Document 52797

bottom line
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Thursday, April 18
Las Cruces Convention Center
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President and Chair Columns...............2
Mayor talks finances, plans ..................3
Heritage Foundation Column ...............3
Governmental Affairs Issues .................4
Small Business of the Month ................5
Business of the Month ........................6
Leadership Las Cruces .......................7
Business After Hours ..........................8
Conquistadore Corner........................9
Nonprofit of the Month .....................10
Military Column ................................10
Agriculture Column ............................11
Ribbon Cuttings ................................12
New and Renewing Members ............13
Calendar and Statistics .......................14
Briefs ...............................................15
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The Greater Las Cruces Chamber of
Commerce provides more than 50 events
and programs each year to promote
the growth of area businesses and the
economic success of the region.
For the past 60 years, the Chamber has
served as the largest and most active
business advocacy organization in the
Mesilla Valley. In 2010, the Chamber
received a four-star accreditation from the
U.S. Chamber of Commerce for best
practices amongst chambers of commerce.
If you are interested in becoming a
member of our growing organization,
contact Vice President of Development
Troy Tudor today at 524-1968 or
[email protected]
GREATER LAS CR UCES
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
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#RUCES$AYIN3ANTA&E3HEISRESPONSIBLEFORCARRYING3ENATE"ILLTOTHEmOORANDWASINSTRUMENTALINGETTINGINFORMEDCONSENTTOPASSINTHESTATE
LEGISLATURE4HELEGISLATIONISINSTRUMENTALTOTHESUCCESSOF3PACEPORT!MERICAANDISCURRENTLYAWAITINGTHEGOVERNORSSIGNATURE
Informed consent progresses
The moment we’ve all been waiting for
A milestone that many in New Mexico
have been anxiously awaiting has finally
arrived.
Although things are not completely finished, it appears Spaceport America has taken a giant step for the future of New Mexico’s
economic development. The legislation that
had twice failed to be approved in Santa Fe
has passed both the House and Senate and
will soon be placed on Gov. Martinez’s desk
for her signature.
Thanks to Senate President Pro Tem
Mary Kay Papen, the keynote speaker at this
year’s Las Cruces Day in Santa Fe, for carrying Senate Bill 240 and Rep. James White
for carrying House Bill 308.
A thank you is also deserved by all
the people who stepped up and stepped
in to help get these bills passed – both
unanimously. Due to the importance of this
issue, a number of groups formed and came
together – including the Greater Chamber’s
Spaceport Task Force and the Save Our
Spaceport Coalition – that helped get the
word out and educate everyone as to the
opportunity we have here.
This story really is not a celebratory one,
although it could be. It demonstrates that
when people get together and rally around a
just cause, things can be accomplished.
Please don’t think that there were no
celebrations, high-fives or fist bumps when
these bills moved through the respective
channels, because there were. This was the
first piece, albeit a big one, to open up what
many think can be a fantastic opportunity
for the state to be on the forefront of a burgeoning industry.
After the dust has settled from the excitement of this great opportunity, now is
the time to ask, “What’s next?”
What’s next for Doña Ana County is
completion of the southern road connecting
Spaceport America to Interstate-25. This
will enable more direct access for tourists
and businesses from the south than the current route through Truth or Consequences.
Doña Ana and Sierra counties are already hard at work trying to find the best
way to both build and maintain the future
road with the current funds allocated to the
project.
The chamber’s Spaceport Task Force is
closely monitoring the situation, and it will
be a key discussion during the Chamber’s
Spaceport Update luncheon in April.
This subject and a future event
spotlighting doing business with Spaceport
America are on the task force’s short list.
In the next few months, expect to see more
information about these and other topics
around this industry.
Board
Members
Chair of the Board Leslie Cervantes
Las Cruces Public Schools
Chair Elect Mike Beckett
COAS Books
Past Chair Richard Haas
Steve Newby Architects & Associates
Treasurer Brandy Darden
Century Bank
Secretary Terra Van Winter
New Mexico State University
At-Large Member Kelly Duke
MountainView Regional
Medical Center
Member Events Open
& Services
Governmental John Hummer, chair
Affairs Steinborn & Associates Real Estate
Military Affairs/ Savonne Griffin, chair
Aerospace FirstLight Federal Credit Union
Community Stella Shelley, chair
Development Shelley Eye Center
Board Members Marci Dickerson
Dickerson’s Catering
Rico Gonzales
El Paso Electric
Janet Green
New Mexico State University
Kiel Hoffman
Pioneer Bank
Margie Huerta
Doña Ana Community College
Jaki McCollum
FIG Publications
Phillip Rivera
Memorial Medical Center
Matt Rush
New Mexico Farm & Livestock
Bureau
Council of Stacie Christiano
Conquistadores Big Brothers Big Sisters of
Southwestern New Mexico
Legal Counsel John Darden
Darden Law Firm
Advisers Miguel Silva
Las Cruces City Council
Karen Perez
Doña Ana County Commission
FROM THE CHAIR
FROM THE PRESIDENT
Time to think
Tough times ahead
T
T
he 2013 Legislature will
come to a close in the
next two weeks, and we
will need to evaluate the actions
of our local and state leaders.
Did they listen to their constituents and did their voting
record reflect informed decision
making? That is up to each of
us to decide. It has yet to be
determined how the minimum
wage conversation will unfold
for the state of New Mexico,
and I know there will be spirited
debate as the session comes to
a close.
LESLIE CERVANTES
The current legislative system does have an effect on the
context in which businesses operate. Special interest groups try to
influence government and politicians.
Their activities can have a major impact on our businesses.
Elected officials frequently only hear from these groups about
new legislation.
Often times, their message is one sided and not inclusive of
the bigger picture. Businesses must step up to the plate to counter
propaganda from these groups, or be prepared to live with the effects of their pressure.
As I look at our federal government and listen to talk
surrounding the sequestration cuts, I feel for sure that this
change in policy will have a major effect on our local economy.
I am particularly concerned for White Sands Missile Range, its
contractors and employees. WSMR is a major employer within
Las Cruces and these cuts will no doubt have an economic impact
on the people that work at the range and their spending in our
community.
Issues for business owners are complex, and consideration
must be given to a number of factors. I encourage you to get
involved in the legislative process and be part of the solution on
legislation that has an impact on each of us as we open our doors
for business each day.
Davin Lopez
Mesilla Valley Economic
Development Alliance
he Chamber’s annual advocacy trip to
Washington, D.C. is in its
final planning stages. The typical
agenda includes one day at the
Pentagon, meeting with the military in support of White Sands
Missile Range and one day at
the Capitol, meeting with our
federal delegation – which includes the congressional district
from West Texas that covers the
El Paso area. We try to pack two
days in an effort that minimizes
expenses, while still seeing everyone that makes decisions on our
region.
BILL ALLEN
This year looks to be a bit
different now that sequestration
is in effect. When we see and hear all the coverage that this subject
is getting from the media, we sometimes forget the cuts, which are
set at 7.8 percent (annualized) for defense items, will impact the
people that live in our community.
We have a large number of civilian contractors that work at
WSMR and NASA who will see a reduction in their income due
to a forced furlough of up to 22 days. And the 7.8 percent is a bit
misleading since the government is in the middle of their fiscal
year, which ends Sept. 30.
In order to achieve their annualized target of 7.8 percent by the
end of the fiscal year the effective percentage of defense reductions
over the next seven months will be approximately 13.1 percent.
That means our neighbors – who have mortgages or monthly
rent payments, car loans and who have to put food on the table
and clothes on their children’s backs will have to do with quite a
bit less – especially over the next seven months. Will that have an
impact on our community? You bet it will.
We need to recognize that a whole new group of our friends
and neighbors will be going through tough times this summer.
However, this may be an opportune time to visit with the
individuals that ultimately make decisions on programs at the
nation’s military installations. The Chamber will again be there
in force making certain that those charged with these difficult
decisions realize that the Las Cruces community stands behind its
bases and is ready to support however and whenever we can.
Leslie Cervantes, Chair of the Board
Greater Las Cruces Chamber of Commerce
Bill Allen, President/CEO
Greater Las Cruces Chamber of Commerce
Monte Marlin
White Sands Missile Range
Stan Rounds
Las Cruces Public Schools
Chamber
Staff
Bill Allen
President/CEO
Troy Tudor
Vice President of Development
Liz Banegas
Office Manager
Cyndi Armijo
Billing & Database Assistant
2 s March 2013 s THE BOTTOM LINE
bottom line
the
Bulletin
T H E
L A S
C R U C E S
2005 Las Cruces
“Business of the Year”
PUBLISHER
Richard Coltharp
PUBLISHERS EMERITI
Jaki McCollum
David E. McCollum
EDITOR
Rachel Christiansen
CONTRIBUTORS
Stephen L. Wilmeth
DESIGN
Rachel Courtney, manager
Theresa Montoya Basaldua,
art director
Ramon Gonzalez
Jessica Grady
Steven Parra
Rafael Torres
ADVERTISING
Claire Frohs
Shellie McNabb
Jorge Lopez
Pam Rossi
DISTRIBUTION
Alyce Bales
The Bottom Line, the official publication of the Greater
Las Cruces Chamber of Commerce, is a copyrighted
publication that is designed, produced and distributed
monthly by the Las Cruces Bulletin, 840 N. Telshor
Blvd., Suite E, Las Cruces, NM 88011. Content of
The Bottom Line is submitted and authorized by the
Greater Las Cruces Chamber of Commerce located at
505 S. Main St., Suite 134. Articles and columns in
The Bottom Line may not reflect the opinions of the
Las Cruces Bulletin. Inquiries regarding editorial content
or advertising may be directed to the publisher at
575-524-8061.
GREATER LAS CRUCES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
4.BJO4U4VJUFt-BT$SVDFT/.ttXXXMBTDSVDFTPSH
Mayor talks finances, plans
State of the City informative to business owners
Mayor Ken Miyagishima spoke
to Chamber members at the State
of the City Recap Luncheon held
at the Las Cruces Convention
Center Feb. 21. and touched on
several areas, including the city’s
finances and plans for the future.
The city’s financial condition
stands at $7.1 million in savings,
twice the amount required by the
state of New Mexico, when fiscal
year 2012 ended last June. Given
the recent recession, this is aexample of impressive financial
management.
The mayor also discussed plans
for a revitalized Downtown, highlighted by the reopening of Main
Street last fall and the recent reopening of the Las Cruces SunNews building.
The city is also continuing its
plans to build a public safety campus on the East Mesa to better
serve the increasing number of residents in that part of the city. Also
mentioned was the desire to include a forensic laboratory that
would service all of southern New
Mexico.
Many people come to stroll the Las Cruces Farmers & Crafts Market on
Wednesdays and Saturdays on Downtown Main Street.
The mayor spoke briefly about
the city becoming more proactive
in efforts to establish a regional
transit system.
Also mentioned was the city’s
new police and fire training facility near Las Cruces International
Airport, and construction that
began on a fire station across the
street from the airport. A positive
outcome of this effort is a revised
insurance score that will ultimately
save businesses and residents money due to the closer proximity of
emergency services to the area.
The event concluded as the
mayor answered questions on his
stance on the proposed increase
in the minimum wage and impact
fees, two issues that are sure to be
of interest to the local business
community.
Las Cruces Mayor Ken Miyagishima touts the city’s gains during the Chamber’s
State of the City Recap Luncheon Thursday, Feb. 21.
Armijo House project
takes steps forward
Greater Chamber prepares to move in
The Greater Las Cruces
Chamber
Heritage
Foundation has taken
several steps forward in its effort to eventually move the
Chamber into the
historic
Armijo
House as its permanent residence.
First,
the
foundation
was
granted its 501(c)(3)
status in December
2012, an essential step to enabling
the group to pursue grants and
monies available from
other foundations.
Next, in February,
the foundation enlisted the assistance
of Steven Silver
of
Philanthropic
Services
of
the
Southwest to drive the
capital campaign and
secure donations for
the project.
Silver has been
very active in February,
both meeting community leaders and developing new
marketing strategies designed to
This rendering shows what the Armijo House and the surrounding area will look like once it is ready for the Greater Las
Cruces Chamber of Commerce to move in to its permanent residence.
deliver the financial results nec- Ave. As a result, the chamber will
We are happy to be locating so
essary to move the campaign to a move to the Loretto Town Center close to our eventual home. It will
close later this year.
over the weekend March 9-10. The make monitoring progress on the
Finally, also in February, the Chamber has secured lease space project much easier. Expect to see
Chamber closed on the sale of its for a period of time until the Armijo fencing around the area installed
building, located at 760 Picacho House compound will be ready.
in the near future.
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THE BOTTOM LINE s March 2013 s 3
Business organizations take a stance
Greater Las Cruces Chamber of Commerce keeps community informed of pro-jobs legislation
As part of the growing commitment to
governmental affairs and issue advocacy, the
Greater Las Cruces Chamber of Commerce
(GLCCC) publishes a Governmental
Affairs Positions page.
The Chamber is working to ensure the
Mesilla Valley is a pro-jobs environment
and will help identify pro-jobs elected officials that are assisting in that goal. Each
month, this page will contain the Chamber’s
pro-jobs scorecard for elected officials with
voting information on ordinances at the city
and county level.
This monthly page will also highlight
positions taken by the Chamber as well as
the Association of Commerce & Industry
(ACI) – which serves as the state chamber
of commerce – and the U.S. Chamber of
Commerce.
ACI takes positions of importance to
the statewide business community, while
the U.S. Chamber addresses national business issues, and, often, the GLCCC takes
similar positions. However, GLCCC positions must be specifically authorized by the
Chamber Board of Directors.
The U.S. Chamber’s Center for Capital
Markets Competitiveness (CCMC) works
toward advancing America’s global leadership in capital formation by supporting
capital markets that are fair, efficient and
innovative.
U.S. Chamber of
Commerce positions
Business should lead
immigration
Immigration reform has once again risen
to the top tier of issues under discussion in
Washington. Why should business care?
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and willing to do a wide range of
essential jobs is wholly inadequate to
meet our needs, yet legal options for
employing foreign workers are pitifully
limited. The numbers allowed in are far
too small, the wait times far too long
and the transaction costs far too high.
Even if we move to temporary worker
programs, based on need rather than
arbitrary political quotas, the costs of
compliance will encourage employers
to use American workers whenever
possible.
t #FDBVTFUIFNJMMJPOVOEPDVNFOUFE
people living in the U.S. aren’t going to
leave and we have neither the will nor
the ability to evict them. Furthermore,
the vast majority of them are holding
jobs and doing work upon which our
employers and our economy depend.
They got those jobs using an out-of-date
paperwork system (the I-9 Form) that
employers must accept if they appear
valid. Now they are vital members of our
workforce across our economy.
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enforcement schemes that has sprung
up makes one national employment
verification system (E-Verify) in the
best interests of employers of all sizes.
Having to deal with different and often
conflicting rules is expensive for large
companies and unworkable for small
companies. Better to stick with one
system, especially since E-Verify has
improved so much in recent years.
t #PSEFSDPOUSPMIBTJNQSPWFE
dramatically in recent years but
remains a high priority. Expanding
legal avenues to enter the country to
do the jobs that we need done will
allow law enforcement to focus their
resources where they are most needed:
on inadmissible people with criminal
backgrounds.
A summary of these points is available,
along with a one-page “Issues and Solutions”
document, a sample policy statement, and a
sample letter to your senators at the new
U.S. Chamber Immigration Toolkit.
City of Las Cruces Noise Ordinance
City of Las Cruces One Stop Shop Concept
Commissioner Duarte-Benavidez
D
D
Commissioner Scott Krahling
City of Las Cruces Minimum Wage Increase Resolution
-
Commissioner Karen Perez
CLC/DAC Support Annual Funding for MVEDA
Doña Ana County Noise Ordinance
City of Las Cruces Security Alarm Ordinance
Commissioner Dolores Saldana-Caviness
Resolution for Expanded Informed Consent Legislation
Commissioner Billy Garrett
City of Las Cruces Impact Fees (public safety)
Mayor Pro-Tem Sharon Thomas
City of Las Cruces Delay of Impact Fees (parks)
Councillor Gil Sorg
City of Las Cruces Delay of Impact Fees (roads, drainage)
Councillor Nathan Small
Resolution for Organ Mountains Desert Peaks National Monument
Councillor Olga Pedroza
City of Las Cruces Night Sky Lighting Ordinance
D
D
D
C
C
D
C
C
Councillor Greg Smith
City of Las Cruces Dust Ordinance
Councillor Miguel Silva
The Chamber is working to ensure the
Mesilla Valley is a pro-jobs environment
and will help identify pro-jobs elected
officials that are assisting in that goal.
Each month, this page will contain the
Chamber’s Pro-jobs scorecard for elected
officials with voting information on
ordinances at the city and county level.
Mayor Ken Miyagishima
Discussion Item
Pro-Jobs
Pro-jobs scorecard for City of Las Cruces & Doña Ana County elected officials
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
-
-
-
-
-
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
-
-
-
-
-
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
-
-
-
-
-
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
-
-
-
-
-
Y
N
NA
Y
Y
Y
Y
-
-
-
-
-
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
-
-
-
-
-
Y
Y
Y
NA
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
-
Y
Y
-
Y
Y
-
Y
Y
-
Y
Y
-
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Vote estimated for Spring 2013
C
Vote estimated for Spring 2013
Y: Yea vote, N: Nay vote, NA: Abstained from vote or not present, -: Vote not held
Note: All future ordinances and resolutions will be reviewed by an independent economist to determine the impact on jobs in the community
4 s March 2013 s THE BOTTOM LINE
SMALL BUSINESS OF THE MONTH - MARCH 2013
The home at 5488 Saddle Ridge Court features a cedar swing, crafted by
landscape designer Louis Worley of Kraenzel’s Landscaping.
Kraenzels Landscaping
Finding the “aha” moment
David Kraenzel, owner of Kraenzels Landscaping, stands with his team of Vidal Meza, Louis Worley
and Clyde Montoya in front of a recent waterfall project in a Las Alturas neighborhood.
575-312-1147 t WWW.LASCRUCESLANDSCAPES.COM t 2902 N. VALLEY DRIVE
By Rachel Christiansen
Many residents in the Mesilla Valley are
learning to do more with less – especially
water – and landscaping is no different.
David Kraenzel, owner of Kraenzels
Landscaping and Doña Ana Bend Farms
Inc., said he has seen the trend emerge
for low-maintenance and low water usage
plants.
Using landscape that is resistant to the
climate of the area, Kraenzel said, is one
way to continue to enjoy the surroundings
while not using too much of the precious
resources.
Kraenzel has been a horticulturist and
landscaper in the region for the past 41
years, and in 2003, merged both interests
to focus solely on urban landscaping, both
commercial and residential.
“A lot of our landscaping starts out as a
drainage issue and then leads to a full landscape,” Kraenzel said. “Channeling the water
is the No. 1 functional need, and secondary
is aesthetics – how it looks, so it has curb
appeal for the homeowner.”
Curb appeal, however, is what gives the
customer the “aha moment” that Kraenzel
said is his ultimate goal.
At the urging of friend and Doña Ana
County Extension Agent Jeff Anderson,
Kraenzel became a member of the Master
Gardeners, a program that educates community members on gardening and plantrelated issues.
Because of this interest in gardening and
planting, Kraenzel said the residential projects he has completed in areas such as Las
Alturas, Picacho Hills and Sonoma Ranch
have become a passion.
“Being with (Master Gardeners) allows
me to focus on high-end garden areas with
people who have like minds – kindred spirits, if you will,” Kraenzel said. “We like those
projects because they are custom to the individual resident.
“We try to tune into the customer’s visualization. I depend on the input of my
steady customers. One customer may have a
real sense of color, another on placement or
how the plants should be put in, should they
be asymmetrical, symmetrical … those types
of technical viewpoints.”
A sluggish economy continues to affect
many businesses, despite a comeback over
recent years.
“Before 2008, I employed about 12 people,” he said. “It’s hard to carry full-time employees in this economy.”
With the help of agencies such as
Manpower Inc., Kraenzel said he is able
to hire employees on a contract basis when
there are jobs that need more hands on
deck.
A graduate of New Mexico State
University who holds a bachelor’s degree in
agriculture business, and master’s degrees in
horticulture and marketing, Kraenzel said he
maintains relationships within the university
to always continue learning his trade. He
also gives student designers the opportunity
for design-and-build experience.
“We are blessed in this area with some
really talented horticulture people,” he said.
The Ph.D. in adult education Kraenzel
obtained from the University of WisconsinMadison is something he said he uses every
day.
“The basics of adult education and how
you teach people to do things comes into
our training programs,” he said. “It extends
to not only the company and the company
employees, but to the customers. I’ve always
been a firm believer that the best way to
learn is to teach.”
All of Kraenzel’s education plays to his
advantage within his business, as he continues to work with irrigation and water
control, planting and farming and creating
landscapes – all which fall under the umbrella of horticulture.
“We want our customers, when the
landscape is done, to walk out the door and
say, ‘Aha! That’s exactly what I wanted,’”
Kraenzel said.
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THE BOTTOM LINE s March 2013 s 5
BUSINESS OF THE MONTH - MARCH 2013
Sagecrest Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
A place to live and heal
575-522-7000 t 2029 SAGECREST COURT
By Rachel Christiansen
Singing or laughter may be heard drifting from a quiet corner of the High Range
neighborhood at any given time throughout
the day.
From being able to choose the food in
front of them to the daily activities and
bimonthly outings, nearly 100 people call
Sagecrest Nursing & Rehabilitation Center
their full-time home.
And the staff is determined to put a smile
on their faces.
“We have the ability to have a positive
impact on someone’s life and I take that very
seriously,” said Administrator TJ JohnstonHicks.
The activities range from bingo to Bible
t
WWW.SAGECRESTREHABILITATION.COM
study and game time to hosting holiday
dances, a favorite in the hearts of both residents and staff.
“They love live entertainment, especially
the mariachi music,” Johnston-Hicks said.
In addition to daily activities, the residents on the activities committee choose
where to take bimonthly outings in the
community, whether it be to see “Lincoln”
– as was the most recent choice – or to a
restaurant or shopping.
Sagecrest has emerged as a premier facility, with a range of services offered such as
rehabilitation, occupational therapy, speech
therapy and full-time assistance available.
Johnston-Hicks said Sagecrest is the
only facility in Las Cruces that offers an infectious disease doctor and wound care sur-
geon on the executive committee, as well as
voice-activated charting.
The advanced health care technology
Accunurse, a voice-activated system that allows for immediate updates on the needs of
each patient was implemented in 2011, long
before the program hit the industry standard
mark it will soon reach.
“You will see our CNAs and nurses
walking around with what looks like a
Bluetooth and it recognizes only their
voice,” Marketing Director Lupe Rios said.
“They get the patient information they need
immediately, so it’s faster and more efficient
than going back and checking charts.”
Sagecrest is also currently undergoing
a major renovation, and will soon boast of
new and improved patient rooms, a comfortable lobby and a beautifully landscaped
patio where residents can sit and enjoy views
of the Organ Mountains.
According to Johnston-Hicks, the key
to success is working as a team to ensure
the highest quality care for patients and
residents.
“When you have low turnover and your
employees are happy, the customer service
is better,” he said. “Whether it’s Burger
King or a nursing home, it doesn’t matter.
Happy staff makes for a better customer
experience.”
Many success stories are heard – and seen
– from patients who have walked through
Sagecrest’s doors.
“We have a resident right now that is
mentally disabled who came in unable to
walk, feed herself or speak and now she
walks all over the facility independently,
feeds herself and even socializes with others,” Johnston-Hicks said.
In an effort to try and get the word out to
the community about what Sagecrest does,
Rios said she wants to let people know they
can come take a tour of the facility and ask
questions when making the choice for loved
ones.
“Having our families actually know what
we do and have them trust us, it’s great to
see that,” Rios said.
Sagecrest is also involved in the community, by providing sponsorships to things
such as La Casa Domestic Violence Shelter,
El Caldito Soup Kitchen and Take Our
Kickboxing event.
This rendering
shows what
the new lobby
inside Sagecrest
will look like
once the
renovation is
complete.
CNAs Amanda Gomez and Anna Portillo work at one of the newly installed nurse stations at Sagecrest
Nursing & Rehabilitation Center, a part of the facility’s current undertaking of a nearly $1 million
renovation.
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6 s March 2013 s THE BOTTOM LINE
LEADERSHIP
Another class of leaders
Full class sure to be exciting
The Greater Las Cruces Chamber
of Commerce has selected its class for
Leadership Las Cruces 2013.
This is the premier leadershiptraining program in southern New
Mexico and once again there is another
full class of 28 participants.
2013 marks the fifth consecutive
year during which the number of applicants has exceeded the capacity of
the class.
Orientation for this year’s class is
scheduled for Friday and Saturday,
March 15-16, at La Posta de
Mesilla. The 2013 class is a diverse mix
of individuals from large and small
businesses, nonprofits, municipalities
and education.
This diversity typically leads to
great discussion, where everyone is able
to learn from their classmate’s perspectives and experience. Here is this year’s
class:
Karen Altamirano, Pioneer Bank;
Rachel Christiansen, The Las Cruces
Bulletin; Eric Fraass, Las Cruces Public
Schools; Tim Hargrove, Citizens
Bank; Paul Heiberger, Positive Energy
Solar; Anna Henke, New Mexico
State University Marketing; Mellow
Honek, Sunspot Solar Energy; Laura
Huybers-Pierce, Comcast Spotlight;
Michael Jasek, NMSU; Georgia Lane,
Gift Baskets by G; Tiffani Lucero,
Bradbury Stamm; Billy Massie, El
Paso Electric Co.; Belinda Mills, Las
Cruces Sun-News; Anthony Moreno,
KRWG-TV; Joshua Orozco, Border
Industrial Alliance; Laura Reynolds,
Las Cruces Real Estate; Sherri Rials,
Manpower; Brian Rodriguez, Jaynes
Corporation; Christopher Sanders,
First American Bank; Estela Sauceda,
City of Las Cruces; Kenna Stubbs,
Stubbs Engineering; Jay Sundheirmer,
Memorial Medical Center; Travis
Tarry, US Bank; April Tate, American
Document Services; Raymond Taylor,
Jacobs Technology; Lidia Trujillo,
MountainView Regional Medical
Center; George Vescovo, Las Cruces
Toyota and Maria Villa, City of Las
Cruces.
White Sands Missile Range Chief of Public Affairs Monte Marlin,
right, details the history of rocket testing in the United States at
Launch Complex 33 for the 2012 Leadership Las Cruces program as
a part of Military Day.
Junior leadership class continues to learn
Students visit state, local governments
This past fall, the Greater Las Cruces
Chamber of Commerce kicked off its first
Junior Leadership program.
The program is modeled after the chamber’s successful Leadership Las Cruces
Program. It is a unique program that involves nine all-day sessions throughout the
school year.
Twenty two high school juniors who
represent Centennial, Las Cruces, Mayfield,
Oñate, Arrowhead Early College, San
Andres and Mesilla Valley Christian high
schools will participate.
This program allows the students to enhance their skills and knowledge base while
at the same time exposing them to pieces of
the Las Cruces community they probably
have not experienced. One of our hopes is
that the knowledge they gain may, in small
part, be a factor that will get them to remain
in the area following graduation.
The Junior Leadership Committee is
made up of Chair Stacie Allen, Big Brothers
Big Sisters of Southwestern New Mexico;
Brett Beckett, COAS Books; Kelly Duke of
MountainView Regional Medical Center;
Mandy Leatherwood of Memorial Medical
Center; Eric Montgomery of the Mesilla
Valley Economic Development Alliance and
Charissa Paskowski of American Classifieds.
All are Leadership Las Cruces Alumni
who work with the Chamber staff to create
each month’s agenda that focuses on a
specific topic.
Over the past few months, the students
have participated in field trips and interacted with speakers focusing on health care, the
arts, nonprofits and agriculture.
Last month, the training focused on state
and local government. The students toured
the Doña Ana County Government Center
and the county detention center; saw the
sheriff ’s K-9 Unit in action and met with
Las Cruces Mayor Ken Miyagishima in the
City of Las Cruces Council Chambers.
It was a day of learning about the operations of the city and county, the job opportunities in various law enforcement and
ways to become a better citizen.
Next month, the class will dive into
The 2012 Junior Leadership class receives training during orientation at Mesilla Valley Hospital. The
exercise help to establish a trust level amongst the students.
economic development and learning how
the community brings new business to
town, future economic impact on Doña Ana
County and how they can get involved.
Visit www.lascruces.org for more information about this program. Applications
for our 2013-14 Junior Leadership program
will be released in May.
THE BOTTOM LINE s March 2013 s 7
BUSINESS AFTER HOURS AT U.S. BANK
Photos by Alta LeCompte
Christine Logan, Bruce Drum, Stacie Allen, Pat and Cindy Breedlove
The U.S. Bank team of Craig Buchanan, John Vasquez, Jeremy Phillips, Claudia Clement and Karen
Bailey at 277 E. Amador Ave. hosts Business After Hours for the Greater Las Cruces Chamber of
Commerce Thursday, Feb. 27, at the branch.
Elke Wunderlich of TopView Leadership and Karen Bailey of U.S. Bank
Matt Rush of New Mexico Farm & Livestock Bureau, Chamber President/CEO Bill Allen and Les
Baldock, Mesilla Valley Economic Development Alliance operations manager
Nadine Salak chats with chamber members Mary Beth Reinhart and Anna Mae Evans.
Peter Cruz of ClearVue and John Vasquez of U.S. Bank
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8 s March 2013 s THE BOTTOM LINE
Las Cruces’ only locally owned, locally managed and locally printed real estate resource.
Copies are available at more than 250 locations in and around Las Cruces including White Sands Missile Range.
Contact Sid Graft at 575-532-1001 or [email protected] for more information.
CONQUISTADORE CORNER
Bataan March next thing to conquer
I
t is time to spring into
action. But first, I am pleased
to congratulate two amazing
Conquistadores who are always
springing into action.
During the Greater Las
Cruces Chamber of Commerce
Annual Banquet held Feb. 1,
Leslie Martinez and Bruce Drum
were recognized for going above
and beyond.
Martinez was awarded the
2012 Conquistador of the Year
award. She is very involved with
the Greater Las Cruces Chamber
of Commerce, is a member of
the Las Cruces Day in Santa Fe
and Retention committees and
a leader on the Conquistadore
Executive Council.
Martinez is always smiling and
willing to jump in and help out
when needed.
Drum was awarded the 2012
Volunteer of the Year Award. He
is someone you can always count
on, and is willing to step up to any
challenge.
His dedication to helping
businesses grow and his endless
volunteer hours spent to support
the community are such a blessing.
Congratulations to Martinez
and Drum on their recognition,
very well deserved. We are blessed
to have them as members of our
community.
The Conquistadores are geared
up to support the 24th Bataan
Memorial Death March Sunday,
March 17.
We are excited to host the
first water station of the march
and provide fruit slices, water,
Gatorade and support to the
6,000-plus marchers.
Thanks to Kari Shepan, who
has helped organize this year’s
event. I know it will be a huge
success.
In addition to the Bataan
Memorial Death March, we
are getting ready for our first
quarterly meeting in April,
where we will be inducting new
Conquistadores and welcoming
new businesses to the chamber.
Thank you all for what you do!
Stacie Allen,
Chair of the Council of
Conquistadores 2013
Greater Las Cruces
Chamber of Commerce
STACIE ALLEN
The Chamber takes applications for new education award
2013 Team Citizenship Award
Group education effort
The Team Citizenship Award will be given annually to a
team of dedicated individuals who have taken extraordinary
action that resulted in a positive impact on education with
children and/or adults.
Recipients of this award are nominated based on the criteria set by the Greater Las Cruces Chamber of Commerce’s
Education Committee. The award will be given out at the
Chamber’s Annual Education Update Luncheon on Aug.
29.
Please use the following criteria in developing a nomination narrative:
Describe how the “team” organized themselves to address educational issues outside the prescribed responsibilities of their job.
How did the results of the team’s effort make a significant impact on the lives of others?
How has the team’s effort contributed to providing
educational opportunities for children or adults in the
community?
To be considered, all three criteria must be completed.
Please include a narrative of how the team exemplifies
the criteria. Nominations will not be considered complete
unless all criteria have been addressed.
Please limit the narrative to four pages. While not required, you may also include two additional pages of supplementary materials may be attached to the application
narrative.
Send the application and summary to Liz Banegas, 505
S. Main St., Suite 134, Las Cruces, NM 88001, or email to
[email protected] by 4 p.m. Monday, April 8.
2013 Team Citizenship Award
Names of Nominees on Team: ______________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________________
Nominee contact information:
Phone:_____________Email: _____________________________________________________
Nominated by: ________________________________________________________________
Relationship to Nominee: _________________________________________________________
Phone:_____________Email: _____________________________________________________
Deadline: 4 p.m. Monday, April 8, 2013
Send the application and summary to Liz Banegas, 505 S. Main St., Suite 134, Las Cruces, NM 88001 or email to
[email protected]
THE BOTTOM LINE s March 2013 s 9
NONPROFIT OF THE MONTH - MARCH 2013
Downtown Las Cruces Partnership
138 S. WATER STREET t 525-1955 t DOWNTOWNLASCRUCES.ORG
Mission:
The mission of the Downtown
Las Cruces Partnership is
to serve as the public and
private voice for Downtown
revitalization by working with
our community to create a
business and visitors destination
that celebrates our region’s rich
cultural heritage and contributes
to a thriving, diverse and
economically vibrant downtown.
Purpose:
We promote downtown
revitalization through our
economic development efforts.
We serve as the liaison between
downtown stakeholders and the
City of Las Cruces, Doña Ana
County and the State of New
Mexico, to coordinate downtown
revitalization efforts.
Key goals:
t #VTJOFTTSFDSVJUNFOU
t #VTJOFTTSFUFOUJPO
Downtown Las
Cruces Partnership
members include
Mollie McGraw,
Steve Newby,
Connie Hines,
Board President
Hal Henthorne,
Executive Director
Carrie La Tour,
Brett Beckett,
Freda Flores,
Jorge Lopez,
Patrick Grooms,
Craig Buchanon
and Stephanie
Snodgrass.
t %PXOUPXOFWFOUT
t 1VCMJDBOEQSJWBUF
beautification projects.
History:
We are the only nonprofit
organization charged with the
redevelopment of Downtown.
We have been a New Mexico
Main Street Community since
2004 and were formerly known
as Las Cruces Downtown.
Both organizations have
been lobbying for Downtown
revitalization for decades, with
the original emphasis being on
the re-opening of Main Street.
With South Main completed
in November 2012, the plan
is to expand retail venues on
Main Street and within the
Tax Incentive Development
District (TIDD), which supports
infrastructure projects in the
downtown district.
Key people to know:
t $BSSJF-B5PVS&YFDVUJWF
Director
t )BM)FOUIPSOF#PBSE
President
t .JHVFM4JMWB$JUZ$PVODJMPS
for District 1
Events and activities:
Downtown business
promotions, facilitate interest
HSPVQT&WFOUT"WFOVF"SU
SalsaFest!, business breakfasts
BOE&M1BTP&MFDUSJD)PMJEBZ
Light Show.
Future plans:
Continue development
Downtown, improve both the
public and private space and have
more events.
MILITARY
Community and military come together
WSMR begins forum to strengthen ties
By Miriam U. Rodriguez
Missile Ranger Editor
White Sands Missile Range Commander
Brig. Gen. Gwen Bingham kicked off the
first of what will be quarterly meetings of
the Military Civilian Council at White
Sands Missile Range Tuesday, Feb. 19, where
members of the surrounding communities
exchanged information and dialogue.
The first meeting, held at the Frontier
Club, brought together leaders and decision
makers from the surrounding communities
to include Las Cruces, Doña Ana, Holloman
Air Force Base, Alamogordo and Fort Bliss.
The intent is to rotate the forum to other
surrounding locations. The next event will
be hosted by Las Cruces.
At the meeting, Bingham covered
WSMR’s mission, vision and talked about
strategic goals for the range.
Bingham said there were two things that
resonated with her when she first arrived at
WSMR.
The first was that WSMR is a national
treasure, mostly because of the people who
work here, she said, to include the people in
the communities surrounding WSMR.
“We cannot accomplish our mission on
this base without the full support and partnership of every one of you. For that, we are
eternally grateful,” Bingham said.
The second thing, she said, is that in order to continually thrive, “we must posture
ourselves strategically.”
To do that, the surrounding communities need to come together to communicate
and collaborate.
Bingham said the purpose of this forum
is for community leaders to come together
to break bread, for fellowship and to get to
know each other.
“We want to make sure that as we continue our journey together … we can build a
Business Banking Made
5 LOCATIONS IN
LAS CRUCES
10 s March 2013 s THE BOTTOM LINE
relationship with each other,” she said.
She presented guests with a snapshot of
WSMR, featuring WSMR’s goals, focus areas and strategic themes; including looking
at community partnership as a key part of
WSMR’s success.
Bingham said that in 31 years of military service, she has never seen a community come together and support the military
community as the surrounding communities
have.
Her goal is for the organization leaders to come together to provide insight and
share information.
Karen G. Perez, District 3 Commissioner
Chair for Doña Ana County, said the meeting helped her better understand the connection between WSMR and the county.
Easy!
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Renew New Mexico
District (DASWCD) for Restore New
Mexico were Greg Carrasco and the
Carrasco family’s Mimms Well Ranch, and
the lateTom Cooper and Cooper Cattle
Company’s Alamo Basin Ranch.
Both recipients incorporated multiple practices into their plans to earn the
awards.
During the week of Feb. 10, the awards
were presented to Carrasco and to Cooper’s
widow, Carol Cooper, by representatives of
DASWCD and the Natural Resources and
Conservation Service. Signs of the awards
will be mounted at the entrances to the respective ranches.
$8,000, and a pipeline installation can top a
dollar per linear foot. These projects get expensive very quickly.
Although there are examples of such
practices on more restrictive land designations, those lands designated as multiple use
are much more likely to be considered for
such landscape and natural system investments. The history of such projects demonstrates that lands under more restrictive
designations are much less likely to enjoy
the same benefits. Therein lies the real risk
of more restrictive land management designations. The risk is real and the outcome is
permanent.
Multiple-use management
Congratulations
Restore New Mexico and complementary programs are vital to our landscape. Under
all circumstances of conditional drought, the
retention of scarce rainfall and moisture is of
utmost importance.
All resources benefit when that rainfall
is converted effectively, pastures are rotated
and rested systematically, and residual turf is
allowed to strengthen. That is the goal of every rancher and that was certainly the driver
in the management plans of the award recipients.
Both stewards and their colleagues are
partners in the efforts with the federal government. They share in the expense and they
are required to finance the practice installation.
They are reimbursed proportionally to
the contractual agreement, but these practices are not inexpensive. For example, a
square mile of creosote treatment now runs
about $16,000.
A mile of new fence runs as much as
Cooper did not live long enough to know
he was selected for this award. His projects,
however, will continue long into the future
to support the stewardship implicit in the
effort to get them accomplished.
Carrasco will forever be the steward who
created the results of his conceptualized
practices. He is one of the actual managers who make a difference in the health our
landscape.
Applaud these folks. They, along with
their colleagues, are hugely important to the
future of our lands. They are becoming rare,
but they remain the best and are the greatest
hope for future land stewardship.
Continuing the minimum wage debate
As low-income workers gain skills and
move up the wage ladder, the earned income
tax credit phases out until the worker becomes a taxpayer.
Imposing minimum wage laws at the
state or local level introduces additional
problems. If an employer can substantially
drop their costs by moving business outside
the city limits or across a state line, of course,
they would be silly not to.
Especially for a state like New Mexico,
with a low-income workforce, the cost of
unilaterally increasing employment costs
will be disproportionally negative.
Conservation Award Recipients honored
By Stephen L. Wilmeth
In a program little known by most people, an effort to improve the health of the
landscape is under way.
In fact, the eradication of encroaching brush on New Mexico rangelands has
passed the millionth acre mark.
In treatment areas within Doña Ana
County, the results are apparent. The next
time you drive north on Interstate-25 near
the Upham exit, notice the evidence of expanding grass in a once expansive chokehold of creosote brush. The success of the
program benefits productive turf, wildlife
and livestock alike.
Renew New Mexico
The research done by institutions such
as New Mexico State University and private enterprises such as Dow Chemical
has proven that succession vegetation like
creosote and mesquite cannot be returned to
productive grassland without manipulation
by man. The control of brush expansion has
many facets, and it isn’t simply the desire to
have grass.
Healthy turf does many things. It provides nutritional sources for animals, but it
also enhances moisture penetration and retention, it contributes to the cooling of the
surface and it adds organic matter to the soil.
All of these factors are vital to maximize the
benefit of the scarce rainfall accumulation of
our desert grasslands.
Restore New Mexico is the program
that was orchestrated by fromer Bureau of
Land Management State Director, Linda
Rundell.
Rundell had a keen interest in the idea.
She made the program a reality.
The program relies heavily on brush
eradication, but most local plans have incorporated water development and fencing to
make the projects dynamic and complementary. The results are demonstrating widespread successes.
Vendors such as Dow have developed
products that are extremely effective. The
protocol attached to the application of the
products further enhances the effectiveness
of the treatments.
For example, the material now used for
creosote control is applied after the threat
of thunderstorms of summer. That adds to
effectiveness by avoiding the possibility of
washing the granulated product from the
targeted drop zones.
The moisture from the normally softer
fall rains ‘sets’ the material and promotes efficient and even intake. The brush dies over a
period of time and the native grasses quickly
reseed naturally and develop into robust
stands.
Carrasco and Cooper
The 2013 conservation award winners
within the administrative boundaries of the
Doña Ana Soil and Water Conservation
Other ways to help the working poor
By Christopher A. Erickson, Ph.D.
New Mexico State University
There is move to increase the minimum
wage in New Mexico. At $7.50, the minimum wage is already 25 cents above the national minimum wage.
The City of Las Cruces is considering a
resolution in support of the new minimum
wage.
The purpose behind these increases in
minimum wage is to help the working poor,
and I support this goal.
I think anyone who works 40 hours a
week, 50 weeks a year (with two weeks off
for vacation) should earn more than the
poverty line.
So, the question is not whether workers
should earn a decent income, but how best
to achieve that goal.
Minimum wage, I would argue, is not the
best way to do this. Minimum wages force
employers to pay more for workers than they
would otherwise, effectively acting like a tax
on hiring.
A single worker can earn $15,000 annually,
well above the poverty line. The problem
comes for those workers who see their hours
cut, are laid off, or never get hired in the first
place after a minimum wage increase.
The better way to help the working poor
is not to impose a tax but to subsidize employment. The mechanism for doing this is
the earned income tax credit, a policy first
proposed in its modern form by Milton
Friedman (he called it the negative income
tax), and supported by George McGovern
and Ronald Reagan.
The earned income tax credit can be targeted to benefit the poor. It can be calibrated
so those with large families receive larger
benefits.
Stephen L. Wilmeth is a rancher from southern
New Mexico. “There are few things in the world that
will influence your view of how people act and think
like visiting them in their own environment. When
the corners of the world are judged with a view from
the banks of the Potomac or the Hudson, those views
are incomplete and skewed. Decisions thus made often run counter to the facts on the ground.”
Christopher A. Erickson, Ph.D., is professor of
economics at New Mexico State University. He has
taught principles of economics for nearly three decades. The opinions expressed here may not be shared
by the regents or administration of NMSU. Erickson
can be reached at [email protected]
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2345 E. Nevada Avenue
http://dacc.nmsu.edu/ctp
THE BOTTOM LINE s March 2013 s 11
HACIENDAS AT GRACE VILLAGE – Feb. 19, 2802 Corte Dios – CFO and partner Cathy
Gutierrez and director of operations Aubrey TeGrotenhuis hold the proclamations while CEO and
partner Gary Coppedge cuts the ribbon.
RIBBON CUTTINGS
CHARLES SCHWAB
INDEPENDENT BRANCH
- LAS CRUCES – Feb. 3,
141 S. Roadrunner Parkway,
Suite C – Independent branch
client and service specialist
Terry Lombard and regional
relationship leader Laura Jean
Roetzel hold the proclamations
while independent branch
leader and financial consultant
Jackie Mitchell Edwards cuts
the ribbon.
EDWARD JONES
INVESTMENTS – Feb. 21, 3880
Foothills Road, Suite 2 – Branch
office administrator Olivia Fierro
and holds the proclamation while
financial advisor John Grant cuts
the ribbon.
LAS CRUCES
HOMES AND LAND
– Feb. 22, 1701 Calle
de Mercado, Suite
1 – Office manager
Cori Johnson and
associated broker
Maria Contreras hold
the proclamations while
owner and qualifying
broker Beth Johnson
cuts the ribbon.
MENDEZ JEWELERS – Feb. 8,
110 S. Main St., Suite 114 – Jay
Holland and Karen Billings hold
the proclamation while owner
Rudy Mendez cuts the ribbon.
Everything you want to know about Las Cruces
Featuring 260 pages of:
s(OMES$ESERT,IVING
s!RTS%NTERTAINMENT
s"USINESS
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.OW!VAILABLE
12 s March 2013 s THE BOTTOM LINE
HAKES BROTHERS – Feb.
15, 4632 Del Prado Way –
Camille Garza and Shelley
Yonder hold the proclamation
while vice president of
operations Chris Hakes cuts
the ribbon.
s,OCAL,EGENDSPEOPLE
TOKNOW
s-APSANDUSEFULCONTACT
INFORMATION
s-UCHMUCHMORE
.4ELSHOR"LVD3UITE%,AS#RUCES.-
New Members
Best Western Mission Inn
Ravi Patel
524-8591
Community Options
Jose Solis
532-9275
Edward Jones - John Grant
John Grant
522-5583
University of Phoenix
Vanessa Smallpage-Herrera
(915)765-7521
Marron and Associates
Hilary Brinegar
(575)618-7351
Renewing Members
All Aboard America
Benji Natividad
Goodwill
Tom Andrews
McGonigle Insurance Inc.
Bob McGonigle
StayBridge Suites Hotel
Ben Buchanan
Batteries Plus
Loren Stone
Helena Chemical Company
Jeff Elmore
Memorial Medical Center
Paul Herzog
Steinborn & Associates Real Estate
Michelle Martin
COAS Books Inc.
Michael Beckett
Home Instead Senior Care
Jan Wimsatt
Positive Energy Solar
Paul Heiberger
Terracon
Dan Cosper
Comcast Cable
John Christopher
KGRT/KHQT/KKVS/KSNM Radio
Allen Lumeyer
Red Hawk Golf Club
Ryan Flamm
Timberland Construction Inc.
Ernest Terrazas, Jr.
El Paso Outlet Centers LLC
Mike Doblado
Las Cruces Bulletin
Richard Coltharp
Sagecrest Nursing & Rehabilitation
Center
Lupe Rios
University Family Dental
Kim Martin
Ernesto Uranga
Las Cruces Sun-News
Jessica Tolman
Sandia Hearing Aid Service
Paula Rogers
Las Cruces
LABOR MARKETS
Quick
Facts
Employment
Wells Fargo N.A. - Telshor branch
Trudy Isaacks
HOUSING PRICE INDEX
Dec. ’12
Dec. ’11
% change
Las Cruces
86,012
86,905
(1.0)
Statewide
878,400
867,670
1.2
U.S. (in thousands)
143,060
140,681
1.7
Unemployment Rate
Dec. ’12
Dec. ’11
Difference
Las Cruces
6.8%
6.7%
1%
Statewide
6.5%
6.6%
(0.1%)
(All Sources)
U.S. data
7.8%
8.5%
(0.8%)
Permits
Valuation
Source: New Mexico Department of Workforce Solutions
Las Cruces
New Mexico
United States
3rd Quarter
2012
159.11
284.39
315.57
3rd Quarter
2011
166.89
289.03
315.68
% change
Jan. ’13
Jan. ’12
% change
183
$221,846
269
$207,377
-32%
7%
-4.7%
-1.6%
0%
Source: Federal Housing Finance Agency
BUILDING PERMITS
Las Cruces Area
Source: City of Las Cruces
2013 SOUTHWEST NEW MEXICO LEGISLATIVE GUIDE
NOW AVAILABLE
ON NEWSSTANDS & AT THE LAS CRUCES BULLETIN
s&AXs.4ELSHOR3UITE%,AS#RUCES.-
THE BOTTOM LINE s March 2013 s 13
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SCHEDULE
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
MARCH 2013
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Communications Coordinator
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
1
2
The Chamber is seeking to fill the position
of Communications Coordinator. A
Bachelor’s degree in communications, marketing or
related field, experience with Adobe Creative Suite /
In Design and Microsoft Office applications strongly
desired, as well as Work Keys scores preferred.
Please send a letter of interest describing your
strengths for this position, along with your
resume by e-mail to [email protected]
CHAMBER BY THE NUMBERS
3
4
5
6
7
6:30 a.m. Good
Morning Las
Cruces, La Posta
de Mesilla
8:30 a.m.
Junior Leadership
10
11
12
13
8
8 a.m.
Leadership Las
Cruces
Orientation, La
Posta de Mesilla
14
15
9
8 a.m.
Leadership
Las Cruces
Orientation, La
Posta de Mesilla
16
The Greater Las Cruces Chamber of Commerce
is the primary advocate for the Greater Las
Cruces business community, dedicated to
fostering growth and opportunity by focusing on
communication, education and participation.
FULFILLING THE
COMMUNITY NEED
The following statistics from the past 30 days indicate
the number of individuals interested in learning more
about the Chamber by visiting the website. Those
who have visited the site inquired about relocation
advice as well as the approximate number of member
business referrals by Chamber staff members.
9,965
79
89
people have visited the Chamber’s website.
17
18
19
20
22
23
people have inquired about individual relocation.
5:30 p.m.
Business After
Hours, Olive
Garden
24
31
21
25
26
27
28
referrals have been issued for members.
29
Looking ahead
Thursday, April 25
Economic Update Forum
KRWG Studios
Thursday, April 18
Spaceport Update Luncheon
Las Cruces Convention Center
Thursday, April 25
Business After Hours
Wright Jewelers
30
COMMITTEE MEETINGS
March 1
March 4
March 6
March 7
March 11
March 14
March 14
March 14
March 19
March 20
March 20
March 20
7:30 a.m. ........Military Affairs Committee, MV Hospice
4 p.m..................Las Cruces Day in Santa Fe Committee
4 p.m.......................Conquistador Executive Committee
4 p.m..............Issues & Governmental Affairs Committee
Noon ..........................................Retention Committee
9 a.m. ............................ Commercial Space Committee
11 a.m. ............................Events and Benefits Committee
4 p.m....................... Candidates & Elections Committee
3:30 p.m....................... Finance & Executive Committee
7:30 a.m. ........Education Committee, Housing Authority
11 a.m. ....................................... Small Business Council
4 p.m................Marketing & Public Relations Committee
*All above meetings are held in the Chamber boardroom unless specified otherwise.
14 s March 2013 s THE BOTTOM LINE
CHAMBER MEMBER BRIEFS
Local insurance
broker certified
Gilda
Dorbandt
of the ‘N Compass
Group, an organization specializing in
Health Insurance and
Employee Benefits, has
qualified as PPACA
(Health Care Reform)
certified by the National
Association of Health
DORBANT
Underwriters.
This certification was developed by experts
in both PPACA and employment law. The
10-hour course ensures that Dorbandt as an
insurance broker understands the key technical components of PPACA and is better
prepared to counsel her clients on upcoming
required health care changes and new options and requirements for health plans.
The PPACA certification course is a certification of expertise in the provisions and
implementation of health care reform.
Green Chamber seeking
nominations for LCGCC
board of directors
Since formally organizing in 2010, the
Las Cruces Green Chamber of Commerce
has grown significantly. As part of that
growth, the chamber is currently seeking
nominations from its membership for board
members.
“If you are interested in serving on a
board that believes in the power of the
Triple Bottom Line – that investing in people, protecting our air, land and water and
promoting profit through sustainable business practices will build a thriving community for today and for generations to come,
then we want you,” said Executive Director
Carrie Hamblen.
In order to be considered for board participation, the applicant must be a member
in good standing and up to date on membership dues. For an application, or answers
to questions, contact Hamblen at [email protected]
nmgreencamber.com. Applications will be
accepted through Monday, March 11.
Small Business
Development Center
announces workshops
The Small Business Development Center
in Las Cruces has scheduled the following
workshops for March:
How to get a business loan – Experienced
loan officer will discuss what it takes to successfully obtain a business loan, 9 a.m. to 11
a.m. Thursday, March 21.
Getting and keeping customers – A discussion of target marketing, ways to attract
customers, and customer service, 2 to 4 p.m.
Thursday, March 21.
How to start a business – Learn how to
start a business safely and legally with emphasis on New Mexico regulations and licenses, 9 to 11 a.m. Friday, March 29.
All workshops are free at the DACC
Workforce Center, 2345 E. Nevada Ave.,
(between Walnut Street and Triviz Avenue),
Room 101A. For more information, call
527-7676.
Las Cruces audiologist
named 2012 Hearing
Professional of the Year
Advanced Hearing Care, a full-service
audiology practice based in Alamogordo and
with locations in Las Cruces and Ruidoso,
recently announced one of its providers, Dr.
Melissa Kreze, Au.D., has been named the
region’s 2012 Hearing Professional of the
Year by the battery manufacturer Rayovac.
Nominated for this award by her patients
for providing them with superior hearing
care, Kreze is honored to be recognized by
both her peers in the hearing care community and the patients who have known her
for years and benefited from her care and
experience.
The Hearing Professional of the Year
award recognizes outstanding hearing care
providers for exceptional service and commitment to their profession. Kreze was
among six audiologists selected by Rayovac
from across the country, with patients’ nominations supported by written letters from
the individual patients describing the exceptional care and service they received from
their valued hearing care provider.
Rayovac will donate $500 in the name of
each regional winner to the charity of their
choice.
Kreze has selected a Rotary International
funded mission by the Starkey Hearing
Foundation as her charity, which fits thousands of people in poverty-stricken communities around the world each year with new
hearing aids.
Schwab to host
workshops
A series of financial workshops open to
the public will be presented by the independent branch of Charles Schwab, 141 S.
Roadrunner Parkway, Suite C.
Reassessing Risk in Your Portfolio is
the topic of a presentation to be given from
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Thursday, March
21.
Schwab will present another workshop,
Put Your Investment Plan Into Action, from
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. April 4. The session
will provide tools and information for better
investing results.
Reservations may be made at https://
client.schwab.com/Public/BranchLocator/
BranchDetails.aspx?BranchID=1838
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THE BOTTOM LINE s March 2013 s 15
16 s March 2013 s THE BOTTOM LINE