Document 5632

mentioned.
b©©Th
Urinalysis
In ClInical
Laboratory
Practice.
A. H. Free and H. M. Free.
CRC Press,
Inc., Cleveland,
Ohio
44128, 1975, 284 pp. $47.50.
The authors’
avowed purpose
is to
present
information
relating
to the
practical
utility of urine study, and it
would
seem
that
this objective
has
been met. This volume
is not a manual
of laboratory
procedures,
but rather
a
compendium
of information
relative
to the
diagnostic
urinary
studies.
potential
The book is organized
of various
into 50 sepa-
rate sections,
beginning
with
considerations
of urinalysis
implications
and terminating
ulation
on future
potential
study.
Included
in
the
historical
and its
in specof urine
chapters
are
all sorts of
considerations
urinary
study,
of virtually
ranging
from urinary
bacteriology
and
cytology through
toxicology
and hormone
assays.
This book is probably
of primary interest to those responsible
for training
of laboratory
technicians
who will be
engaged in various
analytic
studies of
urine. Indeed, one chapter deals with
“Creative
Approaches
to Teaching
Urinalysis”, which will be of interest
not only to the laboratory
technician
but to the instructor
as well. The most
significant
criticism
might be the price
of this volume,
which is only of average quality
and lacks any color illustrations
or other embellishments.
James
Division
of Urologic
Center
chapter
is a discussion
of the
intend
that
this
thors
discuss
which
is affected
several
by different
logical
Clinical
NIH,
Chemistry
statisti-
data.
S. Young
Donald
tests,
processes,
e.g.,
BSP
each
of
Laboratory
Bethesda,
Books
physioand
creati-
Md.
20014
series
tion
for isolating
a “normal”
from
a population
populacontaining
both healthy
and sick individuals.
final chapter is concerned with
The
speci-
ficity
and
sensitivity
of analytical
methods
in detecting
disease
with
a
discussion
of the cause of false positive and negative
indications.
Each of
the chapters
is supported
by a com-
prehensive
bibliography
and the book
contains
both
detailed
author
and
subject indices.
The book is simply
written
and is
easy to follow. The content
is presented in a logical
sequence
and
provides
all the
information
the
Received
Chemical
nine clearances,
and plasma cortisol.
In the fifth chapter the authors develop “normal ranges” from typical
hospital
populations.
In this chapter
the
authors
discuss the Neumann,
Bhattacharya,
and Hoffman
procedures
for
dissecting
mixed populations.
The authors also evaluate
the Gram-Charlier
book
that
a
laboratory
director
need know to develop “normal
ranges” from the mixed
laboratory
data that he is likely
to
produce in his laboratory.
Whether
Cycles
and
the
Environment-Assessing
influences.
A.
Mackenzie,
mann,
Inc.,
C. Hunt.
222 pp.
1975.
M.
Global
Human
Garrels,
William
Los Altos,
Paperback,
F. T.
Kauf-
Calif. 94022.
$4.95.
Pub.
Quantitative
Analysis by Gas Chromatography,
5 (Chromatographic
Science
Series).
J. Novak.
Marcel
Dekker,
Inc.,
New
York,
N. V.
10016. ix + 218 pp. $16.75. Pub.
Sept. 1975. “This book is devoted
primarily
to the theoretical
aspects
of the problem;
the main goal is to
show
that gas chromatography
can
be looked
upon as a self-contained
analytical
discipline
having
consistent
theory.
Includes
tion of result reliability.”
Subunits in Biological
ological
Macromolecules
Volume 7-Part
C). S.
and G. 0. Fasman, Eds.
ker, Inc., New York, N.
+ 343 pp. $39.50. Pub.
NOW
October,
its own
evalua-
Systems (BiSeries
N. Timasheff
Marcel DekV. 10016. vii
Nov. 1975.
For
for Certification
Clinical
Chemists
Clinical
Chemistry
free
brochure
Washington,
one
Phone:
various
factors
that
ACCEPTED
REGISTRY
EXAMINATION
1976
Examinations
Executive
are known
to influence
data, other than a disease
BEING
FOR THE NEXT NATIONAL
IN CLINICAL
CHEMISTRY
book
title.
the
of the
of laboratory
cal manipulation
influence
The book consists of only six chapters. The first is an interesting
historical review
of the concept
of normal
ranges. The second chapter
is the only
in which
and suspicions
doubts
of physiological
variation
and analytical error on normal
ranges. The au-
APPLICATIONS
has practical
application
in clinical
laboratories
and bring to it considerable statistical
and clinical
chemical
experience.
The subtitle
of the book is
a better indication
of its content than
its main
feel
given
short
shrift.
The third
chapter
includes simple rules to cope with both
gaussian
and nongaussian
distribution
of raw data. Methods
for
assuring
quality
assurance
of analytical
methods are also presented.
The fourth
viii+ 504 pp. $37.50.
authors
must
been
the
F Glenn
Normal Values In Clinical Chemistry. A Guide to Statistical
Analysis
of Laboratory
Data. H. F. Martin, B.
J. Gudzinowicz,
and H. Fanger. Eds.
Marcel
Dekker,
Inc., New York, N.
The
values
to
Surgery
Duke University
Medical
Durham,
N. C. 27710
V. 10016.
adherents
has
these are the best data to use for the
interpretation
of patient
values remains to be tested. This is a book that
should be read by laboratory
scientists. It should remove much of their
mentioned
Yet these are
only, and
concept of reference
that their viewpoint
in passing
and
of:
Technologists
application
materials
contact:
Director
1155 Sixteenth
Street,
NW
D. C. 20036
(202)659-9660
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CLINICAL
CHEMISTRY,
Vol. 22, No. 5, 1976
697
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Ifl KROI11EDI(
SYSTEffiS
102 WITMER
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©1976
Circle No. 277
on
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r&Th
-
@[email protected]
Compiled
AACC
by J. S. King,
Award
Executive
Winners,
1976
Association
G. Anderson will receive the
AACC
Award
for Outstanding
Contributions
to Clinical
Chemistry,
sponsored
by the Ames Co., at the 28th
Norman
1976
National
Meeting
of the
AACC.
This
will be the 25th year that this award has
been given.
Dr. Anderson
is a native of Davenport,
Washington,
and obtained
his
B.A., M.A.,
and Ph.D.
degrees
from
Duke University.
His research interests
are many,
a basic one being the description
of cell function
and cell pathology
at the molecular
level. He has
been concerned with the development
of
some of the instrumentation
and separations
systems
required
for this purpose, including
the zonal ultracentrifuge
(1955-1968),
high-pressure
chromatography
for nucleic acid derivatives
and
urinary
constituents,
development
of large-scale
continuous-flow-with-
banding
ultracentrifuges
for the largescale purification
of influenza
and other
viral vaccines
(1964-68),
development
of the GeMSAEC
computer-interfaced
centrifugal analyzer (1968-71); development
tration
(1973-74);
systems
of methods
for protein
concendependent
on the Mazur
effect
and development
of cyclum
for cyclic
affinity
chromatog(1972-74).
The
GeMSAEC
has
raphy
become a valuable and unique tool in the
clinical
laboratory.
A miniaturized
version, which occupies
only one cubic foot,
was developed
for NASA’s
Skylab program.
Dr. Anderson
has over 300 publications in cell physiology
and fractionation,
virus and vaccine
purification,
zonal and vaccine centrifuge
development, high-pressure
chromatography,
centrifugal
analyzer
development,
and
fetal antigens
in cancer and immunochemistry.
He has
Van Slyke
received
Award
many
awards:
from the New
the
York
Section of the AACC,
1974; West Germany Academy
of Sciences,
1973; Biomedical Engineering
Society, 1973; John
Scott Medal and Award,
1972,
for the
invention
of the zonal ultracentrifuge
(previous
winners
include
Land,
J. J. Thompson,
and
Curie);
AEC
Citation
to the
vaccine,
development
1972; award
Fleming,
Madame
for contributions
of
the
Editor
influenza
from the German
for
Clinical
Chemistry
for
the GeMSAEC
Analyzer
as the most
outstanding
analytical
advance worldwide in biochemical
and clinicalanalysis
during a two-year
period, 1972; Eli Lilly
Lectureship;
Sigma
Xi Award;
IR100
Award; and a Special Citation by Edward Steichen
for submarine
photography.
In keeping
with his many interests,
Dr. Anderson
belongs
to a variety
of
societies:AACC, American Association
for the Advancement
of Science,
American
Institute
of Biological
Sciences, American
Association
for Cancer
Research,
American
Physiological
Society, Academy
of Clinical
Laboratory
Physicians
Society,
and Scientists,
Biophysics
Biomedical
Engineering
Soci-
ety,
and
eral
Society
of Experimental
Medicine,
and the Society
Physiologists.
Dr. Anderson was the Director
Biology
of GenRobert
S. Melville
of the
at Oak
Molecular Anatomy
Program
Ridge National Laboratory, 1968-1975,
and a faculty member of the University
of Tennessee-Oak
Ridge
Graduate
School of Biomedical
Sciences.
His
present position
is Professor,
Department of Surgery, Medical University
of
South
Carolina,
Charleston,
South
Carolina,
and Associate
Director
for
Basic Sciences,
South
rial Cancer
Institute.
Robert
S. Melville
(eleventh)
AACC
1976
standing
Contributions
Carolina
will
Memo-
receive
Award
the
for Out-
Through
Ser-
vice to Clinical
Chemistry
as a Profession, sponsored
by the Fisher Scientific
Co.
Dr.
Melville,
originally
from
Worcester,
Massachusetts,
received his
A.B. from
Clark
University
and his
Norbert W. Tietz
Ph.D. degree from the State University
of Iowa.
Before
joining
the National.
Institute
of General
Medical
Sciences in
1965, where he has served as Chief of the
Automated
Clinical Laboratory Section
in the Biomedical Engineering Program
since 1968, Dr. Melville
progressed
from
research
chemist
at Massachusetts
General
Hospital
to Chief Biochemist
at
St. Luke’s
Hospital,
Chicago,
via the
Department
of Biochemistry
at the
State University
of Iowa, where he was
a research
assistant.
He was also with
the Veterans Administration
for several
years,
where
he
served
as
chief
bio-
Nathan
CLINICAL CHEMISTRY,
0. Kaplan
Vol. 22. No. 5, 1976
699
chemist at the VA Hospital in Iowa City
and in the Central Office in Washington,
clinical
D.C.
Dr. Melville has been active in the
AACC for the past 25 years. He was its
president
in 1970-71,
and has been a
diplomate
of the American
Board of
Clinical
Chemists
since 1952. He received the Joseph H. Roe Award in 1972
from the Capital
Section,
AACC. This
award, sponsored
by the American
Instrument
Co., is presented in recognition
of contributions
in the field of clinical
chemistry.
Dr. Melville
unique
cipline.
contributions
to
the
record
of
field
of
especially
in recent
Three
of these
many
accom-
plishments
deserve special mention.
As
Chief Biochemist of the Veterans Administration,
Dr. Melville
instituted
policies
and practices relating to clinical
chemistry
that endure to this day and
that have done much
to strengthen
staffing and operational
patterns
in the
clinical laboratory services of VA Hospitals
has a sustained
chemistry,
years, which have by themselves
greatly
enhanced
recognition
of clinical
chemistry and its standing
as a separate dis-
all over
the
Dr. Melville’s
tion to the field
country.
outstanding
of laboratory
The latest
advances
in clinical
laboratory
instrumentation
will be displayed
at the
28th AACC
National
Meeting
Houston,
Texas
August
1-6, 1976
contribuscience is
the major
tomation
of clinical
laboratories,
in
particular
clinical
chemistry
laboratories. In 1968, he helped begin the national
program
year
Bicentennial
come
the NIH,
and established
the
tion in the Medical
Laboratory
terest
many
entists
-
P.O.
Box
Astrodoine
Houston,
20661
Station
Texas
77025
*
Vol. 22,
No.
#{149}
eighth year, these symposia
provide
a
major forum for the interchange
of ideas
between basic and clinical
laboratory
scientistsand members of the industrial
sector.
Dr. Melville
has been a highly
effective and stabilizing
influence
in the
provision
of credentials
for clinical
chemists
for some years. A founder
of
the National
Registry
in Clinical
Chemistry
and its immediate
pastpresident,
he has helped to develop and
expand that program for more than 1000
working
1976
in clinical
extended
the
viding
credentials
fession
through
chemistry
peer
system
of pro-
at the top of the procertification
of ABCC
*
of Chemists,
and the American
Association
for the Advancement
of
Science, and a member of the American
Chemical
Society,
Sigma
XI,
Phi
Lambda
Upsilon, Gamma
Alpha, and
the American
Society
of Biomedical
Engineering.
Norbert
1976 AACC
5,
sci-
In addi-
with
Dr. Charles
D. Scott
of the
Ridge
National
Laboratory,
Dr.
Melville
originated
and has co-chaired
the annual
Oak Ridge
Symposia
on
Advanced
Analytical
Concepts
for the
Clinical
Laboratory.
Now
in their
sponsored
CLINICAL CHEMISTRY,
young
field.
tion,
Oak
Efforts
700
qualified
diplomates.
In addition
to his activities
in clinical
chemistry,
Dr. Melville
is a senior
member
of the Instrument
Society
of
America,
a member
of the Association
for Advancement
of Medical Instrumentation,
a fellow
of the American
to...
1976
highly
in this important
Institute
1-6,
Automa-
Sciences
Review Committee,
which has reviewed
and recommended
funding of several of
the most outstanding
practical
developments
in the field. These include the
Standard
Reference
Materials Program
at the National
Bureau
of Standards,
the development
of the GeMSAEC
centrifugal
analyzer
in collaboration
with
the Atomic Energy Commission
at the
Oak Ridge National
Laboratory
and (at
an earlier time) the review of training
and fellowship grants in clinicalchemistry. The overall effect has been to in-
and
Houston
August
clinical
laboratories.
As a director
and current
vice president
of the American
Board of
Clinical
Chemistry,
he has also participated in the formulation
of policies and
practices
that have greatly
expanded
American
Association
of Clinical
* Chemists
28th
National
Meeting
the
on automated
laboratory
sciences at the National
Institute
of General
Medical
Sciences of
persons
of our
played in the creprogram for the au-
role he has
ation of a national
in
W. Tietz
Award
will receive the
for Outstanding
Education
by SmithKline
and
Training
Corp. This
will be the sixth year that
Bound into this
specially prepared
handsome volume are
The Best Selections
From The Journal
of
IRREPRODUCIBLE
RESULTS#{174}
PUBLISHERS
JIR
P. 0. Box 234, Chicago
Illinois60411,
U.S.A.
Please
THE
send
Heights,
copies
______
SELECTED
of
PAPERS
OF THE JOURNAL
OF
IRREPRODUCIBLE
RESULTS
this
award
has
been given.
Dr. Tietz was born and educated in
Germany,
and received
a doctorate
in
Natural
Sciences
from the Technical
University
of Stuttgart.
He came to the
United
States in 1954 as Research
Fellow in the Department
of Pathology,
University of Chicago. Later Chairman
of the Department
of Chemistry,
Reid
Memorial Hospital, Richmond, Indiana,
he went on to Mount
Sinai Hospital
Medical
Center, Chicago, where he held
a position as Director
of Clinical
Chemistry
until
early this year. He
started as Associate
in Pathology
at the
Chicago
Medical
School/University
of
Health
Sciences and advanced
to Professor of Clinical
Chemistry
in 1969 and
Professor
of Biochemistry
in 1970. He
was also Consultant
to the State of Illinois, Department
of Health.
During
his years at the Chicago
Medical
School, Dr. Tietz has restructured the clinical
chemistry
portion
of
the course
in clinical
pathology
for
medical
students.
In the school
of
graduate
and postdoctoral
studies
he
established one of the firstM.S. degree
programs
in clinical
chemistry;
this
program
has subsequently
been expanded
into a Ph.D. program.
He was
also involved
in the organization
of a
degree
program
for medical
technologists in the School of Related
Health
Sciences. He directed
the teaching
programs for residents
in clinical pathology
and the continuing-education
programs
in clinical
chemistry
for employees
at
the Mount
Sinai
Hospital
Medical
Center. Earlier this year, Dr. Tietz accepted a position
as Director
of Clinical
Chemistry
and Professor
of Pathology,
College
of Medicine,
University
of
Kentucky
Medical
Center,
Lexington,
Kentucky.
Dr. Tietz is editor of and contributor
to the text Fundamentals
of Clinical
Chemistry
(W. B. Saunders,
1970).
A
forthcoming
second
edition
includes
foreign
He
as well as American
authors.
has coordinated
and directed
workshops:
Electrolyte
Institute
and
Name
Workshop,
Catholic
Hospital
Association of the USA, 1965; Gas Chromatography
in Clinical
Chemistry,
Mount
Address
Sinai
Hospital,
Chicago,
ternational
Seminar
and
City
the
Workshop
1967;
Inin
Enzymology,
Mount
Sinai
Hospital
Medical Center in 1972; and the Second
State
Zip
in
Enclosed is $
L check
D
money
order
0 c.o.o.
Circle No. 282
on Ruder’s
Service
Card
International
Symposium
Enzymology,
Mount
Medical
Center,
the faculty
gional,
and
on
Clinical
Sinai
Hospital
1975. He has served on
of many
other national,
local workshops.
re-
Dr. Tietz has served as member of the
AACC
Committee
on Education.
He
participated
in the Conference
of Program Directors
in Columbus,
Ohio, in
1972 and in Chicago in 1975, serving as
Chairman
of the M.S.
Degree
Study
Group.
He also served as a member
of
702
CLINICAL CHEMISTRY,
Vol. 22, No. 5. 1976
the AACC Committee
on Standards,
as
chairman
of the Sub-Committee
on
Enzymes,
and as consultant to the
Board of Editors
of Selected
Methods
of
Clinical
Chemistry.
Dr. Tietz is the 1976
President-Elect, AACC.
His research
interests
are in methodology
related
to clinical
chemistry,
and fat metabolism
related
to atherosclerosis.
He received
the Clinical
Chemist
Award from the AACC
Chicago Section
in 1971 and was Chairman
of the Chicago Section, 1965-7.
He is a member of
the American
Institute
of Chemists
(Fellow),
American
Association
for the
Advancement
of Science
(Fellow),
American
Chemical
Society, American
Society of Clinical
Pathologists
(Associate), Sigma Xi, American
Association
of University
Professors,
and the Institute of Medicine
of Chicago.
Nathan
0. Kaplan
will receive the
fourth
AACC
Award
for Outstanding
Contributions
to Clinical
Chemistry
in
a Selected
Area,
sponsored
by
the
Boehringer
Mannheim
Corporation.
Dr. Kaplan, a native New Yorker,
received
his A.B.
from
the
University
of
California,
Los Angeles, and his Ph.D.
from the same university
at Berkeley.
He began his career
as Assistant
Biochemist,
University
of California,
became
a research
chemist
on the
Manhattan
Project, associate research
biochemist
at
Massachusetts
General
Hospital,
and Instructor,
Harvard
Medical School. He then went on to
Assistant
Professor, Associate Professor,
and Professor
of Biology,
McCollumPratt
Institute,
The Johns
Hopkins
University.
From 1957-68
he was Professor and Chairman
of Biochemistry
at
Brandis
University.
From 1968 to the
present
Chemistry
he has
been
Professor
of
at the University
of Califor-
nia at La Jolla.
Dr. Kaplan’s
main interest
has been
the study of enzymes from both a theoretical and applied point of view. On the
practical
level he has been involved
in
developing
instrumentation
for the automated
determination
of enzymes on a
clinical
level.
From
instruments
have
ticated
instruments
by a number
prototypes,
these
evolved
into sophisthat are produced
of different
manufacturers.
He has made basic contributions
in developing
kinetic
methods
that can be
used to distinguish
isoenzymos.
Analyzers based on this type of approach are
appearing
that determine
isoenzymes
by
kinetic measurements,
an example being
the stopped-flow
instruments
for determining
lactate
dehydrogenase
isoenzymes. A microcalorimeter
developed
by Dr. Kaplan has been used in the determination
and lactate
of the
kinetics
dehydrogenase
of uricase
of particular
biochemical
interest
and is routinely
used in clinical
chemistry
laboratories.
Inalyse nanomoles of peptides and
metabolites in 30 minutes...
IJ
with the LKBTachophor
LKB
nciple
minutes
2127 Tachophor
for separating
or less.
be separated
pretreatment
Ion species
from
metals
thermal,
to proteins
minutes.
length
of a zone is directly
proporalto the amount
of sample
ions in
zone, so that quantitative
determinas can simply
be made by measuring
peak-width
on the UV recording
shown below).
A typical
protolytes
separation
takes only
gives
you
UV and
a complete
picture
of an analysed
sample
in the 0.1 to 50 jzl range.
The
easily and with high resolution.
of the sample such as deproteinization
oncentration
is necessary.
ieotides
or low molecular
system,
A twin-detector
utilizes
the isotachophoresis
ions to give you results
in
twin-buffer
system
using
Ampholine#{174} carrier
as ‘spacers’
gives
of
20 to
ampholytes
you excellent
separation
and resolution
of difficult
peaks.
And no stabilizing
medium
is required
as in other electrophoresis
methods.
The UV lamp used in the LKB Tachophor
detec-
tor system is a plug-in type that is very easy to change.
The LKB Tachophor
is easy to operate
and maintain,
with
a 4-position
control
and simple
#{149}
sample
injection,
plus counter-flow
I RUN
capability
for analysis
of large
volume
#{149}
dilute samples.
For more information,
contact your LKB representative
or
write to us at one of the adresses
listed below.
3INJECT
LKB Instruments
12221 PARKLAWN
301) 881-2510
TELEX
Circle
No.
347
DRIVE
Inc.
ROCKVILLE
89-682
on Readers
Service
Card
MD
20852
Dr. Kaplan
is the author
or co-author
50
of about 350 publications,
most of them
dealing
with enzymes.
He is best known
probably
as co-editor
(with
S. P. Colowick)
of Methods
in Enzyrnology
(Academic
Press). His research interests
C
3C
a
a20
have been in enzymology,
immobilized
enzymes, affinity
chromatography,
and
cancer
lIII
chemotherapy.
20
Dr. Kaplan
is a member
of the National
Academy
of Sciences
and the
American
Academy
of Arts and Sciences. His awards are: Honorary
Fellow
of the Harvey Society; Sigma Xi; Sugar
Research Award; Nutritional
Research
Award; Eli Lilly Award in Biochemistry;
Commonwealth
John
Simon
(1964..-5 and
Travel
Fellowship;
Guggenheim
1975).
and
Fellowship
An analysis
was made
Members
of the ages of the
of that
age. The median
(left arrow) for all new members
years,
33 years
(middle
arrow)
students
were not included.
RIA
15
1.
on the right
is the calculated
mean
value. Most of the students
were below
30, but two persons became student
affiliates
youngest
age
when
over
40. Perhaps
person
ever
to become
the
a
at
the
age
20.
The
-Albert
oldest
A. Dietz
Advisory
Committee
Member
on Membership
Services,
which
the
by
the
Laboratory
represents
17 member
organizations
active
in conducting
medical
laboratories
throughout
the
U.S.,
was held in Washington,
D.C., on
October
6 and 7, 1975. About 200 laboratorians,
including
several from England and the Netherlands,
attended.
first
when
tional
Conference
Testing
for medical
GLC-MS
of the
on
Second
Na-
Proficiency
laboratories
nine
conference
are now
on pro-
areas
of
laboratory
operation-
bacteriology,
blood banking,
chemistry,
hematology,
histopathology
and cytology, immunology,
parasitology,
radioimmunoassay,
and toxicology-focused on questions
and problems
compiled
in advance
by the program
committee.
Their
conclusions,
along
with
recommendations
to industry,
govern-
73-page
societies
testing,
publication
conare
also reprints
19 papers presented
at the conference,
with 14 summaries
prepared by program
and study-group
chairmen.
Copies
of the Proceedings
may be
ordered for $10 each from Information
Services, 9650 Rockville
Pike, Bethesda,
Md. 20014. Checks should
be made
payable
to the National
Council
on
Health Laboratory
Services.
RIA
for
ented
Suffering
from acronymophobia?
It’s painful, but seldom fatal.
Alleviated by a little in-depth information, packaged
in a red, readily
absorbable
capsule, to be taken each
month, p.r.n., ad lib., or Ut dict.
national
ficiency
testing, held in Atlanta,
Georgia, in 1971, was devoted
primarily
to
discussions
of the complexities
of
applying
proficiency
testing to laboratory medicine.
The recent conference
brought
the previous
discussions
up to
date and developed
recommendations
for the future.
Separate
study groups for
The
Proceedings
TLC
on Health
ment, and professional
cerned
with
proficiency
given in the Proceedings.
Publications
The
CPB
of
person who was accepted as a member in
1975, perhaps the oldest ever accepted,
was Dr. Elliott
T. Adams of the Northeast Section. He became a Fellow at the
age of 75, but would have been eligible
earlier as he is a diplomate
of the ABCC.
was 32
The arrow
Council
The
member of the Association
is Lawrence
L. Taylor,
III, who became
a student
persons
accepted
for membership
in
1975. The results are shown in Figure 1,
which represents
625 new members,
including 67 student affiliates.
The top of
each bar represents
the total number of
each age and the distance
between the
x -axis and the lower end of the bar, the
students
50
ASS
Fig.
National
in
h4IjhllliII5i!#{149}lI.11
30
affiliate
Ages of New AACC
available;
a copy was received
Editorial
Office
on March
6.
The
conference,
sponsored
111
40
Physicians,
a clinically
ori-
newsletter;
$30/yr
($35 to subof Radioassay
News).
Write:
scribers
Scientific
Newsletters,
Broadway,
Calif.
Inc.,
2421
W.
P. 0. Box 4546, Anaheim,
92803.
Proceedings
Symposium
on
of the 1st Invitational
the Serodiagnosis
of
SP74-1,
March,
1974)
Cancer
(AFRRI
has been received
(Mar. 12) from the
Armed
Forces Radiobiology
Research
Institute,
Defense
Nuclear
Agency,
Be-
thesda, Md. It reports
proceedings
of
this meeting,
held at the National
Naval
Medical
Center,
Bethesda,
Md., Sept.
29, 1973.
Clinical
Chemistry
Bicentennial
at Brookhaven
An
-
$25/yr
(in U.S.)
Then all you have to worry about
is ochlophobia
(the journal
is very
popular).
Energy
Summer
Events
Lab
Fair,
Open
Saturdays
are
House,
three
planned
at ERDA’s
Brookhaven
National
Laboratory
on Long Island for
greeting
the public
“The
Laboratory,
erably
broadened
research
in ‘76.
which
its initial
on the peaceful
has considmission
of
aspects
atom to helping
ERDA
develop
ergy sources, will host the Energy
provide
visitors
with a sampling
704
CLINICAL
CHEMISTRY,
Vol. 22, No. 5, 1976
and
events
of the
all en-
Fair to
of ex-
You’re looking for the specific
glucose determination
We’ve got it
System
Glucose Gluc-DH (UV)
#{149}
Diagnostica
MERCK
We will be pleased
to provide
detailed
information
on request
E. Merck, 61 Darmstadt,
Circle No. 267 on Reader’s
Service
Federal
Republic
of Germany,
Postfach
4119
Card
CLINICAL
CHEMISTRY,
Vol. 22, No.5,
1976
705
isting and planned
energy technology,”
Seventh
Automation
Congress
on
This will be
held Dec. 13-15, 1976, at the New York
announced
Dr. R. C. Anderson,
Assistant Director.
The
5-day
exhibition,
beginning
on Wednesday,
May 12, and
ending on Sunday,
with BNL’s
Open
end,
May
15
and
Hilton,
May 16, will overlap
House on the week16.
Designed
as
a
learning environment
and as a stimulus
for public
response,
interaction,
and
investigation
of energy alternatives,
the
Fair will house dozens of exhibits
from
all over the country
as well as from the
Greater New York metropolitan
area.
Movies
and other audiovisuals
will
complement
many exhibits.
Energy Fair and Open House visitors
may also tour the building
housing
Brookhaven’s
historic
Graphite
Research Reactor and displays of the work
of the Laboratory.
The new-style
Open House on the
weekend
will
highlight
research
in
progress.
The actual
scientists
and
technicians
involved
will explain
and
demonstrate
research methods and tools
as well as answer questions
about their
work. “It’s a ‘hands on’ approach
that
proved
extremely
popular
during
last
year’s Open House,” Dr. Anderson
mid.
The public is invited to visit 14 separate research areas including
laboratories in the Medical,
Biology,
Chemistry,
Physics,
Accelerator,
Applied
Mathematics,
and Applied
Science
Depart-
ments.
of light;
and
in addition,
the High
Flux
Beam
Reactor,
one of the most advanced
research reactors
providing
neutrons
for
research in medical and energy fields.
A series of Saturday
bus tours of the
Lab site will run all summer (except July
3). Featured will be a long stop at BNL’s
Exhibition
Summer
Hall.
Saturdays
More
details,
on the
be released
at a
will
later date.
“Because
of the number of areas that
can be toured
during
Open House and
the broad scope of the Energy Fair exhibits and seminars, visitors may wish to
set aside two days for attending
these
special free events,”
suggested
Dr. Anderson. “Hours
are 10:00 a.m. to 4:00
p.m. daily,
food is available,
and no
reservations
are required.
School groups
or other
large touring
groups
may,
however,
wish to contact
the Public
Relations
Office at (516) 345-2345
for
further
information.
regarding
seminar
made shortly.”
Announcements
scheduling
will
be
The entrance to Brookhaven
National
Laboratory
is on the William
Floyd
Parkway,
approximately
one mile north
of Exit 68 of the Long Island Expressway.
706
CLINICAL
CHEMISTRY,
(Technicon).
New York
City.
Theme:
“To-
morrow’s
Technology
ulars from Michele
Corp.,
Tarrytown,
Today.”
ParticBarth,
Technicon
N.Y.
10591 (Tel.
914/631-8000).
Squibb
National
Nuclear
Medicine
Seminar,
a four-day
program
(ASMTapproved)
will be conducted
without
charge in 14 U.S. cities
during
1976.
Write: Daniel J. Murphy,
E. R. Squibb
& Sons, Inc., P. 0. Box 4000, Princeton,
N.J. 08540.
Expo-Medical
76-Symposium,
Exhibition
Gardens, Tel Aviv, Israel, Sept.
15-20,
C. S. Frings
Awards
At the 27th Pittsburgh
Conference
on
Analytical
Chemistry
and Applied
Spectroscopy,
Cleveland,
Ohio,
on
March 3, 1976, Dr. C. S. Frings received
the first Pittsburgh
Applied
Analytical
Chemistry
Award.
This award is presented
by the Society
of Analytical
Chemists
of Pittsburgh,
“to the author
of a paper
ceding
five
cially
are
BNL’s
large research
machines:
the Alternating
Gradient
Synchrotron,
one of
the world’s largest proton accelerators;
two Tandem
Van de Graaff electrostatic
accelerators,
the largest tandem
accelerator facility
used to accelerate
nuclei
of atoms to velocities
one-tenth
the
speed
To be viewed,
International
published
within
the preyears which
has been espe-
useful
in solving real problems
in
chemistry”.
The award paper
was entitled,
“Drug
Screening”
and
appeared
in CRC Critical
Reviews
in
Clinical
Laboratory
Sciences,
CRC
Press Inc., Vol 4, No. 4, pages 357-382,
1973. The
award
is a plaque
and
$1000.00.
Prix
Andr#{233} Lichtwitz.
This
prize
analytical
(8800 francs) for 1976 is awarded by the
Institut
National
de Ia Sante et de la
Recherche
M#{233}dicaleto a French or foreign research worker,
or team, for outstanding work on calcium
or phosphorus
metabolism
during
the previous
year.
Ten copies of fully documented
applications should reach the Director
of the
INSERM,
do le Docteur
Bonnot,
101,
rue de Tolbiac,
75645 Paris Cedex 13, by
June 29.
Meetings
and Continuing
Education
Northeast
Section:
nounces
This
two meetings:
Ari#{235}ns,AACC
National
at Carney
Hospital,
and
16, H.
June
an12, E. J.
section
May
Tour
Dorchester,
E. Spiegel
Speaker,
Mass.;
speaks
on
federal legislation
in the din. lab. area,
at Old Sturbridge
Village,
Sturbridge,
Mass.
Write:
H. C. Clemson,
Lynn
Hosp., Lynn, Mass. 01904.
Interpretative
Enzymology,
June
29-July
2, 1976, Univ. Calif., San Diego
School of Med. Particulars
from: David
Allan,
M.D., Associate
Dean for Continuing
Education,
UCSD
School
of
Medicine
(M-002),
La Jolla,
Calif.
92093. (Tel. 714/452-3707).
Vol. 22, No. 5, 1976
1976.
Features
symposia
on
Emerging
Diagnostic
Systems in Medicine, Inborn
Metabolic
Errors,
Nutritional Status. Write: Organizing
Committee and Secretariat,
P. 0. Box 16271,
Tel Aviv.
In Vitro
Nuclear
Medicine,
Oct.
11-13, 1976. A three-day
course of lectures for persons
interested
in the in
vitro application
of radioactive
tracers.
Procedures
such as radioimmunoassay,
competitive
protein-binding
assay, immunoradiometric
assay,
enzymatic
assay, and other radiometric
techniques
will be presented.
The theoretic
basis,
practical
aspects of the procedures,
and
clinical
application
will
be
discussed.
The course will stress the recent progress and clinical
aspects of the field.
Cost: $200. Write: Office of Continuing
Medical Education,
The Johns Hopkins
Medical
Institutions,
Turner
Building,
Room 17,720 Rutland
Ave., Baltimore,
Md.
21205.
Fed Up?
There
might
is a feeling
in the country
that we
be able somehow
to get along as
well if some large part of the bureaus
and agencies of the federal government
were to magically
vanish
and govern-
ment were to confine itself to the business of governing.
Some recent quotes:
Another
question
asked [of 2074 persons]
was, ‘In which of the areas listed would you
most like (and least like) to have your taxes
spent
for science
and technology?’
The
replies, in 1972 and 1974 indicate
a great incongruity
between what the people say they
want and what the government
actually does
in this matter. Topping
the list in both 1972
and 1974, with 65 and 69 percent was “improving health care.” Next came “reducing
and controlling
pollution,”
with 60 and 50
percent.
-Daniel
S. Greenberg,
The New
England
Journal
of Medicine,
March
25, 1976,
discussing
the NSB
report,
Science
Indicators-1974.
Second, we need to put our health care
delivery
system in perspective.
We cannot
expect our health care institutions
to cure all
our illnesses,
nor solve all of our health
problems.
With
this perspective,
we might be
better able to curb the rising costs of health
You talk English.
It talks FORTRAN.
The Unique
ROTOCHEM#{174}llaCentrifugal
Fast Analyzer
It’s fast. It’s accurate.
It will print test results for lab or ward use.
And it’s simple to operate.
What makes it all possible
is computer
technology
coupled
with a
proven analytical
technique
to make testing
easier and faster. The
ROTOCHEM
ha Analyzer,
directed
by a computer
that utilizes
FORTRAN language
programs,
provides
a flexibility
of operation
and output which will resist obsolescence
for years to come - as new methods are developed,
you can develop
new programs
to operate
your
ROTOCHEM
unit. The output
is fantastic
batch testing,
stat tests,
test status reports,
and patient test result printouts
are all part of the
norm. Computer
technology
in the modern
clinical
lab.
Want to computerize
your lab? Start with a ROTOCHEM
Analyzer.
You talk English.
It talks FORTRAN.
It’s an easy first step.
Today’s
Technology
for
Today
AND
Tomorrow.
Can / get an SGOT STAT?
Sure, here we go
SUBROUTINE
Q&A
COMMON/RUNANS/
NUMQA
COMMON/RDSCP1
/TECHQ(8),DETERQ(2),DATEQ(8)
COMMON/RDSCP2/WAVEQ,IWAVPQ,ITEMPQ
COMMON/RDSCP3/ANSRQ,YE
WRITFt4,500)
#{149}#{149}..#{149}
-
‘1
r
COMPPtNY
AM1’N.
8030
Circle No. 329
on
Readers
Georgia
Service
Card
Avenue.
aryland
20910
care. I think
pected
the American
too much
from
the
public
has ax-
If
system.
delivery
those of us who serve the system every day
help the public understand
the limitations
of
the delivery system, we just might help curb
both its rising costs and growing
regulation
by government.
(italics ours).
-Remarks
by Karl D. Bays,
Chairman
and Chief Executive Office,
American
Hospital
Supply Corp.,
before the Scientific Apparatus
Makers Association,
Phoealx,
Ariz.,
November
10, 1975.
past decade has seen a runaway
growth
of bureaucracy, restrictive legislation,
and squandering of taxpayers’ money on such
high-sounding
but ill-planned
undertakings
as regional medical programs
and compreThe
hensive
medical
care-all
this
with
the
seeming approval, and urging, of many of the
faculty
of our medical schoolL...
-Irvine
H. Page, M.D., Editorial in
Modern Medicine,
Feb. 15, 1976
Has the
volvement
price?
The
rising
in health
Commerce
cost of government
care been worth
Department
total US health
inthe
that
forecasts
they cost unbelievably
more than projected,
and that with them comes an overlay of suffocating regulation&
-Warren
L. Bostick,
M.D., President,
ASCP, in Laboratory
Medicine
7,
No. 3, March
legislative
need for prompt
clinical
feedback
in drug
realized and,
above all, that regulations
will be avoided
that impose cumbersome
and often redundant constraints on clinical studies.
itiscertainly appropriate
that government
should regulate clinical experimentation,
but
it is vitally
important
that all parties constantly seek means that allow thisvital process to proceed
as efficiently
and expeditiously as possible.
The view that the sole
discovery
will
be increasingly
function
of drug regulation
is the protection
of the public from harm should be replaced
by a new and broadened
conception
of the
regulators’
mission. The public interest would
be best served if the Congress broadened the
mandate
of FDA
to include
a positive
responsibility
to encourage drug innovation and
to expedite the development
and availability
of new drugs.
-from
care spending will rise an-
10% this year to $135 billion-up
from
billion
10 years ago. During the same
span, Washington
upped
its share
of the
health care tab from 19 to nearly 40%, largely
1976, p2
of the debate on forthcoming
proposals, it is hoped that the vital
As a result
Annual
Report
Pfizer
1975,
-js.x.
other
$40
But look at Medicare
itself.
Before
itbegan,
the over-65 population
paid about 70% of its
medical
bills out of pocket. Today, although
senior
citizens pay only 40% themselves, rising costs have forced them to pay almost as
many actual dollars for medical care as they
did
in
on Nomenclature
such massive programs as Medicare.
through
1965.
“Washington
Report,”
in Modern
Medicine
Feb. 15, 1976, p 20
A tide
isturning
and
the public
is becoming
up with
the extent
that government
over-involves
itself in the livesof the citizens,
their activities
and their businesses. People
have witnessed the promises of successive
administrations
and congressional
laws, only
to note that they fall far short in delivery, that
fed
An
invitation
Some Forthcomb
(Special Issue)
Readers may have noticed the use of the title
‘Chairholder’
in the preceding
reports. This
results from a letter from Professor
D. N.
Baron of the Royal Free Hospital
in London,
England
who wrote to the Editon
“Sir, I am sorry that you are using the
grotesque word ‘Chairperson’
on page 1 of the
December
1975 issue. If you have to degendense the Chairman,
then ‘Chairholder’
is
much better
English
and has the same
meaning (compare
‘Office-holder’).
Yours faithfully,
D. N. Baron”
Perhaps this suggestion
of Professor
Baron’s should be taken up by all those responsible for organising
congresses, symposia, and
meetings!
IFCC
-from
Newsletter
March
to membership
No. 13
1976, p7
Papers
Analysis
of Results
of Toxicological
Performed
by Coroners’
or Medical
Timiners’
Laboratories
in
2000 Drug-Involved
Deaths
in Nine
Major
U.S. Cities
Examinations
Eugene
C. Dinovo,
A. GottaHerman Birch, and Jon F. Heiser
Results of a Nine-Laboratory
Survey
chalk,
Frederick
of Forensic
Louis
McGuire,
L.
Toxicology
Dinovo
Eugene
Proficiency
and Louis
C.
Gottschallc
Automated
Enzymic
Determination
Ethanol in Blood, Serum and Urine
a Miniature
Centrifugal
of
with
Analyzer
Analytical
Toxicology
Applications
of
Element-Selective
Electrolytic
Con-
ductivity
for Gas Chroma-
Detection
tography
E. Pape
Enzymatic
Assay
for Methotrexate
in
Serum
and Cerebrospinal
Fluid
Larry C. Falk and Dennis R Clark
Relative
Merits
of Some
Amphetamine
Fluids
RobertO.
and Irving
Assay
Methods
in
for
Biological
Boat, Craig A. Sutheimer,
Sunshine
Serum
Quinidine
Concentrations:
Comparison
of Fluorescence,
GasChromatographic,
and Gas-Chromatographic-Mass-Spectrometric
Methods
David H. Huffman
and Charles
Hignite
Gas-Chromatographic
Theophylline
in
Small
Quantitation
Volumes
Plasma
Donald
Perrier
and Evangeline
Gas-Chromatographic
of an Antifibrinolytic
in the
A.
T. P. Hadjiioannou,
& I. Hadjiioannou, J. Avery, and H. V. Malmstadt
Improved
Micro-Radioimmunoaasay
of Digoxin
in Serum,
with use of ‘ILabeled Digoxin
Benjamin
Calesnick
and Annette
Dinan
Brian
A Footnote
-.-‘
caproic
L
Det
Drug,
6-Amino-
Acid
R. Keucher, Elizabeth
Solow, John Metaxas, and Robert
Thomas
AMERICAN
ASSOCIATiON
FOR
CLINICAL
CHEMISTRY
B.
L.
Campbell
is extended
Dues:
to all readers
of Clinical
Chemistry
to $42.50
per year, depending
membership
category
$36.50
upon
Gas-Chromatographic
Micro-Scale
Procedure
for Theophylline,
with use of
a Nitrogen-Sensitive
Detector
Charles
J. Least,
Jr., George
F.
Johnson,
and
Harvey
M. Solomon
Drug Concentrations
in a
Case of Combined
Overdosage
with
Primidone
and Methsuximide.
George F. Johnson,
Charles J. Least,
Jr., James W. Serum,
Elizabeth
B.
Monitoring
(includes
subscription
For application
forms
to Clinical
and
information,
Chemistry)
write:
Solow, and Harvey
AmerIcan
Association
for Clinical Chemistry
1725 K Street,
NW
Washington,
0. C. 20006
Therapeutic
triptyline
CLINICAL
CIEMISTRY,
Vol.
22.
No.5,
1976
and Nortriptyline
N. Bailey
for
Analysis
Concentrations
with Use of a Nitrogen
David
708
M. Solomon
Gas-Chromatographic
of Ansiin Plasma,
Detector
and Peter
I. Jatlow