Index The Voice of the Community since 1987

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Aug. 29-Sept. 4, 2012
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Volume 19, No. 45
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The Voice of the Community since 1987
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Commentary – A6
128 N. Church St., Rockford, Illinois 61101
www.rockrivertimes.com
Online Exclusives at rockrivertimes.com
Pork industry faces record losses
13-year-old persuades governor to veto plastic bag bill
Local United Way 211 information referral line debuts
Becca’s Closet to open for homecoming season Sept. 1
Poll shows support for teachers receiving pensions
Charlie’s Angels-themed modeling expo in DeKalb Sept. 5
Daily news updates, searchable archives and other exclusive content available online at rockrivertimes.com.
Do Republicans use ‘money,
lies & voter suppression?’
Vibe – B1
Great Lawn headliners at Rockford’s 29th On the Waterfront Festival include (from left) The Offspring Thursday, Aug. 30; Billy Currington Friday, Aug. 31; Creedence
Clearwater Revisited Saturday, Sept. 1; and Theory of a Deadman Sunday, Sept. 2.
Canned Heat to perform
at Rockford’s Adriatic
Vitality – C1
Suicide prevention group
to walk Sept. 8
Home & Garden – D1
On the Waterfront
80 performers on five stages at
Aug. 30-Sept. 2 On the Waterfront
Staff Report
Rockford’s On the Waterfront
(OTW) Festival returns for its 29th
year Thursday-Sunday, Aug. 30Sept. 2, in downtown Rockford.
The event will feature more than
80 performers on five stages, special events, food and carnival rides,
among other activities.
Red Oak Estates residents
revitalize neighborhood
Festival borders are the Rock
River to the east, Church Street to
the west, Mulberry Street to the
north, and Green and Cedar streets
to the south.
Festival hours are 5 p.m.-midnight, Friday, Aug. 31; 11:30 a.m.midnight, Saturday, Sept. 1; and
11:30 a.m.-11 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 2.
Renewable Energy
Index
Rock River Sweep from Janesville
to Black Hawk Island Sept. 8
News
Staff Report
! Commentary — A1-A2, A5-A6
! News — A1-A8
! Letters to the Editor — A6
! Obituary Notices — A3
! People in Our Times — A3
! Renewable Energy — A1, A7
Section B:
Vibe Entertainment
! Crossword Puzzle — B7
! TV Listings — B7
! Vibe Calendars — B 2-B 6, B8
! Vibe News — B1-B8
Vitality
! Health — C1-C2, C4
! Naturally Rockford — C2
! Outdoors — C2, C4
! Sports — C1, C3-C4, D23-D24
Section D:
PRSRT STD
U.S. Postage
PAID
Permit No. 397
Rockford, IL
Home & Garden
! Classifieds — D2-D5
! Home & Garden — D1, D23
! Horoscopes — D23
! Public Notices — D6-D17
! Real Estate Notices — D17-D21
! Real Estate — D21-D22
this article) include Billy
Currington (Friday, Aug. 31),
Creedence Clearwater Revisited
(Saturday, Sept. 1) and Theory of a
Deadman (Sunday, Sept. 2).
Reserved Great Lawn tickets
range from $29.50 to $79.50, although Friday-Sunday Great
Continued on page B8 in VIBE !
Rock River Trail
Section A:
Section C:
The Offspring, with opening acts
Dead Sara and Finding Clyde, will
kick off the festival on the south
side of Davis Park, 320 S. Wyman
St., at 6:15 p.m., Thursday, Aug.
30. Reserved tickets ($32.50-$79.50)
are required for the kickoff concert.
Other Great Lawn headliners
(see full festival lineup at end of
Photo by Sherry Piros
The worker in the upper left controls cement-pouring robotically.
Can green jobs solve unemployment?
By Drs. Robert & Sonia Vogl
President and Vice President
Illinois Renewable Energy Association
When discussing green careers,
a common response is to think in
terms of categories such as energy
auditors, recycling, electric vehicles, green construction, solar
power and wind energy.
While jobs do exist in these categories, Jason LaFleur, who made
a presentation about green jobs at
the Aug. 11-12 Illinois Renewable
Energy and Sustainable Lifestyle
Fair at Ogle County Fairgrounds,
remarked that many jobs involve
expanding existing jobs to cover
green aspects that require an employee to learn new skills to perform the “green portion” of the job.
Federal statistics about green jobs
are organized into two categories:
green technologies and practices and
green goods and services. The statistics are not complete and are most
useful in terms of reporting trends
in employment rather than the number of current employees.
Themostfrequentlyreportedtypes
of green technologies used by firms
surveyed involve improving energy
efficiency and reducing wastes. Some
of the most accurate figures come
Continued on page A7 !
Rock County Parks, Rockton
volunteers, Rock River Enterprises
and Homeowners Association,
WTVO-17/WQRF-FOX 39, and
The Rock River Times are coordinating sections of a greater Rock
River clean-up Saturday, Sept. 8.
The Third Annual Great Rock
River Sweep is a clean-up conducted simultaneously in each and
every community along the river
for its entire 285 miles, reaching
from Horicon, Wis., to Rock Island, Ill. Learn more at
www.rockriversweep.org.
Janesville and Beloit
Rock County Parks has adopted
the section between the cities of
Janesville, Wis., and Beloit, Wis.
The clean-up has the following
two fronts:
! Waterborne participation, by
boat, canoe, kayak or a raft; or
! Walking the shoreline.
The clean-up is open to all ages.
Meeting place will be Happy Hollow County Park, 1731 W. Happy
Hollow Road, Janesville, Wis. Start
time is 9 a.m., Saturday, Sept. 8.
Volunteer pre-registration preferred, but not required. Contact
Rock County Parks at (608) 7575473 to sign up. Those with boats
are encouraged to participate by
water. Boat launch fees will be
waived for the day for those participating in the clean-up.
The Rock County Parks Division
Continued on page A7 !
Rockford News
Summer is almost over
Campaign 2012
128 N. Church St.
Rockford, IL 61101
Presidential election: Obama leads
in money, polls show dead heat
! A breakdown of the
money and U.S. Rep.
Adam Kinzinger supports
Romney’s energy plan
By Brandon Reid
Assistant Editor
Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6,
is just 69 days away, and recent
nationwide polls show presump-
tive Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney and his running
mate, U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan, RWis., in a near dead heat with
President Barack Obama and Vice
President Joe Biden.
An Aug. 28 CBS News poll showed
Obama edging Romney 46-45 percent, while an Aug. 27 ABC News/
Washington Post poll had Romney
Continued on page A7 !
Photo by Frank Schier
Only a few Thursday nights left for Dinner On The Dock, great music, drinks and
food, from 5 to 10 p.m. at Prairie Street Brewhouse, 200 Prairie St. With amazing
food provided by Backyard Grill of Cherry Valley, Loves Park and Roscoe, A Few
Good Men played some fine music to a crowd of more than 200 Aug. 23. The next
show will be Aug. 30. Enjoy Karaoke on the Dock, from 6-9 p.m., Sept. 20, and try
out Dogs On The Dock from 6-9 p.m., Sept. 27. Geesh, just like the big city,
Rockford’s actually utilizing its biggest and most beautiful asset, the Rock River.
The Rock River Times has been leading area media in Renewable Energy and green news coverage since 2002.
2
A
The Rock River Times
Commentary/News
Aug. 29-Sept. 4, 2012
Support Postal Service any and every chance you get
Sept. 3
‘National Rally
Guest Column
By David Soll
for Change’
aims to improve
maternal care
And that is exactly what H.R. 6407
is. This piece of legislation forces
Guest Column
the Post Office to prepay their
members of a given body yell out “yea” or
“nay” as a group, instead of a roll call, which
would correctly make the elected official attach his or her name to that vote. In effect,
Back in early January, there was a town hall the voice vote gives the politicians present
meeting about the potential closing of the Post political cover, especially when the motion or
Office facility on Harrison Avenue in Rockford. law in question is controversial.
And that is exactly
I was appalled by the
what H.R. 6407 is.
seeming lack of reThis piece of legislaspectthehostsseemed
tion forces the Post
to have for the intelliOffice to prepay their
gence of the citizens
in attendance and the retirement fund 75 years into the retirement fund 75
years into the future
whole of our community.Thepresentation future over a 10-year period at about over a 10-year period
appears now to have $5.5 billion a year, starting in 2007. at about $5.5 billion
a year, starting in
been a whitewash of
reality as to what ails one of our greatest 2007. In the entire recorded history of manAmerican institutions, the U.S. Postal Service. kind, no government agency or private comThat reality is H.R. 6407: “The Postal Account- pany has been mandated to do this. It is this
mandate that is effectively making the Post
ability and Enhancement Act” of 2006.
This “law” was passed during the lame- Office bankrupt, and many Republicans have
duck session of December 2006 by voice vote, been all too happy to point to this, minus the
not by roll call. What does “voice vote” mean? details as to how this happened.
Why the Post Office? My guess is greed,
A voice vote is a legislative procedure where
but more likely an ingrained
hate of good government. Over the last 30
years, we have been told by a band of wellfunded corporate vultures and many willing
pundits telling us that government is forever
bad. That no matter what government does
or what kind of person is working for our
government, that it is a necessary evil and
untrustworthy to do anything right. These
people understand the further removed
people are from their own government, it
becomes easier for them to fill it with people
who don’t care about good government.
As I suspected earlier, it’s likely because the
Post Office represents one of the finest, bestrun sections of our government. The Post Office
is the second-largest employer in America and
the largest public union. Not only that, but the
Post Office “does not” rely on taxpayer dollars
to run. It is this reality that scares those who
seek to destroy any semblance of good government, not to mention destroy unions and our
rights as workers. Make Ben Franklin proud
and support the United States Postal Service
any and every chance you get.
David Soll is a Democratic candidate for
Winnebago County Board in District 20.
Garbage collection schedule delayed
because of Labor Day holiday
Staff Report
The garbage collection for City of Rockford residents on Monday,
Sept. 3, and the remainder of that week will be delayed one day
because of the Labor Day holiday. Residents who normally have
garbage pick-up Monday will be picked up Tuesday, and so on
through the subsequent days of the week.
The Household Hazardous Waste Site at 3333 Kishwaukee St. will
be closed for the weekend of Sept. 1 and 2 because of the holiday.
By Karyn Schwitters
The United States ranks 49th when it
comes to maternal care, meaning 48 countries — most with less money — provide
better birth outcomes than we do.
We need to examine how we can improve
this for mothers, babies and families, and
decrease infant and maternal mortality rates.
ImprovingBirth’s“NationalRallyforChange
on Labor Day” Sept. 3 seeks to educate and
empower women with evidence-based information so they can make truly informed choices
regarding their maternity care.
One of the main interventions we are focused on decreasing is cesarean sections. They
occur way too frequently in this country, and
often without medical necessity.
Studies have shown that when cesarean
rates rise above 10 to 15 percent, more harm is
being done than good, and yet, even in Rockford, the rates average around 35 percent.
A local rally will be from 10 a.m. to noon,
Monday, Sept. 3, in front of SwedishAmerican
Hospital, 1401 E. State St., Rockford. The
event is not a protest, as we recognize there are
many wonderful doctors and nurses in this
community who deliver excellent care. But as a
community, and as a nation, we need to be
looking at how we can continually improve and
deliver the best care.
Karyn Schwitters is an interning therapist in Rockford, working toward her master’s
in social work from the University of Illinois
at Urbana-Champaign. She had a daughter
in 2010; delivery was medication-free with a
doula, but she ended up being told she required a cesarean because of a “failure to
progress.” She is organizing the local rally
with Jessica Beaufils, a doctoral student at
Ball State studying medical anthropology.
She was forced to have an induction for her
first birth, and chose a home birth for her
second. For more about the National Rally
for Change, visit www.ImprovingBirth.org.
Rockford Human
Services
announces start of
LIHEAP energy
assistance program
Staff Report
The City of Rockford Human Services
Department, along with the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic
Opportunity’s Office of Energy Assistance,
announces the beginning of the LIHEAP
(Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program) this fall.
LIHEAP is a state and federally-funded
energy assistance program for eligible lowincome families in which a benefit is paid
directly to the utility companies on behalf of
eligible households, or directly to renters if
the utility costs are included in their rent.
Some LIHEAP clients will have the option of choosing between the traditional
Direct Vendor Payment (DVP) plan or the
Percentage of Income Payment Plan (PIPP).
PIPP is available to eligible LIHEAP clients
who are customers of ComEd and Nicor Gas
only. Under PIPP, the eligible client will pay
a percentage of their Income toward their
bill each month. In turn, they will receive a
benefit toward their utility bill, and also
receive a reduction in any overdue payments for every on-time payment they make.
PIPP can assist in ways that will help customers manage their utility bills and break
the cycle of disconnections and
reconnections. The traditional DVP plan is
a one-time payment only.
Select area agencies will be scheduling
appointments and taking applications for
the program. A list of these sites, program
sign-up dates and required documentation
is available at the City of Rockford Human
Services Department, 555 N. Court St., Suite
301 or at www.rockfordil.gov/human-services/community-neighborhoodprograms.aspx. Clients must call to make
an appointment and must bring all required
documentation to their visit. No walk-ins
will be accepted. Appointments are scheduled on a first-come, first-served basis until
funding is exhausted. For more information, contact (815) 987-5711.
The Rock River Times
News
Aug. 29-Sept. 4, 2012
A
People In Our Times
3
T h e Vo i c e o f t h e C o m m u n i t y s i n c e 1 9 87
© Copyright 2012
Staff - The Rock River Times, Inc.
EDITOR & PUBLISHER
PUBLISHER:: Frank Schier | ASSISTANT EDITOR: Brandon Reid | COPY EDITOR/VIBE CALENDAR
CONTACT: Susan Johnson | SPORTS COLUMNISTS: Doug Halberstadt, Matt Nestor, Todd Reicher | PRODUCTION
MANAGER: Jeff Helberg | TYPESETTER: Jon Bystrom | ACCOUNTING MANAGER: Lynda M. Bolin | CLASSIFIEDS/
CIRCULATION MANAGER: Jennifer Abel | SENIOR SALES CONSULTANT: Robert Crowe | ADVERTISING SALES
MANAGER: Jody Marshall | ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Jeff Bennett
Locally owned and operated since 1987
ABOUT US
US:: The Rock River Times has a circulation of 22,000 free newspapers in the Rockford, Ill., metropolitan area by
Third Class mail and through more than 2,035 commercial outlets. The weekly newspaper, distributed every Wednesday,
has been in publication since 1987 and strives to be “The Voice of the Community.” Printed on recycled paper using soy ink.
SUBSCRIPTIONS: Bulk mail subscriptions are available for $27 for 26 weeks, or $42 per year, prepaid.
CONTACT US
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OFFICE HOURS: 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Monday-Friday, CST
ACCURACY AND FAIRNESS: The Rock River Times strives for accuracy and fairness. If you spot any inaccuracies in any
of our stories, please notify our editors as soon as possible.
COPYRIGHT NOTICE: All material herein is the sole property of The Rock River Times. No reprint, reproduction or other use
of any of the materials contained herein is permitted without the consent of the publisher or his duly appointed representative.
DEADLINES: News due Thursday by 4 p.m. Information for Community Calendar events due by noon Thursday for the
following Wednesday issue. Events are printed as space permits. Letters to the Editor should be 200 words or fewer, and
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noon Classified advertisements must be received by noon
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Although 4 p.m. Friday is preferred, Legal Notices must be received by 5:30 p.m. Friday for the following Wednesday issue.
AFFILIATIONS: The Rock River Times is a proud member of the following organizations:
Photo by Frank Schier
JOINING RESOURCES: Dennis Bragelman and Benny Salamone stand in the new section of Bragelman’s
320 Store at 320 N. Court St., in Rockford. Salamone’s Market, 727 Kent St., closed recently and reopened here to provide a fine selection of meats (Italian sausage!), Italian groceries and sandwiches to
complement the amazing selection of organic produce and other specialty foods at the 320 Store. The
320 Store’s lunch-time buffet is already famous for its amazing homemade dishes, salads and desserts.
Now, Salamone’s bring their fame to expand the fare. Stop by and you might have the privilege to meet
Benny and his Ma, Carmella. Dennis’ good humor is always welcoming, too! This place is truly a Rockford
treasure. They are open Monday through Saturday from 8 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Call (815) 965-2313.
Great Duck Race winners announced
The Alzheimer’s Association-Rock River Branch extends its thanks to participants in
this year’s Great Duck Race on the Rock River, who helped raise vital funds for the branch’s
programs and services.
Because the Rock River was dangerously low over the weekend and had no current, the ducks
did not launch. Instead, Petty Officer First Class Kevin Fahlund, serving as Master of Arms
assigned to the USS Ronald Reagan nuclear aircraft carrier, drew the winners in front of the
Reagan statue in Dixon, Ill. Kevin and his wife, Susan, and daughter, Reagan, were in town from
California specifically to join in the Reagan Day festivities honoring the former president.
The winners were as follow: first place ($1,000): Bob Oncken, Milledgeville, Ill.; second
place ($250): Clifford Rugh, Dixon, Ill.; third place ($100): Matt Heartland Realty, Dixon,
Ill.; and fourth place ($50): D.L. Hughes Sr., Savanna, Ill.
Several area businesses generously sponsored “families” and “fleets” of ducks for the event. They
include Bob White, Borg Warner; Bonnie O’Connell, Heritage Square; Matt Hermes, Heartland
Realty; Pat O’Brian, Leaf River Telephone Company; Valerie Ford, Dixon Ford; Cathy Williams,
Dixon Ford; Donna Hall, Century Tap; Connie Augsburger, Attorney; J &I J Household; Joe
Hass, The Other Bar; KSB Hospital; Quality Redimix Concrete Company; Kathy Groenhagen,
Serenity Hospice & Home; Exceptional Dentistry; Oliver’s Corner Market; and Big John Portable.
Pilot helps young people discover flight
EAA Aviation Center, Oshkosh, Wis. — An area pilot has now given more than 100 young
people a free demonstration plane ride as part of the Experimental Aircraft Association’s
Young Eagles Program, which is introducing a new generation to the world of flight.
Among the more than 45,000 pilots around the world who have donated their time and
aircraft to the effort is Scott Ross of Rockford.
All pilots in the Young Eagles program explain the safe operation of airplanes and principles of
flight before the short trips. Young Eagles flights are provided by volunteer EAA-member pilots in
aircraft ranging from the newest airplanes to vintage biplanes. Such interesting aircraft as gliders,
helicopters, and even hot air balloons and blimps have also been used for Young Eagles flights.
Since 1992, the EAA Young Eagles program has flown more than 1.7 million young people,
free of charge. Recent research shows these young people are five times more likely to become
pilots than non-Young Eagles. They also already comprise more than 7 percent of the nation’s
pilot population younger than 35, as nearly 20,000 pilots are former Young Eagles participants.
Participating young people become official Young Eagles with the flight, with the names
of the pilots; the names of the pilots and the participants are also included in the “World’s
Largest Logbook,” which is on permanent display in the EAA AirVenture Museum in Oshkosh,
Wis., and online through the Young Eagles’ website.
A Young Eagles flight is the first step in EAA’s Flight Plan, which helps young people move
from an initial flight toward the full potential of aviation. Among the menu of Flight Plan activities available is a free EAA student membership, free access to Sporty’s Online Pilot Training
Course, a free flight lesson, and reimbursement for the costs of a successful FAA written test, in
addition to more than $300,000 in scholarships and awards available to young people each year.
Visit www.youngeagles.org for more information.
Obituary Notices
Rosemary Antrim, 82, Rockford, 8/19/12
Carlene Jones, 54, Rockford, 8/19/12
Charles Mondt, 73, Rockford, 8/19/12
George Pro, 91, Rockton, 8/19/12
James Carpenter, 56, Rockford, 8/19/12
Larry Mason, 57, Rockford, 8/19/12
Justin Moberg, 27, Rockford, 8/19/12
Judith Bauby, 64, Rockford, 8/19/12
Norman Viola, 76, Rockford, 8/19/12
Rosalie Guzzo, 91, Rockford, 8/19/12
Royce Johnson, 88, Rockford, 8/19/12
Josephine Carlson, 93, Rockton, 8/20/12
Roger Deethardt, 80, Rockford, 8/20/12
Barbara Dillon, 58, Rockford, 8/20/12
Terrance Curcio, 57, Rockford, 8/20/12
Virginia Deckard, 92, Rockford, 8/20/12
Doris Wynn, 83, Rockford, 8/20/12
Stephen Young, 61, Rockford, 8/20/12
Maria Flores, 80, Rockford, 8/20/12
Michael Bliss, 54, Rockford, 8/20/12
Craig Runestad, 57, Rockford, 8/20/12
Carolyn Huddlestun, 92, Rockford, 8/21/12
Liz Gray, 65, Rockford, 8/21/12
Cynthia Burton, 59, Rockford, 8/21/12
Ronald Neidermeier, 75, Rockford,8/21/12
Paula Brooks, 49, Rockford, 8/22/12
Leticia Devera, 73, Rockford, 8/22/12
Gerald Faulkner, 80, Rockford, 8/22/12
James Fisher Sr., 87, Rockford, 8/22/12
Gabrielle Manos, 70, Rockford, 8/22/12
Lela Unglesbee, 90, Rockford, 8/23/12
Ronald Jurs, 75, Rockford, 8/23/12
Melvin Hines, 90, Rockford, 8/23/12
Derrick Youtzy, 31, Rockford, 8/23/12
Catherine Blais, 79, Rockford, 8/23/12
David Klagues, 60, Rockford, 8/23/12
Cheryl Anderson, 64, Rockford, 8/23/12
James Rowan, 82, Rockford, 8/23/12
Thomas Williams, 71, Rockford, 8/23/12
Genelle Samuelson, 68, Rockford, 8/23/12
Douglas Sherman, 59, Rockford, 8/23/12
Raymond Heinke, 66, Rockford, 8/23/12
Doris Kiester, 92, Loves Park, 8/24/12
Robert Gregory, 47, Loves Park, 8/24/12
William Tate Sr., 84, Rockford, 8/24/12
Edmond Casarotto, 79, Rockford, 8/24/12
Willie Hyles, 61, Rockford, 8/25/12
Cathy Hines, 59, Rockford, 8/25/12
Patricia Larson, 58, Rockford, 8/25/12
Richard Malngren, 87, Rockford, 8/25/12
0)&3
PLGZHVWIUHHFRPPXQLW\SDSHUV
Citizens Alert!
Rockford’s City Council voted to allow an
asphalt plant to be built in a quarry on
Charles Street inside the city limits. This
is outrageous!
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ROCKFORDSPACE.COM
CONDO/BUSINESS
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WITH PARKING!!!!!
You Can Help
It makes no sense to put an air-polluting,
water-contaminating, traffic-impeding
asphalt plant in the middle of existing
neighborhoods of family homes. A lawsuit
has been filed against the City of Rockford
to stop this injustice. Donations are
needed to help fund the cost of this lawsuit.
Please send your donations, if
you agree with this injustice, to:
NETS
P.O. Box 5124 • Rockford, IL 61125
For information:
• Clare Merwin—815-398-1653
• Alec Kaplanes—815-399-1027
www.stopasphalt.org
Cedar & Churc
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Courthouse and Amtrak Station
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The Rock River Times
Aug. 29-Sept. 4, 2012
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B
entertainment
Page B1 - Pullout | Aug. 29-Sept. 4, 2012
Music News – B3
Community News – B7
Crossword Puzzle – B7
Tom Petty tribute band Free
Fallin’ at Whiskey’s Aug. 31
Screw City Beer Festival in
downtown Rockford Sept. 8
Can you solve this week’s
crossword puzzle?
Music News
Canned Heat to perform at Adriatic Aug. 31
Staff Report
tional scene and secured their place in rock
Rock fans can expect a hot time at the and roll history with their performances at
Adriatic Café, starting at 9:30 p.m., Friday, the 1967 Monterey Pop Festival and the
Aug. 31. That’s when the sizzling band headlining slot at the original Woodstock
Canned Heat will rev things up for the Festival in 1969. Alan Wilson was already
audience at 327 W. Jefferson St.; $20 will known for his distinctive harmonica work
when he accompanied veteran bluesman
get you admittance to the show.
Canned Heat rose to fame because their Son House on his rediscovery album, Father
of the Delta
knowledge
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Photo courtesy of cannedheatmusic.com
Mole” Taylor
Bear” Hite. Canned Heat are (from left) Larry Taylor, Fito de la Parra, Harvey
on bass.
The band Mandel and Dale Spalding.
T h e i r
name was inspired by the household cooking product unique blend of modern electric blues, rock
Sterno. The group specialized in updating and boogie has earned them a loyal followobscure old blues recordings, and using ing and influenced many aspiring guitarists
this bold approach, the band attained two and bands during the past four decades.
worldwide hits, “On The Road Again” in Their Top-40 country-blues-rock songs, “On
1968 and “Going Up The Country” in 1969. The Road Again,” ”Let’s Work Together”
Canned Heat broke onto the interna- and “Going Up The Country” became rock
anthems throughout the world; the latter
became the unofficial theme song for the
film Woodstock. Their cover version of “Let’s
Work Together” became their biggest hit as
it rose to No. 1 in 31 different countries.
Much of Canned Heat’s legacy stems
from these three classic, early recordings,
featuring two unique talents, both of whom
died young: Alan Wilson, a gifted slide
guitarist, harmonica player, songwriter and
vocalist; and Bob Hite, a blues shouter
whose massive physique earned him the
nickname “The Bear.”
Continued on page B3 !
2
B
Vibe
Aug. 29-Sept. 4, 2012
Music
Upcoming Events
View the Music Calendar online at
www.rockrivertimes.com for a
complete list of upcoming events.
Wednesday, Aug. 29
Imagination Station – Sinnissippi Park
Music Shell, 1401 N. Second St.
7:30 p.m.
HED P.E. w/Beyond Threshold, Jeffrey Nothing from Mushroomhead,
Reckless Redemption, Mister
Dirty, Truth Burns Cold & Joey
Columbine – Bar 3, 326 E. State St.
9 p.m. $15 advance, $18 door. Info:
815-968-9061.
Brewsky’s Jammin’ Blues – Brewsky’s
Pub, 4414 Charles St. Open Blues
jam, 6-10 p.m. Info: 815-399-9300.
Mark Reed and Waddy – Franchesco’s,
7128 Spring Creek Road. 6-9 p.m.
Info: 815-229-0800.
NIU Jazz Jam Session – The House
Café, 263 E. Lincoln Hwy., DeKalb. 8
p.m. Free. Info: 815-787-9547.
The Sons of Many Bitches followed by
DJ Vic Monsta – Kryptonite Bar,
308 W. State St. 10 p.m. $5. Info:
815-965-0931.
Caravan Gypsy Swing – MashUp, 1641
N. Alpine Road. 7 p.m. Free.
Open Stage w/Jim Grass – Hope
and Anchor, 5040 N. Second St.,
Loves Park. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Free.
Info: 815-633-2552.
Open Stage w/Chris Johnson & Mike
Labay – Whiskey’s Roadhouse, 3207
N. Main St. 7 p.m. Info: 815-877-8007.
Country Night – Mandalay Lounge, 411
Mulberry St. Starts at 5 p.m.
Vinyl Voodoo – Mary’s Place, 602 N.
Madison St. 10:30 p.m. Free. Info:
815-962-7944.
Karaoke with Mike – Rusty Nail, 1804
Eighth Ave. 7:30 p.m.-midnight. Every
Wed. Free. Info: 815-397-2510.
Thursday, Aug. 30
The Offspring w/Dead Sara & Finding Clyde – On the Waterfront Great
Lawn Stage, south side of Davis
Park, 320 S. Wyman St. Starts 6:15
p.m. Reserved tickets required.
$32.50-$79.50. Tickets: 877-5697767or onthewaterfront.com.
The Last Vegas w/Veilside, Persistence of Memory, Red Poet – Otto’s
Niteclub & Underground, 118 E. Lincoln Hwy., DeKalb. 9 p.m. $7. Info:
815-758-2715.
“Smile” with “Maestro” Carl A. Cole
– Rockford College, Fisher Memorial Chapel, 5050 E. State St. 6
p.m. Summer sing-along with his
wife Dianna and son Andrew. Freewill donations. Info: 815-914-1487
or [email protected]
Paul Poulton – Josiah’s Place Coffeehouse, 310 State St., Beloit, Wis. 7
p.m. Christian rock, on tour from
England. Info: 608-365-0365.
Jon Conover – The District Bar & Grill,
205 W. State St. 8 p.m. Info: 815977-4524.
Tallhart w/Belle Histoire, Caught In
Your Pockets – The House Café,
263 E. Lincoln Hwy., DeKalb. 8 p.m.
$8. Info: 815-787-9547.
Karaoke by Hallie – Hawkeye’s Lounge,
Hawk’s View Restaurant, 11189
Forest Hills Road, Machesney Park.
Pizza, too! Info: 815-282-4868.
Blues – Mandalay Lounge, 411 Mulberry St. 5 p.m.
Bike Night Acoustic Jam , DJ, Karaoke –
Whiskey’s Roadhouse, 3207 N. Main
St. 6-10 p.m. Info: 815-877-8007.
Open Mic – Hope and Anchor, 5040 N.
Second St., Loves Park. 9 p.m. Info:
815-633-2552.
Open Mic – Katie’s Cup, 502 Seventh
St. Info: 815-986-0628.
Open Mic – The Grove, 100 E. Grove
St., Poplar Grove. 6 p.m. Free. Info:
815-765-1002.
Open Stage – Mary’s Place, 602 N.
Madison St. 9:30 p.m. Free. Every
Thurs. Info: 815-962-7944.
Open Mic – Cronie’s Grill, 9032 N. Second St., Machesney Park. Every Thurs.
Friday, Aug. 31
On the Waterfront Festival – Downtown Rockford. Features more than
80 performers on five stages, special
events, food, carnival rides and
children’s activities (see related article starting on page A1 for details). 5
p.m.-midnight. $12 for 2 days or $15
for 3 days; $15 1-day wristbands at
gate; free for ages 8 and younger w/
paid adult. Info: onthewaterfront.com
or 815-964-4388.
Billy Currington w/TBA – On the Waterfront Great Lawn Stage, south
side of Davis Park, 320 S. Wyman
St. Starts 7:30 p.m. Reserved tickets: $32.50-$79.50. Viewable with
festival passes ($12-$15) or wristbands ($15). Tickets: 877-5697767 or onthewaterfront.com.
Canned Heat – Adriatic Café, 327 W.
Jefferson St. 9:30 p.m. $20. Info:
815-967-9939.
Philip Reilly Stendek w/The Devil Whale
– Kryptonite Bar, 308 W. State St. 8
p.m. Free. Info: 815-965-0931.
King of the Demons, Skinny White
Lines, Das Boton feat. Billy Dolan –
Mary’s Place, 602 N. Madison St.
9:30 p.m. Info: 815-962-7944.
Warmouth w/Lost Thoughts, Casket
Robbery & Ominous Grey – Bar 3,
326 E. State St. 9:30 p.m. $5 or $3
for On the Waterfront attendees.
Info: 815-968-9061.
Big Daddy Woo Woo – Big Al’s Bar,
610 N. Bell School Road. 9 p.m. Free.
Info: 815-398-6411.
After 5 Jazz Trio – Bistro 108, 6164
E. Riverside, Loves Park. 6:30 p.m.
Bea Brady – Caza, 4001 N. Perryville
Road. 8 p.m.
Matter of Fact – The District Bar &
Grill, 205 W. State St. 10 p.m. Info:
815-977-4524.
Vintage Vinyl – Franchesco’s, 7128
Spring Creek Road. 9 p.m. Free. 815229-0800.
Stroker Red – Otto’s Niteclub & Underground, E. Lincoln Hwy., DeKalb. 9
p.m. $7. Info: 815-758-2715.
Smokin’ Gunz – Take 20, 438 Bypass
U.S. 20, Cherry Valley. 9 p.m. Info:
815-332-9920.
Free Fallin (Tom Petty tribute) –
Whiskey’s Roadhouse, 3207 N.
Main St. 9 p.m. Info: 815-877-8007.
Music on the Mall: Emery Christiansen
– Mary’s Market, Edgebrook, 1601
N. Alpine Road. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free.
Bring your own chair.
One Less Tenor – Rockford City Market, Water Street in downtown Rockford. 3-8 p.m. Free.
Changing Frequency (alt, indie rock) –
Band Shell, village square, Village of Mt.
Morris. 7-9 p.m. Reggae, rock. Free.
Listening Room: Benefit for Centennial
United Methodist Church feat. Ron
Holm – JustGoods, 201 Seventh St.
7 p.m. Folk musician. MC Nick Juric.
Free-will donations. Info: http//
justgoods.info/ or 815-964-7111.
Two Dollar Grey, Divyded, Falling From
Fiction, Ultria – The Back Bar, 1901
Beloit Ave. (Hwy. G), Janesville, Wis. $5
advance, $7 door. Info: 608-741-0001.
Blue Moon by TFU – The House Café,
263 E. Lincoln Hwy., DeKalb. 8 p.m.
Info: 815-787-9547.
Karaoke by Hallie – Hawkeye’s Lounge,
Hawk’s View Restaurant, 11189
Forest Hills Road, Machesney Park.
Pizza, too! Info: 815-282-4868.
’80s Music – Mandalay Lounge, 411
Mulberry St. Starts at 5 p.m.
Karaoke – The Filling Station, 6259
11th St. Info: 815-874-5766.
Karaoke – The Grove, 100 E. Grove
St., Poplar Grove. 9 p.m. Info: 815765-1002.
Karaoke – Scanlan’s, 2921 City View
Drive. 9 p.m. Info: 815-639-0000.
DJ – Backstop Bar & Grill, 1830 Union
Ave., Belvidere. 9 p.m. Free. Info:
815-547-8100.
DJ – Oscar’s Pub & Grill, 5980 E. State
St. 9:30 p.m. Info: 815-399-6100.
DJ – Manor Nightclub, 293 Executive Pkwy. 9 p.m. Free. Info: 815394-0077.
DJ – Brewsky’s, 4414 Charles St. 9
p.m. Free. Info: 815-399-9300.
DJ – RBI’s, 3870 N. Perryville Road. 9
p.m. Info: 815-877-5592.
DJ – Tad’s, 10 E. Riverside Blvd., Loves
Park. 9 p.m. Info: 815-654-3500.
DJ – The Office Niteclub, 513 E. State
St. 9 p.m. Info: 815-965-0344.
DJ Mark & Lana – FIBS, 105 W.
Main St., Rockton. 9:30 p.m. Free.
Info: 815-624-6018.
DJ/Karaoke – Jayne’s Place, 2229
Anderson Drive, Belvidere. Info: 815544-5153.
DJ/Karaoke – Red’s Neighborhood
Tavern, 129 N. State St., Belvidere.
Info: 815-544-6677.309
Saturday, Sept. 1
On the Waterfront Festival – Downtown
Rockford. Features more than 80 performers on five stages, special events,
food, carnival rides and children’s activities (see related article starting on
page A1 for details). 11:30 a.m.-midnight. $12 for 2 days or $15 for 3
days; $15 1-day wristbands at gate;
free for ages 8 and younger w/paid
adult. Info: onthewaterfront.com or
815-964-4388.
Creedence Clearwater Revisited w/
TBA – On the Waterfront Great Lawn
Stage, south side of Davis Park, 320
S. Wyman St. Starts 7:30 p.m. Reserved tickets: $29.50-$79.50. Viewable with festival passes ($12-$15)
or wristbands ($15). Tickets: 877569-7767 or onthewaterfront.com.
Honcho – Adriatic Café, 327 W.
Jefferson St. 9 p.m. Info: 815967-9939.
Pulse 18 – Bar 3, 326 E. State St. 10
p.m. $5 door, $3 for On the Waterfront attendees. Info: 815-968-9061.
Southern Heritage – Big Al’s Bar, 610
N. Bell School Road. 9 p.m. Info:
815-398-6411.
The Pimps – The District Bar & Grill,
205 W. State St. 8 p.m. Info: 815977-4524.
Missing Links – Hawk’s View,
1118l9 Forest Hills Road,
Machesney Park. 8 p.m.-midnight.
Info: 815-282-4868.
As One & Whiskey Train – Kryptonite
Bar, 308 W. State St. 7 p.m. Free.
Info: 815-965-0931.
Nominate the King, B-Town Strokers,
Shades of Tomorrow – Mary’s
Place, 602 N. Madison St. 9:30 p.m.
Info: 851-962-7944.
Jamie Campbell & the Redneck
Romeos – Otto’s Niteclub & Underground, 118 E. Lincoln Hwy., DeKalb.
9 p.m. $7. Info: 815-758-2715.
Shot Gun Jane – Splitter’s Bar & Grill,
5318 N. Second St., Loves Park. 9
p.m. Free. Info: 815-877-6051.
Dorydrive – The Back Bar, 1901 Beloit
Ave., Janesville, Wis. No cover. Info:
608-741-0001.
County Line – Best Dam Bar, 13963
Best Road, Davis, Ill. 9 p.m.
All-ages show feat. The Mind Berlin,
4:45-5:15 p.m.; Blue Skyportrait,
5:30-6 p.m.; I, the Creator, 6:156:45 p.m.; More Than Heroes, 77:30 p.m.; Look, I’m Burning, 7:458:15 p.m.; As A Heart Attack, 8:309 p.m.; Cauz ‘N’ Effx w/Falcon Train,
10 p.m. – The House Café, 263 E.
Lincoln Hwy., DeKalb. Gates open 3
p.m. $6. Info: 815-787-9547.
The Rock River Times
Greg Herriges – Just Goods, 201 Seventh St. 7i p.m. Info: 815-965-8903.
Country Night – Mandalay Lounge, 411
Mulberry St. Starts at 5 p.m.
Open Mic – Take 20, 438 Bypass U.S.
20, Cherry Valley. 8 p.m. Info: 815332-9920.
DJ/Karaoke – Red’s Neighborhood
Tavern, 129 N. State St., Belvidere.
Info: 815-544-6677.
DJ Mark & Lana – FIBS, 105 W. Main
St., Rockton. 9:30 p.m. Free. Info:
815-624-6018.
DJ – Tad’s, 10 E. Riverside Blvd., Loves
Park. 9 p.m. Info: 815-654-3500.
Sunday, Sept. 2
On the Waterfront Festival – Downtown
Rockford. Features more than 80 performers on five stages, special events,
food, carnival rides and children’s activities (see related article starting on
page A1 for details). 11:30 a.m.-11
p.m. $12 for 2 days or $15 for 3
days; $15 1-day wristbands at gate;
free for ages 8 and younger w/paid
adult. Info: onthewaterfront.com or
815-964-4388.
Theory of a Deadman w/The Last Vegas – On the Waterfront Great Lawn
Stage, south side of Davis Park, 320
S. Wyman St. Starts 6:15 p.m. Reserved tickets: $29.50-$79.50. Viewable with festival passes ($12-$15)
or wristbands ($15). Tickets: 877569-7767 or onthewaterfront.com.
Pistol Pete – Adriatic Café, 327 W.
Jefferson St. 8 p.m. Info: 815967-9939.
Sum of Souls w/Murdalize & Poor
Man’s Fortune – Bar 3, 326 E.
State St.10 p.m. $5 or $3 for On
the Waterfront attendees. 815965-0931.
Minotaur w/3 Piston Asshammer
– Kryptonite Bar, 308 W. State
St. 10:30 p.m. Free. Info: 815965-0931.
Miles Nielsen & The Rusted Hearts –
Mary’s Place, 602 N. Madison St.
9:30 p.m. Info: 815-962-7944.
Karaoke with Bob – Whiskey’s Roadhouse, 3207 N. Main St. 6 p.m. Info:
815-877-8007.
Open Mic – Take 20, 438 Bypass U.S.
20, Cherry Valley. 8:30 p.m. Info:
815-332-9920.
Monday, Sept. 3
Vinyl Voodoo – Mary’s Place, 602 N.
Madison St. 10:30 p.m. Free. Info:
815-962-7944.
Tuesday, Sept. 4
Rockford Christian Fellowship Band
Rehearsal – First Evangelical Covenant Church, 316 Wood Road. 7
p.m.Info: 815-226-0558.
Pub Trivia – Hope and Anchor, 5040
N. Second St., Loves Park. 8 p.m.
Info: 815-633-2552.
Barb City Swing Connection – The House
Café, 263 E. Lincoln Hwy., DeKalb. 7
p.m. $5. Info: 815-787-9547.
Shades of Blue/Street Corner Blues
w/Harlan Jefferson – Nikki’s Café,
431 E. Grand Ave., Beloit, Wis.
Street Corner Blues every Tuesday, 7-9 p.m.
Open Stage – Mary’s Place, 602 N.
Madison St. 9:30 p.m. Free. Info:
815-962-7944.
Tuesday Night Karaoke & Craft Beers
– Kryptonite Music Lounge, 308
W. State St. $2 off majority of craft
beers, $3 Captain Morgans, $5
Rum Buckets. Info: 815-965-0931.
Classic Night – Mandalay Lounge, 411
Mulberry St. Starts at 5 p.m.
Karaoke with Bob – Whiskey’s Roadhouse, 3207 N. Main St. 9 p.m.
Free pool. Info: 815-877-8007.
Have your free listing in the Thursday
preceding our Wednesday publication. Listings can be e-mailed to
[email protected] ,
faxed to 815-964-9825 or called
in to 815-964-9767.
Arts & Theater
Ongoing Attractions
Age Quake Theatre – Plays for and
about those 55 and older performed
in the greater Rockford area. Info:
815-398-8090.
Alan and Adrianne St. George Center
for the Arts – 800 Chicago Ave.,
Savanna. Info: 815-244-2035, 815273-3900, 815-273-7262.
Artists’ Ensemble – Rockford College
Cheek Theatre, 5050 E. State St.
Coming Sept. 7: Jeeves Takes A
Bow . Info: 815-904-2277 or
www.artistsensemble.org.
ArtSpace West Gallery – 1426 N. Main
St. Wed.-Sat., noon-6 p.m. Info: 815963-1894.
Beloit Fine Arts Incubator – 520 E.
Grand Ave., Beloit, Wis. Mon.-Fri., 10
a.m.-2 p.m. Other hours by appointment. Info: 608-313-9083.
Bliss Beads Studio & Gallery – 161 E.
Lincoln Hwy., DeKalb, Ill. Weekly
classes in bead jewelry making,
silversmithing and flamework glass.
Regular hours: 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Mon.Sat. Info: 815-517-0164.
Bonzi Productions Theatre Group –
Family theater, plays, musicals. Info:
815-394-8987.
Byron Civic Theatre – 850 N. Colfax,
Byron. Info: 815-312-3000.
Cholke Photography & Fine Art Gallery – 2211 E. State St. Fri., 7:3010 p.m.; Sat., 4:30-10 p.m.; Sun., 25 p.m. Free. Info: 815-226-9398.
John Deere Historic Site – 8334
Clinton St., Grand Detour, Dixon.
Gates open Wed.-Sun., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Admission $5 for ages 12 and older.
Coming Sept. 9: the 64th Annual
Grand Detour Arts Festival. More
than 50 artists working in all media.
Info: 815-652-4551.
DeKalb Area Women’s Center – 1021
State St., DeKalb. Info: 815-758-1351.
District Bar & Grill – 205 W. State St.,
Rockford. Art exhibit from Kortman
Gallery includes paintings, prints,
mixed media, photography. Art with
an urban theme.
Ingrid Dohm Studio Gallery – 839 N.
Perryville Road. Appointments/Info:
815-519-6492.
The Fireside Theatre – Fort Atkinson,
Wis. Now playing: Hello, Dolly! Tickets/Info: 800-477-9505 or
www.firesidetheatre.com.
Found It! Gallery – 107 Monroe St.,
Genoa. After school arts & crafts from
3:30-4:30 p.m. Tues.-Fri. for kids ages
3-14. Cost: $3 if you sign up at least
the day before, $5 drop-in, $10 for all
four days. Info: 815-601-2375.
Freeport Art Museum –121 N. Harlem
Ave., Freeport. Tues.-Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.;
Sat., noon-5 p.m. Info: 815-235-9755.
Freeport/Stephenson County Visitors Center – U.S. 20, east of
Freeport. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Info: 815233-1357.
Funktional Arts – 412 N. First St.
Furniture & sculpture. Info: 815969-7942.
Galena Artists’ Guild Gallery – 324
Spring St., Galena. Thurs.-Mon., 10
a.m.-5 p.m. Info: 815-777-2870.
The Gallery At JustGoods – 201 Seventh
St. Now exhibiting: Dan Taylor (rustic
art). Info: 815-965-8903.
Charlotte Hackin Art Studio & Gallery – 6278 Brynwood Drive. Info:
815-639-1318.
Kortman Gallery – 107 N. Main St. Mon.Sat., 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Exhibiting now:
“Mao Zi: an exhibition of traditional
Chinese hats.” Info: 815-968-0123.
Tom Littrell Design & Art Studio –
317 Market St., Rockford. Info:
[email protected]
Main Street Players of Boone County
– Community Building Complex of
Continued on page B3 !
The Rock River Times
Vibe
Photo provided
Free Fallin’ is a Minneapolis-based band that presents its show with the instrumentation to duplicate
the sound of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers as well as the convincing looks and costumes to visually
give you a show you will not soon forget.
Free Fallin’ brings look,
sound of Tom Petty to
Whiskey’s Roadhouse Aug. 31
Staff Report
Free Fallin’, the nation’s No. 1 tribute to
Tom Petty, will make a stop at Whiskey’s
Roadhouse Bar & Grill, 3207 N. Main St.,
Rockford, Friday, Aug. 31, on its “2012 Petty
Love Tour.”
Free Fallin’ is rapidly becoming a national force in the tribute band world. They
have been traveling extensively over the
past four years, impressing audiences all
over the United States.
Free Fallin’ is a Minneapolis-based band
that presents its show with the instrumentation to duplicate the sound of the Heartbreakers as well as the convincing looks and
costumes to visually give you a show you
will not soon forget.
Tom Petty’s music has been an important
part of America’s music scene for more than
30 years. Spreading the “Petty Love” is the
most fun these guys have ever had.
The lineup of musicians involved all
chose this project for the love of Petty’s
music and the craftsmanship that went
into the song-writing. The musicians in
the band include Brian Evans as Tom
Petty, Karl Swartz as Mike Campbell,
Dale Peterson as Benmont Tench, John
Hill as Scott Thurston, Russ Lund as Ron
Blair and Mark Larsen as Stan Lynch.
Whiskey’s Roadhouse can be reached at
(815) 877-8007.
Canned Heat to perform at Adriatic Aug. 31
! Continued from page B1
Bob Hite was born into a musical family
in Torrance, Calif. His mother was a singer,
and his father had played in a dance band
in Pennsylvania. Young Bob grew up collecting old jukebox records, and managed
to amass a remarkable collection by his
teen-age years.
Alan Wilson grew up in Boston, where he
became a music major at Boston University and a frequent player at the Cambridge coffeehouse folk-blues circuit. He
also wrote two lengthy, analytical articles
about bluesmen Robert Pete Williams and
Son House for Broadside of Boston, a Massachusetts music paper.
Later on, this group made connections
with Mike Perlowin and John Fahey, who
also joined the band. The initial configuration was composed of Perlowin on lead guitar, Wilson on bottleneck guitar, Hite on
vocals, Stu Brotman on bass and Keith
Sawyer on drums. Perlowin and Sawyer
dropped out within a few days of the rehearsal, so guitarist Kenny Edwards stepped
in to replace Perlowin, and Ron Holmes
agreed to sit in on drums until they could
find a permanent drummer. They soon realized three guitars were overkill, so they let
Edwards go. About the same time, Frank
Cook came in to replace Holmes as their
permanent drummer.
Before their first album, Canned Heat,
which Liberty released, the band appeared
at the Monterey Pop Festival June 17, 1967.
Downbeat magazine praised their performance in an article in the Aug. 10 issue.
Recordings of the festival resulted in their
spirited rendition of “Rollin’ and Tumblin’”
being captured in a film of the event, and a
1992 boxed CD set of the festival included
some of their work. Canned Heat’s selftitled debut was released in July 1967, and
following a one-week gig at the Ash Grove
from Aug. 22-26, the band went on their
first national tour.
They’ve had some problems along the
way, including some jail time in Denver for
marijuana possession, but they’ve kept on
playing, and have since acquired a new
drummer, Fito de la Parra, whose talent
has been called “completely fantastic” by
The Beat magazine. Their third album,
Living the Blues, displayed the quintet at
their most experimental. It was a ninepart sound collage and fusion of blues,
raga, sitar music, honky-tonk, guitar distortion and other electronic effects, all under the experimental direction of manager/
producer Skip Taylor. They even released
a Christmas single, “The Chipmunk Song,”
in the 1970s.
To catch up on their latest exploits, catch
their act at the Adriatic this Friday, and be
prepared for a swingin’ time! More details
are also at www.cannedheatmusic.com.
Aug. 29-Sept. 4, 2012
! Continued from page B2
Boone County, 111 W. First St.,
Belvidere. Info: 800-741-2963 or
mainstreetplayersofboonecounty.com.
Midtown Marketplace – 203 Seventh St.
Info: 815-961-1269.
Monroe Arts Center – 1315 11th St.,
Monroe, Wis. Now exhibiting thru
Aug. 31: “The Art of Pedro E.
Guerrero: Photographs of Calder,
Nevelson,Wright and Others” in
Frehner Gallery. Info: 608-325-5700
or www.monroeartscenter.com.
NIU Art Museum – Hall Case Galleries,
116 Altgeld Hall, DeKalb. Tues.-Fri.,
10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat., noon-4 p.m. Info:
815-753-1936.
NIU Community School of the Arts –
Music Building, Room 132, DeKalb
Campus. Various music classes,
music ensembles, art classes. Info:
815-753-1450 or www.csa.niu.edu.
NIU School of Theatre & Dance –
Stevens Building, DeKalb campus.
Info: 815-753-1337.
Northwest Illinois Theater Coalition –
Hanover’s Back Street Players,
Stockton’s Plum River Playhouse and
Orangeville’s Mighty Richland Players. Tickets for Back Street Players
may be purchased at Apple River
State Bank, Hanover, at 815-5912201. Tickets for Mighty Richland
Players in Orangeville at 815-8291310 or 608-325-5700. Tickets
for Plum River Playhouse at Stockton Banking Center at 815-9472000. Also: [email protected]
David C. Olson Photography Studio –
7801 E. State St., inside Clock
Tower Resort. Wildlife and nature
imagery. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday; 9 a.m.-noon, Saturday. Free.
Info: 815-873-1777.
Pec Playhouse Theatre – 314 Main St.,
Pecatonica. Info: 815-239-1210.
Rock Valley College Starlight Theatre
– 3301 N. Mulford Road. Info: 815921-2160.
Rockford Art Museum – 711 N. Main
St. Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun.,
noon-5 p.m. Free for everyone every
Tues. 72nd Rockford Midwestern
Biennial Exhibit. Dates: May 18Sept. 23. Juried exhibit; prizes
awarded. Rockford Photo Club display in Art Annex runs thru Sept. 23.
Exhibiting now: Into the Light: Illinois Glass, runs thru Oct. 21. New
program: Blue Star Museums, offering free admission to active duty
military personnel and their families
this summer from Memorial Day
thru Labor Day. Info: 815-968-2787.
Rockford College Art Gallery – Clark
Arts Center, 5050 E. State St. 3-6
p.m., Tues.-Fri. Info: 815-226-4105.
Rockford Dance Company – Riverfront
Museum Park, 711 N. Main St. Info:
815-815-963-3341.
Timber Lake Playhouse – 8215 Black
Oak Road, Mt. Carroll. Coming Sept.
1: An Evening of Art & Music at Brick
Street Coffee. Info: 815-244-2035
or www.timberlakeplayhouse.org.
317 Studio & Gallery – 317 Market
St. Every Friday, see “Artists at Work”
from 4-9 p.m.
TownSquare Players, Inc. – Woodstock
North High School, Woodstock, Ill.
Village Gallery – Stewart Square. Artists’
co-op. 45 artists. Open Wed.-Fri., 11
a.m.-2 p.m. Info: 815-963-ARTS.
Beth Ann Weis Salon & Spa – 4108
Morsay Drive, Rockford. Hours: Tues.
& Fri., 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Thurs., noon-9
p.m.; Sat., 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Closed Sun.,
Mon., Wed. Info: 815-387-2700.
Womanspace – Womanspace, 3333
Maria Linden Drive. Mon.-Thurs., 9
a.m.-5 p.m. Now exhibiting: “Live in
Pride” by artist Norm Knott in
Gallery2Go gift shop. Dedicated to the
memory of young people who committed suicide. Info: 815-877-0118.
Woodstock Musical Theatre Company
– Woodstock Opera House, 121
VanBuren St., Woodstock. Info: 815338-5300.
Wright Museum of Art – 700 College
St., Beloit, Wis. 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Tues.Sun. Info: 608-363-2677.
Registration Needed
Sign up for Blithe Spirit Auditions –
Town Square Players,Woodstock, Ill.
Auditions to be held at Grace
Lutheran Church, 1300 Kishwaukee
Valley Road, Woodstock, Ill., Sept. 4
and 5, 7-9:30 p.m. No appointment
needed. Callbacks will be held Sept.
at same time and location.
Registration for NIU Community
School of the Arts classes – NIU
Music Building, DeKalb campus. Prelude, Development, Group Piano for
Adults, Piano Starter for Children.
Classes start Sept. 8. Info: 815-7531450 or www.csa.niu.edu.
Deadline extended for “Seasons on the
Land” Art Show and Benefit – Fundraiser for Natural Land Institute. New
deadline: Sept. 21. Fine Art/Photography and Artisan entry forms are available online at www.naturalland.org.
Entry fee: $25 for Fine Art/Photography; $100 for Artisan category. Fees
refundable if the entrant is not selected. Entry forms and more information at NLI office, 320 S. Third St.,
Rockford. Info: 815-964-6666, e-mail
[email protected]
Wanted: Vendors for Rockton Chamber of Commerce Candy Cane Craft
Show – Date: Dec. 21, 7:30 a.m.3:30 p.m. Food concessions will be
sold, and other activities planned.
Applications being accepted for
B
3
crafters. Booths are $30 each, incl.
table and 2 chairs; approx. space of
6x4 ft. Photos of craft and/or craft
booth need to be submitted, along
with application and entry feeno later
than Nov. 1. Info: 815-624-7625 or
[email protected]
Call for Artists: Woods Equipment
Company commemorates 50th
anniversary of Batwing Rotary Cutter with commission for original
work of art – Looking for a work of art
that captures the role this invention
has played in changing the landscape
of American agriculture. Open to artists working in all media. Judging panel
will select the winning entry on or
about Dec. 15. Winner will receive
$1,000, and the work will be displayed in the lobby of the company,
featured in website and announced
in a national press release. Entry deadline: Nov. 30. Info: 815-732-9561.
Wednesday, Aug. 29
No listings submitted
Thursday, Aug. 30
Hello, Dolly! – The Fireside Theatre,
Fort Atkinson, Wis. Dinner theater.
Tickets/Info: 800-477-9505 or
www.firesidetheatre.com.
Friday, Aug. 31
Artists at Work – 317 Studio & Gallery, 317 Market St. Every Friday,
see “Artists at Work” from 4-9 p.m.
Hello, Dolly! – The Fireside Theatre,
Fort Atkinson, Wis. Dinner theater.
Tickets/Info: 800-477-9505 or
www.firesidetheatre.com.
Saturday, Sept. 1
An Evening of Art & Music – Timber
Lake Playhouse, 8215 Black Oak
Road, Mt. Carroll, Ill. Brick Street
Coffee, downtown Mt. Carroll. 3-8
p.m. Various performers. Info: 815244-2035.
Hello, Dolly! – The Fireside Theatre,
Fort Atkinson, Wis. Dinner theater.
Tickets/Info: 800-477-9505 or
www.firesidetheatre.com.
Sunday, Sept. 2
50th Annual Art in the Park – New
Glarus Village Park. New Glarus, Wis.
9 a.m.-4 p.m. Pottery, paintings, jewelry, photography, more. Live music
and food. Families staying for the
weekend can see the 75th presentation of Wilhelm Tell, and enjoy
camping, children’s lantern parade
and a yodel contest.
Fifth Annual Art in the Park – Krape
Park, 1799 S. Park Blvd., Freeport.
10 a.m.-5 p.m. Artists from northern Illinois and surrounding area.
Continued on page B4 !
4
B
Vibe
Aug. 29-Sept. 4, 2012
! Continued from page B3
Paintings, photography, ceramics,
metal crafting, more. Local musicians and performing artists. Kids’
activities. Free.
Hello, Dolly! – The Fireside Theatre,
Fort Atkinson, Wis. Dinner theater.
Tickets/Info: 800-477-9505 or
www.firesidetheatre.com.
Monday, Sept. 3
No listings submitted
Tuesday, Sept. 4
Blithe Spirit Auditions – Town Square
Players,Woodstock, Ill. Auditions to
be held at Grace Lutheran Church,
1300 Kishwaukee Valley Road,
Woodstock, Ill., Sept. 4 and 5, 79:30 p.m. No appointment needed.
Callbacks will be held Sept. at same
time and location.
Have your free listing in the Thursday
preceding our Wednesday publication. Listings can be e-mailed to
[email protected] ,
faxed to 815-964-9825 or called
in to 815-964-9767.
Community
Fall Attractions
Amenti Haunted House – Egyptian Theatre, 135 N. Second St., DeKalb.
Ages 12 and older. Open at 7 p.m.,
Oct. 19-21, 26-28, 30-31. $13. Info:
815-758-1215.
Curran’s Apple Orchard – 6385
Kilburn Ave. Open 9 a.m.-6 p.m. daily
until first weekend in December. Info:
815-963-7848.
Edwards Apple Orchard – 7061
Centerville Road, Poplar Grove. Open
daily 9 a.m.-6 p.m. from Labor Day to
end of October, and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. in
November, closing the weekend of
Thanksgiving. Info: 815-765-2234.
Edwards Apple Orchard West – 8218
Cemetery Road, Winnebago. Open
daily 9 a.m.-6 p.m. from Labor Day to
end of October, and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. in
November, closing the weekend of
Thanksgiving. Info: 815-963-2261.
Fear Asylum Haunted House –
Belvidere Park District (William
Grady Pool), 916 W. Lincoln Ave.,
Belvidere. Ages 13 and older. 7-11
p.m., Fri. Sat. and Halloween; and 710 p.m., Sun. Thurs., Sept. 28, Oct.
5-7, 12-14, 18-21, 24-31. $10/
$15. Info: 815-965-6772.
Fright Factory – 1405 Riverside St.,
Janesville, Wis. Ages 13 and older.
7-10:30 p.m., Fri. and Sat.; 7-9:30
p.mk., Thurs., Oct. 25 and Sun., Oct.
28; Oct. 5-6, 12-13, 19-20, 25-28.
$13 or $18 Fright Pass (go to front
The Rock River Times
Fun at Rockford’s Block 5
of line). Info: 608-754-5879.
Hopper’s Haunted House – 11576
Route 2, Rockford. 7p.m.-midnight,
Fri.-Sat; and 7-10 p.m., Sun.-Thurs.,
Oct. 5-6, 12-13, 19-21, 24-31. $10.
Info: 815-871-7334.
The Pumpkin Patch – 3178 Illinois Rt.
173, Caledonia. Open 7 days a week,
9 a.m.-6 p.m. in Sept. and 9 am-.7
p.m. in Oct. Admission to grounds,
petting zoo and barn is free Mon.-Fri.;
$3 per person and free for children 2
and younger and adults 65 and older,
Sat. and Sun. Additional fee for rides
& attractions. Info: 815-765-2587.
Screamatorium Haunted House –
Screamatorium Haunted House, Arte
Verde Garden Center, 15630 Ill.
Route 76, Poplar Grove. Ages 13
and older. 7-11 p.m., Fri., Sat. and
Halloween; 7-10 p.m., Sun.-Thurs.,
Sept. 28, Oct. 5-7, 12-14, 18-21, 2431. $10/$15. Info: 815-965-6772.
Ongoing Attractions
View the Community Calendar online at
www.rockrivertimes.com for a complete list of Ongoing Attractions.
Registration Needed
Registration for Rockford Park District Youth Indoor Volleyball – Indoor Sports Center, 8800 E. Riverside Blvd., Loves Park. Sessions begin Sept. 16 and Oct. 28 for ages 58. Fee: $40/person ($50 non-resident). Ages 8-11, sessions begin Sept.
21 and Oct. 26. Ages 11-14, Sept.
21 and Oct. 26. Fee: $65/person
($75 non-resident). Sessions also
offered in January and February for
ages 8-11. Info: 815-987-8800.
Registration for Rockford Park District After School Ice Skating –
Riverview Ice House, 324 N. Madison St., Rockford. Dates: Sept. 6May 30, 2013. Fee: $3/person.
Info: 815-969-4069.
Registration for Freeport Park District Programs – Martial Arts at
the Freeport Park District: Little Rippers, Aug. 29-Sept. 5, ages 5-15.
Info: 815-235-6114, ext. 109.
Registration for Daytime and Evening
Adult Grief Support Groups – Beloit
Regional Hospice, 655 Third St.,
Beloit, Wis. 1-2:30 p.m. and 6-7:30
p.m. Each group meets for seven
weeks. Register at 608-363-7421
or 877-363-7421. No fee, but advance registration is required.
Registration for NFL Flag Football –
Carlson Ice Arena, Perryville and Riverside, Loves Park. Date: Aug. 31, 67 p.m. For players ages 5-8 and 9-11.
Registration fee for new players is
$85 ($90 non-resident); for returning players from 2012 summer season, fee is $50 ($55 non-resident).
Info: www.rockfordparkdistrict.org
(click Register Now), by fax (with credit
card), by mail and at both Park District Customer Service locations.
Registration for Lost Nation Golf Club
Event Benefit – Easter Seals Autism
Therapeutic School, Rockford and
Rockvale Children’s Home,Rockford
at 6931S. Lost Nation Road, Dixon.
Date: Aug. 31, 10 a.m. shotgun start.
Cost: $75 includes dinner; hole sponsorships available at $100 each. Info:
815-652-4212.
Registration for Yoga Classes for adults
or After-School Programming for
kids – Angelic Organics Learning Center, 1547 Rockton Road, Caledonia.
Date: Begins Sept. 5. Yoga classes will
be a flowing, energetic style called
Prana Yoga. Youth programs will include an animals series in September
and a cooking series in October. Info/
Register: 815-389-8455. Classes will
coincide with weekly pick-up of fresh
vegetables. Info: 815-389-2746 or
www.angelicorganics.com.
Registration for BART (Bike for the
Arts) – Date: Sept. 8. Choose from
one of four scenic rides: 5-mile Family Fun Ride, 22-mile ride, 37-mile
ride, or 65-mile ride. Riders receive
a T-shirt and enjoy food and entertainment at post-ride party. Register by mail at: BART, 711 N. Main
St., Rockford, IL 61103; in person at
Rockford Symphony Orchestra,
Rockford Dance Company,
Mendelssohn PAC, or Kantorei Singing Boys of Rockford; or on day of the
event at Riverfront Museum Park.
Info: www.BikeForTheArts.com.
Reservations for “Twilight in the Garden” – Klehm Arboretum & Botanic
Garden, 2715 S. Main St. Date: Sept.
8, doors open at 6 p.m., dinner at
7.Cost: $75/person, reserved table
of 8, $600. Raffle tickets: $5 each
or 5 for $20. Reserve by Aug. 31.
Info: 815-965-8146.
Registration for Family Farm Overnight at Angelic Organics Farm –
1547 Rockton Road, Caledonia.
Date: 11 a.m., Sept. 1-noon, Sept. 2.
Pre-register at 815-389-8455 or
www.learngrowconnect.org.
Registration for North Park Fire Department Community Blood Drive
and Be The Match Marrow Registry Drive – North Park Fire Department, 600 Wood Ave., Machesney
Park. Date: Sept. 4, 3-7 p.m. Must
be between ages of 18-60 and in
good health. Info: 815-636-3051.
Registration for Preschool Fresh Food
from the Farm: Totally Tomatoes!–
Angelic Organics Learning Center,1547 Rockton Road, Caledonia.
Date: Sept. 5, 10-11:30 a.m. PreContinued on page B5 !
Photos by Frank Schier
Top photo: As the Block 5 Festival headliner, The Honey Island Swamp Band, took the stage Saturday,
Aug. 25, event organizer Sandy Kohn of MedicineMan Creative Design Agency and Mike Wright of The
Office charged up the crowd before the show, and offered a toast to the recently-deceased Rockford artist
Jim Julin. The festival, held in the street of the 500 block of East State Street, is known as downtown
Rockford’s block party, with “Music, drinks, great food and righteous partying,” according to their
Facebook page. “Mission: To promote the heart of downtown Rockford and maintain the traditions of our
River District community by way of encouraging our cuisine, arts and culture. Company Overview: Deli
Italia, The Irish Rose, Brio, Social, MedicineMan, Pranayama Yoga Studio, Digits Salon, Bamboo, and all
our regular customers and supporters working together to maintain the Block 5 mission.” Additional
event sponsors included REACT, the RLDC, Bud Light, the Element, La Monica Beverages, SupplyCore,
Alpine Inn, Catalyst Business Solutions and Maverick Media. Mana Kintorso and Fresh Hot Fritters were
also featured bands. Kohn said 1,000 people attended the festival.
Lower left photo: John Sadler, Frank Calvanese and Dan “The Man” Britton play in the new outdoor
seating area of Deli Italia, 507 E. State St., during Block 5 Festival, Saturday, Aug. 25.
Lower right photo: Marcole Walston of Cozi Pedicab squires around customers at Main and State
streets Saturday, Aug. 25. His route went from Block 5 to Kryptonite. He also will go from the BMO
Harris Bank Center to the Riverfront Museum Park to Cliffbreakers. His fees for short downtown trips
are from $1 to $5; $12 for 15-minute trips; and $25 for 30-minute trips. Cozi Pedicabs are available
for sightseeing and even weddings. Call (815) 540-2957.
WLUV reschedules picnic
Staff Report
WLUV Radio 50th Anniversary Picnic —
Take Two!
The50thanniversarypicnic,originallyscheduled for Sunday, Aug. 26, was rained out.
Joe Salvi, owner of WLUV Country Radio
in Rockford, invites everyone to the rescheduled picnic from 1 to 5 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 2,
at the radio station, 2272 Elmwood Road.
It’s your day to be a star! All bands and
singers are welcome to perform live on WLUV
Radio, 1520 AM on the dial, at this event —
country, bluegrass, gospel music. Bring your
lawn chairs and settle in for some fun
(weather-permitting). Enjoy free hot dogs,
chips and pop outside; free anniversary cake
will be served inside the radio station.
Call WLUV Radio at (815) 877-9588.
‘Smile’ with Carl A. Cole and family Aug. 30
Staff Report
Sounds Of Good News Productions
(SOGN) invites all lovers of “Oldies” music
to help them close out August with “Smile”
— a summer sing-along with Maestro Carl
A. Cole on piano. The program will feature
his “fabulous” wife Dianna and son Andrew.
This celebration of musical memories will
take place at 6 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 30, at
Presenting Sponsor
Premier Sponsor
C W Blazer Foundation
Rockford College’s Fisher Memorial Chapel,
5050 E. State St. This event is free to the public;
free-will donations will benefit the “Young
Eagles Success” (YES) Club Program of Character Development & Excellence for Kids. A
new Smile CD will be available that evening.
For more information, contact Dianna at
(815) 914-1487 or [email protected], or
go to www.WAY4U.net.
The Rock River Times
Vibe
Freeport’s Art in the Park
Sept. 2 at Krape Park
Staff Report
FREEPORT, Ill. — Art in the Park is a
one-day outdoor arts festival celebrating
local and regional visual and performing
arts in Freeport’s Krape Park.
From 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 2,
this free community event offers something
for the whole family.
Artists from across northern Illinois and
surrounding areas will display their work,
from paintings and photography to woodworking, ceramics and metal crafting.
Visitors to the event will also be able to
watch as artists demonstrate their art live
at the event. Local musicians and performing artists will also be featured. Children
and families can create their own artwork
at a free hands-on activity area.
Art in the Park is a cooperative effort
between the Freeport Park District and the
Freeport Art Museum.
“The art museum is proud to be part of this
collaboration and create opportunities for
the community to connect with regional artists,” said Jessica J. Caddell, director of the
Freeport Art Museum. “People’s Choice
Awards are a fun way visitors can participate in this event by voting for their favorite
artist in two categories. Awards will be presented to artists for Best in Show and Best
Display. New this year is a raffle for original
works of art provided by participating artists. Attendees to the event can select from
five different pieces of art for the raffle.”
The outdoor location at Krape Park, 1799
S. Park Blvd., Freeport, will set the stage for
Art in the Park. In addition to the activities
planned for Art in the Park, visitors can also
explore the amenities of Krape Park, including an antique working carousel, Yellow
Creek and paddleboat rentals, fenced-in duck
farm, fishing area, waterfall, children’s play
areas, miniature golf and much more. Food
will be available from several local vendors.
For more about Art in the Park, visit
www.facebook.com/artintheparkfreeport.
Greenwich Village Art Fair to
feature more than 100 artists
Staff Report
The 2012 Rockford Art Museum Greenwich Village Art Fair will be Saturday and
Sunday, Sept. 15-16, rain or shine, on the
grounds of Rockford Art Museum at
Riverfront Museum Park, 711 N. Main
St., Rockford.
Gates are open 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturday,
and 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday.
Admission is $5 for adults, free for children 12 and younger. Advance tickets are
$3 and are available at the Rockford Art
Museum Store or any Alpine Bank location.
All proceeds support Rockford Art Museum programs throughout the year.
The 64th Greenwich Village Art Fair is
dedicated to the creativity and kindness of
Rockford artist Jim Julin (1956-2012).
A Rockford tradition since 1948, Greenwich is the oldest continuous outdoor fine art
fair in the Midwest. The 2012 event features
more than 100 juried artists; live music, both
days; children’s art activities; 20 Gourmet
Marketplace and Bohemian Bazaar vendors;
and food and beverage vendors, including
The Rock River Times Bistro, Bud Light
Village Pub, Kortman Gallery Point Bar.
Julie Ganser of the University of WisconsinMadison serves as 2012 Juror. Visit
www.rockfordartmuseum.org/gvaf.html.
Art in the Park in New Glarus, Wis., Sept. 2
! Event held in conjunction with
75th Annual Wilhelm Tell Drama
Staff Report
NEW GLARUS, Wis. — The 50th Annual
Art in the Park fine arts and crafts festival
will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sunday, Sept.
2, at New Glarus’ Village Park.
Juried artists will sell their wares, including pottery, paintings, jewelry, photography
and more. The event will be in conjunction
with the 75th Annual Wilhelm Tell Drama.
Event organizer Mary Thomson exContinued on page B7 !
Aug. 29-Sept. 4, 2012
! Continued from page B4
register at 815-389-8455 or
www.learngrowconnect.org.
Registration for “Apples: Nutritious
& Delicious!” – U of I Extension Ogle
County, 421 W. Pines Road, Oregon.
Date: Sept. 5, 1-2 p.m. Growing
apples and how to prevent or manage common problems. Cost: $5/
person. Register by Aug. 29. Info:
815-732-2191.
Registration for Fall Bulb Wokshop –
University of Illinois Extension Ogle
County, 421 W. Pines Road, Oregon.
Date: Sept. 5, 5-6 p.m. Cost: $5. Info:
815-732-2191.
Registration for “Fun at the Farm:
Animals!” – Angelic Organics
Learning Center, 1547 Rockton
Road, Caledonia. Dates: Sept. 5,
12, 19, 26, 4-5:30 p.m. Pre-Register. Info: 815-3898-8455 or
www.learngrowconnect.
Registration for Prana Flow Yoga –
Angelic Organics Learning Center,
1547 Rockton Road, Caledonia.
Dates: Sept. 5, 12, 19, 26, 4:15-5:15
p.m. Pre-Register. Info: 815-38988455 or www.learngrowconnect.
Registration for “Doing Business with
the Federal Government” NIMCA
Symposium – EIGERlab Auditorium,
605 Fulton Ave. Date: Sept. 6, 5-7
p.m. Open to all minority, women and
veteran small business owners. Info:
815-962-3335.
Registration for Christmas Stocking
Sew-in for Soldiers – Bethesda Covenant Church, 2101 E. State St. Date:
Sept. 6, 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Hosted by
Sinnissippi Quilters. Bring your sewing machine or hand sewing kit. Fabric is provided. Come to sew a few
hours or all day. Potluck at noon and
6 p.m. Goal is 1,500 stockings. Info:
815-742-7013 or 815-757-4660.
Registration for Golf Tournament to
Benefit National Fallen Firefighters
Foundation – Prairieview Golf Club,
Byron, Ill. Date: Sept. 7. Open to
public; $85 per golfer, includes 18
holes with cart, lunch at the turn,
steak dinner banquet, door prizes,
gift certificates, raffle. Shotgun start
at 10 a.m. Register/Info: http://
golf.firehero.org/il/rockford/.
Registration for Midway Village Museum Golf Outing – Aldeen Golf Club,
1902 Reid Farm Road. Date: Sept.
7. Registration begins at 11 a.m.,
lunch until 12:30 p.m. Shotgun start
at 12:30. Info: 815-397-9112 or
www.midwayvillage.com.
Registration for Classic Car Show –
Central Christian Church, 6595
Guilford Road. Date: Sept. 8, 9 a.m.3 p.m. Pre-registration cost: $10
day of show. Music, kids activities,
food vendors, soft drinks. Proceeds
go to Carpenter’s Place. Info: 815997-5178 or 815-963-7254.
Order Tickets for “Elmo Makes Music” – BMO Harris Bank Center,
300 Elm St. Dates: Sept. 7-9. Tickets: $3 and $13; limited number of
$25 Gold Circle seats and $60
Sunny Seats. Opening Night, all seats
(excluding Gold Circle and Sunny
Seats) are $20. Facility fee of $1.50
is added. Info: 815-968-5222 or
www.sesamestreetlive.com.
Registration for Bird/Plant Hike –
Byron Forest Preserve District,
7993 N. River Road. Date: Sept. 7,
8-11 a.m. Meet at Jarrett Center.
Free. All ages. Register by Sept. 6.
Info: 815-234-8535, ext. 200.
Registration for Astronomy Class: The
Universe – Byron Forest Preserve District, 7993 N. River Road. Date: Sept.
7, 7-8 p.m. All ages. Free. Register by
Sept. 6. Info: 815-234-8535, ext. 200.
Registration for 2012 Fatman Olympics – Kishwaukee Forest Preserve,
5757 Blackhawk Road, Cherry Valley. Date: Sept. 8, noon. Cost: $25
adults, BYOB; kids younger than 12,
$10 (to participate). Provided: meats,
refreshments, T-shirt while supplies
last. Bring a dish to pass. Info: 815751-7663 or 815-378-2671.
Registration for Second Annual Screw
City Beer Festival – Downtown
Rockford. Date: Sept. 8, 1-6 p.m.
Dozens of American craft breweries. Online ticket sales end Aug. 30.
Tickets available at Artale Wine Co.,
Kryptonite Bar and The Olympic Tavern, or online at http://
www.screwcitybeerfest.com.
Registration for Out of the Darkness
Community Walk for Suicide Prevention – Anderson Japanese Gardens, 318 Spring Creek Road. Date:
Sept. 8. Register to walk or donate:
www.OutOfTheDarkness.org.
Registration for Cheesemaking – Angelic Organics Learning Center,
1547 Rockton Road, Caledonia.
Date: Sept. 8, 9 a.m.-noon. Pre-register. Info: 815-389-8455 or
www.learngrowconnect.org.
Registration for Junior League of Rockford Dine by Design Kitchen Tour –
Dates: April 27-28, 2013. Fundraiser
offers a tour of 10 kitchens. Deadline
to register: Sept. 10. Info: 815-3994518 or www.jlrockford.org.
Registration for “Nothing But Net” 3
on 3 Basketball Tournament – Cornerstone Christian Academy, 355
N. Cross, Sycamore. Date: Sept. 22.
Free throw contest, championship
game. Cost: $4 registration fee per
team payable at time of registration.
Early registration available if received
by Sept. 8; final registration due by
Sept. 18. Info: 815-895-8522 or
B
5
www.cornerstonechristianacademy.com.
Reservations for Grace UMC Style Show
& Luncheon – Grace United Methodist Church, 3555 McFarland Road,
Rockford. Date: Sept. 8. Doors open
11:30 a.m., Salad Luncheon served at
12:15 p.m. Models wear clothing from
CherryVale Mall’s Dress Barn. Tickets
$15. Info: 815-637-4561.
Reservations for “An Evening with
Clutch Cargo” – Cliffbreakers Riverside Resort, 700 W. Riverside Blvd.
Date: Sept. 8, 7-11 p.m. Cost: $45/
person. Dance contest with $100
prize, raffle, door prizes. Tickets:
www.sienaonbrendenwood/events
or 815-399-6167.
Registration for Eighth Annual Thin Mint
Sprint – Girl Scouts Camp McCormick,
Stillman Valley. Date: Sept. 8. Events:
8K and Tough Cookie Trail Run are
$25/person, $30 after Aug. 15. “Do
the Double” is $40/person; $50 after Aug. 15. 2-mile Family Fun Walk/
Run is $15/person; $20 after Aug.
15. Info: www.girlscoutsni.org.
Registration for Third Annual Rock
River Sweep – Meet at Gazebo,
Settler’s Park, 301 E. Main St.
Rockton. Date: Sept. 8, 9 a.m.-all
day. Walkers, boaters, kayakers,
canoers welcome. Gloves, bags,
water, snacks, insect repellent provided. Info: 815-624-7622 or
www.rockriversweep.org.
Registration for Handmade Pasta –
Angelic Organics Learning Center,
1547 Rockton Road, Caledonia.
Date: Sept. 8, 2-5 p.m. Pre-register.
Info:
815-389-8455
or
www.learngrowconnect.org.
Registration for Paranormal Investigation of Tinker Swiss Cottage &
Museum – 411 Kent St. Date: Sept.
8, Session I, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Session
II, 10 p.m.-1 a.m. With special guests
Ghost Head Soup investigators. Cost:
$25 advance, or $30 at event. Info:
www.hauntedrockford.com.
Registration for Cheesemaking 2: Hard
Cheeses – Angelic Organics Learning Center, 1547 Rockton Road,
Caledonia. Date: Sept. 8, 1-5 p.m.
Pre-register. Info: 815-389-8455 or
www.learngrowconnect.org.
Registration for 12th Annual Grandparents Day Dinner and Awards
Banquet – Radisson Hotel & Convention Center, 200 S. Bell School
Road. Date: Sept. 9, 2 p.m. Tickets:
$25. Mailing address: see above
entry. Info: 815-243-3073.
Registration for Fish-Abled Foundation
Fund-raiser – SM & SF Club, 1010
Sandy Hollow Road. Date: Sept. 9, 48 p.m. Benefit for new nonprofit organization to raise money for vehicle to
help the handicapped enjoy outdoor
Continued on page B6 !
6
B
Vibe
Aug. 29-Sept. 4, 2012
! Continued from page B5
excursions. Admission $10, includes
meal, 50/50 raffle, giveaways, silent
auction. Fishing equipment also
needed. Info: 815-289-8385.
Registration for Financial Peace University – Hope Free Church, 5656
Elevator Road, Roscoe. Date: Begins
Sept. 10, 6:30 p.m. Taught by Dave
Ramsey on DVD. Info: 815-623-5645.
Registration for U of I Small Wind Energy Options – Freedom Field, 3333
Kishwaukee St. Date: Sept. 10, 6:308 p.m. Cost: $5. Pre-registration is
required. Info: 815-986-4357.
Registration for Better Health 4 Life
Event – Caraotta Chiropractic Orthopedics, 4921 E. State St. Date: Sept.
11, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. All professional services will be donated to Rockford Area
Pregnancy Care Center. Those who
make a $20 donation per person
($30 per family) will have all chiropractic and orthopedic spinal and joint
conditions evaluated at no charge.
Space is limited. Info: 815-398-4004.
Registration for Swing Dance Lessons
at Freeport Park District – Krape
Park Community Building. Sept. 1125, 7-8:15 p.m. Register by Sept. 4;
call Freeport Park District at 815235-6114, ext. 0 or stop by the
Park District office, 1122 S.
Burchard. Resident fees: $22.50 /
person, non-resident, $26.
Registration for U of I Extension
Openfields Local Foods Dinner Series – Fieldstone Inn, 1121 W. Empire St., Freeport. Date: Sept. 11.
Confirmation in process. Call U of I
Extension for time and cost. Info:
815-986-4357.
Registration for IGNITE’s Lunch Outside the Box – Cliffbreakers Riverside Resort, 700 W. Riverside Blvd.
Date: Sept. 12, noon. Cost: $12
members, $15 non-members. Info:
815-316-4335.
Registration for AARP Driver Safety
Course – Lifescape Community Services and Senior Expo, Indoor Sports
Center, 8800 E. Riverside Blvd.,
Loves Park. Dates: Sept.13-14. 9:30
a.m.-1:30 p.m. both days. For drivers age 50 and older. Cost: $12,
AARP members, $14 non-members. Info: 815-963-1609.
Registration for Fund-raising Seminar:
“From Donor Desire to Done Deal –
Getting Results” – Giovanni’s, 610
N. Bell School Road. Date: Sept. 14,
7:30 a.m.-noon. Hosted by Association of Fundraising ProfessionalsRockford Chapter. Cost: $50 for AFP
and NIPGC members and guests;
$75 for non-members. Register
online at www.afprockford.org or call
815-490-1621.
Registration for RAMI Golf Play Day to
benefit Gary S. Wilmer Memorial
Scholarship Fund – Elliot Golf Course.
Date: Sept. 14. $65 per golfer or
$350 Gold Sponsorship or $250
Silver Sponsorship or Hole Sponsorship for $125. Deadline: Sept. 7, golfers and dinner reservations for nongolfers. Limited to first 144 golfers.
Entry forms at www.ramiawards.com.
Info: 815-546-3021.
Reserve Booth Space for Lifescape’s
Senior Expo – Indoor Sports Center, 8800 E. Riverside Blvd., Loves
Park. Dates: Sept. 13-14. Theme:
“Fit & Fabulous!” Info: 815-4901111 or www.lifescapeservices.org.
Registration for SPAY Illinois Low-Cost
Pet Vaccine Clinic – All Paws Beauty
Salon, 130 N. First St., Rockford.
Date: Sept. 14,11 a.m.-4 p.m. By
appointment only. Various prices; no
exam fee when pets receive
vaccines.Cash or credit; no personal
checks. Info: 815-472-2300.
Registration for “River to Ridge Half
Marathon, 10K & 5K Fun Run” –
Janesville, Wis. Date: Sept.15, start
at 7 a.m. at River Park in Janesville.
A portion of proceeds go to Rock
County Cancer Coalition. Register
on race day or info: 608-754-2286,
www.rivertoridgehalfmarathon.com
or [email protected]
Registration for Bikers for Local Pantries Poker Run – Whiskey’s Roadhouse, 3207 N. Main St. Date: Sept.
15. Registration begins at 10 a.m.
Kickstands up at 11 a.m. Last bike
out at 1 p.m. Not a race–total of 5
stops, ends at Whiskey’s. Cost:
$10/biker, $10/passenger. Nonperishable donations at the door if
not riding. Benefits Gentle Shepherd
Pantry and God’s Glory Pantry. Live
music, food, prizes at end of event.
Register by Sept. 14 at Whiskey’s.
Registration for Barrick Camp Out –
Byron Forest Preserve District,
7993 N. River Road. Date: Sept. 15,
6 p.m. All ages. Meet at Jarrett
Center. Tents provided, or bring your
own. Cost: $25 if using our tent, or
$15 if using yours; at least one adult
per tent. S’mores and drinks provided. Register by Sept. 13. Info:
815-234-8535, ext. 200.
Registration for Critter Hunt – Byron
Forest Preserve District, 7993 N.
River Road. Date: Sept. 15. Meet at
10 a.m. at Jarrett Center. Free.
Register by Sept. 12. Info: 815-2348535, ext. 200.
Registration for CureSearch for
Children’s Cancer Walk – Rock Valley College, 3301 N. Mulford Road.
Date: Sept. 15. Fund-raiser starts at
8:30 a.m. Music, face-painting, activities for kids. Register/ Info:
www.curesearchwalk.org/rockford.
Registration for Trip to Boerner Botanical Gardens and Milwaukee Zoo
– Byron Forest Preserve District,
7993 N. River Road. Date: Sept. 15,
9 a.m.-6 p.m. Meet at Jarrett Center.
Cost: $50/person, includes admission and brunch. Register by Aug. 31.
Info: 815-234-8535, ext. 200.
Registration for Vintage Illinois Wine
Festival – Matthiessen State Park
(just south of Starved Rock State
Park on Rt. 178). Dates: Sept. 15-16.
No outside food or beverages; pets
must be on leash. Bring blankets and
lawn chairs for seating. Bring a photo
ID showing proof of age. Musical entertainment provided. Tickets: $20,
includes wine glass, wristband and
seven tasting tickets. General admission for those not drinking is $5.
Tickets/info: www.vintageillinois.com.
Registration for Critter Hunt – Byron
Forest Preserve District, 7993 N.
River Road. Date: Sept. 15, 10 a.m.
Meet at Jarrett Center. All ages.
Free. Register by Sept. 12. Info: 815234-8535, ext. 200.
Registration for Brownie badge: Bugs –
Byron Forest Preserve District, 7993
N. River Road. Date: Sept. 15, 1-4 p.m.
For all Brownies. Register by Sept. 12.
Info: 815-2w34-8535, ext. 200.
Registration for Barrick Camp Out –
Byron Forest Preserve District, 7993
N. River Road. Date: Sept. 15, 6 p.m.
Meet at Jarrett Center. All ages.Tents
provided or bring your own. Cost:
$25 if using our tent or $15 if using
yours. Must have at least one adult
per tent. S’mores and drinks provided. Register by Sept. 13. Info: 815234-8535, ext. 200.
Registration for Shelby Palooza –
Tebala Shrine Temple, 7910
Newburg Road, Rockford. Date:
Sept. 16, 1-8 p.m. Fund-raiser for
Shelby Martin, age 10, who has a
rare liver disease. Live music and
magician performance. Food, 50/
50/ raffle, cash bar, silent auction.
Tickets: $15 advance, $20 at the
door. Info: 815-961-2437.
Registration for Workshop: “Rewards
or Punishment–Understanding Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports” – Training for Parents of Students Receiving Special Education
Services, at Easter Seals Metro-politan
Chicago Rockford Region, 650 N. Main
St., Rockford. Date: Sept. 20, 6-9 p.m.
Includes dinner. 3 CDPUs available for
educators. Register by Sept. 13. Info:
866-436-7842, ext. 107. If accommodations are needed, call at least 2
weeks before training date.
Registration for Crusader Community
Health’s “Fall into Fitness” 5K Run/
Family Fun Walk – Fairgrounds Park
Pavilion, Rockford. Date: Sept. 22, 9-
11 a.m. $25 registration fee. Family
Fun Walk begins at 9:30 a.m. Info:
www.crusaderhealth.org.
Order Fish for Pond Stocking and Restocking – Rochelle Wildlife Conservation Club, Pete Reiff and Logan
Hollow Fish Farm will provide channel catfish, hybrid sunfish,redear
sunfish, grass-eating carp, bass,
bluegill, crappie, others. Date: Sept.
22. Deadline for ordering grass carp
is Sept. 10; for all other fish, Sept.
17. Info: 815-562-6268.
Registration for Alzheimer’s Association’s Rock River Walk to End
Alzheimer’s – YMCA Log Lodge, Rockford, Sept. 22, 9 a.m. and Hopkins
Park, DeKalb, Sept. 23. 3-mile walk.
Walk Booklet/Programming Guide
now available with info on Walk. Booklets at local outlets or at Rock River
Branch, 93 S. Hennepin Ave., Dixon,
online or call 800-272-3900. New
this year: For each $100 a person
raises, his/her name will be entered
once into a drawing for a new iPad3.
Start or join a team today at alz.org/
walk or call 815-484-1300.
Registration for 12th Annual DeKalb
County RAMP Wheel-A-Thon –
Downtown DeKalb and NIU campus.
Date: Sept. 22, starts at 10 a.m.
Lunch and awards to follow.All participants who raise a minimum of
$50 will receive a T-shirt. Those who
raise additional funds will be entered
into a drawing for incentives from
area businesses. Info: 815-7563202 or [email protected]
Registration for Pig & Pie in the Park
Backyard BBQ Cookoff & Apple
Baking Contest – Read Park, Freeport. Date: Sept. 22. Cash prizes of
$1,200 for 1st-3rd place in each
category. Meat check-in at 7 a.m.;
judging begins at 3 p.m. Teams are
asked to register by Sept. 1. Fundraiser for Sojourn House. Admission: $5; children 8 and younger,
free. Info: www.sojournhouse.com.
Reservations for Illinois Paranormal
Conference – Veterans Memorial
Hall, 211 N. Main St. Date: Sept.
22, noon-6:30 p.m. Speakers, investigation teams, other vendors.
Cost: $15 advance, $20 at the
door. Info: 815-871-4239 or email www.hauntedrockford.com.
Reservations for Paranormal Tour of
the Ethnic Heritage Museum –
1129 S. Main St., Rockford. Date:
Sept. 22, 7:30-9 p.m. Tour of 1850s
home displaying immigrant heritage.
Cost: $15 advance, $20 at event.
Info: www.hauntedrockford.com or
815-871-4239.
Registration for Golf Hall of Fame Play
Day & Induction Ceremony – Play Day
at Aldeen Golf Club, Ceremony Dinner
at Radisson Hotel & Conference Center. Date: Sept. 24. Cost of Play Day:
$100, includes dinner. Deadline to register: Sept. 14. Info: 815-987-8800.
Reservations for La Voz Latina’s 41st
The Rock River Times
Annual Banquet – Cliffbreaker’s Riverside Resort, 700 W. Riverside
Blvd. Date: Sept. 28, 5 p.m. social
hour, 6 p.m. dinner. Tickets: $60/
person or $600 for corporate table
of 8. Also accepting items for silent
auction. Info: 815-965-5784.
Reservations for Rockford Career
College’s 150th Anniversary Banquet – Giovanni’s Restaurant, 610
N. Bell School Road. Date: Sept. 29,
7-9 p.m. Cost: $25/person. Social
hour (cash bar), 6 p.m. Dinner (choice
of Chicken Marsala or Vegetarian
Lasagna, with hors d’oeuvres and
dessert), 7 p.m. Celebratory program, 8 p.m. Register by Sept. 14.
Info:
815-967-7321
or
[email protected]
Registration for Third Annual Stone
Bridge Trail Marathon & 5K Races
– Date: Saturday, Oct. 13, 2012, 7
a.m. Race registration closes at 200
runners. Registration for marathon,
$80 thru Oct. 5, $90 after. Registration for each 5K run is $25 thru
October, $30 after. Info/Register:
815-623-5858
or
www.ymcastonebridgemarathon.org.
Registration for “Master the SAT
Class” by College Prep Genius –
Talcott Library, 101 E. Main St.,
Rockton. Dates: Oct. 19 (4-9:30) and
20 (9-2:30). Tuition: $179, includes
DVD review. Early registration is $149
until Sept. 15. Space limited; reserve
early. Info: 815-624-0970.
Vendors Needed for Holiday Craft &
Gift Fair – Oregon United Methodist Church, Oregon, Ill. Date: Nov. 3,
9 a.m.-4 p.m. Cost: $20 per table
space; 6-foot and 8-foot tables available on limited basis for additional
donation. Info: 815-732-2994.
YWCA of Rockford accepting Nominations for Leader Luncheon XXXIII
Awards – Available at 4990 E. State
St., Rockford, or download forms at
www.ywca.org/rockford/leaderluncheon. Deadline: Jan. 11, 2013,
5 p.m. Info: 815-316-6126.
Get Healthy, Rockton! – Rockton Chamber of Commerce, 330 E. Main St.
Northern IL Fit Club and John Sole of
Sole Fitness invite Rockton to “Get
Healthy” during a Team Beach Body
workout every Thursday evening
from 7-8 p.m Cardio conditioning,
free samples of Shakeology, Results
and Recovery, Energy and Endurance offered. Info: 815-200-1116.
Reservations for Salvation Army Civic
Luncheon with Astronaut Buzz Aldrin – Cliffbreakers Riverside Resort, 700 W. Riverside Blvd. Date:
Sept. 18, 11:45 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Cost:
$35/person. Info: 815-972-1133.
Registration for Computer Classes at
Ken-Rock – Ken-Rock Community
Center, 3218 11th St. Various
classes offered Sept. 18-Dec. 20.
Info: 815-398-8864 or kenrock.org.
Nominations Sought for La Voz Latina
“Community Member of Distinction” – Deadline:
Sept. 7. Selected
individuals will be
honord at Sept.
28
banquet.
Nomination
forms/Info:
www.lavozlatinarkfd.org or call
815-965-5784.
Registration for
Diabetes Education Program –
University of Illinois Extension
Ogle County, 421
W. Pines Road,
Oregon. Dates:
Sept. 19, 26, Oct.
3, 10. 4-7 p.m.
Cost: $40; register by Sept. 12.
Class size is limited. Info: 815732-2191.
Wednesday, Aug.
29
Alzheimer’s Association Program: “The Basics of Memory
Loss” – Rock
River Branch Office,
93
S.
Hennepin, Dixon.
1:30-3 p.m. Cost:
$5 includes materials. Register
by Aug. 28. Info:
815-272-3900.
Alzheimer’s Association program
“Train
Your
Brain” – Rock River Branch Office, 93
S. Hennepin, Dixon. Dates: Aug. 29Oct. 3, 1:30-3 p.m. Cost: $30/person. Participants receive a brain stimulation activities manual and handouts
for each session. Register by Aug. 28.
Info: 815-272-3900.
Golf Lessons – Rockford Park District,
Aldeen Golf Club,1900 Reid Farm
Road. Aug. 29-Sept. 12. Seniors age
50 and older, ladies ages 18 and
older. Meet Wed. and Fri. mornings.
Info: www.rockfordparkdistrict.org or
by mail, fax (with credit card) at Park
District Customer Service locations
or at Carlson Ice Arena.
Kids with Cob – Angelic Organics
Learning Center, 1547 Rockton
Road, Caledonia. 1-4 p.m. Pre-register. Info: 815-389-8455 or
learngrowconnect.org.
Babes and Books – Rockford Public Library, Main Library Little Theatre, 215
N. Wyman St. 11:15 a.m.-noon. For
children under 2. Build baby’s literacy
and social skills. Info: 815-965-7606.
YouthBuild Rockford Graduation – Memorial Hall, 211 N. Main St. 6 p.m.
Program of Comprehensive Community Solutions, Inc. Open to the public.
Salute to Labor Fund-raiser – Deli
Italia, 507 E. State St. 5-9 p.m. Tickets: $10 advance or at the door.
Featuring Jim Hughes. Tickets/ Info:
815-440-0354.
DNR Hunter Education Course – Byron
Forest Preserve District, Jarrett Prairie Center, 7993 N. River Road. 6-9
p.m. Info: 815-234-8535, ext. 200.
“All Things Poultry: Breed, Raising, Nutrition, Disease and Marketing” – University of Illinois Extension Ogle County,
421 W. Pines Road, Oregon. 6-8 p.m.
Cost: $12/person or $20 for two
from same homestead; $5 for children
under age 18. Info: 815-732-2191.
Town Hall Meeting: “A Listening
Progress Report” – Freeport Public
Library. 6:30-9 p.m. All sitting county
board members and board candidates are invited to sit on the panel.
Sunset Storytime – Rockford Public
Library, East Branch, Children’s Area,
6685 E. State St. 6:30-7:15 p.m.
Info: 815-965-7606.
Stateline FastPitch Competition Phase
III – Gateway Technical College’s iMET
in Sturtevant, Wis. 5:30 p.m. Info:
http://eigerlab.org/events.html.
Hire Me! (4-week class) – Rockford
Public Library, Main Library, secondfloor computer room, 215 N.
Wyman St. 6-8 p.m. Get help with
your resume. Prerequisites: Proficient familiaruty with the mouse and
Internet. Info: 815-965-7606.
Comedy Night – Whiskey’s Roadhouse,
3207 Main St. 8 p.m. Free. Info:
815-877-8007.
Baseball: Rockford RiverHawks vs.
Road Warriors – RiverHawks Stadium, 4503 Interstate Blvd., Loves
Park. 7:05 p.m. $1 Beer Night.
Single-game tickets: $10 infield box,
$7 outfield box, $20 Diamond Deck
($15 kids 12 and younger); $2 parking. $2 off for active and retired
military; kids ages 3-12, age 2 and
younger, free. Info: 815-885-2255.
Thursday, Aug. 30
“Beyond Ash and Maple: Tree Selection and Care” – U of I Extension
Ogle County, 421 W. Pines Road,
Oregon. 7 p.m. Cost: $5. Open to
public. Info: 815-732-2191.
FCQ Brewhouse Cruise – Prairie Street
Brewhouse, 200 Prairie St. 6-8 p.m.
Boat leaves the dock every 30 minutes. Cost: $2/person; snacks on
board. Every Thurs. in August. Info:
815-987-8894 or 815-987-1685.
“Solarbration” (Installation of New Solar Panels) – Oregon High School
Library, 210 S. 10th St., Oregon, Ill.
3:30 p.m. Focuses on class activities tied to clean energy; teachers
will speak. All are welcome.
Foundations of Yoga – Womanspace
Library, 3333 Maria Linden Drive.
5:30-6:45 p.m. Cost: $60 members,
$72 non-members. Six-week class.
Info: 815-877-0118.
Sunset Storytime – Rockford Public
Library, Main Library Little Theatre,
215 N. Wyman St. 5-5:45 p.m. Ages
4-10. Info: 815-965-7606.
Swing Dancing – Mt. Olive Lutheran
Church, 2001 N. Alpine Road. 810:30 p.m. Every Thurs. Info:
www.forestcityswing.org.
Bilingual Thursdays Storytime (Spanish/English) – Rockford Public Library, Rock River Branch, 3128
11th St., 4-4:45 p.m. Ages 3-8. Info:
815-965-7606.
Stepping Forward” Cancer Support
Group – OSF Saint Anthony Center
for Cancer Care, 5666 E. State St.
6:30-8 p.m. Info: 815-227-2223.
SOUNS for Infants – Rockford Public
Library, East Branch, Children’s Area,
6685 E. State St. 6-6:45 p.m. Ages
younger than 2. Infant literacy-building program. Info: 815-965-7606.
Sunset Storytime – Rockford Public
Library, Main Library, Little Theatre,
215 N. Wyman St. 5-5:45 p.m. All
ages. Info: 815-965-7606.
A Ministry of Restoration Bible Study
– Montague Branch Library, 1238
S. Winnebago St. 5:30 p.m. Every
Thurs. Prayer every Tues. 6:30 p.m.
For prayer or info: 815-966-6322.
Overeaters Anonymous H.O.W. – Byron
Public Library, on Ill. Route 2. 6-7:30
p.m. every Thurs. Info: 815-547-5932.
Public Skating – Carlson Arctic Ice
Arena & Sapora Playworld, 4150 N.
Continued on page B8 !
Vibe
The Rock River Times
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7
Screw City Beer
Festival Sept. 8
Staff Report
The Second Annual Screw City Beer Festival (SCBF) will be from 1 to 6 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 8, at the intersection of State and
Main streets in downtown Rockford.
SCBF will host dozens of American craft
breweries and pour more than 130 different
beers to nearly 2,000 craft beer enthusiasts.
Tickets are $25 in advance or $30 at the
gate the day of the festival.
Advance tickets are available for purchase
at Artale Wine Co., 6876 Spring Creek Road;
Kryptonite Bar, 308 W. State St.; and The
Olympic Tavern, 2327 N. Main St. Tickets
purchased with a credit card will incur a $2
fee. Tickets can also be purchased online at
www.screwcitybeerfest.com through Aug. 30.
All tickets are non-refundable or exchangeable, and you must be 21 or older to order. ID
is required for entrance to the festival.
General admission includes the 1-6 p.m.
public session, branded tasting cup, event
program, 25 drink tickets and access to
hourly special releases.
Each SCBF ticket-holder must exchange
a drink ticket per 2-ounce sample. This is a
regulatory measure to keep in compliance
with current Illinois liquor laws for this type
of event.
This isn’t a Wisconsin event where the
samples can be unlimited. Illinois has different laws. Additional drink tickets are
available for 50 cents per ticket.
In addition to beer, everything from gourmet wood-fired pizzas to grilled bacon
skewers from locally-owned and operated
businesses will also be featured. All food
sales are cash only, meaning drink tickets
may not be exchanged for food.
The SCBF was founded in early 2011 by a
group of local business owners and craft
beer enthusiasts. A grassroots effort, SCBF
was met with a virtually sold-out crowd,
rave reviews and awarded the State of Illinois Governor’s Award for Best New Event/
Festival of 2011.
Playing inside Kryptonite during the festival will be Empty Pockets at 2 p.m., followed
by Vince Chiarelli Band from 4 to 5:30 p.m.
For more about the festival, visit
www.screwcitybeerfest.com.
Art in the Park ...
! Continued from page B5
plained: “We are very excited to be presenting our 50th event. We have many talented
artists and exceptional craftsmen from Wisconsin, and several other surrounding states.
It’s a great opportunity to experience fine
arts and crafts in a casual outdoor venue.”
In addition, blues and rock and roll music
will be provided by musician, singer and
songwriter Greg Boerner. A variety of food
and quick access to New Glarus’ charming
downtown round out the day.
Kaye Gmur, a director of the Wilhelm Tell
Festival, said: “Travelers hoping to take in
our celebratory 75th presentation of the
drama Wilhelm Tell featuring Swiss folk
dancing, music and live animals, may want
to spend the weekend with us. Families can
enjoy everything from camping, a children’s
lantern parade and a yodel contest.”
For more about Labor Day weekend events
in New Glarus, visit www.swisstown.com.
46 Love Story actress
47 Give the OK
Solution to
last week’s
crossword
puzzle
Crossword puzzle creator
Myles Mellor, of Lake View Terrace, Calif., has been creating
puzzles of various styles for
multiple publications for more
than eight years.
8
B
Vibe
Aug. 29-Sept. 4, 2012
80 performers on five stages ...
! Continued from page A1
Lawn performers can also be viewed with a
general admission festival pass or wristband.
Three-day festival passes are $15, two-day
passes are $12 and one-day festival wristbands are $15 at the gate each day, while
children 8 and younger are admitted free
when accompanied by a paid adult. Unlimited ride wristbands are $17. Food and beverage tickets are 50 cents each at ticket booths.
OTW is one of Illinois’ largest music festivals, drawing more than 100,000 people
each day and encompassing 25 city blocks in
the center of the city, with more than 80
performers on five stages, 30 special events
and 40 food vendors.
The festival is supported by the efforts of
more than 4,000 volunteers and has generated
more than $10.1 million for more than 300 notfor-profit organizations in 28 years with an
economic impact of $13.2 million annually.
In the last four years, the total economic
impact of the OTW has been more than
$50 million.
Attractions, special events and other details include the following:
! Carnival rides — Carnival kickoff is
from 5 to 10 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 30, and
includes rides all night with a $17 wristband. Midway Madness is from 11:30 a.m.
to 2 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 1-2.
All rides and inflatable activities are three
tickets for $1.50 per ride.
! Adventure Alley — Includes the
Bungee Pull and the Giant Slide.
! Hole-In-One — Tee up at the OTW
Hole-in-One Shoot-Out. Prizes will be
awarded for winners older and younger
than 18, as well as to anyone whose ball
lands on the green. Tee up at the Oasis
Stage and aim for the green on a pontoon
floating in the Rock River. Open to all amateur golfers, all festival hours until dark.
! ComEd Kids’ Castle — Children
younger than 12 can take part in more than
30 interactive and make-and-take activities. Play bingo with the other kids, learn to
mini putt and create a masterpiece with
stamp art. Also included are stories read by
the Rockford Public Library team and entertainment on the Kids’ Court Stage with
performances during Kids’ Castle hours.
The Kids’ Castle is in the Wyman and Elm
Street parking deck and is open Saturday
and Sunday from festival open until 6 p.m.
! Kids’ 1/4-Mile Fun Run — 9 a.m.,
Saturday, Sept. 1. Immediately following
the Waterfront 5K at the Trolley Station
near the Riverview Ice House. Free registration from 8:15 to 8:50 a.m. the day of the
race at the Trolley Station.
! Rockford Chariots Wheelchair Basketball — Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 3-4.
Established in 1986, the Rockford Chariots
Wheelchair Athletic Association works to
provide programs for developing the athletic
potential of individuals with lower-limb impairments. These gifted athletes compete
against local celebrities and city officials in a
long-standing and friendly rivalry that goes
back many years. Exhibition games are Saturday and Sunday on Chestnut Street.
! FIRST Robotics at Play — Noon-4
! Continued from page B6
Perryville Road. Tues., Thurs. & Fridays during school year, 11 a.m.-1
p.m. Info: 815-969-4069.
Baseball: Rockford RiverHawks vs.
Road Warriors – RiverHawks Stadium, 4503 Interstate Blvd., Loves
Park. 7:05 p.m.$1 Beer Night. Singlegame tickets: $10 infield box, $7
outfield box, $20 Diamond Deck
($15 kids 12 and younger); $2 parking. $2 off for active and retired
military; kids ages 3-12, age 2 and
younger, free. Info: 815-885-2255.
Friday, Aug. 31
On the Waterfront Festival – Downtown Rockford. Features more than
80 performers on five stages, special
events, food, carnival rides and
children’s activities (see related article starting on page A1 for details). 5
p.m.-midnight. $12 for 2 days or $15
for 3 days; $15 1-day wristbands at
gate; free for ages 8 and younger w/
paid adult. Info: onthewaterfront.com
or 815-964-4388.
Lost Nation Golf Club Event Benefit –
Easter Seals Autism Therapeutic
School, Rockford and Rockvale
Children’s Home,Rockford at 6931S.
Lost Nation Road, Dixon. 10 a.m.
shotgun start. Cost: $75 includes
dinner; hole sponsorships available
at $100 each. Info: 815-652-4212.
NFL Flag Football – Carlson Ice Arena,
Perryville and Riverside, Loves Park.
p.m., Saturday, Sept. 1. See FIRST Robotics
high school teams play Rebound Rumble.
Teams from northern Illinois and southern
Wisconsin will be playing a form of basketball with robots they built. Winnovation,
Winnebago High School’s team, Rockford
Robotics and Charger Robotics from Sussex, Wis., host this event.
! Hot Air Balloon Fly-over — Approximately 6 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 1. This
event is visible from anywhere in the festival. See several brightly-colored hot air balloons soar overhead.
!Urban Street Market — Shop the weekend away at this unique collection of outdoor
vendors. The Urban Street Market is filled
with colorful booths overflowing with art, jewelry, clothing, carvings and other rare finds
from exotic locales from all over the world.
! Bright Stars Celebration — The
11th Annual Bright Stars Celebration takes
place on the Left Bank Stage at 12:30 p.m.,
Saturday, Sept. 1. The Bright Stars Celebration honors eighth-grade students in
the Rockford area who have achieved honor
roll status during each quarter of the 20112012 academic year.
! WOWballs — Jump into a WOWball
and defy the laws of nature by walking on
water. This combination of fun and exercise
is at Wyman and Elm streets and is open all
festival hours.
! Body Bumperz — Next to WOWballs,
Body Bumperz allows you to run, walk,
jump, flip, bounce and roll into other Body
Bumperz and much more. Your legs are not
inside the bumper, meaning you are free to
move and do what your legs want to. Just
put the bumper over your head, and arms
through the shoulder straps.
! Children’s Face Painting — The
Children’s Face Painters will be returning
to paint hearts, flowers, rainbows and much,
much, more.
! River Bonfires — View five roaring
bonfires floating on 55-gallon drums that
will be blazing in the middle of the Rock
River each night.
! Waterfront 5K — Race along the
Rock River for the 19th Annual Waterfront
5K. Registration is 6:30 a.m., Saturday,
Sept. 1, with the race beginning at 8 a.m.,
followed by the Kids’ 1/4-Mile Fun Run.
Register at www.onthewaterfront.com.
! Lullaby Lounge — This area is for
parents and their little ones who just need a
few moments of quiet time. Breast-feeding
stations, changing tables and a play area
await the smallest of festival-goers. Their
older siblings will enjoy toys, games and
videos. This family-friendly location offers
air-conditioned quiet with diapers, water
and juice available for a modest fee.
! OTW Water Taxi — Spend Labor Day
weekend on the Rock with the Forest City
Queen riverboat. The Rockford Park District
offers the area’s first Water Taxi & Tours as
a way to travel up and down the Rock River
over Labor Day weekend. The Forest City
Queen Water Taxi & Tours kicks off Friday,
Aug. 31, with water taxi shuttles leaving
Martin Park boat dock and dropping you off
at Beattie Park boat dock, 401 N. Main,
6-7 p.m. For players ages 5-8 and 911. Registration fee for new players
is $85 ($90 non-resident); for returning players from 2012 summer
season, $50 ($55 non-resident). Info:
www.rockfordparkdistrict.org (click
Register Now), by fax (with credit
card), by mail and at both Park District Customer Service locations.
Rockford City Market – Water Street
in downtown Rockford. 3-8 p.m. every Friday before Labor Day; 3-7
p.m. every Friday after Labor Day
through Oct. 12. Free. Features
more than 50 vendors including local growers and vendors who sell
natural products, vegetables, fruit,
eggs, meat, cheeses, flowers, herbs,
baked goods, wine and healthy
snacks, as well as artisans and beer
garden with live music. This week:
Live music by One Less Tenor,
Zumba demonstrations and activities by Severson Dells.
Grab ‘N Go Lunch Cruise – Trolley
Station, Riverview Park, 324 N. Madison St. Every Friday Lunch Cruise on
the Forest City Queen. 11:15 a.m.
12:15 and 1 p.m. Prices: Adults $8
($8.50 non-resident); ages 5-17,
$7.50 ($8 non-resident); ages 4 and
younger, $5. No reservations
needed; walk-ups welcome. Specialty
cruises or private rentals also available. Info: 815-987-8800.
Drop-In Storytime – Rockford Public
Library, Main Library Little Theatre,
215 N. Wyman St. 10:30-11 a.m.
Info: 815-965-7606.
Group Hope Depression Bipolar Meetings – St. Edward Church, 3004
11th St. 6:15-7:45 p.m. Every Friday. Info: 815-398-9628.
Wellness for the Mind, Body & Spirit
Lecture Series: Natural Health –
Siena on Brendenwood, 4444
Brendenwood Road. 1:30 p.m. Ryan
Hulsebus, D.C. Info: 815-399-6167.
Public Skating – Carlson Arctic Ice
Arena & Sapora Playworld, 4150 N.
Perryville Road. Tues., Thurs. & Fridays during school year, 11 a.m.-1
p.m. Extra Friday session, 8-10 p.m.
Info: 815-969-4069.
DNR Hunter Education Course – Byron
Forest Preserve District, Jarrett Prairie Center, 7993 N. River Road. 6-10
p.m. Info: 815-234-8535, ext. 200.
Comedy Night – Franchesco’s, 7128
Spring Creek Road. 8 p.m. Info: 815229-0800.
Saturday, Sept. 1
On the Waterfront Festival – Downtown Rockford. Features more than
80 performers on five stages, special events, food, carnival rides and
children’s activities (see related article starting on page A1 for details). 11:30 a.m.-midnight. $12 for
2 days or $15 for 3 days; $15 1day wristbands at gate; free for
ages 8 and younger w/paid adult.
Info: onthewaterfront.com or
The Rock River Times
Rockford, just steps away from OTW.
! Rockford College Radio Presents
Rockford Originals — Stop by the Rockford College Radio booth to enjoy the sounds
of talented Rockford-area musicians. Near
the corner of West State and Wyman streets,
Rockford College Radio will also broadcast
live during various times of the weekend.
Performances by a lineup of “Rockford Originals” will occur throughout the festival,
including 5-8 p.m., Friday; noon-7 p.m.,
Saturday; and noon-7 p.m., Sunday.
! Army National Guard — Test your
strength on the Army National Guard’s fun
course, at the corner of State and Wyman
streets in the bank plaza.
! OSF Helicopter — Don’t miss out on the
OSF Saint Anthony Medical Center Helicopter landing on the State Street bridge. Look for
this new addition Saturday afternoon.
! Texas On Tour — Discover all that
Texas has to offer at Texas on Tour. This
interactive traveling road show makes the
Lone Star State come alive. Explore the
Texas coastline on a virtual beach, watch a
film and play Texas trivia inside the dome
theater, and splash your way across the
state in a virtual kayaking adventure.
! “The Other Brew” Podcast — “The
Other Brew” is a weekly audio podcast hosted
by four former Northern Illinois University
students: Doug Meenan (White Doug), Doug
Rindfleisch (Black Doug), Tim M. (Cool-NamePending) and Tim S. (Israel). The show blends
sarcastic humor with Internet news stories of
the weird, served to you in a full-bodied pitcher
of chaotic fun. The hosts review a new beer at
the opening of each show, which they drink
throughout the podcast. The show is released
Monday mornings, and the recording schedule and contact information can be found at
www.theotherbrew.com. Watch them record
their live podcast Saturday down by the State
Street Bridge Bar.
! Food — More than 30 food vendors will
offer various food selections.
! Rockford Mass Transit District
(RMTD) Park-and-Ride Shuttle — Ride
to the festival in comfort and ease on the
RMTD OTW Shuttle. Park at Target on
East State Street or Cliffbreakers at 700 W.
Riverside Blvd., and ride to the festival
entrance in air-conditioned comfort on the
WREX-TV bus or the Pearson Plumbing
bus. Shuttle buses will run at approximately
30-minute intervals, on the hour and on the
half hour, during festival hours. Shuttle
rides are $1 round-trip.
! Parking — Public parking is available
on the west side of the Rock River at the lot
on the corner of Green and Church streets,
at the ramp on Church Street between Elm
and Chestnut streets, and at the ramp on
North Main Street between West Jefferson
and Park streets. On the east side of the
Rock River, parking is available at South
Second and Walnut streets. Handicapped
parking is available in the ramp on Church
Street between Elm and Chestnut streets
and in the lot on First Street between East
State and Walnut streets.
Following is the lineup of musical performers by day and stage:
Thursday, Aug. 30
Schnucks Great Lawn Stage
6:15 p.m. — Finding Clyde
815-964-4388.
Becca’s Closet Opens – Headquarters
is Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd, 1829 N. Rockton Ave. Collecting formalwear for homecoming season thru Oct. 20. See organization
listing for places and times to drop off
clothing. Info: 815-962-4279.
Rockford Area Spanish Conversation
Meetup – Katie’s Cup, 502 Seventh
St. 10 a.m.-noon. Every Saturday.
Info: [email protected]
Yoga Nidra – Womanspace, 3333
Maria Linden Drive. 9-10 a.m. Age
14 and up, females and males. Fee:
$13, members $12. Learn deep
relaxation. Info: 815-877-0118.
Get Your Goat – Angelic Organics
Learning Center, 1547 Rockton
Road, Caledonia.1-4 p.m. Pre-register. Info: 815-389-8455 or
www.learngrowconnect.org.
Family Skate – Carlson Arctic Ice Arena
& Sapora Playworld, 4150 N.
Perryville Road, Loves Park. 8 p.m.
Info: 815-969-4069.
Adult Grief Support Group – Beloit
Regional Hospice Office, 655 Third
St., Suite 200, Beloit, Wis. 6-7:30
p.m. Info: 608-363-7421.
Public Skating – Riverview Ice
House, 324 N. Madison St. Info:
815-963-7465.
Public Skating – Carlson Arctic Ice Arena
& Sapora Playworld, 4150 N. Perryville
Road. Info: 815-969-4069.
50-Lap Figure 8 Race at Rockford
7:30 p.m. — Dead Sara
9 p.m. — The Offspring
Friday, Aug. 31
Schnucks Great Lawn Stage
7:30 p.m. — TBA
9 p.m. — Billy Currington
Oasis Stage
5:30 p.m. — Kelly Steward and the Restless
Kind
7:45 p.m. — Miles Nielsen & the Rusted
Hearts
10 p.m. — The BoDeans
Left Bank Stage
5:30 p.m. — The Rockin’ Johnny Band
7:45 p.m. — Moonlight Jazz Orchestra
10 p.m. — Hamilton Loomis
Center Stage
5:30 p.m. — Quinteto Latino
7:45 p.m. — Natty Nation
10 p.m. — The Elders
Saturday, Sept. 1
Schnucks Great Lawn Stage
7:30 p.m. — TBA
9 p.m. — Creedence Clearwater Revisited
Oasis Stage
Noon — Keith Country Day Rock Camp
1:30 p.m. — Rockford Area Music Industry
Youth Jam winners
4:15 p.m. — Guzzardo’s Emerging Artist
winners showcase
7:45 p.m. — The Handcuffs
10 p.m. — The Dunwells
Left Bank Stage
12:30 p.m. — Bright Stars Celebration with
Hope Despite
3:15 p.m. — After 5 Jazz Project
5:30 p.m. — Guy King Little Big Band
7:45 p.m. — The Kinsey Report
10 p.m. — Cherry Poppin’ Daddies
Center Stage
Noon — Mariachi Ameca
2:45 p.m. — TBA
5 p.m. — Back Country Roads
7:15 p.m. — Smokin’ Gunz
9:30 p.m. — Casey James
Children’s Stage
Noon-2 p.m. — Those Funny Little People
3 and 5 p.m. — Heidi Swedberg and the
Sukey Jump Band
Sunday, Sept. 2
Schnucks Great Lawn Stage
6:15 p.m. — The Last Vegas
9:15 p.m. — Theory of a Deadman
Oasis Stage
Noon — Can’t Touch This
2:15 p.m. — The Missing Links
4:30 p.m. — Mr. Big Stuff
6:45 p.m. — 25 or 6 to 4
9 p.m. — Leon Russell
Left Bank Stage
11:30 a.m. — RVC Jazz Ensemble with
Mark Colby
1:45 p.m. — Five to Go
4 p.m. — John Allred Quartet
6:15 p.m. — Bryan Lee and the Blues Power
Band
8:30 p.m. — Dirty Dozen Brass Band
Center Stage
Noon — Two of Us
2:15 p.m. — Fresh Hot Fritters
4:30 p.m. — Zackery Lane
6:45 p.m. — Slamabama
9 p.m. — Phil Vassar
Children’s Stage
3 and 5 p.m. — Jim Gill
2 and 4 p.m. — Ballet Folklorico
Speedway – 9572 Forest Hills Road,
Loves Park.Final Dollar Beer Night.
Daredevils of the speedway will crisscross 100 times through the “X”
trying to grab the $500 payday. All
four NASCAR divisions will also be in
action for Late Models, Sportsmen,
American Short Trackers, and
RoadRunners. A fan/driver water
balloon toss is also planned. Spectator gates open at 5 p.m., qualifying
begins at 5:55 with the first race at
7:07 p.m.Tickets: adults, $12; students (ages 12-17) $8; kids (ages 611) $5 with children age 5 and
younger, free. Info: 815-633-1500
or www.rockfordspeedway.com.
Sunday, Sept. 2
On the Waterfront Festival – Downtown Rockford. Features more than
80 performers on five stages, special events, food, carnival rides and
children’s activities (see related article starting on page A1 for details).
11:30 a.m.-11 p.m. $12 for 2 days
or $15 for 3 days; $15 1-day wristbands at gate; free for ages 8 and
younger w/paid adult. Info: 815-9644388 or onthewaterfront.com.
Monday, Sept. 3
Labor Day Parade – Begins at Seventh
Street and Sixth Avenue, concludes
at Wyman and Cedar streets, south
of Davis Park. 10 a.m.
Rally for Improving Births: “National
Rally for Change” – Swedish
American Hospital, 1401 E. State
St. 10 a.m.-noon. To raise community awareness; not a protest. Info:
ImprovingBirth.org.
Free Pool – Whiskey’s Roadhouse,
3207 N. Main St. 9 p.m. Info: 815877-8007.
Tuesday, Sept. 4
Learn to Skate Lessons – Rockford
Park District. Register online at
www.rockfordparkdistrict.org (click
Register Now), by mail, fax, or at
Customer Service locations in downtown Rockford or Carlson Ice Arena,
Riverside and Perryville, Loves Park.
Info: 815-987-8800.
GPS Faith Community Center Reopens – GPS Faith Community,
10714 N. Second St., Machesney
Park. Every Tues. from 10 a.m.-2
p.m. Lunch available for $5. No preregistration needed; all are welcome.
Info: 779-221-8491.
Northwest Illinois Audubon Society –
Oakdale Nature Preserve, 3 miles
south of Freeport off Baileyville Road.
6 p.m. potluck, 7:15 program. Topic:
“Invasive Plant Species.” Free. Info:
815-821-1886.
Northern Illinois Pagan Alliance Meeting – Cleo’s Aroma-Pothecary, 1416
N. Main St. 7 p.m. Free.
Pub Trivia – Hope and Anchor, 5040
N. Second St., Loves Park. 8 p.m.
Info: 815-633-2552.
The Rock River Times
Commentary
The new poll tax in the United States
Guest Column
is charged by this company for using their
service, and all major credit cards are accepted (Arkansas Department of Health,
2012). The “Express Service” fee and the
By Sterling E. Blackmon, Ph.D.
“Under the proposed law, concealed hand- original “search fee” are non-refundable, if
gun licenses would be acceptable forms of the record is not found. This was the first poll
photo ID, but student IDs would not,” Eric tax, in my opinion. UPS shipping is also
Holder said. “Many of those without IDs available for an additional shipping fee.
I received a letter from the Arkansas Departwould have to travel great distances to get
them, and some would struggle to pay for the ment of Health while trying to obtain the birth
documents they might need to obtain them. certificate. The letter was notification that the
information provided did not yield a person
We call those poll taxes.”
I wanted to know how much validity could with that name in the county I was inquiring
be attributed to the claims that requiring a about, nor did they find anyone with that name
person to have ID to vote is related to their with different spellings, locations and several
ability to vote in the post-Obama election era years before and after the year of birth.
The two options since they were not able to
and was tantamount to a poll tax.
As a researcher, I know that experimentation locate the birth certificate were: request the
is the only true measure to prove or disprove any certificate again using different names, a difhypothesis. In my research, I used a member of ferent mother’s maiden name, a different
my family who voted in Illinois for President county (I used Ouachita), and/or birth dates.
Barack Obama in 2008. She already had a voter The new search required another non-refundID card, state ID from Arkansas and is elderly; able search fee — in my opinion, another poll
tax. The second option was to start the process
she was born July 4, 1935.
My first experiment was to go to the to file (create) a Delayed Birth Certificate.
Secretary of State office in Rockford to see This process required several documents with
what would be needed to get her an Illinois some having to be more than 10 years old.
I requested another birth certificate online
State Identification Card. This was a result
of her trying to open a checking account. using the same information but substituted
Nevada County this
The bank manager
time, yielding the
said Illinois requires
a person to have an Twelve weeks later, I still had not same results. It was
Illinois driver’s li- heard anything. I then began to call at this time I purcense or ID to open a and leave messages to the ADH. It sued the next phase
of my research, the
checking account.
The requirements was not until I left a message and Delayed Birth Cerfor a first-time Illi- threatened to go to their superiors tificate process.
The Delayed Birth
nois driver’s license/ that I received a call back.
Certificate process in
ID card are docuArkansas requires
ments that satisfy
one each of Group A, B and C and two the following: a minimum of three docudocuments that satisfy Group D (Illinois ments, several of which must be at least 10
year old: 1. Full Social Security Numident
Secretary of State, 2012).
For Group A, we had the current state ID from printout.; 2. Hospital birth record; 3. Census
Arkansas with the signature. Group B and C record (federal or local); 4. Church record; 5.
was a Social Security award letter. Group D was School entrance record; 6. Insurance policy;
7. Immunization record; 8. Employment
an insurance policy and a utility bill.
The clerk would not accept the Social record; 9. Military service record (DD 214);
Security letter for both Groups B and C, and 10. Voter’s registration record; 11. Your child’s
said we would need the birth certificate to birth certificate showing you as the parent,
your age and birthplace.; and/or 12. Your
obtain an Illinois ID card.
This concluded my first experiment. The marriage certificate.
Since she was born in 1935, in the South, and
birth certificate requirement to obtain a
photo identification card was one that most, improvised, the birth was the result of a midif not all, people who are in states that have wife; no records existed other than an entry in
passed or are attempting to pass voter ID an old Bible. So, the first task was to obtain
documents that were 10 years old or later.
laws was congruent.
The Numident Printout was the most
My next experiment was to go to the
Arkansas Department of Health (ADH), critical part, since it showed the birth place,
which is charged with maintaining Arkan- parent’s name and history of the subject.
I sent for this using the form provided in the
sas Vital Records birth records dating from
Feb. 1, 1914, through the present. There are instructions from ADH and waited the rea limited number of birth records available quired six to eight weeks from the Social Secuprior to 1914. Those records were filed with rity Administration (SSA) FOIA area. Twelve
Arkansas Vital Records after 1914. They weeks later, I was still waiting. I called the
also have original copies of some Little Rock number for the SSA FOIA several times, and
and Fort Smith births dating from 1881 left messages and did not receive a call back. It
wasn’t until I threatened to contact their supe(Arkansas Department of Health, 2012).
The Arkansas Department of Health has riors that I received the Numident Printout
an online capability to order vital records, so from the SSA FOIA. This, in my opinion, was
I pursued that avenue first. Arkansas Vital another poll tax, since I had to send the form
Records does not accept credit cards or online UPS to ensure I had a tracking number. I never
orders; however, for convenience, you can received a call as to why it took so long, just the
process online requests through an indepen- copy of the Numident Printout.
I used her daughter’s birth certificate, the
dent company that they have partnered with
Continued on page A6 !
to provide you this service. An additional fee
Apartment-style
living
• Income-based for those
62 and over or disabled
• Full-sized one- and
two-bedroom apartments
• Assisted living available
• Dining services
• Transportation to
doctors appointments
• On-site service
coordinator
• Jam-packed month of
scheduled activities
Luther Center
111 West State Street
Rockford, IL 61101
(815) 965-0055
(847) 390-1460 TTY
Aug. 29-Sept. 4, 2012
A
5
An Open Letter to
Mayor Morrissey
Guest Column
it. He cared about ALL of Rockford.
I worry about my grandchildren that still
live there. I don’t worry so much about my
other grandchildren that live in Machesney
By Linda LaSalla
Unless I am missing it, the City of Rockford Park. I wonder why that might be? Maybe
doesn’t have an official Facebook page ... if I you should go visit the Loves Park mayor
am wrong, please share the following open and see what Darryl would do.
I think instead of talking to your cronies
letter with Mayor Lawrence J. Morrissey.
that seem to be out in the field rubbing elbows
Mayor,
I lived in Rockford for 45 years. I left 10 with the people (remember them?, they put
years ago. Most of my family still lives there. you in office), that you go out yourself, let the
folks see you, have town hall meetings, and for
Every time I go back, I want to cry.
Under your administration, the northwest God’s sake, listen to these people.
You were an OK atand far west side has gone
torney, I remember.
from being a safe, wonUnder your administration, You aren’t a good mayor
derful place to live and
raise a family, to people
the northwest and far west nor a good leader.
that are terrified to walk
side has gone from being a Shame on you.
I don’t want to hear
out of their door. I could go
safe, wonderful place to live rhetoric
about why you
on and on, but hopefully,
and raise a family, to people built this fantastic Rockyou are aware of the decay of most of Rockford.
that are terrified to walk out ford Walk to bring
people to our town ...
From what I am hearof their door.
are you really serious?
ing from many friends,
Now you do know that
viasocialnetworking,you
seem to be so out of touch with most of your Rockford isn’t just East State and Alpine,
residents, it is scary. You don’t seem to be right? Do you honestly want the outside
unfamiliar at all with the east side. I saw the world to see ALL of Rockford? I will send you
Rockford Walk … $7.5 million that could have pictures if you have forgotten what the west
been put to much better use. I recommend social side looks like now. Do you even have a
networking and being more transparent to your homeless shelter in Rockford? Maybe you
residents. You should pay attention to the folks should open one right by the Rockford Walk.
I wouldn’t get any more comfortable in
you, sir, are putting in danger. There was never
the gang problem that you have now, when I that big seat of yours if I were you ... I doubt
lived there. Rockford folks didn’t want Chicago’s if you will be voted in again.
Thank you for your time. No need for a
leftovers. There are a great deal of wealthy
people in Rockford that work in and near Chi- response because there is NOTHING you
cago. I was a Realtor for almost 10 years in the could say to make it better … action, Mr.
’80s. We had a great mayor, wonderful alder- Mayor, not talk. Talk is cheap. Romney is
man... We had Dave Johnson... and Ken Staaf. I like you, he doesn’t have a clue.
Have a good day.
know that Dave is turning over in his grave. He
Linda LaSalla is a resident of Corona, Calif.
was a wealthy man, but you would never know
6
A
The Rock River Times
Aug. 29-Sept. 4, 2012
Money, lies and voter suppression Editorial cartoon by Charles Story
Guest Column
“consent from the governed” for their reverse
Robin Hood scheme that substitutes for “promoting the general Welfare,” without money,
lies and voter suppression.
By Nancy Churchill
George W. Bush said it outright: “If this
Local resident, former stockcar racer
What a drag democracy is for the 1 percent were a dictatorship, it would be a heck of a lot
and their Republican accomplices. Their guy easier, just so long as I’m the dictator.”
So, to realize GW’s dream, Democrats are
Mitt Romney couldn’t campaign his way out of
a wet paper bag without zillions of dollars to being outspent 8, 10, 20 to 1. Their daily e-mails
perpetuate his lies, and his running mate Paul plead with me to stop the Koch brothers and
Ryan’s. Congress couldn’t produce one jobs bill, Karl Rove’s SuperPACs with at least another
yet his budget plan calls for closing down the $3. Seriously, $3. To stop totalitarianism.
People who feel insignificant are natupeople’s Medicare and turning it into a voucher
rally drawn to the underdog, something
program to pay for tax cuts for the wealthy.
They talk about reducing big government. I I learned racing short dirt stock car tracks
for 25 years, the first
take that as code for
womaninaformerly
removing government
for the people. You They talk about reducing big all-male sport.
From early on,
know, government de- government. I take that as code for
signed to “promote the removing government for the people. my opponents
couldn’t help but
general Welfare,” that
derives its “just pow- You know, government designed to telegraph their iners from the consent “promote the general Welfare,” that tention to use my
of the governed.”
derives its “just powers from the car to break their
slide in the turn, a
They do not mean to
maneuver that
reduce government consent of the governed.”
would send me into
that exempts giant
corporations from environmental protection the marbles, out of play. But even with earlaws, nor government that doles out huge plugs, I could hear they weren’t lifting, so I’d
subsidies to Big Oil while it’s enjoying mon- lightly tap my brakes to corner early to surster profits, nor government that refuses to prise them; and instead of banking off me,
hold Wall Street and Big Banks accountable they’d miss and end up hopelessly mired in
for gambling away customer securities, nor the marbles themselves, while I ducked inside
the government that bailed these banks out to proceed merrily on my way.
What’s the political equivalent? For oppobut left their customers high and dry when
nents trying to take Democratic underdogs
the whole thing came crashing down.
No, that government is just the right size out with money and lies, of tapping your
brakes lightly to corner early to surprise
to fit in their pockets.
For good measure, Republican legislators them, so that instead of banking off you,
across the land hasten to pass voter suppression they miss entirely and end up hopelessly
... er, “voter ID” laws ... to reduce the number of mired in their own marbles? Will public
voters who might be inclined to vote Democratic opinion favoring the underdog be enough to
this year. Because, let’s face it, they’d never get stop an advancing autocratic state?
The new poll tax in the United States
! Continued from page A5
subject’s voter registration card, the subject’s
10 years old insurance policy and the subject’s
Numident Printout and sent them via UPS to
the ADH with the application for the Delayed
Birth Certificate and waited another six to
eight weeks, as required. That took care of the
required documents. Twelve weeks later, I
still had not heard anything. I then began to
call and leave messages to the ADH. It was not
until I left a message and threatened to go to
their superiors that I received a call back.
First, from a supervisor in the area, then some
clerk, and finally a very pleasant woman who
left me a very pleasant message and said they
were working on it.
I waited another four weeks, and still nothing. Then, I called and threatened them again,
and got a call back the next day. This time, the
woman said they could not locate the documents I sent. Since I had sent them UPS, I had
the tracking information, and told her, “Let us
work this backwards.” I would give her the
name of the person who signed for them, and
she could look on her end. It took her five
minutes to find them after I had given her the
person’s name. The next day, on a weekend, by
the way, a supervisor from the ADH called and
left me a voicemail and said she was printing
and sending the Delayed Birth Certificate out
that day. I got it Monday by noon via FedEx.
Now that I had the birth certificate and all
the other required documents, I went to the
Illinois drivers’ license office I had originally
begun this story with and, ironically, to the
same clerk who had turned me around several
months prior. We presented the same documents as before, but this time with the birth
certificate, and she processed the request and
gave my subject her new Illinois State ID. We
then went to the bank and opened her checking account. Some would say if we hadn’t had
to open the checking account, we may never
have had to get the picture ID.
My opinion is this: in states where the
new voter ID laws are in effect, it will be very
difficult for the elderly and, for that fact,
anyone, to obtain the picture ID. These are
people who have served their country, voted
for decades and paid taxes as well.
For this country to allow this “scorched
earth” policy because of partisan rhetoric is
reprehensible. People have fought and died
for the right to vote in this country, and we
pride ourselves on our willingness to play fair
and by the rules, but the bureaucratic machine that is in place to discourage people from
obtaining the picture ID is so inefficient that I
fear millions of people will be disenfranchised
in the process. And honestly, does that not
appear to be the end game?
Rockford resident Sterling E. Blackmon
earned a Ph.D. at Capella University, has an
MBA in finance from LeTourneau University
and a bachelor’s degree from Wiley College. He
is employed as an IT professional with Health
Care Service Corporation and is an adjunct
instructor with Olivet Nazarene University.
First Amendment
Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free
exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably
to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.
Q
uestion of
the Week
Vote at
www.rockrivertimes.com
Do you support Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn’s veto of a gambling expansion bill
that would have brought a casino to Rockford?
LAST WEEK — 44 RESPONDENTS:
Do you support the efforts of Sensata Technologies employees in Freeport
who are fighting against the outsourcing of their jobs to China?
Yes 75% [33 votes]
No 25% [11 votes]
!
!
!
Cartoon was right to reject ‘gun control’
Thank you for printing the Charles Story
cartoon in the Aug. 8-14 issue that depicts an
armed man atop a pile of bodies being confronted by an unarmed female. It drives home
the point that mass shootings typically occur at
“gun-free” zones and at businesses that post a
little sign that states “No Firearms Allowed.” As
we know, criminals ignore laws and those signs.
In fact, such locations are magnets for murderous cowards where law-abiding citizens are
deprived of the means of self-defense.
It is also a reminder that Illinois is now the
lone holdout of the 50 states that have no
provision allowing law-abiding citizens to carry
a loaded firearm in public. Mr. Story is correct to
reject “gun control” in favor of criminal control,
since private citizens successfully defend themselves with firearms millions of times each year.
Keep up the advocacy, Mr. Story, and
eventually we will create a safer society
when citizens have the means to protect
themselves — and others — in public.
William J. Lee
Rockton
!
!
!
Look at me
Watching what our politicians and leaders
say and do is little in comparison to the repairs of
the damage that others have done in the past.
We keep doing new things, and we should be
workingtowardthemistakesofthepast.Smaller
government puts more jobs out in the public.
States are so far in the hole financially.
We should be looking for ways to change
that problem and bring that part of the
wasteful spending to a stop.
We should make all accountable for wasteful
spending across the country, just as you hold
people for other crimes. There should be someone
to watch those who are giving out the money.
That should be watched way better than it is.
White-collar crime with no prison time?
The threat of prison time may make some
who steal like that think.
Kieth Nielsen
Rockford
!
!
!
Where has the good music gone?
I’m 60, and I grew up in Rockford listening
to the greatest rock & roll, rock, and blues
music ever recorded and performed, so I am
pretty opinionated when it comes to music. I
have been to every On the Waterfront Festival since the beginning and have listened to a
lot of great music there. For the last few years,
the music there has really gone downhill for
me. Some of the great shows I saw there were
Robert Cray, Tab Benoit and Webb Wilder. I
am not going to pay admission for the privilege of the outrageous food prices, people
watching (go to the City Market for that), or
any of the music groups listed there this year.
I hope younger people enjoy the music, but it’s
too bad they won’t have the opportunity to
hear any of the truly great music groups
anymore because O.T.W. won’t book them.
Doug Campbell
Rockford
Letter to Illinois Health Facilities
and Services Review Board
Guest Column
By Patricia Pearce
RN, Referral Department, H. Douglas Singer
Mental Health Center
The following letter was sent to the
Illinois Health Facilities and Services Review Board in Springfield, Ill., Aug. 9, in
regard to the decision about Singer remaining open for service for people with
mental illness.
I am respectfully requesting the Board
keep Singer open for the following reasons:
Every day at work, I receive referrals from
21 counties in Illinois for admission to Singer
after referring caseworkers have searched
five services themselves and turned to the
hospital search service ABS (Advanced Behavioral Services) that searches throughout
Illinois. We have a waiting list for admission
since there are no community services available as testified by the caseworkers.
The caseworkers serve nine network agencies. Singer has always required proof that
Singer is the service of last resort. There has
been miscommunication to the governor
about the number of counties served by Singer
after no community service is available.
The cost of people with mental illness housed
in emergency departments and jails is far more
than serving them appropriately at Singer.
Please review the following data regarding Singer’s area of service when allowed:
1. North Central Behavioral Services
... LaSalle, Bureau, Marshall, Stark,
Putnam counties
2. Robert Young Center ... Rock Island,
Mercer counties
3. Human Services ... Peoria County
4. Bridgeway Center ... Knox, Henderson,
Warren, Henry counties
5. Sinnissippi Center ... Whiteside, Lee,
Ogle, Carroll
6. Family Counseling Center ...
Stephenson, Jo Daviess counties
7. Ben Gordon Center ... DeKalb County
8. Rosecrance Ware Center ... Winnebago,
Boone counties
Thank you for your time on this important
decision and the people in need in the above
areas. The governor needs accurate information. Families and children are represented
by the citizens living in these areas who can
return to productive lives with help.
Community service is not available, or
people would not be living in jails and emergency departments.
7
Presidential election: Obama leads in ... Rock River Sweep from Janesville to ...
News/Renewable Energy
The Rock River Times
! Continued from page A1
edging Obama 47-46 percent.
According to OpenSecrets.org, the Center
for Responsive Politics, as of Aug. 28, Obama’s
campaign has raised $348.4 million in comparison to Romney’s $193.3 million and spent
nearly $263 million in comparison to
Romney’s $163 million.
Obama’s campaign is carrying a debt
of $2.8 million, while Romney’s campaign is debt-free.
Obama’s campaign has $87.7 million in
cash on hand,
in comparison
to Romney’s
$30.2 million.
Breaking
down the donations, 39.6 percent of Obama’s
individual contributions have
come from small
donations, while
80.7 percent of Obama’s top five
Romney’s indi- contributors are as
vidual contri- follow: 1. University of
butions have California, $491,868; 2.
come from large Microsoft Corp.,
donations.
$443,748; 3. Google Inc.,
Obama has re- $357,382; 4. DLA Piper,
ceived $348 mil- $331,715; and 5. Harvard
lion in individual University, $317,516.
contributions
with nearly $138 million in small individual
contributions and $214 million in large individual contributions.
Romney has received $192.4 million in
individual contributions with $37 million in
small individual contributions and $156.6
million in large individual contributions.
Obama’s campaign has received zero dollars from political action committees (PACs),
while Romney’s campaign has received
$838,481 from PACs. Romney has also selffinanced $52,500 of his campaign in comparison to $5,000 in self-financing for Obama.
Neither candidate has accepted federal funds.
Obama’s top five contributors are as follow: 1. University of California, $491,868; 2.
Microsoft Corp., $443,748; 3. Google Inc.,
$357,382; 4. DLA Piper, $331,715; and 5.
Harvard University, $317,516.
Romney’s top five contributors are as follow: 1. Goldman Sachs, $676,080; 2. JPMorgan
Chase & Co., $520,299; 3. Morgan Stanley,
$513,647; 4. Bank of America, $510,728; and
5. Credit Suisse Group, $427,560.
By state, Obama has received $30.5 million
from California, nearly $19 million from New
York, nearly $10 million from Illinois (his home
state),$9millionfromMassachusetts(Romney’s
home state) and $8 million from Florida.
Romney has received $17.6 million from
California, $13.5 million from New York, $13.5
million from Texas, $13 million from Florida
and $5.6 million from Massachusetts.
Obama’s top five sectors include the following: 1. Other, $43.3 million; 2. Lawyers &
Lobbyists, $15.7 million; 3. Finance, Insurance & Real Estate, $12.1 million; 4. Miscellaneous Business, $12.1 million; and 5. Communications/Electronics, $10.9 million.
Romney’s top five sectors include the following: 1. Other, $29.2 million; 2. Finance,
Insurance & Real Estate, $28.6 million; 3.
Miscellaneous Business, $12.2 million; 4.
Lawyers & Lobbyists, $7.7 million; and 5.
Health, $6.4 million.
The Energy & Natural Resources sector
has donated $4.2 million to Romney’s campaign and $1.3 million to Obama’s campaign.
OpenSecrets.org ranked Obama’s quality
of disclosure at 85.6 percent and Romney’s
quality of disclosure at 76.9 percent.
Kinzinger supports Romney’s energy plan
U.S. Rep. Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., issued
a statement Aug. 23 in support of Romney’s
plan for energy independence.
A member of the U.S. House Energy &
Commerce Committee, Kinzinger said the
following in his statement regarding
Romney’s energy plan:
“Few challenges are so vital to the future of
our nation as the need to dramatically reduce
the current and growing reliance of the United
States on imported petroleum — oil
oftentimes imported from regions of the world
hostile to the interests of the United States.
Gov. Romney understands that only through
a comprehensive energy policy, as the one he
proposed today, will the United States see
increased energy independency, stable energy prices and the creation of much-needed
high-paying jobs here at home. Additionally,
several economic reports have noted that over
1 million jobs could be created through the
benefits from affordable energy and demand
for products that use gas.
“After nearly four years, President Obama’s
commitment to energy independence never
moved beyond his campaign speeches. From
stonewalling the permitting process to blocking the Keystone Pipeline, his opportunity to
lead on this issue has passed. American
businesses and consumers have suffered the
consequences of his inaction long enough.
“Gov. Romney is a forward-thinking leader
who will tackle our pressing issues. He is
exactly what we need right now to begin
America’s economic comeback.”
Following is Romney’s energy plan, as
presented on his campaign website,
mittromney.com:
As president, Mitt Romney will make every
effort to safeguard the environment, but he
will be mindful
at every step of
also protecting
the jobs of American workers.
This will require
putting conservative principles
into action.
Significant
Regulatory
Reform
The first step
will be a rational and streamlined approach
to regulation,
which would facilitate rapid
progress in the
development of
our domestic reserves of oil and natural gas and allow for
further investment in nuclear power.
! Establish fixed timetables for all resource development approvals
! Create one-stop shop to streamline
permitting process for approval of common activities
! Implement fast-track procedures for
companies with established safety records to
conduct pre-approved activities in pre-approved areas
! Ensure that environmental laws properly account for cost in regulatory process
! Amend Clean Air Act to exclude carbon
dioxide from its purview
! Expand NRC capabilities for approval
of additional nuclear reactor designs
! Streamline NRC processes to ensure
that licensing decisions for reactors on or
adjacent to approved sites, using approved
designs, are complete within two years
Romney’s top five
contributors are as follow:
1. Goldman Sachs,
$676,080; 2. JPMorgan
Chase & Co., $520,299; 3.
Morgan Stanley, $513,647;
4. Bank of America,
$510,728; and 5. Credit
Suisse Group, $427,560.
Increasing Production
The United States is blessed with a cornucopia of carbon-based energy resources. Developing them has been a pathway to prosperity for the nation in the past and offers
similar promise for the future.
! Conduct comprehensive survey of
America’s energy reserves
! Open America’s energy reserves for
development
! Expand opportunities for U.S. resource
developers to forge partnerships with neighboring countries
! Support construction of pipelines to
bring Canadian oil to the United States
! Prevent overregulation of shale gas
development and extraction
Research and Development
Government has a role to play in innovation in the energy industry. History shows
that the United States has moved forward in
astonishing ways thanks to national investment in basic research and advanced technology. However, we should not be in the
business of steering investment toward particular politically favored approaches. That
is a recipe for both time and money wasted on
projects that do not bring us dividends. The
failure of windmills and solar plants to become economically viable or make a significant contribution to our energy supply is a
prime example.
! Concentrate alternative energy funding
on basic research
! Utilize long-term, apolitical funding
mechanisms like ARPA-E for basic research
Following is information about Obama’s
energy plan, as presented on his campaign
website, www.barackobama.com:
President Obama has made protecting
the environment a priority, moving us toward energy independence, investing in clean
energy jobs, and taking steps to improve the
quality of our air and water. As of November
2010, the Obama administration’s policies
have helped create hundreds of thousands of
jobs in the clean energy industry.
President Obama enacted the largest expansion of land and water conservation and
protected wilderness in a generation. He also
created the America’s Great Outdoors initiative to develop a community-led conservation
and recreation agenda for the 21st century.
President Obama is committed to putting
in place an “all-of-the-above strategy” to
develop every available source of American
energy while making sure we never have to
choose between protecting our environment
and strengthening our economy.
! Continued from page A1
is open weekdays between 7 a.m. and 4 p.m.
From Rockton to Fordham Dam
The Rock River Sweep is the second annual
cleanup of the whole 285-mile length of the
river.GoogleRockford’sSportscoreIorRockton’s
Settlers’ Park for directions.
WTVO 17/WQRF-FOX 39, Rock River
Homeowners Association, Rock River Enterprises, Rockton Friends of the Rock, The
Rock River Trail Initiative and The Rock
River Times are co-sponsoring the cleanup
of the northern section of Winnebago County
from above the Rockford Fordham Dam to
above Rockton on the
Rock River.
For registration for
the Rockford, Loves
Park and Machesney
Park section, we will
meet at 9:30 a.m. at
Sportscore I Park in
Rockford and in
Rockton. Door prizes will
be awarded and cleanup
assignments made. We
plan to be off the river no
later than 3 p.m. For the Rockton section, we
will meet at the gazebo at Settlers’ Park at
Blackhawk Boulevard and Hawick.
Put in either at Rockford Marina, Martin
Park, Sportcore I for the Rockford, Loves
Park and Machesney Park section. For the
Rockton section, put in at Macktown Forest
Preserve, Jensen Forest Preserve, the
Rockton boat launch on Hononegah Road
across from Hononegah High School,
Rockton Hononegah Forest Preserve or Settlers’ Park.
We will clean the stretch from Fordham
Aug. 29-Sept. 4, 2012
A
Dam up to the Roscoe Shallows and leave trash
at Sportscore I. For the Rockton section, trash
may be left at Settlers’ Park. More announcements may be made for trash drop-off ports.
Questions? For the Rockford, Loves Park
and Machesney Park section, call Rock River
Enterprises and Rock River Homeowner
Association’s Steve Lucas at (815) 243-8742
or e-mail him at [email protected] AND for
the Rockton section, call Loren Floto at (815)
624-7622 or e-mail him at [email protected]
From Fordham Dam to Hinchcliff FP
The Rock River Sweep is the second annual cleanup of the
whole 285-mile length
of the river.
Prairie State Canoeists, The Illinois Paddling Council, Paddle
and Trail, The Rock
River Trail Initiative
and The Rock River
Times are co-sponsoring the cleanup of the
South Rockford Reach
of the Rock River.
Meet at 9:30 a.m. at
Blackhawk Park in
Rockford for registration. Door prizes will be
awarded and cleanup assignments made.
We plan to be off the river no later than 3 p.m.
Put in either at Blackhawk Park or at
South Park behind La Famiglia.
REACH We will clean the stretch from
Fordham Dam down to the south end of
Blackhawk Island and leave trash and takeout at Hinchcliff, at the former Ace of Diamonds property on the southwest end of
Blackhawk Island and at La Famiglia.
Questions? Call Tom Lindblade at
(630) 207-9500.
Can green jobs solve unemployment?
! Continued from page A1
from sales of Energy Star appliances and more
fuel-efficient cars and trucks as their presence in
the marketplace is driven by federal mandates.
Only 2 percent of the firms surveyed reported
using renewable electricity, heat or fuel.
Efficiency and renewable energy have been
experiencing rapid growth over the past decade, but the industry remains dependent on
high energy prices and government mandates.
In the book Lights in the Tunnel, Martin
Ford postulates that accelerated growth in
technology will continue to have a highly disruptive impact on global and local economies.
While politicians seeking public office often
campaign on the promise of being able to
generate more jobs than their opponents, they
fail to address the issue of declining mass
employment opportunities as technological
advances and outsourcing eliminate an everincreasing number of jobs.
In a market economy, people need jobs to
earn sufficient income to meet their needs
for food, shelter, clothing and other factors.
We were reminded of technology’s advance
when we witnessed cement being poured for
a house foundation. Instead of several workers pulling the end of a chute to distribute
the cement, one worker used electronic controls to move it to the desired locations.
Another example is the use of bar codes
on items sold in stores that feed the information into a computer, which indicates
which items need to be ordered. In a large
box store, it is technically possible to use
automated skids to move pallets of goods
onto the shelves, eliminating jobs.
According to a recent posting in Robotic
Nation, robots were used to eliminate labor
unrest in a
knitwear factory
in Hong Kong.
New machines
were introduced
that cut the labor force from 80
to six, while
eliminating
worker complaints about
low wages.
Drones are being used for military purposes
and in civilian
applications. For
surveillance purposes, they can
be equipped with
facial recognition
cameras, infrared cameras or
tasers. If so used,
what protections
exist for ordinary
citizens?
Ford believes
the rapid pace of
technological advancement will
dramatically reduce job opportunities for both
laborers and professionals.
If technological advances occur at a rate
that leaves a growing number of workers
without jobs, an opportunity exists to reorganize the economy along more equitable
and environmentally sustainable lines.
Drs. Robert and Sonia Vogl are founders
and officers of the Illinois Renewable Energy Association (IREA) and coordinate the
annual Renewable Energy and Sustainable
Lifestyle Fair. E-mail [email protected]
8
A
Aug. 29-Sept. 4, 2012
News
The Rock River Times
Founders Market — Reshaping
the South Main Corridor
Staff Report
If you haven’t been to Founders Market
this summer, you might want to check it
out. This emerging market is on the verge of
breaking new ground in building a vibrant,
community-based enterprise.
Described as a neue concept, open-air
community market, for food growers, artisans and cultural-creatives — Founders
Market operates
with Old World
themes in mind,
and a mission to
cultivate and support sustainable
living practices.
Thefolkswhohelp
run Founders Market will gladly take
you on a tour of three
on-site organic vegetable gardens that
are the product of
“Eco-Advocates”—a
workingpartnership
with Angelic Organics Learning Center and YouthBuild Rockford.
The very impressive EcoAdvocates program goes full-circle in combining urban
agriculture training with GED preparation
and support services.
Eco-Advocate students are enthusiastic
about their involvement in the hands-on
planning, design and implementation of the
gardens, as well as the daily care, harvest
and marketing of their products.
This year’s harvest includes 5 varieties of
heirloom tomatoes, greens of all kinds, peppers, string beans, carrots, just to name a few.
The tomatoes are the best you’ll ever taste.
Another highlight of Founders Market is its
location. On-site is SALVAGE TOO, Rockford’s
Re-Use Center, where you can explore three
expansive floors of reclaimed and recycled
goods. For artisans and craftsmen, this is
considered the place to find just about anything for a home
construction or arts
project. New items
arrive daily. While
you’re there, ask
about the SALVAGE
TOO
FOSSA Re-Use
Contest (Functional
Objects, Structural
and Sculptural Art).
Part of a national
competition started
in San Francisco,
the FOSSA Contest
includes all building
Photo by Frank Schier
projects as well as
stand-alone creations created predominantly
from reclaimed materials — entries will be
accepted through September.
Founders Market is open to the public from
9 a.m. to noon on the first and third Saturdays
of the month, through Sept. 15. It’s super easy
to find, just south of downtown at 907 S. Main
St., with plenty of on-site parking.
Founders Market is definitely something
to experience. Don’t delay, there are only
two market days left this season.
Paddle and Trail celebrates second
anniversary with community events
Staff Report
Paddle and Trail is celebrating its second anniversary by hosting a free open
house at the Regional Activity Center in
Loves Park 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturday,
Sept. 1. The public will have the opportunity to try out kayaks and stand-up
paddleboards and fish for free.
Sunday, Sept. 2, they continue the celebration with “Celebrate Rockford Day,”
starting with a Breakfast Paddle to the
Burpee at 8:30 a.m., and visiting the Rick’s
Picks exhibit at the Burpee. The festivities
continue later in the afternoon at the
Milliennium Center, 220 S. Madison St.,
Rockford at 3 p.m. with a free reception
featuring guest speaker Frank Schier speaking about the “Rock River Trail Initiative.”
The winner of the “Gear Up. Head Out.
Photo Contest” will also be announced. After the reception, guests are invited to head
over to enjoy the On the Waterfront music
festival. To join any of Paddle and Trail’s
Second Anniversary celebration events register at www.paddleandtrail.com or call
(815) 636-9066.