Lance Armstrong Fountas-Pinnell Level L Narrative Nonfiction by David Lau

LESSON 30 TEACHER’S GUIDE
Lance Armstrong
by David Lau
Fountas-Pinnell Level L
Narrative Nonfiction
Selection Summary
Bicycle racing champion Lance Armstrong has won races all over the
world. Readers will learn that he never gives up. His racing career
started with a triathalon when he was thirteen. From there he went on
to win races all over the world.
Number of Words: 444
Characteristics of the Text
Genre
Text Structure
Content
Themes and Ideas
Language and
Literary Features
Sentence Complexity
Vocabulary
Words
Illustrations
Book and Print Features
• Narrative Nonfiction: Biography
• Third-person narrative focuses on life and career of Lance Armstrong.
• Information presented sequentially
• Professional bicycle racing
• Lance Armstrong’s life and career
• Champions never give up.
• You can overcome personal problems to achieve a goal.
• Sports competition is thrilling.
• Exclamations for emphasis
• Descriptive details about subject
• A mix of simple, compound, and complex sentences with clauses and phrases
• Longer sentences (more than 15 words)
• Content-specific words explained in text: triathlon, champion, Iron Kids Triathlon
• Plurals, contractions, compound words: races, didn’t, everyone
• Many two and three-syllable words
• Color action photos support and extend text.
• Nine pages of text, photos on every page either above or beside text
• Some sentences continuing over several lines
• Photo caption extends text.
© 2006. Fountas, I.C. & Pinnell, G.S. Teaching for Comprehending and Fluency, Heinemann, Portsmouth, N.H.
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Lance Armstrong
by David Lau
Build Background
Read the title to children and discuss the scene on the cover photo. Ask children what they
think they will learn about Lance Armstrong in this book. Encourage children to use their
knowledge of bicycle riding to think about the book. Ask questions such as: What do you
like best about riding a bike? What do you think it’s like to ride a bike in a big race?
Introduce the Text
Guide children through the text, noting important ideas, and helping with unfamiliar
language and vocabulary. Here are some suggestions:
Pages 2–3: Explain that this book is about a world famous bicycle racer,
Lance Armstrong.
Suggested language: Turn to page 2. This is a picture of Lance Armstrong wearing
his racing uniform. The last sentence reads: Lance liked to race, and he never gave
up.
Page 4: Turn to page 4. What is happening in this picture? Lance was also a
winning swimmer. For swimming or biking, Lance always trained hard. He rode his
bike ten miles a day! Have you ever trained hard for a race or sports event?
Page 5: Remember to use captions to help you understand a photo and the text.
The caption says: Lance runs in a triathalon at age 17. In the triathlon, racers
swim, run a race, and ride a bike. Look at the photo. Which triathlon race is Lance
taking part in? What do you think racers have to do before entering a triathlon?
Page 8: Turn to page 8. Lance wanted to be win an important bicycle race and
become a champion. How do you think never giving up helped him? What else do
you have to do to become a champion in a sport?
Page 9: Turn to page 9. The sentence reads: Lance asked his coach for help. His
coach had some new ideas to help Lance win. Look at the photo. Do you think
Lance listened to his coach? Why?
Now turn back to the beginning and read to learn more about Lance Armstrong’s
life.
Learn More Words
champion
Grade 1
coach
2
train
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Read
Have children read Lance Armstrong silently while you listen to individual children read.
Support their problem solving and fluency as needed.
Respond to the Text
Personal Response
Ask children to share their personal responses to the book. Begin by asking what they
liked best about the book, or what they found interesting.
Suggested language: What is one thing you learned about Lance Armstrong’s life that you
would like to share with a friend?
Ways of Thinking
As you discuss the text, make sure children understand these teaching points:
Thinking Within the Text
Thinking Beyond the Text
Thinking About the Text
• Lance Armstrong is a famous,
bicycle racing champion.
• You must never give up if you
want to reach a goal.
• The exciting photos bring the
words to life for readers.
• Lance became very sick, but got
well and raced again.
• You must work hard to become
a champion.
• The author really admires Lance
Armstrong.
• Lance Armstrong never gives up.
• The details about Lance
Armstrong’s life help make the
book more interesting.
© 2006. Fountas, I.C. & Pinnell, G.S. Teaching for Comprehending and Fluency, Heinemann, Portsmouth, N.H.
Choices for Support
Fluency
Invite children to choose a passage from the text to read aloud. Have them demonstrate
appropriate stress on words, pausing and phrasing, intonation, and use of punctuation.
Phonics and Word Work
Provide practice as needed with words and sounds, using one of the following activities:
• Make New Adjectives Materials: index cards and two boxes. Write the following
words from the book on index cards and put the cards in a box: hard, old, strong,
long. Write the suffixes –er and –est on index cards and put them in the second box.
Ask children to select an index card from each box and create new words. Work with
children to use the words in original sentences.
• Build Sentences Materials: books, index cards, sentence strips. Have children find
photos of six words in the book (i.e. triathlon, bike racing, race, champion, riders,
winning) and write each word on an index card. Then have them write sentences using
the words. Call on children to read aloud their sentences to the group.
Grade 1
3
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Writing About Reading
Critical Thinking
Read the directions for children on BLM 30.9 and guide them in answering the questions.
Responding
Read aloud the questions at the back of the book and help children complete the activities.
Target Comprehension Skill
Understanding Characters
Remind children that they can tell more about
characters in a book by paying attention to what they say, what they do, and how they feel.
Model how to think about understanding characters:
Think Aloud
I read on page 7 that when Lance Armstrong got sick he fought very hard
to get well and race again. No matter what, he didn’t give up. When he
was stronger he entered a big race in France and won. This shows me
that Lance is a strong person who never stops trying.
Practice the Skill
Have children share examples of what characters in other books, did, said, and felt and
what this told children about the characters.
Writing Prompt
Read aloud the following prompt. Have children write their response, using the writing
prompt on page 6.
Think about what you learned about Lance Armstrong in this book. Then write two
questions you would like to ask him about his training.
Grade 1
4
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English Language Learners
Reading Support Give English learners a “preview” of the text by holding a brief,
small-group discussion with them before reading the text with the entire group.
Oral Language Development
Check the children’s comprehension, using a dialogue that best matches their English
proficiency level. Speaker 1 is the teacher, Speaker 2 is the child.
Beginning/ Early Intermediate
Intermediate
Early Advanced/ Advanced
Speaker 1: Who is this book about?
Speaker 1: Why is Lance Armstrong a
champion?
Speaker 1: How did Lance
Armstrong become a champion
bicycle racer?
Speaker 2: Lance Armstrong
Speaker 1: What sport does he like the
most?
Speaker 2: bicycle racing
Speaker 1: What happens when Lance
enters bicycle races?
Speaker 2: He wins bicycle races.
Speaker 1: What did Lance do when he
got very sick?
Speaker 2: He worked very hard
to reach his goal. No matter what
happened, he never gave up.
Speaker 2: He fought hard to get well
and never gave up.
Speaker 2: He wins.
Lesson 30
BLACKLINE MASTER 30.9
Name
Think About It
Lance Armstrong
Think About It
Write an answer to the question.
Responses may vary.
1. Why does Lance Armstrong never give up?
He wants to be the best. He wants to be
a champion.
Making Connections Think about something you
never give up working on. Write some sentences
about what it is and why you never stop trying.
Read directions to children.
Think About It
11
Grade 1, Unit 6: Three Cheers for Us!
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5
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Name
Date
Lance Armstrong
Think about you learned about Lance Armstrong
in this book. Then write two questions you would
like to ask him about his training.
Grade 1
6
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Lesson 30
BLACKLINE MASTER 30.9
Name
Think About It
Lance Armstrong
Think About It
Write an answer to the question.
.
1. Why does Lance Armstrong never give up?
Making Connections Think about something you
never give up working on. Write some sentences
about what it is and why you never stop trying.
Grade 1
7
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Student
Lesson 30
Date
BLACKLINE MASTER 30.14
Lance Armstrong • LEVEL L
page
2
Lance Armstrong
Running Record Form
Selection Text
Errors
Self-Corrections
Accuracy Rate
Total SelfCorrections
When he was young,
Lance Armstrong was a lot like
other kids. He didn’t have any
brothers or sisters. He liked to
play, swim, and ride his bike.
But Lance could also ride his
bike for hours and swim for
miles. Lance liked to race, and
he never gave up.
Comments:
(# words read
correctly/50 × 100)
%
Read word correctly
Code
✓
cat
Repeated word,
sentence, or phrase
®
Omission
—
cat
cat
Grade 1
Behavior
Error
0
0
1
8
Substitution
Code
cut
cat
1
Self-corrects
cut sc
cat
0
Insertion
the
1
Word told
T
cat
cat

Error
1413379
Behavior
1
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