now attending College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati
47% Male
38% Caucasian
As of June 2013, the Youth Program
at Cincinnati Museum Center has
1,562 graduates, and 100% have
completed high school. What’s more,
an astonishing 99% of those teens
enrolled in a 4-year college, with the
other 1% choosing technical school or
military service. “These outcomes are
considered best-in-class on a national
level,” says Sherry Kelly Marshall,
President and CEO of the Southwest
Ohio Workforce Investment Board.
As this year began, the Youth Program
reached an all-time high of 160
participants. They came from 63 public,
private, parochial and charter schools
and 17 home-school situations.
Since 1989, Youth Programs
participants have visited about 80
colleges or universities and 70
museums or other cultural institutions
in more than 15 cities. They have
provided more than 175,000 volunteer
hours at Museum Center and
developed at least 75 new programs
and demonstrations for Museum Center.
34% at-risk for dropping out
32% from low-income families
“
I was able to see firsthand what it was like being a
paleontologist working in the field, the kind of experience
I could never have had without Museum Center…These
past 4½ years have been incalculably rewarding.
”
-Richard Dennis, Class of 2013, Museum of Natural History & Science
Attending Kenyon College, Gambier, OH, in Fall 2013
29% will be first in family
to graduate high school
and consider college
“
I have taught demonstrations about all kinds of things,
and it’s given me the chance to see that science interests
me in a way that other branches of knowledge just don’t.
I want to know how things work, improve our nation’s
carbon footprint, make the world a better place.
”
-Madison Thomas, Class of 2015, Duke Energy Children’s Museum
3% Multi-racial or other
28
29
Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth R. Campbell
Ms. Susan B. Esler & Mr. Steve Skibo
Mr. & Mrs. Jason M. Farler, CFA
Ms. Consuelo W. Harris
Mr. & Mrs. Albert E. Heekin III
Mr. & Mrs. Gregory B. Kenny
Tom & Tara Knipper
Mr. & Mrs. J. Brian Kropp
Elizabeth & Bradford Pierce
Mrs. Nancy L. Schlemmer
Mr. & Mrs. David W. Warner
Christie & Gregory Wolf
Mr. & Mrs. J. Wickliffe Ach
Mr. & Mrs. Frederick E. Bryan II
Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Castellini
Ms. Diana Collins
Mr. & Mrs. Jon T. Gimpel
Mr. & Mrs. Michael H. Giuliani
Cathy Hansel
Mr. & Mrs. R. Keith Harrison, Jr.
Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Heimann, Sr.
Francie & Tom Hiltz
Mr. & Mrs. Robert Lafkas
Mr. & Mrs. Carl H. Lindner III
Mr. & Mrs. Raymond H. Matlock
Mr. William T. Robinson III
Ms. Melody Sawyer Richardson
Mr. & Mrs. George A. Schaefer, Jr.
Rosemary & Mark Schlachter
Mr. & Mrs. Robert N. Sibcy
Dr. & Mrs. John M. Tew, Jr.
Mr. Leonard A. Weakley, Jr.
Mr. & Mrs. W. Joseph Williams, Jr.
Investor Clubs are associations of $1,000+ investors who
are passionate supporters of and advocates for special
events and programming related to the Cincinnati History
Museum and Cincinnati Historical Library & Archives
(1788 Club), the Museum of Natural History & Science
(Hopewell Council), the Duke Energy Children’s Museum
(Tree House Club) and educational opportunities for the
Next Generation (Grandparents Club).
Play Time = STEM Time
Experts agree. Quality experiences
during the first five years lay the
foundation for “kindergarten readiness.”
And early success in school is a good
predictor of children’s future success.
But what does that mean and how do
we get there?
There is no single definition of
“readiness,” but it generally means
having the skills to benefit from
kindergarten. It involves being a good
listener, aware of others, curious,
able to skip – things like that.
Research shows that going to preschool
can help, especially if children come
from disadvantaged backgrounds, but
quality is still the key to success.
“
Enter our ECSITE program and
Learning Through Play conference.
These nationally recognized programs
help teachers and parents discover new
ways to bring learning to life.
ECSITE: Early Childhood Science
Inquiry Teacher Education. Its full name
is a mouthful, but the concept is
straightforward. By increasing teachers’
confidence and competence, we help
not just one class of students but all of
the classes that follow. This multiplies
our impact, and 100% of teacher
participants say it’s working!
Duke Energy Children’s Museum is teaching
educators and parents how to work with children so
they are “kindergarten ready” and eager to “do” STEM.
Take Head Start teacher Angela
Fletcher, for example. She describes
how ECSITE helped her grow, becoming
“more than I knew I could be,” while also
making a difference for her students.
They begin the year “a bit intimidated
about science – just like I used to
be.” But the hands-on STEM activities
Fletcher shows the children soon have
them asking questions and “trying things
freely, on their own.”
Our Learning Through Play conference
takes the same hands-on, fun and
inquisitive spirit to a broader audience.
Last year we had more than 700
teachers and parents register – the
most ever. Recurring themes in survey
comments were, “Very informative,”
“Lots of fun” and “Great to take back to
my classroom!”
“
PNC is committed to early childhood
education and improving children’s school
readiness. Museum Center’s ECSITE program
is dramatically increasing confidence levels of
teachers and is positively impacting the
students’ kindergarten readiness.
”
- Kay Geiger,
PNC Regional President for
Greater Cincinnati & Northern Kentucky
ECSITE has literally changed my life…
I now realize that you can’t teach
without science!
”
- Angela Fletcher, ECSITE teacher
at Northern Kentucky
Community Action Coalition
Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy. If you
have a change or correction, please contact the Office of
Philanthropy at (513) 287-7074.
30
31
Turning Union Terminal
into a Concert Hall
Cincinnati organ buffs don’t need to visit
Europe’s magnificent cathedrals to hear
outstanding organ concerts. Museum
Center has an instrument and space to
match those sounds! During the 20122013 Winifred and Emil Barrows Concert
Series, more than 1,300 people attended
“Music in the Museum” to experience
world-class performances.
That’s just what longtime volunteer Harley
Piltingsrud was hoping would happen.
He and others had discovered that the
Rotunda’s 5-second reverberation time
was similar to the resonance of large
cathedrals. It would be perfect for a
concert pipe organ!
So they set out to find a suitable instrument.
In 1988, Powel Crosley, Jr.’s home organ
was donated to Museum Center and then
paired with a “symphonic” concert organ
Through engineering and the physics of sound, the historic E.M. Skinner
Organ fills the Rotunda with symphonic and cathedral-like music.
from Philadelphia. E.M. Skinner, arguably
the most respected organ builder in
American history, had produced both
instruments in 1929.
The combined organ uses approximately
5,000 pipes to offer a broad spectrum of
musical tones. To create a symphonic
sound, pipes are designed to imitate the
qualities of orchestral instruments, from
a string section to a solo French horn,
trumpet, tuba or clarinet. Many factors
influence the pitch and quality produced by
the organ, which is fundamentally a “wind”
instrument: Is the pipe made of metal or
wood? What is its length? Diameter?
Shape? Does it have the “lip” of a flue pipe
or a curved brass “reed”?
The Antiphonal division of the
organ pipes (pictured above)
are located above the Cincinnati
History Museum entrance.
2012-2013 Series
Season Sponsor:
The Corbett Foundation
Carpet was added to the front
of the Rotunda to aid in sound
quality, which is also why the
windows above are open.
Thanks to a blend of science and history, music
lovers can savor the lush sounds of the restored
1929 E.M. Skinner organ. Called a “national
treasure” by concert organist Gerre Hancock,
this magnificent instrument matches the
splendor of Union Terminal, listed as a
National Historic Landmark!
The Solo, Great and Pedal divisions
of the organ pipes are located
behind the left windows.
(pictured above)
Harley Piltingsrud,
retired research physicist,
with the E.M. Skinner organ.
“
The Choir and Swell divisions
of the organ pipes are located
behind the right windows.
(pictured above)
This organ is, without question, one of the finest examples of Skinner’s
few surviving masterpieces. Each stop—even the quietest of ranks—beautifully ‘couples’ with the room
itself… [producing] a brilliant classic organ forte; yet it also has a rich palate of orchestral color,
making it a transcription player’s dream instrument.
32
Pipe placement is also crucial because music
depends on a complex series of overtones.
The room’s structure, shape, wall thickness
and extent of reflective surfaces all play a key
role in the instrument’s success. Therefore, the
six “divisions” of pipes are carefully arranged
in “chambers” around the Rotunda.
”
- Peter Conte, November 2012 featured artist
Photographs by Michael E. Keating.
In Memoriam
Neil A. Armstrong
Dorothy Lee Agricola
Mrs. James L. Armitage, Sr.
Neil A. Armstrong
Helene C. Barnett
Ms. Joan Baumer
Arch Bolton
Joe J. Bordman
Mrs. Clement L. Buenger
Mrs. Gloria Chabot
Floyd Crooker
Frank G. Davis
Gilbert T. Davis
Helen F. Dhonau
Mark C. Draves
Sharon Edwards
Mrs. Guy A. Fibbe
Mr. A. William Forbriger
Mrs. Jane Alice Foster
Robert F. French
Carol A. Fronk
Mrs. James A. D. Geier
Mrs. Paul E. Geier
Mr. Benjamin Gettler
Ms. Hilda K. Gilbert
Dr. Frederick Goldman
Dorothy Meakin Grant
Bernard J. Haynes
Melva J. Henn
John H. Hermanies
Mrs. Larry C. Hyer
Mrs. Harvey C. Knowles, Jr.
Blanche Koebbe
Miss Helen L. Kropf
Mr. Roger D. Laib
Mrs. Joseph D. Landen
Mrs. Gladys Lazarus
Shaun K. McClanahan
Mrs. Victoria L. Memmel
John S. Mosier
Michael Muth
Jeanne Nesbitt
Mrs. Harold F. Nieman
Louise D. Nippert
Phyllis D. Peyton
Mrs. Margaret A. Reiss
Mr. George Riechman, Jr.
Thomas J. Rielage
Mrs. Margie A. Rosselot
Mr. Eugene P. Ruehlmann
Donald A. Shumrick
Pam Siegel
Barbara A. Smith
Andrew D. Smith
George L. Strike
Jean W. Sutphin
Mr. Morley Thompson
David G. Uetrecht
Marjorie H. Wagner
Christopher Walker
Dr. Donald E. Walker
Mrs. Barbara Willke
Thomas J. Woeber
Mr. Charles F. Yeiser
August 25 marked the passing of a true
American hero and longtime friend of
Cincinnati Museum Center. An Ohio native,
Neil Armstrong served as a member and
chairman of the board of trustees of the
Museum of Natural History & Science at its
Gilbert Ave. location in the 1980s. In 2004,
Neil was a spokesperson for the Union
Terminal operating levy campaign. On April
18, 2006, he received NASA’s Ambassador
of Exploration Award at a ceremony held at
Cincinnati Museum Center. US Senator John
Glenn and NASA Administrator Dr. Michael
Griffin were on hand as Neil designated
34
Louise Dieterle Nippert
Cincinnati Museum Center to receive a moon
rock collected during his Apollo 11 mission.
The moon rock, that Neil affectionately named
“Bok,” is on display in the Museum of Natural
History & Science, along with a replica of his
Apollo 11 space suit and tools. In honor and
memory of Neil Armstrong’s place in history
and his contribution to society and our
community, Cincinnati Museum Center opened
the Museum of Natural History & Science for
free from August 26 through Labor Day. More
than 10,000 guests visited the Museum to
pay their respects in this period and share his
legacy with their children, leaving comments
about how Neil Armstrong inspired them.
“
Neil has been an
inspiration to so many, here
locally and around the world.
He is truly an American
hero and a man of quiet
dedication to science.
We hope his contributions
to science and humanity
will continue to inspire future
scientists and engineers in
generations to come.
”
- Douglass W. McDonald,
President and CEO
Benjamin Gettler
Kent Jones
Benjamin Gettler, beloved husband of
Dee Gettler, passed away June 4, 2013.
Cincinnati Museum Center is thankful for his
many lasting contributions to our community.
A prominent businessman, successful
attorney, political activist and civic leader,
Ben will be remembered for his investment
in Cincinnati and his passion to share
knowledge and to strive for excellence.
Kent Jones joined Cincinnati Museum Center
as an interpreter when the traveling exhibit
Titanic was here in 2006. In 2007, he joined
the Cincinnati History Museum staff as a
Program Specialist. From day one, he always
actively engaged our visitors and left people
happy and smiling while inspiring them with
stories of Cincinnati’s past. Kent created
programs that dealt with history and
technology. You may remember him being
the telegraph operator on the landing for our
Telegraph program or the announcer for
The Night Before Christmas radio show.
Kent enjoyed sharing his knowledge with
others and inspired us all.
Dee and Ben supported the Museum of
Natural History & Science and its move to
Union Terminal, as well as the founding of
Cincinnati Museum Center. Dee is a former
Trustee of Museum Center. Their love for
their grandchildren proves that fun is never
limited by age and was an inspiration in the
creation of the Grandparents Club,
an investor club that honors those
grandparents who want to share the
world with the next generation.
Louise Dieterle Nippert loved Cincinnati,
her hometown, and was a devoted patron
of arts and culture. Without her passion and
influence, Cincinnati’s cultural landscape
would not be what it is today. Both Mrs.
Nippert and her husband, Louis, were
trustees; she of the Museum of Natural
History & Science, and he of the Historical
Society. They supported key projects,
including the move to Union Terminal, the
creation of exhibits in both the Museum of
Natural History & Science and the
Cincinnati History Museum, the expansion
of the Edge of Appalachia in Adams County,
and much more.
Volunteer Years of Service
Mrs. Nippert was a woman of many
enthusiasms who gave freely of her means
for decades – most of which she did her
way – behind the scenes, without fanfare
and always with grace and pride in her
hometown’s people and institutions.
In May 2012, she was a recipient of an
Ohio Governor’s Award for the Arts. Carter
Randolph, executive vice president of her
Greenacres Foundation, accepted on her
behalf and said, “Mrs. Nippert is fond of
saying that philanthropy is not about credit,
it’s about the smiles on the faces of the
ultimate beneficiaries – the audiences and
the children” and added that she believed
strongly that her contributions were
investments in the community.
George C. Riechmann
George was a very dedicated volunteer,
contributing more than 8,000 hours during
his 15 years of service to Museum Center.
One of his passions was the Science Library
at the Geier Collections & Research Center,
where he made it his mission to catalog
the unprocessed books in the collection.
George designed an information database
and search engine and catalogued over
25,00 entries. For this accomplishment,
he was awarded a “Volunteer Peer Award”
for Initiative.
5 years
Robert Andriot
Wayne Beckwith
Richard Berning
Barbara Bolten
Holly Crawford
Donald Frey
Shirley Hoodin
Nicholas Lang
John Parlin
Kenneth Skirtz
Michele Skora
George Slama
10 years
Charlotte Gibson
Walter Bruce Gibson
John Groh
Bebe Hales
Donna Levi
Charles Moorman
Brian Porter
Arlene Solomon
Blanche Sullivan
15 years
James Clark
Janice Forté
Barbara Rizzi
Judith Wacksman
20 years
Ruth Hemme
At the same time, George was a long-time
volunteer fossil preparator in the Museum
of Natural History & Science paleontology
lab. He was a founding member of the prep
crew that began operating the lab and was
particularly fond of talking about and
explaining his work to museum visitors.
Many of his prepared specimens are now
safely housed at the Geier Center.
These volunteers hit a milestone
anniversary with Cincinnati Museum Center
January - December 2012. For a complete
list of our Volunteers, please visit our website
at cincymuseum.org.
A Special Thanks to Cincinnati Heritage Programs
Cincinnati Museum Center Heritage
Programs docents provide unique
opportunities of historical, cultural and
architectural tours. For more than 30 years,
the docents have enjoyed sharing their
passion for history through hundreds of
audio-visual presentations, lectures,
motor-coach and walking tours.
As an outreach association of the
Cincinnati History Museum, the all-volunteer
Cincinnati Heritage Programs has unlocked
doors to privately owned places generally
not open to the public. All topics are
thoroughly researched for accuracy.
The Ambassadors of Cincinnati Heritage
Programs strive to inspire people to learn
and appreciate the region’s history.
Photographs by Robert Webber, Mike Howard, and Nick Massa.
35
25+ Year Members
Anonymous
Mr. & Mrs. Alfred Ambrosius
Mr. & Mrs. Benny A. Anderson
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas A. Asbury
Mr. & Mrs. David P. Barkalow
Dr. & Mrs. Stuart W. Bassman
Mr. & Mrs. William J. Baston
Mr. & Mrs. Allan B. Beach
Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth L. Becker
Mr. Henry J. Behrens
Mr. & Mrs. Herbert J. Beigel
Mrs. Thomas S. Benjamin
Ms. Amy E. Berger
Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth H. Beringhaus
Dr. & Mrs. Jerome Berman
Mr. & Mrs. John S. Berten
Dr. & Mrs. David A. Billmire
Mr. & Mrs. Norman E. Bissell
Dr. Donald J. Blaney
Mr. David A. Blevens & Mr. Robert T. Blevens
Mr. & Mrs. Howard H. Bond
Dr. & Mrs. Glenn D. Boutilier
Mr. & Mrs. Edward Brown
Mr. & Mrs. Robert W. Buechner
Mr. & Mrs. Louis Buente
Dr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Bunnell
Mr. & Mrs. James E. Bushman
Mrs. Robert Buten
Ms. Susan E. Cannon & Ms. Emily Hawkins
Dr. & Mrs. John F. Cardosi
Mr. & Mrs. Sanford I. Casper
Mr. & Mrs. James W. Cochran
Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Cody
Dr. & Mrs. John S. Cohen, MD
Dr. & Mrs. Mitchell B. Cohen
Dr. Donald J. Blaney
Mr. David A. Blevens & Mr. Robert T. Blevens
Mr. & Mrs. Howard H. Bond
Dr. & Mrs. Glenn D. Boutilier
Mr. & Mrs. Edward Brown
Mr. & Mrs. Robert W. Buechner
Mr. & Mrs. Louis Buente
Dr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Bunnell
Mr. & Mrs. James E. Bushman
Mrs. Robert Buten
Ms. Susan E. Cannon & Ms. Emily Hawkins
Dr. & Mrs. John F. Cardosi
Mr. & Mrs. Sanford I. Casper
Mr. & Mrs. James W. Cochran
Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Cody
Dr. & Mrs. John S. Cohen, MD
Dr. & Mrs. Mitchell B. Cohen
Dr. & Mrs. Loren Cohen
Dr. & Mrs. John M. Collins
Mr. & Mrs. Earl J. Conklin
Mr. & Mrs. Michael A. Connelly
Mr. Roger W. Creasy
Mr. & Mrs. William S. Culp, Jr.
Mr. Ralph A. Damico & Mrs. Darrina Turner Damico
Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Davis
Mrs. Nancy S. Debrunner
Ms. Lily Ann Demar
36
Concourse Club Members
Ms. Angela Denov & Mr. Jon Blickenstaff
Mr. & Mrs. Michael A. Detroy
Mr. John A. Diehl
Mr. & Mrs. Allan G. Dirr
Mr. & Mrs. Russell Doran
Mr. & Mrs. Herman A. Eckstein
Mr. & Mrs. John W. Eilers
Mr. & Mrs. Gilbert Eisenmenger
Dr. & Mr. Donna T. Endress
Mrs. Jacob S. Epstein
Mr. & Mrs. Sterling Euster
Mr. & Mrs. Stephen J. Fagel
Ms. Barbara Farber
Dr. & Mrs. Andrew T. Filak, Jr.
Mrs. Harriet A. Finley
Mr. & Mrs. Robert Fluharty
Mr. & Mrs. Barry E. Franz
Ms. Geni Fryman
Mr. & Mrs. Charles Gagel, Jr.
Mrs. Shirley B. Gallagher
Mr. & Mrs. Don R. Gardner
Frank & Tara Gardner
Mr. & Mrs. James R. Gardner
Mr. & Mrs. Dean Gaudin
Dr. Lawrence A. Gilbert
Mr. & Mrs. William B. Gillman
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas W. Goldschmidt
Mr. & Mrs. James E. Goldschmidt
Mr. & Mrs. John H. Grate
Ms. Deborah Grayson & Mr. Bruce Meizlish
Mr. Gerald Greenberg & Ms. Pamela Meyers
Ms. Loretta Greenland
Mr. & Mrs. Guenther R. Hager
Mr. & Mrs. John W. Hancock
Mr. Ronald Hanks
Mr. & Mrs. Alan J. Hartman
Dr. & Mrs. Jack Hazen
Mr. & Mrs. Charles R. Heath
Mr. & Mrs. Jack H. Heckscher
Mr. Donald J. Heimbrock
Mr. & Mrs. John F. Heinzelman
Ms. Mary L. Heiselmann
Mr. & Mrs. John S. Heldman
Ms. Elizabeth Henderson
Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Henley
Mrs. Jill Ann Hersman
Mr. & Mrs. Michael L. Hill
Mr. & Mrs. James Hogan
Mr. & Mrs. William J. Hosking
Mrs. Larry C. Hyer
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Iaciofano
Mr. & Mrs. Paul Inderhees
Mr. & Mrs. Richard W. Jackson
Mrs. Barbara Jennings & Mr. Martin Shacat
Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence J. Jones
Ms. Joan Kattwinkel
Ms. Susan Kellogg
Ms. Nancy K. Klapproth
Ms. Cecilia Kloecker
Mr. Frank B. Knapke
Mr. & Mrs. Michael C. Kneflin
Ms. Judith A. Koch
Mr. Maurice J. Koch, Jr. & Ms. Geraldine Lewin
Mr. & Mrs. Frederick G. Koehler
Mr. & Mrs. Dennis S. Koenigsknecht
Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Kopp
Mr. & Mrs. Michael L. Kosky
Ms. Kathleen M. Kraemer & Mr. Peter R. Duffy
Ms. Lisa L. Lane
Mr. Patrick C. Larkin & Ms. Mary C. Henkel
Mrs. Dorothy K. Larsson
Mr. David S. Learned
Mrs. Jean E. Lemon
Dr. & Mrs. Robert S. Lenobel
Ms. & Ms. Margaret Leon
Mr. & Mrs. Joseph R. Levee
Betty Jane Lillie
Ms. Roberta L. Lippelman
Mr. & Mrs. Richard W. Lodge
Mr. & Mrs. Phillip C. Long
Dr. & Mrs. Richard D. Longshore
Mrs. Janet Lykins
Dr. & Mrs. James D. Lytle
Mr. & Mrs. Donald L. Mackos
Mr. & Mrs. John B. Martin
Mr. & Mrs. Vernon J. Mast
Mr. & Mrs. Michael Mathis
Mr. Michael C. Mattingly & Ms. Shelia Yates-Mattingly
Mrs. Joan E. Mauk & Ms. Julie Vorpe
Dr. & Mrs. Richard Mcfarland
Mrs. Suzanne B. Mehne
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Meier
Ms. Audrey Merrill & Ms. Amy Saalfeld
Mrs. Carol Messerle & Mr. Charles Messerle
Ms. Verna M. Meyer
Dr. & Mrs. Richard A. Meyer
Ms. Ann Meyers & Mr. Richard Waller
Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Miller
Mr. Akila J. Misali
Mr. & Mrs. Matthew A. Molony
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas L. Moon
Mr. & Mrs. William Moore
Mr. & Mrs. Frederick Moore, Jr.
Dr. & Mrs. Charles M. Myer, III
Ms. Barbara K. Myers
Mr. & Mrs. John W. Narburgh
Mr. A. Ralph Navaro, Jr.
Mrs. Stanley D. Neumann
Mr. & Mrs. James O. Newman
Mr. & Mrs. Jerald E. Noran
Mr. & Mrs. Fred W. Oliver
Mr. & Mrs. Lowell P. Orr, Jr.
Mr. & Mrs. Roy Parsons
Mr. & Mrs. Morris H. Passer
Mr. & Mrs. Howard P. Pecquet
Mr. & Mrs. J. M. Petit
Dr. & Mrs. John F. Popken, Jr.
Dr. & Mrs. Martin B. Popp
Mr. & Mrs. Cliff Radel
Dr. Mitchell C. Rashkin & Dr. Karen B. Ohlbaum
Mr. & Mrs. William L. Reder
Mr. & Mrs. Gerhard W. Richter
Mr. & Mrs. Stephen W. Rindsberg
Dr. & Mrs. John M. Roberts V
Mr. Douglas O. Robinette
Mr. & Mrs. Edward S. Rosenthal
Dr. & Mrs. Eli M. Roth, MD
Snowden & Marianne Rowe
Mr. Paul J. Ruffing
Dr. & Mrs. Richard Salzer
Mr. & Mrs. Frank Schmaltz
Mr. & Mrs. Philip Schmidt
Mr. & Mrs. Arthur K. Schuler
Dr. & Mrs. G. Alan Schwemlein
Mr. & Mrs. Eugene A. Schwoeppe
Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Scott
Mr. F. Peter Seidel
Mr. David C. Seim & Ms. Juanita Diersing
Mr. & Mrs. Jon L. Seymour
Kathryn Shahani
Mrs. Richard F. Shaw
Mr. & Mrs. John L. Shields
Dr. Siegfried E. Sieber & Ms. J. McCauley
Mr. Mark Silbersack & Ms. Ruth A. Schwallie
Dr. Edward B. Silberstein & Ms. Jacqueline M. Mack
Mr. & Mrs. Gerald T. Silvers
Elizabeth C.B. and Paul G. Sittenfeld
Mr. & Mrs. Bill Smith
Ms. Patricia A. Songer
Mr. & Mrs. Charles R. Specter
Judith Spraul-Schmidt, Ph.D. & Mr. Michael R. Schmidt
Mr. & Mrs. John Starkweather
Ms. Kathryn Stearns
Mr. & Mrs. Bob Stevie
Ms. Elizabeth A. Stone
Mr. & Mrs. Charles M. Strebel
Dr. & Mrs. Theodore W. Striker
Mr. Jerry R. Swormstedt
Mr. Robert Tait & Ms. Elizabeth Tait
Dr. & Mrs. Stephen R. Thomas
Mr. Vernon F. Thomas
Mrs. Florence E. Thompson
Dr. & Mrs. Thomas Todd
Dr. & Mrs. Thomas Todd
Ms. Rose Ann Troxell
Mr. & Mrs. Patrick Valant
Miss Madge Van Buskirk & Ms. Clara Dantic
Dr. & Mrs. Ronald B. Visscher
Mr. James Volker
Mr. & Mrs. Albert W. Vontz III
Mr. & Mrs. Paul Wagner
Mr. & Mrs. James J. Walsh
Ms. Nancy Lu Walters
Mr. Edward R. Walton III & Ms. Patsy A. Kelly
Mr. & Mrs. William Warden
Dr. Jerry W. Warner
Mr. & Mrs. Ralph A. Weil
Mr. & Mrs. Ed Wesley
Dr. & Mrs. Jeffrey A. Whitsett
Mr. & Mrs. Donald Wisman
Mr. & Mrs. John Woeste
Mr. & Mrs. Don Wolnik
Mr. & Mrs. Robert Wones
Mr. Alvin Wulfekuhl & Dr. Shirley Ekvall
Miss Mariam A. Zabel
Mr. & Mrs. Clifford Zepf, II
Mr. & Mrs. Frank Albers
Mr. & Mrs. Jeff Anderson
Dr. & Mrs. Jayapandian Bhaskaran
Ms. Patricia Ten Bieg
Dr. & Mrs. H. Stephen Bjornson
Mr. & Mrs. Donald R. Blum
Mrs. William W. Breidster
Ms. Susan E. Cannon & Ms. Emily Hawkins
Mr. J. W. Childs, II & Ms. Magdalena Betas
Mr. & Mrs. Michael Clements
Ms. Cynthia Combs & Ms. Wendy Combs
Ms. Carolanne Corwin
Mr. & Mrs. Frederick G. Davison
Mr. & Mrs. Peter Dickie
Dr. & Mrs. Nelson R. Diers
Mr. & Mrs. A.J. Economon
Ms. Freda K. Flerlage
Mr. & Mrs. John Gabriel
Mr. & Mrs. Charles Gagel, Jr.
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas C. Garber
Ms. Sarah Georgin
Mr. & Mrs. Ralph W. Goldsmith
Mr. Glen C. Goodwin & Ms. Vicki A. Lipstreuer
Mr. & Mrs. William J. Gore
Mr. & Mrs. Mark Grimme
Mr. & Mrs. Robert C. Hale
Ms. Julie Hansen & Mr. Craig Lyjak
Mr. Mike Herald & Mr. Bryce May
Mr. & Mrs. Paul Howell
Ms. Rosemary M. Huhn
Mr. Louis H. Katz & Ms. Andrea Kravetz
Mr. & Mrs. Jeff Koehn
Mrs. Marjorie L. Liggett
Mrs. & Mrs. John H. Linnenberg
Mr. & Mrs. Wayne A. Lippert, Jr.
Dr. & Mrs. Steven Lisco
Mr. Dale A. Louda & Ms. Ann D. Navaro
Mr. & Mrs. Bill Lyons
Mr. & Mrs. Alfred A. Marggrander
Ms. Bonnie McNett & Mr. Cam Eicher
Dr. Michael E. Miller & Dr. Chris Modrall
Mrs. Grace S. Munique
Mr. & Mrs. Mark Muse
Mr. Tann Nichols & Ms. Nicole Kuzmin-Nichols
Mr. & Mrs. Gregory Nieport
Mr. & Mrs. Alvin Olsson
Mr. & Mrs. Mark E. Owen
Mr. & Mrs. Mike Patterson
Mrs. Susan Penn
Mr. & Mrs. Marc A. Randolph
Mr. & Mrs. Chris Rennegarbe
Mr. & Mrs. John D. Rice
Mr. & Mrs. Timothy H. Riordan
Mr. & Mrs. Patrick Roberson
Mr. Jeff Roberts
Mr. & Mrs. Tom Rocklin
Mr. & Mrs. Doug Roessler
Mr. & Mrs. David Rosenbaum
Ms. Caroline Schiff & Mr. Patrick Schreiber
Ms. Laura Sheldon & Ms. Susan Beckman
Mr. & Mrs. Bob Sullivan
Mr. & Mrs. Gregory C. Thomas
Ms. Holly Thompson & Ms. Jennnifer Coomer
Mr. & Mrs. Chris Trainor
Mr. Mark A. Watkins
Mr. & Mrs. Stuart Willis
Mr. & Mrs. Robert Wones
Mr. & Mrs. John Wood
Dr. & Mrs. Ronald W. Zesch
Whispering Fountain
Club Members
Ms. Patricia Armstrong
Dr. Sarbori Bhattacharya & Dr. Sambhu Choudhury
Mrs. Elizabeth Bryant & Ms. Sandra Privett
Mr. Charles Comins & Ms. Audrey Green-Comins
Dr. Robin T. Cotton & Ms. Cynthia Fitton
Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Crowley
Mrs. Richard J. Goettle III
Mr. & Mrs. William J. Gore
Ms. Lynda Groh & Mr. Thad Karbowsky
Ms. Barbara K. Groh
Mr. & Mrs. Marc James
Mr. & Mrs. Bruce A. Krone
Dr. Duane E. Lewis & Mr. Rex Van Alstine
Mrs. Marjorie L. Liggett
Mr. & Mrs. Eric Locher
Mr. & Mrs. Matthew Merz
Mrs. & Mr. Sharon E. Mitchell
Mr. Nathan L. Nunaley
Mrs. Susan Penn
Dr. Elsira Pina & Dr. Charles Mehlman
Mr. & Mrs. Stuart R. Pray
Mr. & Mrs. Jeff Raub
Ms. Aviva R. Rich & Mr. Mitchell Quint
Mr. & Mrs. Tom Rocklin
Mr. & Mrs. Michael Rooney
Mr. & Mrs. Alan Vonderhaar
The list recognizes those members who renewed their
membership and celebrated their 25+ consecutive years,
as well as those members who joined or renewed as
Concourse Club or Whispering Fountain Club members
between July 1, 2012 and June 30, 2013.
Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy. If you
have a change or correction, please contact the Office of
Philanthropy at (513) 287-7074.
37
Anonymous (5)
Romola N. Allen
Dr. & Mrs. Compton Allyn
Mr. & Mrs. Peter A. Alpaugh
Mr. & Mrs. J. Leland Brewster II
Mrs. Lela C. Brown
Edward & Susan Castleberry
Ms. Diana Collins
Mr. & Mrs. Raymond K. Cooper II
Mr. & Mrs. C. Wesley Cowan
Mrs. Caroline H. Davidson
Martha and Stuart Dornette
Anne G. & Robert W. Dorsey
Mr. & Mrs. Theodore H. Emmerich
Mr. & Mrs. Fred W. Erschell
Harry & Linda Fath
Mr. & Mrs. Kurtis B. Finch
Ashley & Bobbie Ford
Mr. & Mrs. William A. Friedlander
Mr. & Mrs. James J. Gardner
Jane Garvey & John Lanier
Mrs. Philip O. Geier, Jr.
Shelly & Michael Gerson
Mr. John B. Goering
Mr. & Mrs. Chas Goering
Mr. & Mrs. J. Franklin Hall
David & Debra Hausrath
Timothy E. Hoberg & Caryl A. Yzenbaard
Mrs. Phyllis S. Hopple
Mr. & Mrs. Thomas E. Huenefeld
Mrs. Margot Jacobs
Mr. James J. Jenny
Linda Busken & Andrew MacAoidh Jergens
Florence and Ron Koetters
Janet C. Kreider
Mr. & Mrs. S. George Kurz
Mr. Lawrence A. Leser
Mr. & Mrs. Robert D. Lindner, Sr.
Mr. & Mrs. Robert D. Lindner, Jr.
Mr. & Mrs. David C. Lindner
Mr. & Mrs. Alan B. Lindner
Mr. & Mrs. Bruce C. Long
Mr. & Mrs. Phillip C. Long
Mr. & Mrs. John P. March
Mrs. Debra R. McMillan-Ash & Mr. William F. Ash
Cortland and Annette Meader
Mr. & Mrs. Harold A. Merten
Bonnie & Dan Meyer
Dean and Catherine Moulas
Dr. & Mrs. Keith A. Murrell
Mr. & Mrs. George H. Musekamp III
Valerie L. Newell & Timothy A. Smith
Mr. & Mrs. Robert W. Olson
Mr. & Mrs. John Weld Peck
Francie & John Pepper
Mr. & Mrs. George H. Perbix
Dr. Gale E. Peterson
Mr. & Mrs. Daniel P. Randolph
Daniel & Beverly Reigle
Mr. John A. Ruthven
Mr. & Mrs. George A. Schaefer, Jr.
Dr. & Mrs. Robert Schiff, Jr.
James A. & Elizabeth York Schiff
Mrs. Nancy L. Schlemmer
Mr. James P. Schubert
Mr. & Mrs. Marvin H. Schwartz
Recie & Jim Scott
Jeremy F. Simpson
Tom & Dee Stegman
Mrs. Joseph S. Stern, Sr.
Dr. & Mrs. John M. Tew, Jr.
Margaret & Michael Valentine
Carol & Robert Vidal
Mrs. Harris K. Weston
Mr. John H. White, Jr.
Mr. & Mrs. W. Joseph Williams, Jr.
Mr. & Mrs. Eric B. Yeiser
Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy. If
you have a change or correction, please contact
the Office of Philanthropy at (513) 287-7074.
38
STEM: Not Just Now,
But in the Past
The Cincinnati History Museum reminds us
that innovation has always been an important
part of the Queen City.
Using an acronym to talk about science, technology, engineering and math education might be
relatively new., but these areas have been around for centuries! A stroll back through time
highlights a multitude of ways STEM has played a key role in Cincinnati’s history—even if it’s
not labeled that way.
Before 1788, when John Cleves Symmes bought a tract of land from Congress between the Great Miami and Little Miami rivers, Native
Americans and early settlers were in the region. Stop along your way to meet a fur trader and a tracker who used their knowledge of biology
to survive, or watch a young visitor trying her hand at carding wool (“It’s so soft!), using a spindle and even learning to knit.
By the 1860s, steam was changing industry and transportation—and Cincinnati was booming! At the re-created Public Landing, talk with a
steamboat captain. Visit Gibson & Co. to see how cards used to be printed. Hear how the telegraph revolutionized communications. You can even
click out your own name in Morse Code. (When you think about it, those dots and dashes were basically a binary system—the foundation
of today’s Digital Age!)
Fast forward to the 1940s, and you’ll learn how Cincinnati reconfigured manufacturing of machines, textiles and other industries to support the
War Effort. Recycling! It didn’t start in the 1970s with Earth Day. Did you know people saved cooking fats to be turned into explosives?
Worn fabric became parachutes, while scrap metal and worn-out rubber were also salvaged for reuse.
Then as you check out a canning demonstration, you realize today’s urban gardening and “buy local”
movements have a lot in common with Victory Gardens.
So when you think about STEM at Museum Center, don’t forget about science, technology,
engineering and math through history!
Some Cincinnati Firsts Through History
1796
1835
1836
1839
1850
First city
in the
Northwest
Territory
to print
a book
(engraved
by William
Maxwell)
First bag
of airmail
lifted by
hot air
balloon
First McGuffey’s
Readers
compiled
and
printed in
Cincinnati
Cincinnati
purchased
the privately
owned
Cincinnati
Water
Company
for $300,000,
making it the
first publicly
owned water
system in
the State
of Ohio.
First city
in U.S. to
establish
a Jewish
hospital
1853
First city
to establish
a municipal
fire
department,
using first
First city practical
in U.S.
steam fire
to publish engine
greeting
cards
(Gibson
Greeting
Card Co.)
1868
1869
1870
1880
1902
1906
1934
1952
1954
1955
1976
1992
First city
west of
New York
City to use
steampowered
printing
press
(Ehrgott,
Forbriger
& Co.)
First city
to
establish
a
weather
bureau
First city
to hold
annual
industrial
expositions
First city with
a woman
leading a large
manufacturing
operation (Maria
Longworth
Nichols Storer
at Rookwood
Pottery)
First
concrete
skyscraper
in U.S.
(Ingalls
Building)
First
university
to offer
cooperative
education
(University
of
Cincinnati)
First radio
station to
broadcast
at 500,000
watts
(Crosley
Broadcasting
Corp.,
“The Nation’s
Station”)
First
heart-lung
machine,
developed at
Cincinnati
Children’s
Hospital,
making
open heart
surgery
possible
First
licensed
public
television
station
(WCET)
First
company
to sell
toothpaste
with fluoride
(Procter &
Gamble)
First fully
automated,
computerized
stock
exchange in
world piloted
at Cincinnati
Stock
Exchange
Cincinnati Water
Works became
the first utility in
the nation to
introduce a
granular activated
carbon system
(GAC). The GAC
system captures
organic impurities
and there are
on-site furnaces
to recycle the
carbon for water
treatment.
First and only
city to build
and own a
major railroad
39
Cincinnati Museum Center thanks our generous supporters and investors for helping
us advance our mission. For over 20 years, Museum Center has been, and continues to be,
a cornerstone in the Greater Cincinnati community. Investing in Museum Center is more
than just a contribution of time, talent or treasure – It’s an investment in our community,
the people and families we serve each and every day.
Thank you to our Investors!
Dr. Jerry Warner
“
This dedication is indeed fitting. Gloria volunteered
for the Library, before it was located in Union Terminal,
when it was on the campus of the University of Cincinnati.
Guests who share her passion for preserving history and
visit the Cincinnati History Library & Archives will now enter
through the lobby dedicated in Gloria’s memory.
– Douglass W. McDonald, President & CEO
”
Dr. Jerry Warner began his relationship with the Museum of Natural History & Science over
30 years ago shortly after moving to Northern Kentucky to accept a position as assistant
professor of biology at Northern Kentucky University. During the 1990s he became an active
volunteer at the Geier Collections & Research Center. When he took a sabbatical from his position as Chair of the Department of Biological Sciences, he assisted Dr. Robert Kennedy, then
Director of Natural History Collections and Research for Museum Center at its Gilbert Avenue
location, with mammal skin preparation and cataloging of the Mammal Collection. In Jerry’s
words “the collections of Museum Center are valuable to the world scientific community and it
is crucial that scientists from around the world have access to study them.”
Jerry continued for several years as a volunteer at the Geier Center and has served as an
active member on the Natural History Advisory Board.
Jerry’s interest in natural history led him not only to lend his volunteer time, but also to make
long-term plans for Cincinnati Museum Center. He generously assigned a portion of his
Individual Retirement Account to help preserve the collections of the Museum of Natural
History & Science for future generations.
Gloria J. Goering
On July 16, 2012, Cincinnati Museum
Center was honored to celebrate the
life of Gloria J. Strohmenger Goering.
The Cincinnati History Library & Archives
Lobby is gratefully dedicated in memory of
Mrs. Goering in honor of a generous gift
from The Goering Family Foundation.
Her husband, John, and family attended the
unveiling of her portrait and memorial
plaque with Douglass W. McDonald,
President & CEO, followed by a tour of
the Cincinnati History Library & Archives
collections and reception.
Dave & Diane Moccia
Matching Gift Companies
Dave and Diane Moccia have volunteered at Cincinnati Museum Center for over ten years.
After Diane retired as a speech pathologist for the Cincinnati Public Schools and Dave
completed his three-decade career at Procter & Gamble in research and development,
they were looking for stimulating volunteer work.
Duke Energy Foundation, Inc.
GE Foundation
Hewlett Packard, Corp.
IBM Matching Grants Program
SAP Matching Gift Program
They began their relationship with Museum Center as special exhibit docents for the
St. Peter and Vatican: The Legacy of the Popes exhibit in 2003. Diane enjoys her experience as
a docent because “every new exhibit is an opportunity for us to learn and broaden our
horizons, through the training and reading we do so that we can provide a good experience for
our guests.” The Moccias have served as docents for all of the special exhibits since
St. Peter and the Vatican including Cleopatra: The Search for the Last Queen of Egypt,
A Day in Pompeii and Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Ancient Times.
Dave and Diane have been generous donors to the annual fund and generous investors
because, in Dave’s words, “when you get involved in an organization, you develop an
ownership and you want to help it succeed.”
Several years ago, the Moccias arranged for a bequest to the endowment of Cincinnati
Museum Center. “We believe that it’s important to help provide the opportunity for people
in the future to experience what we’ve been able to experience,” according to Dave.
40
Gifts in Kind
Cincinnati Bell
DECO Dining by Sodexo
Goodwin Lighting Services
Gray & Pape Inc.
Grubco Incorporated
Greater Cincinnati Water Works
Hewlett Packard, Corp.
Hamilton County, Ohio
Cheryl Hern-Janovic
Mr. John Keegan
LaRosa’s Inc.
Procter & Gamble
United Maier Signs, Inc.
Validex Employment Screening Services
White Oak Garden Center, Inc.
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Our Mission We
reveal stories about freedom’s heroes, from the
era of the Underground Railroad to contemporary times,
challenging and inspiring everyone to take courageous
steps for freedom today.
Establishing a
Viable Institution:
Balanced Budget:
A year after merging with Cincinnati Museum Center, the National Underground Railroad
Freedom Center ended fiscal year 2013 with a budget surplus.
Merger Savings:
Back office savings and synergies with Cincinnati Museum Center have resulted in $1MM in
budgetary savings.
Endowment Growth:
Shaping a
Vibrant Center:
Endowment has grown from $1.5MM to $6MM post-merger.
More than 100,000 people visit the Freedom Center each year, making it one of the most-visited
museums in the region. New initiatives look to bring more visitors to experience the stories of
freedom’s heroes:
St. Louis-based PGAV Destinations, a global design and planning firm, is creating new exhibit
concepts to refresh permanent exhibitions.
New special exhibitions like And Still We Rise: Race, Culture and Visual Conversations give
locals and tourists alike reasons to return seasonally.
A new website coming in late fall 2013 will give visitors across the world new ways to engage
in stories of freedom.
Driving the Mission:
Ending Human Trafficking:
Since 2010, the Freedom Center has established a unique role in the modern abolition movement:
history-inspired abolition. We are convening and encouraging awareness through unique programs
and partnerships, inspiring courageous steps to end human trafficking.
Programs in Abolition:
Journey to Freedom documentary, shown in 50 U.S. embassies; Historians Against Slavery
National Conference; Yale teacher workshops; Invisible, the world’s first museum-quality
exhibit on human trafficking; End Slavery Now website and community (under development).
Partners in Abolition:
Yale University, Google, U.S. Department of State, American Bar Association, Fair Trade
Productions, Frederick Douglass Family Foundation, Historians Against Slavery, Made in a
Free World, 12 Years a Slave (the book and new feature film).
Sharing Stories of Freedom’s Heroes in Schools:
More than 40,000 students visited the Freedom Center last year to hear stories of courage,
cooperation and preservation through the heroes of the Underground Railroad. A newly
revamped education sales team is projecting a 10% increase in school visit revenue for
fiscal year 2014.
Inspiring Courageous Steps of Empowerment:
The Freedom Center works to remove the legacies of slavery through economic
empowerment programs:
Freedom Legacy Program provides mentors and classes on life skills and child development
for low-income, single parents from targeted neighborhoods.
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Youth Docent Program uses the lessons of the Underground Railroad to build leadership,
preservation, communication and critical thinking skills in area high school students.
Provided in partnership with The Links, Inc.
Contributions
& Support
Operating Expenditures
Operating Revenue
43
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
The Numbers
30,000,000
25,178,723
23,344,903
22,827,558
20,867,570
20,000,000
19,309,984
18,017,926
10,000,000
30,000,000
27,172,991
23,235,301
22,194,522
19,850,969
19,570,875
17,698,627
10,000,000
Contributions and Support
44
Statement of Activities Recap
Above: Revenue
Below: Cash & Investments
Operating Revenue
Operating Expenditures
45
1301 Western Avenue, Cincinnati, Ohio 45203
cincymuseum.org
#cincymuseum
Photograph by Micheal E. Keating.
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