Document 51212

Contents
An introduction to the agricultural portfolio Page 3
An introduction to Farmers Guardian Page 4
An introduction to Farmers Guardian continued Page 5
Farmers Guardian features 2013 Page 6
Farmers Guardian special projects Page 7
Farmers Guardian mechanical information Page 8
Farmers Guardian rate card Page 9
An introduction to Dairy Farmer Page 10
An introduction to Dairy Farmer continued Page 11
Dairy Farmer features 2013 Page 12
Dairy Farmer mechanical information Page 13
Dairy Farmer rate card Page 14
Farmers Guardian online Page 15
Online advertising positions Page 16
Other online opportunities Page 17
Other online opportunities continued Page 18
Online technical specifications Page 19
Contact information Page 20
**DF Mar Cover_Layout 1 22/02/2013 08:39 Page 1
FARMERS GUARDIAN
FRIDAY FEBRUARY 22 2013 £2.40
AGRICULTURE’S NATIONAL NEWSPAPER
MARCH 2013
DAIRY SPECIAL
Including UK Dairy
Expo preview p27-43
TIME FOR ACTION CELEB CHEF ON HORSE MEAT FALL-OUT p48
By Howard Walsh
ARLA Foods has launched what
it believes is the first milk supply
contract fully compliant with all
aspects of the dairy industry voluntary code of practice.
The announcement prompted other firms, namely Muller
Wiseman and Dairy Crest, to restate their support of the code.
It was also welcomed by farming unions (more on page 11).
Arla pledged it would address
the various points of the code
when its comprehensive ‘milk
sourcing model’ was announced
last September.
The new Arla direct contract
at a current standard litre price
of 30.02ppl is ‘a part of that
overall milk sourcing model’. It
incorporates liquid and compositional variations, a volume
bonus for larger producers, seasonality options and a 12-month
notice period with the threemonth price or contract change
trigger as specified in the code.
It will be available to producers
not already supplying Arla from
March 1, but the company’s notice
to producers remains 12 months.
The new contracts are seen
as an important part of its drive
to secure an additional 500
million litres of milk in the UK.
It means Arla is now able to
recruit via two contracts – the
SIMMENTAL STUNNER 45,000gns at Stirling
13
British beef
goes upmarket
16
Seed sourcing
rules update
MACHINERY
19
New Holmer
beet harvester
LIVESTOCK
21
Schmallenberg
cases on rise
SALES
Use Biotal expertise for crop and
condition specific additives
axphast gold® works quickly on wet grass silage
to preserve nutrients, ensuring good intake and
maximum performance.
axcool gold® has a unique action which prevents
dry silage heating up and moulding, resulting in
better intake and productivity.
SPECIAL FEATURE
h Concent
ra
Hig
axphast
BIOTAL
gold
o lu
Focus on forage
and grassland
Pages 26-37
m e a p p li c a ti o
RENEWABLES
Potential on-farm
energy investments
Pages 38-42
50
32,000gns tops
Limousin sale
IN YOUR FIELD
60
NEW
FARMER
NEW PRODUCTS
Latest releases to the
dairy marketplace
PHIL LATHAM,
CHESHIRE
Anne MacPherson, Croy, Inverness, with Bel Dhu Capercaillie, which sold for the breed record price
of 45,000gns. For full report and pictures from the second round of bull sales, see pages 52-53.
SPRING EQUESTRIAN – INSIDE CLASSIFIED
WWW.FARMERSGUARDIAN.COM
2
BUSINESS
ARABLE
Premium price
Ash Amirahmadi, Arla’s head of
milk and member services, said:
“We believe this contract offers
dairy farmers in England, Scotland and Wales who aren’t
already supplying Arla, a longterm premium milk price.
“Since its launch in September,
there has been plenty of debate
around the code and Arla is fulfilling its commitments by introducing what we believe is the first
fully-compliant supply contract.
“We are also working to ensure all our farmer contracts are
fully compliant with the code.”
The move led Muller Wiseman
to reiterate its position on the voluntary code, claiming all its 1,094
producers were covered by the
code now, and in future.
The processor was also keen to
point out supplying farmers could
resign outwith price or schedule
changes on three months notice,
provided they did not leave during
the autumn trough. Other milk
buyers, it claimed, were maintaining a 12-month notice period outwith price and schedule changes.
Dairy Crest, which moved to a
three-month notice period last
July, said it had been working to
ensure it was compliant with all
aspects of the code.
3
They’ll tell
you when
you’ve got
it right
Producing enough quality grass silage can be
difficult, but using Biotal forage inoculants is one
decision that can make it easier.
v
they are following suit
new Arla direct contract and an
Arla Foods Milk Partnership
(AFMP) contract. The company
said farmers who aspired to be
members of Arla Foods amba
should choose AFMP’s shared
ownership model. The new Arla
direct contract was available for
those who wanted to supply Arla
but preferred direct supply.
NEWS
Neonics ban
slammed
farmers
guardian
.com
Pages 32-37
Volume 60 Issue 3
Lo w
rOther firms say
104 PAGES OF
NEWS AND
CLASSIFIEDS
Machinery
Forage kit for
season ahead
FARMER
n
tio
Dairy industry moves to
implement code of practice
rArla contract ‘fully
code compliant’
DAIRY
n
Farmers
Guardian
WWW.FARMERSGUARDIAN.COM
“To make our
business more
resilient we have
diversified and look
to create additional
revenue from the
space on-farm”
Pages 48-49
delivering forage and nutrition technologies
Biotal Ltd tel: (029) 2054 7050 www.biotal.co.uk
OPEN DAY
part of
Details: Page 5
Tip of the month: Reduce digital dermatitis through sire selection – p18
For more information email: [email protected]
An introduction to the agricultural portfolio
Farmers
Guardian
WWW.FARMERSG
UARDIAN.COM
ARTICULATED COMB
Grain handling US-sty INE
with Tribine prototy le
pe
p30
FRIDAY FEBRUAR
Y 15 2013 £2.40
AGRICULTURE’S
NATIONAL NEWSPAP
SPRING SPRAYIN
G ADVICE ON GRO
WING
Our portfolio brings together two of the
leading brands in the agricultural sector,
Farmers Guardian and Dairy Farmer, as well as
farmersguardian.com and offers a cost effective
way of communicating with key decision-makers
and purchasers in this market.
More
opportunities to
showcase your
brands, products
and services
Farmers Guardian
tackles all issues facing
agriculture on a weekly
basis through its indepth news reporting
and technical coverage,
boosted with its
programme of special
features and initiatives.
Dairy Farmer, with its in-depth coverage of all aspects
of milk production, provides essential monthly reading
for all British dairy farmers.
11:12 Page 1
ut 1 25/01/2013
**DF Feb Cover_Layo
DAIRY
Good Evans
a
Gearing up for
tractor cull?
Pages 54-55
FARMER
2
Volume 60 Issue
Februar y 2013
RE
ON FARM FEATU
Building up a top
yielding dairy herd
Pages 10-12
L
MAIZE SPECIA
Growing advice and
varieties focus
Pages 28-42
last drop
Squeeze out every
loading and
yeast reduces acid
rumen specific live
es forage intake
bility, which improv
increases fibre digesti
from forage.
ensuring more milk
you can make
money
extra
L how much
Why not ask BIOTA
feed efficiency?
through improved
delivering forage
and nutrition technol
2054 7050
Biotal Ltd tel: (029)
ogies
www.biotal.co.uk
BREEDING
e
Campaign to promot
benefits of A2 milk
Pages 18-20
WIN A MUSTO!
part of
See insert inside
crop – p38
s of growing good maize
Tip of the month: Secret
In addition, farmersguardian.com
delivers an array of promotional
platforms from banners and
skyscrapers to sponsored videos
and webinars. After a major
redesign and with rapidly
growing traffic, it offers even
more opportunities to showcase
your brands, products and
services. And with low-cost
entry points, the web offers
those with tighter budgets
an effective way to reach the
farming community.
As a group, we continue to forge close connections
with the industry and central to this is our
involvement with major industry events. In 2011
we were the official media partner for Lamma. With
each of these media partnerships comes a range of
promotional opportunities, providing you with many
exciting new ways to reach your market.
Our portfolio of print and
online will help you reach
both existing and potential
customers who are making
key buying decisions every
day. Farmers Guardian, Dairy
Farmer and farmersguardian.
com will drive and deliver the
response you need.
ER
DECISIONS p19-27
Farm chiefs call for
tougher
red meat chain regu
lation
rFarmers ‘let down’
by horse meat scandal
rCalls for industry
crisis summit
By Olivia Midgley
taken our product and
devalued it.”
Mr Mallon said
spent time, effort producers
and money
making sure they
adhered to
farm assurance, but
time for processors it was now
and
to ‘pay and play their retailers
part’.
Farming Minister
David
Heath, who held
talks with the
supermarkets, food
distributors
and devolved administrati
ons
this week, indicated
retailers
could do more.
3
BUSINESS
14
First Milk
investment
INDUSTRY chiefs
are calling for
a tighter grip on processors
and
retailers after the
horse meat fiasco laid bare the
‘gaping hole’
in regulation between
the farm Alliance
gate and the supermarket
This week, UK meat shelf. Cumbrian farmer John
Geldard,
plants speaking
were implicated in
independently
the
after the Food Standardsscandal, in his capacity as Nationaland not
Sheep
Agency Association
(FSA) raided units
chairman, called for
in
a
shire and Aberystwyth.West York- new alliance of farming
tions to specifically organisaThe FSA suspended
support the
all
operaGovernment on food
tions at the plants
chain
as
investigations after part of its and ‘make sure they listen issues
to
officers views of
discovered kebabs
core food producers’. the
and
Mr Geldard said:
purporting to be beef burgers
“The horse
were in fact meat
horse.
scandal and lack
consultation in findingof farming
Farm leaders,
solutions
convene in London who will and future-proofing
secure food
summit next week, for a crisis supplies shows existing
said a lack of nication
commuregulation after
between farmers
the
was to blame for the farm gate Government is inadequate.” and
furore.
But a former
National Beef Association
di- entist said the Government scirector Chris Mallon
FSA testing regime
action was needed said urgent had been ‘lacking’
in recent
to address months,
the ‘murkiness’ surrounding
blaming staff cutbacks.
the
Dr Mark Woolfe said
processing industry.
it was no
surprise the horse
Mr Mallon said: “We
meat debacle
make sure the integrityneed to ensued after the
European
of our Commission
product which is
there when it desinewed last year banned
leaves the farm, is still
meat with
it gets to the retailer. there when couple of days’ notice’. only ‘a
At the moHe said the decision
ment this is not happening.
panies sourcing mince saw com“There was a
for value
culture of products
farmers being glad
turn to cheaper altermarkets would sell the super- natives from abroad.
their
produce but now it should
be the
other way around.
MORE ON THIS
STORY
They have
See page
2
92 PAGES OF
NEWS AND
CLASSIFIEDS
NEWS
Gangmaster
farmers update
ARABLE
Beet weed
control trials
MACHINERY
New Agrifac
harvesters
LIVESTOCK
17
28
33
Managing
Johne’s disease
SALES
46
Brecon calves
top £3,800
IN YOUR FIELD
56
STEVE HEARD,
LEICESTERSHIRE
Farmers should
ANATOMY OF A
CRISIS HORSE MEA
T LATEST
be confident of
standards once
WWW.FA RMERSG
stock leaves the
UARDIAN .COM
farm or market.
p2
“I am lucky enough
to have yet
another new
sprayer parked in
the workshop. This
latest sprayer is
the first of a kind”
Farmers Guardian –
an Award Winning Publication
Farmers Guardian received many journalism
awards in 2011, reinforcing its position as a leading
media brand providing high quality, business critical
information and a brand which champions the
farming industry.
Farmers Guardian won the Editorial Campaign of the
Year award at the Periodical Publishers Association
Awards for our “Backing Britain’s Professional
Farmers” campaign. This builds on our reputation as a
campaigning brand following our previous win in this
category in 2008.
Our business editor, Howard Walsh, received an
outstanding contribution award from the Guild of
Agricultural Journalists, while editor Emma Penny
won Editor of the Year at the coveted British Society
of Magazine Editors’ Awards where judges described
Farmers Guardian as ‘excellent’ for its complex
understanding and passion for its reader, ability to
speak to a broad audience while also recruiting new,
younger readers and its news agenda, which had a
life-improving benefit to the reader.
The BSME Awards also saw our multi-media
competition Tractor Factor, which championed farming
talent, highly commended in the Innovation/BrandBuilding Initiative of the Year category, which was
won by Cosmopolitan.
Our website was highly commended
in the Business Website of the Year
category at the Association of Online
Publishers’ Awards, while we were also
shortlisted for Digital Product of the
Year in the PPA Awards, and for CrossMedia Project of the Year at the
AOP Awards.
FARMERS GUARDIAN
farmers
guardian
.com
For more information email: [email protected]
3
An introduction to Farmers Guardian
Farmers Guardian – written for farmers, about farming
Farmers
Guardian
WWW.FARMERSGUA
RDIAN.COM
Whether it is the latest news on everything that
matters in the industry, or in-depth farm features,
farmers across Britain turn to Farmers Guardian
every Friday.
providing dedicated coverage
for the next generation of
farmers, whether they are
Young Farmers or studying.
FRIDAY FEBRUARY 1
2013 £2.40
AGRICULTURE’S NATIONAL
NEWSPAPER
AGROFORESTY
Pioneering approach to
farm diversity p40-41
WIN THE TRIP OF A LIFE
TIME ENTER NOW p42-4
3
84 PAGES OF
NEWS AND
CLASSIFIEDS
Our authoritative coverage means farmers who want
to know what’s going on read Farmers Guardian
and use our website farmersguardian.com. Our
award-winning journalists are the first to break news,
whether it is potential changes in legislation, on-farm
issues, disease outbreaks, or the latest business news
and price movements.
FARMERS GUARDIAN
farmers
guardian
.com
Farmers Guardian’s
technical coverage –
whether arable, livestock
or machinery – covers the
key issues our readers
need to know, week-in,
week-out. Our features
list reflects critical timings
in every farming sector,
allowing us to focus on
delivering highly topical
advice and information.
We cater for everyone
in the farming family,
Enterprise profile of
Farmers Guardian readers*
And if there’s anything
farmers want to buy or
sell, our market-leading
classified section covers
everything anyone in the
countryside could possibly
want to buy.
NEWS
6
High speed
rail anger
BUSINESS
16
Yorks potash
mining project
The proposed partial
ban on three pesticides
Neonicotinoid ban could
be ‘catastrophic’ for UK
in the neonicotinoid
family comes after a
report found they posed
a ‘high risk’ to honey
bees. PICTURE: Tim
Scrivener
rEU wants partial,
not total ban
Safety Agency (Efsa) report
found
Arable farmer and member
seeds treated with neonicotinoid
of look at other chemicals
the NFU combinable crops
insecticides posed a ‘high
board reduce our armoury.” which will cide Action Network (PAN),
risk’ to James Cox, said
any such measure
honey bees in crops producing
discounted the report.
Mr Cox said using
would ‘dramatically’ affect
fewer
nectar and pollen.
PAN
oilseed chemicals in
greater quantities said: policy adviser Nick Mole
honey bees
rape and cereals. And
The chemicals are mainly
“The industry’s defence
used spraying the crops he believes could then pose the issue of
is
to treat seeds prior to sowing
nonsense because it looked
at the early resistance.
in emergence stage
at
the battle against insects
ing neonicotinoids compared usBy Olivia Midgley
Syngenta spokesman
such as the burden on would increase
with
Luke
already stretched Gibbs
aphids, particularly on
oilseed farmers.
said the Efsa conclusions using nothing. Studies from Italy
rape,
have shown there has
maize and cereals. No
EU moves to ban certain
were ‘highly theoretical and
insecti- concerns were
failed in yield, production been no loss
cides due to their impact
highlighted for Implication
to take into account all
or profitabilion bee sugar beet.
s
relevant ty after they
populations could have
banned the use of
studies
as well as independent
Mr Cox said: “Currently,
a potenYesterday (Thursday),
neonicotinoids in maize.”
seed monitoring’.
tially ‘catastrophic’ impact
Euro- treatments
on
Campaigners including Friends
farming industry, accordingthe pean Commissioner for Health operation. are all done in one
Earlier this month, a report
to and Consumers Tonio
If we have to spray the
by of the Earth, welcomed
experts.
EU think-tank the Humboldt
Borg pre- crops after
the prodrilling, there will not
sented a discussion paper
posed ban, with the Soil
This week, the European
Forum
to mem- only be cost
AssociaCom- ber states at a
and timing implica- funded for Food and Agriculture, tion calling it the ‘beginning
mission proposed a partial
meeting of the tions
by Bayer CropScience and
of the
but
end for neonicotinoids’.
on three pesticides in the ban standing committee on pesticides. emissions also unnecessary Syngenta, said a ban
on neonicotineonireleased into the noid
Mr Borg said a partial ban
B&Q and Homebase
cotinoid family – imidacloprid,
seed treatments could reduce
necessary to protect honey was environment.
announced they would pull also
thiamethoxam and clothianidin.
yields by 20 per cent and
bees,
pesti“These insects are not going
cost the cides containing
but added a complete ban
to EU economy up to
It comes after a European
imidacloprid off
was ‘not go away so we
€4.5 billion their shelves,
Food justified’.
will still have to con- (£3.7bn)
while Wickes said it
a year.
trol them. We will have
would replace a product
to then
But critics, including the
containPesti- ing thiamethoxam.
rMove is to protect
CAP REFORM WELSH
RECOUPLING BOOST p10
Farmers Guardian is
committed to working
for a positive future for Britain’s farmers,
highlighted by our successful Backing Britain’s
Professional Farmers campaign in 2010.
WWW.FAR MERSGUA
RDIAN.CO M
ARABLE
20
Take action on
farm drainage
MACHINERY
24
Zetor Forterra
HSX on-farm
LIVESTOCK
35-37
Maize seed
special feature
SALES
44
11,000gns for
Blues at Carlisle
IN YOUR FIELD
52
WILLIAM AND
ANDREW COWX,
CUMBRIA
“On the cattle
front things are
quiet, we have
only sold a small
number of bull
calves but trade is
still good”
It’s a paper for farmers, about farming,
and that’s backed by the results of recent
research. Interviews of 1,082 farmers
showed that Farmers Guardian led when
it came to being the most informative,
most entertaining and most relevant read.
The annual spend of Farmers
Guardian readers on key inputs*
1,200
35,000
S pend in millions (£) by
Farmers Guardian readers
per annum
31,664
30,000
1,000
S pend in millions (£) by
Farmers Guardian readers not
reading any other national weekly
25,000
20,000
719
800
692
600
15,000
13,915
10,000
482
9,816
326
307
282
7,600
5,000
400
173
100
108
0
Sheep
Beef
Arable
Dairy
200
228
183
Machinery Feed
Fertiliser
Crop
Vet and
Protection Meds
62
Seed
0
*Independent readership research, November 2010 (Base 1082)
4
For more information email: [email protected]
An introduction to Farmers Guardian
Farmers Guardian advertising
A
dvertise on the page – various positions and sizes available
Be part of our successful classified market place
U
se Pointers for Profit to promote your brand within a specially designed editorial platform
S ave money on postage and deliver your sales material direct, using our insert programme
N
umerous sponsorship possibilities, from the weekly crossword and recipes, to our caption competition
Farmers Guardian
readers own 1.9m
head of beef*
Farmers Guardian
readers farm 0.7m
head of milking cows*
Farmers
Guardian
readers farm
1.1m hectares
cereals*
Farmers Guardian
readers farm 16.8m
head of sheep*
40,366 Total average net circulation per issue
01 Jan 2012 - 31 Dec 2012
*Independent readership research, November 2010 (Base 1082)
For more information email: [email protected]
5
Farmers Guardian features 2014
January
JULY
Feature title
Issue date
Apprenticeships, skills and training
03.01.14
Sheep and lambing
10.01.14
LAMMA preview
17.01.14
LAMMA report
24.01.14
Beef (pull-out supplement)
Feature title
Issue date
Grass and forage
04.07.14
Royal Welsh Show preview
11.07.14
Livestock Event 2014 report
11.07.14
24.01.14
Contractors
18.07.14
The Hot 50 (stand alone supplement)
24.01.14
Varieties focus (cereals and OSR)
25.07.14
Renewables
31.01.14
AUGUST
FEBRUARY
Sheep 1 (pull-out supplement)
01.08.14
07.02.14
Crop establishment special (including establishment,
machinery and agronomy)
08.08.14
Spring spraying (including T0 fungicides and OSR PGRs)
14.02.14
Autumn herbicides 1 (pre- and early post-emergence)
15.08.14
Sprayers and spreaders
14.02.14
Dairy
22.08.14
Spring equestrian
21.02.14
Beef
29.08.14
Dairy (including Dairy Expo preview)
28.02.14
Spring weed control
07.02.14
Maize seed
MARCH
SEPTEMBER
Sheep 2 (pull-out supplement)
05.09.14
Combines
05.09.14
14.03.14
Autumn herbicides 2 (post-emergence herbicides)
12.09.14
Farm buildings and planning
21.03.14
Dairy (including Dairy Show preview)
19.09.14
Cereal disease control 1 (including T1 fungicides)
21.03.14
OSR disease control
26.09.14
Grass and silage
28.03.14
Renewables
26.09.14
Sheep
07.03.14
Dairy
14.03.14
Materials handling
APRIL
Cereal disease control 2 (including T2 fungicides)
04.04.14
Beef
11.04.14
Trailers (general articles and technical piece)
OCTOBER
Breeding and calves
03.10.14
11.04.14
Tractors
10.10.14
Maize
18.04.14
Agri-Expo preview
17.10.14
Renewables
25.04.14
Animal Health
24.10.14
Vermin control
31.10.14
MAY
Sheep
02.05.14
Grassland and muck preview
09.05.14
Beef Expo preview
09.05.14
Property and farm management
16.05.14
Dairy
Cereals preview
NOVEMBER
Grain storage and handling
07.11.14
Tyres and tracks
14.11.14
23.05.14
AgriScot preview
14.11.14
30.05.14
Beef
21.11.14
Renewables
28.11.14
JUNE
Royal Highland Show preview
06.06.14
OSR varieties and establishment (agronomy update for OSR,
plus latest establishment kit and technology)
06.06.14
Breeding and calves
13.06.14
Cereals report
20.06.14
Livestock Event 2014 preview
20.06.14
NSA Sheep Event preview
Great Yorkshire Show preview
DECEMBER
Dairy
05.12.14
HGCA Recommended List Report (Cereals and OSR
Recommended Lists)
05.12.14
Spring cropping
12.12.14
27.06.14
Farm buildings and maintenance
19.12.14
27.06.14
Muck and slurry handling equipment
27.12.14
For more information email: [email protected]
Special projects
FG26/46
In 2011 Farmers Guardian launched a special
initiative, FG26/46, for next generation farmers in
the post-YFC age group. This focuses on developing
business acumen and leadership in the industry,
and it centres around regional discussion groups,
specialist visits to relevant businesses and an online
resource area on farmersguardian.com featuring case
studies, information about new opportunities and
links to key business
information.
There is a unique
opportunity to be
associated with this
ground-breaking
TWENTYSIX
initiative which
appeals to our
most progressive
next generation
farmers. Benefits
of being a partner
include branding on
collateral and data
FORTYSIX
sharing.
FG
26
46
Pointers for Profit
‘Pointers for Profit’ provides sponsors with a unique
opportunity to be interviewed on a specific topic
which is focused on improving farm profitability
though better business management or technical
advancement. The whole process, from initial
interview to page design will be carried out using
Farmers Guardian’s expert resource. Pointers for Profit
will carry sponsor branding and can run in most of the
main sections of the paper.
The Watch Series
The Watch Series follows the progress of a crop, herd
or particular on-farm project through a nine to twelvemonth period across two
farms. As we track the
farmers’ herd or flock
through the seasons, the
series sponsor will be
given a column within
the page to outline
their perspective on
the issues facing the
farmers and to talk
about key issues
tied in with the
particular time of year.
Sponsorship is for a
minimum of nine
months, and
all Watch Series
articles will carry
sponsor branding.
Farmers Guardian awards for the
next generation
Our awards, which include Dairy Farmer of the
Future and Beef Stockman of the Future, are aimed
at finding and celebrating the next generation of
successful farmers and contractors who are working
hard to build a sound business, through good
management, determination and a clear vision.
The awards give sponsors the chance to raise
their profile over a prolonged period through a
multimedia campaign.
For more information email: [email protected]
7
Farmers Guardian mechanical information
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Also Cast Cows & Sale of 1600 Store Cattle
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ts
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TRY OUR NEW
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D
CROSSWOR
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co.uk
www.zintec.
Mini Page 25x4
BER 4 2013
OM
FRIDAY OCTO ERSGUARDIAN.C
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FRIDAY NOVEMBER
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WWW.FARMERSGUA 2013
RDIAN.CO
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NEWS | 5
Guy Smith
sparks NFU
leadership
contest
Welsh MEP’s post-qu
ota
REJECTION by the
European
Parliament’s agricultu
mittee to look into the re comeffects of
abolishing milk quotas
has ‘disappointed’ Welsh
MEP Jill
Evans.
With quotas due
to be
scrapped in 2015 and
concerned
about the effects on
Welsh dairy
farming, she tabled
amendments to a report by
the agriculture committee on the
future of
the milk market.
She wanted the European
open until January
By Alistair Driver
‘One
candidate’
elections
do not make
for good
democracy
NOMINATIONS for the
three
officeholder positions
will
remain open until January.
More candidates are
certain
to come forward as
county
branches continue
to make
their nominations
LEXION 670TT
£34,675
SMITH
Intentions
Raymond
They could be joined
by a third suspect is an old friend but I
he
candidate, the NFU’s
vice-presi- candidate would agree that ‘one
dent and Warwicks
hire farmer for good ’ elections do not make
Adam Quinney, who
democracy.”
said
The deputy
announce his intention he will
s next dent elections and vice-presiThursday, following
look set to be
a
of his local branch at meeting fiercely contested, as candidate
which he is eye longer
s
expected to be
nominated lead the term opportunities to
for the president and
NFU.
deputy
Wiltshire farmer Minette
president posts.
Batters has announce
Mr Raymond remains
d she will
the stand for the
frontrunner for the
deputy and viceposition, president
with strong support
posts. Lincolnshire
within the farmer
NFU council.
Jonathan Brant
Yorkshire farmer Rosey and
Mr Smith, a council
Dunn
member have said
since 2003 and chairman
they will contest the
NFU communications of the vice-president election.
stood for vice-presidentboard,
in the Ladies in Beef
2010.
Mrs
Batters,
He said: “In running
for the co-founde a beef farmer who
presidency my first concern
d Ladies in Beef, was
is to nominated by
ensure there is more
her county and
than one said she
candidate for the post.
hoped to get support
Meurig from other
branches.
She said she wanted
to ‘get
Nominations
agriculture and food
production
more widely recognise
d by Government’.
Mr Brant, an arable
and beef
farmer who stood for
vice-president in 2012, highlight
ed
ensuring farmers and
had access to sufficient growers
levels of
labour when the Seasonal
cultural Workers Scheme Agrigoes
next year as a priority.
concern
Welsh dairy farming
would be
hit by the abolition
of
This highlighted the quotas.
cheaper imports and risk of
a Europe
wide decline in raw
Unfair practices
milk prices.
“That report pointed
A second amendme
to a likent called
establishment of ombudsmfor ly fall in Welsh milk productio
n
en
of
about
for the food chain to
8
ensure fair per cent per cent and a fall of 4
practices so farmers
in Welsh farm income.
were
“We need reform but
squeezed by unfair practicesnot
not at
by the expense
retailers and processor
of an industry
s.
which is already facing
The Plaid Cymru MEP
tough
said: times and is
“A report in 2009
so
importan
t to the
suggested wider
rural economy.”
China offers
market for
British exports
DEFRA Secretary Owen
Paterson led a delegatio
n including
35 British food and
drink businesses to China this
week in a
bid to tap into the huge
for quality food exports. market
Mr Paterson was joined
panies such as Weetabix, by comNorthern Ireland and Dunbia
a
other companies selling host of
tea, beer,
cheese, smoked salmon,
desserts
and confectionary.
HIRE or BUY a ne
w
combine TODAY.
YOU CHOOSE…
rRunning for president
and vice-president
rNominations are
MEURIG Raymond
will
least one challenge face at
r for the
presidency of the
NFU
Essex farmer Guy Smith after
name forward to contest put his
the top
two positions in February.
Mr Smith was nominate
d by
his county branch for
the
tions of NFU president posiand
deputy president at
a meeting
on Monday.
He said his main concern
was
to ensure there was
a proper
leadership contest
for the top
positions at the
NFU, but
pledged to give his ‘best
winning both elections. shot’ at
Mr Raymond,
a Pembrokeshire farmer,
confirmed
he will stand for the
position of
president after eight
GUY
Peter Kendall’s deputy. years as
Commiss ion to undertak
urgent impact assessmen e an
the effects of milk quotat about
tion on affected regions. aboli-
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E CONTRACT
An introduction to Dairy Farmer
Dairy Farmer – what you need to know…
With more than 70 years of communicating with
farmers, Dairy Farmer is acknowledged as the
longest established and best read specialist dairy
title in the UK.
3 11:12 Page 1
yout 1 25/01/201
**DF Feb Cover_La
DAIRY
Good Evans
a
Gearing up for
tractor cull?
Pages 54-55
FARMER
2
Volume 60 Issue
February 2013
RE
ON FARM FEATU
Building up a top
yielding dairy herd
Pages 10-12
To ensure we keep our feet firmly on the ground, it
has a host of cowmen commentators who portray the
story as they see it from the parlour pit. And to soften
the edges it always finishes off with a slice of humour
from that great raconteur Roger Evans.
We all know milk producers are
having a torrid time of it with
prices often below production
costs and, to stand any chance
of countering this pressure,
producers must, above all,
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Pages 28-42
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On the political side it has some first class
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Page 2
1 22/02/2013 10:08
Page 1
1 21/02/2013 12:33
Vet's View_Layout
VET’S VIEW
VET’S VIEW
ses vets
Gloucestershire, confes ent.
Veterinary Group,
l rather than treatm
Watson of the Wood
This month, Chris
ses down to contro
rs, with some disea
not have all the answe
do
t have
Surprisingly we don’ seases
di
to
s
er
sw
all the an
I
DAIRY
FARMER
ways
There are easier
yout 1 22/02/201
3 08:39 Page 1
DAIRY
MARCH 2013
They’ll tell
you when
you’ve got
it right
hy ruminal flora
to maintain healt
an aid to post
Are you looking for
gement of rumen
therapeutic mana
flora following:-
Machinery
Forage kit for
season ahead
FARMER
Use Biotal experti
se for crop and
condition specifi
c additives
Pages 32-37
Volume 60 Issue
3
Producing enough
quality grass silage
can be
difficult, but using
Biotal forage inoculants
is one
decision that can
make it easier.
axphast gold® works
quickly on wet grass
silage
to preserve nutrients,
ensuring good intake
and
maximum performan
ce.
axcool gold® has
a unique action which
prevents
dry silage heating
up and moulding,
resulting in
better intake and
productivity.
axphast
BIOTAL
h Concen
Hig
tr
gold
ol
Upsets?, Metabolic
Ketosis?, Digestive
,
is?, Bloat?, Scour?
Disorders?, Mastit
ing?
Cereal/Protein Poison
Ruminal Stasis?,
Pro-Rumen
L FLORA MAKES A
HEALTHY RUMINA
CONTENTED COW
the
acts by supporting
(live yeast) which
therapy
Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be used following antimicrobial
stasis.
Pro-Rumen contains
rumen bacteria. Pro-Rumen
bloat, scour and ruminal and to
mastitis, ketosis,
activity of beneficial
after treatment of
for nutritional value
and as an aid to recovery milk powder and fat soluble vitamins
contains
bacteria.
Pro-Rumen also
of beneficial rumen
further aid the management
e a p p li c a ti o
n
SPECIAL FEATU
RE
Focus on forage
and grassland
Pages 26-37
RENEWABLES
Potential on-farm
energy investments
Pages 38-42
from:
is available on request
Further information
House, Great Slade,
Limited, Vetoquinol
MK18 1PA.
UK: Vetoquinol UK
Park, Buckingham,
Buckingham Industrial
825460
Fax: 01280
o.uk
Tel: 01280 814500
.uk Website: www.vetoquinol.c
House, Great Slade,
Email: [email protected]
Limited, Vetoquinol
MK18 1PA.
ROI: Vetoquinol Ireland
Park, Buckingham,
Buckingham Industrial 1800406116
Fax:
o.uk
Tel: 1800406117
.uk Website: www.vetoquinol.c
Email: [email protected]
MARCH 2013
DAIRY
FARMER
25
NEW PRODUCTS
Latest releases to
dairy marketplace the
MARCH 2013
delivering forage
Pages 48-49
and nutrition technol
Biotal Ltd tel: (029)
2054 7050
ogies
www.biotal.co.uk
part of
Tip of the month: Redu
ce digital dermatitis
10
um
v
24
Hillsborough research
station
**DF Mar Cover_La
Lo w
horn form.
t of
There is little prospec
so
eradicating this disease
to
everything is down
are the
control. Foot baths
now for
front line and are
dipping
lameness what teat
is
is for mastitis. This
has to be
something which
the risk is
done routinely as
ever present.
There are broadly
of bath
speaking two types
ics
formulation – antibiot
kill the
which specifically
m or the
spirochaete organis
which
skin disinfectants
on the
cleanse everything
tics
skin surface. Antibio
d to
yield this has increase
more in
10% incidence or
many herds.
twins
Most would agree
the dairy
are bad news for
d
cow, with the increase
after
health risks at and
the milk
calving damaging
yield and of course
ty and
increased mortali
calves.
freemartins in the
Some 30 years ago
would
time, which again
sort of
any
be typical of this
miserably to achieve
and
virus sweeping in
improvement.
Management
The
of the
damaging the foetus.
Increased feeding
cies were all
rDigital dermatitis:
during
pregnan
cow
aring
twin-be
e,
too
ng
Good footbath techniqu
diagnosed as being
period by providi
dry
the
and
cows
dense
remember the dry
small at the PD session
an increased energy
being
postd
rTwins: Early
currently many are
ration actually produce
ently
trying
calving checks
lost when subsequ
more problems than
Check
are
y.
rSchmallenberg:
rechecked. Some
to feed them normall
Outbreak
sing but I cannot
pregnancies again.
much
as
progres
just
at
was
been
There
to the
Certainly there has
and
tell if there is damage
outbreak
peri-calving disease
will
least one clinical
were developing
calf. The worst thing
dairy
they were more likely
ing
lost
in our practice with
have
techniques for improv
be pregnancies being
g
to be ketotic and
cow
later and
cows scouring, showin
ent
the health of the
and not found till
mastitis in the subsequ
identmilk drop and pyrexia
s time.
preciou
carrying twins by
losing
to be
lactation.
and
to
which is thought
again
ifying them early
A vaccine is likely
So it is bad news
ed with
t
but as yet
possibly associat
we can
adopting differen
become available
for twins and all
in late
and we
Schmallenberg.
sure we
feeding techniques
we have no details,
we
really do is make
the
how
Also on a few farms
nt and
lactation and during
are at a loss to suggest
have good treatme
seen the loss of early
work has
used in
have
be
should
it
calving
if
dry period. This
and
care protocols after
cies in a cluster of
impact pregnan
herds.
been repeated with
the same cattle
to reduce the health
s in
cows at or around
modern cattle genetic
twins.
of
the US and has failed
is
My third problem
It is
Schmallenberg virus.
how
difficult to know
give this
much attention to
not
virus as we still do
or
extent
know the full
disease
scale of any clinical
it may produce.
on
ati
cows
spread or infect
l’ effect and
moisture,
got a have a ‘residua
without slurry or
like to think I have
four
feet clean
can be used every
h and
so keeping cows’
practical approac
part of
weeks or so but skin
and dry is a key
an answer to tackling
have to be
tants
re so
disinfec
exposu
in
reducing the
most diseases I see
cases.
problem
used daily in most
a
of
less
is
My
.
there
cattle practice
So what are the key
first place.
agree I
the
in
usually
will
er?
clients
we
things to rememb
answer
The second thing
lly
especia
do always have an
–
much
■ Treat all cows
rily the
seem unable to do
– but not necessa
The rate
the dry cows.
hear.
about is twinning.
one they want to
product at
cattle
■ Use the right
a few
of twinning in dairy
However, there are
.
less
the right dilution
to be about 5% or
on some
frequently. used
conditions which
but
■ Clean the bath
we have
all cows calving,
if
of
as
seems
for
it
days
solution
for milk
■ Use enough
. The first
with the selection
and
not got a solution
cows
of
number
dermatitis. the
of these is digital
ination.
contam
faecal
affects
This condition now
t depth to
■ Use sufficien
dairy
well above 90% of
the foot.
for 25% of cover
herds accounting
Digital
s in its
all cases of lamenes
dermatitis
and, more
simple skin form
will not
worryingly, the chronic
Dairy Update
ART3062
**DF Mar p24 25
Vet's View_Layout
British Dairying
OPEN DAY
Details: Page 5
through sire selection
–
p18
For more information email: [email protected]
An introduction to Dairy Farmer
Dairy Farmer reader spend *
700
S pend in millions (£) by Dairy Farmer
readers per annum
600
**DF Feb Cover_Layout 1 25/01/2013 11:12 Page 1
DAIRY
S pend in millions (£) by Dairy Farmer
readers not reading British Dairying
181
500
February 2013
Good Evans
Gearing up for a
tractor cull?
FARMER
Pages 54-55
Volume 60 Issue 2
400
395
ON FARM FEATURE
Building up a top
yielding dairy herd
Pages 10-12
300
89
200
73
193
MAIZE SPECIAL
Growing advice and
varieties focus
160
100
Squeeze out every last drop
46
Pages 28-42
rumen specific live yeast reduces acid loading and
increases fibre digestibility, which improves forage intake
ensuring more milk from forage.
100
Why not ask BIOTAL how much extra money you can make
through improved feed efficiency?
0
BREEDING
Campaign to promote
benefits of A2 milk
Pages 18-20
Feed
Machinery
Fertiliser
Vet and
Meds
delivering forage and nutrition technologies
Biotal Ltd tel: (029) 2054 7050 www.biotal.co.uk
**DF Mar p24 25
**DF Mar Cover_La
yout 1 22/02/201
3 08:39 Page 1
Vet's View_Layout
VET’S VIEW
Hillsborough research
station
horn form.
t of
There is little prospec
so
eradicating this disease
to
everything is down
are the
control. Foot baths
now for
front line and are
dipping
lameness what teat
is
is for mastitis. This
has to be
something which
the risk is
done routinely as
ever present.
There are broadly
of bath
speaking two types
ics
formulation – antibiot
kill the
which specifically
m or the
spirochaete organis
which
skin disinfectants
the
on
ing
cleanse everyth
tics
skin surface. Antibio
24
DAIRY
FARMER
Use Biotal experti
se for
condition specifi crop and
c additives
Volume 60 Issue
3
Producing enough
quality grass silage
can be
difficult, but using
Biotal forage inoculant
s is one
decision that can
make it easier.
axphast gold® works
quickly on wet grass
silage
to preserve nutrients,
ensuring good intake
and
maximum performa
nce.
axcool gold® has
a unique action which
prevents
dry silage heating
up and moulding
, resulting in
better intake and
productivity.
axphast
BIOTAL
h Concen
Hig
tr
gold
ol
um
v
many herds.
twins
Most would agree
the dairy
are bad news for
d
cow, with the increase
after
health risks at and
the milk
calving damaging
yield and of course
ty and
increased mortali
calves.
freemartins in the
Some 30 years ago
They’ll tell
you when
you’ve got
it right
any
miserably to achieve
improvement.
of the
Increased feeding
during
twin-bearing cow
providing
the dry period by
dense
an increased energy
d
ration actually produce
trying
more problems than
y.
to feed them normall
Pages 32-37
Lo w
I
d to
yield this has increase
more in
10% incidence or
would
time, which again
is
My third problem
sort of
be typical of this
It is
and
Schmallenberg virus.
virus sweeping in
how
The
difficult to know
damaging the foetus.
this
give
to
all
much attention
rDigital dermatitis:
pregnancies were
not
e,
too
virus as we still do
Good footbath techniqu
diagnosed as being
and
the full extent or
cows
dry
know
session
the
er
PD
rememb
small at the
disease
being
scale of any clinical
are
many
ly
rTwins: Early postcurrent
ently
it may produce.
calving checks
lost when subsequ
Check
are
rSchmallenberg:
rechecked. Some
cannot
Outbreak
pregnancies again.
much
progressing but I
been at
There was just as
to the
Certainly there has
and
tell if there is damage
outbreak
peri-calving disease
will
least one clinical
were developing
calf. The worst thing
dairy
they were more likely
ing
lost
in our practice with
have
techniques for improv
be pregnancies being
g
to be ketotic and
and
cow
cows scouring, showin
ent
not found till later
the health of the
subsequ
and
the
in
mastitis
identmilk drop and pyrexia
carrying twins by
losing precious time.
to be
lactation.
and
to
which is thought
again
ifying them early
A vaccine is likely
So it is bad news
ed with
t
but as yet
possibly associat
we can
adopting differen
become available
for twins and all
we
lenberg.
in late
and
ues
Schmal
details,
techniq
no
we
sure
feeding
we have
we
really do is make
the
how
Also on a few farms
nt and
lactation and during
are at a loss to suggest
of early
have good treatme
work has
used in
have seen the loss
calving
dry period. This
and if it should be
care protocols after
cies in a cluster of
impact pregnan
been repeated with
same cattle herds.
reduce the health
the
to
around
in
or
s
cows at
modern cattle genetic
of twins.
the US and has failed
Management
Machinery
Forage kit for
season ahead
FARMER
on
ati
t have
Surprisingly we don’ seases
di
all the answers to
MARCH 2013
e a p p li c a ti o
n
SPECIAL FEATU
RE
Focus on forage
and grassland
Pages 26-37
RENEWABLES
Potential on-farm
energy investments
Pages 38-42
ways
There are easier
hy ruminal flora
to maintain healt
an aid to post
Are you looking for
gement of rumen
therapeutic mana
flora following:-
Upsets?, Metabolic
Ketosis?, Digestive
,
is?, Bloat?, Scour?
Disorders?, Mastit
ing?
Cereal/Protein Poison
Ruminal Stasis?,
Pro-Rumen
L FLORA MAKES A
HEALTHY RUMINA
NEW PRODUCTS
Latest releases to
dairy marketplace the
delivering forage
Pages 48-49
and nutrition techno
Biotal Ltd tel: (029)
2054 7050
CONTENTED COW
the
acts by supporting
(live yeast) which
therapy
Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be used following antimicrobial
stasis.
Pro-Rumen contains
rumen bacteria. Pro-Rumen
bloat, scour and ruminal and to
mastitis, ketosis,
activity of beneficial
after treatment of
for nutritional value
and as an aid to recovery milk powder and fat soluble vitamins
contains
bacteria.
Pro-Rumen also
of beneficial rumen
further aid the management
ART3062
ses vets do
Gloucestershire, confes ent.
Veterinary Group,
l rather than treatm
Watson of the Wood
This month, Chris
ses down to contro
rs, with some disea
not have all the answe
cows
spread or infect
l’ effect and
moisture,
got a have a ‘residua
without slurry or
like to think I have
four
feet clean
can be used every
h and
so keeping cows’
practical approac
part of
weeks or so but skin
and dry is a key
an answer to tackling
to be
disinfectants have
in
g the exposure so
see
I
s
reducin
disease
most
cases.
used daily in most
is less of a problem
there
cattle practice. My
key
So what are the
agree I
in the first place.
er?
clients will usually
we
things to rememb
answer
The second thing
do always have an
– especially
much
■ Treat all cows
rily the
seem unable to do
– but not necessa
The rate
the dry cows.
hear.
about is twinning.
one they want to
product at
cattle
■ Use the right
a few
are
of twinning in dairy
there
er,
Howev
.
5% or less
the right dilution
on some
used to be about
tly.
frequen
conditions which
, but
■ Clean the bath
we have
of all cows calving
days it seems as if
solution for
for milk
■ Use enough
. The first
with the selection
and
not got a solution
number of cows
the
tis.
dermati
of these is digital
ination.
affects faecal contam
This condition now
t depth to
■ Use sufficien
dairy
well above 90% of
the foot.
for 25% of cover
herds accounting
Digital
s in its
all cases of lamenes
itis
dermat
and, more
simple skin form
not
will
worryingly, the chronic
DAIRY
Page 2
1 22/02/2013 10:08
3 12:33 Page 1
View_Layout 1 21/02/201
VET’S VIEW
See insert inside
Tip of the month: Secrets of growing good maize crop – p38
*Independent readership research, November 2010 (Base 1082)
Vet's
**DF Mar p24 25
WIN A MUSTO!
part of
logies
www.biotal.co.uk
part of
Tip of the month: Redu
ce digital dermatitis
OPEN DAY
Details: Page 5
through sire selection
–
p18
from:
is available on request
Further information
House, Great Slade,
Limited, Vetoquinol
MK18 1PA.
UK: Vetoquinol UK
Park, Buckingham,
Buckingham Industrial
Fax: 01280 825460
o.uk
Tel: 01280 814500
.uk Website: www.vetoquinol.c
House, Great Slade,
Email: [email protected]
Limited, Vetoquinol
MK18 1PA.
ROI: Vetoquinol Ireland
Park, Buckingham,
Buckingham Industrial 1800406116
Fax:
o.uk
Tel: 1800406117
.uk Website: www.vetoquinol.c
Email: [email protected]
MARCH 2013
DAIRY
FARMER
25
MARCH 2013
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dvertise on the page – Various positions and sizes available
Take an insert – Choose from bound, loose, split /full run options
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11
DAIRY FARMER FEATURES LIST 2014
January
Breeding & Fertility: improving herd performance
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Maize: new varieties and cultivation tips
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Spring Property Supplement
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**DF Feb Cover_Layout 1 25/01/2013 11:12 Page 1
DAIRY
February 2013
Good Evans
Gearing up for a
tractor cull?
FARMER
Pages 54-55
Volume 60 Issue 2
ON FARM FEATURE
Building up a top
yielding dairy herd
Pages 10-12
MAIZE SPECIAL
Growing advice and
varieties focus
Squeeze out every last drop
Pages 28-42
rumen specific live yeast reduces acid loading and
increases fibre digestibility, which improves forage intake
ensuring more milk from forage.
Why not ask BIOTAL how much extra money you can make
through improved feed efficiency?
BREEDING
Campaign to promote
benefits of A2 milk
Pages 18-20
delivering forage and nutrition technologies
Biotal Ltd tel: (029) 2054 7050 www.biotal.co.uk
WIN A MUSTO!
part of
See insert inside
Tip of the month: Secrets of growing good maize crop – p38
For more information email: [email protected]
13
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**DF Mar p24 25
Vet's View_Layout
ses vets
Gloucestershire, confes ent.
Veterinary Group,
l rather than treatm
Watson of the Wood
This month, Chris
ses down to contro
rs, with some disea
not have all the answe
do
t have
Surprisingly we don’ seases
di
to
s
er
sw
all the an
cows
spread or infect
l’ effect and
moisture,
got a have a ‘residua
without slurry or
like to think I have
four
feet clean
can be used every
h and
so keeping cows’
practical approac
part of
weeks or so but skin
and dry is a key
an answer to tackling
have to be
tants
re so
disinfec
in
reducing the exposu
most diseases I see
daily in most cases.
problem
used
a
of
less
there is
cattle practice. My
So what are the key
I
place.
first
agree
the
in
usually
er?
clients will
things to rememb
second thing we
answer
an
The
have
lly
always
especia
do
–
much
■ Treat all cows
rily the
seem unable to do
– but not necessa
The rate
the dry cows.
hear.
about is twinning.
one they want to
product at
cattle
■ Use the right
a few
of twinning in dairy
However, there are
.
less
the right dilution
to be about 5% or
on some
frequently. used
conditions which
■ Clean the bath
calving, but
have
cows
we
all
if
of
as
days it seems
solution for
milk
■ Use enough
the selection for
. The first
with
and
not got a solution
number of cows
dermatitis. the
of these is digital
ination.
contam
affects faecal
This condition now
t depth to
■ Use sufficien
dairy
well above 90% of
the foot.
for 25% of cover
herds accounting
Digital
s in its
all cases of lamenes
dermatitis
and, more
simple skin form
will not
worryingly, the chronic
I
horn form.
t of
There is little prospec
so
eradicating this disease
to
everything is down
are the
control. Foot baths
now for
front line and are
dipping
lameness what teat
is
is for mastitis. This
has to be
something which
the risk is
done routinely as
ever present.
There are broadly
of bath
speaking two types
ics
formulation – antibiot
kill the
which specifically
m or the
spirochaete organis
which
skin disinfectants
on the
cleanse everything
tics
skin surface. Antibio
14
Page 2
1 22/02/2013 10:08
VET’S VIEW
VET’S VIEW
24
Vet's View_Layout
Page 1
1 21/02/2013 12:33
DAIRY
FARMER
d to
yield this has increase
more in
10% incidence or
many herds.
twins
Most would agree
the dairy
are bad news for
d
cow, with the increase
after
health risks at and
milk
the
ng
calving damagi
yield and of course
ty and
increased mortali
calves.
freemartins in the
Some 30 years ago
Hillsborough research
station
would
time, which again
sort of
any
be typical of this
miserably to achieve
and
virus sweeping in
improvement.
Management
The
of the
damaging the foetus.
Increased feeding
were all
cies
rDigital dermatitis:
during
pregnan
cow
twin-bearing
e,
too
ng
Good footbath techniqu
diagnosed as being
period by providi
dry
the
and
cows
dense
remember the dry
small at the PD session
increased energy
an
being
d
rTwins: Early postcurrently many are
ration actually produce
ently
trying
calving checks
lost when subsequ
more problems than
Check
are
y.
rSchmallenberg:
rechecked. Some
to feed them normall
Outbreak
but I cannot
sing
pregnancies again.
much
as
progres
just
at
been
There was
to the
Certainly there has
and
tell if there is damage
outbreak
peri-calving disease
will
least one clinical
were developing
calf. The worst thing
dairy
they were more likely
ing
lost
in our practice with
have
techniques for improv
be pregnancies being
g
to be ketotic and
cow
later and
cows scouring, showin
ent
the health of the
and not found till
mastitis in the subsequ
identmilk drop and pyrexia
time.
s
preciou
carrying twins by
losing
to be
lactation.
and
to
which is thought
again
ifying them early
A vaccine is likely
So it is bad news
ed with
t
but as yet
possibly associat
we can
adopting differen
become available
for twins and all
in late
and we
Schmallenberg.
sure we
feeding techniques
we have no details,
we
really do is make
the
how
Also on a few farms
nt and
lactation and during
are at a loss to suggest
have good treatme
the loss of early
has
in
seen
work
used
have
be
This
calving
dry period.
and if it should
care protocols after
cies in a cluster of
impact pregnan
herds.
been repeated with
the same cattle
to reduce the health
s in
cows at or around
modern cattle genetic
of twins.
the US and has failed
is
My third problem
It is
Schmallenberg virus.
how
difficult to know
give this
much attention to
not
virus as we still do
or
know the full extent
disease
scale of any clinical
it may produce.
ways
There are easier
hy ruminal flora
to maintain healt
an aid to post
Are you looking for
gement of rumen
therapeutic mana
flora following:-
Upsets?, Metabolic
Ketosis?, Digestive
,
is?, Bloat?, Scour?
Disorders?, Mastit
ing?
Cereal/Protein Poison
Ruminal Stasis?,
Pro-Rumen
L FLORA MAKES A
HEALTHY RUMINA
CONTENTED COW
the
acts by supporting
(live yeast) which
therapy
Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be used following antimicrobial
stasis.
Pro-Rumen contains
rumen bacteria. Pro-Rumen
bloat, scour and ruminal and to
mastitis, ketosis,
activity of beneficial
after treatment of
for nutritional value
and as an aid to recovery milk powder and fat soluble vitamins
contains
bacteria.
Pro-Rumen also
of beneficial rumen
further aid the management
ART3062
**DF Mar p24 25
from:
is available on request
Further information
House, Great Slade,
Limited, Vetoquinol
MK18 1PA.
UK: Vetoquinol UK
Park, Buckingham,
Buckingham Industrial
825460
Fax: 01280
o.uk
Tel: 01280 814500
.uk Website: www.vetoquinol.c
House, Great Slade,
Email: [email protected]
Limited, Vetoquinol
MK18 1PA.
ROI: Vetoquinol Ireland
Park, Buckingham,
Buckingham Industrial 1800406116
Fax:
o.uk
Tel: 1800406117
.uk Website: www.vetoquinol.c
Email: [email protected]
MARCH 2013
DAIRY
FARMER
25
MARCH 2013
For more information email: [email protected]
farmersguardian.com
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60,000
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Aug Oct Dec Feb Apr Jun Aug Oct Dec Feb Apr
2009 2010 2011
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650,000
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24 | MACHINERY
Online advertising positions
Page peels
An imposing means to promote online.
These have proven to return particularly
high click-through rates and offer virtually
half the screen area to deliver your
message. Its animated page curl in the
top right corner of the screen acts as a
trigger and enticement to the message
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REPORT
farmersguardian.com
FRIDAY JANUARY
21 2011
WWW.FARMERSGU
ARDIAN.COM
THIS SEASON
G E T T H E VA LT
RA EXPERIEN
CE..
Leaderboard
... A N D P U T VA
LT R A
TO T H E T E S T
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own
and experience the difference test drive
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With the flexibility
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valtra.co.uk
myvaltra.com
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The Message Plus Unit also known as
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Skyscraper
MPU
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Positioned at the very top of the
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leaderboard replaces the banner
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Tiles
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Skyscrapers are superb traffic
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16
For more information email: [email protected]
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| 25
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17
Other online opportunities (cont)
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18
farmersguardian.com
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Leaderboard
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Email
newsletter
Mobile
website
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300 x 250
728 x 90
120 x
(300 or 600)
160 x 188
120 x 300
Various –
please contact
[email protected]
ubm.com
500K
30K
30K
25K
18K
25K
15k
JPEG
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SWF (with
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JPEG, GIF or
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back-up GIF)
JPEG, GIF or
SWF (with
back-up GIF)
JPEG or
GIF
JPEG or
GIF
JPEG or
GIF
Page curl
appears top
right of page
Immediate
right of
content
Immediate
top of page
Right hand
side of
content
Right hand
side of
content
Right hand
side of
content
Above/below
core content
area
Maximum
file size
File types
Site position
Lead time
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Farmers
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AGRICULTURE’S NATIONAL NEWSPAPER
FRIDAY MARCH 15 2013 £2.40
DAIRY SPECIAL
Latest on turnout, herd
health and nutrition p35-49
PRECISION FARMING EFFICIENCY BOOSTING KIT ON SHOW p26
Criminal gangs cash in as 200
tractors stolen in two months
rTractors shipped
to eastern Europe
100 PAGES OF
NEWS AND
CLASSIFIEDS
NEWS
2
Bovine TB
slaughter rise
BUSINESS
14
Green belt
versus housing
rBetter security
urged at farm level
ARABLE
By Olivia Midgley
18
Horticulture
partnership
GANGS are pocketing millions of
pounds as part of an organised
crime ring which is seeing highvalue tractors from Britain’s farms
‘disappear without a trace’.
Criminals are defying the law
by using fake documents to cash
in on overseas markets, with
Poland being the gangs’ destination of choice.
Northern Cyprus, Bulgaria
and Lithuania – renowned for
their lack of legal jurisdiction –
are also hotspots, according to
experts from the Association of
Chief Police Officers vehicle
crime intelligence service and
rural insurer NFU Mutual.
More than 200 tractors, valued at more than £25,000 each,
were stolen from UK farms in
December 2012 and January
2013, with figures for February
expected to continue the upward curve. This was a 35 per
cent spike on previous months.
NFU Mutual’s vehicle security
expert Clive Harris, who works
closely with port police, said the
problem was spiralling.
He said: “The sudden increase
in farm vehicle theft is extremely concerning. In the past we
have recovered vehicles from
Poland as the market is so
strong for stolen tractors, but at
the moment they are just completely disappearing.”
MACHINERY
24-25
Temporary
tyre fixes
LIVESTOCK
33
Managing
forage stocks
SALES
56
British Blue
tops Leyburn
IN YOUR FIELD
64
Farmers are being warned about securing their machinery after more than 200 tractors ‘disappeared’ in two months. PICTURE: John Eveson
The worrying trend follows a
dip in thefts last year.
The Metropolitan Police’s
plant and agricultural national
intelligence unit said thefts had
dropped by almost 50 per cent in
the 12 months to June 2012, after
a spike in 2010 when insurance
claims hit the £10 million mark.
“Tractor theft is very much in
vogue again and where they are
going, we don’t know,” added Mr
Harris. “We need people to be
aware the problem has not gone
away but has in fact come back
with a vengeance.”
Shipped out
He said tractors and telehandlers,
particularly those with loaders,
command a high price overseas
and are often loaded onto curtainsided lorries before being driven
straight to ports and shipped out
within a matter of hours.
Mr Harris said the sheer num-
ber of lorries arriving at ports
meant it would be ‘impossible’ to
check every single vehicle.
Lower-value tractors and allterrain vehicles are often
stripped down before the parts
are shipped out and sold abroad.
The insurer said on-farm
security was key to tackling the
growing problem.
John Deere said every new tractor it sells in the UK and Ireland
is fitted with the Construction and
Agricultural Equipment Security
and Registration Scheme
(CESAR) datatag security system,
as well as an immobiliser system
where the key has a transponder unique to each tractor.
NFU Mutual urged people to fit
CESAR marking to farm vehicles
and consider immobilisers and
tracker devices; always remove
the tractor key; physically
padlock or chain ATVs and record
machinery serial numbers.
UK DAIRY EXPO FULL REPORT & PICTURES p30-31
STEVE HEARD,
LEICESTERSHIRE
“A continued
relentless invasion
of pigeons seem to
have staked claim
to all of my oilseed
rape land”
WWW.FARMERSGUARDIAN.COM
Jane Newton
Account Manager
Email: [email protected]
Tel: 01948 780 783
Mobile: 07901 558 772
Mark Jackson
Account Manager
Email: [email protected]
Tel: 01322 449 624
Mobile: 07775 754 548
FARMERS GUARDIAN
farmers
guardian
.com
**DF Mar Cover_Layout 1 22/02/2013 08:39 Page 1
DAIRY
They’ll tell
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Pages 38-42
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Latest releases to the
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Tip of the month: Reduce digital dermatitis through sire selection – p18