British Endocrine Societies BES 2005 PROGRAMME 4-6 April 2005

BES 2005
24TH JOINT MEETING OF THE
British Endocrine Societies
4-6 April 2005
HARROGATE INTERNATIONAL CENTRE
PROGRAMME
BES 2005
24TH JOINT MEETING OF THE
British Endocrine
Societies
4-6 April 2005
HARROGATE INTERNATIONAL CENTRE, HARROGATE, UK
Conference Secretariat:
Society for Endocrinology
22 Apex Court
Woodlands
Bradley Stoke
Bristol BS32 4JT, UK
Contact: Feona Horrex or Juliet Need
Tel: +44 (0)1454 642212
Fax: +44 (0)1454 642222
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.endocrinology.org
The Society for Endocrinology
Company Limited by Guarantee
Registered in England No 349408
Registered office as shown left
Registered Charity No 266813
British Endocrine Societies Constituent Groups
Joint Meetings of the
British Endocrine Societies
25th
Newcastle, 18-22 March 2007
8th
European Congress
of Endocrinology,
Glasgow, 1-5 April 2006
24th
Harrogate, 4-6 April 2005
23rd
Brighton, 22-24 March 2004
(with the European Federation
of Endocrine Societies)
Association of British
Clinical Diabetologists
Bayliss and Starling Society
Bone and Tooth Society
British Association of
Endocrine Surgeons
British Endocrine Pathologists'
Group
British Society for
Neuroendocrinology
British Society for Paediatric
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Caledonian Society for
Endocrinology
Diabetes UK
Irish Endocrine Society
Ovarian Club
RSM Section for Diabetes
and Endocrinology
Society for Endocrinology
Society for Experimental Biology
Society for Reproduction
and Fertility
Welsh Endocrine and
Diabetes Society
22nd
Glasgow, 24-26 March 2003
21st
Harrogate, 8-11 April 2002
20th
Belfast, 26-29 March 2001
19th
Birmingham, 13-16 March 2000
(with the European Federation
of Endocrine Societies)
18th
Bournemouth, 12-15 April 1999
17th
Edinburgh, 23-25 March 1998
16th
Harrogate, 7-10 April 1997
15th
Dublin, 25-28 March 1996
14th
Warwick, 27-30 March 1995
13th
Bournemouth, 21-24 March 1994
12th
Liverpool, 29 March-1 April 1993
11th
Harrogate, 23-26 March 1992
JA Franklyn (Chair), DRE Abayasekara (Society for Reproduction and
Fertility), P Bell (Irish Endocrine Society), SR Bloom (Chairman, Society for
Endocrinology), S Boardman (Association of British Clinical Diabetologists),
AJ Bone (Diabetes UK), P Bouloux (Clinical Committee of the Society for
Endocrinology), GM Coast (Society for Experimental Biology), JMC Connell
(Chair, BES Committee of the Society for Endocrinology), GS Conway
(Ovarian Club), JS Davies (Welsh Endocrine and Diabetes Society),
JRE Davis (Molecular Endocrinology Workshop Organiser), P Freedman
(RSM Section for Diabetes and Endocrinology), M Hewison (Science
Committee of the Society for Endocrinology), J Hubbard (British Association
of Endocrine Surgeons), C Kelnar (British Society for Paediatric
Endocrinology and Diabetes), B Kennon (Caledonian Society for
Endocrinology), A Logan (Programme Secretary, Society for Endocrinology),
D McCance (Bayliss and Starling Society), JF Morris (British Society for
Neuroendocrinology), D O'Shea (Irish Endocrine Society), JM Polak (British
Endocrine Pathologists' Group), JR Seckl (Molecular Endocrinology
Workshop Organiser), PL Selby (Bone and Tooth Society), M Vanderpump
(British Thyroid Association), JAH Wass (General Secretary, Society for
Endocrinology), A White (Treasurer, Society for Endocrinology)
10th
Brighton, 15-18 April 1991
Local Organising Chair
9th
Glasgow, 19-22 March 1990
P Hammond
8th
Manchester, 10-13 April 1989
7th
Exeter, 18-21 April 1988
6th
Warwick, 23-26 March 1987
5th
Sheffield, 7-10 April 1986
4th
Oxford, 25-28 March 1985
3rd
Edinburgh, 27-30 March 1984
2nd
York, 5-8 April 1983
1st
London, 25-27 May 1982
British Thyroid Association
Programme Organising Committee
Corporate Members
The Society for Endocrinology would like to
thank the following Premier Level Corporate
Members whose support is greatly appreciated:
AstraZeneca plc
BioScientifica Ltd
Ferring Pharmaceuticals Ltd
GlaxoSmithKline
Ipsen Ltd
Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd
Novo Nordisk Ltd
Pfizer Ltd
Sandoz Biopharmaceuticals
Serono Ltd
The Society for Endocrinology would also like to
thank the following Ordinary Level Corporate
Members whose support is greatly appreciated:
Abbott Diagnostics
Ardana Bioscience Ltd
Eli Lilly & Company Ltd
Genzyme Therapeutics
Organon
Randox Laboratories Ltd
Schering Health Care Ltd
Servier Laboratories Ltd
Sponsors and Exhibitors
In addition to the above, we are also grateful to
the following companies and organisations who
have sponsored our meeting in other ways:
OBI-DSL
Wisepress
Contents
General Information
Harrogate
1
Conference venue
1
Transport links
1
Accommodation
1
Tourist information
2
Wheelchair access
2
Prayer room
2
Meals and refreshments
2
Security
2
Internet café
2
Slide preview room
2
Posters
2
Business meetings
2
Social programme
3
Awards
4
Satellite sessions
4
Meeting Programme
Meeting overview
7
Monday 4 April
11
Tuesday 5 April
15
Wednesday 6 April
19
Attended posters
23
Exhibitors
35
Meeting Timetable
Inside Back Cover
Welcome
We are delighted to provide you with the programme for our BES 2005 meeting in Harrogate.
We hope that you will share the Programme Organising Committee's view that this is an
inspirational programme for delegates, which spans modern clinical practice and the dynamic
basic science that underpins endocrinology and integrates the two.
Plenary lectures, symposia, workshops and sessions on 'the expert's view' will address a broad
range of contemporary endocrine topics. Oral presentation and poster sessions representing
the best of clinical and basic science research in endocrinology are strong features of the
programme. A further highlight will be the Moral Maze session, in which a panel of
international repute will present facets of the argument regarding the role of animals in
laboratory research. Look out for the sessions dedicated to Young Endocrinologists and
Endocrine Nurses too! Once again, the meeting has the more compact 3-day format. The
registration desk will be open from 09.00 on Monday 4 April and the main programme will
commence at 12.30.
Harrogate is itself an elegant spa town in picturesque North Yorkshire, and a winner of
'Britain in Bloom'. On arrival you will notice grand historic buildings, charming parks and
gardens, and an air of sophistication. Harrogate has earned its reputation as a leading
conference destination and, with the Harrogate International Centre, has enviably become
one of Britain's major conference and exhibition towns.
The BES's traditional social events return again this year, including a golf tournament, five-aside football, a tennis tournament, a ramble in the Yorkshire Dales, and not forgetting our very
own BES orchestra. Following Monday's plenary lecture, make sure you attend the Welcome
Reception in the Harrogate International Centre, after which there will be a 'buffet and
boogie' night in a local city centre bar. The BES Banquet takes place on Tuesday evening in
the Majestic Hotel, a palatial and stately Victorian property set in 12 acres of private gardens
overlooking Harrogate town centre.
We very much look forward to seeing you in Harrogate.
Jayne Franklyn
Chair, Programme Organising Committee
Peter Hammond
Local Organising Chair
G E N E R A L I N F O R M AT I O N
Harrogate
Easily accessible in the heart of North Yorkshire - England's largest county - Harrogate is equidistant from London and
Edinburgh (200 miles) and the east and west coasts (60 miles). This ideal geographical position is enhanced by excellent
road, rail and air links to a town which has been attracting visitors for over 400 years. Visitors arriving by road will find
straightforward motorway access from all directions. There are frequent rail connections to Harrogate from London's
Kings Cross, as well as via Leeds and York.
Conference venue
The Harrogate International Centre is renowned for its auditorium seating over 2000 delegates, which is interlinked with
seven exhibition halls. It stands resplendent at the heart of the elegant town. Magnificent hotels and homely
guesthouses are within walking distance. The town centre boasts exciting shops and tempting restaurants, and
stunning parks and gardens testify to Harrogate's reputation as 'England's Floral Town'. The Harrogate International
Centre has also recently benefited from carefully planned expansion and improvements.
Transport links
Harrogate is located at the centre of the UK, midway between the ports of Hull and Liverpool, and with ready access to
London and Edinburgh. A first class motorway network, and mainline rail, sea and 24-hour air links ensure that
Harrogate is able to offer all the benefits expected of a truly international venue.
BY TRAIN
There are regular services to Harrogate via York and Leeds. Links to and from London Kings Cross are run by GNER
(www.gner.co.uk). You can contact National Rail Enquiries on 08457 484950 (UK only) or book tickets online at
www.thetrainline.com.
BY COACH
For details of public transport in the Harrogate area visit www.harrogateanddistrict.co.uk, while information about
National Express coaches can be found at www.gobycoach.com.
BY CAR
From London: M1, then A1(M) - take the Wetherby exit (9 miles from Harrogate).
From the North: A1(M) - take the Wetherby or Knaresborough exit (the Knaresborough exit is 8 miles from Harrogate).
From the East: M621, then A1(M) - take the Wetherby exit.
From the West: M56, M62, then A1(M) - take the Wetherby exit.
There are 450 car parking spaces at the Harrogate International Centre. At the time of printing, charges were as follows:
up to 3 hours, £3.50; up to 6 hours, £5.50; up to 12 hours, £7.50; up to 24 hours, £10.00.
BY AIR
Manchester Airport: 75 mins' drive from Harrogate.
Leeds/Bradford International Airport: 20 mins' drive from Harrogate.
BY SEA
From Rotterdam or Zeebrugge to Hull, which is 60 miles from Harrogate.
Accommodation
There is a wide variety of hotels in Harrogate, ranging from comfortable budget-conscious options through to luxury
choices. Book your accommodation either online at www.endocrinology.org/sfe/bes2005/accomform.htm or using the
enclosed accommodation booking form. Please book early to secure the hotel of your choice. Contact British Endocrine
Societies direct for any other accommodation queries (Tel: +44 (0)1423 569615; Fax: +44 (0)1423 701433).
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G E N E R A L I N F O R M AT I O N
Tourist information
Harrogate Tourist Information Centre can be contacted on +44 (0)1423 537300 or by email at [email protected]
For further information about Harrogate and the surrounding area see their web site: www.harrogate.gov.uk/tourism.
Wheelchair access
There is wheelchair access to all areas of the Harrogate International Centre.
Prayer room
A prayer room will be located in the Chorus Dressing Room, Level 6A, and will be available throughout the meeting.
Meals and refreshments
Complimentary tea and coffee will be available during scheduled breaks in the programme. A buffet lunch is included
in the registration fee, and will be available for delegates on all 3 days in Hall D. Tea and coffee will be available to
purchase outside scheduled breaks.
Security
Please wear your badge at all times. Entrance will not be permitted to delegates who are not wearing their badges.
Delegates are advised to look after their own belongings, as neither the BES nor the Harrogate International Centre
can be held responsible for any loss. A cloakroom is available for your use at the Harrogate International Centre.
Internet café
There will be an internet café available on the 5th floor of the HIC, kindly supported by Novo Nordisk Ltd.
Slide preview room
The slide preview facility will be located in Conference Office 1. Speakers will be directed to this room from the
registration desk in order to drop off their presentations. Please do not bring your own laptop computer to the meeting.
Posters
Posters will be on display in Hall D of the Harrogate International Centre from 11.00 on Monday 4 April and all day on
Tuesday 5 and Wednesday 6 April. All posters must be removed by 16.15 on Wednesday 6 April. Even-numbered posters
will be attended from 11.45 to 13.00 on Tuesday 5 April and odd-numbered posters will be attended from 11.45 to 13.00
on Wednesday 6 April.
Business meetings
An Extraordinary General Meeting of the Society for Endocrinology will take place on Tuesday 5 April at 11.45 in the
Main Auditorium.
The British Thyroid Association will be holding their Annual General Meeting at 11.30 on Wednesday 6 April in the Main
Auditorium.
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G E N E R A L I N F O R M AT I O N
Social programme
Sunday 3 April
Golf Tournament - Pannal Golf Club
This year's tournament will be held in the afternoon. To take part, please indicate your interest on the registration form;
you will be sent further details in due course. If you have any questions please contact Steve Gilbey (Email:
[email protected]).
Five-a-side Football Tournament - Rossett Sports Centre
GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY PFIZER LTD
Kick-off will be on Sunday afternoon. If you would like to participate, please indicate your interest on the registration
form, and you will be sent further details. Questions should be directed to Peter Hammond (Email:
[email protected]).
Tennis Tournament
GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY PFIZER LTD
Please indicate your interest on the registration form if you would like to take part, and you will be sent further
information. Please address any questions to Maggie Carson (Tel: +44 (0)131 2421378; Email: [email protected]).
Hike - Malham Cove
You will need strong shoes, waterproofs and a packed lunch for this walk of about 7 miles, taking approximately 3 hours.
The destination, Malham Cove, is a huge curving amphitheatre-shaped cliff of limestone rock. The cliff's vertical face is
about 80m high. The top of the cove is a large deeply eroded limestone pavement, of a strange pattern rarely seen in
England. Please indicate your interest on the registration form and you will be sent further details in due course. If you
have any questions please contact Feona Horrex (Tel: +44 (0)1454 642212; Email: [email protected]).
Monday 4 April
Orchestral Recital
Delegates are invited to play in the BES Orchestra at Monday evening's Welcome Reception. Practice will take place on
Monday morning. To participate, please indicate your interest on the registration form and you will be sent further
information. Questions should be addressed to Julian Davis (Tel: +44 (0)161 2755181; Email: [email protected]).
Welcome Reception - Hall D, Harrogate International Centre - 18.30
GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY PFIZER LTD
Join your colleagues for the Welcome Reception, accompanied by live classical music from the BES Orchestra.
Buffet and Boogie - Bar Med - 19.30
GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY PFIZER LTD
Tickets £10
Join in the fun at Bar Med, a popular venue in the city centre. You will receive a complimentary drink on arrival, followed
by a buffet, then dance the night away with your fellow delegates. Places are limited, so tickets will be allocated on a
first-come, first-served basis. You will find Bar Med at Unit 1, Royal Bath, Parliament Street, Harrogate HG1 2WH.
Tuesday 5 April
British Endocrine Societies Banquet - Majestic Hotel - 19.30
DRINKS RECEPTION GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY IPSEN LTD
Tickets £50
The Majestic Hotel is an impressive 19th century hotel nestling in the centre of Harrogate and set in 12 acres of awardwinning landscaped gardens. It is positioned directly behind Harrogate International Centre and is the venue for this
year's BES banquet. After a drinks reception and dinner, you can dance along to the modern jazz band. Those of you
who fancy a flutter can try your luck at the casino tables. Places are limited and tickets will be sold on a first-come, firstserved basis. The Majestic Hotel is on Ripon Road, Harrogate HG1 2HU.
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G E N E R A L I N F O R M AT I O N
Awards
We are extremely grateful to Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd and Pfizer Ltd for their continued generous support in
offering the following prizes, which are to be used for research and travel.
NOVARTIS AWARDS
Two abstracts have been selected by the BES Programme Organising Committee for the 2005 Novartis Awards, and the
prizes will be presented at the BES Banquet on Tuesday 5 April. The abstracts will be presented in a dedicated poster
session at 12.30 on Tuesday 5 April in Hall D and also as oral communications:
OC18 Genetic ablation of the AgRP neuron leads to a lean, hypophagic phenotype GA Bewick, JV Gardiner,
WS Dhillo, AS Kent, MA Ghatei & SR Bloom, to be presented at 11.30 on Tuesday 5 April in Queen's Suite 2.
OC29 Characterisation of a novel protein interacting with the glucocorticoid receptor LM Rice, CE Waters,
HJ Garside, A White & DW Ray, to be presented at 14.45 on Tuesday 5 April in Queen's Suite 2.
BRITISH ENDOCRINE SOCIETIES AWARDS SUPPORTED BY PFIZER LTD
The BES and Pfizer Ltd are pleased to announce the eleventh in a series of awards for clinical and basic science
laboratory research proposals in the field of endocrine growth factors. The prizes will be awarded at the BES Banquet
on Tuesday 5 April.
BRITISH THYROID ASSOCIATION AWARDS
The BES and the British Thyroid Association are delighted to announce the first in a series of awards for young
researchers who present high quality research into the thyroid. The prizes will be awarded at the BES Banquet on
Tuesday 5 April. The two winners for 2005 will present their abstracts as oral communications as indicated below:
OC35 Risk of second cancers among people with thyroid cancer - treatment effects or common aetiology?
TC Sandeep, MWJ Strachan, RM Reynolds, DH Brewster, G Scélo, E Pukkala, K Hemminki, A Anderson, E Tracey,
S Friis, M McBride, C Kee-Seng, V Pompe-Kirn, EV Kliewer, JM Tonita, JG Jonasson, C Martos, P Boffetta &
P Brennan, to be presented at 10.00 on Wednesday 6 April in the King's Suite.
OC40 Development of novel thyroid stimulating monoclonal antibodies from an experimental model with
potencies equivalent to those in Graves' disease patients, including full agonistic activity but also differential
blocking properties JA Gilbert, PV Rao, S Salehi, M Gora, AM McGregor & JP Banga, to be presented at 11.15 on
Wednesday 6 April in the King's Suite.
Satellite sessions
Pfizer Ltd
Monday 4 April, 11.00-12.00, Main Auditorium
Critical issues in adolescent endocrinology: from genetics to transitional care
KIGS/KIMS: their contribution to transition - Roger Abs
Transitional care in endocrinology is critical, and this is clearly exemplified by the young adult with pituitary disease.
KIGS (Pfizer International Growth Database) and KIMS (Pfizer International Metabolic Database) are international
databases containing information relating to growth hormone treatment in children (KIGS), as well as adults (KIMS).
KIGS has been active since 1987 and contains data from more than 51 000 patients, whereas KIMS has been collecting
data since 1994 and has recruited over 9300 patients. It is now proving possible to utilise information from these
databases to help inform the optimum care of the young adult with persisting/severe growth hormone deficiency.
Data analyses addressing this issue will be presented at this symposium.
We are delighted to welcome Roger Abs who will present these data. Dr Abs is Head of Endocrinology at the University
Hospital of Antwerp, Belgium, and has extensive experience in the management of growth hormone deficiency. He is
also a longstanding KIMS investigator.
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G E N E R A L I N F O R M AT I O N
Future role of genetic tests - Peter Clayton
There are an ever-increasing number of gene mutations that cause disordered growth and pituitary dysfunction.
Examples of these disorders and their mutations will be presented, as well as how this knowledge can be applied to the
differential diagnosis of the short child. It is also being recognised that polymorphisms in growth-related genes can
contribute to growth performance and response to growth hormone therapy. How this new knowledge might be used
to individualise growth hormone treatment and improve efficacy will be discussed.
We are also delighted to welcome Peter Clayton to cover this subject. He is a Professor of Child Health and Paediatric
Endocrinology at St Mary's Hospital in Manchester. His research focus over the last 15 years has been on the clinical,
biochemical and molecular control of normal and abnormal growth. He has extensive experience in the management of
children treated with growth hormone.
Schering Health Care Ltd
Tuesday 5 April, 13.00-14.00, Main Auditorium
New quarterly intramuscular testosterone undecanoate and the future of testosterone replacement therapy
Male hypogonadism is a condition arising from androgen deficiency due to abnormalities affecting the hypothalamicpituitary-testicular axis. Hypogonadism has important health implications because of the hormone's actions on the heart,
bone and sexual function. It is an acknowledged cause of osteoporosis and fractures in men. There is also growing
evidence that androgens play an important role in cardiovascular disease, including atherogenesis and heart failure.
In this symposium, the aetiology of hypogonadism will be discussed, including the links between abnormally low
testosterone levels and cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and diabetes, as well as the new and exciting area of the
metabolic syndrome. Testosterone management has developed considerably over the years with many treatment options
now available. Existing testosterone replacement therapy will be reviewed during a discussion concerning the management
of hypogonadism, focusing on Nebido® (testosterone undecanoate) which has recently been launched in the UK.
The introduction of Nebido®, the first quarterly intramuscular injection, expands the portfolio of available drug
management, offering patients and clinicians a product with smoother continuous testosterone levels maintained
within the normal range, which is easy to administer and well tolerated. Nebido® provides a promising new alternative
for the treatment of hypogonadism.
Ipsen Ltd
Tuesday 5 April, 18.00-19.00, Main Auditorium
Would you recognise LOH if it walked into your clinic? Interactive case presentations on the diagnosis and
management of late-onset hypogonadism (LOH)
The development of newer presentations for testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) has been significant in the past
few years, helping to improve the management of patients with late-onset hypogonadism (LOH). However, progress can
still be made to improve the short- and long-term outcomes for patients with this medical condition. Awareness and
education are key to improving the diagnosis and management of these patients, as many potential patients with LOH
currently remain undiagnosed.
In this symposium, management of LOH will be discussed and existing TRT will be reviewed including Testim® 50mg gel,
which has recently been launched in the UK. The main part of the symposium will comprise challenging case
presentations with audience participation and comments from an expert panel. Delegates are invited to attend this
educational symposium which will be interactive and informative.
Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd
Wednesday 6 April, 07.30-08.30, Queen’s Suite 1
New frontiers in the diagnosis and management of neuroendocrine tumours
Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are a rare, diverse group of cancers that have a variable rate of progression. The
majority of these tumours arise in the gastro-entero-pancreatic (GEP) region. Most NET cells express somatostatin
receptors, and can synthesise and secrete a variety of physiologically active peptides that generate disabling symptoms.
However, some tumours produce peptides only after a prolonged period of inactivity. The diagnosis of NETs depends on
the presence and specificity of these symptoms.
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G E N E R A L I N F O R M AT I O N
The majority of functioning tumours present with specific symptoms such as hypoglycaemia, whilst in others’ nonspecific symptoms feature (e.g. diarrhoea, abdominal pain, dyspepsia). As a result, immediate diagnosis is not always
possible. Non-functioning NETs are often diagnosed incidentally during examinations carried out for further medical
problems or during the course of surgery in connection with other disease. GEP tumours have been further classified
according to their anatomical site of origin (pancreas, stomach, duodenum and upper jejunum, ileum, caecum, colon,
rectum, appendix). The main prognostic factors for NETs are tumour type and tumour size, histological grading, organ of
origin, functionality and stage of tumour progression.
The initial diagnosis of GEP tumours is often biochemical. The main screening marker is chromogranin A (CgA). Raised
plasma CgA levels are found in the vast majority of patients with GEP endocrine tumours. Neurokinin A (NKA) can be
used to accurately identify patients with a poor prognosis. It is a glycoprotein present in almost all neuroendocrine cells.
A plasma NKA concentration greater than 50ng/l is a more powerful predictor of poor prognosis for mid-gut carcinoid
tumours than traditional clinical markers. Other specific markers can be selected on the basis of symptomatology of the
patient for diagnosis after a biopsy is taken.
The basic imaging techniques used for diagnosis of NETs are computerised technology (CT), magnetic resonance
imaging (MRI), ultrasound, somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) and positron emission tomography (PET).
Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy is a valuable imaging tool for localising and staging NETs.
Many patients presenting with metastatic disease are not suitable candidates for surgery or cannot be managed
effectively using surgery alone. Non-surgical intervention in the treatment of NETs focuses mainly on controlling the
symptoms of the disease, and treatment of NETs should be based upon individual patient characteristics and be tailored
to address the growth properties of the tumour. Treatments include somatostatin analogues, interferon-␣ and
chemotherapy.
Ardana Bioscience Ltd
Wednesday 6 April, 13.15-14.15, Queen's Suite 1
Testosterone replacement: management across the patient spectrum
The Ardana Bioscience session brings together experts in the field of male hypogonadism. It spans a range of topics
including cutting edge research and the latest thinking on clinical management, and will also incorporate the views of
endocrine specialist nurses and patients.
Professor Fred Wu, who will chair the meeting, will briefly review the current status of testosterone replacement therapy
and will discuss current successes in the area, as well as highlighting topics that require further research. Professor
Shalender Bhasin from the Charles Drew University, Los Angeles, USA will share some of his work on treatment
algorithms for patients with hypogonadism and will present some of his research on testosterone deficiency and muscle
function. Dr Hugh Jones from Barnsley will review the current evidence about the effects of testosterone on the heart, a
topic which continues to generate considerable debate. Dr Jones will share study results from his department including
the effects of testosterone on patients with heart disease, heart failure and diabetes. The last presentation, from
endocrine nurse Maggie Carson, will discuss nurses' and patients' perspectives on the current management of
hypogonadism and will outline ways in which endocrine specialist nurses can be best utilised in order to improve
treatment outcomes.
The symposium promises to be a stimulating and informative blend of the latest research as well as a useful insight into
current clinical management. We look forward to welcoming you.
6
O V E R V I E W
Monday 4 April
from 09.00
Registration
Main Foyer
11.00-12.00
Pfizer Ltd Satellite Session
Main Auditorium
12.00-12.30
LUNCH
Hall D
12.30-13.15
Society for Endocrinology Dale Medal Lecture
Main Auditorium
13.15-14.45
Symposium 1: Endocrine complications of systemic disorders
Queen's Suite 1
13.15-14.45
Symposium 2: The endocrinology of the kidney
Queen's Suite 2
13.15-14.45
Clinical Management Workshop 1: Diagnosis and management of steroid deficiency
Main Auditorium
14.45-15.15
TEA
Hall D
15.15-17.30
Symposium 3: Thyroid disease in pregnancy and childhood
Main Auditorium
15.15-17.30
Oral Communications 1: Diabetes and metabolism
Queen's Suite 1
15.15-17.30
Oral Communications 2: Reproduction and growth
Queen's Suite 2
17.30-18.15
Clinical Endocrinology Trust Visiting Professor Lecture
Main Auditorium
18.30-19.15
Welcome Reception
Hall D
19.30-late
Buffet and Boogie
Bar Med (ticket only)
Tuesday 5 April
07.30-08.15
The Expert's View 1: Clinical - Precocious puberty
Queen's Suite 1
07.30-08.15
The Expert's View 2: Clinical - Amiodarone, lithium and thyroid dysfunction
Queen's Suite 2
07.30-08.15
The Expert's View 3: Science - The polypeptide hormone stanniocalcin, no longer just
a fish-tale
King's Suite
08.30-09.15
Clinical Endocrinology Trust Lecture
Main Auditorium
09.15-09.45
COFFEE
Hall D
7
A lifelong commitment
Pfizer Ltd, Walton Oaks, Dorking Road, Tadworth, Surrey KT20 7NS Tel: 01737 330 643 Fax: 01737 332 513
Date of preparation: January 2005. Code: GEN074
O V E R V I E W
09.45-11.45
Symposium 4: Intracellular transport of steroids
Queen's Suite 1
09.45-11.45
Clinical Management Workshop 2: HRT in women - who should get what?
Main Auditorium
09.45-11.45
Oral Communications 3: Neuroendocrinology
Queen's Suite 2
11.45-12.00
Society for Endocrinology Extraordinary General Meeting
Main Auditorium
11.45-13.00
LUNCH
Hall D
11.45-13.00
Attended Posters (even numbers)
Hall D
12.30-13.00
Novartis Awards Poster Session
Hall D
13.00-14.00
Molecular Endocrinology Workshop: Protein chip technology
Queen's Suite 1
13.00-14.00
Schering Health Care Ltd Satellite Session
Main Auditorium
13.00-14.00
Debate: Growth hormone in adults: did NICE get it right?
Queen's Suite 2
14.00-16.00
Symposium 5: Cardiovascular endocrinology
Main Auditorium
14.00-16.00
Symposium 6: Novel approaches for defining oestrogen action
Queen's Suite 1
14.00-16.00
Oral Communications 4: Steroids
Queen's Suite 2
14.00-16.00
Nurses Session: Skeletal health
King's Suite
16.00-16.15
TEA
Hall D
16.00-16.30
NURSES' TEA
Conference Suite
16.15-17.00
The Expert's View 4: Science - The use of genomics to identify key transcriptional
pathways of mammalian implantation
King's Suite
16.15-17.00
The Expert's View 5: Clinical - Controversies in androgen replacement
Queen's Suite 1
16.15-17.00
The Expert's View 6: Clinical - Dyslipidaemias in diabetes
Queen's Suite 2
17.00-17.45
Society for Endocrinology Transatlantic Medal Lecture
Main Auditorium
18.00-19.00
Ipsen Ltd Satellite Session
Main Auditorium
19.30-late
BES Banquet
Majestic Hotel (ticket only)
9
O V E R V I E W
Wednesday 6 April
07.30-08.30
Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd Satellite Session
Queen's Suite 1
08.30-09.15
British Thyroid Association Pitt-Rivers Lecture
Main Auditorium
09.15-09.45
COFFEE
Hall D
09.45-11.30
Symposium 7: The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and inflammation
Queen's Suite 2
09.45-11.30
Clinical Management Workshop 3: Endocrine manipulations in the transsexual
Queen's Suite 1
09.45-11.30
Oral Communications 5: Thyroid
King's Suite
11.30-12.30
British Thyroid Association Annual General Meeting
Main Auditorium
11.30-13.15
LUNCH
Hall D
11.30-13.00
Attended Posters (odd numbers)
Hall D
13.00-14.15
Moral Maze: Ethics and animal experimentation
Main Auditorium
13.15-14.15
Ardana Bioscience Ltd Satellite Session
Queen's Suite 1
14.15-15.45
Symposium 8: Hyperinsulinism-induced hypoglycaemia
Queen's Suite 1
14.15-15.45
Symposium 9: Regulation of ovarian folliculogenesis
Queen's Suite 2
14.15-15.45
Clinical Management Workshop 4: Endocrine sequelae of childhood cancer
Main Auditorium
14.15-15.45
Young Endocrinologists Session: Tricks for success in research
King's Suite
15.45-16.15
TEA
Hall D
16.15-17.00
The Expert's View 7: Science - State of the art lecture: Aquaporins
Conference Suite
16.15-17.00
The Expert's View 8: Clinical - Diagnosis and management of neuroendocrine
tumours of the pancreas and gut, particularly carcinoids
Queen's Suite 1
16.15-17.00
The Expert's View 9: Clinical - Brittle diabetes - does it exist?
Queen's Suite 2
16.15-17.00
The Expert's View 10: Clinical - Interpretation of bone mineral
density and markers of bone metabolism
King's Suite
10
M O N D A Y
M O N D AY
Programme - Monday 4 April 2005
Registration
from 09.00
Main Foyer
Pfizer Ltd Satellite Session
11.00-12.00
Main Auditorium
Critical issues in adolescent endocrinology: from genetics to transitional care
(see page 4 for further details)
LUNCH
12.00-12.30
Hall D
Society for Endocrinology Dale Medal Lecture
12.30-13.15
Main Auditorium
S1
A genetic analysis of insulin and diabetes regulated gene expression
Kahn CR (Boston, USA)
12.30
Chair: Bloom SR (London)
Symposium 1: Endocrine complications of systemic disorders
13.15-14.45
Queen's Suite 1
Chair: Wass JAH (Oxford)
S6
13.15
The metabolic effects of antiretroviral therapy
Danner S (Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
S7
13.45
Parathyroid hormone in children with chronic renal failure
Rees L (London)
S8
14.15
The endocrinology of critical care
Cooper MS (Birmingham)
Symposium 2: The endocrinology of the kidney
13.15-14.45
Queen's Suite 2
Chair: Pearce S (Newcastle)
S9
13.15
Lessons from the genetic hypercalciuric stone forming rat
Bushinsky DA (New York, USA)
S10
13.45
Regulating PTH responses in the kidney
Friedman PA (Pittsburgh, USA)
S11
14.15
The WNK kinases: novel regulations of sodium and potassium transport in the kidney
O’Shaughnessy K (Cambridge)
Clinical Management Workshop 1: Diagnosis and management of steroid deficiency
13.15-14.45
Main Auditorium
S38
13.15
Why is the management of corticosteroid deficiency still controversial?
Lightman SL (Bristol)
Chair: Howlett T (Leicester)
S39
13.45
Diagnosing the suppressed adrenal
Stewart PM (Birmingham)
S40
14.15
Glucocorticoid resistance
Lamberts S (Rotterdam, The Netherlands)
TEA
14.45-15.15
Hall D
11
M O N D AY
Symposium 3: Thyroid disease in pregnancy and childhood
15.15-17.30
Main Auditorium
Chair: Lazarus J (Cardiff)
S12
15.15
Maternal thyroid dysfunction
Weetman A (Sheffield)
S13
15.45
Maternal and placental control of thyroid hormone availability for the foetus
Köhrle J (Berlin, Germany)
S14
16.15
Neuropsychological consequences of thyroid hormone deficiency
Rovet J (Toronto, Canada)
S15
16.45
Diagnosis and management of thyroid dysfunction in childhood
Grüters-Kieslich A (Berlin, Germany)
Oral Communications 1: Diabetes and metabolism
15.15-17.30
Queen's Suite 1
Chairs: Bloom SR (London) & White A (Manchester)
OC1
15.15
Plasticity in myogenesis and skeletal muscle metabolism via insulin and IGF receptor-mediated
Akt activation
Gonzalez I, Cosgrove RA, & Pell JM
OC2
15.30
The relationship of beta-cell function with age: effect of population migration
Heald AH, Anderson SG, Patel J, Rudenski A, Vyas A, Laing I, Hughes E, Prabharakan D, Durrington P
& Gibson JM
OC3
15.45
Depot specific glucocorticoid regulation of key components of the insulin signalling cascade in
human adipose tissue
Gathercole LL, Bujalska IJ, Stewart PM & Tomlinson JW
OC4
16.00
Effect of cholesterol depletion on IGF-induced cell survival: the role of caveolar and non-caveolar
domains
Matthews LC, Taggart MJ & Westwood M
OC5
16.15
Changes in gut hormones after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity favour an anorectic state
Borg CM, le Roux CW, Ghatei MA, Bloom SR, Patel AG & Aylwin SJB
OC6
16.30
Analysis of post-translational processing and trafficking of agouti-related protein
Pritchard LE, Creemers JWM, Gyte A, Davies N, Le Rouzic P, Lawrence C, Luckman S, Brennand JC & White A
OC7
16.45
Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) II mRNA in human subcutaneous adipose tissue is altered by
menopausal status
Gupta P, Harte AL, Hill MJ, Barnett AH, Sturdee DW, Kumar S & McTernan PG
OC8
17.00
Blockade of the neuropeptide Y Y2 receptor with the specific antagonist BIIE0246 attenuates the
effect of endogenous and exogenous peptide YY(3-36) on food intake
Abbott CR, Small CJ, Kennedy AR, Neary NM, Sajedi A, Ghatei MA & Bloom SR
OC9
17.15
Testosterone improves functional capacity and symptoms in men with chronic heart failure: a doubleblind placebo-controlled trial
Malkin CJ, Pugh PJ, Jones RD, van Beek E, West JN, Channer KS & Jones TH
Oral Communications 2: Reproduction and growth
15.15-17.30
Queen's Suite 2
OC10 15.15
Glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis in human decidua: a novel role for 11 beta-hydroxysteroid
dehydrogenase in late gestation
Chan JCY, Evans KN, Innes B, Bulmer JN, Stewart PM, Hewison M & Kilby MD
12
Chairs: Franks SJ (London) and Mason H (London)
M O N D AY
OC11 15.30
A defect in the DHEA-DHEAS shuttle defines a novel cause of polycystic ovary syndrome
Arlt W, Hammer F, Filko D, Chalder SM, Hughes BA, Sanning P, Schofl C & Stewart PM
OC12 15.45
Direct inflammatory action of triiodothyronine on human ovarian surface epithelial cells in vitro
Rae MT, Gubbay O, Kostogiannou A, Niven D, Critchley HOD & Hillier SG
OC13 16.00
A novel autocrine/paracrine inside-out signalling pathway that cross-talks the prostanoid and GnRH
receptors in pituitary cells
Naor Z, Naidich M, Pawson AJ, Morgan K, Battersby S, MacPherson S, Millar M, Jabbour HN & Millar RP
OC14 16.15
Pathophysiology and genetics of congenital adrenal hyperplasia caused by P450 oxidoreductase
deficiency
Dhir V, Ivison HE, Walker EA, Draper ND, Hammer F, Malunowicz EM, Stewart PM, Shackleton CHL & Arlt W
OC15 16.30
Early preantral follicle development in polycystic ovaries (PCO) differs according to ovulatory status
Franks S, Stubbs S, Webber LJ & Hardy K
OC16 16.45
A densitometric and architectural analysis of the skeleton in adults with varying degrees of GH
deficiency
Murray RD, Adams JE & Shalet SM
OC17 17.00
Disruption of intramembranous and endochondral bone development in TRalpha 2 null mice
Bassett JHD, O'Shea PJ, Nordstrom K, Vennstrom B & Williams GR
Clinical Endocrinology Trust Visiting Professor Lecture
17.30-18.15
Main Auditorium
S2
Growth hormone - not only for growth, but for life?
Christiansen JS (Aarhus, Denmark)
17.30
Chair: Rees L (London)
Welcome Reception
18.30-19.15
Hall D
Buffet and Boogie
19.30-late
Bar Med (ticket only)
13
14
T U E S D A Y
T U E S D AY
Programme - Tuesday 5 April 2005
The Expert's View 1: Clinical
GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY SERONO LTD
07.30-08.15
Queen's Suite 1
Chair: Conway G (London)
Precocious puberty
Stanhope R (London)
The Expert's View 2: Clinical
07.30-08.15
Queen's Suite 2
Chair: Vanderpump M (London)
Amiodarone, lithium and thyroid dysfunction
Sheppard M (Birmingham)
The Expert's View 3: Science
07.30-08.15
King's Suite
Chair: Bland R (Warwick)
The polypeptide hormone stanniocalcin, no longer just a fish-tale
Wagner G (London, Canada)
Clinical Endocrinology Trust Lecture
08.30-09.15
Main Auditorium
S3
Thyroid disease - causes and effects
Franklyn JA (Birmingham)
08.30
Chair: Wass JAH (Oxford)
COFFEE
09.15-09.45
Hall D
Symposium 4: Intracellular transport of steroids
09.45-11.45
Queen's Suite 1
S16
09.45
An introduction to lipid rafts and their role in protein targeting
Shennan K (Aberdeen)
Chair: Hewison M (Birmingham)
S17
10.15
The steroid hormone response element binding proteins
Adams JS (Los Angeles, USA)
S18
10.45
The molecular mechanism of nuclear trafficking
Stewart M (Cambridge)
S19
11.15
Intracellular trafficking of vitamin D receptors and interacting proteins
Barsony J (Bethesda, USA)
Clinical Management Workshop 2: HRT in women - who should get what?
09.45-11.45
Main Auditorium
Chair: Buckler H (Manchester)
S41
09.45
Current state of HRT in post-menopausal women
Prelevic G (London)
S42
10.15
Hormone replacement in pre-menopausal women
Conway GS (London)
S43
10.45
DHEA and its role in women
Allolio B (Würzburg, Germany)
15
T U E S D AY
Oral Communications 3: Neuroendocrinology
09.45-11.45
Queen's Suite 2
Chairs: Buckingham JC (London) & Davis JRE (Manchester)
OC18 09.45
Genetic ablation of the AgRP neuron leads to a lean, hypophagic phenotype
Bewick GA, Gardiner JV, Dhillo WS, Kent AS, Ghatei MA & Bloom SR
NOVARTIS AWARD WINNER (NP1) ALSO PRESENTED AS A POSTER
OC19 10.00
The nadir growth hormone after an octreotide test dose predicts the long term efficacy of
somatostatin analogue therapy in acromegaly
Gilbert JA, McGregor AM & Aylwin SJB
OC20 10.15
Transcriptional activation of the prolactin gene by TNF-alpha is mediated via NF␬B
Friedrichsen S, Wilding M, Harper C, Nelson G, Spiller DS, White MRH & Davis JRE
OC21 10.30
Adenosine expression and function in the anterior pituitary gland
Francis K, Pexa A, Lewis BM, McNicol AM, Jasani B, Deussen A, Scanlon MF, Rees DA & Ham J
Modulators of the SUR2B/Kir6.1 ATP-sensitive K+ channel regulate annexin 1 release in the TtT/GF
OC22 10.45
folliculostellate cell line
Payne JP, Morris JF, Solito E & Buckingham JC
OC23 11.00
Ghrelin and cannabinoid interactions on food intake
Korbonits M, Tucci SA, Rogers EK & Kirkham TC
OC24 11.15
Feeding effects of the gut hormones ghrelin, peptide YY(3-36) and oxyntomodulin in lean and obese mice
Druce MR, Neary NM, Small CJ, Monteiro M, Thompson EL, Ghatei MA & Bloom SR
OC25 11.30
Does GH replacement increase the risk of recurrence in patients with craniopharyngioma?
Karavitaki N, Warner JT, Shine B, Stratton IM, Turner HE & Wass JAH
Society for Endocrinology Extraordinary General Meeting
11.45-12.00
Main Auditorium
LUNCH
11.45-13.00
Hall D
Attended Posters (even numbers)
11.45-13.00
Hall D
Novartis Awards Poster Session
12.30-13.00
Hall D
Molecular Endocrinology Workshop
13.00-14.00
Queen's Suite 1
S57
Protein chip technology
Banks R (Leeds)
13.00
Chair: Davis JRE (Manchester)
Schering Health Care Ltd Satellite Session
13.00-14.00
Main Auditorium
New quarterly intramuscular testosterone undecanoate and the future of
testosterone replacement therapy (see page 5 for further details)
Debate: Growth hormone in adults: did NICE get it right?
13.00-14.00
Queen's Suite 2
For: Barkan A (Ann Arbor, USA)
16
Chair: Shalet SM (Manchester)
Against: Wass JAH (Oxford)
T U E S D AY
Symposium 5: Cardiovascular endocrinology
14.00-16.00
Main Auditorium
Chair: Bouloux P (London)
S20
14.00
Adipokines, metabolic syndrome and atherogenesis
Sattar N (Glasgow)
S21
14.30
Inflammatory markers in coronary heart disease
Danesh J (Cambridge)
S22
15.00
Endothelial function and atherogenesis
Deanfield JE (London)
S23
15.30
Oxidative stress and cardiovascular disease
Dominiczak AF (Glasgow)
Symposium 6: Novel approaches for defining oestrogen action
14.00-16.00
Queen's Suite 1
Chair: Parker M (London)
S24
14.00
Imaging of E2 action in vivo
Maggi A (Milan, Italy)
S25
14.30
New roles for oestrogens as revealed by models of oestrogen insufficiency
Simpson ER (Melbourne, Australia)
S26
15.00
Profiling in endometrium - genomic approaches to defining oestrogen action
Moggs JG (Macclesfield)
S27
15.30
Oestrogen receptors and growth factor interactions: implications for cancer development and treatment
Nicholson RI, Hutcheson IR, Giles MG & Gee JMW (Cardiff)
Oral Communications 4: Steroids
14.00-16.00
Queen's Suite 2
Chairs: Ray D (Manchester) & Adams JS (Los Angeles, USA)
OC26 14.00
Identification of a defective gene in familial glucocorticoid deficiency type 2 as an ACTH receptor
accessory factor responsible for cell surface trafficking
Metherell LA, Chapple JP, Cooray S, Naville D, Begeot M, Huebner A, Cheetham ME & Clark AJL
OC27 14.15
Interaction of the ACTH receptor C-terminal tail with a nuclear envelope protein
Doufexis M & Clark AJ
OC28 14.30
Impact of dietary chenodeoxycholic acid on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in rats
McNeilly AS, Walker BR & Andrew R
OC29 14.45
Characterisation of a novel protein interacting with the glucocorticoid receptor
Rice LM, Waters CE, Garside HJ, White A & Ray DW
NOVARTIS AWARD WINNER (NP2) ALSO PRESENTED AS A POSTER
OC30 15.00
Cortisol, DHEA and DHEAS in severe sepsis - a paradigm revisited
Arlt W, Hammer F, Sanning P, Filko D, Allolio B, Stewart PM & Annane D
OC31 15.15
Functional effects of mutations in the 11beta-hydroxylase (CYP11B1) gene
Barr M, Wilkinson DM, Holloway CD, Miller S, MacKenzie SM, Kazi S, Fraser R, Connell JMC & Davies E
OC32 15.30
Differential induction of fibroblast 11beta-HSD1: a mechanism for tissue-specific regulation of
inflammation
Hardy RS, Cooper MS, Filer A, Parsonage G, Buckley CD, Stewart PM & Hewison M
OC33 15.45
Generation of glucocorticoids by 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase isozymes in the perfused
mouse hindlimb
Dover AR, Hadoke PWF, Miller E, Newby DE & Walker BR
17
T U E S D AY
Nurses Session: Skeletal health
14.00-16.00
King's Suite
Chairs: Smethurst L (Manchester) & Campbell K (Glasgow)
S50
14.00
Techniques of bone mass measurement
Alsop C (Manchester)
S51
14.30
Steroids and the skeleton
Francis RM (Newcastle)
S52
15.00
Management of osteoporosis
Selby PL (Manchester)
S53
15.30
Osteoporosis and fracture: the role of the endocrine nurse
Nelson DA (Glasgow)
TEA
16.00-16.15
Hall D
NURSES' TEA
GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY SERONO LTD
16.00-16.30
Conference Suite
The Expert's View 4: Science
16.15-17.00
King's Suite
Chair: Lowry P (Reading)
The use of genomics to identify key transcriptional pathways of mammalian implantation
Smith S (Glasgow)
The Expert's View 5: Clinical
16.15-17.00
Queen's Suite 1
Chair: Arlt W (Birmingham)
Controversies in androgen replacement
Bouloux P (London)
The Expert's View 6: Clinical
16.15-17.00
Queen's Suite 2
Chair: Williams G (Bristol)
Dyslipidaemias in diabetes
Durrington P (Manchester)
Society for Endocrinology Transatlantic Medal Lecture
17.00-17.45
Main Auditorium
S4
Consequences from loss of estrogen receptor activity in endocrine physiology
Korach KS (Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA)
17.00
Chair: Bloom SR (London)
Ipsen Ltd Satellite Session
18.00-19.00
Main Auditorium
Would you recognise LOH if it walked into your clinic? Interactive case presentations on the
diagnosis and management of late-onset hypogonadism (LOH) (see page 5 for further details)
BES Banquet
19.30-late
18
Majestic Hotel (ticket only)
Programme - Wednesday 6 April 2005
Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd Satellite Session
07.30-08.30
Queen's Suite 1
New frontiers in the diagnosis and management of neuroendocrine tumours (see page 5 for further details)
British Thyroid Association Pitt-Rivers Lecture
08.30-09.15
Main Auditorium
S5
Essential role of transporters in cellular entry of thyroid hormone
Visser TJ (Rotterdam, The Netherlands)
08.30
Chair: Lazarus J (Cardiff)
COFFEE
09.15-09.45
Hall D
Symposium 7: The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and inflammation
09.45-11.30
Queen's Suite 2
S28
09.45
Neuroendocrine and immune changes associated with autoimmune disease
Harbuz MS (Bristol)
Chair: Simpson ER (Melbourne, Australia)
S29
10.10
Structure/function of the glucocorticoid receptor and its ligands
Ray DW (Manchester)
S30
10.35
Glucocorticoid action in asthma and COPD
Barnes PJ (London)
S31
11.00
Annexin A1 - a unique mediator of glucocorticoid action
Flower RJ (London)
Clinical Management Workshop 3: Endocrine manipulations in the transsexual
09.45-11.30
Queen's Suite 1
S44
09.45
Sexual differentiation of the human brain and gender
Swaab DF (Amsterdam, The Netherlands)
Chair: Bouloux P (London)
S45
10.15
Endocrine treatment of the transsexual
Levy A (Bristol)
S46
10.45
Phalloplasty for female to male gender reassignment
Ralph DJ (London)
Oral Communications 5: Thyroid
09.45-11.30
King's Suite
Chairs: Weetman A (Sheffield) & Visser TJ (Rotterdam, The Netherlands)
OC34 09.45
Association between serum TSH and fT4 concentrations and occurrence of atrial fibrillation in a large
community-based population of elderly subjects. The Birmingham Elderly Thyroid Study (BETS)
Gammage M, Parle JV, Franklyn JA, Wilson S, Roberts L, Holder R, Sheppard M, Hobbs FDR, Roalfe A,
Heath C & Pattison H
OC35 10.00
Risk of second cancers among people with thyroid cancer - treatment effects or common aetiology?
Sandeep TC, Strachan MWJ, Reynolds RM, Brewster DH, Scélo G, Pukkala E, Hemminki K, Anderson A,
Tracey E, Friis S, McBride M, Kee-Seng C, Pompe-Kirn V, Kliewer EV, Tonita JM, Jonasson JG, Martos C,
Boffetta P & Brennan P
BRITISH THYROID ASSOCIATION AWARD WINNER
OC36 10.15
PTTG induces genomic instability in thyroid cells
Kim DS, Stratford AL, Boelaert K, Pemberton H, Gockce C, Eggo M, Tannahill L, Watkinson JC, Franklyn JA &
McCabe CJ
19
W E D N E S D AY
W E D N E S D AY
W E D N E S D AY
OC37 10.30
PTTG binding factor (PBF) - a novel transforming gene in thyroid tumorigenesis which represses
iodide uptake
Stratford AL, Boelaert K, Tannahill LA, Eggo MC, Gittoes NJ, Franklyn JA & McCabe CJ
OC38 10.45
Anti-TNF␣ therapy inhibits TNF␣-dependent ICAM1 up-regulation in orbital fibroblasts from patients
with thyroid associated ophthalmopathy
Cawood TJ, Moriarty P, Golden-Mason L, O'Farrelly C & O'Shea D
OC39 11.00
Thyrotrophin receptor (TSHR) activation in preadipocytes stimulates the early but inhibits the terminal
stages of adipogenesis
Janus D, Baker GRC, Fuhrer D & Ludgate M
OC40 11.15
Development of novel thyroid stimulating monoclonal antibodies from an experimental model with
potencies equivalent to those in Graves' disease patients, including full agonistic activity but also
differential blocking properties
Gilbert JA, Rao PV, Salehi S, Gora M, McGregor AM & Banga JP
BRITISH THYROID ASSOCIATION AWARD WINNER
British Thyroid Association Annual General Meeting
11.30-12.30
Main Auditorium
LUNCH
11.30-13.15
Hall D
Attended Posters (odd numbers)
11.30-13.00
Hall D
Moral Maze: Ethics and animal experimentation
13.00-14.15
Main Auditorium
Panel:
Chair: Blakemore C (London)
Coombes B (FRAME)
Furr B (AstraZeneca plc)
Matfield M (European Biomedical Research Assocation)
Ardana Bioscience Ltd Satellite Session
13.15-14.15
Queen's Suite 1
Testosterone replacement: management across the patient spectrum (see page 6 for further details)
Symposium 8: Hyperinsulinism-induced hypoglycaemia
14.15-15.45
Queen's Suite 1
S32
14.15
Hypoglycaemia and the brain
Frier BM (Edinburgh)
Chair: Jones P (London)
S33
14.45
Tumour associated hypoglycaemia - mechanisms and treatment
Camacho-Hübner C (London)
S34
15.15
Hyperinsulinism in infancy
Dunne M (Manchester)
Symposium 9: Regulation of ovarian folliculogenesis
14.15-15.45
Queen's Suite 2
S35
14.15
Dialogue between oocytes and somatic cells
Eppig JJ (Bar Harbor, USA)
S36
14.45
Anti-mullerian hormone and the dynamics of follicle development
Themmen APN & Visser JA (Rotterdam, The Netherlands)
20
Chair: Franks SJ (London)
W E D N E S D AY
S37
15.15
Endocrine and local control of the preovulatory follicle and developing corpus luteum in primates
Stouffer RL (Beaverton, USA)
Clinical Management Workshop 4: Endocrine sequelae of childhood cancer
14.15-15.45
Main Auditorium
Chair: Shalet SM (Manchester)
S47
14.15
Endocrine sequelae of childhood cancer: overview - size of the problem
Sklar CA (New York, USA)
S48
14.45
Growth and puberty after treatment for intracranial neoplasia
Spoudeas H (London)
S49
15.15
Ovarian reserve after chemotherapy
Davies M (London)
Young Endocrinologists Session: Tricks for success in research
14.15-15.45
King's Suite
Chairs: Mostyn A (Nottingham) & Noon L (London)
S54
14.15
How to survive a PHD
Westwood M (Manchester)
S55
14.35
Career fellowship schemes for the clinical and non-clinical endocrinologist - where are they and how
to succeed
Stewart PM (Birmingham)
S56
15.00
Tricks for success in research: the clinic versus the lab
Crown AL (Bristol)
S57
15.25
The BTA (been to America) degree: is it still worth it?
Fowkes RC (London)
TEA
15.45-16.15
Hall D
The Expert's View 7: Science
16.15-17.00
Conference Suite
Chair: Hewison M (Birmingham)
State of the art lecture: Aquaporins
Verkman A (San Francisco, USA)
The Expert's View 8: Clinical
GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY NOVARTIS PHARMACEUTICALS UK LTD
16.15-17.00
Queen's Suite 1
Chair: Gittoes N (Birmingham)
Diagnosis and management of neuroendocrine tumours of the pancreas and gut, particularly carcinoids
Grossman A (London)
The Expert's View 9: Clinical
16.15-17.00
Queen's Suite 2
Chair: Gough S (Birmingham)
Brittle diabetes - does it exist?
Williams G (Bristol)
The Expert's View 10: Clinical
GENEROUSLY SUPPORTED BY SERVIER LABORATORIES LTD
16.15-17.00
King's Suite
Chair: Selby P (Manchester)
Interpretation of bone mineral density and markers of bone metabolism
Eastell R (Sheffield)
21
22
POSTERS
Attended posters
P10
Assessment of subclinical neuropathy in
children with insulin dependent diabetes
mellitus
Assem H, Mahmoud S, Omar M, Khalil I,
Abdel Megeed MA & Saad S
P11
The risk of vascular complications in patients
with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus.
Al Saraj F, McAteer S, Galvin J, Keelan T,
Fitzgerald D & Sreenan S
P12
Refractory hypertension can often be helped by
the use of the potent vasodilator minoxidil:
results in 13 patients, 12 of whom were already
receiving angiotensin converting enzyme
inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor antagonists
Black RNA, Hunter SJ & Atkinson AB
P13
A comparative analysis of clinical outcomes in a
multidisciplinary weight management clinic
D'Costa RV, Guthrie G, Martinez-Riquelm A &
Kennedy RL
P14
Effects of hormone replacement therapy and
raloxifene on C-reactive protein in healthy
postmenopausal women
Kumru S, Yildiz MF, Godekmerdan A & Yilmaz B
P15
Prostaglandin synthesis in adipose tissue from
women with simple obesity - differences
between omental and subcutaneous depots
Quinkler M, Bujalska IJ, Tomlinson JW, Smith DM &
Stewart PM
P16
Hypothalamic expression of the glucose sensing
KATP channel component Kir 6.2 is altered in
animal models of obesity and diabetes
Gyte AC, Pritchard LE, Brennand J & White A
P17
Targeted inactivation of hexose-6-phosphate
dehydrogenase (H6PDH) results in impaired
reactivation of glucocorticoids and endorses a
pivotal role for H6PDH in regulating 11betahydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1
Lavery GG, Draper N, Parker KL, Walker EA &
Stewart PM
P18
Murine expression of 11beta-hydroxysteroid
dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) and
hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PDH)
Hewitt KN, Bujalska IJ, Draper N, Onyimba CU,
Walker EA & Stewart PM
Posters will be on display in Hall D. Please note that
even-numbered posters will be attended on Tuesday 5
April at 11.45-13.00 and odd-numbered posters will be
attended on Wednesday 6 April at 11.45-13.00.
Diabetes and metabolism
P1
Study of catecholamine secretion in obstructive
sleep apnoea
Tan TMM, Hoy LJ, Haque S, Davison AG &
Metcalfe KA
P2
Rosiglitazone increases testosterone levels in
hypogonadal men with type 2 diabetes
Kapoor D, Goodwin E, Channer KS & Jones TH
P3
Low insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II)
concentration predicts weight gain in normal
weight subjects with type 2 diabetes
Heald AH, Karvestedt L, Anderson SG, McLaughlin
J, Knowles A, Wong L, White A, Brismar K &
Gibson M
P4
Silencing of leptin and resistin gene expression
by RNA interference in vitro
Brown RE, Ur E & Wilkinson M
P5
A study of obesity awareness in obese patients
attending a District General Hospital
John LJ & Ooi CG
P6
A comparison study between the new ADA
criteria for the diagnosis of dysglycaemia and
the old ADA/WHO criteria
Al Saraj F, King T, Corbett M, Dillion D, McAteer S,
Tormey W & Sreenan S
P7
Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes in adults in
Ireland
Cawood TJ, McKenna MJ, Gallagher CG, Smith D,
Chung WY, Gibney J & O'Shea D
P8
Hyperinsulinaemia-associated endotoxaemia
and its relationship to type 2 diabetes mellitus
Creely SJ, McTernan PG, Harte AL, Farmer J &
Kumar S
P9
Assessment of angiogenic factors and
microalbuminuria and electroretinography in
type 1 diabetes mellitus
Assem H, Abdel Megeed MA & Abdel Halim N
23
POSTERS
P29
Differential modulation of orexin receptors by
hyperglycaemia in the mouse heart
Karteris E, Chen J, Zervou S, Pelengaris S, Khan M &
Randeva HS
P30
Fatty liver disease is associated with both
endotoxaemia and sub-clinical inflammation
which is further aggravated by diabetes
da Silva NF, Harte AL, Hill MJ, Kumar S, Day CP &
McTernan PG
Gene polymorphisms related to metabolic and
cardiac complications in patients with primary
aldosteronism
Ronconi V, Agostinelli L, Turchi F, Rilli S, Mantero F,
Giacchetti G & Boscaro M
P31
The effect of a high fat, high cholesterol diet on
blood glucose in pigs
Massey KA, Laws J, Perkins KS, Beattles S, Filby L,
Hatton E, Lomax MA, Haskard DO, Buckingham J,
Jarvelin MR, Corson AM, Lean J & Clarke L
Elevated endotoxin levels as a mediator of
consistent chronic sub-clinical inflammation in
CABG patients
Baker AR, da Silva NF, Ranasinghe A, Pagano D,
Bonser RS, Kumar S & McTernan PG
P32
Upregulation of adiponectin receptors in
human adipose tissue from women with the
polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)
Tan BK, Chen J, Digby JE, Keay SD, Karteris E &
Randeva HS
Rosiglitazone and phenformin, but not
metformin activate AMP-activated protein
kinase and stimulate nitric oxide release in
human aortic endothelial cells
Boyle JG, Cleland SJ, Salt IP & Connel JMC
P33
Testosterone does not promote A7r5 rat aortic
vascular smooth muscle cell growth
Kerry KE, Jones RD, Channer KS & Jones TH
P19
Cholesterol feeding induces fatty streak
formation in the testicular feminised mouse
Nettleship JE, Jones RD, Channer KS & Jones TH
P20
Is ghrelin involved in BMI determination in
patients with type 2 diabetes?
García E, Gueorguiev M, Lecoeur C, Grossman A,
Walley A, Froguel P & Korbonits M
P21
P22
P23
P24
Glucocorticoid-induced mineralisation of
vascular pericytes
Kirton JP, Wilkinson FL, Canfield AE & Alexander MY
P34
Control of MC2-R expression during
adipogenesis
Noon LA, Clark AJL & King PJ
P25
Lys-gamma3-MSH stimulated lipolysis in the
3T3-L1 adipocyte cell line may be mediated
through a novel melanocortin receptor
Harmer SC, Lowry PJ & Bicknell AB
P35
Study of the effect of testosterone upon
apoptosis in the rat aortic A7r5 vascular smooth
muscle cell line
Kerry KE, Jones RD, Channer KS & Jones TH
P26
Physiological concentrations of testosterone
inhibit extracellular calcium entry via voltagegated calcium channels in the A7r5 vascular
smooth muscle cell line
Hall J, Jones RD, Kang P, Channer KS, Peers C &
Jones TH
P27
P28
24
Maternal consumption of a high-meat, low
carbohydrate diet during pregnancy impairs
glucose tolerance in the adult offspring
Reynolds RM, Godfrey KM, Haselden S, Sheill AW,
Barker DJ, Campbell-Brown M & Phillips DI
Expression of adiponectin receptors in fetal and
adult human adrenal cortex
Karteris E, Digby JE, Chen J & Randeva HS
Growth and development
P36
SOCS proteins inhibit leptin signalling in MCF-7
cells
Fazeli M, Maamra M & Ross RJM
P37
Internalization of the melanocortin 2 receptor is
required for erk activation by ACTH in H295R
adrenocortical cells
Janes ME & Clark AJL
P38
Modulation of somatostatin receptors
expression by genistein in human umbilical vein
endothelial cells
Zhong W & Atkin SL
P39
Expression of somatostatin receptors in normal
human kidney
Bhandari S, Zhong W, Long E & Atkin SL
POSTERS
P40
Purifying growth hormone on an affinity
column using his-tagged growth hormone
receptor
Bowles CE, Wilkinson IR, Sayers JR & Ross RJM
P51
Radioimmunoassay (RIA) method for salivary
testosterone: reference ranges in children, adult
men and adult women
Teoh Y, Macintyre H, Ahmed F & Wallace M
P41
Nuclear factor kappa B signalling in the
folliculo-stellate cell line TtT/GF
Mehet DK, Solito E, John CD & Buckingham JC
P52
The value of ultrafiltration in the detection of
macroprolactin
Kavanagh L, Smith TP & McKenna TJ
P42
Hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance in an
animal model of polycystic ovary syndrome
(PCOS)
Robinson JE, Chambers G, Shah A, Hardy K,
Franks S & Evans NP
P53
Adult growth hormone replacement therapy
and neuroimaging surveillance in brain tumour
survivors
Jostel A, Mukherjee A & Shalet SM
P54
P43
Kisspeptin-10 stimulates the hypothalamicpituitary-gonadal axis in adult male rats
following central and peripheral administration
Thompson EL, Patterson M, Murphy KG, Smith KL,
Dhillo WS, Todd JF, Ghatei MA & Bloom SR
A new sustained-release preparation of human
growth hormone: pharmacokinetic,
pharmacodynamic and safety profile
Jostel A, Mukherjee A, Smethurst L & Shalet SM
P55
Constitutional delay of growth and puberty
(CDGP) is associated with the GPR54 gene but
not with leptin (L), leptin receptor (LR) and
cocaine and amphetamin regulated transcript
(CART) genes
Banerjee I, Trueman J, Patel L, Hall CM, Price DA,
Hirschhorn JN, Palmert MR, Read A & Clayton PE
P56
Obese subjects have lower satiety
Giles C, le Roux CW, Aylwin SJB, Hunt C, Ghatei MA,
Frost G & Bloom SR
P57
Partial GH deficiency is associated with an
adverse serum lipid profile
Murray RD, Wieringa G & Shalet SM
P58
Growth hormone replacement in patients with
hypopituitarism and severe growth hormone
deficiency
Gonzalez S, Sugunendran S & Atkin SL
P59
In vitro demonstration of the effect on RNA
splicing of a novel growth hormone receptor
mutation
David A, Metherell L, Shaw NJ, Camacho-Hübner
C, Chew SL, Savage MO, Khoo B & Clark AJL
P60
PTTG and PBF in human placenta: the effects of
intra-uterine growth restriction
Boelaert K, Pemberton HN, Bulmer JN, McCabe CJ,
Franklyn JA & Kilby MD
P44
The regulation of neurokinin B and its preferred
NK3 receptor during pregnancy
Page NM, Dakour J & Morrish DW
P45
Bioactivity of macroprolactin in vitro
Kavanagh L, Smith TP & McKenna TJ
P46
Differential effects of CREB (cAMP responsive
element binding) protein expression between
normal ovarian surface epithelial cells and cell
lines derived from ovarian cancers
Gubbay O, Rae MT, Zeleznik AJ & Hillier SG
P47
P48
P49
P50
In vitro effects of prolactin and bromocriptin on
seminal vesicle contractions in rat
Kutlu S, Ogras S, Onur R, Ozcan M, Orhan I,
Aydin M & Ayar A
Fertilization in superovulated sheep is disturbed
by oestrogenic anovulatory follicles
Veiga-Lopez A, Gonzalez-Bulnes A, Tresguerres JAF,
Dominguez V, Ariznavarreta C & Cocero MJ
Expression of iodide transporters in human
placental tissue
Burbridge E, Nawoor Z, Smith DF, Sheehan S,
O'Herlihy C & Smyth PPA
Nebivolol inhibits spontaneous and oxytocininduced contractions in the rat uterus
Kavak B, Simsek M, Kutlu S, Ozcan M, Kumru S,
Yilmaz B & Kelestimur H
25
POSTERS
P61
The effects of modifying the fatty acid
composition of lipids used in total parenteral
nutrition (TPN) on the growth and development
of the preterm piglet
Hyde MJ, Perkins KS, Laws J, Dodds PF, Symmons R,
Geering R, Litten JC, Corson AM, Lean IJ & Clark L
P71
Effect of grape procyanidins on free radicalinduced oxidative damage in MC3T3-E1
osteoblast-like cells in vitro
Zhong J & Zhang L
P72
IL-1 and glucocorticoids synergistically enhance
11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase
expression in osteoblastic MG-63 cells: a novel
mechanism for steroid induced bone loss
Kaur K, Crook R, Bujalska I, Cooper MS, Stewart PM
& Hewison M
P73
Effects of raloxifene on serum cytokine
concentrations in healthy postmenopausal
women
Kumru S, Godekmerdan A, Yildiz MF & Kutlu S
P74
Two novel missense mutations in GPR54 in a
subject with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism
Semple RK, Achermann JC, Ellery J, Farooqi IS,
Karet FE, Stanhope RG, O'Rahilly SP & Aparicio SA
P62
Separase and securin: their roles in the
developing human fetal brain
Pemberton HN, Boelaert K, Kilby MD, Franklyn JA &
McCabe CJ
P63
The effect of maternal dietary fat
supplementation on the immunoglobulin status
of their offspring
Cordrey A, Laws J, Perkins KS, Lean IJ, Buckingham
J, Jarvelin MR & Clark L
P64
Epigenetic programming of the human
endothelial nitric oxide pathway
Abbott LP & Newell-Price J
P65
Effect of active and treated acromegaly on PTH
concentration, PTH target-organ sensitivity and
phosphocalcium metabolism
White HD, Ahmad AM, Durham BH, Joseph F,
Fraser WD & Vora JP
P75
A comparison of vascular reactivity in
postmenopausal women receiving testosterone
and conventional HRT versus conventional HRT
Lane HA, Smith JC, Davies N, Cockcroft J, Morris K,
Scanlon MF & Davies JS
P66
The circadian rhythm of osteoprotegerin and its
association with parathyroid hormone secretion
Joseph F, Chan BY, Corlett P, Durham BH, Ahmad
AM, White HD, Wherley N, Vinjamuri S, Gallagher
JA, Fraser WD & Vora J
P76
P67
Assessment for osteoporosis in patients with
primary hyperparathyroidism - audit
John LJ, Saleem S, Ishorari J & Joseph K
Intercellular adhesion molecule 1, ICAM-1, in
polycystic ovary syndrome: relationship to
insulin resistance or obesity
Vrbikova J, Vankova M, Sramkova D, Hill M,
Stanicka S, Dvorakova K, Cibula D, Kvasnickova H,
Vondra K & Bendlova B
P77
UCP1 (A-3826G) and PPARG2 (Pro12Ala)
polymorphisms in women with polycystic ovary
syndrome
Vankova M, Sramkova D, Lukasova P, Vcelak J,
Stanicka S, Dvorakova K, Vondra K, Cibula D,
Vrbikova J & Bendlova B
P78
Testogel - an effective and acceptable androgen
replacement
Meston N, Cowsill C, Wass JAH & Turner HE
P79
A 2-year audit of the polycystic ovary syndrome
(PCOS) clinic at the Royal Berkshire Hospital
Ghosh D, Murphy C & Elsheikh M
P80
The biological variation of the LH/FSH ratio in
normal women and those with polycystic
ovarian syndrome
Cho LW, Jayagopal V, Kilpatrick ES, Holding S &
Atkin SL
P68
P69
P70
26
Effect of phosphate supplementation on PTH
target-organ sensitivity during growth hormone
replacement in adult growth hormone
deficiency
White HD, Ahmad AM, Durham BH, Joseph F,
Fraser WD & Vora JP
Effects of raloxifene and oestradiol on bone
turnover parameters and histology in female rats
Yilmaz B, Canpolat S, Kumru S, Colakoglu N,
Seyran AD, Turkoz Y & Firat S
Modulatory effects of Aroclors 1221 and 1254
on bone turnover and vertebral histology in
intact and ovariectomized rats
Yilmaz B, Seyran AD, Sandal S, Aydin M, Colakoglu
N, Kocer M & Carpenter DO
POSTERS
P81
Testogel - improves well being and libido in
hypogonadal men
Cowsill C, Meston N, O'Connor M, Wass JAH &
Turner HE
P91
Superoxide dismutase expression in human
uterine cervix carcinoma cells (HeLaS3) treated
with cytostatics or nucleoside drug
Adzic M, Niciforovic A, Isenovic ER & Radojcic MB
P82
Assessment and diagnostic workup of male
hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism
Ahmed A, Mirza Q & Winocour P
P92
Is survivin regulated by c-Myc?
Cosgrave N, Hill A & Young L
P93
P83
Differential effects of pregnancy on different
high molecular mass forms of serum prolactin
Ahlquist JAO, Dearman G, Fahie-Wilson MN &
Everitt A
Associations and interactions between the coregulatory protein SRC-1 and Ets-2 in breast
cancer
McIlroy M, Myers E, Hill AD & Young L
P94
DNA array analysis of a vitamin D-resistant
variant of MCF-7 breast cancer cells
Townsend K, Colston KW, Bujalska IJ, Campbell MJ
& Hewison M
Development of a tamoxifen resistant breast
cancer cell line
McVittie CJ, Khalaf S, Bustin SA, Carpenter R &
Jenkins PJ
P95
Tissue specific regulation of IGF-I expression by
GH
Ogunkolade BW, Khalaf S, Kelly PA, Bustin SA,
Kelly P, Binart N, Kopchick JJ & Jenkins PJ
Diagnostic mutation testing in multiple
endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1): support for
the current referral criteria
Vaidya B, Owen M, Hattersley AT & Ellard S
P96
Adiponectin receptor expression in human
prostate cancer cell lines
Mistry T, Karteris E, Digby JE, Chen J, Desai KM &
Randeva HS
Experience of intrarterial calcium stimulation in
the localisation of insulinomas
Morganstein DL, Jha A, Jackson J, Meeran K,
Todd JF & Devendra D
P97
External pituitary irradiation normalizes serum
insulin-like growth factor-I levels in a significant
percentage of patients with acromegaly
Mullan K, Abram WP, Hunter SJ, McCance DR,
McConnell M, Leslie H, Sanabria C, Sheridan B &
Atkinson AB
P98
What is the final outcome in patients with
macroprolactinoma resistant to dopamine
agonists?
Trifanescu R, Karavitaki N, Coculescu M, Turner HE
& Wass JAH
P99
Natural history of non-functioning pituitary
adenomas managed conservatively at a single
neuroendocrine unit
Hughes DG, Sinclair D, Holland J, Heald AH & Ciin L
P100
BRAF mRNA is over-expressed in pituitary
adenomas, but the oncogenic BRAF mutation
V5999E is not a frequent finding
Pedder-Smith S, Emery M, Musat M, Korbonits M &
Grossman AB
Endocrine tumours and neoplasia
P84
P85
P86
P87
Expression and role of 'steroid superfamily'
receptors in meningioma
Bilko D, Renner U, Stalla GK & Newton CJ
P88
Long term culture of MCF-7 breast cancer cells
with siRNA to the IGF-I receptor causes
continued transcriptional silencing of the IGF-I
receptor and decreased cell proliferation
McVittie CJ, Ogunkolade W, Khalaf S, Macaulay V,
Bustin SA, Carpenter R & Jenkins PJ
P89
Cell cycle dysregulation in breast cancer - the
roles of Jab1 and Archipelago
Bonner SE, Morris DG, Korbonits M, Laban CL,
McCarthy K, Al-Mufti R, Carpenter R &
Grossman AB
P90
The effect of somatostatin analogues on p27
and on mitogen-activated protein kinase
(MAPK) in different human pituitary tumour
cells
Hubina E, Czirjak S, Goth MI, Grossman AB &
Korbonits M
27
POSTERS
P101
Patients with hypothalamic-pituitary disease:
prevalence of diabetes, hypertension,
dyslipidaemia and other cardio-vascular risk
factors
Furlong N, Deepak D & MacFarlane IA
P102
Localisation of unilateral aldosterone secreting
tumours in hypokalaemic hypertensive subjects
Jatyasena C, Meeran K & Devendra D
P103
Peripituitary tumour surveillance imaging in
patients receiving growth hormone
replacement
Chung TT, Evanson J, Besser GM, Chew SL,
Grossman AB, Monson JP & Drake WM
P104
Acromegaly outcomes: the Exeter experience
Goss LA, Forbes MI, Macleod KM, Daly ME,
Donohoe M, Hattersley AT & Vaidya B
P105
Clinically mute adrenal tumours - study of 63
cases
Gheorghiu ML, Hortopan D, Dumitrascu A,
Stefanescu AM, Trifanescu R, Niculescu D &
Coculescu M
P106
P107
P108
Selective parathyroid venous sampling in
patients with complicated primary
hyperparathyroidism
Ogilvie CM, Brown PL, Matson M, Carpenter R,
Drake WM, Jenkins PJ, Chew SL & Monson JP
Hypercalcaemia in acromegaly is not always due
to MEN-1
Tsametis C, Karavitaki N, Fazal-Sanderson V,
Turner HE & Wass JAH
Attenuation of vasopressin-induced antidiuresis
in poorly-controlled type 2 diabetes
Agha A, Smith D, Finucane F, Sherlock M, Morris A,
Baylis P & Thompson CJ
P109
Leptin and the diurnal rhythm of blood pressure
Joseph F, Ul-Haq M, Ahmad AM, Whittingham P,
White HD, Wallace AM, Fraser WD & Vora JP
P110
Symptomatic Rathke cleft cysts: systematic
review of 10 cases with long follow-up
Karavitaki N, Georgas G, Ansorge O, Adams CBT &
Wass JAH
P111
Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) replacement
enhances IGF-I generation in hypopituitary
patients on growth hormone replacement
Brooke AM, Kalingag N, Maher K, Walker D,
Hinson J & Monson JP
28
P112
Implications of severe hyponatraemia in
neurosurgical patients
Sherlock M, O'Sullivan E, Agha A, Behan LA,
Finucane F, Owens D, Rawluk D & Thompson CJ
P113
Late endocrine effects after treatment for
nasopharyngeal cancer
Gleeson HK, Turnbull L, Jostel A, Donne A, Sykes AJ,
Slevin NJ & Shalet SM
P114
How useful is IGF-I in adults with GH deficiency?
DeSilva S, Soni A, Tsametis C, Marland A,
Karavitaki N, Suliman S, Turner HE & Wass JAH
P115
A novel finding of activation of the
hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis with
increased cortisol production rates and
circulating cortisol concentrations in 24-hour
profiling study in cranially irradiated adult
cancer survivors
Darzy KH & Shalet SM
P116
The dynamics of GH secretion in adult cancer
survivors with severe radiation-induced GH
deficiency
Darzy KH, Pezzoli SS, Thorner MO & Shalet SM
P117
The incidence and pathophysiology of
hyponatraemia after subarachnoid
haemorrhage
Sherlock M, O'Sullivan E, Agha A, Behan LA,
Rawluk D, Brennan P & Thompson CJ
P118
The natural history of post-traumatic
hypopituitarism: implications for assessment
and treatment
Agha A, O'Kelly P, Tormey W, Phillips J &
Thompson CJ
P119
Comparison of long term psychological health
in patients with treated pituitary Cushing's and
Nelson's syndrome vs adrenal Cushing's
Ghosh S, Heald AH, Gibson C, Bray S, Anderson SG,
O'Driscoll K, Davis JRE, Buckler H & Fowler HL
P120
GH, ACTH and cortisol responses to insulininduced hypoglycaemia and exercise in healthy
young men
Clark PM, Armada-da-Silva PAS, Williams JW,
Sage HJ, Jones DA & Toogood AA
P121
Absence of specific effect of DHEA-S deficiency
on mood and quality of life in Addison's disease
Adma P, Heald AH, Kane J, Gibson C, Davis JRE,
Buckler H & Fowler H
POSTERS
P132
Immunomodulatory 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D3
synthesis by dendritic cells and macrophages is
highly dependent on the availability of inactive
substrate 25D3 levels
Evans KN, Burke F, Hughes SV, Freeman L,
Sansom DM & Hewison M
P133
Modulation of glucocorticoid sensitivity by
retroviral gene transfer
Le Rouzic P, Gillingham H, Berry A, Garside H,
White A & Ray DW
P134
Oestrogen interacts with TNFalpha signalling
pathways to stimulate human prolactin gene
transcription
Adamson AD, Friedrichsen S, Wilding M,
White MRH & Davis JRE
Haplotype analysis of the aldosterone synthase
(CYP11B2) and 11beta- hydroxylase gene
(CYP11B1) locus
Barr M, Wilkinson DM, Freel EM, MacKenzie SM,
Brain N, Fraser R, Davies E & Connell JMC
P135
Complement C5a receptors are expressed
throughout the anterior pituitary gland
Francis K, Lewis BM, Monk P, Scanlon MF & Ham J
ACTH stimulates mitogenic signalling pathways
but does not affect cell division in the human
adrenal H295R adrenal cell line
Whitworth EJ & Hinson JP
P136
Establishment of physiological and supraphysiological testosterone dosing regimen in
mice
Nettleship JE, Jones RD, Channer KS & Jones TH
P137
Development of a cortisol binding capacity
assay for use in the newborn
Smith J, Armstrong L, Hoftijzer D, Midgley P,
Mallam B, Armstrong J, Yorke J, Edwards A &
Wilson C
P138
WNK kinases; a novel pathway regulating
electrolyte balance and blood pressure, which is
mutated in pseudohypoaldosteronism type II
O'Reilly M, Marshall E, Mittal M, Kenyon CJ &
Brown RW
P139
Profiling aldosterone and salt responsive
pathways in an inducible hypertensive mouse
model
Marshall E, Forster T, Dickenson P, Roy D, Mullins J,
Kenyon C & Brown R
P140
N-POMC peptides activate adrenal ERK signaling
pathways
Pepper DJ & Bicknell AB
P141
Chronic glucocorticoid excess does not cause
fatty liver disease in mice
Raubenheimer PJ, Nyirenda M & Walker BR
P122
Lymphocytic hypophysitis: what is the longterm outcome?
Tsametis C, Karavitaki N, Ansorge O, Turner HE &
Wass JAH
P123
Screening and prevalence of endocrine and
radiological pituitary abnormalities in adultonset Langerhans cell histiocytosis
Jayasena CNL, Lewis DH, Chu A, Meeran K &
Devendra D
P124
P125
P126
P127
Central relaxin-3 administration causes
hyperphagia in male Wistar rats
McGowan BMC, Stanley SA, Smith KL, White NE,
Connolly MM, Gardiner JV, Ghatei MA & Bloom SR
Does annexin-1 have a biological function in the
adrenal gland?
Omer S, Davies EL, Christian HC, Buckingham J &
Morris JF
P128
PYY(3-36) inhibits food intake in both fed and
fasted states
Parkinson JRC, Small CJ, Ghatei MA & Bloom SR
P129
Telomerase-mediated immortalisation of human
embryonic olfactory GnRH neuroblasts
Kim S, Gonzalez D, Brazma D, Hu Y, Peters G &
Bouloux P
Steroids
P130
Refolding and purification of recombinant
human hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase
from bacterial inclusion bodies
Walker OJ, Walker EA, Stewart PM & Ride JP
P131
Identification of the sites of expression of the
Triple A syndrome mRNA in the rat using in situ
hybridisation
Storr HL, Clark AJL, Priesley JV & Michael GJ
29
POSTERS
P142
Medication management and quality of life in
patients with primary adrenal insufficiency
White KG, Wass JAH, Elliott AE & Baker SJK
P143
Salivary testosterone measurement for
monitoring treatment of children with
congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH)
Perry RJ, Mayo A, Deeb A, MacIntyre H,
Wallace AM, Hughes IA & Ahmed SF
P144
Increased 5alpha-reductase activity during the
luteal phase of the normal menstrual cycle
Quinkler M, Hughes BA & Stewart PM
P145
The aldosterone/renin ratio using renin
concentration compared with renin activity in a
healthy population
Al-Hashmi KM, Wallace AM & Connell JMC
P146
Natural history of metabolic progression for
autoimmune Addison's disease in subjects with
adrenal autoantibodies
Devendra D & Meeran K
P152
Thyroid follicular cells express receptors for
vascular endothelial growth factors which have
an autocrine role
Susarla R, Watkinson JC & Eggo MC
P153
Plasminogen activators in human thyrocytes:
regulation and role
Susarla R, Watkinson JC & Eggo MC
P154
Can deacetylation promote radioiodide uptake
in thyroid cancer?
Clarke C, Burbridge E & Smyth PPA
P155
Expression of connective tissue growth factor in
human thyroid tissue
Nguyen QD, Buchanan MA, Watkinson JC & Eggo MC
P156
Regression mapping of the HLA association with
Graves' disease
Simmonds MJ, Howson JMM, Heward JM, Cordell HJ,
Foxall H, Carr-Smith J, Gibson SM, Walker N, Tomer Y,
Franklyn JA, Todd JA & Gough SCL
P157
The Birmingham Elderly Thyroid Study (BETS):
TSH and fT4 values in 5784 community-living
subjects aged 60 and over
Parle JV, Franklyn JA, Wilson S, Roberts L, Holder R,
Sheppard MC, Hobbs FDR, Roalfe A, Gammage M,
Heath C & Pattison H
P158
Pegylated-liposomal formulation of chimeric
LNA/DNA antisense oligonucleotides against
DNA MeTase and vinorelbine induces apoptosis
in anaplastic thyroid cancer characterised by
5'CpG island methylation of TSGs Gadd45, p53
and Rb
Giannios J, Lambrinos P, Michailakis E,
Maragudakis E & Alexandropoulos N
P159
Effects of maternal hyperthyroidism during early
gestation on neonatal and obstetric outcome
Idris I, Srinivasan R, Simms A & Page RC
P160
Abnormalities in basal and stimulated TSH
secretion in cranially irradiated euthyroid adult
cancer survivors: does 'hidden' central
hypothyroidism exist?
Shalet SM & Darzy KH
P161
The titration regimen is as effective and better
tolerated than the block-replace regimen in the
medical therapy of Graves' hyperthyroidism
Abraham P, Avenell A, Park CM, Watson WA &
Bevan JS
Thyroid
P147
Seaweed - a marine thyroid?
Burbridge E, Smith D, Kraan S & Smyth PPA
P148
Gene regulation by the c-terminal pxxp motif of
pituitary tumour transforming gene (PTTG)
Gokce C, Tannahill LA, Stratford AL, Khanim FL,
Pemberton HN, Kim DS, Gittoes NJL, Boelaert K,
Franklyn JA & McCabe CJ
P149
Thyroid hormone (T3) activates GH/IGF-I
signalling during skeletal development
O'Shea PJ, Sriskantharajah S, Yao H, Suzuki H,
Cheng SY, Chassande O, Samarut J & Williams GR
P150
Antisense chemoradioimmunotherapy
consisting of antiEGFscFv linked onto high
energy radioisotopes, vinorelbine and 21nucleotide double stranded siRNA targeted to
DNMT1 induce apoptosis in anaplastic thyroid
CCCa characterised by hypermethylated
oncosuppressor Gadd45 promoter CpG islands
and overexpression of bcl-2, VEGF and Raf-1
Giannios J, Lambrinos P, Michailakis E,
Maragudakis E & Alexandropoulos N
P151
30
Psychometric validation of new measures of
hypothyroid-dependent quality of life (QoL) and
symptoms
McMillan CV, Bradley C, Razvi S & Weaver JU
POSTERS
P162
Screening thyroid function in early pregnancy
Anthony S, Bilous M, Hutchinson RS, Drury J,
Vaidya B & Bilous RW
P174
Clinical outcome and implications for training in
thyroid surgery in a district general hospital
Rao R, Marimuthu K & Thomas P
P163
Left ventricular functional reserve and central
arterial stiffness in subclinical hypothyroidism
Owen PJD, Rajiv C, Swampillai J, Vinereanu D,
Mathew TP, Fraser AG & Lazarus JH
P175
An audit of the outcome of a fixed dose (555
Mbq) of radioidine for hyperthyroidism
Abdalla TME, Khan S & Wilton A
P176
P164
Health status is impaired in people with subclinical hypothyroidism
Razvi S, McMillan CV & Weaver JU
Iodine deficiency goitre in the United Kingdom the result of a vegan diet
Park C, Watson W, Bevan J & Abraham P
P177
P165
Physical examination in thyroid diseases: should
it be relied on?
Sadri M, Yiangou CY & Dhanda A
Thyroid dysfunction alters NT-proBNP
concentrations
Manuchehri AM, Jayagopal V, Kilpatrick ES,
Holding S & Atkin SL
P166
Tri-iodothyronine and glucose insulin potassium
individually improve cardiovascular
performance post coronary artery bypass graft
surgery without increasing systemic oxygen
consumption
Ranasinghe AM, Quinn DW, Franklyn J,
Graham TR, Keogh BE, Mascaro J, Rooney SJ,
Wilson IC, Pagano D & Bonser RS
P178
Dietary factors in thyrotoxicosis management:
case report on excessive 'Brassica' intake
Helmy AFA & Soo SC
P179
Are urgent thyroid referral proformas successful
enough in detecting thyroid cancers?
Sadri M, Yiangou C & Dhanda A
P167
Evaluation of thyroid hormone replacement
therapy with two different thyroid preparations
Owen PJD, John R & Lazarus JH
P168
Pseudomembranous gastritis, hepatitis and iritis
complicating carbimazole therapy for Graves'
disease
Oswald G, Mullen P & Chinyama C
P169
Early response to high dose intravenous steroids
in thyroid associated ophthalmopathy
Rosales CF, Perros P, Dickinson AJ & Neoh C
P170
Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels
predict relapse of Graves' disease following
carbimazole treatment
McCallum RW, Stewart A & Hopkinson H
P171
Quality of life is impaired in people on
levothyroxine therapy and untreated people
with sub-clinical hypothyroidism
Razvi S, McMillan CV & Weaver JU
P172
Changes in thyroid function in survivors of brain
tumours followed longitudinally
Gleeson HK, Smethurst L & Shalet SM
P173
Incidence of selenium deficiency in thyroid
disease
Bohnet HG, Broyer Y, Ebert PA & Peters N
Clinical
P180
Pituitary apoplexy. Retrospective review of 28
patients: is surgical intervention always
necessary?
Gruber AG, Kumar S, Robertson I, Howlett TA &
Mansell P
P181
Pituitary macroadenoma: is IGF-I measurement
enough to exclude growth hormone excess?
Three case reports
Basu A, Heald AH, Kane J, Reid H & Buckler H
P182
Familial expansile osteolysis (FEO): a rare cause
of tooth loss
Thomas RM, Welbury RR, Wallace R, Parr J,
Hughes A, Pearce SHS & Cheetham TD
P183
A novel calcium-sensing receptor gene
mutation in a family with an extensive history of
familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia
Ryan J, Thorne J, Hoashi S, Green A & Powell D
P184
Refeeding Blaine: studies following a 44-day fast
Korbonits M, Blaine D, Elia M & Powell-Tuck J
P185
Appropriate management of CAH requires
detailed mutational analysis to be interpreted
within the context of family history and
biochemistry
Davis NL, Robertson S, Burren CP & Crowne EC
31
POSTERS
P186
Isolated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH)
deficiency: a rare condition? Three case reports
Basu A, Heald AH, Kane J, Rudenski A & Buckler H
P200
Hyperthyroidism as the cause for 'brittle'
Addison's disease
Evans KM & Flanagan DE
P187
Pituitary mass due to lymphocytic hypophysitis
presenting in late pregnancy with spontaneous
post-partum resolution
Watt AJ, Bidgood KA & Watson JM
P201
Controversial issues in the management of
hypercalcaemia in a young patient
Varughese GI, Roy Chowdhury S & Barton DM
P202
P188
Graves' disease and struma ovarii
Moisey RS, Nagi DK, Andrew J, Anathhanam AJ,
Raja U, Ali D, Burr WA & Jenkins RC
Interpretation of the short synacthen test in the
presence of low cortisol binding globulin
Moisey RS, Wright D, Aye M, Murphy E & Peacey SR
P203
P189
Myelinolysis following the treatment of
Addisonian crisis
Lockett HA, Smith JC, Dyer RG & Crook NJK
An incidental phaeochromocytoma
Tahrani AA & Macleod AF
P204
Langerhans cell histiocytosis and auto-immune
thyroiditis presenting as a thyroid mass with
progressive hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction
Deepak DS, Woodcock B & MacFarlane IA
P205
Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positive
inflammatory athropathy during long term
propylthiouracil treatment in a patient with
Graves' hyperthyroidism
Gruber A, Thomson GA, Fernando DJ & Idris I
P190
A case of insulin sensitivity
Tahrani AA, Macleod AF & West TET
P191
Ulcerative colitis presenting after bilateral
adrenalectomy
Zachariah S, Wright J & Russell-Jones D
P192
Antibodyless, painless, steroid responsive
thyrotoxicosis
Arosi A, Ruge P, Ratcliffe L & Rajbhandari SM
P206
Coexistent acromegaly and thyroid-associated
ophthalmopathy: chance or association?
Arutchelvam V, Dickinson AJ, Neoh C & Perros P
Thionamide resistant thyrotoxicosis - three
illustrative cases
Lee S, Kapoor D, Thomas WEG & Jones TH
P207
Challenges of treating hyperthyroidism
Roy Chowdhury S, Varughese GI, Redford DHA,
West TET & Barton DM
Autoimmune thyroid disease following
treatment of multiple sclerosis with Campath-1H
Wotherspoon F, Kajicek JP & Flanagan DE
P208
Phaeochromocytoma in pregnancy: medical or
surgical management?
Rees DA, Agarwal N, Gibby OM, Scott-Coombes D,
Davies JS & Scanlon MF
A somatostatin responsive, ACTH-secreting
bronchial carcinoid - a diagnostic and
therapeutic challenge
McDermott JH & Sreenan S
P209
Late change in immunohistochemical staining
in a non-functioning pituitary adenoma
following treatment with GnRH analogue
Gannon DH, Nelson RJ, Moss TH & Ulahannan TJ
P210
Young woman with alopaecia, short stature and
recurrent fractures
Kashyap AS, Anand KP, Kashyap S & Anand A
P211
Evolving tumour behaviour in a patient with
combined Conn's and Cushing's syndrome
Forbes MI & Daly ME
P212
Management of a macroadenoma in pregnancy
Hatfield ECI & Meeran K
P213
A case of transient hypopituitarism and
hyponatraemia
Raste Y, Smeeton F & Russell-Jones D
P193
P194
P195
P196
A case of an angry old man
Grainge C & English P
P197
Cushing's syndrome in pregnancy: a case report
Rice SPL, Lane H, Chudleigh R, Gibby O, ScottCoombes D, Davies JS, Scanlon MF & Rees DA
P198
Bromocriptine-sensitive acidophil-stem-cell
adenoma co-secreting growth hormone and
prolactin - a case report
D'Costa RV & Kalk WJ
P199
Pituitary failure as a presentation of previously
undiagnosed metastatic lung cancer
Galliford TM & Winocour PH
32
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& 10m
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3
NORDITROPIN® SIMPLEXX® (Somatropin (epr)) Presentations: Norditropin
Simplexx 5 mg/1.5 ml (somatropin (epr) 5 mg) Norditropin Simplexx 10 mg/1.5 ml
(somatropin (epr) 10 mg), Norditropin Simplexx 15 mg/1.5 ml (somatropin (epr)
15 mg) for use only with NordiPen™ 5, 10 and 15 respectively. Uses: Growth failure
due to growth hormone (GH) insufficiency, Turner’s syndrome or prepubertal
chronic renal disease. Growth disturbance (current height SDS <-2.5 and parental
adjusted height SDS <-1) in short children born small for gestational age (SGA),
with a birth weight and/or length below -2 SD, who failed to show catch-up
growth (HV SDS < 0 during the last year) by 4 years of age or later. Pronounced GH
deficiency in adults if evidence of deficiency in at least one other pituitary axis
(prolactin excepted) or childhood onset growth hormone insufficiency, reconfirmed
by two provocative test. Posology and method of administration: Dosage is
individual via subcutaneous injection, usually daily. Generally recommended daily
dosages: GH insufficiency 25-35 µg/kg [0.07-0.1 IU/kg] body weight or 0.71.0 mg/m2 [2-3 IU/m2] body surface area. Turner’s syndrome and chronic renal
disease: 50 µg/kg [0.14 IU/kg] or 1.4 mg/m2 [4.3 IU/m2]. SGA: 35 µg/kg [0.1 IU/kg]
or 1 mg/m2 [3 IU/m2] until final height; discontinue if HV<2cm/year and at closure
of epiphyseal growth plates. Adults: very low starting dose e.g. 0.15-0.3 mg/day
(0.45-0.9 IU/day) increased gradually at monthly intervals. Maintenance dosages
vary but seldom exceed 1 mg/day (3 IU /day). Dose requirements decline with age.
Contra-indications: Hypersensitivity, active tumour, tumour therapy. Treatment
should be discontinued after renal transplantation or if tumour growth recurs.
Special warnings: Children should be regularly assessed by a specialist in child
growth. Treatment should be instigated by a physician with special knowledge of
GH insufficiency. No skeletal growth can be expected after epiphyseal disc closure.
Growth disturbance in chronic renal disease should be established by monitoring
growth for 1 year on optimal treatment for renal disease. In SGA children: rule out
other reasons for growth disturbance before starting treatment; measure fasting
insulin and blood glucose before start of treatment and annually thereafter; oral
glucose tolerance testing should be performed in patients with increased risk of
diabetes mellitus; growth hormone should not be administered if overt diabetes
occurs; measure IGF-1 levels before start of treatment and twice a year thereafter,
if IGF-1 levels > 2 SD compared to reference consider dose adjustment taking into
account IGF-1/IGFBP-3 ratio; initiation of treatment near onset of puberty not
recommended; some height gain may be lost if treatment stopped before final
height reached; experience with patients with Silver-Russell syndrome limited.
Monitor for glucose intolerance (if on insulin there may be need for dose
adjustment); thyroid function; renal function in patients with chronic renal
insufficiency; and in patients with history of an intracranial lesion for tumour
progression or recurrence. In the event of severe or recurrent headache, visual
problems, nausea and/or vomiting, a funduscopy is recommended. If papilloedema
is confirmed, a diagnosis of benign intracranial hypertension should be considered
and if appropriate the growth hormone treatment discontinued. Monitor for signs
of scoliosis, slipped capital femoral epiphysis or Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease.
Experience with prolonged treatment in adults is limited. Experience above 60 years
of age is lacking. Pregnancy and lactation: Contraindicated during pregnancy
because of insufficient evidence of safety. The possibility that human growth
hormone is secreted in breast milk cannot be discounted. Undesirable effects:
Fluid retention with peripheral oedema and especially in adults, carpal tunnel
syndrome – normally transient. Mild arthralgia, muscle pain, paresthesia in adults
usually self-limiting; rarely headaches in children (0.04/patient year). Formation of
anti-somatropin antibodies are rare – where observed the antibodies have not
interfered with response to Norditropin. Local skin reactions. Benign intracranial
hypertension has been reported rarely. Legal category: POM, CD4. Prices and
marketing authorisation numbers: Norditropin SimpleXx 5 mg/1.5 ml: £118.20
PL3132 / 0131. Norditropin SimpleXx 10 mg /1.5 ml: £236.40 PL3132 / 0132.
Norditropin SimpleXx 15 mg/1.5 ml: £354.60 PL3132/0133. Further information is
available from: Novo Nordisk Limited,
Broadfield Park, Brighton Road, Crawley,
West Sussex RH11 9RT. NordiPen,
Norditropin and SimpleXx are registered
trademarks. Date of preparation: January
2005. SimpleXx3/0105
Norditropin® SimpleXx® –
The first ready-to-use liquid
growth hormone preparation
somatropin (epr)
POSTERS
P214
Use of etomidate for control of severe
hypercortisolism
Moyes VJ, Wat W, Akker SA, Drake WM & Monson JP
P215
Pituitary tumours coexisting with meningioma
and astrocytoma - description of 4 cases in
unirradiated patients
Palin SL & Gittoes NJL
P226
An audit on the type and amount of specialist
education that newly appointed endocrine
nurses receive - educational needs unmet?
Smethurst LE & Roberts ME
P227
An audit of the management of primary
hyperparathyroidism
McDermott JH, Smith C & Sreenan S
P216
Genuine carcinoid syndrome but spurious
adrenal carcinoma - deception by heterophile
antibodies
Nag S, Webb B & Kelly W
P228
An audit of insulin stress tests performed by an
individual endocrine specialist nurse - a safe and
reliable procedure
Wright D, Shah M & Peacey SR
P217
The association of thyroid cancer with Graves'
disease: potential cost implications
Brain HPS, Bano G & Nussey SS
P229
The TRH test at South Tyneside - 'should it be
confined to the dustbin?'
Jordan A, Basu A, Parr JH & Wahid ST
P218
Cushing's syndrome in evolution
Biswas M, Rees DA & Davies JS
P230
P219
Pitfalls in the biochemical assessment of
acromegaly
Mukherjee S, Rees DA, Page MD, Scanlon MF &
Davies JS
Differential regulations of urocortine 3 mRNA
expression in the central nervous system by
stress and glucocorticoides
Jamieson PM, Li C, Vaughan J & Vale W
NOVARTIS AWARD POSTERS
P220
Unusual presentation of multiple endocrine
neoplasia 2A
Saravanan P, Goss L, Dunn J, Paisey R, Rankin J &
Macleod KM
NP1
Genetic ablation of the AgRP neuron leads to a
lean, hypophagic phenotype
Bewick GA, Gardiner JV, Dhillo WS, Kent AS, Ghatei
MA & Bloom SR
P221
Adrenal crisis in an individual with
panhypopituitarism and new-onset Graves'
disease
Lewandowski KC, Marcinkowska M, Makarewicz J
& Lewinski A
NP2
Characterisation of a novel protein interacting
with the glucocorticoid receptor
Rice LM, Waters CE, Garside HJ, White A & Ray DW
P222
Hypothalamo-pituitary axis in chronic fatigue
syndrome and incidentaloma
Thomas CM, Renner CA & Lloyd JL
P223
Effect of timing of prolactin sampling on the
incidence of spurious hyperprolactinaemia
Lewandowski KC, Skowronska-Jozwiak E,
Szosland K & Lewinski A
P224
'Tired all the time' - a positive diagnosis
Evans KM, Flanagan DE & Wilkin TJ
P225
Management of hyponatraemia - are we doing
enough?
Soran H, Alio Z, Pattison T, Burrows G, Cook G &
Kong N
34
EXHIBITORS
Harrogate International Centre
HALL D
FIRE EXIT
25
20
22
FIRE EXIT
CATERING
24
23
19
21
10
7
11
6
12
5
13
4
14
3
17
15
2
16
1
CATERING
9
8
18
Key
Posters
Stand no.
12
Exhibitors in Hall D
1 & 16
Novo Nordisk Ltd
2
The Alliance for Better Bone Health
3
Society for Endocrinology
4
BioScientifica Ltd
5
British Thyroid Foundation
6
Thyroid Eye Disease
7 & 10
Sandoz Biopharmaceuticals
8
Servier Laboratories Ltd
9
Genzyme Therapeutics
11 & 12 OBI-DSL
13 & 14 Schering Health Care Ltd
15
Klinefelter's Syndrome Association
17 & 18 Ardana Bioscience Ltd
19
Ferring Pharmaceuticals Ltd
20
Serono Ltd
21
Glasgow Convention Bureau and
8th European Congress of Endocrinology
22
Eli Lilly & Company Ltd
23
Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd
AMEND (Assocation for Multiple
Endocrine Neoplasia Disorders)
24
Pfizer Ltd
Pituitary Foundation
25
Ipsen Ltd
Wisepress
Exhibitors in Foyer Area
35
EXPLORING THE WORLD OF
ENDOCRINOLOGY TOGETHER
EXHIBITORS
Exhibitors
Alliance for Better Bone Health
Stand 2
The Alliance for Better Bone
Health co-markets Actonel®
(risedronate sodium), a bisphosphonate licensed for
reducing vertebral and hip fracture risk in
postmenopausal and established postmenopausal
osteoporosis respectively. The Alliance, comprising
Procter and Gamble Pharmaceuticals and SanofiAventis, is committed to progressing the timely
identification of patients at risk of osteoporosis, and
supports intervention with a rapid acting therapy.
AMEND
Foyer Area
AMEND (the Association for Multiple Endocrine
Neoplasia Disorders) was formed in 2002 and became a
registered charity in 2003. Our aims are: to share
information about the rare genetic conditions of MEN
types 1 and 2; to provide leaflets giving information
about the conditions and genetic testing relating to
MEN types 1 and 2; to offer support via our Tele-Buddy
Group; and to promote a wider knowledge of MEN thus
assisting in earlier and accurate diagnosis. We work
closely with the medical profession to increase our
knowledge of recent developments in surgical
procedures and treatments in order to inform patients
and carers. Further information can be found at
www.amend.org.uk or by telephoning +44 (0)1423
712235.
Ardana Bioscience Ltd
Stands 17 & 18
Ardana Bioscience Ltd is a
speciality pharmaceutical
company which aims to discover, develop and market
innovative products that promote better reproductive
health.
The company was created in July 2000 to commercialise
research developed by the Medical Research Council
Human Reproductive Sciences Unit (HRSU) in
Edinburgh, UK. The HRSU is one of only four academic
centres of excellence in human and primate
reproductive biology in the world.
On inception, Ardana rapidly reviewed and prioritised
the HRSU research programmes and today it is
aggressively taking forward selected projects through
the early stages of development.
At the same time, the company has undertaken a series
of licensing agreements and strategic product and
company acquisitions in order to build up a portfolio of
projects for later stage development.
Ardana's key therapeutic and commercial areas of
interest are:
androgen replacement
endometriosis/menstrual disorders/infertility
male and female contraception
male and female sexual dysfunction
obstetrics
•
•
•
•
•
Within its chosen therapeutic areas, Ardana plans to
market its own products to endocrinologists and
reproductive health specialists. More information about
Ardana Bioscience Ltd can be found on the company
web site at www.ardana.co.uk.
The launch of Ardana's first flagship product, a buccal
testosterone replacement therapy indicated for male
hypogonadism took place in 2004.
BioScientifica Ltd
Stand 4
BioScientifica offers a range of
services from conference
management to secretariat services and journal
publishing for learned societies and pharmaceutical
companies. Our stand at Harrogate showcases:
European Journal of Endocrinology, published in print
and online with HighWire Press for the European
Federation of Endocrine Societies
Reproduction, published in print and online with
HighWire Press for the Society for Reproduction and
Fertility
a range of books including Handbook of Acromegaly,
also available as a CD-ROM, Pituitary and Periphery:
Communication In and Out, Central and Peripheral
Mechanisms in Pituitary Disease, The Expanding Role of
Octreotide I: Advances in Oncology, The Expanding Role
of Octreotide II: Advances in Endocrinology, Targets for
Growth Hormone and IGF-I, Action and Hormone
Action: Basic and Clinical Aspects
•
•
•
Discounts are available for conference delegates.
Reduced rate subscriptions to journals are also available
to some groups. Please come along to the stand to find
out more and see our online demonstrations of the
journals. If you are looking for someone to run your
conference, your society membership or publish your
journal come and talk to us! BioScientifica is owned by
the Society for Endocrinology.
37
EXHIBITORS
British Thyroid Foundation
Ferring Pharmaceuticals Ltd
Stand 5
Stand 19
The British Thyroid Foundation is
offering a 1-year award of up to £10
000 to enable medical researchers to supplement
existing projects or for the pump-priming of existing
research ideas. Funds will be awarded for consumables,
running costs and necessary items of equipment.
Further information and application forms are available
from our stand or from British Thyroid Foundation, PO
Box 97, Clifford, Wetherby, West Yorkshire LS23 6XD, UK,
or via the Foundation's web site at www.btf-thyroid.org.
The closing date for applications is 31 August 2005.
Come along to our stand to find out more about our
organisation.
Providing tailored treatments
on the body's own terms.
Eli Lilly & Company Ltd
Stand 22
Eli Lilly & Company is one of the
world's largest research-based
pharmaceutical companies, dedicated to creating and
delivering innovative pharmaceutical healthcare
solutions that enable people to live longer, healthier
and more active lives. Our research and development
efforts constantly strive to address urgent unmet
medical needs.
Eli Lilly & Company was founded in 1876 in
Indianapolis, USA, and has had a long history of
producing endocrine products, dating all the way back
to the collaboration with Banting and Best and the
introduction of the world's first insulin product in 1922.
Another element of Lilly's endocrine portfolio is growth
hormone replacement. Lilly manufactures recombinant
human growth hormone (somatropin) at Speke near
Liverpool, UK. A full range of products and services is
provided for the healthcare professional to use with
their patients in growth hormone replacement therapy
for both adults and children.
To assist in the therapeutic management of
osteoporosis, Lilly has two products each catering for
different patient needs: Raloxifene can be used in the
early post menopausal stage, whilst Teriparatide was
recently launched for the treatment of severe
osteoporosis.
Finally, Lilly continues to focus significant resources on
research in the endocrine field. For additional
information about any of our endocrine products or
services please come and talk to us at the Lilly stand.
38
Founded in 1950 by Dr Frederik Paulsen, Ferring
Pharmaceuticals is a world leader in the research and
commercial development of peptides - natural
compounds that play a role in virtually all of the body's
systems. Ferring produces pharmaceuticals in specific
therapeutic areas to help clinicians to treat patients on
the body's own terms. A speciality, research-driven
biopharmaceutical company, Ferring identifies,
develops and markets innovative products in the fields
of fertility, obstetrics, endocrinology, urology and
gastroenterology. Ferring continues to invest in
research and development to enable the introduction
of new and enhanced medicines. At present, there are a
number of major projects in the Ferring research and
development pipeline, which complement the existing
portfolio and offer innovative follow-ups to successful
brands. They also fit neatly into the core expertise areas
of peptide chemistry, pharmacology and drug delivery
systems. The scale and breadth of Ferring's
development activities are conducted in collaboration
with leading academic centres and teaching hospitals
world-wide. Coordination of the development effort is
maintained from the Ferring International Centre in
Copenhagen, Denmark. The accumulated knowledge
and experience of Ferring is paving the way for novel
compounds that will become tomorrow's
pharmaceuticals.
Genzyme Therapeutics
Stand 9
Founded in 1981, Genzyme is
now one of the world's largest
and most established biotechnology companies. With
more than 25 major products and services marketed in
over 60 countries, Genzyme is a global leader in the
effort to develop and apply the most advanced
techniques in biotechnology, in order to address a range
of unmet medical needs. With corporate headquarters in
Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, Genzyme has
approximately 4600 employees working in 40 countries
throughout the world. The European headquarters are in
Naarden, The Netherlands, and the UK headquarters
covering the whole of the British Isles are now based in
Oxford. Genzyme-sponsored research and development
has led to the introduction of new treatments for many
serious health problems, from rare and debilitating
genetic diseases to renal disease, orthopaedic injuries
EXHIBITORS
and thyroid cancer. One of Genzyme's most significant
successes is Thyrogen (thyrotrophin alpha), which
contains a highly purified recombinant form of human
thyroid-stimulating hormone. It can be used to eliminate
the devastating and painful symptoms of thyroid
hormone withdrawal that patients may experience
when they are tested for a recurrence of thyroid cancer.
The use of Thyrogen will also lead to more accurate
thyroglobulin measurements on thyroid hormone
suppression. Genzyme has a commitment to improving
the lives of patients and supporting the work of doctors
and other healthcare providers.
Glasgow Convention Bureau and
8th European Congress of Endocrinology
This is the first ever staging of this important
conference in the UK, and will follow the introduction of
the European Society for Endocrinology.
The programme organising committee have put
together a truly inspirational programme, which spans
both modern clinical practice and the dynamic basic
science that underpins endocrinology, and integrates
the two. Alongside excellent endocrinology, the city of
Glasgow will share some of its delights in our social
events for the delegates.
Further information can be found at www.ece2006.com
or contact Liz Brookes, Event Manager, Society for
Endocrinology (Email: [email protected];
Tel: +44 (0)1454 642210).
Stand 21
Ipsen Ltd
Glasgow: Scotland with style.
Stand 25
Glasgow is one of Europe's most exciting destinations
and combines the energy and sophistication of a great
international city with the friendliness of its people - all
on the doorstep of Scotland's stunning scenery!
Ipsen Ltd is the UK subsidiary of
the Ipsen Group which has a
presence in over 110 countries, and a total staff of
nearly 4000.
It is also a world-renowned cultural capital with an
outstanding portfolio of more than twenty museums
and galleries - many of them free - including the unique
Burrell Collection, stunning Mackintosh House and cool
and contemporary Gallery of Modern Art.
The Group develops products in three targeted therapeutic
areas - oncology, endocrinology and neuromuscular
disorders - and is also engaged in developing certain
biologically derived products. Ipsen is currently marketing
more than 20 products, both to specialists working in its
targeted therapeutic areas and in therapeutic areas related
to the Group's history. In 2003, 18.5% of Ipsen's turnover
was invested in research and development, carried out
through an international network of about 615 people
from four centres: Paris, Boston, Barcelona and London.
Glasgow's history timeline can be vividly traced
through its architecture from the medieval Cathedral
and exotic neo-classicism of Alexander 'Greek' Thomson
to Charles Rennie Mackintosh's sensuous art nouveau
and the futuristic, cutting-edge Science Centre.
As the largest retail centre in the UK outside London,
Glasgow is also where you'll find absolutely fabulous
shopping - all laid out on an easy-to-navigate grid system!
The city's café culture encompasses the entire spectrum
of great food and drink so whether you prefer traditional
fayre, ethnic cuisine or the very latest in fusion and
Pacific Rim, you'll find something to suit your taste.
Glasgow's nightlife is eclectic and electric and the city
plays host to a year-round calendar of exciting festivals
and major events.
When it comes to enjoying life, you'll find it in a city
that's got it down to a fine art!
8th European Congress of Endocrinology 2006
incorporating the British Endocrine Societies
1-5 April 2006, SECC, Glasgow
Europe's largest endocrinology conference will take
place at the SECC in April 2006. Up to 2500 delegates
from the UK, Europe and further afield will attend.
A major factor which has contributed to the Group's
growth and success in recent years has been the ability to
combine the therapeutic potential of peptides with
sophisticated controlled-release delivery systems. Ipsen is
the only company in the world to supply prolonged release
formulations of more that one peptide: Decepeptyl® SR
(triptorelin), Somatuline® LA and Autogel® (lanreotide). In
the past year our commitment to endocrinology has been
further strengthened by our partnerships with Genentech
for NutropinAq™ (somatropin) and Auxilium for Testim®
50mg gel (testosterone).
Klinefelter's Syndrome Association
Stand 15
The KSA is a national charity supporting all those affected,
either directly or indirectly, by Klinefelter's syndrome,
including parents, siblings and partners throughout the
UK. The KSA also aims to offer information to medical and
educational professionals, in order to create an awareness
with a greater understanding of the syndrome.
39
EXHIBITORS
The Association has constant communication with
medical specialists, keeping members up to date with
developments in medical treatments and general
management of Klinefelter's syndrome. This is achieved
by way of a newsletter, a quarterly publication for
members, and regular updating of the web site.
Medical research, education, day-to-day living and
social issues are subjects covered, with many
contributions from the members.
Do come to our stand and let us introduce ourselves ,
and please visit our website: ksa-uk.co.uk.
Novartis Pharmaceuticals UK Ltd
Stand 23
Novartis is proud to contribute
to and be represented at the
BES 2005. Novartis AG is a world leader in healthcare
with core businesses in pharmaceuticals, consumer
health, generics, eye-care and animal health. The Group
invested approximately CHF 4.0 billion (USD 2.4 billion)
in research and development. Novartis Group
companies employ about 70 000 people and operate in
over 140 countries around the world. In the UK,
Novartis has large research and production facilities as
well as a dedicated sales and marketing company.
Novartis UK is organised in integrated business units,
covering all customer-related aspects from clinical
development to sales and marketing. The
endocrine/oncology business team has, with
Sandostatin® LAR®, the leading product in the UK
somatostatin analogue market. Planning for the future,
we have a universal somatostatin receptor blocker in
development. Other currently marketed products
include Zometa®, a highly potent bisphosphonate,
Aredia®, Femara®, an aromatase inhibitor, as well as
Glivec®, the first signal transduction inhibitor to reach
the market, representing a significant milestone in
targeted anti-tumour therapy. We are looking forward
to welcoming you at our stand to discuss the properties
of our currently marketed products with our specialist
sales and marketing team as well as our medical and
clinical development team members.
In addition, Novo Nordisk has a leading position within
areas such as growth hormone therapy, haemostasis
management and hormone replacement therapy. Within
the area of growth hormone, Novo Nordisk has been
producing recombinant human growth hormone since
1988. In 1999, Novo Nordisk launched the first ready-to-use
liquid growth hormone, Norditropin® SimpleXx®, supplied
in a pen system that was developed utilising existing
experience in diabetes research. This pen system was
designed to ensure that people who use growth hormone
can simply, comfortably and accurately administer their
dose. Novo Nordisk also provides the support of a
homecare service and the convenience of home delivery.
Novo Nordisk manufactures and markets
pharmaceutical products and services that make a
significant difference to patients, the medical profession
and society. With headquarters in Denmark, Novo
Nordisk employs approximately 18 700 people in 68
countries and markets its products in 179 countries. For
further company information visit
www.novonordisk.co.uk.
OBI-DSL
Stands 11 & 12
For 25 years Diagnostic Systems
Laboratories, Inc. have been a research and
clinical immunoassay manufacturer based in Houston,
Texas, USA. Product highlights include automated and
manual inhibin A assays for antenatal screening as well
as an extensive range of assays for androgen
assessment and all analytes involved in the GH-IGFIGFBP axis. We are also marketing a range of biogenic
amine immunoassays.
Our research assays are suitable for a wide range of
research areas, with particular emphasis on fertility and
reproductive function, energy homeostasis and growth
and metabolism.
Stands 1 & 16
The latest addition to our existing assay formats is
Active Glo. This new technology is based on our
existing Microtitre plate assays, but with precise,
sensitive chemiluminescent endpoints. Our state of the
art Luminometer, with simple, easy to use software will
enable even the smallest laboratories to offer the
widest range of specialist endocrine analysis.
Novo Nordisk is a focused
healthcare company. With the
broadest diabetes product portfolio in the industry,
including very advanced products within the area of
insulin delivery systems, Novo Nordisk is the world
leader in diabetes care.
DSL continues to meet the needs of science by
maintaining close relationships with key academics and
clinicians across the globe. For further information
please contact George Hammett, UK Sales Manager on
+44 (0)7971 782746 or [email protected], or visit
our web site at www.DSLabs.com.
Novo Nordisk Ltd
40
EXHIBITORS
Pfizer Ltd
Stand 24
Pfizer's dedicated Endocrine
Care Team has developed
extensive support services for patients and clinicians to
find solutions to some of the issues surrounding growth
hormone therapy.
Pfizer Home Nurse Service: this is a national network
offering patient training from specialist endocrine
nurses (freephone 0800 521249 (UK only) for details).
Pfizer at Home: this is our prescription management
service allowing patients the convenience of having
their growth hormone and consumables delivered
when and where it suits them.
KIGS and KIMS: these international clinical databases
provide on-going surveillance of patients on growth
hormone therapy.
In addition, we have a comprehensive range of delivery
devices to suit the needs of every patient: our mg Pen
can be fully personalised to gain patient support for
their therapy. We also produce ten strengths of a fridgefree, preservative-free, single-use growth hormone
product for patients with busy lifestyles. Products for
use with traditional syringes and autointerjectors
complete the range. Pfizer is committed to
endocrinology in the UK and we are proud to be a
benefactor of the British Endocrine Societies. Please
visit our stand to find out more about Pfizer Endocrine
Care, our products and our services.
Pituitary Foundation
Foyer Area
The Pituitary Foundation aims to
support everyone affected by
pituitary problems throughout the UK, and works to
raise public awareness of pituitary illness.
Launched in November 1994, our membership now
exceeds 11 000.
We provide:
a helpline backed by many of the country's leading
endocrinologists and with personal access, for
specialised enquiries, to a dedicated endocrine nurse
a range of leaflets written in clear, non-medical
language covering the more common issues that
pituitary patients face
a newsletter, Pituitary News.
a Pituitary Disease Factfile for General Practitioners to assist
GPs in the diagnosis and shared care of pituitary patients
a Carers’ Pack specifically aimed at people who
support pituitary patients
•
•
•
•
•
• a comprehensive website - www.pituitary.org.uk
• a national network of local support groups
• a national network of Telephone Buddies - patients
and carers trained to offer peer-support
The Pituitary Foundation is funded through voluntary
donations, support from the pharmaceutical industry
and grants from grant-making trusts.
Contact us at: The Pituitary Foundation, PO Box 1944,
Bristol BS99 2UB, UK. (Tel/Fax: 0845 4500376; Helpline:
0845 4500375 (UK only); Email:
[email protected]; Web: www.pituitary.org.uk).
Sandoz Biopharmaceuticals
Stands 7 & 10
Sandoz, a Novartis company,
is one of the leading
manufacturers of biotechnological products. Longstanding experience and know-how make Sandoz a
renowned partner in the three business franchises of
pharmaceuticals, biopharmaceuticals and industrial
products. Sandoz has its headquarters in Vienna, and
altogether employs around 13 000 people. Posted sales
of USD 2.9 billion were achieved in 2003.
Based on long-standing experience in the field of
recombinant products, Sandoz has cutting-edge experience
in the production and processing of biopharmaceuticals. As
such it constitutes the centre of the biopharmaceutical
production field within Novartis. Drawing on the company's
rich experience in biotechnology, Sandoz
Biopharmaceuticals is expanding to meet growing demand.
On the pharmaceuticals side, Sandoz produces highquality generic pharmaceuticals sold to pharmacies and
hospitals, while on the industrial products side, Sandoz
manufactures active pharmaceutical ingredients for
industrial partners.
In 2003, numerous different company brands were
rebranded under the single name Sandoz. Over the last
few years, the company has grown dynamically and
undertaken various strategic acquisitions. The
establishment of a uniform brand has strengthened and
harmonised its global position and identity. You can
contact us at Sandoz GmbH, Wagramer Str 19, 1220
Vienna, Austria (Tel: +43 (0)1 260680; Email:
[email protected]; Web: www.sandoz.com).
Schering Health Care Ltd
Stands 13 & 14
Schering is a research-based
pharmaceutical company
with a long tradition in the development of hormone
preparations, not only for women but also for men.
41
EXHIBITORS
Company research contributed to the isolation and
structural elucidation of the male sex-hormone
testosterone, and the world's first androgen preparation
for the treatment of hormone deficiency in men was
put on the market by Schering as early as 1934.
Schering also developed the first anti-androgen,
cyproterone acetate, which continues to be widely used
in the treatment of inoperable carcinoma of the
prostate, and for the suppression of an excessive sex
drive. Products for the treatment of hypogonadism are
also part of Schering's range of healthcare products for
men.
Serono Pharmaceuticals Ltd
Stand 20
Serono Ltd is the UK subsidiary
of Serono SA, the largest
biotechnology company in Europe and the third largest
in the world. Serono's portfolio of endocrine products
includes the recombinant human growth hormone,
Saizen.
Serono's UK growth hormone team is committed to the
highest level of support for clinicians, nurses and,
ultimately, patients using Saizen. Through our products
and services, we aim to make a real difference to the
quality of life of both paediatric and adult patients on
Saizen.
Serono Homecare is a nationally available network
which offers patient training and family support
delivered by specialist nurses and is designed to ensure
the best possible start for Saizen patients. We offer a
home delivery service where required, enabling
patients to receive their Saizen and consumables when
and where it is convenient for them. To augment this
service patients can now elect to receive their Saizen in
a ready-to-use cartridge so that they no longer need to
spend time reconstituting their medication.
In 2004, with support from Serono Symposia
International, we launched MeGHa, a comprehensive
and user friendly research database offering flexible
monitoring of patients with growth hormone disorders,
on and off treatment, giving users the ability to conduct
collaborative observational research projects easily.
Subsequently, a new improved version of MeGHa (1.4)
was launched in January this year creating great
excitement among the growth hormone community.
The Saizen device family provides patients with a real
choice of Saizen administration devices including
One.Click, the only multidose autoinjector for growth
hormone, and Cool.Click, a new generation needle-free
device for growth hormone. Both devices use the
42
Saizen 8 mg Clickeasy multidose formulation of growth
hormone. Serono are committed to continual
improvement in drug administration and as such are
actively developing new ideas which will ultimately
make patient injections much more convenient.
Serono is pleased to be a benefactor of the British
Endocrine Societies and we very much look forward to
seeing you at our stand at BES 2005.
Servier Laboratories Ltd
Stand 8
Servier is France's leading
independent pharmaceutical
company, with a tradition of ground-breaking research.
In 2002 Servier was awarded the Prix Galien in
recognition of the 'quantity, quality and dynamism' of
research in major fields of medicine, such as
cardiovascular disease, psychiatric and CNS disorders,
cancer treatment, diabetes, gynaecology and
rheumatology.
Servier has turned its attention to osteoporosis research
in the firm belief that real progress in this field depends
on a new understanding of the process of bone
physiology.
We believe that our research today will help reduce the
fractures of tomorrow.
Society for Endocrinology
Stand 3
Today the Society for
Endocrinology has almost 2000
members and publishes four leading journals in print
and online for the community at large. As one of the
world's major endocrine societies and a founder
member of the British Endocrine Societies, the Society
offers membership to anyone working in endocrinology
anywhere in the world. Our stand showcases Journal of
Endocrinology with an impact factor of 2.879, Journal of
Molecular Endocrinology with an impact factor of 4.359
and Endocrine-Related Cancer with an even higher
impact factor of 6.087. You can see online
demonstrations of these journals, which are published
in both print and online formats. We also offer online
manuscript submission and tracking for authors, which
reduces time to first verdict and improves publication
times for leading-edge articles. Our pre-print service
publishes articles online before the printed journal is
available. A library subscription to one of our journals
enables full online access for all professionals at an
institution. Come and take a look at the online journals
and pick up a form to recommend your library to place
EXHIBITORS
a subscription. The Society's official clinical journal,
Clinical Endocrinology, will also be on display. Free
samples of all our journals are available from our stand.
If you are considering becoming a member some of the
benefits are:
reduced registration fees to attend the annual
Society meeting, which provides an unparalleled
opportunity to network with colleagues, share
research interests, exchange knowledge and meet
experts
discounted entry to the BES spring meeting plus a
free programme and abstract book
huge savings on subscriptions to the Society's
journals: Journal of Endocrinology, Journal of Molecular
Endocrinology, Clinical Endocrinology and EndocrineRelated Cancer
free online access to the Society's journals for junior
members
an opportunity to apply for the Society's grants and
fellowships
up to 25% discount on books published by
BioScientifica Ltd
a free quarterly newsletter - The Endocrinologist
special activities for endocrine nurses
an electronic discussion list for young
endocrinologists
a Society handbook with a full list of members, in
print and on the web
•
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•
•
•
•
•
•
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•
Wisepress
Foyer Area
Wisepress Online
Bookshop is pleased
to present a display of publications chosen especially
for BES 2005 from the world's leading publishing
houses. All the books on display can be ordered/bought
directly at the stand or via our web site. Free journal
sample copies are also available, and we can take
subscription orders. Whatever your book requirements,
Wisepress will be happy to help - whether you are an
author seeking a publisher or a reader having difficulty
obtaining a title, our professional staff will assist you.
Contact us at Wisepress Bookshop, The Old Lamp
Works, 25 High Path, Merton Abbey, London SW19 2JL,
UK. (Tel: +44 (0)20 87151812; Fax: +44 (0)20 87151722;
Email: [email protected]; Web:
www.wisepress.co.uk).
Visit our stand to find out more and pick up a
membership form.
Thyroid Eye Disease
Stand 6
TEDct is a registered charity which aims to provide
information, care and support to those affected by
thyroid eye disease. It has produced a leaflet in layman's
terms (the first in the UK), has support groups and
telephone helplines throughout the country, a medical
helpline which includes specialists, both eye and
endocrine, with an awareness and understanding of the
distressing nature of thyroid eye disease and its
treatment, raises money for research/studies, and
produces quarterly newsletters which include
contributions from both those suffering from thyroid
eye disease and members of the medical profession.
Many consultants from home and abroad contribute to
the TED newsletter and a list of past medical articles is
available on request from TED head office.
43
NOTES
44
08.00
07.30
08.00
KS
QS2
QS1
Venue key
MA: Main Auditorium
QS1: Queen’s Suite 1
QS2: Queen’s Suite 2
09.00
09.00
MA
CS:
KS:
HD:
HD
COFFEE
09.30
HD
COFFEE
09.30
Conference Suite
King’s Suite
Hall D
MA
British Thyroid
Association
Pitt-Rivers
Lecture
T J Visser
08.30
09.30
Registration
09.00
Clinical
Endocrinology
Trust Lecture
J A Franklyn
08.30
08.30
Novartis
Pharmaceuticals UK
Ltd Satellite Session
07.30
The Expert’s
View 3:
Science
The Expert’s
View 2:
Clinical
QS1
Expert 1
The Expert’s
Clinical
View 1:
Clinical
08.00
07.30
M O N DAY
T U E S DAY
W E D N E S DAY
10.30
10.30
11.00
MF
11.30
10.30
11.00
MF:
Main Foyer
Oral Communications 5:
Thyroid
Clinical Management Workshop 3:
Endocrine manipulations in the
transsexual
QS2
MA
KS
QS1
BM2
11.30
QS2
Symposium 7:
The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis
and inflammation
10.00
Oral Communications 3:
Neuroendocrinology
Clinical Management Workshop 2:
HRT in women – who should get what?
QS1
11.30
Pfizer Ltd
Satellite
Session
11.00
Richard
Symposium 4:
Pfizer
Intracellular transport of steroidsSatellite
Stanhope
Satellite
Session
10.00
10.00
LUNCH
13.30
HD
HD
15.00
15.00
15.30
QS2
QS1
15.30
16.30
MA
KS
Young Endocrinologists Session:
Tricks for success in research
TEA
HD
17.00
17.00
17.00
The Expert’s
View 10:
Clinical
KS
QS2
The Expert’s
View 9:
Clinical
QS1
The Expert’s
View 8:
Clinical
The Expert’s
Expert 1
View Clinical
7:
State of art
CS
lecture
16.30
CS
QS2
QS1
The Expert’s
View 6:
Clinical
18.00
17.30
QS2
QS1
MA
19.00
MAJESTIC HOTEL
British
Endocrine
Societies
Banquet
19.30
BAR MED
Buffet and
Boogie
19.30
T I M E TA B LE
Expert’s View Titles
The Expert's View 1: Precocious puberty
The Expert's View 2: Amiodarone, lithium and thyroid dysfunction
The Expert's View 3: The polypeptide hormone stanniocalcin, no longer
just a fish-tale
The Expert's View 4: The use of genomics to identify key transcriptional
pathways of mammalian implantation
The Expert's View 5: Controversies in androgen replacement
The Expert's View 6: Dyslipidaemias in diabetes
The Expert's View 7: State of the art lecture - aquaporins
The Expert's View 8: Diagnosis and management of neuroendocrine tumours
of the pancreas and gut, particularly carcinoids
The Expert's View 9: Brittle diabetes - does it exist?
The Expert's View 10: Interpretation of bone mineral density and markers
of bone metabolism
MA
18.30
HD
19.00
Welcome
Reception
18.30
Ipsen Ltd
Satellite Session
18.00
MA
Clinical
Endocrinology
Trust Visiting
Professor
MA Lecture
J S Christiansen
17.30
Society for
Endocrinology
Transatlantic
KS Medal Lecture
K S Korach
The Expert’s
View 5:
Clinical
The Expert’s
View 4:
Science
16.30
NURSES’
TEA
HD
TEA
16.00
KS
QS2
QS1
MA
16.00
Oral Communications 2:
Reproduction and growth
Oral Communications 1:
Diabetes and metabolism
TEA
Clinical Management Workshop 4:
Endocrine sequelae of childhood
QS1 cancer
Regulation of ovarian
folliculogenesis
Symposium 8:
Hyperinsulinism-induced
hypoglycaemia
14.30
MA Symposium 9:
14.00
Nurses Session:
Skeletal health
Oral Communications 4:
MA Steroids
QS2
HD
16.00
Symposium 3:
Thyroid disease in pregnancy
and childhood
15.30
Novel approaches for defining oestrogen
action
QS1 Symposium 6:
Ardana
Bioscience Ltd
Satellite Session
Moral Maze:
Ethics and animal
experimentation
13.30
Debate:
Growth hormone
in adults: did NICE
get it right?
14.30
MA
TEA
15.00
Symposium 5:
Cardiovascular endocrinology
14.00
Schering Health Care
Ltd Satellite Session
13.00
HD
QS2
QS1
14.30
Clinical Management Workshop 1:
Diagnosis and management of
steroid deficiency
Symposium 2:
The endocrinology
of the kidney
Molecular
Endocrinology
Workshop:
Protein chip
HD technology
HD
14.00
Symposium 1:
Endocrine complications
of systemic disorders
13.30
Business meetings
BM1: Society for Endocrinology Extraordinary General Meeting
BM2: British Thyroid Association Annual General Meeting
Attended Posters
(odd numbers)
LUNCH
MA
12.30
MA
13.00
Novartis
Awards
Poster
Session
12.30
HD
LUNCH
13.00
Society for
Endocrinology
Dale Medal
Lecture
C R Kahn
12.30
Attended Posters
(even numbers)
12.00
MA
BM1
12.00
MA
12.00
Conference Secretariat
Society for Endocrinology
22 Apex Court
Woodlands
Bradley Stoke
Bristol BS32 4JT, UK
Contact:
Tel:
Fax:
Email:
Website:
Feona Horrex or Juliet Need
+44 (0)1454 642212
+44 (0)1454 642222
[email protected]
www.endocrinology.org
The Society for Endocrinology
Company Limited by Guarantee
Registered in England No 349408
Registered office as shown left
Registered Charity No 266813
`