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W A P A K O N E T A
SPORTS, 1B
‘SKINS STOMP ‘CATS
Wapakoneta Redskins trounce
Kenton Wildcats for 1st league win
DAILY NEWS
Hi 13
Lo -4
Sunny
Cold
ICON PASSES
RECORDS, 3A AN
Child star Shirley Temple dead at 85
Tuesday, February 11, 2014
LIMIT
NATION, 6A DEBT
GOP eyes reversing military pension cut
www.wapakdailynews.com
When life gives you snow,
make snow angels
75¢
Armed robbery
at Subway store
SUSPECT ARRESTED:
Troopers nab
Michigan man
By MIKE BURKHOLDER
STAFF WRITER
Photos provided/Deane and Phyliss Elliott
Deane, 79, and Phyliss Elliott, 78, made snow angels Monday outside their home at 1403
Madison Place in Wapakoneta.
Board
gets
high
marks
By MEREDITH ENKOFF
STAFF WRITER
NEW BREMEN —
The Auglaize County
Board of Developmental Disabilities recently
received a five-year accreditation from the Ohio
Department of Developmental Disabilities, the
highest accreditation such
a program can receive.
“That’s a reflection on
the entire staff, from the
custodians and the bus
WAPAKONETA — A
Michigan man is in custody after he allegedly
robbed a Wapakoneta
Subway restaurant Monday night.
At approximately 5:07
p.m. Monday, the Wapakoneta Police Department received a phone
call from employees at
the Subway at 1401 Bellefontaine St., regarding a
robbery. A male subject
reportedly entered the
store, produced a weapon
and demanded money.
The suspect fled the scene
heading east on Bellefontaine Street in a mini-van
with Michigan license
plates. An undisclosed
amount of cash was taken
from the store.
Officers gave a description of the vehicle to regional law enforcement
agencies and at 5:39 p.m.,
a vehicle matching the
description was stopped
on southbound Interstate 75, near mile post
90, by troopers from the
W-G board approves contracts
By JOHN BUSH
STAFF WRITER
WAYNESFIELD —
The supplemental contracts for three coaches
and one music director
were approved during a
regular meeting of the
Waynesfield-Goshen
Board of Education on
Monday evening.
Head boys track and
field coach Jim Epperly,
volunteer assistant girls
basketball coach Janet
Patton, pit orchestra
director Klayton Hilleary and assistant track
coach Brian Shaw were
all approved by the board
based on the adopted
supplemental
salary
schedule for the 2013-14
school year.
The board also ap-
proved nine teachers to
serve as tutors for the
Reading Club and the
Ohio Achievement Assessment exam at the
elementary school level.
These are part-time positions and wages are not
to exceed 16 hours.
During executive session, board members
spoke about additional
personnel decisions that
will be discussed at the
next board meeting on
March 10.
“We wanted to get
a feel about some of
the things we’re going
to present at the next
meeting,” WaynesfieldGoshen Superintendent
Chris Pfister said. “That
way, it’ll all be out in the
open and laid out as far
as what we’re doing and
who we’re recommending to do what.”
W-G
Elementary
School Principal Tim
Pence stated that he had
received calls from some
parents regarding whether the school will reimburse them for all the
school their preschoolers
missed because of cancellations related to inclement weather. So far, a.m.
preschool has missed 19
days of school and p.m.
See CONTRACTS, Page 5A
Staff photo/Michelle Meunier
The Subway on Bellefontaine Street was the scene of an
armed robery Monday afternoon.
Ohio State Highway Patrol. Troopers took Steven D. Anschuetz, 58, of
National City, Mich., into
custody. The incident remains under investigation
and the Ohio Bureau of
Criminal Investigation
assisted with processing
the crime scene. The Auglaize, Shelby and Allen
County Sheriff ’s Offices
also assisted in the matter.
ANSCHUETZ
Have a heart
and help
By MICHELLE MEUNIER
STAFF WRITER
Steinke Family Chiropractic is hosting its second annual Have a Heart
dinner at 7 p.m. tonight at
the Wapakoneta VFW.
The dinner is free, but
donations are welcomed.
Emily Ailes, head chiropractic assistant at Steinke
Family Chiropractic, said
the event is open to the
public and donations will
go to Oklahaven Children’s Chiropractic Hospital in Oklahoma City.
“We do a campaign,
so if they come to dinner
they can donate,” Ailes
said. “We also bless our
guests by inviting them
into our office.”
Ailes explained that
this local, family business
teamed up with Oklahaven and the Have a Heart
campaign through the International Chiropractic
Pediatric Association.
She went on to say that
Oklahaven is a nonprofit
organization, and this is
the only fundraiser they
have each year. According
to Oklahaven’s website,
the Have a Heart campaign has been around
since 1962.
The 2014 campaign is
going on during the week
See HEART, Page 5A
See MARKS, Page 5A
index
State & Local
Records
Opinion
Sports
County Life
Medical
Comics
Classifieds
VOLUME 109, ISSUE 35
2A
3A
4A
1B
4B
5B
6B
7B
quick
i look
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — Get
ready for bacon like you’ve never
eaten, drunk or worn it before.
Bacon milkshakes. Chocolatecovered bacon shaped like roses.
Bacon-flavored toothpaste, dental
floss and lip balm. Bacon bourbon,
margaritas, beer and vodka. Bacon
ice cream sundaes. A BLT sandwich
with a full pound of bacon.
They’re all on the menu this week
as one Atlantic City casino stretches
the bounds of good taste and cardiovascular health with Bacon Week.
The festival at the Tropicana Casino
and Resort gives new meaning to the
term “pigging out.”
“Bacon is like heaven,” said Nadina
Fornia, of Egg Harbor Township. “If
you’re going to die, die with bacon on
your lips and a BLT in each hand.”
Best
Hometown
OHIO MAGAZINE’S
state and local
2A
3.35
www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Tuesday, February 11, 2014
Murphy USA
Clark
Clark
Clark
Marathon
1281 Bellefontaine St.
3.33
302 Willipie St.
3.33
109 Defiance St.
Looking Back
Through the pages of the
Wapakoneta Daily News
75 years ago, Feb. 11, 1939
At the age of 81, Pope Pius XI, head of the Roman
Catholic Church, died shortly before dawn this morning. His heart, weakened by a long illness, stopped
beating at 5:31 a.m. The pope died of cardiac asthma.
The Archbishop of Canterbury and head of the Church
of England was one of the prominent Britons to express
publicly his grief over Pope Pius XI today. “He was a
man of wide learning and sincerest, ardent piety who
bore the immense burden of his great office, with unfailing dignity and courage,” the archbishop said. “We
shall always remember his efforts in the cause of peace.”
Wapak Redskins to Play Kenton: Assured by their
coach, Paul Schofer, that they have everything is takes
to win their cage batt le against Kenton High on the
Kenton Armory floor tonight, the Blume High Redskins were prepared this afternoon to leave for the
Hardin County capital, accompanied by a delegation
of fans. The Redskins face a large floor peril at Kenton
tonight. The armory is enormous and the abundance of
space may present dangers for the local players. Erb and
Shuler will start at forwards with Karl Kohler moved
to a guard position as running mate of Westbay with
Charley Siferd in the center position. (Editor’s note:
Kenton 38-Redskins 29.)
50 years ago, Feb. 11, 1964
First Church Plan Lenten Bible Studies: The Rev.
David Ullery, pastor of First English Lutheran, announces there will be a series of Lenten Bible study coffee breaks held at church beginning Thursday at 9:30
a.m. Each morning Bible study will last for a one-hour
period. These coffee breaks will least for an indefi nite
number of weeks. Coffee and doughnuts will be served;
each person is asked to bring a Bible. The group will
study to gospel of St. Mary. All are welcome to attend.
Students attain honor roll: Four freshmen at St.
Joseph High School are listed on the honor roll with
an average of 95 percent or more in three subjects:
Stephen Becker, Angela Henkener, Barbara Marker
and Bonita Neumier. There are three sophomores as
well: Michael Klima, Mary Lou Luthman and Thomas
Schroeder. Also with high standing on the honor roll
are Patricia Bustetter and Patricia Meinerding, juniors;
and Christine Foltz and Judith Kentner, seniors.
Consult with Jay Koenig and Benny Koenig about
this question: “We got a beautiful pheasant and weren’t
even hunting. He crashed into our windshield! A new
windshield cost $90 – a prett y expensive pheasant dinner.
25 years ago, Feb. 11, 1989
Final Game in Fisher Gym: Friday night the last
basket was made, the crowds milled around on the
floor one last time, some taking pictures. The trash was
blown out from under the bleachers, lights were turned
off in the locker room and the doors are closed for the
last organized varsity sport in Wapakoneta Senior High
School’s Fischer gym. The varsity teams will move to a
new facility beginning the fall of this year. The gym is
dedicated to and named for the man who donated the
land that the present high school sits on. The dedication plaque in the hall outside the gym reads: “Carl D.
Fischer Jr. Gymnasium, Named in Memory of Carl D.
Fisher, 1881-1952, who with great foresight and love for
Wapakoneta presented the 33 acre site on which this
building stands to the Wapakoneta City School District to serve as a recreational and educational center.”
Chairpersons named: Jackie Bunyan, Jeff Carder
and Deb Kaeck have recently been named chairperson
for the 1989 American Heart Association campaign
in Wapakoneta. Local residents are urged to volunteer
to help collect for their neighborhood campaigns and
contribute to this “fight for life.”
Nick Doenges compiles this daily historical column
for the Wapakoneta Daily News.
The Voice of Auglaize County Since 1905
520 Industrial Drive, Wapakoneta, OH 45895
The Wapakoneta Daily News is open
Mondays through Fridays from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
General business telephone number: (419) 738-2128
Fax number: (419) 738-5352
Publisher Deb Zwez:
(419) 739-3504 - [email protected]
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After hours news tips:
Please call (419) 739-3515 and leave a message.
Published Monday-Friday evenings and Saturday morning, except holidays,
by Horizon Ohio Publications Inc. ID No. 665840
The publisher reserves the right to reject,
edit or cancel any advertising at any time without liability.
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PRICES COURTESY OF GASBUDDY.COM
7-Day
Forecast
courtesy of
meteorologist
Elise Dolinar and the
WLIO weather team
High pressure is in control over the region giving us sunny skies during the day and also clearing skies at night, which has allowed temperatures to get so cold.
In addition to bringing in frigid temperatures, high pressure has also kept conditions dry. We are keeping our eye on a clipper that will move in late Thursday/
during the overnight into Friday bringing us our next chance for snow showers. A second clipper moves in late Saturday bringing yet another chance for snow. In
addition to snow for the weekend, we will also see a warm up with temperatures in the 30s.
Injuries reported after vehicle roll
By BRITTANY POWELL
STAFF WRITER
Minor injuries were
reported in a rollover accident at 9 a.m. on I-75 in
Botkins.
Driver Sujan Veerareddy, 20, of Campbellsville,
Ky., was traveling at an
unsafe speed for roadway
conditions while northbound on I-75, when he
lost control, veered to the
left side of the road and
rolled his vehicle.
Veerareddy had four
passengers in his vehicle,
none of whom were severely injured. He was
traveling 45 mph in a 70
mph zone, which was
too fast, according to
Sergeant Robison, of the
Ohio State Highway Patrol Piqua Post.
“Just because the speed
limit is 70 mph, that
doesn’t necessarily mean
that’s what you should be
traveling,” Robison said.
“The post limits are for
dry, sunny conditions.”
Robison said drivers need to adjust to the
weather conditions.
“You need to use common sense and drive at
what your able to, and apparently 45 was too fast
for this guy.”
Veerareddy was driving a 2004 Chevrolet
Tracker, which sustained
disabling damage. All of
the windows were broken
out, and the right side of
the vehicle along with the
roof was dented from the
roll.
Ohio State Highway
Patrol Wapakoneta
Post
• With poor visibility
due to blowing snow, a
driver lost control on US
33 after abruptly applying the breaks to avoid a
slow-moving semi tractor trailer at 7:15 a.m. on
Wednesday in Noble
Township.
Brian Miller, 40, of
Michigan, veered off of
the left side of the roadway and went over a
cement culvert over a
drainage pipe and struck
a small sign marking the
culvert. He came to rest in
the high drifted shoulder. He was traveling 40
mph in a 50 mph zone in
a Subaru Legacy, which
sustained minor damage. Miller was wearing his
seatbelt and was not injured.
• A driver lost control
on US 33 and struck a
utility pole at 8:37 a.m.
on Thursday in Goshen
Township.
Bridgette Blaiz, 47, of
Florida, was traveling 45
mph in a 55 mph zone
in a Freightliner vehicle,
which sustained functional damage.
She was wearing her
seat belt and was not injured.
She was cited for operating a vehicle without
reasonable control.
• After hitting a patch
of ice and spinning out
of control on county road
33A, a driver ran off the
right side of the road,
flipped her vehicle and
came to rest in a ditch at
9:50 a.m. on Thursday in
St. Marys.
Kay Wilges, 51, of
Lima, suffered non-incapacitating injuries and
was transported to Joint
Township District Memorial Hospital by St.
Marys EMS. Wilges was traveling
50 mph in a 55 mph zone
in a GMC Jimmy/Envoy
which sustained functional damage.
She was wearing her
seat belt. She was cited for
operating a vehicle without reasonable control.
• After failing to negotiate a curve on an on ramp
on I-75, a driver traveled
off of the left side of the
road and struck a reflective pole at 10:15 a.m. on
Sunday in Duchouquet.
Eric Marshal, 21, of
Wapakoneta, was traveling 1 mph in a 35 mph
zone in a Hyundai Elantra, which sustained minor damage. He was wearing his seat
belt and was not injured.
Marshal was cited for operating a vehicle without
See INJURIES, Page 5A
Police nab suspected Missing juveniles
suspected in auto theft
snow blower thief
By BRITTANY POWELL
STAFF WRITER
A theft of a snow blower was reported from a local business at 11:54 p.m.
on Sunday.
The Wapakoneta Police
Department responded
to a call from True Value
Hardware in Wapakoneta
reporting the theft of a
Toro snow blower, valued
at $619.
Police have a suspect,
and the case remains under investigation.
Wapakoneta Police
Department
• A case of vandalism
to a vehicle was reported
at 7:50 a.m. on Sunday in
Wapakoneta.
Kristin McDonald, 31,
of 411 Lima St. called
the police after finding
her 2002 Honda Accord’s
driver side rear door
smashed.
Nothing was stolen. A
report was taken, and the
incident remains under
investigation.
• An arrest was made
for a woman wanted on
a warrant at 6:25 p.m. on
Thursday.
Sara Gill, 29, of 238
Edgewood Road in Lima,
visited the Arby’s in
Wapakoneta to pick up
her W2s. Upon arrival,
officers arrested her and
transported her to the
Auglaize County Jail.
• A potential burglary
involving pry marks on
a resident’s door was reported at 11:21a.m. Tuesday in Wapakoneta.
Greg Schoen, of 402
Ashland, apartment B10
called police after discovering damage to the
door frame that appeared
to be pry marks. He told
police he believes someone made the attempt
between 7 a.m. and 2:30
p.m. while he and his wife
were gone. No one made
entry into apartment. Police have no suspects.
where they are being held
pending a court hearing.
Names were not listed in
Two juveniles are are the report. suspected with breaking
Auglaize County
and entering into a garage
Sheriff ’s Office
and stealing a vehicle at
•
A driver struck a
1:17 p.m. on Thursday in
deer
on Glynwood-New
St. Marys. Knoxville
Road after the
The Auglaize County
animal
ran
in front of the
Sheriff ’s Office received
vehicle
at
1:16 p.m. on
a call from Robert VoSaturday.
gel, 86, of 122 Bayshore
Diana Sudman, 58, of
Court in St. Marys, adWapakoneta,
was travelvising that his vehicle was
ing
30
mph
in
a 55 mph
missing and two neighzone
in
a
Chevrolet
vehiboring juveniles were also
cle,
which
sustained
funcmissing. Vogel reported
that the vehicle was un- tional damage. She was wearing her
locked inside his garage at
seat
belt and was not inthe time it was stolen. jured.
The vehicle was later
• After backing up a velocated at 11000 Eilerman
hicle
after missing a turn,
Road in Shelby County,
a
driver
hit another vewith the two missing juhicle’s
front
bumper who
veniles found inside. The
had
been
approaching
two suspects, a 16-yearhim
from
the
rear at 6:15
old male and a 14-yearp.m.
on
Saturday
on St.
old female, both of St.
Marys
River
Road near
Marys, were transported
Salem
Noble
Road
in
Noto West Central Juvenile
Detention Center in Troy,
See THEFT, Page 5A
By BRITTANY POWELL
STAFF WRITER
520 Industrial Dr.
Dr • Wapakoneta,
Wapakoneta OH 45895
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www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Tuesday, February 11, 2014
Death Notice
Annamarie Faigle, 100
Annamarie Faigle, 100,
of Wapakoneta, died at
9:15 p.m., Sunday, Feb. 9,
2014, at Elmwood of New
Bremen. Arrangements
are incomplete at the Bayliff & Eley Funeral Home,
in Wapakoneta.
Is Georgia ready
for the snowstorm
this time?
ATLANTA (AP) —
Just two weeks ago, Atlanta became a national
punch line when a few
inches of snow crippled
the city. Comedians said
the gridlocked highways
looked more like a zombie apocalypse than the
South's bustling business
hub.
On Monday, officials
were quick to act as the
winter weather zeroed in,
determined not be the
butt of jokes like the Saturday Night Live parody
that referred to the “devil's
dandruff ” and “Yankee's
slush.” Before a single
drop of freezing rain or
snow fell, Georgia Gov.
Nathan Deal had declared
a state of emergency for
nearly a third of the state,
schools canceled classes
and workers were staying
home.
Still, people were skeptical the state would be
better prepared this time.
“I'm not counting on
it. I've been in Georgia on
and off for 20 years. It's
usually the same scenario,
not enough preparations
and not enough equipment,” said Terri Herod,
who bought a large bag
of sand and a shovel at a
Home Depot. She said
her sister told her to also
buy kitty litter in case her
car gets stuck on an ice
patch.
The memories of the
last storm were too fresh
for some. Late last month,
students were trapped on
buses or at schools and
thousands of cars were
abandoned along highways as short commutes
turned into odysseys. One
woman gave birth on a
jammed interstate. In the
chaos, though, there were
stories of Southern hospitality — people opening
up homes and businesses
to help the stranded. Officials reported one accident-related death.
This storm could be
worse this time. A onetwo punch of winter
weather was expected
for Atlanta and northern
Georgia. Rain and snow
were forecast Tuesday,
followed by sleet and
freezing rain Wednesday.
Downed power lines and
icy roads were a major
worry. Salt trucks, snow
plows were ready to roll
and the National Guard
has 1,400 four-wheeled
drive vehicles to help anyone stranded.
Other parts of the
South were expected to
get hit as well. Alabama,
which saw stranded vehicles and had 10,000 students spend the night in
schools during the January storm, was likely to
get a wintry mix of precipitation. Parts of Mississippi could see 3 inches of
snow, and a blast of snow
over a wide section of
Kentucky slickened roads
and closed several school
districts. South Carolina,
which hasn't seen a major ice storm in nearly a
decade, could get a quarter to three-quarters of an
inch of ice.
Atlanta has a long and
painful history of being ill-equipped to deal
with snowy weather and
people were not taking
any chances, even though
officials promised the response would be different
this time.
“We're not looking
back, we're looking forward,” Deal said. “The
next three days are going to be challenging. We
want to make sure we are
as prepared as possible.”
Schools
announced
early that they would close
Tuesday, and tractor-trailer drivers were handed fliers about the weather and
a law requiring chains on
tires. City and state government were to stay open
Tuesday, but the governor
called for a liberal-leave
policy, meaning if workers didn't want to come in
they didn't have to. More
than 500 Delta flights
with Atlanta connections
on Tuesday had been
canceled, and passengers
traveling through several
Southeastern states between Tuesday and Thursday were offered a chance
to make free one-time
changes to their itineraries. People around Atlanta
planned to stay off the
roads, which couldn't be
treated last time because
there were too many cars
stuck on them.
“Basically, everyone
from the office is going to
be working from home”
on Tuesday, Dakota Herrera said as he left a downtown car park on his way
to the office Monday.
Deal was doing many
things differently. He
opened an emergency operations center and held
two news conferences
before the storm. When
the Jan. 28 storm hit, Deal
was at an awards luncheon
with Mayor Kasim Reed,
who was named a magazine's 2014 “Georgian of
the Year.”
Reed had just tweeted:
“Atlanta, we are ready for
the snow.”
This time, the mayor
made no such predictions.
Instead, he said he was in
contact with school leaders and the city had 120
pieces of equipment to
spread salt and sand and
plow snow.
Shirley Temple,
iconic child
star, dies at 85
SAN FRANCISCO
(AP) — Shirley Temple,
the dimpled, curly-haired
child star who sang,
danced, sobbed and
grinned her way into the
hearts of Depression-era
moviegoers, has died,
according to publicist
Cheryl Kagan. She was
85.
Temple, known in
private life as Shirley
Temple Black, died
Monday night at about
11 p.m. at her home near
San Francisco. She was
surrounded by family
members and caregivers,
Kagan said.
“We salute her for
a life of remarkable
achievements as an
actor, as a diplomat,
and most importantly
as our beloved mother,
grandmother,
greatgrandmother, and adored
wife for fifty-five years of
the late and much missed
Charles Alden Black,” a
family statement said.
A talented and ultraadorable
entertainer,
Shirley Temple was
America's top box-office
draw from 1935 to 1938,
a record no other child
star has come near. She
beat out such grownups as Clark Gable, Bing
Crosby, Robert Taylor,
Gary Cooper and Joan
Crawford.
In 1999, the American
Film Institute ranking of
the top 50 screen legends
ranked Temple at No. 18
among the 25 actresses.
She appeared in scores
of movies and kept
children singing “On the
Good Ship Lollipop” for
generations.
Temple was credited
with helping save 20th
Century
Fox
from
bankruptcy with films
such as “Curly Top” and
“The Littlest Rebel.” She
even had a drink named
after her, an appropriately
sweet and innocent
cocktail of ginger ale and
grenadine, topped with a
maraschino cherry.
Temple blossomed into
a pretty young woman, but
audiences lost interest,
and she retired from
films at 21. She raised a
family and later became
active in politics and
held several diplomatic
posts in Republican
administrations,
including ambassador to
Czechoslovakia during
the historic collapse of
communism in 1989.
“I have one piece of
advice for those of you
who want to receive the
lifetime
achievement
award. Start early,” she
quipped in 2006 as she
was honored by the
Screen Actors Guild.
But she also said that
evening that her greatest
roles were as wife,
mother and grandmother.
“There's nothing like
real love. Nothing.” Her
husband of more than 50
years, Charles Black, had
died just a few months
earlier.
They lived for many
years in the San Francisco
suburb of Woodside.
Temple's expert singing
and tap dancing in the
1934 feature “Stand Up
and Cheer!” first gained
her wide notice. The
number she performed
with future Oscar winner
James Dunn, “Baby Take
a Bow,” became the title
of one of her first starring
features later that year.
Also in 1934, she
starred in “Little Miss
Marker,” a comedydrama based on a story
by Damon Runyon that
showcased her acting
talent. In “Bright Eyes,”
Temple introduced “On
the Good Ship Lollipop”
and did battle with a
charmingly bratty Jane
Withers,
launching
Withers as a major child
star, too.
She
was
“just
absolutely
marvelous,
greatest in the world,”
director Allan Dwan
told
filmmaker-author
Peter Bogdanovich in his
book “Who the Devil
Made It: Conversations
With Legendary Film
Directors.” ''With Shirley,
you'd just tell her once
and she'd remember the
rest of her life,” said Dwan,
who directed “Heidi” and
“Rebecca of Sunnybrook
Farm.” ''Whatever it was
she was supposed to do —
she'd do it. ... And if one of
the actors got stuck, she'd
tell him what his line was
— she knew it better than
he did.”
Temple's
mother,
Gertrude, worked to keep
her daughter from being
spoiled by fame and was a
constant presence during
filming.
Her daughter said years
later that her mother
had been furious when a
director once sent her off
on an errand and then got
the child to cry for a scene
by frightening her. “She
never again left me alone
on a set,” she said.
Temple became a
nationwide
sensation.
Mothers dressed their
little girls like her, and a
line of dolls was launched
that are now highly
sought-after collectables.
Her immense popularity
prompted
President
Franklin D. Roosevelt
to say that “as long as
our country has Shirley
Temple, we will be all
right.”
“When the spirit of
the people is lower than
at any other time during
this Depression, it is a
splendid thing that for just
15 cents, an American can
go to a movie and look at
the smiling face of a baby
and forget his troubles,”
Roosevelt said.
She followed up in
the next few years with a
string of hit films, most
with sentimental themes
and musical subplots.
TROUBLE BATHING?
Here are the
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selections for Monday:
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Mega Ball: 10
Powerball 2/08
24-25-34-37-54
Powerball: 29
Pick 3 Numbers 2/10
7-4-4 (day)
6-5-4 (night)
Pick 4 Numbers 2/10
0-9-0-2 (day)
7-3-7-0 (night)
Pick 5 Numbers 2/10
3-7-0-5-9 (day)
0-9-7-9-0 (night)
Rolling Cash 5 2/10
6-7-11-21-33
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Kicker: 6257888
Mega Millions jackpot
$122 million
Powerball jackpot
$284 million
Rolling Cash 5 jackpot
$227,000
Classic Lotto jackpot
$60.2 million
Hospital
ST. RITA’S
MEDICAL CENTER
Births
• Sierra and Gary
Wynk, of Celina, a
girl and a boy, on
Monday, Feb. 10.
• Maria and Brett
Trump, of
Wapakoneta, twin
girls, on Monday,
Feb. 10.
• Jozy and Brent
Schwieterman, of
Wapakoneta, a boy,
on Monday, Feb. 10.
In brief
BLUFFTON — Bluffton
University’s Jazz Ensemble
and Concert Band will present
the university’s annual winter
instrumental concert at 2:30
p.m. Sunday, Feb. 16, in
Yoder Recital Hall. The concert
is free and open to the public; a
free-will offering will be taken
during intermission for music
scholarships.
Adam Schattschneider,
professor of music, conducts the
Jazz Ensemble, whose seven
numbers will include “A Salute
to Glenn Miller” and arrangements of “MacArthur Park,”
“Frankie and Johnny” and Cole
Porter’s “Night and Day.”
Conducted by Roy Couch,
visiting assistant professor of
music, the Concert Band will
perform four pieces—“Resting
in the Peace of His Hands,”“Summerland,”“… and the antelope
play” and “Bayou Breakdown.”
DETROIT (AP) — New General Motors CEO Mary Barra will
get a pay package worth $14.4
million this year, 58 percent
more than her male predecessor,
the company said Monday.
GM released the figure to
counter reports that said Barra,
the first woman to lead a major
automaker, would be paid less
than former Chairman and CEO
Dan Akerson.
Those reports calculated
Barra’s compensation without
including her long-term stock
compensation, and the company was criticized for paying a
woman leader less than a man.
Barra will get $1.6 million
in salary, $2.8 million in shortterm incentives and long-term
stock compensation worth $10
million, the company said in
a statement. The long-term
amount is part of a new incentive plan that still has to be
voted on by shareholders in
June.
Feb 11: The Auglaize
County Airport Authority is
scheduled to meet at 7:30
p.m. at the Neil Armstrong
Airport, east of New
Knoxville.
• The Wapakoneta City
Schools Board of Education
will hold a special meeting
at 5:30 p.m. at the Board
Office.
• The Moulton Township
Board of Trustees is
scheduled to meet at 7:30
p.m. at the township hall,
08980 Glynwood Road,
Wapakoneta
• The Botkins Village
Council is scheduled to
meet at 7 p.m. in its council
chambers, 111 E. Lynn St.,
Botkins.
• The Auglaize County
Library will hold its board of
directors meeting at 5 p.m.
in Cridersville.
Feb 12: The Botkins
School District Board of
Education is scheduled to
meet at 7 p.m. in the school
library, 208 N. Sycamore
Ave., Botkins.
Feb 13: The Buckland
Village Council is scheduled
to meet at 6:30 p.m. at
the Buckland Community
Building.
Feb 17: The Wapakoneta
City Council is scheduled
to meet at 7:30 p.m. at
the
Wapakoneta
City
Administration
Building,
701 Parlette Court.
• The Goshen Township
Board of Trustees is
scheduled to meet at
7:30 p.m. at the township
building on U.S. 33 in New
Hampshire.
• The Cridersville Village
Council is scheduled to
meet at 7 p.m. in council
chambers at the Cridersville
Village Hall
Feb 18: The Auglaize
County Board of Health
is scheduled to meet at
8:30 a.m. in the Health
Department Building, 214
S. Wagner St., Wapakoneta.
Feb 19: The Union
Township Trustees are
scheduled to meet at 8 p.m.
at the township facility in
Uniopolis. Parlette Court.
Feb 20: The Auglaize
County Board of Education
is scheduled to meet at
7 p.m. in the Auglaize
County Educational Service
Center, 1045 Dearbaugh St.,
Wapakoneta.
•
The
Auglaize
County Veterans Service
Commission is scheduled
to meet at 5 p.m. at
the
Veterans
Service
Commission Office, 209 S.
Blackhoof St., Wapakoneta.
Feb 23: The Auglaize
County
Emergency
Management
Agency
Executive Board meets at
7:30 p.m. in the county
commissioners chambers.
Feb 24: The Waynesfield
Village Council is scheduled
to meet at 7:30 p.m. in
the village office at 300 N.
Westminster St.
Feb. 25: The Botkins
Village Council is scheduled
to meet at 7 p.m. in its
council chambers, 111 E.
Lynn St., Botkins.
• The Botkins Village
Council Finance Committee
is scheduled to meet
immediately following the
village council meeting in
its council chambers, 111 E.
Lynn St., Botkins.
• The Botkins Village
Council Safety Committee is
scheduled to meet at 6 p.m.
in its council chambers, 111
E. Lynn St., Botkins.
• The Wapakoneta Board
of Education meets at 7
p.m. at Wapakoneta High
School.
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opinion
4A
Today in History
Publisher: Deb Zwez Managing Editor: Tom Wehrhahn
www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Tuesday, February 11, 2014
In our view ...
Simple
outreach
M
y ninth grandchild was Christened on Sunday. We understand it was slightly overdue
according to the rules, but bad weather, a
severe cold and my move stirred things up
a bit.
But this is not about Christenings, but
discovery.
The event was held at St. John the
Baptist Church in Landeck, but it was what
was in the pews (other than parishioners)
that was exciting.
Here along with the hymnals, were
these nicely laminated, colorful guides to
the Catholic Mass. “Cheat sheets” if you
will.
It was printed by “Our Sunday Visitor,”
a Catholic publisher of newspapers and
magazines, and included the various responses and other items used in the weekly
celebration.
Now, I imagine that tiny Landeck
doesn’t get many visitors, being tucked
between Delphos and Spencerville, but
I also knew that the Catholic Church has
made a few changes recently. Either way,
four words came to mind: what a wonderful outreach.
Attending a different church — or any
event to which you’re not accustomed —
can be a little scary. The last thing you need
is to feel uncomfortable in a new situation.
Having worked in public relations and
marketing, I can identify with those who
are trying to communicate with a larger
audience. Efforts such as those at Landeck
are to be commended. It’s almost like
purchasing a complicated piece of electronics and finding an exploded diagram rather
than a 200-page book of dry text — in 10
languages.
My most useful — and therefore my
favorite — map of Manhattan is a simple
thing. In addition to the streets, it highlights attractions and lists subway and bus
stops. It folds to pocket size and is coated
to avoid stains. Simple, yet functional (and
less than $5).
Just like the Mass “cheat sheet” it lets me
know what I need to know.
We need more things that can help
uncomplicate our lives — things that help
us connect to new experiences and new
thoughts. Reaching out and fostering understanding can have some wonderful results ... and also allow you to enjoy a service
you’re unfamiliar with without looking, or
at least feeling, out of place.
Governor race
gives voters
little say
O
nce again, last-minute maneuvering by the two major
political parties will result in a
“primary-free” gubernatorial election for
Ohioans.
That’s too bad. In a state nearly split
between conservatives and liberals, voters
should have a say when picking a party’s
candidate for such an important statewide
race. More often, it’s state party leaders,
not voters, who decide which candidate
progresses to the fall election.
Contested primaries had once looked
like a possibility in this year’s governor race
for both Republicans and Democrats.
But the GOP primary ticket was cleared
for Gov. John Kasich, who will be seeking
a second term, when Ted Stevenot, a tea
party favorite, dropped out less than a week
after he had thrown his hat into the ring.
Democrats, too, had been staring at a
primary matchup, until last Friday.
That’s when Hamilton County Commissioner Todd Portune withdrew his
bid to go head-to-head against Cuyahoga
County Executive Ed FitzGerald.
Both Portune and Stevenot have since
suggested they would have liked to have
taken their campaigns a step farther, but
were not encouraged to by officials in their
respective parties.
That’s not surprising. The clearing of
the gubernatorial ticket before a primary is
long-established political strategy.
Party leaders like to avoid first-round
fights which can divide the base. Granted,
Portune or Stevenot may not have had a
realistic chance of winning their respective
party’s nomination in May, but they may
have broadened the discussion.
Unfortunately, voters will only get to
weigh in once, not twice.
— The (Findlay) Courier
Freedom of Speech: Reader Opinions and Other Views
Cheering for American
manufacturing on the field
and the factory floor
A
t the 2012 Summer Olympic opening ceremony,
Team USA took the stage
wearing foreign-made red, white,
and blue uniforms. At a time when
so many good jobs had disappeared
overseas, the news that our Olympic team was being forced to wear
uniforms made
overseas was an
outrage. It made
no sense that an
American organization would place a
Chinese-made beret
on the heads of our
SHERROD best athletes when
BROWN
we have capacity to
make high-end apparel right here at home. That’s why I
passed a resolution calling on the U.S.
Olympic Committee (USOC) to
change this, and it promised it would
do so. Last week, at the opening ceremony of the Sochi Olympics, we
saw the USOC live up to its pledge,
as Team USA took the stage sporting
American-made apparel.
But while it was great to see
Olympic athletes wearing uniforms
with a “USA-made” label, there’s
more that we can do now to boost
American manufacturing. Ohio has a long and storied history of designing and manufacturing
clothing and apparel and we must
continue to help small businesses
across our state grow and succeed.
Our apparel companies like American Made Bags in Akron and All
American Clothing in Arcanum – can
compete with anyone in the world,
if given a level playing field. But, the
U.S. government spends more than
$1.5 billion on clothing made in
factories overseas.
We need to be doing all that we
can to invest in our own manufacturing base — and that begins with
ensuring our government is doing its
part.
My legislation, the Wear American Act, would change an existing
law that requires 51 percent of federal
government’s non-defense textile and
apparel purchases be made on U.S.made products.
We can do better than that.
Why shouldn’t apparel and textiles purchased by U.S. tax dollars be
100 percent American-made?
This isn’t rocket science. It just
makes plain sense to put U.S. tax dollars back into the U.S. economy.
When we do have to buy goods
that are made overseas, we need to
make sure we aren’t doing business
with contractors who violate labor
rights and worker safety laws, especially as they apply to child labor.
That’s why I am urging the General Services Administration (GSA) to
ensure that federal agencies not only
disclose the locations of the factories
they contract with, but that they are
aware of and take their working conditions into account when making
purchasing decisions. We should be in the business of
creating policies that reward hardworking Ohioans, who want to create
jobs in Ohio – rather than supporting
policies that help companies send
U.S. jobs overseas or take part in
questionable labor practices.
Right now, the stakes couldn’t be
higher. We must do everything we
can to support American workers.
Sherrod Brown,
U.S. Senator, D-Ohio
Adoption reform providing
a choice of life
O
ur current Ohio House of
Representatives has made
it a goal to discuss and
pass numerous pro-life bills. The most
recent of these bills is House Bill 307.
House Bill 307 focuses on reforming the at-birth adoption process, and
affords significant rights to mothers
who are looking to give their children
up for adoption at birth. The goal of
the bill is to speed
up and simplify the
adoption process for
expectant mothers in
the hopes that these
women will choose
to give birth, rather
than to abort the
Jim
child.
Buchy
House Bill 307
addresses the financial well-being of expectant mothers by outlining appropriate living
expenses to be paid to a biological
mother from adoptive parents. This
will allow women a greater opportunity to give the child up for adoption,
without worrying about the costs that
are sometimes associated with pregnancy.
Additionally, the bill makes it
harder for a father who is late to the
game to block the completion of an
adoption after a mother has decided
to give up the infant. Fathers who have
known about the possibility of a pregnancy for up to nine months and have
done nothing to support the mother
will, under the new bill, have up to
seven days after the birth of a child to
step up to the plate.
The bill establishes a new procedure for notifying a putative father of
his rights prior to the birth of a child.
The new procedure is modeled after
Indiana law, but uses the existing
Putative Father Registry for a putative
father to gain rights regarding decisions about the baby.
The pre-birth notification process
secures constitutional rights afforded
to birth fathers. The bill also reduces
the time for a father to register with
the Putative Father Registry after the
birth of a child from 30 days to seven
days in some cases where a father has
not been involved in a pregnancy.
Currently, persons wishing to
contest an adoption can do so for up
to one year. HB 307 reduces this time
period to 60 days, ensuring loving
couples do not become attached to a
child, only to have it taken away. This
also lowers the risk for exorbitant legal
costs for an adoptive family.
The bill encourages adoption right
here in Ohio, which increases the odds
that a child will find a loving home.
Through a state tax credit of $10,000
over a five-year period, adoptive parents in Ohio will have greater incentive to adopt from a mother in the
state, rather than looking elsewhere.
These measures all serve to decrease the burden upon a mother during the adoption process, and make it
easier for women to choose adoption
instead of abortion.
I understand that sometimes,
raising a child is not in the cards for a
woman. With this bill, I hope to make
it easier for women to find a solution
to their crisis pregnancy, and discourage them from turning to abortion as
an escape from the blessing of a new
child. Please give me your opinion on
this topic and others in the news this
month by completing an online survey at tinyurl.com/buchyfeb2014.
Jim Buchy
Republican state representative,
84th House District, from Greenville
Today is Tuesday, Feb. 11, the 42nd day of
2014. There are 323 days left in the year.
TODAY’S HIGHLIGHT IN HISTORY:
On Feb. 11, 1812, Massachusetts Gov.
Elbridge Gerry signed a redistricting law
favoring his Democratic-Republican Party —
giving rise to the term “gerrymandering.”
ON THIS DATE:
In 1858, a French girl, Bernadette Soubirous, reported the first of 18 visions of a lady
dressed in white in a grotto near Lourdes.
(The Catholic Church later accepted that the
visions were of the Virgin Mary.)
In 1862, the Civil War Battle of Fort Donelson began in Tennessee. (Union forces led by
Brig. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant captured the fort
five days later.)
In 1929, the Lateran Treaty was signed,
with Italy recognizing the independence and
sovereignty of Vatican City.
In 1937, a six-week-old sit-down strike
against General Motors ended, with the
company agreeing to recognize the United
Automobile Workers Union.
In 1945, President Franklin D. Roosevelt,
British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and
Soviet leader Josef Stalin signed the Yalta
Agreement during World War II.
In 1963, American author and poet Sylvia
Plath was found dead in her London flat, a
suicide; she was 30.
In 1964, The Beatles performed their first
American concert at the Washington Coliseum
in Washington, D.C.
In 1972, McGraw-Hill Publishing Co. and
Life magazine canceled plans to publish what
had turned out to be a fake autobiography of
reclusive billionaire Howard Hughes.
In 1979, followers of Ayatollah Ruhollah
Khomeini (hoh-MAY’-nee) seized power in
Iran.
In 1989, Rev. Barbara C. Harris became
the first woman consecrated as a bishop in
the Episcopal Church, in a ceremony held in
Boston.
In 1990, South African black activist
Nelson Mandela was freed after 27 years in
captivity.
In 2012, pop singer Whitney Houston, 48,
was found dead in a hotel room in Beverly
Hills, Calif.
Ten years ago: Wesley Clark dropped out
of the Democratic race for the White House.
A car bomb at an army recruiting center in
Baghdad, Iraq, killed 47 people. Cable TV
giant Comcast Corp. launched a hostile bid to
buy The Walt Disney Co. for more than $54
billion (Comcast later dropped its bid).
Five years ago: The nation’s top bankers
went before the House Financial Services
Committee, pledging to build public trust
with greater lending and fewer perks. Stewart
Parnell, owner of Peanut Corp. of America,
repeatedly invoked his right not to incriminate
himself at a House Energy and Commerce
subcommittee hearing on a salmonella
outbreak that had sickened hundreds. All-Star
shortstop Miguel Tejada pleaded guilty to
lying to Congress about steroids in baseball.
(He was sentenced to a year’s probation.)
Rep. John Dingell, D-Mich., who first went
to Congress in 1955, became the longestserving member of the U.S. House of Representatives. President Robert Mugabe (mooGAH’-bay) swore in longtime rival Morgan
Tsvangirai (SVAHNG’-ur-eye) as Zimbabwe’s
prime minister. Estelle Bennett, 67, one of the
singing trio Ronettes, was found dead in her
home in Englewood, N.J.
One year ago: With a few words in Latin,
Pope Benedict XVI did what no pope had done
in more than half a millennium: announced
his resignation. The bombshell came during a
routine morning meeting of Vatican cardinals.
(The 85-year-old pontiff was succeeded by
Pope Francis.)
Today’s Birthdays: Actor Conrad Janis
is 86. Actress Tina Louise is 80. Actor Burt
Reynolds is 78. Songwriter Gerry Goffin is
75. Actor Sonny Landham is 73. Bandleader
Sergio Mendes is 73. Rhythm-and-blues
singer Otis Clay is 72. Actor Philip Anglim is
62. Actress Catherine Hickland is 58. Rock
musician David Uosikkinen (The Hooters) is
58. Actress Carey Lowell is 53. Singer Sheryl
Crow is 52. Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin
is 50. Actress Jennifer Aniston is 45. Actor
Damian Lewis is 43. Actress Marisa Petroro
is 42. Singer D’Angelo is 40. Actor Brice Beckham is 38. Rock M-C/vocalist Mike Shinoda
(Linkin Park) is 37. Singer-actress Brandy is
35. Actor Matthew Lawrence is 34. Rhythmand-blues singer Kelly Rowland is 33. Singer
Aubrey O’Day is 30. Actress Q’orianka Kilcher
is 24. Actor Taylor Lautner is 22.
Thought for the day
“Respect for ourselves
guides our morals; respect for
others guides our manners.”
— Laurence Sterne,
Irish-born English author
(1713-1768)
Letters Policy
This newspaper welcomes letters on
any public issue. Letters should be 500
words or fewer in length and are subject
to editing for grammar and clarity. Letters
that are libelous in nature will not be published. Letters should be typed or neatly
printed. Submissions must be signed and
include the writer’s address and phone
number for verification.
Send letters to: Letters to the Editor,
Box 389, Wapakoneta, Ohio 45895, or via
e-mail to: [email protected]
www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Tuesday, February 11, 2014
Marks From Page 1A
drivers and the workshop
specialists, to the nurse,
to the directors, to all the
people involved, including us as board members,”
Superintendent Al Willis
said. The board received the
same award five years ago.
Business and Finance
Director Todd Busse
discussed the summer
budget report for 2013
with board members,
highlighting the problem
areas. He reported areas
which he found to be over
budget, including administration, which was 1.95
percent over budget.
“Within the adult services ... contract services
(was) $34,125 over,” he
said. “I think we’ve addressed that throughout
the past year ... When this
budget was developed,
we still had subs on our
payroll over at Auglaize
Industries. To save a little
money, basically, they’re
their subs now and we’re
reimbursing them. So that
Contracts From Page 1A
comes out of contract services ... so that’s the reason why that’s like that.”
He reported going
slightly over budget in
transportation as well, but
that all these areas have
already been taken care of
with a budget transfer.
“We spent 92.81 percent of our budget,” Busse
said, noting the total
came to approximately
$4.5 million out of a $4.9
million dollar budget.
The board received approximately $490,000 in
levy revenue toward the
end of 2013, Busse reported, which brought its
total revenue for the year
to an amount more than
the anticipated $4.6 million. “Going into this year,
we had a cash balance
of $1.5 million to get us
into March, April, when
we get our first significant
levy revenue,” Busse said.
Willis lauded the
board’s ability to have
operated for the past two
New Bremen
eyes new policy
for drug testing
By JANICE BARNIAK
STAFF WRITER
NEW BREMEN —
This week, New Bremen
Board of Education member are set to consider a
drug-testing policy for
students who participate
in extra curricular activities.
The proposed policy
would allow for random,
periodic testing for any
participants in extracurricular activities and for
student drivers. New Bremen High School Principal Brian Pohl said the
board will see a draft of
the policy and, at a later
date, have the company
that does the testing
come in and speak to the
board.
The policy is a recommendation of the current
athletic council.
“I think we don’t know
how many kids are doing
(drugs or alcohol) exactly, in talking to students,
talking to their parents
and working with local
law enforcement, it’s a
concern that it has increased,” Pohl said.
He said traditionally
the bigger concerns in
the area were with alcohol usage, but in the last
year or so administrators
have heard from students,
parents and local law enforcement that drugs are
a problem they want to
see get better.
“We want to be sure
we’re doing our part to
provide the safe, nurturing environment we’ve
always offered,” Pohl said.
“As far as we understand,
there is an increase occuring. We don’t want to get
to the point where it becomes the norm.”
He said instituting the
extracurricular
policy
5A
could be an easy way to
discourage use, but more
than that, it could be an
easy out for students
who’d like to have a ready
response to a person who
offers substances they’d
feel pressured to take.
“We’re looking at every option,” Pohl said.
Pohl said Marion Local has policy in place
and the testing has yet to
yield a positive test. At
the same, the school felt
the policy was a positive
measure.
“It’s a way to get out in
front of friends and save
face,” Pohl said.
He said he believed the
testing would coincide
with the sports seasons
of fall, winter and spring.
He added testing for participants would not carry
the same consequences
students face with the
campus’ policy.
The sports policy
would be considered
non-punitive, and would
cause a student who tested positive to miss games,
possibly get counseling,
or eventually if continuing to fail testing, require
residential rehabilitation.
The consequences in
the student handbook
for campus drug activity
include academic consequences from detention,
to in-school or out-ofschool suspension, to
expulsion. The extracurricular and driving policy
would be considered a
participant’s agreement.
“You can’t just test every kid that walks in the
door,” Pohl said. “If they
choose to participate, you
can do random testing at
that point.”
Janice Barniak
Staff Writer
years on the same amount
of money without having
to cut any services.
“I think the board has
done an outstanding job,
again, in helping all of us
work together as a team
to accomplish ... this safe
cash flow balance at this
time,” Willis said.
Adults Services Manager Greg Ferrall updated
the board members on
the bocce ball project, for
which he estimated a cost
of $30,000. The court will
be located near Sunshine
Playground in New Bremen, and he shared that
he hopes to create a sign
in the park with the history of bocce ball and listing
those organizations and
groups who helped with
the court’s construction.
The vocational program at Auglaize Industries had eight closures
and six delays in January
because of weather, but
that in spite of that, production was fairly high.
Willis emphasized that
road conditions and the
decisions made by local
schools are all factors in
the decision to cancel or
delay when weather is
bad.
Brenda Winner, of
Auglaize Industries, updated board members on
the Employment First
Initiative, a program that
can currently help six employees who are currently
in sheltered employment
to supported community
jobs — independent job
sites.
“It’s just another way
to get some involvement
with getting individuals
with disabilities out in the
community and get them
working,” she said.
In other business,
board members:
• Approved a motion
to pay the January vouchers totaling $472,591.
preschool has missed nine.
The board agreed that
the best course of action
will be to offer free tuition
to parents of a.m. preschool
children and reduce the tuition for p.m. preschoolers
by half during the month of
March.
The board also approved
the following matters:
Adoption of the 201415 school calendar that was
recommended by the superintendent.
Heart From Page 1A
of Valentine’s Day, February 7-15, and can be done
in offices, community
groups, stores and more to
help raise awareness and
funds to help more children find health.
Through the dinner put
on by Steinke Family Chiropractic, people will be
Meredith Enkoff made aware of the imporStaff Writer tance and impact of chiropractic for children in
419-300-1075
need, as well as [email protected]
ing the internationally recognized nonprofit organization of Oklahaven.
From Page 2A
Office manager Randee
Steinke said people
reasonable control.
which sustained funcplanning
on attending the
• After swerving to tional damage.
event
should
call in by 3
avoid an object on I-75,
She was wearing her
p.m.
today
in
order
to have
a driver spun out of con- seat belt and was not inenough
seating
and
food
trol, ran off of the road jured. Mays was cited for
for
att
endees.
and stuck the median ca- operating a vehicle withAiles said the camble barrier at 4:36 p.m. on out reasonable control.
paign
raised almost $800
Sunday in Duchouquet. Brittany
Powell
last
year
and is looking to
Ta’nia Mays, 20, of
Staff
Writer
match that or exceed that
Englewood, was traveling
70 mph in a 70 mph zone
419-739-3516 this evening.
Steinke explained that
[email protected]
in a Chevrolet Cobalt,
the campaign is important
for children who suffer
from severe complications
From Page 2A
or problems in their life.
“It all goes toward helpble Township. of ice on state Route 364 ing children receive chiroRobert May, 63, of in St. Marys, a driver practic care,” Steinke said.
Lima, was traveling 5 crossed the center line, “Cerebral Palsy, MS, any
mph in a 55 mph zone entered a ditch and rolled kind of neurological probin a Jeep sport utility ve- onto its roof. The crash lems like that so kids that
hicle, which sustained was later reported at a can’t walk are able to walk
minor damage.
passenger’s residence at without having a surgery.”
He was cited for im- 9:48 p.m. on Sunday.
Steinke Family Chiproper backing on the
Craig Stephenson, 53, ropractic’s message is,
roadway. of New Knoxville, was
Levi Krouskop, 21, driving a two-door ChevCode
of Spencerville, was in rolet vehicle, which sus- Stock Name
UBS AG UBS ETC(UBS BBG...
INDU
a stopped Ford Taurus, tained disabling damage.
Hewlett-Packard Company
HPQ
CVS
which sustained funcBoth Stephenson and CVS Caremark Corporation
Applied Materials, Inc.
AMAT
tional damage. Krouskop the passenger were wear- AT&T Inc.
T
Motors Company
GM
said he honked his horn, ing their seat belts and General
Bed Bath & Beyond Inc.
BBBY
but it was too late. Bob Evans Farms Inc
BOBE
were not injured. BP plc (ADR)
BP
Both drivers were
Bristol-Myers Squibb Co
BMY
Brittany Powell
Cisco
Systems,
Inc.
CSCO
wearing their seat belts
Staff Writer
Citigroup Inc
C
and were not injured.
E I Du Pont De Nemours...
DD
Duke Energy Corp
DUK
419-739-3516
• After hitting a patch
EMC Corporation
EMC
[email protected]
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“We still want to be
able to help these
kids receive the
best chiropractic
care possible so
they can live the
healthiest lives
possible without all
the medications or
surgeries.”
– Steinke
“bringing hope to a hopeless generation that has
no hope of ever receiving
optimal health. We are
committed to reaching the
world with chiropractic…
We are on a mission to
help as many people as we
can achieve the health and
life that God has intended
for them.”
Even though the Steinke’s have no direct connection to Oklahaven the
desire to help is vast.
“We’re trying to help
others even though we
don’t know them,” Steinke
said. “We still want to be
able to help these kids receive the best chiropractic
care possible so they can
live the healthiest lives
possible without all the
medications or surgeries.”
Michelle Meunier
Staff Writer
419-739-3517
[email protected]
Price
959.44
28.81
66.94
17.25
32.44
34.90
64.31
50.95
47.50
52.12
22.83
49.32
63.45
70.74
24.71
64.99
89.52
21.27
14.84
25.05
23.50
57.09
76.41
36.48
9.03
24.29
91.07
56.74
84.34
46.12
94.86
54.89
36.80
65.08
7.38
37.30
115.58
80.60
31.47
78.03
41.28
56.51
63.65
42.36
40.08
46.91
73.76
60.65
77.06
45.52
7.69
Change/Percentage
+42.92 (4.68%)
-0.26 (-0.89%)
+0.50 (0.75%)
+0.07 (0.41%)
+0.14 (0.43%)
-1.21 (-3.35%)
+0.20 (0.31%)
-0.01 (-0.02%)
-0.11 (-0.23%)
+1.79 (3.56%)
+0.16 (0.71%)
-0.02 (-0.04%)
0.00 (0.00%)
+0.75 (1.07%)
+0.22 (0.90%)
-0.20 (-0.31%)
-1.06 (-1.17%)
+0.17 (0.81%)
-0.13 (-0.87%)
-0.14 (-0.56%)
-0.03 (-0.13%)
+0.20 (0.35%)
-0.04 (-0.05%)
-0.07 (-0.19%)
0.00 (0.00%)
+0.09 (0.35%)
+1.03 (1.14%)
+0.12 (0.21%)
-0.50 (-0.59%)
+0.05 (0.11%)
-1.06 (-1.11%)
+0.12 (0.22%)
+0.24 (0.66%)
+0.48 (0.74%)
-0.28 (-3.66%)
+0.11 (0.30%)
-3.09 (-2.60%)
+0.38 (0.47%)
+0.25 (0.80%)
+0.72 (0.93%)
+0.18 (0.44%)
+0.18 (0.32%)
-0.26 (-0.41%)
+0.41 (0.98%)
+0.08 (0.20%)
+0.10 (0.21%)
+0.01 (0.01%)
-0.31 (-0.51%)
+1.39 (1.84%)
+0.15 (0.33%)
-0.33 (-4.11%)
This data is the current day’s opening price and should be used for
informational purposes only. The accuracy of these details is not warranted.
“Excellent Rating” by AM Best
Harrison Insurance Agency, Inc.
[email protected]
To set the school’s week
of no activity from June 29
to July 6, 2014.
Allow the use of the
school’s facilities for youth
basketball on Feb. 28 and
March 17, as well as the
parking lot for the W-G Academic Booster’s Car Show
on Sept. 20, 2014.
Resolution of Appreciation for all the volunteer
work that has been done on
the academic, athletic and
music boosters.
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www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Tuesday, February 11, 2014
Reversal of military pension cut eyed Admiral orders
DEBT RELIEF: House Republicans receive rocky reception from conservatives
WASHINGTON (AP)
— House Republican
leaders Monday unveiled
a plan to reverse a recently passed cut to military
pensions as the price for
increasing the government's borrowing cap, but
it received a rocky reception from skeptical conservatives.
GOP leaders briefed
rank-and-file GOP lawmakers at a meeting in the
Capitol on Monday evening in hopes of passing
it on Wednesday before
departing Washington for
a week-long vacation. It's
unclear whether the vote
would still go forward after it was rejected by many
conservatives.
"Right now we've got
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a debt ceiling bill that increases spending, which
is diametrically 180 degrees opposite of what we
were battling over just two
years ago — where the
question was how much
in spending cuts we were
going to get," said Rep.
Mo Brooks, R-Ala.
The GOP bill would
extend Treasury's borrowing authority for at
least another year, repeal
the curb passed in December on pension inflation adjustments for
military retirees under the
age of 62, and extend automatic cuts to Medicare
and other programs to
2024, another year than
presently scheduled.
It's not clear that the
plan will fly with Democrats. Their votes would
be needed to help pass the
measure since some Republicans refuse to vote to
raise the debt ceiling under any circumstances. A
spokesman for House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said Democrats will continue to
insist that any debt limit
legislation omit add-ons,
even bipartisan proposals like repealing military
pension cuts.
But a 94-0 Senate procedural vote on Monday demonstrated the
widespread support in
both parties to repeal the
pension cut, and GOP
leaders seem confident
they would win Democratic votes. The Senate
tally came in relation to a
stand-alone bill to repeal
the cut. A key consideration for Republican leaders is whether to schedule
the vote — with the markets open — if they are
uncertain of the outcome.
If Monday's plan falls
through, GOP leaders
may have little choice but
to yield to Democratic
demands for a debt ceiling measure that's "clean"
of GOP add-ons, which
would be a bitter defeat
for a party that has sought
to use must-pass debt ceiling measures as leverage
to force spending cuts on
Democrats.
The cuts to cost-ofliving pension increases
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for military retirees under the age of 62 were
part of December's budget agreement, backed by
House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan,
R-Wis. Repealing them
would cost $7 billion over
the coming decade, the
Congressional Budget Office said Monday.
The reduction has
sparked an uproar among
advocates for veterans, and
lawmakers in both parties want to repeal it. The
cost of canceling the cut
would be borne by extending for an additional year a
2 percentage point cut to
Medicare reimbursements
to doctors and hospitals,
as well as cuts to a handful
of other benefit programs.
Those cuts, known as sequestration, would now
extend through 2024, with
savings for that year finally
appearing to make up for
almost a decade's worth of
additional pension spending.
Time is running out for
lawmakers to act to lift the
debt limit. Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew told lawmakers last week that Treasury will exhaust by Feb.
27 its ability to employ
accounting maneuvers to
borrow to pay its bills.
SOCHI 2014
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purge of bin Laden
corpse photos
WASHINGTON (AP)
— A newly-released email
shows that 11 days after
the killing of terror leader
Osama bin Laden in 2011,
the U.S. military's top
special operations officer
ordered subordinates to
destroy any photographs
of the al-Qaida founder's
corpse or turn them over
to the CIA.
The email was obtained
under a freedom of information request by the conservative legal group Judicial Watch. The document,
released Monday by the
group, shows that Adm.
William McRaven, who
heads the U.S. Special Operations Command, told
military officers on May
13, 2011 that photos of bin
Laden's remains should
have been sent to the CIA
or already destroyed. Bin
Laden was killed by a special operations team in
Pakistan on May 2, 2011.
McRaven's order to
purge the bin Laden material came 10 days after
the Associated Press asked
for the photos and other
documents under the
U.S. Freedom of Information Act. Typically, when
a freedom of information
request is filed to a government agency under the
Federal Records Act, the
agency is obliged to preserve the material sought
— even if the agency later
denies the request.
On May 3, 2011, the AP
asked Special Operations
Command's Freedom of
Information/Privacy Act
Division office for "copies
of all e-mails sent from and
to the U.S. government
account or accounts" of
McRaven referencing bin
Laden. McRaven was then
vice admiral.
A May 4, 2011 response
from the command's
FOIA office to the AP acknowledged the bin Laden
document request and
said it had been assigned
for processing. AP did
not receive a copy of the
McRaven email obtained
by Judicial Watch.
The Department of Defense FOIA office told the
AP in a Feb. 29, 2012 letter
that it could find no McRaven emails "responsive to
your request" for communications about the bin
Laden material.
The Special Operations
Command is required to
comply with rules established by the chairman of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff
that dictate how long records must be retained. Its
July 2012 manual requires
that records about military
operations and planning
are to be considered permanent and after 25 years,
following a declassification review, transferred to
the National Archives.
Last July, a draft report
by the Pentagon's inspector general first disclosed
McRaven's secret order,
but the reference was not
contained in the inspector
general's final report. The
email that surfaced Monday was the first evidence
showing the actual order.
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Wapakoneta
71
Kenton
Parkway
49
51
VS
W-G
Spencerville
48
46
VS
Botkins
VS
41
W A P A K O N E T A
B
SPORTS
DAILY NEWS
Tuesday, February 11, 2014
Horn holds high mark in US
By CHRISTOPHER GRABER
SPORTS CORRESPONDENT
Staff photo/Justin Thomas
Botkins Trojans senior Emily Brown (14) looks to make a pass
Monday in a non-league varsity girls basketball game against
the Spencerville Bearcats at Botkins High School.
COLUMBUS — WaynesfieldGoshen High School graduate Gray
Horn opened his season by posting
the No. 12 performance in the U.S. in
the long jump (25 feet, 3.25 inches)
after capturing first place in the event
at the Buckeye Classic as an unattached athlete on Jan. 10 in Columbus.
In the competition, the 2008
WGHS graduate and five-time Southeastern Conference (SEC) champion
for the University of Florida added
a third-place finish in the 60-meter
hurdles (7.94).
He continues to compete postcollegiately, with his most notable
performance coming in a third-place
finish at the 2012 Olympic Trials in
the decathlon (7,954 points) in Eugene, Ore.
COLLEGE NOTES
MILESTONES
Heidi Schlegel (Wapakoneta
2011) was named Horizon League
Scholar-Athlete of the Month, the
league announced on Jan. 16.
The
6-foot
forward
for
Youngstown State University (10-12,
6-3 HL) tallies a 3.74 GPA and added
17.6 points per game and seven rebounds per game for the month.
For the season, the sophomore is
tallying 19.9 ppg, 8.2 rpg and 1.3 assists per game.
In 13 games, she has posted more
than 20 points.
In 17 games, she has finished as
the Penguins’ leading scorer.
On Feb. 8, she contributed a career-high 28 points and 13 rebounds
in an 87-67 loss at Oakland (10-13,
5-5 HL) in Rochester, Mich.
Taylor Miller (WaynesfieldGoshen 2010) captured the No. 44
mark in the U.S. in the shot put (603.75) after garnering first in the event
at the Northwest Ohio Invitational
as an unattached athlete on Jan. 17 in
Findlay.
The three-time All-American is
a senior for No. 8 Findlay, which
ranked among the NCAA Division
II Top 25 by the United States Track
and Field and Cross Country Coaches poll released on Jan. 29.
SPOTLIGHT
Kaylee Patton (WaynesfieldSee COLLEGE, Page 3B
Spencerville
‘Skins
stomp
’Cats
controls 4th for
win over Botkins Wapak wins 1st league game of season
By JAKE DOWLING
By JUSTIN THOMAS
SPORTS CORRESPONDENT
BOTKINS — The
Botkins Trojans led for
most of the game, but a
fourth-period
rally by the
Spencer v ille
Bearcats gave
the Trojans a
46
loss on Senior
Night,
4641, in a nonleague varsity
girls basketball
41
contest at Botkins High School.
Botkins had held the
lead throughout the
game, but in the fourth
period, turnovers began
to cost the Trojans a win.
Botkins only had five
points in the fourth period, while the Bearcats
had a 15-point stanza to
propel them to victory,
largely in part to Jacey
Grigsby who hit five free
throws.
“Seemed like we made
a costly turnover and
it deflated us,” Botkins
varsity coach Don Mack
said. “It took a lot of enSee BOTKINS, Page 2B
’Skins close season
with win over VW
FROM STAFF REPORTS
The Wapakoneta Redskins closed the regular
season with a win Saturday.
The Redskins defeated
the Van Wert
Cougars, 2,2921,659, in a var2,292 sity girls West
Ohio
High
School Bowling Conference
match at 20th
1,659 Century Lanes
in Lima.
Britni Hosterman was
Wapak’s top bowler Saturday with a 207-142 series.
Shelby Timmerman was
at 140-190 for the Redskins.
Also in the lineup Saturday for Wapak was Kylie
Timmerman (169-148),
Courtney Robey (138145) and Josee Kaeck
(128-148).
Wapak finished its regular season with a 9-4 record
in a three-way tie for fourth
place.
Versailles was the
WOHSBC champion for
the 2013-14 season.
The Redskins will make
a long trip to northern
Ohio to compete at Star
Lanes in Port Clinton at
noon Feb. 22 in a Division
I Northwest District sectional tournament.
Wapak will compete
among some unfamiliar teams at its sectional.
Wapak is the only Division
I school among WOHSBC
members in the Northwest
District. This is the first season
in which the state bowling tournament will be
divided into two divisions. Previously, the state
tournament grouped all
of Ohio’s bowling teams
into one division.
SCHEDULE
Today
Girls Basketball
Wapakoneta vs. Minster, 7:30 p.m.
Boys Basketball
W-G at Indian Lake, 7:30 p.m.
NBA
Cavaliers vs. Kings, 7 p.m.
College Basketball
Ohio St. vs. Michigan, 9 p.m.
Thursday
Girls Basketball
Wapakoneta at Van Wert, 7:30 p.m.
SPORTS CORRESPONDENT
A fast start usually turns into
good things, and for the Wapakoneta Redskins boys basketball
team, Monday’s fast
start against the Kenton Wildcats set the
tone as the Redskins
won their first game
71
in Western Buckeye
League play beating
the Wildcats on the
road, 71-49, in varsity
boys basketball ac49
tion at Kenton High
School.
The Redskins’ WBL win Monday was first-year coach Doug
Selvey’s first league win with the
team.
Wapak’s win Monday was its
third in the last four games and
came after a 1-13 start to the season which included a 10-game
loss streak.
“It feels great to get this win,”
Redskins varsity coach Doug
Selvey said. “I thought this game
was a total team effort because we
were able to put four good periods of basketball together.”
That team effort began right
away as Wapak jumped on the
Wildcats (2-12, 0-7) with a 16-5
run midway through the first period.
A few minutes into the game,
junior Kodi Morgan drained a
pair of 3-pointers to help get the
ball rolling for the Redskins (4-14
Staff photo/Jake Dowling
Wapakoneta Redskins senior Zach
Schmerge prepares to attempt a free
throw Monday in a Western Buckeye
League varsity boys basketball game
against the Kenton Wildcats.
overall, 1-6 WBL).
Morgan’s two 3-pointers were
a byproduct of the Redskins’
decision to attack the rim early,
forcing the Wildcats’ defense to
cave in, thus giving ample shooting opportunities for Morgan and
others.
“We have shot the 3-point-
ers well this season,” Selvey said.
“There was one game where we
had 13 3-pointers. We’re getting
our confidence back as a team and
they’re making the extra pass.”
The Redskins finished 8 of 15
from the behind the arc, an impressive 53 percent.
Another aspect Selvey was
pleased with was the way his team
finished.
“We have really struggled to
play well for four quarters, usually
we can only finish through three
quarters, but today I thought we
were able to put a full game together,” he said Monday.
The Redskins tattooed the
Wildcats for 32 points in the first
half, going into halftime up 3220, and they never let up in the
second half, pouring on 39 more
points.
Wapak shot 48 percent (24 of
50) from the field Monday.
The major contributors offensively for Wapak were juniors
Keaton Metz, who scored a gamehigh 20 points, and Adam Henderson, who added 17 points.
Morgan finished with eight
points.
“Keaton and Adam play very
well together and they continue
to improve every day for us,”
Selvey said.
On the defensive end of the
floor, the Redskins allowed an average of 12 points per period on
just a 31 percent shooting clip.
See WAPAK, Page 2B
Parkway rallies past Waynesfield-Goshen
entering the
fourth period
The
Waynesfield- but Parkway
Goshen Tigers lost 51-48 owned a 15-10
to the Parkway Panthers advantage in
51
in a non-league varsity the final stanza
girls basketball game to earn the win.
Monday at WaynesfieldTigers
freshman
Goshen High School.
Emily Patton nearly had
W-G led by two, 38-36, half of her team’s points,
FROM STAFF REPORTS
QUICK LOOK
Lawmakers, Redskins spar over team name
ASHBURN, Va. (AP) — The latest back-and-forth over the Washington
Redskins name includes a stern letter from two lawmakers and a public relations move from the team.
A letter sent Monday from Sen. Maria Cantwell of Washington state and
Rep. Tom Cole of Oklahoma tells NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell that the
league is on “the wrong side of history” and mentions the league’s tax-exempt
status. Cantwell chairs the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs.
The Redskins countered by saying they’ve received “almost 200” letters and
emails in recent months in support of the name from people who identified
themselves as Native Americans or as family members of Native Americans.
They say they’ve received only seven letters from Native Americans opposed to
the name.
scoring 23 in
three periods.
She was held
scoreless in
48
the
fourth
period.
Sydney Buffenbarger
added eight points for
W-G.
Mackenzie Jarnagin
and Chelsea Spencer
each scored five points
for the Tigers.
W-G is now 10-7
overall this season.
The Tigers will play
a road game Thursday
for their next contest,
visiting
the
CoryRawson Hornets.
CORRECTION
The headline above the
story on Page 1B about the
Wapakoneta versus Sidney
varsity boys basketball game in
the Monday, Feb. 10 edition
incorrectly
stated
that
Wapakoneta’s season high for
most points scored in one game
was 81.
Wapakoneta scored 82
points in its game against
Sidney on Saturday and so its
season high for most points
scored in one game is 82.
Sports Editor
BRAD FRANK
[email protected]
419-739-3508
sports
2B
www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Tuesday, February 11, 2014
High School
College From Page 1B
BOYS STANDINGS
Goshen 2013) produced
a team-high 18 points and
three rebounds for Tiffin University (7-13, 4-12
Great Lakes Intercollegeiate Athletic Conference)
in a 76-69 loss at Malone
(15-8, 10-7 GLIAC) on
Jan. 23 in North Canton.
On Feb. 6, the 5’9”
guard added 18 points, five
assists, four rebounds and
four steals in a 76-73 victory at home against Hillsdale College (10-11, 9-8
GLIAC) in Tiffin.
For the season, the freshman is tallying 7.1 ppg, 1.6
rpg and 1.5 apg.
Chris Johnson (Botkins 2012) contributed
her fourth double-digit
scoring effort of the season
for Edison Community
College (13-5, 0-3 Ohio
Community College Athletic Conference) in a 7876 triumph at Cincinnati
State & Community College (15-9, 6-2 OCCAC)
on Feb. 6 in Cincinnati.
On Feb. 1, the 5’9” forward added 15 points,
seven rebounds and two
steals in a 103-55 thrashing
at home of Lakeland Community College (3-19, 0-7
OCCAC) on Feb. 1 in Piqua.
For the season, the
sophomore is producing
7.0 points per game, 4.9
rebounds per game and 0.9
assists per game.
Abbey Gray (Waynesfield-Goshen 2011) was
named the Ohio Athletic
Conference women’s track
athlete of the week, the
OAC announced Jan. 27 after she garnered first in the
60-meter hurdles (9.2 seconds) and runner-up in the
200 (26.83) at the Denison
Lid Lifter for Otterbein on
Jan. 25 in Granville.
Gray ranks fifth among
all hurdlers this season in
NCAA Division III.
BASEBALL
Johnny
Crawford
(Wapakoneta 2013) is
entering his first year as a
Basketball
Western Buckeye
League
Defiance
Elida
Bath
Celina
Ottawa-Glandorf
Van Wert
St. Marys
Shawnee
Wapakoneta
Kenton
WBL
6-1
6-1
6-1
6-1
4-3
2-5
2-5
2-5
1-6
0-7
Overall
15-3
15-3
14-3
12-6
12-6
8-10
8-10
5-13
4-14
2-12
Source: WBLsports.com
Tuesday, Feb. 4
Crestview 62, Celina 60
Columbian 60, Kenton 57
Wapakoneta 81, Ada 62
Friday, Feb. 7
Bath 78, Kenton 47
Celina 76, Shawnee 74 (OT)
Defiance 49, Van Wert 41
Elida 89, Ottawa-Glandorf 69
St. Marys 48, Wapakoneta 41
Saturday, Feb. 8
Bath 77, Columbus Grove 51
Coldwater 57, Celina 56 (OT)
Lima Senior 68, Defiance 57
Elida 70, Lima Central Catholic 69
Ottawa-Glandorf 81, Leipsic 60
St. Marys 48, Minster 44
St. Henry 52, Van Wert 37
Wapakoneta 82, Sidney 57
Monday, Feb. 10
Wapakoneta 71, Kenton 49
Tuesday, Feb. 11
Elida at Bellefontaine
Friday, Feb. 14
Celina at Kenton
Bath at Elida
Ottawa-Glandorf at St. Marys
Defiance at Shawnee
Van Wert at Wapakoneta
GIRLS STANDINGS
Western Buckeye
League
Bath
Ottawa-Glandorf
Van Wert
Wapakoneta
Elida
Shawnee
Kenton
Celina
St. Marys
Defiance
WBL
8-0
7-1
6-2
6-2
4-4
4-4
2-6
2-6
1-7
0-8
Overall
16-2
17-2
17-4
11-9
9-10
8-11
7-11
3-17
3-16
4-15
Source: WBLsports.com
Tuesday, Feb. 4
Crestview 44, Celina 34
Elida 53, Parkway 41
Kenton 44, Bluffton 41
Coldwater 43, Wapakoneta 36
Van Wert 50, Lima Central Catholic 43
Thursday, Feb. 6
Shawnee 60, Celina 46
Bath 105, Kenton 42
Ottawa-Glandorf 58, Elida 36
Wapakoneta 51, St. Marys 32
Van Wert 65, Defiance 47
Saturday, Feb. 8
Perrysburg 48, Bath 38
Defiance 50, Fairview 49
Elida 55, Fort Jennings 40
Ottawa-Glandorf 47, Napoleon 32
Upper Scioto Valley 53, Kenton 43
Allen East 61, Shawnee 57 (2OT)
Lima Senior 76, St. Marys 45
Liberty-Benton 55, Wapakoneta 53
Tuesday, Feb. 11
Fort Loramie at Bath
Celina at Fort Recovery
Paulding at Defiance
Spencerville at Kenton
Ottawa-Glandorf at Archbold
Minster at Wapakoneta
Thursday, Feb. 13
Elida at Bath
Kenton at Celina
Shawnee at Defiance
St. Marys at Ottawa-Glandorf
Wapakoneta at Van Wert
END OF REGULAR SEASON
Wapak From Page 1B
pitcher and outfielder for
Bowling Green State University, which will open
at Belmont on Feb. 14 in
Nashville, Tenn.
Clint Spencer (Lima
Shawnee 2011) is returning as a catcher for Mount
Vernon Nazarene University after posting a .330 batting average complemented by 13 RBIs, three runs
and two doubles in 2013.
The Wapakoneta native is a junior for MVNU,
which will open at home
against Ohio Mid-Western
College.
A.J. Etzkorn (Wapakoneta 2013) is entering
his first year as a pitcher for
Ohio Northern, who will
open at home against Neumann on March 2 in Ada.
MEN’S BASKETBALL
Nike Wake (Waynesfield-Goshen 2011) has
participated in one game as
a 5’9” guard for Cincinnati
Christian (16-9, 9-3 Kentucky Intercollegiate Athletic Conference), which
will resume competition at
Berea College (12-11, 5-7
KIAC) on Feb. 11 in Berea,
Ky.
Josh Schwartz (Botkins 2013) is tallying 0.4
rpg and 0.2 ppg through
five appearances as a 6’4”
forward for Mount St. Joseph (12-8, 9-5 Heartland
Collegiate Athletic Conference), which will compete
against Bluffton (8-13,
4-10 HCAC) in its next
competition on Feb. 12 in
Bluffton.
MEN’S GOLF
Matt Smith (Waynesfield-Goshen 2010) will
resume competition at the
Saginaw Valley State Spring
Invitational for Northwestern Ohio from March 2223 in Florence, Ky.
From Sept. 28-29, the
senior completed the fall
portion of the season by
posting an eighth-place finish with a score of 154 (77See COLLEGE, Page 3B
BOYS
BASKETBALL
Monday, Feb. 10
Varsity
WAPAKONETA 71
Jarrett Koch 2-0-6, Jake Bruns 1-0-3,
Ethan Good 0-1-1, Kodi Morgan 2-28, Adam Henderson 5-5-17, Keaton
Metz 8-3-20, Sam Hinegardner 2-0-4,
Cameron Lauck 0-1-1, Jon Eaton 1-0-2,
Zach Schmerge 2-1-5, Corey Crawford
2-1-5, Corey Crawford 1-0-2, Alec
Temple 0-2-2. Totals 24-15-71.
KENTON 49
Grant Sherman 4-2-10, Travis Downing
1-0-2, Trevor Downing 0-1-1, Matt Bahr
5-2-16, Justin Sawmiller 1-2-4, Colyn
Blackford 2-5-9, Austin Phillips 2-2-7.
Totals 15-14-49.
W
K
Staff photo/Jake Dowling
Wapakoneta Redskins sophomore Ethan Good (12) looks over
the Kenton Wildcats’ defense Monday in a Western Buckeye
League varsity boys basketball game at Kenton High School.
clip.
“I told my players to
stay focused because I
have seen Kenton come
back from as much as 15
points down just to win
the game,” Selvey said
Monday. “You can’t let
these guys back into the
game because they are
physically strong, allowing them to score down
low whenever they want.
Our players didn’t let that
happen tonight.”
Matt Bahr was Kenton’s leading scorer with
16 points, and Grant
Sherman chimed in with
10 points.
The Redskins have
encountered a difficult
season, landing their first
WBL win Monday with
three games left in the
regular season, but Selvey
has seen much improvement throughout an adversity-filled yet inspiring
season.
“Our kids are getting
better and better each day
shooting out on the perimeter and that’s credit
to these kids,” Selvey said.
“They put in the time and
the effort and they have
not given up even though
they had lost 10 games
in a row. It’s pretty easy
to give up on something
when that happens.”
Monday’s league win
was sweet and an otherwise sour season, and
Selvey wants to reward
his players for their continued competition.
Cold winter creates big run on ice fishing gear
The parade out of Crane Creek
or Catawba often starts at first light.
All-terrain vehicles and snowmobiles pulling trailers, anglers dragging sleds loaded with fishing tackle
and pop-up ice shanties — all traversing what appears to be an uncharacteristically thick pavement of
frozen water.
Ice fishing on Lake Erie, which
has withered and remained mothballed for many anglers in recent
years, is alive and thriving as the
Siberian-esque winter continues to
bare its fangs. On most days, loosely
clustered shanty villages are visible
close to shore, then another a couple of miles out, and a third vestige
maybe four miles into the haze.
“I’m 26, and I’ve lived in Ohio
for 24 of those years, and in that
time span there have been maybe
three or four times when we’ve had
ice like this,” said Jon Pollauf, who
helps manage the fishing tackle department at Bass Pro Shops in Rossford. “On some weekends, you’ll
see 300 or more shanties out there,
and over a thousand people fishing
on the ice.”
Mother Nature’s relentless ice
production, which has prompted
an ice fishing resurgence for some
and a boom for others this winter,
has resulted in a shortage of some
of the essentials the sport requires.
There has been a run on everything
associated with ice fishing — augers, blades, fish finders, heaters,
shanties, skimmers, sleds, rod holders, and the wide array of ice-fishing
specific tackle.
“It’s unreal, the business we’ve
been doing on those items,” Pollauf
said. “Over the last few years we’ve
had little to no ice, and little to no
ice-related sales, but this winter has
been crazy.”
Botkins From Page 1B
ergy out of us.”
Mack described how
Botkins’ turnovers helped
guide the Bearcats to victory.
“We had 24 turnovers,
and they seemed like they
were just at crucial times,
especially in the fourth
period,” Mack said. “We’d
get the ball and be able to
break the press and then
someone would travel or
not make a great pass.”
The Trojans won the
opening tip and scored a
quick bucket. Soon they
saw a 6-2 lead off of quick
points on inbound passes.
“I saw that they had
that kind of pressure and
I knew we could get it at
least once,” Mack said.
Spencerville’s Katie
Merriman hit a 3-pointer
in the first period to help
the Bearcats bring their
16 16 22 17
7 13 10 19
71
49
“This win is nice,” said
Selvey. “I think I’m going
to let these guys relax and
enjoy it for a little while.”
Monday night’s win
was a showcase of a team
that has endured a disappointing and unlucky
year but one that still has
the fight and charisma to
play hard on the court.
And that dedication
only makes Selvey more
excited for what is to
come.
“These guys continue
to improve on both sides
of the ball since Day 1,”
Selvey said. “I keep saying this to people but I
can’t wait until the summer because we are going
to keep getting better as a
team and I think we’re going to be dangerous next
year.”
Monday’s game was
Wapak’s third in four days,
and fourth in seven days.
The Redskins will
play three straight home
games to conclude the
regular season, as they
will play back-to-back
games later this week,
starting Friday night at
home in a WBL game
against the Van Wert
Cougars (8-10, 2-5), with
the junior varsity squad
taking the court at 6 p.m.
High School
Basketball
BOYS RANKINGS
The Top 10 teams in the sixth of seven
Associated Press Ohio high school
basketball polls for the 2013-2014
season with first-place votes in
parentheses and won-loss record and
total points at right:
DIVISION I
1. St. Edward (15)
2. Cin. Moeller (5)
3. Zanesville (4)
4. Massillon Jackson
5. Trotwood-Madison
6. Perrysburg
7. Cols. Northland
8. Berea-Midpark
9. Uniontown Lake
10. Tol. Bowsher
Others receiving 12 or
11. Shaker Hts. 17.
16-1
17-1
18-0
15-2
17-2
17-1
16-3
16-2
16-2
16-2
more
228
208
199
132
121
112
82
69
36
26
points:
DIVISION II
deficit within one, 8-7, at
the end of the first period.
Senior Michaela Kramer had four points, and
Kayla Heuker and Emily Brown each added a
bucket in the first period.
The second period saw
the Trojans increase the
lead with consistent play
by the entire team.
Heuker and Casey
Woodall each had four
points, while Kramer
and Brooke Bornhorst
added three. Andrea
Goettemoeller also added a bucket. However a
Schylar Miller 3-pointer
toward the end of the period brought the Bearcats
within four as Botkins led
at the half, 24-20.
The third period started with a different pace,
one set by Miller to bring
Spencerville some momentum.
GIRLS
BASKETBALL
Monday, Feb. 10
Varsity
SPENCERVILLE 46
Schylar Miller 6-1-15, Karri Purdy
1-0-2, Emilee Meyer 5-0-11, Katie
Merriman 1-0-3, Caitlyn Propst 2-2-6,
Jacey Grigsby 1-7-9. Totals 16-10-46.
BOTKINS 41
Kayla Heuker 3-2-8, Emily Brown 3-0-6,
Michaela Kramer 7-1-15, Casey Woodall
2-0-4, Brooke Bornhorst 1-1-3, Andrea
Goettemoeller 2-1-5. Totals 18-5-41.
S
B
7 13 11 15
8 16 12 5
46
41
“Schylar Miller hit
some big shots for them,”
Mack said. “We lost her
a couple times and she
made us pay for it.”
Miller had six points
in the third, including
another 3-pointer which
helped keep the Bearcats
in the game.
For Botkins, Brown
and Kramer kept pace by
contributing four points
each, giving the Trojans a
36-31 lead.
However, the fourth
period was a much different story, one that saw
Spencerville take the advantage and record the
win.
“We didn’t execute,”
Mack noted. “When they
made a run we didn’t take
our time to run a play to
get a great shot. When we
did get a good shot, we
couldn’t knock it down.”
Kramer led the Trojans with 15 points, while
Heuker contributed eight
points and Brown added
another six.
For Spencerville, Miller led the team in scoring
with 15 points as well.
Emilee Meyer also added
11 to the Bearcats’ cause,
while Grigsby finished
with nine. Caitlyn Propst
also contributed another
six points.
The Trojans will be in
action at home on Thursday in their regular season
finale against the Ridgemont Golden Gophers
for a non-league game before they enter the Ohio
High School Athletic Assocation tournament.
Botkins will participate in a Division IV
Southwest District sectional tournament at Sidney High School, where
they will play the winner
of Fort Loramie and Mississinawa Valley.
Fort Loramie, the defending Division IV state
champion, swept Botkins
in two Shelby County
Athletic League games
during the regular season.
1. Cols. Watterson (15)
16-1 224
2. Mansfield Ontario (6)
19-0 196
3. Day. Dunbar (3)
16-3 187
4. Norwalk
17-1 155
5. Circleville Logan Elm
17-1 122
6. Day. Thurgood Marshall 14-4 86
7. Franklin
16-3 80
8. Millbury Lake
17-1 37
9. Central Catholic
13-4 43
10. Defiance
15-3 40
Others receiving 12 or more points:
11. Athens, 22, 12. St. Vincent-St. Mary 19.
DIVISION III
1. Belmont Union Local (18) 19-0 229
2. Beachwood (1)
16-2 188
3. St. Bernard Roger Bacon (2) 15-3 150
4. Villa Angela-St. Joseph (3) 12-6 132
5. Chillicothe Zane Trace
16-2 125
6. Lucasville Valley
18-2 112
7. Gilmour
15-2 100
8. Lima Cent. Cath.
14-3 97
9. Cols. Ready
13-5 46
10. Warrensville Heights
10-7 21
Others receiving 12 or more points:
11. Creston Norwayne 19, 12. Portsmouth
17, 13. Archbold 16.
DIVISION IV
1. Convoy Crestview (21)
18-0
2. New Madison Tri-Village 18-1
3. Berlin Hiland (1)
17-2
4. Canal Winchester Harvest Prep (1) 20-1
5. Tol. Ottawa Hills
14-1
6. Troy Christian
17-2
7. Tipp City Bethel
14-3
8. New Washington Buckeye Cent. 16-2
9. Haviland Wayne Trace
14-2
10. Peebles
16-2
Others receiving 12 or more
11. Maria Stein Local 16.
225
196
166
145
134
95
79
78
31
23
points:
sports
www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Tuesday, February 11, 2014
3B
College From Page 2B
77) at the Kenyon College Fall
Invitational in Mount Vernon.
Dalton
Buffenbarger
(Waynesfield-Goshen 2011) is
a junior member of the University of Northwestern Ohio Racers.
MEN’S INDOOR
TRACK AND FIELD
Nick Green (Wapakoneta
2011) collected a personal record following a runner-up finish in the shot put (50-10.25”)
at the Mount Union Jim Wuske
Invitational for Ohio Dominican University on Feb. 8 in Alliance.
Elijah O’Leary (Waynesfield-Goshen 2013) garnered
fifth place in the heptathlon
(3,430 points) at the NCAA Division II Indoor Track and Field
Challenge at SPIRE from Feb.
7-8 in Geneva.
Daniel Miller (St. Marys Memorial 2012) placed fifth in the
high jump (5-6.5”) at the Fighting Scots Invitational for Wittenberg University on Feb. 1 in
Wooster.
The sophomore is a Wapakoneta native.
SOFTBALL
Kati Sawmiller (Wapakoneta 2013) enters her first year
as a catcher for the University of
Northwestern Ohio, which will
open at Montreat College on Feb.
15 in Montreat, N.C.
Erica Bryan (Wapakoneta
2010) is returning for her senior season as an infielder for
Ohio Wesleyan University after
posting a .221 batting average to
complement team highs in stolen
bases (11) and runs scored (15)
in 2013.
On March 10, the Batting
Bishops will open against St. Joseph’s (Maine) in Fort Myers, Fla.
Jill Schneider (Botkins
2013) is entering her first year
as an infielder for Defiance College, which will open at Centre
on March 7 in Danville, Ky.
WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
Logan Pitts (Botkins 2013)
contributed a season-high 11
points and five rebounds for Edison Community College (13-5,
0-3 OCCAC) in a 95-54 victory
at Lourdes College junior varsity
on Nov. 30 in Toledo.
In her most recent competition, the 5’9” forward nabbed
one rebound and one assist in
a 78-76 triumph at Cincinnati
State & Community College
(15-9, 6-2 OCCAC) on Feb. 6 in
Cincinnati.
For the season, the freshman is
totaling 2.1 ppg and 0.8 rpg.
WOMEN’S INDOOR
TRACK AND FIELD
Ivy Horn (Waynesfield-Goshen 2012) placed as runner-up
in the pentathlon (3,517 points)
at the Gladstein Invitational for
The Ohio State University from
Jan. 24-25 in Bloomington, Ind.
On Jan. 10, the sophomore
whose hometown is Wapakoneta
added a fifth-place finish in the
long jump (17-4.75) and a seventh-place effort in the 60-meter
hurdles (9.05) at the Buckeye
Classic in Columbus.
Morgan Horn (WaynesfieldGoshen 2012) captured first in
the pole vault (11-1.75) at the
Findlay Open for Tiffin University on Jan. 31 in Findlay.
Michelle Mosler (Wapakoneta 2012) collected runner-up
honors in the 4x400-meter relay
(4:13.1) at the Joe Banks Invitational for Ohio Northern University on Feb. 8 in Ada.
In the competition, the sophomore added a 12th-place finish
in the 400-meter dash (1:04.39)
and a 17th-place effort in the 200
(28.96).
Kati O’Neill (Wapakoneta
2013) ended 17th overall in the
800-meter run (3:03.27) and
21st in the 1-mile run (6:30) at
the Taylor University Invitational
for Bluffton University on Feb. 1
in Upland, Ind.
Jessica Plaugher (Wapakoneta 2013) finished 18th in the
800 (2:59.43) at the Ohio Athletic Conference North Split for
Ohio Northern University on
Jan. 17 in Ada.
WRESTLING
Nate Valentine (Wapakoneta 2013) has tallied a 6-12 record
at 149 pounds for No. 25 Kent
State University (10-9, 4-3 MidAmerican Conference).
John Martin (Wapakoneta
2013) has totaled a 5-19 record
at 125 pounds for Cleveland
State University (1-10).
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LIMA, OH
45801
Modern Rarities: NW Ohio’s premier precious metals dealer
Randy Camper has
worked with precious metals and rare coins for more
than 30 years, both in California, and here in Ohio.
Along with his own business, he spent several years
as an authenticator/grader
for major Third Party Grading services as well as a year
as staff writer for Coin World.
Now he takes on his next
adventure as owner of Modern Rarities, Northwest
Ohio’s premier precious
metals dealer.
Modern Rarities keeps a
wide stock of gold and silver bars and coins as well as
U.S., Canadian and South
African bullion coins.
“You would have to go
to Cincinnati or Cleveland
to find another place that
deals in just metals,” Randy
said. “While Modern Rarities will gladly authenticate,
appraise and purchase almost all U.S. coins as well as
foreign gold or silver coins,
they do not carry a large collectible coin inventory.”
Instead they deal mostly
in purchasing and selling
gold and silver.
After spending the last
few years meeting customers at the various banks or
financial institutions, this
new location is ideal for a
precious metals dealer.
“We are right inside
Chase Tower in downtown
Lima,” Randy said. “We
are actually right across the
street from a pawn shop,
so people can see how 95
percent of the time we are
going to pay more for scrap
metal than a pawn shop or
jeweler.”
Modern Rarities is located at 121 W. High St. in
Lima and is open Tuesdays,
Thursdays and Fridays from
Dere Farms Drainage LLC
B & L Produce Farm
The Best Homegrown Produce
• Kid’s
Clothing
Taking Applications
For A Weekly Basket
of In Season Produce
• Kid’s
Shoes
419-678-8686
Tues-Wed 10-7
Thurs-Fri 10-4 • Sat 10-2
“Like” Us On
or call Lynn Bodine
at 419-221-0470
CRIDERSVILLE, OHIO
Mara’s
Fine Wine and
Chef Inspired Cuisine
Catering
Box Lunches
Serving Lunch & Dinner
2119 Spencerville Rd.
Open Tuesday-Saturday
from 11am-9 pm
567-712-6674
Jenny’s Designs
Flowers & Gifts
305 E. State Street • Botkins
937-693-4190
www.jennysdesigns.com
Become a Friend on Facebook.
•Field Tiling
•Backhoe
•Dozer
•Trucking
• Medical
Scrubs
SIGN UP BY MARCH 1ST!
www.blproducefarm.com
570 E. Kremer Hoying Rd.
St. Henry, Oh 45883
9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Wednesdays from noon to 6 p.m.
and Saturdays form 9 a.m.
to 2 p.m.
You can also reach them
by calling 419-222-0623.
You can also check them
out the company website
at www.modernrarities.net
and on Facebook.
For a professional and
safe place to do business,
check out Modern Rarities
in downtown Lima.
Kids & Scrubs
128 S. Main • Sidney
492-0198
Stop in: you’ll be
happy you did!
Conveniently Located
Next To Ron & Nita’s
Monday-Thursday 9:00-6:00
Friday 9-8 • Saturday 9-5
www.DowntownSidney.com
Deane Mann
567-356-0330
Josh Jordan
419-234-7728
WOW! FOWLER’S TV
Lima Sewing Center
VOTED BEST PLACE TO BUY ELECTRONICS 10 YEARS IN A ROW
Sale Running through
Presidents Day
Sony
Sound Bar
& Subwoofer
Rent to Own 1/2 the cost of others • St. Marys
by Readers of The Evening Leader and the Wapakoneta Daily News
Becky Fowler
2100 Harding Hwy., Lima
419-228-8200
Hours: M-F: 10-5:30 • Sat: 10-2
Next to Harbor Freight
Mark Fowler
Now Only $299!
ars in
56 Yesiness
Bu
Regularly $399
MODEL #HT-CT26OH
WE SERVICE WHAT WE SELL WELL
1 Block N. of Hospital,1301 E. Spring St. • 419-394-5316
Dec. Hours: M & F 9:30-8; T, W, TH 9:30-5:30, Sat. 9:30-3
county life
4B
www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Tuesday, February 11, 2014
‘Disease’ debate continues over obesity
I
’m not sure what
to make of the fact
that so many people
are now calling obesity
a “disease.” What’s the
point? Isn’t it a copout?
When the American
Medical Association officially recognized obesity
as a disease last June, the
move was controversial.
But the idea behind
classifying obesity as
a disease rather than a
“disorder” or “condition”
has some merit: Health
officials hoped it would
encourage doctors to
take more ownership
in helping patients with
weight-loss efforts and
encourage more discussion about weight.
Still, in adopting the
measure, the AMA essentially declared one-third
of Americans as “sick”
simply because of their
weight, even if they don’t
have any health problems. For that and other
reasons, some health authorities continue to dis-
pute the label.
Recently, new research
has entered the fray. The
study, published online
in January in Psychological Science, involved
more than 700 people.
Researchers found that
participants who read an
article labeling obesity as
a disease tended to have
a higher body image and
reduced stigma about
obesity.
On the other hand,
they also seemed less
concerned about weight
and saw eating healthfully as less important.
Experts are split on
whether people have
total control over their
weight. Some point to
evidence that hormones
and other factors play a
significant role in a per-
son’s appetite and weight
-- circumstances that go
beyond eating too many
calories and not getting
enough physical activity.
In addition, people wrestling with obesity often
struggle with self-esteem
issues, which present another roadblock in the
battle of the bulge. Previous research has shown
that having a healthy
body image is extremely
important to overall wellbeing and is associated
with other health factors,
including increased physical activity and reduced
stress.
The bottom line?
Maybe it’s not important
whether obesity is a disease or not. If you’re battling a weight problem, it
could be more advantageous to focus on overcoming any discomfort
with the issue and having an upfront, honest
discussion about your
weight with your doctor
or other health professional.
Supporting the YMCA
Treasurer of the Wapakoneta Sertoma Club Jim West presents Wapakoneta Family
YMCA CEO Josh Little with a check of $1,500 toward the YMCA Annual Support
Campaign. The Sertoma club’s Chili day is Feb. 20, and proceeds from that event go
towards helping those in the community.
Restaurant donates furniture,
helps neighbors in need
Bob Evans Farms, Inc.
announced its donation
of more than $500,000 of
furniture to the Furniture
Bank of Central Ohio,
an organization that provides free furniture to
central Ohio families and
individuals
struggling
with poverty and other
severe life challenges.
When Bob Evans
Farms moved to its new
corporate campus in New
Albany, Ohio, in October
2013, thousands of furniture pieces had to be removed to ready the South
High street property for
its new owners, New Mill
Capital LLC.
Bob Evans Farms partnered with the Furniture
Bank of Central Ohio
to repurpose more than
$500,000 of furniture
from the South High
Street corporate campus,
which will allow central
Ohio families and individuals battling poverty to
obtain needed home furnishings for free.
Many larger furniture
pieces will be cut down
and recycled by the Furniture Bank’s carpentry
team to make kitchen tables, night stands, coffee
tables and other essential
items.
“We were very impressed by the work that
the Furniture Bank of
Central Ohio does within
our community and felt it
was a perfect use for the
our corporate campus
Bob Evans Farms, Inc. donated furnishings from its previous
corporate campus to the Furniture Bank of Central Ohio.
furniture,” says Joe Eulberg, executive vice president of human resources,
Bob Evans Farms. “It is
our company’s mission to
make a difference within
all the communities we
serve. We are proud that
our corporate campus furniture will have a new life
for our neighbors in need
within Central Ohio.”
The company also donated numerous items to
the Center for Healthy
Families, which provides
services that address the
holistic needs of pregnant
and parenting teens within Franklin County.
In addition, Bob Evans
Farms held a special sale
on January 11 for employees and their families to
purchase furniture, art,
storage units, and other
items. Nearly $7,000 from
the employee sale benefitted the Bob Evans Farms
employee assistance fund,
which offers assistance to
employees in need.
Bob Evans Farms, Inc.
owns and operates fullservice restaurants under
the Bob Evans Restaurants brand name. At the
end of the second fiscal quarter (October 25,
2013), Bob Evans Restaurants owned and operated
561 family restaurants in
19 states, primarily in the
Midwest, mid-Atlantic
and Southeast regions of
the United States.
Bob Evans Farms, Inc.,
through its BEF Foods,
Inc. segment, is also a
leading producer and distributor of refrigerated
side dishes, pork sausage
and a variety of refrigerated and frozen convenience food items under
the Bob Evans and Owens
brand names. For more
information about Bob
Evans Farms, Inc., visit
bobevans.com.
Community
Calendar
• The Roots and
Shoots Garden Club will
meet at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 11. Program:
Allison Brady.
• Story times will
be held every Tuesday
morning at 10:30 a.m.
at the Auglaize County
Public Library. All ages
welcome.
Although obesity was declared a disease by the American
Medical Institution, many experts believe it can be regulated
by other factors, including physical activity and healthy
eating.
But don’t stop there.
Self-esteem, stress reduction, physical activity and
healthy eating all contribute greatly to overall
health and well-being,
and they’re all things you
can make small but sustainable progress in.
It’s important to also
talk about these things
with your doctor, as well
as any medical or counseling options that may
be helpful.
Chow Line is a service of
Ohio State University’s College of Food, Agricultural, and
Environmental Sciences and
its outreach and research arms,
Ohio State University Extension and the Ohio Agricultural
Research and Development
Center. Send questions to Chow
Line, c/o Martha Filipic, 2021
Coffey Road, Columbus, OH,
43210-1044, or [email protected]
edu
Optimists invite
youth to speak up
for a chance to win
local cash, district
scholarship
The
Wapakoneta
Noon and Breakfast Optimist Clubs invite you
to participate in the local
Oratorical Contest for a
chance to win cash.
2014 Topic: “How
My Passions Impact the
World”
Optimist International
is an association of more
than 2,600 Optimist
Clubs around the world
dedicated to “Bringing
Out the Best in Kids.”
Adult volunteers join
Optimist Clubs to conduct positive service
projects in their communities aimed at providing
a helping hand to youth.
With their upbeat attitude, Optimist Club
members help empower
young people to be the
best that they can be.
Each Optimist Club
determines the needs
of the young people in
its community and conducts programs to meet
those needs.
Every year, Optimists
conduct 65,000 service
projects and serve well
over six million young
people.
Wapakoneta has two
clubs serving our youth;
the Noon and Breakfast
Clubs.
What is an Oratorical
Contest: First conducted
in 1928, The Oratorical Contest is a multiple
level competition providing an opportunity for
young people to speak to
the world on an assigned
topic.
The speech is presented orally before a local
panel of judges with the
1st, 2nd and 3rd place
winners receiving a medallion, participation medallion and a cash award
of $150, $100 and $50.00
respectively. The winner
moves on to compete in
the Zone competition
and an opportunity to
advance to the Regional
level.
The Regional winner
will compete in the Ohio
District level on May 10,
2014 and compete for a
$3,500 scholarship!
Who is eligible: Students under the age of 19
who have not yet graduated from high school or
the equivalent and who
are educated in Auglaize
County.
The contest will be
held at 2 p.m. On Sunday,
Feb. 23 at the Wapakoneta Family YMCA
How to Enter: Interested students must fill
out the attached application form and have it
signed by the parent(s)
or guardian. Applications
should be sent to: Noon
Optimist Club of Wapakoneta, PO Box 1605,
Wapakoneta, OH 45895.
All applications must
be received no later than
Feb. 14. Applicants will
be advised of the specific
local contest rules upon
receipt of application.
Events
OSU fundraiser for Pelotonia
Students at Ohio State
Lima kick off fundraising
and recruitment efforts
for Pelotonia this week.
Pelotonia, the grassroots organization that
raises money to support life-saving cancer
research and with One
Goal: End Cancer is a
three-day experience that
includes a weekend of cy-
cling, entertainment and
volunteerism.
In 2013, its fifth year,
Pelotonia attracted 6,723
riders and raised over
$61 million for cancer research at the James Cancer Center in Columbus.
Ohio State Lima supports both a student and
faculty/staff Pelotonia
team.
• Alcoholics Anonymous meets at 7:30 p.m.
every Tuesday at the First
English Lutheran Church
107 W. Mechanic St.,
Wapakoneta.
• The Civil War Book
Discussion Group will
meet at the Auglaize
County Public Library
on Wednesday, Feb.
12 from noon to 1 p.m.
to discuss the book The
Black Flowers by Howard
Bahr.
• American Cancer
Society’s Relay for Life
meeting will be held at 6
p.m. on Thursday, Feb.
13 Large Group Room
at the Wapakoneta High
School.
• Come to the Auglaize
County Library with a box
on at 6:30 p.m. On Thursday, Feb. 13 to create a
Valentine’s Day box.
• Alcoholics Anonymous meets at 7:30 p.m.
every Thursday at the
First English Lutheran
Church 107 W. Mechanic
St., Wapakoneta.
• A monthly lupus
support group will meet
in Lima from 1-2 p.m. on
Thursday, Feb. 13 at the
Lima Towers.
• Narcotics Anonymous meets every Friday
at 8 p.m. at the First
English Lutheran Church
107 W. Mechanic St.,
Wapakoneta.
• Celebrate Recovery
will meet on Friday from
6 – 8 p.m., at Harvest
Baptist Church on Redskin Trail. Everyone, over
18, is welcome.
• On Friday, Feb. 14
at 7 p.m. the Johnny
Appleseed Metropolitan
Park District will offer,
Valentine’s Night Hike at
Heritage Park.
• The Waynesfield
Lions Pancake Day will
be held from 7:30 a.m. noon on Saturday, Feb.
15 at the Lion’s building.
• Alcoholics Anonymous meets at 9 a.m.
every Saturday at the
First English Lutheran
Church 107 W. Mechanic
St., Wapakoneta.
• A powwow will
be held at 10 a.m. on
Saturday, Feb. 15 and
Sunday, Feb. 16 at the
United Auto Workers Hall,
1440 Bellefontaine Ave,
Lima.
• “My Sweet Valentine”
will be performed at the
historic Holland Theatre
for one night only, Saturday, Feb. 15, at 7:30
p.m.
• Allen County Chapter
of Ohio Genealogy Society will meet at 2 p.m. on
Sunday, Feb. 16 at the
Allen County Museum,
620 W. Market St., Lima.
• Overeaters Anonymous meets every
Monday at 7 p.m. at the
First English Lutheran
Church 107 W. Mechanic
St., Wapakoneta.
To submit an event for the
community calendar e-mail
[email protected] or
mail a typed copy to Community
Calendar, Wapakoneta Daily
News, P.O. Box 389, Wapakoneta,
Ohio 45895.
medical
www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Tuesday, February 11, 2014
5B
Flowers, sweets don’t make a relationship strong
COLUMBUS
—
Heart-shaped boxes of
candy are ubiquitous this
time of year, and with
Valentine’s Day falling
on a Friday, it’s likely restaurants will be mobbed
more than usual.
But chocolates and
a nice dinner out don’t
necessarily make a relationship strong, said Carmen Irving, the Healthy
Relationships Program
specialist with Ohio State
University
Extension’s
Family and Consumer
Sciences program.
“There is a difference
between what people
fantasize is the perfect
romantic
relationship
versus the actual qualities that go into making a
long-lasting, committed
relationship,” Irving said.
Research dating back
to the early 1990s from
the University of North
Carolina-Chapel Hill and
Duke Medical Center indicates that young adults
have different notions of
what would make an ideal
relationship, she said.
Some dream of a relationship with a strong
intimate dimension —
an intertwining of their
emotional lives. Some
long for a relationship full
of romanticized activities,
such as walking on the
beach, sitting in front of
the fireplace, or dressing
up and going out. Others
take a more traditional
view, hoping for a relationship that will lead to
cohabitation or marriage,
possibly children, and
living happily ever after.
Still others get wrapped
up in the view that all a
relationship really needs
is love — as Irving puts it,
“As long as we have each
other, we can do anything.”
But other research
commonly discussed in
textbooks on interpersonal relations points to
elements in a relationship
that predict whether it
will be a strong one, she
said. They include:
• Shared activities.
“This has emerged in the
research as being a fundamental piece to keeping
relationships going,” Irving said. “It’s more than
going about your dayto-day routine together.
It’s really connecting and
taking an interest in new
activities and exploring
things together as a couple.
• Social support. Committed couples offer
social support to each
other, “like no other support you receive, through
good times and bad,” she
said.
• Forgiveness. “This
is an important part of
the process,” Irving said.
“Over the course of time,
there are going to be
things that happen, and
you have to figure out
how to negotiate these
things so you’re not carrying them through the
relationship.” It’s important to note, though,
that this doesn’t mean
couples have to tolerate
everything, particularly
abusive or other behaviors in an unhealthy relationship.
•
Communication.
“Healthy communication
between partners leads to
a lasting commitment,”
Irving said. “That’s almost
a given.” Yet it doesn’t
trump the other factors,
Irving said.
There are things cou-
ples can do to invest in
their relationship, Irving
said. “We know that relationship investment leads
to increased commitment
in a romantic relationship,” she said. “These can
be really simple things to
do.” Examples include:
• Spending free time
together. “It’s making a
choice to be with your
partner versus engaging in other activities or
hanging out with other
friends.”
• Buying gifts, dinner
or other forms of entertainment. “By no means
does this equate into
buying into commercial
ideas, but if you think of
those gifts as an investment in your relationship,
it does increase commitment.”
• Sharing intimate feelings. “This is a big one,”
Irving said. “If you’re
making that investment
in sharing yourself, your
ideas, your beliefs and
sometimes even your
problems, that does increase commitment in
couples.”
• Find some activities
in common. “Develop
interest in activities that
you can do together and
that will boost your commitment to each other.”
• Doing favors for one
another. “We need to take
time and think about our
partner. Sometimes it’s
as simple as picking up a
gallon of milk, and sometimes it’s the really big
things, like changing your
career plans or relocating
to continue your investment into the relationship.”
Irving said it’s important to remember that
building a strong relationship is a two-way street.
One way to think
about healthy, romantic
relationships is based on a
common research-based
model, the “Triangular
Theory of Love” by psychologist Robert Sternberg, Irving said.
The model focuses on
three key elements, she
said.
"One side of the triangle would be intimacy,
which is the trust and
caring, sharing and vulnerability that occurs in
a committed relationship.
Another side of that tri-
angle is passion, which is
that physical desire and
physical intimacy that occurs. And the bottom part
of the triangle is commitment, thinking about
this relationship lasting
through good times and
bad.
“In making a romantic relationship last over
time, it’s really that blend
of all three sides of the triangle that makes a longlasting and healthy relationship,” Irving said.
For Valentine’s Day,
couples should keep
these things in mind, she
said.
“The cliché candlelight dinner may not be
what we’re looking for,"
Irving said. "You might
want to take Valentine’s
Day as an opportunity
to go out walking and
talking together. I don’t
think we have to buy into
media stereotypes. We
know that spending time
together is what makes a
difference. And we know
that this is a process, it’s
not a one-time shot on
Valentine’s Day that fosters long-lasting relationships.”
FITNESS REVIEW
Pros and cons to air duct cleaning
Many
homeowners
consider having the ductwork in their homes
cleaned. Mailers often tout
the benefits of this service
and warn of the potential
hazards that could be lurking inside uncleaned vents
and ducts. But whether or
not air ducts need to be
cleaned remains open for
debate. A quick review of
air duct cleaning can help
homeowners make a more
informed decision.
What is duct cleaning?
Before looking into the
advantages and disadvantages to duct cleaning, it is
advantageous to examine
the process involved when
cleaning air ducts. There
are two ways to have the
ducts cleaned in a
home:rotary
vacuum
brushing or high pressure
air washing.
Vacuum brushing utilizes a spinning brush to
scrub dust and debris off
the air vents and a vacuum
to capture whatever is dislodged.
allergies may find that routine cleaning helps ameliorate the problems of sneezing and watery eyes. Duct
cleaning can remove allergens and dust.
High pressure air washing uses pressurized air
blown through the air
ducts. A truck-mounted
industrial vacuum is
attached to the furnace,
and all of the air register
vents in the home are covered. Once all the air ducts
have been blown clear,
another air wand is fed
into the end of the hot and
cold air supply lines. Dust
and debris is then drawn
backward into the vacuum.
The Environmental
Protection Agency says air
duct cleaning is handy if
there is a noticeable accumulation of dust and
debris in ducts or if particles are actually released
into the home from supply
registers. If ducts are
infested with rodents or
insects, cleaning will make
indoor air much safer.
Pros
One of the more obvious advantages of air duct
cleaning is improved
health and hygiene in the
home. Those prone to
Mold is another factor
to consider when determining if ducts need to be
cleaned. Mold spores floating in the air can lead to
illness. Professional cleaning may be the only way to
remove mold and mildew
from the system.
Homeowners who have
fireplaces may find the air
becomes dirtier faster.
That's because of the residue put into the air from
burning wood and other
fuel. This residue not only
builds up inside of the
chimney in the form of
creosote, but also can form
a sticky, sooty layer inside
of ductwork. Cleaning the
ducts can remove this soot.
Cons
The EPA advises that
no research has definitively shown that duct cleaning prevents health problems. Neither do studies
conclusively demonstrate
that particle (e.g., dust)
levels in homes increase
because of dirty air ducts.
This is because much of
the dirt in air ducts adheres
to duct surfaces and does
not necessarily enter the
living space. What's more,
dirty air that enters the
home from outdoors or
indoor activities, such as
smoking or cleaning, can
actually cause greater
exposure to contaminants
than dirty air ducts.
There also is no evidence that cleaning ducts
and components of the
heating/cooling system
will make the furnace or
air conditioner work any
more efficiently.
Air duct cleaning is an
expensive undertaking.
On average the cost of
such a service can range
from $400 to $1,000,
depending on the extent of
the cleaning and the size of
the home.
Cleaning the ducts also
can be dirty and time-consuming. Cleaning may
spread contaminants that
were lodged inside of the
vents throughout the air
more readily.
Some cleaning services
will advise the use of
chemical biocides to treat
the interior of vents. These
are designed to kill microbiological contaminants.
The EPAwarns chemical
biocides have yet to be
fully researched, and
homeowners should be
fully informed before
deciding to permit the use
of biocides or chemical
treatments in air ducts.
Homeowners should
never attempt to clean air
ducts themselves. If the
decision is made to have
the cleaning done, it
should only be on an asneeded basis and completed by a reputable cleaning
service.
YOUR HEALTH IS IMPORTANT TO US!
PLEASE SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL SPONSORS
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comics
6B
www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Tuesday, February 11, 2014
Annie’s Mailbox
BABY BLUES
Definitely sounds like an emotional attachment
DEAR ANNIE: A few
years ago, my wife went out of
town for a conference. A month
after she returned, I was on our
computer and noticed that she
hadn’t logged out of her email.
My curiosity got the best of me,
and I saw that she had traded
emails with an old boyfriend. I
then discovered that the two of
them had met while she was at
the conference. One of her last
emails to him said, “I still have
feelings for you.”
On the advice of a marriage
counselor, I was direct with her
about it. She claimed nothing
happened and that they only
met for dinner and said she
would never contact him again.
She also was angry that I had
invaded her privacy.
Last year, my wife and I hit a
rough patch. I got suspicious of
her behavior and checked her
cellphone. I saw that she had
exchanged multiple texts with
this same guy. Again, she claims
nothing happened, the texts
were innocent and I had no
right to snoop.
My wife knows the password to my email, and I never
lock my cellphone. All of my
communication is an open
book. Meanwhile, she now
locks her phone and has multiple email accounts. I understand the need for a little privacy, but I don’t believe you
should be hiding things in a
committed relationship. My
wife is angry that I don’t trust
her, and I’m having trouble
dealing with this. Any advice?
BEETLE BAILEY
BLONDIE
CRANKSHAFT
-- Broken Up
DEAR BROKEN: We
don’t trust your wife, either.
She promised not to contact
this man again and then did so
and hid it from you. She locks
her phone and has multiple
email accounts to which you
apparently do not have the
passwords. Worse, to deflect
blame, she accuses you of
snooping. There may not have
been a sexual affair, but it definitely sounds like an emotional
attachment. Please go back to
your counselor and ask your
wife to come with you. The two
of you need a refresher course
on how to make your marriage
work and regain trust.
DEAR ANNIE: I own a
small casual restaurant in a
small town. People order at the
counter and then take their
food to a table to eat.
In the past couple of years,
I’ve noticed more people bringing in food from other establishments and eating at our
place. I don’t understand why
people think it’s OK to take
advantage of an eating establishment like this. Don’t they
realize that the owner is paying
for the incidental items they
use, such as napkins? Don’t
they see that they are taking up
space that could be used by
people who are actually helping
to pay the bills incurred by the
restaurant? Am I looking at the
situation in the wrong way? -No Free Lunch
DEAR NO: We suspect
most people have no clue that
Bridge
this is an inconvenience to you.
There are some establishments
that allow people to sit for
extended lengths of time without ordering, but we know of
none that encourage you to
bring your own food. Most restaurants require a minimum
order to justify the use of the
space. We suggest you implement this policy with a sign at
each table and at the cash register. You may have to approach
flouters with a bill, but word
will get around.
DEAR ANNIE: This is for
“Tired,” who does all the cooking for the holiday meals and
then gets stuck with the cleanup, too. I have a good friend in
the same situation. She is on
good terms with all of her family members, but they never
helped or knew what to do. So
she wrote up duties, put them
on little pieces of paper and
placed the pieces into a nice
dish. When each guest arrived,
they picked out a paper and
read their duty for that meal.
They loved it, and she was not
so worn out. -- DLT
Annie’s Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
email your questions to [email protected], or write
to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 737 3rd Street,
Hermosa Beach, CA 90254.
Horoscope
For Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2014
ARIES
(March 21 to April 19)
This year your good fortune is related to family, home and real estate. This is your best
chance in more than a decade to improve your
home or benefit from real-estate transactions.
Yay!
FUNKY WINKERBEAN
TAURUS
(April 20 to May 20)
Look for ways to get training and further study
in your everyday world. This opportunity exists
throughout 2014 for you. Relations with siblings will improve.
GEMINI
(May 21 to June 20)
It’s your turn to boost your earnings! Look for
ways to make more money throughout 2014.
CANCER
(June 21 to July 22)
You continue to be under divine protection
because lucky Jupiter is in your sign this year.
Opportunities and good fortune bless you in
2014! Make the most of this.
HI AND LOIS
LEO
(July 23 to Aug. 22)
Life has been sending you messages recently
that deepen and enhance your awareness of
your inner values and spiritual matters. It’s
thought-provoking and maturing.
VIRGO
(Aug. 23 to Sept. 22)
The year 2014 continues to be a wonderful,
popular year for you! Join clubs, groups and
associations. Schmooze with others. Make
new friends.
LIBRA
(Sept. 23 to Oct. 22)
SNUFFY SMITH
This year continues to be a fabulous time for
you to put your name up in lights. Expect
kudos, promotions, positive acknowledgment
and praise from others, especially bosses or
VIPs.
SCORPIO
(Oct. 23 to Nov. 21)
Crossword Puzzle
Opportunities to travel and get further education abound for you in 2014. Some will explore
new avenues in publishing, the media, medicine and the law as well.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov. 22 to Dec. 21)
ZITS
Remember that you can benefit from the wealth
and resources of others this year. Your partner
might get a raise. You might get an inheritance. It’s an easy year to get a loan or mortgage.
CAPRICORN
(Dec. 22 to Jan. 19)
Partnerships and close friendships are wonderfully enriched for you in 2014. This is not
the year to go it alone. Join forces with others.
AQUARIUS
(Jan. 20 to Feb. 18)
DENNIS THE MENACE
LOCKHORNS
Keep looking for ways to improve your job,
because you can do this in 2014. You can get
a better job, better duties, better working conditions or a better boss.
PISCES
(Feb. 19 to March 20)
Start saving for a fabulous vacation, because
this is what’s in store for you in 2014. Love and
romance look sweet and promising as well.
Playful times with children, the arts and sporting events will rev engines this year.
YOU BORN TODAY You are versatile, multitalented and faithful to your beliefs and convictions. You listen to others, but you also will
stick to your own views. Because you see
many sides to a question, you are skilled at
bringing people together, especially those in
disagreement. You know how to build consensus. This year an important decision will arise.
Choose wisely.
Birthdate of: Abraham Lincoln, U.S. president;
Christina Ricci, actress; Charles Darwin,
author/scientist.
(c) 2014 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
classifieds
www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Tuesday, February 11, 2014
7B
More changes made to health law Factory blast in
WASHINGTON (AP)
— It may take weeks to
render a verdict on the
Obama administration's
latest health care concession to employers.
But that could make a
difference for Democrats
battling to keep control of
the Senate in the fall congressional elections.
All-important details
are buried in more than
200 pages of dense Treasury regulations released
Monday. The biggest
change is that mediumsized firms got another
delay in a heavily criticized requirement that
they cover their workers
or face fines.
The
administration
said companies with 50 to
99 employees will have an
additional year to comply,
until January 1, 2016.
For businesses with
100 or more employees,
the so-called employer
mandate will still take
effect in 2015. But other
newly announced provisions, dealing with technical issues such as the
calculation of working
hours, may help some of
those firms.
The mandate was originally supposed to take effect this year.
More than 90 percent
of companies with 50 or
more employees already
cover their workers without the government telling them to do so, but
the debate has revolved
around the potential impact on new and growing firms. Most small
businesses have fewer
than 50 workers and are
exempt from the mandate. However, employer
groups were also uneasy
with a requirement that
defines a full-time worker
as someone averaging 30
hours a week.
Republicans trying to
take control of the Senate in the November
elections have once again
made President Barack
Obama's health care
law their top issue, casting it as job killer. They
want to use the employer
mandate to build that
case, with anecdotes of
bosses reluctant to hire
a 50th worker, or slashing the hours of low-
wage workers who need
to pay household bills.
Monday's moves by the
administration seemed
calibrated to reduce that
risk.
The reaction of business groups was mixed.
"These final regulations
secured the gold medal
for greatest assistance to
retailers, and other businesses, and our employees," said Neil Trautwein,
a vice president of the National Retail Federation.
The U.S. Chamber of
Commerce was unimpressed, calling it more
of a respite than a fundamental change.
"This short-term fix
also creates new problems for companies by
moving the goalposts of
the mandate modestly
when what we really need
is a time-out," president
Thomas Donohue said in
a statement.
The
administration
still hasn't issued rules for
reporting requirements
on business and insurers,
the nitty-gritty of how
the coverage requirement
will be enforced.
Administration officials and the law's supporters said the concessions were the sorts of
reasonable
accommodations that regulators
make all the time when
implementing major new
legislation. The Treasury
Department said Secretary Jack Lew was well
within his legal authority
in making the changes.
"This common-sense
approach will protect
employers already providing quality insurance,
while helping to ensure
that larger employers are
prepared to meet their responsibility to their hardworking employees," said
House Minority Leader
Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.
But Republicans said
they smelled fear.
"It is clear Democrats
don't think they can survive politically if Obamacare is allowed to fully
go into effect," said Rep.
Dave Camp, R-Mich.,
who as chairman of the
Ways and Means Committee oversees the tax
penalties enforcing the
mandate.
FAA probes media use of drone aircraft
HARTFORD, Conn.
(AP) — As police responded to a deadly car
crash, they noticed an increasingly familiar sight:
a remote-controlled aircraft, equipped with a
video camera, hovering
over the wreckage.
The Federal Aviation Administration has
opened an investigation
of the drone, which was
used by an on-call employee for a Connecticut
television station. The
FAA is developing new
rules as the technology
makes drones far more
versatile, but for now op-
erators can run afoul of
regulations by using them
for commercial purposes,
including journalism.
The case of the Hartford crash, in which the
victim's body was left
hanging out of a mangled
car, highlights some of
the safety, privacy and
ethical issues that journalists will wrestle with
as interest grows in using
drones for newsgathering.
"Here was a dead body
still on the scene. We
had covered it the best
we could," said Lt. Brian
Foley, a Hartford police
spokesman, who said
drones have been appearing more frequently at
crime scenes. "You don't
want the family to see
that."
Hartford officers questioned the man operating
the drone on Feb. 1 but
did not ask him to take
it down, Foley said. The
man identified himself as
an employee of WFSBTV but said he was not
working for them that
day.
The station's general
manager, Klarn DePalma,
said it constantly evaluates new technology and
is eager to see regulations
spelled out for drones,
but he said the temporary
employee in question was
not on assignment for
them and has never been
paid for drone video.
"We don't even own a
drone," he said.
The FAA said Monday that it has issued 12
warning letters to drone
operators, which can
include orders to stop
operations. It said in a
statement that its investigations are intended to
determine whether operators violated FAA safety
regulations.
CLASSIFIEDS
The
The
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New
aily
ta D 8
one 8-212
pak
Wa 19-73
4
Wapakoneta
PUBLIC
NOTICES
ADOPTION - A loving
alternative to unplanned pregnancy. You
choose the family for
your child. Receive
pictures/info
of
waiting/approved couples. Living expense
assistance. 1-866-2367638
Notice
Lending
Opportunities
Borrow smart. Contact
the Ohio Division of Financial Institutions’ Office of Consumer Affairs BEFORE you refinance your home or
obtain a loan. BEWARE of requests for
any large advance
payment of fees or insurance. Call the Office of Consumer Affairs toll free at 1-866278-0003 to learn if
the mortgage broker or
lender is properly licensed. This notice is
a public service announcement of the
PETERBOROUGH,
N.H. (AP) — An explosion rocked a small-town
ball bearings plant on
Monday, shaking walls,
shattering windows and
sending at least 15 people to the hospital, but a
company spokeswoman
said none of their injuries
appeared to be life-threatening.
Hazardous-materials
teams responded after Monday afternoon's
explosion at the New
Hampshire Ball Bearings
Inc. plant in Peterborough, but firefighters said
there didn't appear to be
any environmental damage.
A plant machine operator, Paul Clark, said he
was outside in the parking
lot on Monday afternoon
when he heard the blast.
"I was in my car backing out when I felt a rumble and heard a bang," he
said. "I looked up, and
snow on the building's
roof was flying into the
wind."
The blast blew out windows on the three-story
building's ground floor,
Peterborough Fire Department spokesman Eric
Bowman said. There was
heavy explosion damage,
and the first arriving firefighters saw a column of
smoke, he said.
The cause of the explosion was under investigation, but all indications
were that it was an industrial-related incident,
Bowman said.
First responders will
try to determine the extent of the damage to the
facility, company spokeswoman Kathy Gerrity
said. It was unknown
when the facility will be
back in operation because
it would need to be inspected and deemed safe
first, she said.
The plant, in the southwest New Hampshire
town that was the inspiration for Thornton Wilder's
play "Our Town," manufactures high-tech parts
for the aerospace industry
and employs 700 people.
Gerrity said she wasn't
sure how many people
were inside when the explosion happened Monday afternoon but there
are usually about 450
working around that time.
Clark, who operates a machine used in a
rolling procedure, said
his girlfriend, Andrea
Painchaud, was at work
in the shipping department when the explosion knocked shelves off
the walls and part of the
roof came down around
her. He said she was uninjured.
"Smoke came pouring out," said Clark, who
lives in nearby Pepperell,
Mass. "I could hear somebody screaming."
Bill Brock, owner
of the Manhattan East
Hair Design shop about
a quarter-mile from the
plant, said he heard and
felt something but didn't
know what it was. Then
about 30 ambulances and
fire trucks went by.
Gov. Maggie Hassan
said the state emergency
operations center was
open to monitor the situation and she was "very
encouraged" to hear that
all employees had been
accounted for.
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520 Industrial Dr.,
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419-738-2128
The Auglaize County
Airport Authority’s annual financial statements for the calendar
year ended December
31, 2013 are complete.
The statements can be
viewed by contacting
the Airport Manager at
the Neil Armstrong Airport at 07776 St. Rt.
219, New Knoxville,
Ohio. Please provide
a 48 hour notice to the
Airport Manager to
view or obtain copies
of the statements.
Copies of the statement will be made for
$.05 per page
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www.wapakdailynews.com • Wapakoneta Daily News • Tuesday, February 11, 2014
BUSINESS
SERVICES
MISC. ITEMS
FOR SALE
WANTED TO
BUY
HELP WANTED
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APARTMENTS
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APARTMENTS
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LEGAL NOTICES
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look programs are required. Please apply
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ACCOUNT. Guardianship of Thomas
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1985 GDN 00003
State
of
Ohio,
Auglaize County, ss.
Common Pleas Court
Probate Division. Notice is hereby given
that an account and
vouchers have been
filed in this Court by
Lois Lindeman, as
Guardian. Said account has been suspended for examination of the receipts and
disbursements together with the investments, if any, shown
thereon. Any person
interested in said account or any item
thereof may examine
said account prior to
April 02, 2014 when
the same will be approved and orderecd
to record. Exceptions
shall be filed in writing
and a copy thereof given to the Fiduciary
Five (5) days prior to
the above date of
hearing. Douglas S.
Jauert, Attorney February 6, 2014 MARK
E. SPEES, Probate
Judge.
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The Auglaize County
Commissioners are
currently accepting resumes and cover letters for the position of
Licensed
Nursing
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an unclassified, FLSA
exempt, full-time position. Interested candidates must be a Licensed Nursing Home
Administrator.
Resumes, cover letter
and application employment form accepted at the office of
Auglaize County Commissioners, 209 S.
Blackhoof St, Room
201, Wapakoneta, OH
45895 or at [email protected] until 4:00
p.m., February 24,
2014. Minimum pay
$60,000.
See
www.auglaizecounty.o
rg for the employment
application form.
Train to be a Professional Truck Driver
through Prime's Student Driver Program.
Obtain your Commercial Driver's License,
then get paid while
training! 1-800-2770
2
1
2
driveforprime.com
WEEKLY HOME TIME
AND EXPERIENCED
BASED PAY! Class A
Professional Drivers.
Call 866-979-1402 for
more details or visit
SuperServiceLLC.com
WORK WANTED
Carpet & Flooring Installation & or Sales.
Shop from home or get
a free quote on just installation. Impressions
Flooring. (419) 9537473
SCHOOLS AND
INSTRUCTIONS
AIRLINE JOBS begin
here - Get trained as
FAA certified Aviation
T e c h n i c i a n .
Housing/Financial aid
for qualified students.
Job Placement assistance. Aviation Institute of Maintenance 1877-676-3836
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA
FROM
HOME. 6 - 8 weeks.
ACCREDITED. Get a
Diploma. Get A Job!
No Computer Needed.
FREE Brochure. 1800-264-8330. Benjamin Franklin High
School
Large two bedroom
townhouse apartments
on Red Oak Dr. Walkin closets, 1-1/2 baths,
carport,
$460-$485
month. Also: Two bedroom single story
apartment with garage
$490-$515 month on
Red Oak Dr. Units
have range, refrigerator, blinds, patio, optional washer/dryer.
$200 deposit. 419586-2381 or kesslerhomes.com
Laurelwood and Riverside 1 & 2 bedroom
furnished and unfurnished apartments, no
pets, for more information call Schlenker Developments (419)7388111
Now Accepting Applications
Beech Tree Hill Apartments 416 Beech St.
St. Marys, Ohio 45885
419-394-5396
Mon. & Wed. 8:00 am4:30 pm or by appt.
2 bedroom apartments
with appliances furnished. On site laundry
facility. Call for details
or pick up an application at the rental office.
Possibility of rental assistance. Equal Housing
Opportunity.
TDD#419-526-0466
“This institution is an
equal opportunity provider, and employer.”
One bedroom single
story apartment on
Black Oak Dr. Range,
refrigerator, blinds, patio, carport, optional
washer/dryer. $375$400 month. $200 deposit. 419-586-2381 or
kesslerhomes.com
Spacious, total electric
1 & 2 bedroom apartments in St. Marys.
Water, sewer, garbage
paid. Pets accepted.
Deposit only $200.00
419-394-8509
St. Marys
2 Bed / 1 1/2 bath,
a p a r t m e n t .
$480/month, plus $480
deposit
No utilities included. 1
cat only allowed
Townview Drive
419-733-8503
HOUSE FOR
RENT
2 Houses
2 bedroom, 115 S.
Mill, Celina $395
2-3 bedroom Apt., St.
Johns $295-$450
937-622-0361
2 Story, 3 bedroom duplex for rent. 10 E
Main St. Wapak, $595
a month, no pets Call
419-234-8919
8693 US 33, Celina
Affordable country
livin'! Updated ranch
with 3 bedrooms, 2
baths, 3 seasons
room, storage sheds
and more! Owner
seeking Rent to Own
and Lease option candidates. $575 per mo.
chbsinc.com for pics,
video tour and details
or 419-586-8220.
)on’tMiss
USE YOUR TAX RETURNS as a down
payment towards your
new home here. Many
remodeled
homes
available in Mercer,
Auglaize, Van Wert
and Allen counties.
Owner financing options
available.
chbsinc.com for pics
and details or 419586-8220
Wapak Available immediately, 1 bedroom,
1 bath, spacious living
room and kitchen.
Laundry hook up, large
yard with storage.
419-738-6388
MOBILE
HOMES FOR
SALE
Mobile Homes with
acreage. Ready to
move in. Seller Financing (subject to
credit approval). Lots
of room for the price,
3Br 2Ba. No renters.
614-859-2953
VMFhomes.com
AUTOS FOR
SALE
NOTICE OF FILING
ACCOUNT. Guardianship of Ferd R.
Link, A Incompetent
Case No.: 2006 GDN
00006 State of Ohio,
Auglaize County, ss.
Common Pleas Court
Probate Division. Notice is hereby given
that an account and
vouchers have been
filed in this Court by
Craig A. Link, as
Guardian. Said account has been suspended for examination of the receipts and
disbursements together with the investments, if any, shown
thereon. Any person
interested in said account or any item
thereof may examine
said account prior to
April 02, 2014 when
the same will be approved and orderecd
to record. Exceptions
shall be filed in writing
and a copy thereof given to the Fiduciary
Five (5) days prior to
the above date of
hearing. Diana G. Dulebohn, Attorney February 6, 2014 MARK
E. SPEES, Probate
Judge.
35
The Union Township's
Annual Financial Report is complete and
can be viewed at the
Fiscal Officer's office
by appointment only
(419-302-3019) or at
the regular meeting
the 3rd Wednesday of
each month at 7pm. at
the township building
in Uniopolis.
1996 Chevy Silverado
3quarter ton 6.5l pick
up, 96,000 miles diesel
engine $3500 call 567356-1547
www.diplomafromhome.c
om
WERNER
NEEDS
DRIVER TRAINEES!!
Drivers are in DEMAND. We need YOU!
No CDL? No Problem!
16-Day CDL Training
available! Opportunity
Awaits. CALL TODAY!
866-203-8445
BOLD & SOLD! Is
what happens when
your ad stands out.
Only $1.00 additional
per word for bolding.
Call us now!
COMMUNITY BOARD
Your connection to local businesses and services.
McCullough Heating
& Air Conditioning
419-953-2423
24 Hr. Service • Plumbing Issues • Electrical
Duct Work • Furnace Service & Installation
Air Conditioning Service & Installation
First Time Customers Get A 10% Discount!
SERVING WAPAKONETA &
SURROUNDING AREAS!
RENT TO OWN
55” SONY TV
$500 Rebate
104 Payments of
$19.63/Week
Due Down - $323.20
WOW! FOWLER’S TV
Rent to Own 1/2 the cost of others • St. Marys
VOTED BEST PLACE TO BUY
ELECTRONICS 10 YEARS IN A ROW
by Readers of The Evening Leader
and the Wapakoneta Daily News
WE SERVICE
WHAT WE SELL WELL
in
56 Yearsess
Busin
1 Block N. of Hospital,1301 E. Spring St. • 419-394-5316
Hours: M & F 9:30-8; T, W, TH 9:30-5:30, Sat. 9:30-3
M S I ENVIRONMENTAL
MIKE’S SANITATION INC.
We operate in compliance with the U.S. and Ohio EPA, State and
County Health Departments, ODA, ODOT and OSHA to provide our
customers and Neighbors with the most Responsible and Safe
ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES, SEPTIC TANK CLEANING
and PORTABLE TOILET RENTALS
Call 1-800-786-3691 for COMPETITIVE PRICING
TSB Construction
Building & Remodeling
• Metal & Asphalt Roofs • Pole Barns
• Room Additions • Garage • Baths
• Kitchens • New Houses
GIRODS METAL
ROOFING
We also Sell & Install
SAFEWAY OVERHEAD DOORS!
30 Years Experience
FREE ESTIMATES Call JOSH at
260-706-1665 for an appointment
419.235.2631
AMOS Girod, Owner
647 E. 900 S., Geneva, IN 46740
LOOKING FOR FAST FLAT
TV REPAIR? Call Us!
We Repair Lamps Too!
419-695-1229
HOHENBRINK TV
52 YEARS
YEARS OF SERVICE
54
11230 Elida Rd., Delphos
419-695-1229
www.hohenbrinktv.com
CALL FOR MORE INFO. ON METAL ROOFS!
J & M LAWN SERVICES
Specializing in Small to Medium Size Lawns
John & Michael Zwez
613 E Pearl St.
Wapakoneta, Ohio 45895
Phone: 419-738-1250
Cell Phone: 419-234-6978
E-Mail: [email protected]
Lawn Mowing & Trimming, Rototilling and Hedge Trimming
To advertise your business for
as little as $2.55 per day
Call Julie in our Classified
Department
937-497-0011 at 419.738.2128
AMISH CREW
CUSTOM BUILD HOMES
References & 20 years experience
ROOFING • SIDING
ROOM ADDITIONS • POLE BARNS
RENOVATE OLD BARNS
AND MUCH MORE!
Free Estimates • 419-305-0857