N L EWS- EADER

NEWS-LEADER
SPRINGFIELD
TUESDAY, MAY 24, 2011 • SPRINGFIELD, MISSOURI
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CHARLIE RIEDEL / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
A man salvages a guitar from a severely damaged home Monday in Joplin. A large tornado moved through much of the city Sunday, killing at least 116 people and leaving many homeless.
ADRIFT IN DEBRIS
‘THAT’S ALL THAT’S LEFT’
Extent of damage shakes Joplin
By Jess Rollins
[email protected]
As hundreds scoured gouged-out
homes looking for photos and
clothes, Tammy Niederhelman
looked desperately for Zach.
He’s her 12-year-old son.
“Is he out there somewhere hurt
and cold? Is he in the hospital all
alone? Is he in the makeshift
morgue?”
She wept.
“We want our baby to come back
home.”
Niederhelman and her husband,
Tony, spent Monday searching for
the blue-eyed boy with dirty blond
hair.
“This really is chaos,” Niederhelman said. “You can’t find anything
out.”
Several blocks away, others
worked to dig out pieces of their lives
buried among brick and beams.
“That’s all that’s left,” Roger
Dedick said as he pointed to a section
of foundation.
Dedick lived at 2830 18th St. for 17
years before he and his wife rushed
to the basement Sunday night.
He said his ears popped as the tornado blew the windows out of the
garage and he used a metal
“tanker’s” bar to pry his way out of
the rubble.
Down the street, Carolyn Hall
fought tears as she and her teenage
sons looked through a collapsed
house for clothes and the family cat
at 2822 E. 18th St.
All that was left of their home were
a few interior walls, but they found
FOOD
» Donations for
food can be made
online at ozarksfoodharvest.org.
Or, mail donations
to Ozarks Food
Harvest, Attn:
Joplin Disaster
Relief, P.O. Box
5746, Springfield,
MO, 65801-5746.
VALERIE MOSLEY / NEWS-LEADER
Surrounded by debris, storm survivors cling to one another Monday.
MEDICAL
» Volunteers with
medical skills can
register at
ShowMe
Response.org or
by calling 417-8329500. All others
are asked to wait
3-5 days to sign up.
MONEY
» Nearly all
Springfield grocery stores are
accepting monetary donations.
Looking west at Range Line and 15th Street: destroyed homes and trees.
IN SPRINGFIELD
Hospitals take in patients from Joplin
“When she
came to,
one child
was dead.
The other
was gone.”
Don Lucore,
CoxHealth
Index
VOL. 121, NO. 144
©2011, NEWS-LEADER
By Sarah Okeson
[email protected]
Area hospitals received at
least 163 patients brought in
from the Joplin area, including
at least 22 patients who were at
the St. John’s Hospital in
Joplin when it was struck by
the tornado Sunday.
Lisa Cox, a spokeswoman for
St. John’s, said 63 patients
were brought to the St. John’s
Hospital in Springfield. TwenBaseball
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» Donate $10 to
Convoy of Hope
by texting the
word “Convoy”
to 50555.
» Donate $10 to
the American Red
Cross by texting
“REDCROSS” to
90999.
THE VICTIMS
Rescuers
race to find
survivors
By Alan Scher Zagier
and Jim Salter
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JOPLIN
NATHAN PAPES / NEWS-LEADER
See DAMAGE, Page 5A
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ty-two of them were from the
Joplin hospital. At least nine
had been discharged by Monday evening.
Cox said 20 to 25 people are
in critical care at St. John’s,
including pediatrics and the
burn unit. CoxHealth had
about 20 patients in critical
condition.
“We got a lot of crush
injuries,” said John Archer,
the director of emergency ser2C
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vices at Cox South. “Buildings
collapsing. We have some
orthopedic injuries and some
chest injuries.”
Other patients were in
shock.
“People have lost their
homes,” said Don Lucore, the
director of pastoral care at
CoxHealth. “One of my
staffers was telling me about
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NEED
HELP?
Call 800-427-4626
or 211.
Online
Find our continuing coverage at
News-Leader.com:
» Videos from
the scene
» Extensive listing
of ways to help
» Interactive map
of damage
in Joplin
— Rescue crews dug
through piles of splintered houses
and crushed cars Monday in a search
for victims of a half-mile-wide tornado that killed at least 116 people when
it blasted much of this city off the
map and hit a major hospital.
It was the nation’s deadliest single
twister in nearly 60 years and the second major tornado disaster in less
than a month.
Authorities feared the toll could
rise as the full scope of destruction
comes into view: house after house
reduced to rubble, cars crushed like
soda cans, shaken residents roaming
streets in search of missing family
members.
The danger was by no means over.
A Riverside police officer was
recovering from a near-lightning
strike suffered while he was helping
during the tornado aftermath.
The unidentified officer was being
treated at a hospital for burns and
other injuries after the strike around
5 p.m. Monday.
Riverside police spokesman Sgt.
Brent Holland said the officer had
just driven a fire commander back to
a command post and was standing
next to an all-terrain vehicle when the
lightning struck near him.
Fires from gas leaks burned across
town, and more violent weather
loomed, including the threat of hail,
high winds and even more tornadoes.
At daybreak, the city’s south side
was a barren, smoky wasteland.
“I’ve never seen such devastation —
just block upon block upon block of
See SURVIVORS, Page 4A
TORNADO COVERAGE
» Organized religion: Find out what
churches here are doing to help . 3A
» Be prepared: Forecasters warn of
more twisters, possible flooding. 8A
» Lines down: Storms bring phone
communication to a standstill. 5A
» Helping out: Businesses use their
resources to lend a hand in Joplin. 8A
Weather Map on page 4C
TODAY 81° HUMID; STORMS LIKELY
TONIGHT 56° • TOMORROW 79°
2A Tuesday, May 24, 2011
JOPLIN TORNADO
NEWS-LEADER • News-Leader.com
Chaos,
bravery
seen at
hospital
By Kurt Voigt
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
JOPLIN — Jonathan Elliott
had heard the tornado
sirens blaring outside St.
John’s Regional Medical
Center for about a half-hour
when things suddenly took
a terrifying turn.
The building started shaking, lights began to flicker
and Elliott, 16, could feel
the wind coming up beneath
the floor in his grandfather’s seventh-floor hospital room. It was time to
make a move, he decided,
and that’s what Elliott and
his grandmother did, making a dash for the relative
safety of an inside stairwell.
Up to that moment, “we
had no idea it was going to
blow,” Elliott said.
The tornado that smashed
Joplin on Sunday also ravaged one of the town’s
major hospitals just when it
was needed the most,
killing at least six people in
the building, blowing out
windows and sucking up Xrays and medical records
and dumping them two
counties away.
After the twister, the
entire nine-story, 367-bed
hospital was evacuated for
fear of structural damage.
Walls were knocked 10 feet
out of place and rooms were
strewn with broken glass,
concrete, ceiling tiles and
other debris. Some patients
were taken out in wheelchairs, while others unable
to make their way out on
their own after the elevators were disabled were
slid down the stairs on mattresses.
Doctors and nurses set up
a triage center in the parking lot amid crushed cars
and a smashed helicopter,
but once storm victims
were evaluated, they had to
CHARLIE RIEDEL / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
The damaged St. John’s Regional Medical Center is seen in the distance through tornado debris in Joplin.
be sent to other hospitals
for treatment.
On the morning after the
storm, parts of the hospital
— one of Joplin’s tallest
buildings
—
appeared
bombed out.
In the frightening minutes before the twister
struck,
the
hospital
declared
a
“Condition
Gray,” and patients, relatives and staff members
were told to leave their
rooms and go into stairwells and other protected
interior parts of the building. A total of 183 patients
were in the building,
authorities said.
Despite what hospital
officials said was at least 10
minutes’ warning inside the
building before the twister
hit, authorities said at least
six of the 116 people who
died in the tornado in Joplin
were killed at St. John’s.
Five of the dead were
patients and one was a visitor.
Elliott and his grandmoth-
er were among the fortunate. When they emerged
from the stairwell, they
didn’t recognize the hospital.
The Wichita, Kan.,
teenager said that when
the twister struck, he didn’t have time to move his
grandfather from his
hospital bed and left him
behind. When Elliott
returned to the room, it
was littered with debris,
but his grandfather had
suffered just one small
scratch on his head.
“I was really worried,
but I was really surprised,” Elliott said.
While Elliott said he
didn’t hear the warning
from the hospital staff to
take cover, he said doctors took control afterward, ordering everyone
to evacuate the building
as fast as possible. For
the patients who couldn’t
walk, Elliott and others
used mattresses to slide
them down the stairs.
Hospitals/Beds, staff freed up
Continued from Page 1A
one woman who has no family. She is in an electric
wheelchair. The wheelchair
is gone. All she has is a little
dog, which she has with
her.”
Lucore
said
another
woman was looking for
shelter during the tornado
with her two children when
she was knocked unconscious.
“When she came to, one
child was dead,” Lucore
said. “The other was gone.”
CoxHealth was asking
people with minor illnesses
and injuries to seek care at
urgent care facilities. Cox
South canceled 19 elective
surgeries Monday morning.
“Our top priority is opening hospital beds to care for
tornado victims,” spokeswoman Stacy Fender said.
“We’re asking people with
loved ones in the hospital
who are ready to be discharged to make transportation arrangements as
soon as possible.”
Cox said some of the
administrators from the St.
John’s Hospital in Springfield went to Joplin on Monday. The Springfield hospital canceled a lot of elective
surgeries scheduled for
Monday because of the tornado. She said the hospital
is not at maximum capacity.
“It definitely freed up a
lot of beds, a lot of surgeons,
a lot of nursing staff,” Cox
said. “We’re able to handle
it.”
Hospitals at Cox South,
Cox North and Cox Monett
received about 100 patients
affected by the tornado.
Archer said the hospital
initially heard that about
300 injured people might be
brought to Springfield hospitals. CoxHealth worked
with St. John’s to divide the
patient load as they came in,
Archer said
About 70 people were
brought to Cox South.
Another 30, including psychiatric patients from the
Joplin
hospital,
were
brought to Cox North.
Christine Roepke, an
Ozarks Technical Community College student who is
working as an emergency
medical technical at Cox,
said ambulance crews were
working double shifts to
ferry people to area hospitals.
“There are people who
say they saw a person die
right next to them,” Roepke
said. “There are a lot of people whose hair is matted
with dirt and blood. They’ve
had a long 12 hours.”
To check on a patient at
CoxHealth, call 417-2693211. People can check on
patients at St. John’s at 417820-2000.
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NEWS-LEADER
Tuesday, May 24, 2011 3A
CARDINALS,
ROYALS DONATING
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The St. Louis Cardinals and
Kansas City Royals are each
donating $25,000 toward the
Joplin tornado relief efforts,
and fans attending Springfield Cardinals games this
week can help, too, the organizations announced late
Monday.
The Cardinals are partnering with Springfield-based
Convoy of Hope, while the
Royals are assisting Olathe,
Kan.-based Heart to Heart
International.
The Springfield Cardinals
also will collect fan donations
at the Hammons Field gates
this week and then present a
check to representatives of
Convoy of Hope shortly
before the 7:07 p.m. game
Friday.
The Double-A Cardinals
open a six-game homestand
beginning at 7:07 p.m.
Wednesday, with the Corpus
Christi Hooks in town for
three games followed by the
San Antonio Missions.
» If your smartGALLERY
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» News-Leader.com: Hundreds of images from our
photo staff and wires.
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CHRISTIAN COUNTY
CHURCHES
Law enforcement,
fire officials pitch in
Faith leaders call for prayers
By Tara Muck
[email protected]
OZARK — Several Christian County emergency
responders went to Joplin
to aid emergency crews
after Sunday’s tornado.
Ozark Police Chief Lyle
Hodges said he and several
other officers arrived in
Joplin late Sunday and provided security for residences and businesses.
Hodges said the destruction was unlike anything he
had seen.
“I’ve seen tornado damage ... but this was as far as
you could see,” Hodges
said. “You couldn’t stand
anywhere and see the edge
of destruction. The houses
were all destroyed. It wasn’t one here and one there.”
Hodges said he and others
provided security at a bank
where only the ATM and
vault were left standing.
“Everything else was a pile
of rubble.”
Ozark City Administrator
Steve Childers said the public works department sent a
crew of six, as well as a
dump truck, front loader,
chain saws and other equipment, to help with rescue
and recovery efforts.
Nixa and Ozark fire
departments also sent
crews.
Christian County Sheriff
Joey Kyle said he and
about a dozen deputies took
off-road vehicles to Joplin
but found themselves
among about 250 other
police officers waiting to
help.
“They’ve got an influx of
volunteers,”
he
said.
“...They really didn’t have
anything else for us to do.”
Kyle said the best thing
for his department to do is
to wait until the first wave
of volunteers go home.
That’s when he believes
they’ll be needed the most.
“Those people responding
are going to go home sometime this week, and when
they do, it’s going to leave a
vacuum of volunteers,” he
said. “I’m going to go over
there and try to organize
that second wave.”
Kyle plans to send four or
five deputies a day to help
augment recovery efforts.
Linda Barger, assistant
director of the Christian
County Emergency Management Agency, said the
department and volunteers
will be available in coming
days to provide relief.
The county Community
Emergency Response Team
has been on standby, waiting to be called to Joplin,
she said.
GALENA
Tornado takes out
Stone County homes
By Tara Muck
[email protected]
The National Weather
Service says an EF2 tornado is to blame for destroying homes and turkey houses north of Galena on Sunday evening.
Meteorologist
Doug
Cramer of the National
Weather Service in Springfield said the tornado had
winds up to 120 mph when it
tore through rural Stone
County about 7:10 p.m. Sunday.
The tornado was on the
ground for about 15 minutes, tracking just over
seven miles before dissipating about five miles northeast of Galena, Cramer
said.
“It was a pretty decent
tornado,” he said.
Stone County Emergency
Management Director Tom
Martin said the tornado
damaged nine homes and
seven turkey houses. Of
those, two modular homes
are a complete loss, and
five turkey houses were
destroyed.
No injuries were reported. Luckily, Martin said,
residents took heed of the
danger and left their homes
before the tornado struck.
Martin said the majority
of damage was along Stone
County Route AA, Missouri
176, Johnson Rowe Drive,
Horse Creek Road, Bass
Hollow Road and Coon
Ridge Road.
“There’s lots of trees
down,” he said. “We’re still
trying to get roads cleaned
up.”
Cramer
said
survey
crews were out Monday
scoping a line from Galena
west to Joplin, where a
deadly tornado hit about 6
p.m. Sunday.
“I think we had some tornado touchdowns along that
line, so that’s where we sent
our survey teams,” Cramer
said.
By late Monday, the survey crew had not reported
its findings to the NWS
office, Cramer said.
NEWS LEADER
AFTER:
Much of
St. Mary’s
Catholic
Church in
Joplin was
destroyed in
the tornado.
By Linda Leicht
[email protected]
Churches in Joplin are
reaching out to storm victims, but some churches
were hit hard, too.
St. Mary’s Catholic
Church — with little
more than a frame topped
by a large cross still
standing — and its
attached
elementary
school were destroyed by
Sunday’s tornado.
The Rev. Justin D. Monaghan is the priest for the
parish, which serves
nearly 650 families. Monaghan, who lives in the
church rectory next door,
sought safety in a bathtub
when the tornado hit.
The residence was
severely damaged, a
spokeswoman for the
Catholic diocese said, but
parishioners came and
helped dig their priest
out. Monaghan was not
injured and spent the
night with a church family, Recy Moore reported.
St. Peter’s Catholic
Church, about 20 blocks
north of St. Mary’s, was
spared any damage, as
were St. Peter’s Junior
High and McAuley High
School nearby.
The high school was
used as an overflow
triage center after the
storm
destroyed
St.
John’s Medical Center,
said Gene Koester, principal at the school.
Joplin’s Memorial Hall
was the primary triage
center.
The building is also
being
used
as
an
overnight
shelter.
Koester estimated 200
people were served Sunday night at the school in
the triage and shelter.
“We even set up a counseling session in the
chapel,” Koester said.
“Father J. (Friedel, pastor at St. Peter’s) did that
last night.”
The junior high also
opened as a shelter.
Koester said the school
has been taking calls
from all over the country
asking how people can
help.
“Most of all, we need
their prayers,” he said.
“It is a devastating
SUBMITTED PHOTO
PRAYER VIGIL
St. Joseph Catholic Academy
in Springfield will offer a
Rosary service at 2:30 p.m.
today for everyone affected by
Sunday’s tornado. Donations
for relief efforts will also be
accepted.
The service will be at St.
Joseph Catholic Church, 1115
N. Campbell Ave.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
BEFORE: St. Mary’s, shown before the storm, serves about
650 families.
moment in the history of
Joplin, and prayers are the
most important thing people can do for us.”
The Rev. James V. Johnston Jr., bishop of the
Springfield-Cape
Girardeau Diocese, also
asked for prayers. His comments were posted on the
diocese website: “Please
keep the people of Joplin in
our prayers, especially
those whose lives were
taken as well as those who
lost loved ones. We pray
especially for the people of
St. Mary’s Catholic Church
and school who suffered a
total loss as well as St.
John’s Mercy hospital
which sustained major
damage.”
3 killed at Harmony
Church
organizations
have echoed that request,
as well as offered places
where people can send
donations to help Joplin
through church relief agencies.
“Our hearts and prayers
go out to all those who
grieve the loss of loved
ones and who have suffered
the destruction of homes
and businesses following
Sunday’s devastating tornado in Joplin,” the Rev.
Robert Schnase, bishop of
the Missouri Conference of
United Methodists, wrote
on the conference website.
FIND MISSING
TORNADO VICTIMS
Quality Windows
Two Methodist churches
— St. James and St. Paul —
were hit by the tornado, as
was the district office.
Southwest District Superintendent Sandra Nenandall confirmed the safety of
the pastors and families of
the churches.
The same cannot be said
for
Harmony
Baptist
Church, where three people
were confirmed killed
when the tornado hit the
building. Empire Baptist
also was damaged, said
Terry Wright of the Greene
County Baptist Association.
“We’re trying to assimilate all the information,”
Wright said. “They’re still
trying to assess what’s been
going on and how to help.”
Assemblies damaged
Four of Joplin’s eight
Assemblies of God churches were in the path of the
storm, a spokesman for the
Assemblies of God national
office in Springfield said.
Faith Assembly is a total
loss, said Dan Van Veen.
Also receiving some damage were First, Second and
Cathedral assemblies.
The Assemblies of God is
working through Springfield-based Convoy of Hope
to assess and meet needs in
Joplin, Van Veen said. Any
updates will be posted on
the Assemblies of God web-
» The Red Cross’ Safe & Well page lets you search for loved
ones or let them know you’re OK. http://bit.ly/krHqwv
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Bethany
Presbyterian
Church was damaged when
the storm broke windows
and sent water inside, but
First Presbyterian was not
damaged.
John Calvin Presbytery
has secured a Presbyterian
Disaster Assistance Emergency Aid Grant of $10,000
for each church. Presbyterian churches in neighboring communities have also
begun collecting bottled
water and other aid to deliver as soon as emergency
teams can go into the community.
One Disciples of Christ
church, South Joplin Christian, was damaged and several members’ homes were
damaged, the denomination’s relief agency said.
The other Disciples church
in Joplin, First Christian,
initially was used as an
emergency shelter and is
now a drop-off point for
supplies.
“The best way you can
respond is to ‘Pray, Pay and
Stay,’” the website offered.
“There will be opportunities to lend a hand. However, now is not the time for
unskilled volunteers.”
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4A Tuesday, May 24, 2011 •
JOPLIN TORNADO
NEWS-LEADER • News-Leader.com
‘THESE ARE OUR NEIGHBORS’
Area relief organizations get to work
By Didi Tang
[email protected]
Area relief organizations
quickly mobilized in the
wake of Sunday’s tornado
in Joplin to send food,
water, blankets and other
relief supplies.
“It’s more near to our
hearts because of how close
it is,” said Jeff Nene,
spokesman for Convoy of
Hope. “These are our
neighbors, friends, and
there are families who have
been affected.”
Convoy of Hope activated
its emergency response
team Sunday night, Nene
said. By Monday afternoon,
the faith-based relief organization had sent 40,000
pounds of relief supplies,
including water, meals and
snacks, to a central distribution center set up at Missouri Southern State University.
Convoy of Hope is coordinating efforts with emergency management officials, Nene said.
“We want the first
responders to do their work
to find victims and clear
some of the roads,” Nene
said. “Then we will set up
our distribution centers.”
Small volunteer teams
will be assembled to help
deliver supplies to different locations and neighborhoods in the city, Nene
said.
By Monday afternoon,
Ozarks Food Harvest also
had secured six truckloads
of food items to be deliv-
VALERIE MOSLEY / NEWS-LEADER
Denisa Simpson (left) and Marsha Denton sort donated clothing at the shelter at Robert
Ellis Young Gym on the MSSU campus on Monday. Dozens of volunteers were on hand to
help sort incoming items, as some tornado victims sought needed items.
ered to Joplin.
Ozarks Food Harvest is
working with the State
Emergency Management
Agency (SEMA) to coordinate additional donation
deliveries.
Its sister food bank in
Kansas City, Harvesters, is
sending donations directly
to Joplin.
The food bank in Columbia is delivering donations
to Harvesters, and the food
bank in Cape Girardeau is
sending
donations
to
Ozarks Food Harvest.
“We are working closely
with our member agency in
Carthage this morning, the
Carthage Crisis Center,
who has already delivered
two truckloads to Joplin,”
Bart
Brown,
president/CEO at Ozarks
Food Harvest, said Monday.
“The Wildwood Baptist
Church in Joplin, another
partner of ours, is currently serving as a triage. We
have yet to reach all member pantries and sites in
Joplin.”
In Buffalo, David Beltz of
the citizen-operated Dallas
County Disaster Relief,
said the not-for-profit orga-
nization is ready to assist
when needed.
“We have two men down
there doing the assessment
and trying to contact the
authorities,” Beltz said.
“Our policy is to make sure
we connect with appropriate authorities so we would
not be a burden on the system.”
When called upon, the
group can send hundreds of
volunteers into the disaster
area with their own food,
water and equipment to
help clear debris and clean
up, Beltz said.
People from Tennessee,
Illinois and Kansas had
contacted his group to volunteer, Beltz said.
“We are trying to identify
the needs and load appropriate equipment,” Beltz
said.
Red
Cross
Greater
Ozarks Regional Center
opened a shelter Sunday
night at the Missouri Southern State University gym,
at 3950 E. Newman Road,
said Joann Moore, spokeswoman for the local chapter.
A hundred remained
Monday morning.
On Monday, majors Norman and Claire Grainger of
the Salvation Army headed
to Joplin.
At least three Salvation
Army canteens from the
tri-state area were also on
their way to assist responders and survivors, including the Springfield canteen
that recently assisted with
flooding in Illinois.
As of Monday, the Salvation Army did not activate
as a shelter but continued
to work with the Red
Cross.
In an open message,
Kristy Nelson, interim
executive director of Habitat for Humanity Springfield, outlined her group’s
plan.
“We have had many
phone calls from people
wanting to reach out and
help our neighbors in
Joplin,” she wrote. “Words
cannot describe the devastation the area has experi-
enced.”
The Springfield group
had been in contact with
the Joplin Habitat for
Humanity affiliate, which
was not able to account for
all Habitat family partners
as of noon Monday.
“There were three Habitat homes in the path of the
tornado, and we are anxiously waiting for an
update on those families,”
she wrote.
Habitat Springfield has a
staff member on site assisting with search and rescue
efforts, she said.
Convoy of Hope’s Nene
said relief efforts for
Joplin could take weeks.
“It can be a matter of a
few weeks, but given the
scope of the disaster, it can
be much longer,” Nene
said.
On Monday, the Community Foundation of the
Ozarks, with its JoplinCarthage area affiliate, set
up the Joplin Recovery
Fund to support community rebuilding efforts.
The CFO will seed the
fund with a $10,000 contribution.
“We ... know from our
past disaster experience,
including the 2003 Stockton
tornado, that recovery is a
long-haul process,” CFO
President Brian Fogle said.
“As bleak as things might
look today, we want to help
give our Joplin neighbors
hope and confidence that
they will successfully rebuild their community.”
Survivors/Death toll expected to rise
COLLEGES
Continued from Page 1A
DEAN CURTIS / NEWS-LEADER
There was a flurry of activity at Ozarks Technical Community College as the community dropped off donations for
the Joplin relief effort.
Ozarks colleges
offering support
By Didi Tang
[email protected]
Area colleges are assisting disaster relief efforts
in Joplin.
Missouri Southern State
University is operating as
a Red Cross triage and
shelter.
The university was relatively undamaged by the
twister. On Monday, it had
power but was without
water because of damage
to sewer treatment plants.
Other higher education
institutions also stepped
up to aid emergency
effort.
» Davidson Hall at Crowder College in Neosho is
serving as an emergency
shelter, as is Ozark Christian College on North Main
Street in Joplin.
» Ozarks Technical Community College in Springfield is collecting items for
donation to tornado victims in Joplin.
Donations must be new,
never-used items. Donations may be brought to
the campus parking lot at
the corner of National
Avenue and Chestnut
Expressway, where they
will be loaded directly into
two tractor-trailers from
OTC’s Transport Training
Institute for transport to
Joplin. Donations of nonperishable food, water,
blankets, boxes and more
can be dropped off
between 7 a.m. and 9 p.m.
through
Wednesday.
Donations also will be
accepted until 5 p.m.
Thursday.
homes just completely
gone,” said former state
legislator Gary Burton,
who came to help at a volunteer center at Missouri
Southern State University.
Unlike multiple storms
that killed more than 300
people last month across
the South, Joplin was hit by
just one exceptionally powerful tornado.
Not since a June 1953 tornado in Flint, Mich., had a
single twister been so deadly. That storm also killed
116, according to the
National Weather Service.
Authorities were prepared to find more bodies
in the rubble throughout
this town of 50,000 people.
Gov. Jay Nixon did not
want to guess how high the
toll would go. But he said:
“Clearly, it’s on its way up.”
Seventeen people were
pulled alive from the rubble. An unknown number of
people were hurt.
While many residents had
up to 17 minutes of warning, rain and hail may have
drowned out the sirens.
As rescuers toiled in the
debris, a strong thunderstorm lashed the crippled
city. Rescue crews had to
move gingerly around
downed power lines and
jagged chunks of debris.
Fires, gas fumes and unstable buildings posed constant threats.
Searchers fanned out
across several square
miles. Groups went door to
door, making quick checks
of property that in many
places had been stripped to
its foundations.
National Weather Service
Director Jack Hayes said
the storm was given a preliminary rating of EF4 — the
second-highest assigned to
TORNADOVIDEO.NET
This frame grab from video shows lightning inside the massive Joplin tornado.
twisters. The storm had
winds of 190 to 198 mph and
at times was three-quarters
of a mile wide.
Some of the most startling damage was at St.
John’s Regional Medical
Center, where staff had
only moments to hustle
patients into hallways. Six
people died there — five
patients and a visitor.
The storm blew out hundreds of windows and
caused damage so extensive that doctors had to
abandon the hospital. A
crumpled helicopter lay on
its side in the parking lot.
Dr. Jim Riscoe said some
members of his emergency
room staff showed up after
the tornado with injuries of
their own, but they worked
through the night anyway.
“I spent most of my life at
that hospital,” Riscoe said.
“It’s awful. I had two pregnant nurses who dove
under gurneys ... It’s a testimony to the human spirit.”
As the tornado bore down
on their trailer home,
Joshua Wohlford, his pregnant girlfriend and their
two toddlers fled to a Walmart store. The family narrowly escaped after a shelf
of toys partially collapsed,
forming a makeshift tent
that shielded them.
“It was 15 minutes of
hell,” Wohlford said.
At a Fastrip store, 20 people ran into a pitch-black
cooler as the building
began to collapse around
them. They documented
their experience with a
video. The audio was even
more terrifying — ear-splitting wind, objects getting
smashed, wailing children
and a woman praying.
Brennan Stebbins said
the group crouched on the
floor, clinging to and comforting each other. No one
was seriously hurt.
Shielded by mattresses,
former lawmaker Chuck
Surface rode out the storm
in his basement with his
wife, daughter, granddaughter and dog. After
about five minutes, the
deafening roar stopped.
“When it got to where we
thought we could look out,
we went to the top of the
stairs and there was no roof
— it was all open air.”
Dazed survivors tried to
salvage clothes, furniture
and family photos.
Kelley Fritz’s sons, both
Eagle Scouts, rushed into
the neighborhood after
realizing every home was
destroyed. When they
returned, she said, “my
sons had deceased children
in their arms.”
Justin Gibson stood outside the tangled remains of
a Home Depot and pointed
to a black pickup that had
been tossed into them. It
belonged to his roommate’s
brother, last seen at the
store with his two young
daughters.
“I don’t know the extent
of this yet,” Gibson said,
“but I know I’ll have friends
and family dead.”
Three firefighters from
Battlefield were among
emergency workers from
throughout the region who
were in Joplin to help with
recovery efforts.
Battlefield Fire Capt.
Jake Schleuter has worked
at disaster scenes before,
but “I’ve never been to anything like this.”
Fellow Battlefield firefighter Peter Rauch urged
civilians to stay away.
“It’s hard enough trying
to find organization in the
chaos without all the
tourists,” he said.
Contributing: News-Leader
reporter Roseann Moring
‘IT WAS SPILLING OVER INTO OUR CLASS’
Schools waste no time in organizing efforts to help victims
By Claudette Riley
[email protected]
After a powerful tornado
shredded Joplin schools and
abruptly ended the school
year, area districts quickly
organized to help.
Joplin Superintendent CJ
Huff announced Monday
that classes were canceled
for the rest of the 2010-11
school year.
A note posted on the district website confirmed
that three schools — including Joplin High — were
destroyed and many other
school buildings incurred
damage.
The district plans to
rebuild but will concentrate
this week on finding and
helping students and teachers.
About half of Springfield
schools — including all five
high schools — announced
plans within 24 hours of the
tornado to raise money or
collect donations.
A few schools will allow
students to wear pajamas
and hats to school or listen to
music during lunch for a
donation.
Others are collecting
coins, gift cards and critical
personal hygiene items.
At Field Elementary, fifthgraders already were studying a unit entitled “Help is
on the Way,” which looks at
how relief organizations
support needy cities, states
and countries.
Those students issued a
challenge for every classroom to raise $200.
Some schools have transformed existing projects or
school fundraisers to help
Joplin families.
Third-graders at Rountree
Elementary already were
planning to show their photography during a gallery
show Thursday. It was part
of a lesson about how “Visual Media Promotes Social
Change.”
But images of the devastation just 70 miles west of
Springfield spurred the students to turn it into an auction.
All proceeds will go to the
tornado victims.
Teacher Nicki Foltz said
the students met Monday
and talked about time they
spent with family in Joplin
and other connections to the
city.
“It wasn’t just about the
people in Joplin,” she said.
“It was spilling over into our
class.”
Foltz said the experience
will provide a lasting lesson
for the students.
“Even though they’re kids,
even though they’re little,
they can make a difference,” she said. “They can
make a change in the
world.”
A growing number of area
districts also announced
efforts Monday.
Willard
Superintendent
Kent Medlin challenged the
4,200-student district to “fill
a truck with donations.”
It’s part of a larger effort
by the Willard Chamber of
Commerce to collect items
quickly.
He called in building
principals to organize the
help. The chamber will pick
up donated items on Thursday.
“I know this is only 1-day
notice, however the need for
the supplies is immediate,”
Medlin said in a release.
“This is one small way that
we can help this effort.”
JOPLIN TORNADO
NEWS-LEADER • News-Leader.com
116
Confirmed deaths in
Joplin as of press time
17
People pulled alive
from the rubble
500
Injured, according to a
USA Today estimate
• Tuesday, May 24, 2011 5A
7 miles
190+ mph
Of destruction was carved
through Joplin (NWS)
2,000
Wind speeds reached
during the tornado
Structures were damaged or
destroyed, approximately
SNAPSHOTS
Rain, hail
add insult
to injury
By Roseann Moring
[email protected]
VALERIE MOSLEY / NEWS-LEADER
This Kum & Go store is among the estimated 2,000 structures damaged or destroyed by the Joplin tornado.
Damage
Continued from Page 1A
the feline hiding under the bed.
Around the corner, Dottie and
Tim Sumners were able to find
scores of framed photos and
albums.
Although they doubted the
storm would be dangerous, the
couple rushed to Eastvue Baptist
Church, where Tim Sumners is
the pastor.
“I’ll never disregard the sirens
again,” Dottie Sumners said. “We
have many times before.”
Tim Sumners said they had
lived in that house for 33 years,
and he plans to rebuild.
“We’ll make it,” he said.
As storm clouds menaced again
about 9 a.m. Monday, the Great
Plains Federal Credit Union
served as a temporary shelter for
weary search crews.
Firefighters and task force
members laughed when asked if
they’d gotten any sleep.
A loud radio was tuned to
KZRG, which took calls from
those who needed help and others
who wanted to give it.
Also seeking shelter in the relatively unscarred bank building
was Barton County bail bond
agent Bryan Lemmons.
Lemmons made the drive to
Joplin after hearing that some
families couldn’t find their loved
ones.
He knew his skills could help.
Seeking survivors
VALERIE MOSLEY / NEWS-LEADER
Roger Dedick walks down 18th Street, where his home was destroyed, on Monday.
He recalled seeing an elderly
woman searching in the rain for
her cat.
“There’s so much loss. People
are holding onto whatever they
can ... which isn’t much,” he said.
After a 20-minute break and
though the rain was still falling,
the firefighters and volunteers
went back to work.
North of the hardest-hit areas,
the Missouri Southern State University campus became a kind of
headquarters for the homeless
and hungry.
Perry Elkins of the American
Red Cross managed the shelter in
the school gym.
He said 65 people stayed there
Sunday night. By noon Monday, it
was up to 110.
“This is certainly some of the
most devastating scenes I’ve ever
seen,” Elkins said.
Although Jeff Malley’s house
was destroyed on New Hampshire Avenue, he made it through.
Malley said he, a friend and his
dog, Sprocket, survived by holing
up in a closet.
“It was dark inside at first, then
it was daylight,” he said.
The walls of the closet were the
only part of the house left standing.
Malley said watching his roof
tear away has left him a bit shaken.
“I’m afraid to stand here with
this rain and the clouds.”
News-Leader photographer Valerie
Mosley contributed to this report.
SPRINGFIELD RESPONSE
Local government agencies send aid to Joplin
By Amos Bridges
[email protected]
The city of Springfield and
Greene County sent dozens of
staff to Joplin in the wake of Sunday’s tornado. By today the number was expected to exceed 100.
Police and sheriff’s deputies,
firefighters and public works
equipment operators formed the
majority of the local response.
A team of about 16 people from
Greene County Emergency Management arrived in Joplin about 9
p.m. Sunday, said county spokeswoman Jenny Edwards.
The group included a Springfield 911 dispatch supervisor and
trained search personnel. They
also brought related equipment.
John Vincent’s house was left
partially standing after Sunday’s
tornado, though the bedroom is
gone.
There is not nearly enough left
to live in, however, and Monday’s
rainstorm threatened to drown
what remained.
Vincent’s driveway was a sixinch puddle full of debris. To navigate it, Vincent, 59, and coworkers helping him sift through the
wreckage walked over the family’s garage door and a fallen tree.
Hail that fell in the early
evening added insult to injury as
helpers packed the family’s
things into a truck. The family
planned to stay Monday night
with relatives in Kansas.
After that, “What am I going to
do? Where am I going to go?”
Sally Vincent asked as she sat in
the ruins of their home. “So many
questions, and I don’t have the
answers.”
Among the things swept up in
the tornado were obituary photos
for three of her children. Without
the help of her husband’s boss and
coworkers, she’d be lost, she said.
Her husband was more stoic.
“What are you going to do?” he
said. “It is what it is.”
Greene County Sheriff Jim
Arnott and more than 40 deputies
responded Sunday, as well.
Deputies conducted search and
rescue efforts, patrol assignments and helped set up and manage a makeshift morgue where
the bodies of dozens of victims
were processed, according to a
news release.
Springfield police sent 10 officers, with more on standby. Several department chaplains went
to help with non-department
efforts and the Springfield Police
Officers Association was trying
to help any Joplin officers who
may have lost their homes.
A number of off-duty Springfield firefighters were helping,
the city said in a news release, in
addition to the technical rescue
team that left Sunday night, minutes after the tornado struck.
The team is specially trained to
deal with large-scale building
collapses and carries equipment
to breach or tunnel into collapsed
buildings to rescue trapped victims, the city release said. The
initial team of eight was relieved
by another team of six Monday.
Clearing debris
Additional local aid has included tetanus vaccine from the
Springfield-Greene
County
Health Department and heavy
equipment from city and county
public works departments.
Edwards, in Joplin on Monday,
said four county highway department crews with backhoes were
working in the area, “clearing
debris from roads and assisting
the local public works department.”
Springfield
Public
Works
expected to send about 30 personnel by this morning, along
with equipment including two
loaders, more than 100 barricades, five backhoes and five
chipper trucks with chippers.
City sewer maintenance sent a
backhoe, as well, and had additional equipment from the treatment plant —dump trucks, a generator and light tower — ready to
go if needed.
State Rep. Bill Lant said he
spent all day Monday talking to
emergency workers, including a
team still looking for survivors as
rain fell in early twilight.
“Nobody’s giving up at this
point on survivors,” said Lant, RJoplin, noting at least seven had
been found earlier.
Lant said planning had turned
toward finding housing and other
necessities for displaced residents.
“It’s just mind-numbing,” he
said. “You can’t find one person
out of a dozen who can tell you
what’s in their medicine cabinet,
but when you don’t have those
things, it’s pretty destructive.”
Rain slows relief
Pouring rain Monday night
hampered relief efforts while
concealing the level of destruction near St. John’s Regional Medical Center.
The Salvation Army and other
service groups set up shop in a
parking lot across the street from
the hospital, which was vacant
and dark after sustaining heavy
damage. Service workers said
most people in the area left earlier in the day.
Tim Anderson of Kansas City
said he took about 10 groups of
people to a main road, where
they were met by friends and
family.
Anderson works for a company
that responds after natural disasters to prepare buildings for
reconstruction.
“It's like (Hurricane) Katrina on
land,” he said.
“It looked just like this.”
Bringing in help
A Fazoli’s restaurant — one of
few nearby eateries that was open
— brought in extra help from
Springfield to take care of the
crowd of customers.
“We were full pretty much all
day and all night,” said Danielle
McIntosh, 19, who had come from
a Fazoli’s in Springfield.
About 8 p.m., they began running out of food and were giving
away most of what was left, she
said.
COMMUNICATIONS
With phones out, many send messages online
By Kathryn Wall
[email protected]
In the wake of Sunday’s
deadly tornado in Joplin,
telephone communication
came almost to a standstill.
As family and friends
elsewhere worried because
they could not reach Joplin
residents, those untouched
by the storm were powerless to call from some areas
of the city.
The remaining phone system in place soon became
overloaded
with
calls.
Many turned to other technology to get the word out.
Websites were quickly set
up to disseminate information. Those with Internet
access assured family and
friends they were safe.
Others posted pictures of
brothers, sisters, grandparents or pets, hoping someone else in the Joplin area
had seen them.
A “Joplin, MO Tornado
Recovery” Facebook page,
set up shortly after the
storm, had 85,000 subscribers by Monday afternoon.
Several posters, some
from as far away as California, asked how they could
help.
Some
posters
announced local fundraising events.
Others posted pictures of
family members, hoping to
get word that friends and
family made it through the
storm.
“Looking for Mae Smith ...
she is an 89 yr. old lady and
we can’t find her,” one post
said.
“If you have seen Justin
Wayne Solon tell him to contact his brother. They are
worried about him,” another poster asked.
A similar Facebook page,
“Animals Lost & Found
from the Joplin, MO tornado,” had descriptions and
photos of animals found
after the storm.
Twitter updated with
around 10 messages a
minute with mentions of
Joplin. Messages included
residents sending pictures
of destruction, aid agencies
offering help and celebrities sending condolences.
The American Red Cross
utilized its Safe and Well
website (safeandwell.communityos.org) to help people find others after the
storm.
Users may register on the
site so family elsewhere
can see that they are safe.
Problems with phone service also affected agencies
responding to the area.
John Archer, director of
emergency services at Cox
South, said the biggest challenge in responding to the
tornado was communications.
Archer said that because
communications had been
mostly wiped out, the fire
department, police department and various ambulance services each operated their own incident commands
to
coordinate
efforts. That made it difficult to track patients who
were taken to hospitals.
Communications companies are working to restore
phone service.
AT&T has multiple teams
in the area, including its
Network Disaster Recovery group.
A satellite truck was
brought in Sunday night,
according to a news
release. The equipment was
expected to be operational
by Monday evening.
Additional equipment will
be placed in the area of U.S.
71 and 20th Street to help
ease the capacity loads on
current phone systems.
Verizon Wireless said
Monday it will send three
temporary cell towers to
provide emergency wireless capacity and coverage
in and around Joplin.
Additional
temporary
resources, including a
mobile charging station and
a temporary store, are
being sent to Joplin.
6A Tuesday, May 24, 2011
NEWS-LEADER • News-Leader.com
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Tuesday, May 24, 2011 7A
NEWS-LEADER • News-Leader.com
For details of services, see obituaries or call the listed funeral
home. For addresses and phone
numbers of local funeral service
providers, visit News-Leader.com
and click on obituaries.
SPRINGFIELD
Mr. John J. Daume, 92,
Herman H. Lohmeyer
Funeral Home.
Mrs. Dorothy LaVerne
Ellison, 90, see obituary.
Mrs. Phyllis Fotopulos,
75, Barnes Family Funeral
Home, Ozark.
Mr. Richard Gray Jr., 74,
Klingner-Cope
Family
Funeral Home at Midtown.
Mrs. Mary Powell Lawson, 54, see obituary.
Mr.
Howard
Edman
McCallister, 78, see obituary.
Ms. Grace Stanton, 22,
Gorman-Scharpf Funeral
Home.
ASH GROVE
Mr. Richard Eugene Kerr
Sr., 70, Fossett-Mosher
Funeral Home, Mount Vernon.
Mr. Kevin Lee Jeansonne,
43, Fossett-Mosher Funeral
Home, Mount Vernon.
BRANSON
Mr.
Melvin
C.
Oelschlaeger, 85, SnappBearden Funeral Home.
CRANE
Mr. Robert Keener, 64,
Westrip Funeral Home.
DIXON
Mr. James W. Chambers,
68, Long-Kloeppel Funeral
Homes and Cremation Services.
EL DORADO SPRINGS
Mr. Eli Lewis Choate, 79,
Bland-Hackleman Funeral
Home.
Mrs. Betty (McGuirk)
McNeece, 81, Bland-Hackleman Funeral Home.
FORDLAND
Mr. Lindell R. Grover, 64,
see obituary.
FORSYTH
Mrs. Katherine Bowman,
64,
Forsyth
Whelchel
Funeral Chapel.
GAINESVILLE
Mr. Alvin Junie Smith, 79,
Clinkingbeard
Funeral
Home.
HOUSTON
Mrs. Micheline P. Johnson, 64, Evans Funeral
Home.
KANSAS CITY
Mr.
Rexford
Barney
Pruitt, 90, Yarber Mortuary, Mountain View.
LEBANON
Mrs.
Barbara
Jean
Howlett, 36, Memorial
Chapel of Richland.
Mrs. Lola M. Johnson, 88,
Shadel’s Colonial Chapel.
Mrs. Gladys Talbot, 102,
Shadel’s Colonial Chapel.
Mrs. Linda Joan Wasmer,
60,
Shadel’s
Colonial
Chapel.
Mr. F. Johnathan “Johnny” Wilson, 78, Shadel’s
Colonial Chapel.
MARSHFIELD
Mr. Jerry Jay Jarratt, 63,
see obituary.
MOUNTAIN GROVE
Mrs. Vina Ellen (Bell)
Buckbee, 87, Craig-Hurtt
Funeral Home.
MOUNT VERNON
Mr. Kennith Douglas, 66,
Westrip Funeral Home,
Crane.
OZARK
Mr.
Kenneth
Billey
McBride, 72, see obituary.
PROTEM
Mrs. Faye Goodsell, 84,
KSE Funeral Home of
Forsyth.
PURDY
Mr. Dale B. Shellenberger, 87, White Funeral Home,
Cassville.
REEDS SPRING
Mr. Kenneth Eugene
Horn, 76, Stumpff Funeral
Home-South, Kimberling
City.
RICHLAND
Mrs. Alice Bethurem, 81,
Shadel’s Colonial Chapel.
SHELL KNOB
Lindell R. Grover
Lindell R. Grover, 64,
Fordland, passed away at
4:37 a.m., Sunday, May 22,
2011 in St. John’s Regional
Health Center, Springfield,
Missouri.
He was born December
14, 1946 in Alton, Illinois,
the son of the late Clarence
and Mary Martha (Robinson) Grover. He was united in marriage on May 27,
1989 in Hammond, Illinois,
to Kathryn L. Fleener.
He was also preceded in
death by two nieces, Crystal and Tonya Fleener; a
nephew, Shane Fleener and a sister-in-law, Susan
Tillery.
Lindell was an U.S. Air Force Veteran. He was
employed with ConocoPhillips for 37 ½ years before
retiring as a pipeline supervisor in Rock Springs,
Wyoming. He was a certified welding inspector and
a member of the American Welding Association and
the National Association of Corrosion Engineers, and
the N.R.A. He was an avid photographer specializing in wildlife and nature photography. He was a
member of Rogersville Church of Christ. He enjoyed
being with his nieces, nephews and great nieces and
nephews, and many other children, that he adopted.
He is survived by his wife, Kathy; his adopted son,
Jason Crocker and wife Melissa, his adopted grandchildren, Abbi and Jackson Crocker, all of Fordland, MO; a sister, Cheryl Allen and husband Jerry,
Spring, TX; a brother, Les Grover, Cooperstown, PA;
three brothers-in-law, Tom Fleener and wife Joanie
and Richard Fleener and wife Beverly, all of Salem,
MO; and John Fleener and wife Jorja, Manhattan,
KS; a sister-in-law, Lora Fleener, Searcy, AR; six
nieces, Angie Clark and husband Kelly, Mt. Zion,
IL; Autumn Osburn and husband Wes, Springfield,
MO; Summer Watt and husband Dan, Nashville, TN;
Spring McDonald and husband Ryan, Henderson,
TN; Lydia Fleener, Searcy, AR; and Brendie Tillery,
State of MS; four nephews, Jason Allen and wife Jennifer, Iowa City, IA; J.T. Fleener and wife Crystal,
and Matt Fleener and wife Jennifer, all of Salem,
MO; and Josh Fleener and wife Pamela, Manhattan,
KS; his father-in-law and mother-in-law, William and
Alene Fleener, Summersville, MO; nineteen great
nieces and nephews and many other relatives and
friends.
Visitation will be held from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. Thursday, May 26, 2011, at the Rogersville Church of Christ,
109 S. Harper, Rogersville.
Funeral services will be held at 10:00 a.m., Friday,
May 27, 2011 at the Rogersville Church of Christ under the care of J.D. Lee and Sons Funeral Home.
Burial, with military honors, will follow in Jadwin
Cemetery south of Salem at 3:00 p.m.
The family request memorial donations to Mountain States Children’s Home, P.O. Box 1097, Longmont, CO 80502-9912.
Online condolences and guest book signing may
also be made at www.jdleeandsons.com.
Mrs. Stella “Colleen”
Alcozar,
Fohn Funeral
Home.
STRAFFORD
Mrs. Gladys M. Comstock, 96, Klingner-Cope
Family Funeral Home at
Midtown.
BULL SHOALS, ARK.
Mr.
Dale
Edward
Philliber, 72, see obituary.
CHANDLER, ARIZ.
Mr. Wendell E. Peterson,
86,
Hathaway-Peterman
Funeral Home, Wheatland.
Kenneth Billey McBride
Kenneth Billey McBride, age 72 of Ozark, passed
away Sunday, May 22, 2011. He was born January
10, 1939 in Carlsbad, New Mexico, the son of Roy and
Donie (Harlan) McBride.
Kenneth was a retired U.S. Army Veteran who
served his country for 23 years. On September 16,
1955 he married Marianne Pabst in Reno, Nevada.
Kenneth enjoyed golf and woodworking and especially enjoyed working for the Lord. He was a deacon
in his loved church, First Assembly of God Church of
Highlandville.
Survivors include his wife, Marianne McBride,
Ozark; his daughter, Tami Weyer, Nixa; his son, Kenneth Allen McBride, Springfield; granddaughter, Kelli Helton and husband Bradley; his great grandson,
Braden Kenneth Helton; and two sisters, Edna Jane
Vickery, Mesa, Arizona and Wanda Marie Rigney,
Williams, Arizona.
Kenneth was preceded in death by his parents and
a brother, Charles Edward McBride.
A graveside service with full military honors will be
held at 11 a.m., Thursday in Missouri Veterans Cemetery, Springfield under direction of Adams Funeral
Home, Nixa, with Reverend Ken Hunt officiating.
In lieu of flowers, memorial donations can be made
to the American Cancer Society.
Howard Edman McCallister
Howard Edman McCallister, age 78 of Springfield,
passed away Monday, May 23, 2011. He was born
March 5, 1933 in Mountain Grove, Missouri, the son
of John and Ethel (McCraw) McCallister.
On March 23, 1953 he married Jo Ella Locke.
Howard served his country in the U.S. Army from
1953 – 1955.
Survivors include his wife, Jo Ella McCallister; two
children, Howard McCallister and wife Alyssa and
Cynthia Luther and husband Mark; two grandchildren, Jeff Luther and wife Sierra and Jaimie McCallister and fiancé Ryan Nuckolls; one sister; and
several nieces and nephews.
Howard was preceded in death by his parents; five
brothers; and two sisters.
A funeral service will be held at 11 a.m., Wednesday in Adams Funeral Home, Nixa with Pastor Jerry
Francisco officiating. Burial will follow in Missouri
Veterans Cemetery, Springfield. In lieu of flowers,
memorial donations can be made to the North Nixa
Baptist Church Building Fund.
Dorothy LaVerne
Ellison
Dorothy LaVerne Ellison,
90, of Springfield passed
onto her heavenly home
on Friday, May 20, 2011
at St. John’s Mercy Hospital. LaVerne was born
September 2, 1920 to Edna
Lucinda Robertson and
Lewis Earl Smay, stepfather, in Ava, Missouri. She
graduated from Pleasant
Hope High School. She met
and married Ansel Ellison,
her husband and partner
of 68 years. She was a devoted wife, homemaker
and mother of two wonderful children. A long-time
member of Second Baptist Church, LaVerne was a
dedicated member of her Sunday School class and
received comfort and joy in the fellowship of the
church. She dedicated his life to serving the Lord and
taking care of her family. She was the best mother
anyone could ask for. She was always there for her
family when they needed encouragement. She gave
her love freely to all of her family and friends. She
was so special to so many people. Her family and
friends will never forget their fondest memories of
her love, kindness and warmth. She had a strong
faith and believed in the power of prayer and in the
goodness of everyone she met. LaVerne will be forever in our hearts.
LaVerne was preceded in death by her husband, Ansel. She is survived by two sons: Richard of Springfield; and Ron of Overland Park, Kansas; daughterin-law, Laurie; three grandchildren, Samantha and
Andrew “Bo” of Overland Park, Kansas; and Jeff of
Jefferson City, Missouri; and cousins Edward Robertson, Marvin Phipps, and Nancy Crowell.
There will be a visitation from 1:00-2:00 p.m., Wed.,
May 25, at Greenlawn East Funeral Home 3540 East
Seminole, Springfield, Missouri, followed by a service at 2:00 p.m. Burial will follow at Rivermont
Cemetery, 4500 South Lone Pine, Springfield, Missouri. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may
be made to Second Baptist Church.
Dale E Philliber
Dale E Philliber, 72, of Bull Shoals, Ark, passed
away Saturday, May 21, 2011 following a 4 month illness. Dale was born December 7, 1938 in Shelbina,
MO. Dale grew up in Raytown, MO and later moved
to Sedalia, MO where he worked in the lab at Bothwell Hospital.
In 1983, Dale moved to Springfield, MO and worked
in the lab at Doctors hospital. After retiring, he
moved to Bull Shoals, Ark where he enjoyed fishing.
Dale served his country in the US Navy. He was an
Eagle Scout and was a scout leader for his kids. He
also coached his kids sports teams. Dale loved to fish
and hunt.
Dale was preceeded in death by his parents Lee and
Fern Philliber. Dale is survived by special friend Pat
Philliber; two sons, Jeff (Diane) Philliber of Grayson, GA and Joel (Daniella) Philliber of Fort Collins,
Colo; one daughter, Kristi Philliber of Freeport, ILL;
stepdaughter, Amy (Brian) Byerley of Hollister, MO;
stepson, Chris Reynolds of Springfield, MO and 8
grandsons, Ryan, Joshua, Bryce, Owen, James, Garrett, Nolan, and Ford.
Graveside services will be held at US National Cemetary in Springfield, MO at 1:00 pm on Wednesday,
May 25th. Visitation will be held from 6 to 8 pm at
Greenlawn Funeral Home North on Tuesday, May
24th.
Mary Powell
Lawson
The Springfield community and the Lawson-Powell family have lost a very
special person.
Mary Margaret Powell
Lawson died on Friday,
May 20, 2011 after valiantly
fighting cancer for the past
five months. She was preceded in death by her parents, William and Harriet
Powell.
Born in Springfield, MO,
on December 19, 1956,
Mary graduated from Parkview High School and
earned a bachelor of science in Business Administration degree from the University of Arkansas. She
was a sister of Chi Omega sorority. On her parent’s
35th wedding anniversary, she married the love of
her life, Bob Lawson, Jr.
Mary was Divisional Merchandising Executive for
Dillards in Little Rock, Arkansas for 14 years before
moving back to Springfield to raise her children. She
was co-owner of Herrman Lumber Company.
The sudden death of this vibrant, loving woman creates deep sadness for her husband of 29 years, Bob,
and her two children, Jessica and William. Her beloved pets, Max, Gracie and Lillian will dearly miss
her as well. She loved and was loved by so many.
The family of Mary Lawson also includes her brothers, Ed Powell and J. Robert Powell, and their families.
Mary was known to her family and friends as an
avid tennis player, walker, gardener, and wonderful
cook. As a devoted mother and wife, she enjoyed
traveling extensively with her husband and children.
Some of her fondest memories included entertaining
family and many wonderful friends at home and at
the lake.
For those who would like to join Mary Lawson’s
family in honoring her life, a service of remembrance
and celebration will take place at King’s Way United
Methodist Church on Wednesday, May 25, 2011, at
11:00 a.m. Gorman-Scharpf is assisting the family
with necessary arrangements.
The family has requested that in lieu of floral arrangements, contributions be made to either Ozarks
Food Harvest, 2810 N. Cedarbrook, Springfield, Missouri 65803 or the Humane Society of Southwest Missouri, 3161 W. Norton Road, Springfield, Missouri
65803.
Online condolences may be left at gormanscharpf.
com.
Olive Vernetta
“Verna” Lindsey
Olive Vernetta “Verna” Lindsey, 89 of Strafford, passed away at 5:10
p.m. Sunday, May 22,
2011 at her home.
She was born June 20,
1921 in Lincoln, Nebraska, the daughter of Gilbert and Lucretia Woodward.
She was preceded in
death by two sons, Carroll and Charles Davis;
one daughter, Lynetta
Lindsey; her husband,
William Lindsey; and her
parents.
Olive is survived by
two sons, Wayne Lindsey and his wife Levita
and William Davis and
his wife Lucille; three
daughters, Jane Cotter,
Joan Schmitt and Judy
Workman and her husband Mickey; and several grandchildren and
great-grandchildren.
Graveside services
will be held at 2:00 p.m.
Wednesday, May 25, 2011
in Spokane Cemetery under the direction of Gorman-Scharpf Brentwood
Chapel. Visitation will be
from 7 to 8 p.m. Tuesday
in the funeral home.
Jerry Jay Jarratt
Jerry Jay Jarratt, son
of Jack and Mildred
(Tindle) Jarratt, was
born September 29, 1947
in Springfield, Missouri
and departed this life
May 21, 2011 in his home
in Marshfield, Missouri,
at the age of sixty-four
years.
He is survived by his
mother, Mildred Jarratt;
his son, Chris Jarratt and
wife, Nicole, of Springfield; one brother, J.C.
“Pike” Jarratt and wife,
Diana of Ervine, California; a special aunt and
uncle, John Bill and Jean
Greer, of Marshfield; and
a host of other relatives
and friends.
He was preceded in
death by his dad, Jack
Jarratt.
Services for Jerry Jay
Jarratt will be 10 a.m.,
Thursday May 26, 2011
in Day Funeral Home
Marshfield with burial
in Marshfield Cemetery,
Marshfield.
Visitation
will be from 7 to 8 p.m.,
Wednesday May 25, in
the funeral home chapel.
In lieu of flowers contributions may be made
to Drury University and
left in care of the funeral
home.
Michael Andrew
Williams
Michael Andrew Williams,
age 60 of Springfield, MO
passed away in his home
on Saturday, May 21,
2011. He was born May 17,
1951 in Springfield, MO to
Edythe (Stone) and John
R. Williams.
Mike graduated from
Greenwood in 1969. He enjoyed biking, swimming,
golf, tennis and loved the
water, sailing and scuba
diving. He graduated from then SMSU, where he
was a member of Sigma Chi Fraternity. He started working for O’Reilly Auto Parts, while attending
SMSU. He was planning on retiring June 1, 2011 after
completing 42 years with the company. He served as
Vice President of Advanced Technologies. He was
very proud of having been with the company from a
few stores to what they are today.
Mike is survived by his brother, Thomas Randolph
Williams; his fiancé, Debbra Worthington and her
children, Liberty, Suzannah, and Kelsey Sibley. Mike
loved his pets; four cats, Jingles, Bob, Hemingway
and Heidi, and two dogs, Thelma and Dinky. They
are going to miss him so much. Mike is also survived
by many friends, colleagues and cousins.
Mike suffered an aortic dissection in July of 2005
and miraculously survived with the help of wonderful
doctors at Missouri Baptist Hospital in St. Louis. He
regained his strength by his hard work and the great
doctors and rehab personnel at St. John’s. He was
an inspiration to all that saw his spirit and effort to
get stronger.
Visitation will be held today (Tuesday) from 6 to 8
p.m. at Gorman-Scharpf Funeral Home. Graveside
services and burial will be at 2:00 p.m., Wednesday
at White Chapel Memorial Gardens.
Memorials may be made to Boys and Girls Clubs,
1300 N. Boonville Ave., Springfield, MO 65802, or
Southwest Missouri Humane Society, 3161 W. Norton
Rd., Springfield, MO 65803.
Agriculture in the Ozarks
David Burton discusses rural industry Sundays in Business.
NEWS LEADER
8A Tuesday, May 24, 2011 •
JOPLIN TORNADO
BUSINESS COMMUNITY
NEWS-LEADER • News-Leader.com
FORECAST
More storms roll toward Ozarks
Companies
look for ways
to meet needs
10 DEADLIEST
By Mike Penprase
The deadliest single tornadoes in U.S. history, before
Sunday’s tornado in Joplin:
[email protected]
By Claudette Riley
WANT TO HELP?
[email protected]
The Springfield business
community is stepping up to
help tornado victims in Joplin.
At least nine local banks will
accept donations at every
branch.
They include Guaranty Bank,
Bancorp South, Empire Bank,
Great Southern, Metropolitan
Bank, US Bank, Oakstar Bank,
Liberty Bank and Springfield
First Community.
Two of the banks, Empire
Bank and Great Southern,
each agreed to match up to
$5,000 in total donations
received.
A lengthy list of Springfield area businesses have
already pledged help to
Joplin families devastated
by the tornado.
Banks, grocery stores and
companies — both big and
small — have offered to collect
donations
from
employees and customers.
Some have also committed
money, supplies and skills.
The Springfield Area
Chamber of Commerce
decided early Monday to
adopt the Joplin Area Chamber of Commerce and serve
as an “information hub” for
businesses that want to contribute in any way.
“We’re trying to figure
out what their needs are,”
said Claire Faucett, spokeswoman for the Springfield
chamber. “We’re here to
collect information, do
whatever we can.”
Faucett said because it’s
too early to know the extent
of the tornado devastation,
the Springfield area business community is focused
on ways to meet the tornado
victims’ immediate needs.
Some are working with
counterparts in Joplin,
answering a call for help
from the State Emergency
Management Agency or
coordinating with large
relief organizations such as
the American Red Cross or
Convoy of Hope.
Others simply contacted
the emergency management operations in Jasper
County and plan to deliver
donations this week.
At least nine local banks
will accept donations, at
every branch. They include
Guaranty Bank, Bancorp
South, Empire Bank, Great
Southern,
Metropolitan
Bank, US Bank, Oakstar
Bank, Liberty Bank and
Springfield First Community.
Two of the banks, Empire
Bank and Great Southern,
each agreed to match up to
$5,000 in total donations
received.
Nearly every Springfield
area grocery store will
accept monetary donations
today.
In Springfield, four Steelman
Transportation
employees were dispatched
to pick up heavy equipment
from St. Louis, Kansas City
and Oklahoma City.
Brett Sheets, a co-owner
of the local company, said
there were also “three or
four other drivers on standby.”
On the Missouri Department of Transportation
emergency response list,
the company is picking up
industrial
generators,
industrial light towers —
often used to illuminate
large construction projects
— and backhoes in those
cities. The equipment will
be transported to Joplin.
“Somebody needs to help,
and we believe in giving
back to our Missouri communities,” Sheets
said.
“Joplin is our neighbor.”
The Springfield Paper
Company and the Edward
Jones branch office in
Republic are accepting
donations. Meeks Lumber
is transferring key supplies
— such as water, nails and
chain saws — to Joplin.
Restaurants and fast food
companies are also getting
involved and inspiring each
other. Jeff Williams, owner
of the Sonic on Commercial
Street, was initially contacted by Bowerman Elementary about raising
funds for Joplin.
Williams called the corporation that owns the other
eight Sonics in Springfield.
Together, the drive-ins will
donate 10 percent of sales
from 4-9 p.m. today to
storm victims.
“We all feel the same way
— that’s what you should
do,” he said. “If you’re
lucky enough to be successful and you’re lucky enough
to have a job you love, you
should give back.”
This week, the Johnny
Morris family and Bass Pro
Shops are working with
NASCAR driver Jamie
McMurray — a Joplin
native — to load a trailer
with relief effort supplies,
including canned goods.
Customers can drop off
donations to help fill a second trailer, which will be
located in the parking lot,
through Monday.
“We are deeply saddened
by the tragic events in
Joplin, and our hearts go
out to those families affected by this event,” said Bass
Pro Shops founder Johnny
Morris. “Jamie McMurray,
the Morris family and the
extended Bass Pro Shops
family want to do everything we can to help during
this time.”
Weather
forecasters
scrambling to fathom the
size of the tornado that
hit Joplin on Sunday are
warning that more violent weather could hit the
region later today.
“I do have a lot of concern for Tuesday and
Wednesday,”
National
Weather Service forecaster John Kurtz said
Monday.
There likely will be a
break in stormy weather
early today as a stubborn
low pressure system
moves east, he said.
But another low now in
the Rockies will combine
with a dry line later
today in Oklahoma and
Kansas to spawn more
storms, Kurtz said.
The oncoming storm
system is moving slowly,
so it likely won’t arrive in
southwest Missouri until
tonight, he said.
“What we’re really concerned about is late
tomorrow,
into
the
evening
hours
and
overnight,” Kurtz said.
The system that is
expected to move into the
region follows the same
pattern of storms that
produced the EF-4 tornado that hit Joplin, he said.
It appears now the
oncoming storm system
might not be as intense,
Kurtz said.
Thunderstorms could
be strong enough to
develop some isolated
tornadoes, he said. The
storms also will produce
large hail and damaging
winds. Flooding also will
be a concern into
Wednesday morning.
In addition to the tornado, the Joplin area and
counties to the south that
send runoff into Table
Rock Lake experienced
heavy rains Monday and
flooding.
Storms moving into the
1896 TOLL: 255
Sunday’s tornado in Joplin
was the deadliest to hit Missouri in more than 50 years,
but it wasn’t the worst in
the state’s history.
Officials say at least 116
people have been confirmed dead in Joplin, and
they fear the death toll will
continue to rise.
The federal Storm Prediction Center says the worst
tornado in Missouri history
hit in St. Louis in May 1896,
when 255 people died.
Ninety-nine people were
killed in an April 1880 tornado in Marshfield, and 98
were killed by a May 1927
tornado in the southeast
Missouri city of Poplar Bluff.
In recent decades, the
worst tornado death toll
before the Joplin tornado
was on May 20, 1957, when
37 people died in Jackson
County.
— The Associated Press
1. March 18, 1925
Missouri/Illinois/Indiana;
695 dead
2. May 6, 1840
Natchez, Miss.; 317
3. May 27, 1896
St. Louis; 255
4. April 5, 1936
Tupelo, Miss.; 216
VALERIE MOSLEY / NEWS-LEADER
Ominous storm clouds approach a devastated neighborhood in Joplin on Monday.
area “trained” or followed
each other and kept up a
constant downpour, Kurtz
said.
A number of roads were
closed south of Joplin, particularly in McDonald
County. Flooding was so
intense north of Noel that a
section of Missouri 59 was
washed out. By Monday
night, homes were being
evacuated in Neosho and
Seneca because of flooding
caused by up to four inches
5. April 6, 1936
Gainesville, Ga.; 203
6. April 9, 1947
Woodward, Okla.; 181
of rain.
Because the next round
of storms also will produce
heavy rain, a flash flood
watch covering much of
southwest Missouri will
remain in effect until
Wednesday morning.
The forecast for today
calls for a 30 percent
chance of showers and
thunderstorms and a high
of 82. Rain chances will
increase to 70 percent
tonight.
7. April 24,1908
Amite, La./Purvis, Miss.; 143
8. June 12, 1899
New Richmond, Wis.; 117
9. June 3, 1953
Flint, Mich.; 115
10. May 11, 1953
Waco, Texas; 114
May 22, 2011
Joplin: 116 confirmed
dead at press time.
SOURCE: NOAA Storm
Prediction Center
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20th Annual National
Cancer Survivor’s Day
Cancer survivors and their guest (one each, please) are
invited to join us for fun music, inspirational stories and a
chance to meet our community resource partners.
Celebrating Life
St. John’s C.H. “Chub” O’Reilly
Cancer Center, 2nd Floor Auditorium
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Registration is required by calling 417-820-3324
or 417-820-3723.
St. John’s is Mercy.
Selection varies by size and store.
Call 1-800-345-5273 to find a Dillard’s store near you.
SL-0000258386
Ozarks
NEWS LEADER
Tuesday
May 24, 2011
News-Leader.com
1B
To report a news tip, call
417-836-1199 or e-mail
[email protected]
Floodgates open at Table Rock Dam
Flooding not serious, but
releases could go higher.
By Mike Penprase
[email protected]
The same storm system that
brought a deadly tornado to
Joplin could have a different kind
of impact on people living on Lake
Taneycomo.
Heavy rain measuring two inches in some places means a lot of
runoff is flowing into Table Rock
Lake. That prompted the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers to open
the floodgates at Table Rock Dam.
By Monday evening, 10 floodgates were open one foot, releasing 26,000 cubic feet of water per
second into Lake Taneycomo.
Floodgates upstream at Beaver
Lake also were opened Monday.
That’s not enough to cause serious flooding below the dam, but
word from the corps that it might
increase releases is cause for concern, Taney County Emergency
Management Director Chris
Berndt said.
“Twenty should not do any damage, and 26 will be minimal, but
there will be houses affected,”
Berndt said.
Word that releases could go higher means people living along the
lake should pay close attention to
changing conditions, he said.
“They’ve seen all the news; they
know what’s going on,” he said.
By 7 p.m., the corps told local
officials releases would go to
34,000 cfs.
The corps has to release water
from Table Rock because it is on
the rise again, lake manager Greg
Oller said.
By Monday afternoon, the lake
had risen to just above 930 feet.
“We’re rising,” he said. “We’ve
increased a foot and one quarter
in the last 24 hours.”
The corps is advising people living along Lake Taneycomo that
releases from Table Rock could
increase substantially. Recent
rains have filled all the lakes in
the White River system, so releasing water is necessary, Oller said.
“All the lakes are full; they’re
not going to be able to hold a lot,”
he said.
In Branson, the city cleared the
first two rows of its recreational
vehicle park on the lakefront on
Monday, and had representatives
go door to door informing people
living along the lakeshore about
releases from the dam, city
spokesman Jerry Adams said.
Habitat for
Humanity
upgrading
its ReStore
Retail atmosphere, drop-off
station, new marketing
strategies to boost store.
By Mike Penprase
[email protected]
DEAN CURTIS / NEWS-LEADER
A median cable on I-44 near Strafford may have kept this truck from crossing into the oncoming lanes after a recent accident. MoDOT’s
planned cutbacks would eliminate additional median safety cable systems.
MoDOT puts brakes on projects
Declining fuel use cuts
agency’s tax revenue;
new sources needed.
By Roseann Moring
[email protected]
It appears Missourians will
soon face a choice between two
distasteful options: a tax hike or
growing road congestion.
The Missouri Department of
Transportation recently proposed to dramatically scale
back its efforts, including an
end to all new construction projects.
That proposal is scheduled for
a June 8 vote.
The reductions have been a
long time coming, but this proposal highlights the need for a
new plan for funding transportation infrastructure in the
state, officials say.
“We are off the cliff now,”
said state Rep. Thomas Long, RSpringfield, the vice chairman
of the House Transportation
Committee. “This is the cliff
that people have been talking
about.”
To reinvigorate construction,
local and statewide transportation groups say MoDOT must
receive more money. There’s
little consensus on how that
should happen, but it would
almost certainly involve a tax
or fee increase.
Construction
Though drivers most likely
won’t see significant effects for
about five years, local transportation leaders say the cuts
could soon lead to heavy traffic
in rapidly expanding areas.
Construction that’s already
been started, such as the 60/65
interchange, would be completed. But local officials say many
areas need more projects just to
keep up with a growing population, and anything that doesn’t
already have state funding most
likely won’t get any.
MoDOT will still perform road
maintenance, but even projects
such as larger road signs or new
safety devices in roadway medians will be curtailed.
For example, the city of
Springfield would like to see
improvements to James River
Freeway, said Phil Broyles, the
co-interim director of public
works. He said the freeway
could be widened between
Campbell Avenue and Glenstone
Avenue to relieve increasing
traffic.
And for safety reasons, he’d
like to see a diverging diamond
at the intersection of the freeway and Kansas Expressway.
That would cost at least $3 million, he said — money the city
simply cannot afford.
This dearth of improvements
will have serious effects on both
Ozarkers and their jobs, said
Ryan Mooney, the Springfield
Area Chamber of Commerce’s
vice president of economic
development.
“Transportation networks really make the connections
between people and where they
live and where they work,” he
said.
A good transportation system
can encourage employers to
bring jobs to the area, he said.
And it makes life much easier
for people to commute to work.
He said the area has so far kept
up well with rapid population
gains. “But we need to continue
to do that,” he said.
Ozarks Transportation Organization Director Sara Edwards
See MODOT, Page 2B
Board will vote today on upgrades at schools
Four proposals cover
a variety of projects.
By Claudette Riley
[email protected]
Phelps Center for Gifted Education, Watkins Elementary, Pleasant View Elementary and Middle
School, Jarrett Middle School
and Parkview and Central high
schools.
An administrative proposal
recommends the board award a
contract to Construction Concepts of Osage Beach — the low
bidder at $166,198 — to pay for all
the door replacements. The
amount would come from the district’s major repair fund.
The Springfield school board
will consider four proposals to
upgrade school buildings or
campuses during its meeting
today.
Agenda items include parking
lot renovations, roof and door
replacements and the addition
of air conditioning.
Here’s a breakdown of the four
administrative proposals, which Replace roofs
the board will vote to accept or
Three contractors submitted
reject.
bids for roof replacement at
Disney
Elementary
and
Replace doors
Parkview High.
The work would be paid for
Two contractors submitted
bids to replace doors at the from the major repair fund.
Lottery
PICK 3
7-7-3 (midday)
5-8-1 (evening)
PICK 4
0-5-5-7 (midday)
4-8-8-6 (evening)
SHOW-ME CASH
4-7-11-25-34
WANT TO GO?
The Springfield school board will
meet at 5:30 p.m. today at the Kraft
Administrative Center, 1359 St. Louis
St. The meeting is open to the public.
District officials recommend
the board award the contract for
both projects to Joplin Roofing.
The total amount of the proposed
contract is $913,420.
It was unclear Monday if the
massive tornado that hit Joplin
would affect the company’s proposal.
Parking lots
This spring, the district
requested bids to renovate parking lots for 10 schools. Four con-
tractors submitted bids.
Parking lots included in the
project are Cowden, Disney,
Pittman, Rountree, Sunshine and
Truman elementary schools;
Pleasant View Elementary and
Middle School; Carver and Jarrett middle schools; and Glendale
High School.
Contractors were asked to separate the bid amounts for each
parking lot, allowing the district
to select the lowest bids for each
project.
The proposal includes awarding these contracts:
» $66,849 to Ball Paving of
Springfield for Disney. It
includes a new east drive and
angle-in parking for the west
See SCHOOLS, Page 2B
Tom and Jean Stark recently
stopped by the Habitat for Humanity
ReStore to check things out and
ended up loading their van with a bundle of wooden trim for remodeling
work.
“We just heard about it a while
ago,” Bolivar resident Tom Stark
said. The ReStore sits at 2410 S.
Scenic Ave., across the street from
Horton Smith Golf Course. It’s one of
hundreds of such stores now operating nationwide to help Habitat for
Humanity in its mission of providing
homes for the needy.
An acquaintance told the Starks
about the ReStore.
The Starks are among an increasing number of people discovering
that ReStores not only offer bargains, but a variety of building and
remodeling materials, Habitat officials say.
People running the money-making
operation for Habitat for Humanity
say they want more folks like the
Starks to learn about the store.
Offering prices much lower than
retail, the store sells everything
from paint to tile to doors and —
when it comes to building materials
— just about anything else.
A drive-through “ReCycle for
Homes” recyclable drop-off station
planned to start at the store this summer also could tempt people into visiting the two warehouses that house
Habitat offices and the ReStore,
ReStore director Eric Allen said.
Habitat wants the store to have
more of a retail atmosphere and is
updating its marketing.
Linking up with customers on
smartphones and via Facebook gets
the word out on good deals faster
than putting something on the store’s
website, Allen said, adding:
“We’re really catching up to the
21st century here.”
Habitat depends on the generosity
of homebuilders, building material
suppliers and even hospitals for the
items it sells. Even the ReStore’s
home was donated.
Allen, who started working for
Habitat as a driver, has been around
long enough to recall working in a
crowded building on West Chestnut
Expressway.
When Keltner Enterprises donated
the two structures now being used,
Habitat ended up with a total of
around 50,000 square feet of space
for offices and the ReStore.
See RESTORE, Page 2B
MIKE PENPRASE / NEWS-LEADER
Tom and Jean Stark of Bolivar carry a
bundle of trim stock from a storage
area at the ReStore.
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data to see the latest restaurant inspections, school incident reports, 911 calls and
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Wednesday: School spotlight
Thursday: Local columns
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Saturday: Young achievers
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presented by
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2B Tuesday, May 24, 2011
OZARKS
MoDOT/Roads need upgrades
that state agency can’t afford
The rise of fuel-efficient
vehicles and movements
away from gas altogether
have led to declining fuel
use, and that means less
money coming in from the
tax.
The Missouri Transportation Alliance, a coalition of
groups that is pushing for
more transportation funds
for the state, has been talking to Missourians for
more than a year about new
methods of revenue generation for MoDOT.
Jewell Pateck, an organizer for the alliance, said the
most talked-about options
are an increase in the fuel
tax, a sales tax dedicated to
transportation or toll roads.
But none has gained broad
support among voters, who
Continued from Page 1B
pointed to southern Greene
County roads. Increasingly
numerous
commuters
between Christian County
and Springfield must travel on those roads every day,
so they will need upgrades
more
significant
than
MoDOT can afford.
“I think that what we’ll
eventually have to see is a
statewide tax,” Edwards
said.
Revenue
MoDOT’s revenue this
year is half of what it was
last year, and it’s not likely
to go up.
The problem is that most
of the department’s money
comes from the fuel tax.
ReStore/Concept has
grown since 1980s start
revenue and promote its
message of sustainability,
said Larry Gluth, senior
vice president of Habitat
for Humanity.
The concept has grown,
and there are now more
than 750 ReStores nationwide with total sales estimated at between $350 million and $400 million annually, he said.
“The number is continuing to grow,” Gluth said.
The Springfield ReStore’s
revenues go to pay for two
of the 10 or 11 homes Habitat plans to build this year,
Habitat interim executive
director Kristy Nelson
said.
The ReStore also pays
staff salaries, insurance
and other expenses, Nelson
Continued from Page 1B
Even with that much
space, the ReStore can be
crowded, which is why the
staff has been working to
put in new shelving and
storage areas to make more
space available and shopping easier, Allen said.
Regular customers like
Debbie Beesley notice the
changes.
“They have worked their
tails off out here,” Beesley
said while shopping for a
door. “It’s looking good.”
The first ReStore opened
in the mid-1980s in Winnipeg, Canada, followed by
the first U.S. store in
Austin, Texas.
The stores were seen as a
way for Habitat to raise
Schools/Bid for AC
at Sunshine too high
souri of Springfield for
Glendale.
The
project
includes angle-in parking
for the east loop.
Continued from Page 1B
loop.
» $118,000 to Blevins
Asphalt Construction of
Mount Vernon for Cowden,
Pleasant View and Truman
» $211,411 to Leo Journagan Construction of Springfield for Jarrett, Rountree,
Pittman, Carver and Sunshine
» $330,450 to APAC-Mis-
Air conditioning
According to an agenda
item, the sole bid proposal
to install air conditioning at
Sunshine Elementary came
in too high.
A base bid from Bales
Construction was more
Woman found
stabbed to death
CORRECTION
A story on the business section front Sunday should
have noted that a $225,000
study focusing on ways to
grow jobs in seven industry
clusters was underwritten
entirely by the Kansas Citybased Hawthorn Foundation. The foundation’s name
was incorrect.
SEDALIA — A 70-year-old
Henry County woman was
stabbed to death and her
boyfriend was arrested.
Henry County Sheriff J.
Kent Oberkrom says Margaret St. Pike was found
dead Sunday evening at her
home near Leesville.
would have to approve such
a measure.
“None of them is a silver
bullet, and none of them
are pleasant,” he said.
He said he has seen more
awareness lately about
Missouri’s transportation
funding problem. And
when Missourians are
ready to embrace a proposal, the alliance will try to
make it happen, he said.
“We want to be a resource
for Missourians to coalesce
around a solution, but
we’re waiting for Missourians to be ready for it,” he
said.
That is crucial, he said.
“It’s here. It’s now. It’s
real,” Pateck said. “It
affects every single person
in our state.”
said. That means when people and groups donate
money for building homes,
that’s where the donations
go, she said.
Even the recession hasn’t
affected donations much,
Allen said.
While lumber and other
homebuilding
materials
aren’t as common, items
such as cabinets and appliances removed during renovations are plentiful, he
said.
Some donations are so
unusual they call for special treatment.
That was the case when
two 14-foot-tall antique
doors with ornate ironwork
and fittings were donated.
The ReStore set up a
silent auction, but the doors
were sold when someone
offered $1,000 for them,
Allen said.
“I still have folks talk
about them,” he said.
than $1.7 million. The district initially estimated the
cost at just under $1.5 million.
The project will be funded by a $50 million bond
issue approved by voters in
November 2009.
The administration recommends the board reject
the bid and not award a contract.
Earlier this year, bids for
a different air conditioning
project came in higher than
expected. The district modified the design of the project and requested additional bids.
The sheriff says someone
called law enforcement from
a nearby bar after overhearing a man talking about stabbing his girlfriend.
The Sedalia Democrat
reports that St. Pike’s 50year-old boyfriend was taken
into custody Sunday night
and is being held at the Henry
County Detention Center.
NEWS-LEADER • News-Leader.com
OTHER OPTIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION REVENUE
State sales tax: Possibly
the most popular option. But
in this economy and political
climate, voters are likely leery
of a sales tax increase
statewide, even a one-cent
sales tax.
Increased fuel tax: The
state would have to increase
the tax by at least 25 cents per
gallon to bring revenue to the
level that the state needs. That
appears to be even less favorable to voters than the sales
tax.
Toll roads
They are generally only used
on roads with ongoing construction projects and a high
traffic volume. This essentially
limits them to interstates and
would not be a feasible way to
COME SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL MAKE-A-WISH FOUNDATION
ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE SOUTHERN MISSOURI REGION
OF THE MAKE-A-WISH FOUNDATION
GET YOUR TICKETS WHILE THEY LAST!
• SATURDAY, MAY 28TH 6PM
• CALL MAKE-A-WISH FOR TICKETS
417-873-9474
• TICKET PRICE: $10 EACH OR $35 FOR 4
SL-0000257517
Jersey off Your Back
Silent Auction
to be held on game day
A special Springfield Cardinals Make-A-Wish Jersey
will be up for grabs during a silent auction that will
take place during the game. The highest bidder will
go on the field at the end of the game and receive
the jersey right off the player’s back! The player will
take the jersey off, sign it and give it to the winner
of the silent auction.
Do you need child care
because of the tornado?
We are here to help.
Contact our statewide Referral Center toll free. A
specialist will assist you with finding an alternative
child care arrangement. You can also search online
for child care facilities by visiting our website.
— The Associated Press
Call
866-892-3228
or visit
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!
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NIE
The News-Leader in Education series
is intended to help students engage in the world and move into responsible roles in the future. Written with
input from Springfield area teachers, the series meets criteria for MAP testing preparation. Teachers who want
printed or electronic copies may contact reporter Cliff Sain at 836-1217 or [email protected]
NEWS LEADER
Tuesday
May 24, 2011
News-Leader.com
theme: CIVIL WAR • this week’s topic: CIVIL WARS TODAY
3B
ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO, 2011
Egyptian anti-government protesters celebrate Feb. 10 in downtown Cairo’s Tahrir Square after the military stepped in to secure Egypt and call for President Hosni Mubarak’s ouster.
Civil wars still going on today
Several countries in the
Middle East undergoing
changes in leadership.
DEFINITION
By Cliff Sain
[email protected]
It was 150 years ago that the
United States became embroiled
in its own Civil War, but civil
wars are not a relic of the past.
Civil wars are going on around
the world today.
That point is perhaps most
obvious right now in the Middle
East, where several countries are
undergoing changes in leadership, potential changes in leadership, protests and demonstrations known collectively as the
Arab Spring.
So far, Arab Spring, which
began in the north African county of Tunisia in December, has
resulted in the overthrows of
Tunisian President Ben Ali and
Egyptian
President
Hosni
Mubarek; an ongoing civil war in
Libya where the United States is
participating with the United
Nations to enforce a no-fly zone
against President Moammar
Ghadafi’s forces; civil uprisings
against the governments of
Syria, Yemen and Bahrain; and
protests in other countries.
Missouri State University assistant professor David Romano
said it would not be completely
accurate to compare those hostilities to America’s Civil War.
“If you were to do an American
comparison, it would have more
ASSOCIATED PRESS FILE PHOTO, 2007
Rebels continue to battle Libyan leader Moammar Ghadhafi’s forces.
in common with the Revolution,”
Romano said.
He said the Arab Spring, like
the Revolution, is the result of
people who are fed up with
authoritarian rule.
Why now?
So what changed? After all,
many of these leaders have been
in power for decades. Romano
said it is because some of the conditions that allow authoritarian
rule have eroded.
“There are basically two justifications for authoritarian rule,”
Romano said.
One of those is security. The
idea is that the public needs to
give up freedoms to protect itself
from the perceived threat. He
said many Arab nations (includ-
ing Iran, which is actually Persian) have portrayed Israel as
that security threat.
“We experienced that to some
degree in America after 9/11,”
Romano said. “The Patriot Act
sacrificed some liberties to
improve security.”
The other item is economic.
The idea is that authoritarian
measures are needed to improve
the economy.
Romano said those two excuses
for authoritarian rule have “lost
their luster” in the Middle East.
For one, in many Arab nations,
citizens do not feel threatened by
Israel, although Romano said Syrian and Iranian leaders still have
some success with it. As far as the
economic excuse, he said many
citizens are tired of waiting.
GETTING TO KNOW: Adam Bax
School: Eugene Field Elementary
Years experience: Three
Subject/grade: Fifth grade
become a teacher. I have quickly
learned that building relationships
is the most critical piece of education. The knowledge will follow.
advice do you have
Q What
for students?
always tell my students
A Ithat
they need to know
Through the use of technology,
an unlimited amount of knowledge can be researched and presented. The current challenge is
to motivate students to use and
store information in their brains
even though they could use the
computer or other technology.
more press in the past couple of
years with the Primary Years Programme. This school challenges
all students to learn the way they
learn best and to provide a quality education supported by their
family, friends, and teachers. The
parents at this school are so supportive of the staff that I constantly feel supported and loved
by so many people. We are all a
part of a big family here at Field.
did you go
Q Where
to college?
A Missouri State University.
What do you hope students
Q
remember about you?
What do you know now
Q that you wish you knew A will
I want my students to
when you started in education?
remember that I always
work hard to be an unbiased repI thought I had to know
A everything before I could resentative for them.
CLASSROOM Order now
NEWSPAPERS
IN 2011-12
Area teachers can order the electronic Springfield News-Leader for
their classrooms for the 2011-12
school year.
This classroom resource is funded
“Although many economies are
growing, the average people
aren’t seeing it,” Romano said.
“Egypt’s economy has been growing by 7 percent the last couple of
years, but it’s mostly the rich getting richer.”
He said the people of the Middle East have the same types of
concerns Americans do.
“They are concerned about jobs
and housing,” he said. “It’s everyday concerns.”
Where will it lead?
from decided.
The Tunisian and Egyptian
presidents (and their governments) are gone, but upcoming
elections will help determine
what those countries will be like.
Romano said that in Egypt there
has been an increase in violence
against Christians (up to 10 million live in Egypt), leading to
fears that a less tolerant Islamic
faction could rise to power.
Egypt is important because it is
the largest Arab nation, with 80
million people. It also receives
the second largest amount of U.S.
foreign aid (after Israel) as part
of its peace treaty with Israel.
Romano said a recent poll
showed that 54 percent of Egyptians were in favor of canceling
the peace treaty with Israel.
Romano said that many people
in the Middle East are afraid of
democracy after witnessing the
power vacuum in Iraq after the
removal of Saddam Hussein.
For the time being, there will be
more violence in the Middle East.
Recently in Yemen, the AP
reported that a government
crackdown on protests killed 150
people. Romano said government
supporters in Syria are “gunning
down people right and left,” and
that the Syrian people are more
afraid of their government than
in any country he has personally
visited.
The results of Arab Spring are
still to be determined. Syrian
President Bashar Assad and
Yemeni President Ali Abdullah
Saleh are among those still in
power, although protests continue. Next week’s NIE page: A
The civil war in Libya is far wrap-up of the year in NIE.
READ ALL ABOUT IT
how to think.
did you go
Q Why
into education?
How is technology changing
Q education?
wanted a job that would
Tell me something everyone
A Ichallenge
Q
me every day. I
I currently teach in an
A eMINTS classroom and I can school.should know about your
didn't want to sit behind a desk
every day in front of a computer
get to see how powerful technolis a hidden gem in
A Field
screen. I am also a kid at heart
ogy can become to students.
Springfield. It has gotten
and being a teacher allows me to
dig in the dirt, play outside, and
get to experience things that
aren't a part of most professions.
A civil war can be defined as a war
between people of the same country, either over leadership of the
country, to enact change or because
one group wants to separate from
the other. Some define a civil war
simply by the number of deaths that
take place.
Either way, it can be hard to determine when protests cross the line
into civil war. Although it seems
clear Libya is engulfed in a civil war,
other Middle East nations are less
clear, while others are past the initial overthrow of the government
and are involved in a transition period that could still be defined as part
of the overall civil war.
Learn more about this teacher
at News-Leader.com/nie
by corporate donations through
the NIE program, so there is no
cost to teachers or schools.
It provides the teacher and students with daily access to the
News-Leader, in PDF format, on
any computer with Internet
These books can
help readers take a
closer look at the
Newspapers in Education topic. The
books can be checked
out at any SpringfieldGreene County Library
branch.
Grades 3-6: “Brothers in Hope: The Story
of the Lost Boys of
Sudan” by Mary Williams —
When war comes to the
Sudan, thousands of young
boys are left homeless and
join together for survival,
sometimes walking hundreds of miles to reach
refuge in other African
countries.
Grades 6-10: “A Long Walk to
Water” by Linda Sue Park —
This dual narrative tells the true
stories of two young Sudanese
children, a boy and a girl, as they
access.
To find out how to order and if
your classroom is eligible for the
e-edition — or just to learn more
about this valuable program —
please email Cliff Sain at
[email protected]
struggle for survival in war-torn
Sudan.
Grades 7-10:
“Lost Boy, Lost
Girl: Escaping Civil
War in Sudan” by
John Bul Dau and
Martha Arual Akech
— John and Martha
take turns describing
their experiences of fleeing the
Sudan, the struggles each faced in
Africa and adapting to life in
America.
NIE pages
during the
school year are
sponsored by
local businessman John Q.
Hammons.
BUSINESS WATCH
RONALD ZAK / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
European Commissioner for Economic and Monetary Affairs Olli
Rehn speaks on Monday.
Fears over
Greece shake
European market
LONDON — Europe's debt crisis
returned to shake markets on Monday as fears over the solvency of
Greece combined with concerns
that Spain, or even Italy, may be
dragged into the turmoil that has
already seen three euro countries
bailed out.
Investors watched aghast last
week as top policymakers clashed
over how to deal with Greece's
mountain of debt.
While policymakers at the European Central Bank warned of the
catastrophic effects of a Greek debt
restructuring, officials in Brussels
suggested a delay in bond repayments could help give Greece more
time to regain market trust.
Amid the confusion, Fitch on Friday downgraded Greece further
below junk status and on Monday
cut Belgium's outlook, while Standard & Poor's lowered Italy's rating
outlook on the weekend.
Falun Gong members
suing Cisco Systems Inc.
WASHINGTON — Members of the
Falun Gong spiritual movement
have filed a lawsuit against Cisco
Systems Inc. accusing it of supplying
the Chinese government with computer-networking equipment used
to spy on and persecute dissidents.
In a lawsuit filed last week, a
group of Falun Gong practitioners
alleges that Cisco provided networking gear and technical assistance to build and operate an elaborate system of Internet controls
used by the Chinese government to
track the online behavior of its citizens and block content it does not
like.
The lawsuit accuses Cisco of
aggressively marketing and customizing its products for the system, known as the Golden Shield
Project, with the understanding
that the technology would be used
for spying on dissident groups such
as the Falun Gong. By using Cisco
equipment, the lawsuit said, government officials were able to monitor dissidents' activities, including
online meetings of Falun Gong congregations. The lawsuit said some
dissidents were detained, tortured
and even killed as a result; others
disappeared.
MARKETS
DowJones
NYSE
S&P 500
Nasdaq
Russell 2000
12,381.26
8,236.55
1,317.37
2,758.90
814.04
-130.78 -1.05%
-120.98 -1.45%
-15.90 -1.19%
-44.42 -1.58%
-15.02 -1.81%
Get market updates online
Find the latest in business and economic headlines along with a market update and the ability to search
for your stocks of interest: NewsLeader.com/stocks
AWARDS &
ACHIEVERS
Jerry Bear has completed 35 years
with the Muscular Dystrophy Association. He began in 1976 as a program coordinator and today is a district director. His responsibilities
include overseeing 27 counties in
his district, fundraising and coordinating the local Jerry Lewis MDA
Labor Day Telethon on KOLR. This
Labor Day the telethon will be live
from the Branson Landing for the
first time.
Send items to Business Editor, NewsLeader, 651 Boonville Ave., Springfield,
MO 65806.
Or, e-mail items to [email protected]
You may include photos. Information
should include a telephone number.
Business
Housing
market a
challenge
for service
members
licans only got a hint of that this
year. They got burned. They
touched the hot stove.”
Combined, Social Security
and Medicare account for about
a third of government spending, a share that will only grow.
Economic experts say the cost
of retirement programs for an
aging society is the most serious budget problem facing the
nation. The trustees who oversee
Social
Security
and
Medicare recently warned the
programs are “not sustainable”
over the long run under current
financing.
Nearly every solution for
Social Security is politically
toxic, because the choices
involve cutting benefits or raising taxes. Medicare is even
harder to fix because the cost of
modern medicine is going up
faster than the overall cost of
living, outpacing economic
growth as well as tax revenues.
By Ricardo Alonso-zaldivar
and Stephen Ohlemacher
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — They’re not
buying it. Most Americans say
they don’t believe Medicare has
to be cut to balance the federal
budget, and ditto for Social
Security, a new poll shows.
The Associated Press-GfK
poll suggests that arguments
for overhauling the massive
benefit programs to pare government debt have failed to
sway the public. The debate is
unlikely to be resolved before
next year’s elections for president and Congress.
Americans worry about the
future of the retirement safety
net, the poll found, and 3 out of 5
say the two programs are vital
to their basic financial security
as they age. That helps explain
why the Republican Medicare
privatization plan flopped, and
why President Barack Obama’s
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Nicholas Read says there would
be a “rebellion among voters” if
Medicare goes away.
Medicare cuts to finance his
health care law contributed to
Democrats losing control of the
House in last year’s elections.
Medicare seems to be turning
into the new third rail of politics.
“I’m
pretty
confident
Medicare will be there, because
there would be a rebellion
among voters,” said Nicholas
Read, 67, a retired teacher who
lives near Buffalo, N.Y. “Repub-
By Cristina Silva
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LAS VEGAS — Air Force Lt. Col.
Michael Ballek thought the fourbedroom house bordered by sage
bushes and mountain roads on the
edge of Las Vegas was a good deal
when he purchased it for his
growing family in 2007. Nevada’s
skyrocketing home prices had
dipped slightly that year, and the
so-called experts all assured him
he was getting in at the bottom of
the market.
Property values continued to
fall, however, and next month
Ballek expects to sell his family’s
home for less than what he owes
on it. He doesn’t have much of a
choice. Like thousands of service
members, Ballek is moving across
the nation this summer per the
military’s order.
“How can you feel?” Ballek said.
“It’s frustrating.”
Depressed property values have
become a national crisis for homeowners who purchased their houses before the collapse of the housing market. But for members of
the military who must comply
with relocation orders or face disciplinary action, waiting out the
housing crash is often not an
option.
In many ways, military homeowners have no one to blame but
themselves.
Service men and women begin
every assignment with the knowledge that they could be relocated at
any point, and will likely be moved
within five years. The Department
of Defense encourages military
employees to rent, not buy.
Nevertheless, buying a home is
common practice among military
members.
In good years, they purchased
properties with the intent of turning them for profit, saving them
for retirement or renting them out
as an investment.
“People want to think about the
future, where they are going to
put down roots,” said Steve Strobridge, government relations
director for the Military Officers
Association of America. “If you
only rent, I think there is a sense
among military people that when
you retire maybe you will be
behind the power curve in terms
of your financial future.”
Marine Lt. Col. David Berke
purchased a home outside of Las
Vegas when he was relocated to
work at Nellis Air Force Base in
Las Vegas in 2008. He felt certain
that the bubble had burst and that
the housing market was on the
brink of recovery.
Berke, 38, is married with two
daughters. He plans to rent his
house after he is relocated to
Florida this year. The house is
worth too little to sell it.
“The amount of money we would
lose on the home was just not
something we could afford,” he
said.
Business keeps booming
at deal-a-day websites
JACQUELYN MARTIN / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Leslie Hall (left) works inside an office as Kelly Bigel, 22, (right) and other members of the merchant services department of LivingSocial work in a hallway at LivingSocial’s offices in Washington.
Groupon, competitors
growing at rapid pace.
By Ellen Gibson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Groupon is adding 150 employees a month at its U.S. headquarters and trains them in a church
because the conference rooms at
its headquarters aren’t big
enough. Ideeli has crammed so
much electronic equipment into
its New York office that the
power goes out every day.
And at LivingSocial, well, the
living is a little too social. Its
third office in Washington,
open just two months, ran out of
room so fast that employees
have to work in the hallway.
The sites are expected to generate $2.7 billion in revenue
this year, more than doubling
from last year, according to
Local Offer Network, which
collects and distributes deals
from hundreds of sites.
Daily-deal sites are thriving
because they benefit both merchants and consumers without
requiring tech savvy from the
former, says Opus Research
analyst Greg Sterling.
Some companies have gripes,
though. They say the sudden
influx of customers overwhelms staff or that Groupon
demands an unfair cut. Groupon
STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST
Check the performance of any stock at News-Leader.com/stocks
Tuesday: Ticker symbol; Wednesday: Year-to-date percent change;
Thursday: Price-earnings ratio; Friday: Dividend; Saturday: 52-week highs and lows.
Name
Last Chng
Tkr
AT&T Inc
31.08 -.24
T
Aetna
44.39 -.67 AET
Agilent
49.10 -1.60
A
AlcatelLuc
5.62 -.18 ALU
AlliBern
21.16 -.37
AB
Altria
27.85 +.11
MO
Ameren
29.46 -.56 AEE
Apple Inc 334.40 -.82 AAPL
BP PLC
44.03 -.97
BP
BP Pru
109.79 -1.73
BPT
BSD Med
3.53 -.08 BSDM
BcpSouth
12.82 -.13
BXS
BkofAm
11.42 -.16 BAC
BkAtl A h
.81 -.01 BBX
Baxter
59.05 -1.28 BAX
BestBuy
BioRadA
BlkIncoOp
BlkStMT
BlockHR
BdwlkPpl
Boeing
BrMySq
BldBear
CBS B
CME Grp
CVS Care
Caterpillar
Celestic g
Chevron
Cisco
31.52
122.58
9.60
12.15
16.26
29.55
76.28
28.20
6.64
26.71
295.34
37.97
101.89
9.94
101.37
16.35
COMMODITIES
Open High
+.19 BBY
-1.54
BIO
+.02 BNA
+.00 BSD
-.07 HRB
-.31 BWP
-1.24
BA
-.17 BMY
-.13 BBW
-.28
CBS
-3.01 CME
-.43
CVS
-2.44 CAT
-.34
CLS
-1.20 CVX
-.18 CSCO
Citigrp rs
Clorox
CocaCola
ColgPal
Comcast
CmcBMO
CmclMtls
ConocPhil
ConsolEngy
Corning
Crocs
Dell Inc
Disney
DomRescs
DuPont
DukeEngy
40.16
70.13
67.49
86.07
24.55
42.54
14.63
71.33
47.57
19.48
21.16
15.49
41.16
47.94
51.60
18.80
Dec 11
116.00116.00 113.82
Feb 12
117.00117.00 114.90
Apr 12
117.80117.80 115.75
Jun 12
115.50115.50 113.00
Aug 12
Oct 12
Frisales 52831
Friopen int 343546 off-1,275.00
Low Settle Chg.
-.86
C
+.18
CLX
-.81
KO
-.48
CL
-.57CMCSA
-.20 CBSH
-.23 CMC
-1.28 COP
-1.43 CNX
-.47 GLW
-.32 CROX
-.52 DELL
-.34
DIS
-.34
D
-1.14
DD
-.21 DUK
113.82
115.17
115.80
113.00
115.80
117.90
-3.00
-2.73
-2.95
-2.90
CATTLE
40,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
Jun 11
102.05104.25 101.97
Aug 11
104.17106.20 104.10
Oct 11
112.80112.80 110.57
102.15
104.10
110.57
-2.82
-3.00
-3.00
123.80
122.75
124.07
125.12
125.75
-.85
-.62
-3.35
-.19
-.40
-.45
-.90
-.53
-.20
-.47
-1.64
-.23
-.84
-5.64
-.48
-1.33
-.01
EBAY
EMC
EMN
EMR
EDE
ESRX
XOM
FBSI
F
GCI
GD
GE
GSK
GOOG
GSBC
GEF
TMM
GFED
-.20 HOG
-.17 HPQ
-.23
HD
-.12HOVNP
-.77 JBHT
-.04 ICOG
-.36 INTC
Jan 12
126.90126.90 125.05
Mar 12
128.00128.00 125.60
Apr 12
127.00127.00 127.00
Frisales 6547
Friopen int 37126 off-365.00
IBM
168.26 -1.90 IBM
IntPap
30.10 -1.21
IP
JDS Uniph 19.59 -.73 JDSU
JPMorgCh 42.55 -.58 JPM
JackHenry 30.25 -.54 JKHY
JohnJn
65.56 -.13
JNJ
JosABnk s
55.01 +.03 JOSB
Keycorp
8.27 -.13 KEY
Kraft
34.98 -.25
KFT
LeggPlat
25.48 -.31
LEG
Lowes
24.38 -.08 LOW
McDnlds
82.50 +.17 MCD
Medtrnic
41.26 -.95 MDT
Merck
36.90 -.16 MRK
MetLife
43.44 -.78 MET
Microsoft
24.17 -.32 MSFT
Monsanto 67.33 +1.00 MON
NokiaCp
8.11 -.20 NOK
Nucor
41.55 -.25 NUE
OGE Engy 50.21 -1.05 OGE
OReillyAu 59.02 +1.13 ORLY
Oracle
33.16 -1.11 ORCL
PAM
10.23 -.02 PTSI
PeabdyE
57.24 -1.56 BTU
PepsiCo
71.04 -.26
PEP
125.05
125.60
127.00
-3.00
-3.00
-3.00
89.25
89.32
90.50
83.70
81.90
83.42
84.40
89.00
-2.72
-3.00
-3.00
-2.80
-2.20
-1.93
-1.90
-1.00
HOGS-LEAN
FEEDER CATTLE
50,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
May 11
125.30125.30
Aug 11
125.10125.10
Sep 11
126.50126.50
Oct 11
126.80126.80
Nov 11
127.50127.50
responds that it has no shortage
of willing partners and that businesses have the option to cap the
number of vouchers sold.
Bess Wyrick, creative director at Manhattan floral design
shop Celadon & Celery, is
thrilled with the results of
three deals she’s run for flowerarranging courses. The offers
brought in more than 1,000 students, who may be inspired to
come back for more. But she’s
not convinced it’s a long-term
advertising strategy. If you
continue to run promotions, she
says, “How many of your
clients are going to want to buy
at the regular price?”
eBay
31.63
EMC Cp
27.44
EastChm 100.01
EmersonEl 53.90
EmpDist
22.67
ExpScrip s
59.53
ExxonMbl 80.67
FstBkshs
5.50
FordM
14.80
Gannett
14.21
GenDynam 71.39
GenElec
19.39
GlaxoSKln 42.42
Google
518.39
GrtSoBc
18.81
Greif A
63.22
GpoTMM
1.89
GuarFBc
6.30
HarleyD
36.36
HewlettP
35.81
HomeDp
36.82
HovnEn pf A 5.45
HuntJB
45.27
ICO Glb A
2.61
Intel
22.86
123.80
122.75
124.07
125.12
125.75
-1.65
-3.00
-3.00
-3.00
-3.00
40,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
Jun 11
91.50 91.50
Jul 11
91.10 91.10
Aug 11
92.30 92.30
Oct 11
86.00 86.00
Dec 11
81.30 83.70
Feb 12
85.00 85.00
Apr 12
85.70 85.70
May 12
89.00 89.00
4B
News-Leader.com
Poll: Americans don’t
see the need for cuts
FUTURES TRADING ON CHICAGO
MERCANTILE EXCHANGE
SL-0000256218
NEWS LEADER
Tuesday
May 24, 2011
Pfizer
PhilipMor
ProctGam
RegionsFn
SanderFm
SiriusXM
SouthnCo
Starbucks
Taleo A
3M Co
TimeWarn
Tyson
UMB Fn
USA Trk
US Bancrp
ValeroE
ValVis A
VerizonCm
WalMart
Walgrn
WellsFargo
WendyArby
WmsCos
Yahoo
Jun 12
92.00 92.00 89.90
Jul 12
90.00 90.00 89.80
Aug 12
89.00 89.00 89.00
Oct 12
83.50 83.50 83.50
Frisales 29130
Friopen int 222813 up+678.00
20.59
69.10
67.05
6.83
45.99
2.20
40.12
36.44
36.32
92.49
36.15
18.64
41.85
11.89
24.93
25.93
6.37
36.85
55.22
44.50
27.53
4.92
30.34
16.06
-.10
-1.09
-.31
-.12
-1.28
-.02
-.35
-.17
-.78
-1.07
-.64
-.12
-.12
-.36
-.27
-.12
-.26
-.30
-.07
+.13
-.47
-.06
-.42
-.24
90.10
89.80
89.00
83.50
PORK BELLIES
89.00
89.32
90.50
83.50
81.10
82.50
83.55
89.00
40,000 lbs.- cents per lb.
May 11
Jul 11
Aug 11
Feb 12
Mar 12
Frisales
Friopen int unchg
126.50
121.00
106.50
120.00
120.50
PFE
PM
PG
RF
SAFM
SIRI
SO
SBUX
TLEO
MMM
TWX
TSN
UMBF
USAK
USB
VLO
VVTV
VZ
WMT
WAG
WFC
WEN
WMB
YHOO
-2.60
-1.20
-.70
-1.00
LETTERS BLOCKED
Due to some of our favorite
difficulties — technical difficulties — many of your letters sent
from our website, www.newsleader.com, through the “Submit Feedback” option were not
received properly and may have
been lost.
We appreciate you writing
and hope you will resend your
comments on issues to
[email protected]
And, we apologize for the
technical difficulties.
ONLINE POLL
NLL
Question: Given the
record number of tornadoes this season and the
high fatality level, are you
more likely to seek shelter when
the warnings are issued?
To vote, please go online to NewsLeader.com. Vote by 5 p.m. and see
results in Wednesday’s newspaper.
Monday’s results: Do you believe
Missouri will eventually follow if
other states vote to legalize and
regulate the personal use of small
amounts of marijuana in a manner
similar to the way alcohol and
tobacco are now regulated?
» Yes: 47.39 percent
» No: 50.7 percent
» No opinion: 1.91 percent
» Total votes: 574
ONLINEE
TO THE POINT
Comments from readers who
quickly make their point. E-mail
your one or two sentence comments to [email protected]
Stations did well in storm
Sunday, the day that the tornado
hit Joplin, was quite a day to say the
least. The Springfield TV stations —
KYTV, KSPR and KOLR — all deserve
a large “Atta-boy!” for the wonderful job they did on keeping viewers
informed as to what the weather
was doing. For over three hours
they offered uninterrupted coverage showing the most likely places
for a tornado to occur.
It reminded me of 1983 when
south Springfield had 200 homes
destroyed but only 2 people lost
their lives. My philosophy was to
always super serve the listener —
they did. Thanks guys!
- Curt Brown, former general
manager at KTTS radio
More letters at News-Leader.com.
ROSES & THORNS
Send us your nominations for
Roses & Thorns to:
[email protected], and please
include full name, city of residence with
ZIP code and a phone number.
WEDNESDAY
That one of the world’s most
powerful financial officials could be
thrown in jail for allegedly assaulting a chambermaid gives me hope
for my country. Donald Kaul, A
National Voice
VOICE OF THE DAY
Please keep submissions for the
Voice of the Day to under 500
words. If you wish to submit a
piece for consideration, send it
to [email protected]
Year of the Smoke Alarm
Springfield residents can call
864-1500 to have a city-provided
smoke alarm installed or for a new
9-volt battery. Alarms for the hearing impaired are also available.
FIRST AMENDMENT
TO THE CONSTITUTION
“Congress shall make no law
respecting an establishment of
religion, or prohibiting the free
exercise thereof; or abridging
the freedom of speech, or of the
press; or the right of the people
peaceably to assemble, and to
petition the Government for a
redress of grievances.”
Opinion
NEWS LEADER
5B
Tuesday
May 24, 2011
News-Leader.com
’Tis a privilege to live in the Ozarks
Editor: Don
Underwood
dunderwood
@NewsLeader.com
836-1114
Step up now to help Joplin
Your efforts here can
make a difference to
victims of tornado.
Two things you can do immediately following the tragic tornado in Joplin on Sunday.
One, stay away from the Joplin area. Unless you have particular skills such as being a doctor or nurse or unless you are
connected with one of the many
organizations providing help,
you probably will just be in the
way.
Two, don’t stay away from
organizations in Springfield
that can ultimately assist our
neighbors in Joplin. Individuals
stepping up will make a difference now.
LETTERS
Federal deficit
Here are some of the groups
that would like you to donate
time, money or blood:
Greater Ozarks Chapter of
the Red Cross, 832-9500; Convoy of Hope, www.convoyofhope.org; United Way of the
Ozarks, sends checks to 320 N.
Jefferson Ave., Springfield,
Mo., 65806, marked “Joplin Tornado Disaster Relief;” Community Blood Center of the
Ozarks, a list of area blood drives is at www.cbco.org or call 1800-280-5337 and Ozarks Food
Harvest, deliver donations to
The Food Bank at 2810 N.
Cedarbrook Ave.
You may also wish to make
plans within your church or
civic organization to keep a continuous supply of needed mate-
OUR VOICE
This editorial is the view of the
News-Leader Editorial Board.
NLL
Want to help? Go to this
editorial and find the link
ONLINEE
to information for helping victims of the Joplin tornado.
Linda Ramey-Greiwe
President and Publisher
David Stoeffler Executive Editor
Don Underwood Opinion Page Editor
Cheryl Whitsitt Managing Editor
Linda Leicht Senior Reporter
rials and money flowing in the
weeks to come. Also coming up
is the daunting debris clean up.
Now is the time to begin putting
together that church team or
group of volunteers to clean up
in Joplin when the call goes out.
Also, keep in mind that our
first responders are assisting in
Joplin. For example, City Utilities has sent line crews and the
Springfield police are providing
security around damaged areas
among other duties. These people will be working long hours.
But, as CU officials point out,
Springfield’s requirements will
be met. So, if your call for a city
service isn’t responded to quite
as quickly, be patient.
We’ve been through this before. We know you’ll respond as
you have before. Our friends
and neighbors are in need and
together we’ll meet that need.
DISASTER IN THE OZARKS
Cartoon, letter
far apart on issue
Patrick Blair
Springfield
It’s apropos that the May 13
News-Leader editorial cartoon
by Gary Varvel (“Sacred cow”)
was juxtaposed with Richard
Green’s letter to the editor,
“Long should explain vote” of the
same day. Both were in close
proximity on the opinion page
but there could be no more clear
illustration of two perspectives
on government spending that are
miles apart.
Varvel is clearly one who “gets
it” and Green is clearly one who
doesn’t. Sadly, Varvel’s cartoon is
so very true.
Do you
have an
opinion?
Local cartoonists
can send a take on
local or state issues
to [email protected]
news-leader.com.
These “visual letters to the editor”
reflect the view of
the artist, not the
News-Leader
editorial board.
McCarthys
Staff does good
job on MSU issue
Bob Faenger
Springfield
[Executive Editor] David Stoeffler and [reporter] Didi Tang,
did a wonderful job for us in Missouri on his recent study of the
“McCarthy incidents” at MSU.
The McCarthys (and others
there) believe they are living in
a dream world of limitless
money and self-gratification, at
the expense of the public. ...
They need to wake up, and David
sure did provide an alarm clock.
The “average Joe” definitely
does find it wasteful. Why focus
attention on the McCarthys?
Why not?
The recent cancellation of
another trip to China by others at
MSU showed that they “might”
be taking a little more thought on
MSU’s mission to citizens of Missouri and the United States of
America. Why don’t we save that
money and send some of our own
citizens to MSU?
JOHN LOGAN / BRANSON
Obama
Ambition comes
before country
Shirley Harrell
Springfield
Send a memorial rose to the
passing of the United States Constitution and the nation as they
have been known for the last 234
years.
It is sad and troubling to observe what is happening in gov-
ernment as a result of electing an
inexperienced — but very ambitious — person who seems to be
hungry for personal power and
world recognition. This man
seems to have an agenda of his
own, aside from leading our
nation to safety and prosperity,
and that is to gain status as a global leader.
The hymn writers of patriotic
songs graced our nation so beautifully in their descriptions of
America. “My Country, ’Tis of
Thee” rings out: “Sweet land of
liberty.” “Land where my fathers
died, land of the Pilgrim’s pride...
Let Freedom Ring!”
And there is no more moving
song than “America, The Beautiful.”
How can anyone, especially our
president, hear these stirring
words and not have a feeling not
only of pride, but one of true love
and nurture for our land, as most
of us who were born on this soil
do?
A LOCAL VOICE
Time to be firm on littering our home
Not long ago I took an overnight float on one was foam containers, glass and aluminum cans
of my favorite sections of the James River. — with the clear winner in volume being our
Once a yearly rite for me and my school friend the plastic water bottle.
Driving to my office the other day I
chums back in the ’90s, I experienced
noticed the exact same varieties of
the section between Hootentown and
assorted detritus alongside the road
Galena for the first time in 15 years.
at the South Glenstone Avenue and
Most of the river lay exactly how I
East Republic Road intersection.
remember: the long gravel bars for
Now, it doesn’t take a rocket surgeon
camping, deep holes for fishing and
to make the connection as to why the
silver bluffs poking out among the
same kind of trash that ends up alongtrees above the river’s edge. But one
side our highways makes a later
unfortunate similarity on the river
appearance
on the river. The question
between past and present has seemRyan
is, what can we do about it?
ingly multiplied: The amount of trash.
O’REILLY
In addition to organized awareness
I’ll make allowance that a good chunk
and cleanup attempts, I would enof the debris stuck high in the trees is
flood related. There are choke points along courage everyone who takes a float trip any
rivers; places where logs, brush and trash snag time to bring an extra trash bag and fill it
and pile up. One such point I saw, near the old with what you find on the river. I filled two
McCall Bridge, was a mound about 20 feet high contractor bags on my last outing, but there’s
and 50 yards long. Though there were some plenty more. Think of it as a voluntary price
pieces of sheet metal, insulation, plastic sheet- of admission to some of the best floating
ing and other building components among the country in our part of the world.
But cleaning up the river is only half the
driftwood, the majority of the collected refuse
solution. It’s difficult for me to think there
are people out there who throw trash on the
ground, but it happens. A lot. And we must do
something.
One solution would be if you see someone
throwing trash out of their car, give the horn a
honk to get your point across and take note of
the license plate. At an appropriate time and
place, call law enforcement and report them.
There are alternative solutions, I’m sure, but
we have to start demanding that our fellow citizens respect the law and the beauty of our
home. Litter along the highway won’t just sit
there waiting to be picked up. One strong rain
sends it all down the river. If we value our natural heritage in the Ozarks, which surely we
must, then we have to agree to keep it clean. All
you would need to do is see the piles of trash
along the banks of the James, and you’d agree.
Ryan O’Reilly is a published author, entrepreneur
and part-time apple farmer living in Clever. Contact Ryan by visiting www.ryancoreilly.com. His
“Local Voice” appears biweekly.
6B Tuesday, May 24, 2011
Dogs
CLASSIFIED 836-1150 OR TOLL FREE 800-695-1908
606 Dogs
606 Dogs
YORKIE BABIES
CHORKIE PUPS
& Older Chihuahuas
Public Notices
255
All certified delinquent
storage unit's A12, A16,
A1 7 , B 1 8 , C 1 8 , D 0 7 ,
D10, D15, D19 will be
sold for cash at 11 a.m.
o n Tuesday, M a y 2 4 ,
2011 at Sunshine Storage, 917 W Sunshine,
Springfield, Missouri
Home raised, spoiled
rotten. Will deliver to
Springfield.
$200 each
[email protected]
417-561-2190,
230-0730 or 230-5952
Cocker Spaniel
APRI 8 weeks
Sable/Parti
all info on my
website:
galaxyycockers.com
Heidi: 417-485-0915,
daytime or E-mail:
[email protected]
yahoo.com
DACHSHUNDS
Cats
604
CFA Registered
Himalayan/Persian
Exotic Long Hair
Kittens. Family raised,
various color points, vet
checked, wormed, first
shots. Prices $250 & up.
Breeding rights avail.
RandDFarm.com
417-236-3701
417-452-2026
Dogs
606
All white Husky. 1-1/2 yr
old female, not fixed.
Has papers. She is very,
very sweet (not guarddog material). Has all
shots for the year & has
been chipped. $150
OBO If interested, call
(417) 732-7288
Mini. 26 years loving
these dogs!
Come see why our
pups do so well in
their new homes!
References
$200-$300 each
417-338-0453
Designer 'Brug'
Puppies for sale
1/2 Pug, 1/2 Brussels
Griffon, Super Cute!
8 weeks old, 3 males &
1 female. Will be small.
Be the talk of the town
with a fuzzy baby Pug!
Call or text for pictures
or questions. Asking
$200. 417-699-3656 or
[email protected]
English Bulldog
Male,
Red and White
11 months old $500
Great Dane
Fawn w/Black mask
2 females $400 each
417-849-9950
GOLDEN
RETRIEVERS
AUSTRAILIAN
SHEPHERD
Beautiful puppies!
6 Blue Merle one
Black Tri. Only
$250-$300. Brad at
417-527-8016 or
[email protected]
gmail.com
Australian Shepard
AKC
Female., blue merle,
show quality, House
broken, 1 1/2yrs old,
$300
Gorgeous, intelligent,
family raised.
8 weeks old.
Blondes & Reds
Vet current,
$125-$160 each
417-751-2641
417-435-5033
417-742-4477 or
417-830-2480
CHIHUAHUA
ACA reg, tiny beauties,
s o m e under 2 lbs, vet
checked, shots &
wormed, Home raised &
spoiled in clean environment. Must see to appreciate Will hold w/ small
deposit $150-300. Also 2
10 month old males 4 1/2
lb $150 (417)-546-1245
Males, 1 female
Shots, wormed, vet
checked. 2 males are
very, very tiny
Some are
ready to go!
Pit Bull 5 month
old female pup.
UKC. American Pit
Bull Terrirer and
ABKC American
Bully. Razors Edge
bloodline. Super
short and super
stocky. Has all
shots and regularly
dewormed.
Great with kids and
other dogs. $650.
www.flawless
bullies.org
Call Steven
Kasperski at
417-300-2733
flawlessbullies
@gmail.com
POMERANIAN
Fluffy puppies!
MIN PIN female pup.
No papers. Have shots.
$85 each.
(417)546-3077
Branson Area
ROTTWEILER
PUPS .
AKC registered
9 weeks old, Great
German Pedigree.
$1000.
Call 417-855-0655,
daytime
Shih Tzu babies ready
now. Taking deposits
on Malte-Tzu, Bichon
and Shih-Bichon,
puppies. All great for
fam i li es, registered,
n o n - s h e d d i n g , vet
checked, Licensed
Kennel. 417-736-9754
or 425-7805. morning
songkennels.com
Standard Poodle
Rare Chocolate babies
registered, pedigee,
$450. Call
Penny Richter at
417-880-1017 or
[email protected]
Mini Aussie Pups.
Registered. NSDR 1 male Red Merle,
3 females 2 Black Tri,
1 Blue Merle. Current
on vacc & deworming
highbarj.com. $500.
Call 417-230-0365
Free to good homes
417-414-8084
Springfield
Horses
658
Horse
Shoeing
20 Years
Experience.
We'll Come
to You!!!
Chocolates &
Black/Tan
Babies.
Current shots.
AKC
Call for prices
417-796-2336
NW near West Sunshine
& West Bypass. 5 acres
duplex land. Has all utilities at site including sewer. $85,000 must be rezoned
NEIL STENGER
879-7211 OR 861-5047
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any advertising for real estate
for sale or rent which is in
$140/week Studio
violation of the Federal
Fair Housing Act which BEST DEAL in TOWN!
Mobile Homes
Utilities & cable pd.
prohibits discrimination
No pets. 833-3627
836 based on race, color, religion, national origin, age
Studio & 1 BR, Free
or familial status. If you cable & util. $125/week
& up 862-0520
2011 M.H. Stimulus Pkg feel that you have been
Cash 4 Clunkers. Land discriminated against,
Owners . 417-862-0555 please contact the U.S.
Department of Housing Unfurnished
and Urban Development
in Kansas City, Kansas at Apartments
For Sale by
(913) 551-6958 or 1-800Owner
852 743-5323.
Homes For Sale
854
MISSOURI
HORSE AUCTION
All-Breed Horse Sale
Friday, May 27
at the Springfield
Livestock Marketing
Center I-44, exit 70,
Tack at 4pm,
Horses follow Tack
Trailers at 7pm
Horses sold as
checked in
Stock Trailers for Rent
Dwight Glossip
417-725-3333
Sale Day Only
417-831-2770
SE corner W Battlefield &
S Scenic 4.3 acres. Owner will divide; $304,920
per acre; has city utilities,
ready for const.
NEIL STENGER
879-7211 OR 861-5047
Income Property
818
5 rental houses, package
deal. Good cash flow.
417-880-5724
633 W. State 7 Unit Apt.
Building Good cash Flow,
$159,000. 880-5724
Real Estate
Wanted
806
1 & 2 BR's
Parkcrest Village
817 W. Westview,
1875 sf, 3 BR, 2 BA,
hardwood, upgraded
appliances & carpet. RV
& boat parking. 3 liv
areas, lot 100x200, 2
sheds. Open Sun 1-4pm.
$129,900 (417)881-5776
STONE MEADOW SUBD
Walkout, 5 BR, 3 BA,
2 gas frplc, form. living,
form dining, hardwood
floors, granite in kitchen
& rec area, John Deere
room, approx. 4500 sf.
$399,900. 417-881-7214
985 W. Shadow Lawn.
Mini storage for sale, 103
units in city, built on 2.3
acres, room to expand
units. $695,000
NEIL STENGER
879-7211 OR 861-5047
Ask about Specials!
Aaron Prop. 833-8080
5532 S. Jefferson,
Springfield
GREAT LOCATION!
Kickapoo & Cherokee
school district. 3 BR,
2 BA, 2 Car, 1700 sq ft,
Fenced in backyard,
vaulted ceilings,
Jetted tub in master
bath, large kitchen,
brand New dishwasher,
newer furnace & A/C
fireplace, hardwood
floors, & tile. Large
private backyard.
Dir: South on Campbell,
Left on Plainview Road,
then right on Jefferson
to 5532 S. Jefferson
MLS #11035999
Awesome house!
MOTIVATED SELLER!!
$124,900
Call 417- 569-8171
Buying houses, apts, duplexes, comm. buildings.!
DARRYL CAMPBELL
689-4900 or 823-2300
1/2 off 1st Months Rent
On all studios at
University Park Apts. &
McDaniel Street Apts.
southwoodproperties.com
869-5421 or 865-6491
1 Month Free!!!
1 BR From $300
2 BR From $400
Call For details
Evergreen Apts
831-3911
2BRs, 2BAs, Patio,
$420/mo. Income
Qualified. 869-3219
NOW PRELEASING
June - July - August
Special Pricing
1 bedrooms from $475
2 bedrooms from $575
Free cable & internet,
pool, fitness center
and playground.
Sunset Place
Apartments
417-886-6119
Preleasing for Fall
F O R SA L E SW office
1,600 sf $120,000; 1,279
sf $95,925; $75/sf. Additional infill needed. All
utilities at site. Call
NEIL STENGER
861-5047 or 87-7211
MURNEY COMMERCIAL
SW, furnished bedroom
in very nice home!
Utils pd. Cable/internet,
Mature Males.
$350 + $75 deposit
417-725-2885, 694-8917
5 Acre Parcels $100 down.
$185 Mo Owner Finance,
Mobiles OK. 417-860-8846
F r e m o n t H i l l s directly
across street from these
lots. $19,900! Ozark water/Fremont Hills sewer.
Ozark schools. Lot 1, 2
Briarbrooke.
SHERRY LOVELAND
839-2542
For Sale by
Owner
Effic. & 1 Bedroom
Apts. Util. Paid! Visit
us at: carchbay.com
417-869-3112
Studio/1219 W. State
$325/250dep, 1br, 1ba
837 W. Walnut All util. pd
$460/250dep 880-2141
Plexes
Rooms
852
Single occupancy rms/
monthly rental $60/wk
OZARK. 417-581-0119
Houses
OZARK: 2BR 2BA 2 car
gar, kit appli, gas frplc
$575/Mo. 881-1254
1400 W. Tampa 2br, 1ba
c/h/a, $525/350dep 2639
W. Lombard 3br, 1ba,
c/h/a, $625/400dep
Option to buy 880-2141
Southside Apts & Duplexes 417-887-3004
HunterPropertyInc.com
Condos &
Townhouses
4-PLEX / 2 BEDROOM
L a n d l o r d pays wa ter ,
se w e r , & tr a sh . W / D
hkup, all elec, C/A, section 8 approved. $400/mo
$300 dep. Walnut Grove
area. 818-4776
331 S. Casa Grande
Brand New 3BR, 2BA Willard school, $775 742-2420
By Metro Housing
Now Leasing 2 BR,
2.5 BA Starting as
low as $499 Pool
opening soon! Our
prices can't be beat!
417-763-3048
Ozark-Deluxe lrg 2BR by
new O. C. No smoking or
Pets from $460 343-3535
Townhome 65 & CC2BR, 2.5BA , 1car
$585 417-229-3338
Houses
1003 E LOREN-2 br, 1
BA c/a, 1/2 basement,
fenced, $600
1106 W BERKELEY-4
BR, 2 BA cathedral ceiling, FP, C/A, fenced, 2
car gar, $850
5606 W JOSH-3 BR, 2
BA hardwood, new
car pet, F P , split B R
plan, cathedral ceiling,
covered porch, C/A, 2
car gar, Willard schools.
$850
2707 N KELLET-2 BR,
1 BA C/A, fenced 1 car
gar, $550
1825 E GLENWOOD 3 BR, 2 BA C/A, fenced,
gar & CP, $775
2025 E HIGH-3 BR, 1.5
BA hardwood, tile, C/A,
fenced, 1 car gar, $675
2442 NATIONAL-3 BR,
1.5 BA C /A, stor age
shed, CP, close to mall,
$600
Reser Properties
417-881-8100
Reserproperties.com
100+ Rental Listings
Spfld, Nixa, Ozark,
& Republic
COUNTRY TRI-PLEX
Houses, Plexes,
1 BR, C/A, 1 BA all apLofts, Apts
pliances,
$400/mo,
6380
$100+ WEEKLY! Small
www.AtHomeHere.com
Apts. Util paid, NO PETS. E FR 138, 4 miles E of
832-0885
MSU AREA. 865-7600 Hwy 65 on Cherry. Call
PAUL 839-1938
841-2632
DAN CLARK
ReMax House of Brokers
Furnished
Apartments
1428 W McGee
$825/mo
Newer, custom 3 BR, 2
BA, great rm. w/gas FP,
large kitchen w/built in
appliances, attached 2
car gar, deck, fenced
yard. 888-3035
1922 W CHESTNUT
2 BR, 1 BA W/D hkup, C
H/A, no pets, $425/mo,
$300 dep. 840-3254
$425 Super Clean
2BR/2BA lrg walk-in closet, all appli., w/d hk up
Ozark 343-7780
Rentals To Share
Lots & Acreage
Lots & Acreage
826
826
Plexes
Fremont Hills
Townhomes
Jason Cross
417-830-2661
Commercial &
Industrial
814
TOY YORKIES
Furnished
852 Apartments
I-44 & Halltown exit, comRivercut Subd. Ridgemercial property avail- view St. 1/3 acre crawl lot
able. $28,910/acre.
w/great view. $62,000.
NEIL STENGER
417-881-7214
879-7211 OR 861-5047
2 grown Shih Tzus
KING CHARLES
CAVALIERS
2 males, 15.5 weeks
old. $300 each.
Also litter of newborns
1 week old.
Females: $400.
Males: $375
For Sale by
Lots & Acreage
606 Commercial
Land
816
826 Owner
NEWS-LEADER • News-Leader.com
604 WRENWOOD, Strafford - 3 BR, 2 BA, dbl.
gar, $750, no pets. 8606569
727 N NETTLETON
2 BR, 1 BA, W/D hkup,
no pets, $395/mo, $300
dep. 840-3254
908 N. Eagle Remodeled
1BR, Appli., garage, NO
PETS $375 883-2299
TOWNHOUSE
FOR RENT
236 E Buena Vista #D
2 BR, 1.5 BA D/W,
W/D hkup,
$450/mo, $450 dep
Call 417-872-7138
for an appointment
Lease w/Option
To Buy
Republic - Lease Option
4 BR, 2 BA, 3 car gar,
fence & FP. S on Hines
next to Walgreens, R on
Lynn , R to 843 Elizabeth. $1100.
DAN CLARK, O/B
839-0044 or 841-1129
ReMax House of Brokers
Luxury Rentals
Retail Office
3165 S Campbell 1050
+/- sq ft $700/.mo up to
4200 sq ft available. sewer, water and CAM incl.
3865- 68 W Che stnut
Expwy 1848 or 4000 sq ft
avail. Starting at $7.50/ft
GEORGE LOVELAND
887-4857 or 839-0571
NEWS-LEADER • News-Leader.com
310 Hauling
Remodeling &
Remodeling &
Remodeling &
Concrete &
324 Remodeling &
Repairs
349 Repairs
349 Repairs
349 Repairs
349 Masonry
Alpha Omega
Personal Training
"Helping you reach
your fitness goals"
GPersonalized Exercise program
GFree 1st time assessments
GLasting results
269-317-2888
[email protected]
Carpet
Cleaning
Quality Custom
Homes & Remodeling
AAAComplete Remodel
& Home Repair
G Bathroom Remodeling
G Fences & Decks
G Doors And Trimwork
G Sheetrock Repair
G Painting
& Pressure washing
G Full Service Plumbing
Licensed & Insured
Quality Work 25 Yrs Exp.
311
IMMACULATE
CARPET CLEANING's
Spring - 28th Year
SPECIAL!!!
4 rooms & a hallway
cleaned & sanitized
$59.95
Call 844-5646 Today!
A-Able Hauling
Trash & Brush
Garage Clean Out
Basements
Apt & Rental Houses
Shrub & Small
Tree Removal
Full Yard Clean Up
Appliance Haul Off
Avail for all work
417-863-8111,719-3551
o Will match most
competitors prices!
ALL SEASONS
Landscaping 323
Free Estimates!
Davis Bobcat Service
Demo and Dump Services (Comm'l & Residential), Bush hogging,
Rock Rake, Grading,
Sod & Seed Stump
grinding, storm cleanup
& ALL Tree Services.
417-860-1268
If no answer, we're on a
job, leave message and
we'll return the call.
LANDSCAPING
All Types. New home or
redo existing. Flat Rock
Sidewalks & Patios, Flat
Rock Retaining Walls &
Edging, All Types of
Shrub Trimming
30 years experience
Free Estimates!
417-860-0057
Ozark Mountain
Botanicals
Full landscape services. maint., Pruning,
rock work, mulching.
New Landscape install, renovation of
existing landscape. 30
yrs Exp. Julie Minner
849-1393/756-2034
Andrew 894-0985
Tree & Bush
Trim and removal
Yard Clean-ups with
regular maint. avail.
Local moves, garage,
and rental clean-ups.
Gutter clean outs.
Pressure Washing
Quality Service!
Reasonable rates!
20 years experience.
417-883-5966
FREE ESTIMATES!
417-300-2723
AALCO Reliable
Remodeling
# Bathroom Remodels
# Sheet Rock Repair
# Texture & Painting
# General Home repair
# Electric
Always on Time
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates!
(417)299-2805
ALL HOME
REMODELING/REPAIR
Carpenter/Handyman
35 years experience
FREE estimates!
Honest/Dependable
Residential/Commercial
Insured/License & Ref's
CALL CRAIG
417-848-5418
CARPENTER /
HANDYMAN
I do it all!
Insured & Honest!
417-818-1502
Residential & Commercial
# All Landscape
Design & Installation
# Mowing & Lawncare.
Time for Flea & Tick
Spraying
Owner Dewayne B Rout
(417)742-0030
or 860-0727
Call Phil
417-425-5556
Carpentry, Lawn Care, Pressure Washing
Painting / Drywall Repair Existing Electrical &
Plumbing Repair, Brush Clearing & Much More!
Jack & Connie's
357 Dry Wall
All types of concrete
Driveways, Patios,
Sidewalks, Porches,
Foundation & Basement
Walls, Stamped &
Color Concrete.
417-840-8445/Free Est.
appleberrysconcrete.com
HAULING
SERVICE
o Garage & Rental
Clean Outs
o Yard Waste
o Limbs & Brush
Free Estimates!
417-861-5803
REMODELING & REPAIR
CARPENTER / HANDYMAN
• Residential/Commercial
• Honest/Dependable
• 35 Years Experience
Call Craig for Information
SUPERIOR LANDSCAPING
& LAWN INC.
SINCE 1995
Residential & Commercial
All Landscape Design & Installation
Mowing & Lawncare
Time for Lawn Renovation
& Tick and FLea Spraying
▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼▼
GRAND
FLOORS
L-E-V-E-L-I-N-G
Joist Beams
Sill Plates
Water Damage
Dry Rot
Insect Infestation
417-887-3053
▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲▲
Immaculate Carpet
Cleaning’s Spring Special!
4 ROOMS & A HALLWAY
CLEANED & SANITIZED
5995
$
Randy’s
Home Remodel & Repair
•BATH & KITCHEN
REMODELS
•CABINETRY
•TILE
•LAMINATE &
HARDWOOD
FLOORING
•DECKS
•CUSTOM CLOSETS
AVAILABLE
•PAINTING & MOST
OTHER HOME
IMPROVEMENTS
•NOW OFFERING
CARPET & VINYL
INSTALLATION!
417-880-2950
Accept MC, Visa, & Discover
SL-0000257961
Since 1986
MAKEOVERS
MAKEOVERS
FOR YOUR HOME
Interior and Exterior
Wall Covering.
35 Years Experience.
Insured.
Work Guaranteed!
361
G Interior /Exterior
G Painting/Staining
G Drywall Repair
G Texturing Walls
G Ceiling Texturing
G Faux Finishing
G Wood Deck Staining
G Power Washing
Licensed & Insured
Senior Discounts
Mark: 417-840-8736
Paint by Hour
Interior & Exterior
For All Things Drywall
o Crack & Patch Repair
o Ceiling Re-textures
o Wallpaper Removal
o Water Damage Repair
o Remodeling
o Tile, Trim & Painting
Free Estimates 24/7
Stephen: 417-209-8522
HARDWOOD FLOORS
Truckload discount
2 1/4" x 3/4"
$4.50 sq ft, installed
DALE'S FLOORING
(417)861-2129
Ceramic tile, installed
$3.50 sq ft. All brands
of carpet, mill direct.
Expert installation.
45th year! References.
Mow--Trim--Blow
Most yards
just $20.
Greenman Lawn
& Tree Service
Affordable Rates!
417-496-0161
All Time or
One Time Mowing
& Yard Clean Up
Landscaping, Mowing,
Bush & Hedge Trimming
Great Price &
Excellent Service!
Free Estimates
Mark: 417-839-1292
Call Tanner at
1-620-212-2774
GARDENS
TILLED
Extra deep & fine
Excellent work!
Very reasonable!
25 Years Experience!
Springfield & Area
Sam: 736-2456
KNIGHT'S
Awesome Lawns
LAWN SERVICE
Spring Clean-Up!
Grass too tall?
Give us a call!
Commercial/Residential
weekly/bi-weekly rates
Have a landscaping
job? We do that too.
Call now for your free
estimate. Insured for
your protection.
o Mowing: Residential
& Commercial
o Landscaping
o Irrigation
Free Estimates!
Licensed & Insured
417-818-4037
417-840-3986
Paint Average
Bedroom in 2 Hours
Homes, Apartments,
Rental Properties New
& Old. We also remove
& hang paper $15/ Hr
Two Year Guarantee!
40 Years Exp Lic. & ins
Truman 417-300-4669
Lawn & Garden
374
1 AFFORDABLE
LAWN CARE!
Sam Worley Insured
Floor Covering
363
Commercial &
Residential
Starting at $15
Over 7 years Exp.
References Available
417-880-1582
KWIK KUT
LAWN CARE
BURK LAWN AND
LANDSCAPE
Brush Hogging, Plowing,
Tilling, Post Holes,
Mowing, Trimming,
Lawn Installation, Grading,
Driveways, yard drainage
problems Seeding ,
Rock/Top Soil .
Workman's Comp.
Liability & Licensed
742-3322 or 425-8359
417-616-9179
SutherLANDscape
Lawn Service
Professional Lawn
Mowing, Residential
& Commercial
Insured for your
peace of mind!
417-880-6961
sutherLANDscape
Lawn.com
Call Miller's
Lawn Mowing
Licensed & Insured
23 years Experience.
Commercial &
Residential
Competitive Rates
Free Estimates!
417-864-5793
or 353-0364
A-1 Lawn Care
Starting at $15 7days a
week Comm'l &
Residential. Professional Lawn Mowing.
Weedeating, Trimming,
Small Landscape &
Mulch Jobs, Storm
Clean Up. Honest,
Hardworking, Reliable,
Dependable, Responsible. Competitive Rates!
Insured
I want YOUR business!"
417-861-9345,
Servicing Springfield &
Surrounding Towns
Mowing,
Trimming & Blowing
Commercial and
Residential
Over 14 Years Exp!
Free Estimates!
References Available!
ELLIS LAWN
CARE
Mowing 4 U
Reasonable Rates
Reliable Service
Dependable
Residential and
Commercial
$25 & up
FREE estimates!
Tree Care
376
JOE'S TREE
& Landscape Service.
Local, Licensed
& Insured
Boom truck & climbers
ready for any job!
Customer satisfaction
is our 1st priority.
For FREE ESTIMATES
Call the pros at Joe's
(417)496-4424
(417)865-0349
AFFORDABLE LAWN CARE!
Expert Design
&
Construction
For:
Sam Worley Insured
Commercial & Residential
Starting at $15
Over 7 years Exp.
References Available
Kitchen • Bath
Additions • Garages
417-880-1582
Over 35 Years Experience
Many Satisfied Customers
r’s
Call Mille
N
W
A
L
425-5556
G
MOWIN
CALL FOR
FREE CONSULTATION
889-5708
Philip Thomas
Owner
Golden Ru e 4th Generation
Home Improvement
Builder
FREE ESTIMATES!
REFERENCES 417.224.0609
SL-0000257978
FREE ESTIMATES!
CALL 417-864-5793
OR 353-0364
Licensed & Insured 23 years Experience
Commercial & Residential Competitive Rates
SL-0000257965
NO JOB TOO SMALL
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SL-0000257974
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DEWAYNE B. ROUT
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SL-0000258019
We also have specials for
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Thank You Springfield
for 28 Wonderful Years!
417.844.5646
• FREE Estimates!
• Licensed & Insured
• References
417-848-5418
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349
AAA
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Private Office
Doug Gooch 849-1431
springfieldbuyer.com
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Call Tony or Jerry at
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or 987-0013
APPLEBERRY'S
CONCRETE
Licensed & Insured & Referrals
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417-880-2950
35 Years
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(417)844-4134
Your Local Handyman
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References
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Exercise
Tuesday, May 24, 2011 7B
CLASSIFIED 836-1150 OR TOLL FREE 800-695-1908
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Kansas
City
St. Louis
Springfield
63
54
Camdenton
Nevada
54
71
Bolivar
Lamar
Joplin
Willard
160
Carthage
44
60
Neosho
71
25 MILES
37
5
65
13
Lebanon
Buffalo
44
Fort
Leonard
Wood
Licking
Strafford
Republic
Battlefield
Nixa
Monett
Cassville
Branson
1
Rolla
Waynesville
Houston
Marshfield
Springfield
2
60
Cabool
Rogersville Mansfield
Ozark
Ava
65
5
West Plains
160
Gainesville
63
NEWS-LEADER
TELEVISION TONIGHT
May 24
ABC
(
A
CBS
)
*
FOX
^
;
NBC
,
#
PBS
`
5
1 TABLE ROCK LAKE
Coast Guard Auxiliary
offering free boat checks
Members of the U.S. Coast Guard
Auxiliary will help boaters prepare for the summer season during
weekly checks at various marinas
on Table Rock Lake.
The checks will help boaters
make sure all the required equipment is working.
The free weekly checks are at
the following marinas through
August:
Baxter Marina, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Thursdays starting May 26.
What’s Up Dock, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Fridays beginning May 27.
State Park Marina from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m., Fridays starting May 27.
If these dates do not fit your
schedule, call Bill Van Horn at 7391348 to schedule a time.
2 ROGERSVILLE
EPA to test private
well water this week
The Environmental Protection
Agency will be testing private
well water this week near
Rogersville as part of an investigation into contaminated groundwater.
According to a press release
from the EPA, officials will sample
private wells in the vicinity of
Compass Plaza development.
The Missouri Department of
Natural Resources detected the
chemical solvent trichloroethylene, or TCE, in water samples
KSPR
Inside
News at Edition
6 (N)
(N) ‘PG’
KOLR 10 EntertainNews (N) ment
(S)
Tonight
Two and Two and
a Half
a Half
Men ‘14’ Men ‘14’
KY3
Wheel of
News at Fortune
Six (N) ‘G’
PBS NewsHour (N)
(S) (CC) P
TV54 V
%
CW /
KRBK*
Daniel Boone ‘PG’
Family Chris
Guy ‘14’
Access Cash
+ Ron Phil- John
Hagee
MY31 ? lips
Today
Dancing With the
Dancing With the Stars (Season Finale)
Stars (S) (HD) ‘PG’ The winner is announced. (N) (S Live) (HD)
(CC) A
‘PG’ (CC) A
NCIS “Defiance” A NCIS: Los Angeles NCIS “Kill Screen” (S)
suicide bomber kills a “Bounty” ‘14’ (CC) C (HD) ‘PG’ (CC) C
Marine. ‘PG’
American Idol “Two Glee New Directions Ozarks FOX News
Finalists Compete” competes at Nation- Channel in HD (HD)
(N) ‘PG’
als. ‘14’
The Biggest Loser (Season Finale) The
The Voice “The
winner is revealed. (N) (S Live) (HD) (CC) N Battles, Part 3” (N)
‘PG’ (CC) N
Secrets of the Dead Frontline Classified Independent Lens
(S) ‘PG’ (CC) P
documents on WikiLe- Small town deals with
aks. (N) (S)
change. ‘PG’
Little House
Gunsmoke ‘PG’
Star Trek: Next
One Tree Hill ‘14’
Hellcats ‘PG’ (CC) G The Oprah Winfrey
(CC) G
Show (N) ‘PG’
Smarter Smarter Lyrics
Lyrics
Cold Case Files
Rod Pars- Joni
Celebration ‘G’
Joel Osteen ‘PG’
ley ‘G’
Lamb ‘G’
(CC)
KSPR
News at
10:00
KOLR 10
News (N)
(S)
Seinfeld
‘PG’ (CC)
(:35)
Jimmy Kimmel Live (12:07) KSPR
(:06) Paid
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‘G’
gram
10:00
(:35) Late Show With (:37) The Late Late (:37) The (:07) Paid
David Letterman
Show With Craig
Insider Program
(N) ‘PG’
Ferguson
(N) ‘PG’
How
My Name Love-Ray- How
Scrubs Seinfeld
I Met/
Is Earl
mond
I Met/
(S) ‘14’ ‘G’ (CC)
Mother ‘14’
Mother (CC)
KY3
(:35) The Tonight
(:37) Late Night With Last Call/ (:05) Paid
News at Show With Jay Leno Jimmy Fallon (N) ‘14’ Daly
Program
Ten (N) (N) ‘14’
(CC) N
Craft in America
Charlie Rose (N) (S) Frontline Classified Craft in
“Messages” (N) (S) (CC) P
documents on WikiLe- America
‘PG’ (CC) P
aks. (S)
(S) ‘PG’
Frasier Frasier Worship The Harvest Show Worship Worship
Family M*A*S*H Star Trek: The Next Law & Order: Spe- ’70s
Guy ‘14’ ‘PG’
Generation
cial Victims Unit
Show
Cash
Comics RENO
Punk’d South
Stooges Movie
KeithKenneth Life Today Joyce
Celebration ‘G’
Joni
Craft.TV Copeland ‘G’ (CC) Meyer
Lamb ‘G’
‘G’
PREMIUM CHANNELS
(5:30) ›› “Ar›› “2012” (2009, Action) (ESP HDTV) John Cusack, (:40) ›› “Blade II” (2002) Wesley Snipes. A (:40) › “Supernova” (2000)
(:15) “Arvampire hunter unites with his prey against a (HD) James Spader, Robert
mored”
ENC (517) mored” (2009) ‘PG- Chiwetel Ejiofor. A global cataclysm nearly wipes out
13’ (CC)
humanity. (S) ‘PG-13’ (CC)
new threat. ‘R’ (CC)
Forster. (S) ‘PG-13’ (CC)
›› “Night at the
REAL Sports With ››› “Get Him to the Greek” (2010, Com- Game of Thrones
(10:55) Lady Gaga Presents the Monster Treme
HBO (550) Museum: Battle of Bryant Gumbel ‘PG’ edy) (ESP HDTV) Jonah Hill, Russell Brand. Ned sits for the king. Ball Tour: At Madison Square Garden (S) ‘MA’ (CC)
the Smithsonian” (CC)
(S) ‘R’ (CC)
‘MA’ (CC)
(HD) ‘MA’ (CC)
(5:00) ››› “State of (:15) ›› “Predators” (2010) (ESP HDTV) ›› “Cradle 2 the Grave” (2003, (:45)
(:15) “Sin City Diaries 4: Luck Is a Lady” (2007, Adult)
MAX (575) Play” (2009) ‘PG-13’ Adrien Brody. Fearsome aliens hunt a band Action) (ESP HDTV) Jet Li, DMX. Femme (HD) Pretty women offer tempting moments. (S) ‘MA’
of human fighters. (S) ‘R’
(S) ‘R’ (CC)
Fatales ‘NR’ (CC)
(:15) ››› “My Best Friend’s Wedding” Nurse
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Aries Spears: Hol- “Martin
(ESP HDTV) Michael Cera. iTV. lywood, Look I’m
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iTV. (S) ‘PG-13’
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(:05) ›› “Alice in Wonderland” (2010,
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(:45) ››› “About a Boy” (2002) Hugh
›› “The Last Song” (2010, Drama) Miley
Carol” (2009) Voices of Jim Car- Grant. A lonely boy finds a friend in a care- Cyrus. A man tries to reconnect with his
STRZ (533) Fantasy) (ESP HDTV) Johnny Depp, Mia
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rey. ‘PG’ (CC)
free bachelor. ‘PG-13’
estranged daughter. ‘PG’ (CC)
(5:15) ››› “King of ›› “Knowing” (2009) Nicolas Cage. A note (:05) ››› “Staten Island”
(:45) “Hotel California” (2008) Erik Pal››› “Inglourious
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events. ‘PG-13’ (CC)
Hawke. (S) ‘R’ (CC)
betraying a mob boss. ‘NR’
War) ‘R’
CABLE CHANNELS
The First 48 The
A&E Q shooting death of a
28-year-old. ‘14’
(4:00) ›› “Batman
AMC R Returns” (1992)
‘PG-13’
River Monsters:
ANPL ∞ Unhooked ‘PG’
BBCA(162) Top Gear ‘PG’
BET I 106 & Park: Top
The Real HouseBRAV M wives of Orange
County ‘14’ (CC)
CMT [ Extreme, Home
CNN O John King, USA
Daily
The
Colbert
COM N Show
Report ‘14’
Deadliest Catch ‘14’
DISC Æ (CC)
Suite Life Suite Life
DISN ≤ on Deck on Deck
HELPING HANDS
- Movies
\ - Broadcast channels (0) - Mediacom channels (HD) - High Definition
- Sport event (N) - New
Critics’ Ratings ›››› - Highest
‘G’ ‘PG’ ‘PG-13’ ‘R’ - MPAA
6 PM 6:30 7 PM 7:30 8 PM 8:30 9 PM 9:30 10 PM 10:30 11 PM 11:30 12 AM 12:30 1 AM
The First 48 “Divi- The First 48 The
The First 48 A teen- The First 48 (HD)
(:01) The First 48 “Di- (12:01) The First 48 (:01) The
sion; Loose Ends”
creator of a dance is ager is shot to death. ‘14’ (CC)
vision; Loose Ends” (HD) ‘PG’ (CC)
First 48
(HD) ‘14’ (CC)
killed. ‘PG’
‘14’ (CC)
‘14’ (CC)
‘14’
››› “Rocky II” (1979) (HD) Sylvester Stallone, Talia ››› “Rocky III” (1982, Drama) (HD) Sylvester Stal- ››› “48 HRS.” (1982, Action)
Shire. Underdog Philly fighter gets another shot at
lone, Mr. T. A merciless contender forces Rocky into a (HD) Nick Nolte, Eddie Murphy.
heavyweight champ. ‘PG’ (CC)
title match. ‘PG’ (CC)
‘R’ (CC)
River Monsters:
River Monsters:
River Monsters: Un- River Monsters:
River Monsters:
River Monsters:
Monsters
Unhooked ‘PG’
Unhooked ‘PG’
hooked (N) ‘PG’
Unhooked ‘PG’
Unhooked ‘PG’
Unhooked ‘PG’
Star Trek: Next
Nightmares
Nightmares
Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares
Nightmares
Ramsay
Fa. Aff
Wendy Williams
Fa. Aff
Mo’Nique
“Back in the Day” ‘R’ (CC)
›› “Not Easily Broken” ‘PG-13’
The Real HouseThe Real HousePregnant in Heels Pregnant in Heels The Real HouseThe Real HousePregnant
wives of Orange
wives of Orange
“Daddy Boot Camp” “Daddy Boot Camp” wives of New Jersey wives of Orange
in Heels
County ‘14’ (CC)
County ‘14’ (CC)
‘14’
‘14’
(HD) ‘14’
County ‘14’ (CC)
Fried
Music
Smarter Smarter Dukes-Hazzard
Hazzard
Extreme, Home
›› “Police Academy” (1984) (S) ‘R’
In the Arena (N)
Piers Morgan
Anderson Cooper 360 (N) (CC)
Piers Morgan
Anderson Cooper Cooper
South
Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Tosh.0 Sports Daily
(:31) The (:01)
Sports Futurama It’s
Daily
Park ‘MA’ ‘14’ (CC) ‘14’ (CC) ‘14’ (CC) (N) ‘14’ Show
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‘PG’
Always Show
(CC)
Report ‘14’
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Deadliest Catch ‘14’ Deadliest Catch (N) Dual Survival “Out of Deadliest Catch ‘14’ Deadliest Catch ‘14’ Dual Survival “Out of Mayday!
(CC)
‘14’ (CC)
Africa” (N) ‘PG’
(CC)
(CC)
Africa” ‘PG’
Bering
›› “Tinker Bell and the Lost Suite Life Suite Life Suite Life Good
Good
Hannah Hannah Wizards- Wizards- Suite Life
Treasure” (2009) Voices of Mae on Deck on Deck on Deck Luck
Luck
Montana Montana Place
Place
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Whitman. ‘G’
Charlie Charlie (S) ‘G’
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Ask
Rescue Kitchen Kitchen Indoors Extra
Yard
Indoors Kitchen Kitchen Indoors Extra
Yard
DIY
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Deck
Deck
Suite
Suite
NBA FIT Zeke
I’mKings
Phineas Deck
Deck
Deck
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Suite
DXD (122) Kings
Sex &
Sex &
Chelsea Khloe
Khloe
Khloe
Khloe
Khloe
Khloe
Chelsea E! News
Chelsea
E!
π E! News (N)
(5:00) SportsCenter (N) (Live) NFL Live Year of the Quarter- Baseball Tonight
SportsCenter (N) (Live) (HD)
NBA To- SportsCenter (N)
SportsCenESPN C (HD) (CC)
(N)
back (HD)
(N) (CC)
(CC)
night (N) (CC)
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Football 30 for 30 (HD)
Football College Tennis
Baseball Tonight
Live
NAS
30 for
ESPN2D NAS
America’s Funniest America’s Funniest America’s Funniest America’s Funniest The 700 Club (HD) Whose Whose Ck 3x
Body
Paid ProHome Videos (S)
Home Videos (S)
Home Videos (S)
‘PG’ (CC)
Line?
Line?
Faster
Form Ahh gram
FAM ∫ Home Videos (S)
‘PG’ (CC)
‘PG’ (CC)
‘PG’ (CC)
‘PG’ (CC)
Bra
(5:00) ›› “11 Har- ›› “The Chase” (1994) Charlie Sheen. An ›› “11 Harrowhouse” (1974) Charles
›› “The Chase” (1994) Charlie Sheen. An “Only the
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‘PG’ (CC)
for Mexico. ‘PG-13’
petrate a jewel heist. ‘PG’
for Mexico. ‘PG-13’
O’Reilly Factor
Hannity (N)
Record
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Hannity (HD)
Record
Glenn
FNC Ø FOX Report
Chopped
Chopped (N)
Challenge (HD)
Chopped
Chopped (HD)
Challen.
FOODμ Iron Chef America Cupcake Wars
Sports Game 365 World Poker Tour: Halls of Cardinals MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals at San Diego Padres. From
Postgame Sports Final
FSN F Stories
Season 9 (HD)
Fame
PETCO Park in San Diego. (N Subject to Blackout)
Stories Score
Two and Two and ››› “Kung Fu Panda” (2008, Comedy) ››› “Kung Fu Panda” (2008, Comedy) › “Big Momma’s House 2” (2006, Com- Six Star
a Half
(HD) Voices of Jack Black, Angelina Jolie, (HD) Voices of Jack Black, Angelina Jolie, edy) (HD) Martin Lawrence, Nia Long, Emily Knife Set
FX B a Half
Men ‘14’ Men ‘14’ Jackie Chan. ‘PG’
Jackie Chan. ‘PG’
Procter. ‘PG-13’
Bag
Drew
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Love
Fam
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GSN (161) Love
Little House on the Little House on the Frasier Frasier Frasier Frasier Golden Golden Golden Golden Cheers Cheers Cheers
HALL A Prairie ‘PG’
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(S) ‘PG’ (S) ‘PG’ (S) ‘PG’ (S) ‘PG’ Girls
Girls
Girls
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(S) ‘PG’ (S) ‘PG’ (S) ‘PG’
First
Property Property House
Hunters Property Property Property Property House
Hunters Property
HGTV ¥ Hunters House First
American Pickers Larry the Cable Guy Larry the Cable Guy How the States Got How the Earth Was Larry the Cable Guy Larry the Cable Guy How the
HIST ∑ (HD) ‘PG’ (CC)
Their Shapes
Made ‘PG’
States
(:15) “Thank You for Smoking” ‘R’
››› “House Party” (1990) ‘R’
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IFC (503) Whitest Onion
Pawn
Pawn
American Pickers American Pickers How I Met How I Met How I Met How I Met Chris
Chris
Will &
Will &
Chris
LIFE ? Stars
Stars
“Hobo Jack” ‘PG’
(HD) ‘PG’ (CC)
Grace
Grace
“To Have and to Hold” ‘14’ ‘NR’ (CC)
To Have
›› “Murder in the Hamptons” ‘PG’
LMN (504) “Woman Scornd” ›› “Murder in the Hamptons” ‘PG’
The Last Word
Rachel Maddow
The Ed Show (N)
The Last Word
Rachel Maddow
The Ed Show
Hardball
MSN ≥ Hardball Chris
16 and Pregnant
16 and Pregnant
16 and Pregnant (N) (S) ‘14’
16 and Pregnant ‘14’ (CC)
True Life (S)
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MTV Ω 16 and Pregnant
Area 51 Declass.
When Aliens Attack (HD) ‘14’
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Chris
Lopez
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›› “The Amityville Horror” ‘R’ (CC)
OXYG - Snapped ‘PG’
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Barrett-Jackson
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Hub
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SPKE Z Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Hunters Games Games Die
Die
swers
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Video
›› “Category 6: Day of Destruction”
›› “Category 6: Day of Destruction”
›› “Polar Storm” (2009) (HD) Jack Cole- Stargate SG-1 “Reck- Stargate
SYFY Y (2004) Thomas Gibson. ‘PG’
(2004) Thomas Gibson. ‘PG’
man. ‘PG’ ‘PG-13’ (CC)
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(CC)
(CC)
(CC)
(CC)
(CC)
‘14’
(5:15) ›› “Tickle
››› “The Black Stallion” (1979) Kelly
(:15) ›› “The Black Stallion Returns”
(:15) ››› “Run Wild, Run Free” (1969) “White
TCM (501) Me” ‘NR’ (CC)
Reno, Mickey Rooney. ‘G’ (CC)
(1983) Kelly Reno. ‘PG’ (CC)
John Mills, Mark Lester. ‘G’
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(N) ‘PG’ (CC)
‘14’ (CC)
Coupon Coupon ‘PG’ (CC)
‘14’ (CC)
Coupon Coupon Limbed
Law & Order “The Pregame NBA Basketball Chicago Bulls at Miami Heat. (N) (Live) Inside the NBA (N) CSI: NY (S) (ESP
CSI: NY “Redemp- Memphis
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Bizarre Foods
Bizarre Foods
Bizarre Foods
Bizarre Foods
Bizarre Foods
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Bizarre
TRAV ≠ Bizarre Foods
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Fortune Seller
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
Pawn
TRU H World Dumbest
Ray
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Rose
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(:15) Roseanne ‘G’ Rose
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cial Victims Unit
cial Victims Unit
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“Delinquent” ‘14’
“Anchor” ‘14’
“Shadow” ‘14’
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Mob Wives ‘14’
Mob Wives ‘14’
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from two noncommunity wells and
an irrigation well in the area in
March 2010.
Subsequent testing found TCE in
13 wells, five of which had levels
above the maximum contaminant
level of 5 parts per billion.
The sample tests will be offered
at no charge to property owners.
Property owners wanting their
wells to be sampled should contact
Doug Ferguson of the EPA at 1-800223-0425 or (913) 551-7221 to make
arrangements.
Long-term exposure to TCE at
elevated levels is suspected of
causing cancer, as well as liver
problems and weakening of the
immune system, according to the
EPA.
To learn more about the Compass
Plaza Well TCE site, visit
www.epaosc.org/compassplaza
Twain elementary
donates over $800
Telethon to benefit
sick, injured children
Mark Twain Elementary
School will donate more
than $800 to the American
Heart Association after its
5K Run for Heart event that
was held on May 12.
On Friday, the male staff
members at Twain will
wear red dresses to accept
the check on behalf of the
American Heart Association during the lunch hour.
Twain is located at 2352 S.
Weaver Road.
The Twain Trail Runners,
a student running club,
organized the event. The
club is sponsored by the
Hamels Foundation; an
organization that takes a
community-based
approach to education by
providing assistance to
inner-city schools as well as
supporting other education
based non-profit entities in
the United States.
Student runners participated to raise money and
awareness for cardiovascular disease research and
related public and professional education programs.
The American Heart Association and the American
Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation
and Dance were co-sponsors of the event.
The annual telethon for
the Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals will be held
June 4-5.
The telethon will air live
on KYTV from 10:30 p.m. to
midnight June 4 and 8 a.m.5 p.m. June 5. The live
broadcast from Cox South
hospital in Springfield will
feature the stories of local
children who have been
helped by the charity.
Last year, the telethon
raised about $1.4 million.
Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals of CoxHealth has financially supported sick and injured
Ozarks’ children and their
families for more than 25
years by helping with medically
related
travel
expenses, medical equipment purchases and much
more.
Do you have stories of Ozarkers helping out each other? If
you or your group is holding a
fundraiser, donation drive or
church benefit, for example, email information to [email protected] Include
contact information. E-mailed
photos are accepted but please
send only one.
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AROUND
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M i ss o u r i
NEWS-LEADER • News-Leader.com
SL-0000257950
8B Tuesday, May 24, 2011
COMING
WEDNESDAY
Life
NEWS LEADER
Tuesday
May 24, 2011
News-Leader.com
1C
To report a news tip, call
417-836-1199 or e-mail
[email protected]
lost &
found
Loved ones
MATTHEW MEAD / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Planning to do some grilling?
Make your own barbecue sauce.
Regional influences
make inspired sauces
When making barbecue sauce, it’s
all about location. While Kansas
City is home to tangy, tomato and
molasses-influenced sauces, northern Alabama is known for a white
sauce based on mayonnaise with
black pepper and lemon juice. Find
grilling success with regional flavor.
grief assistance
LOST & FOUND GRIEF CENTER
Thrills from the grill
Five-year-old Avery
Gentry (center) chats
with Liz Viele at Lost
& Found Grief Center
while his 7-year-old
sister, Dien, writes in
her grief book, an
activity with the
group the kids started attending after
their mother died in a
car crash in February.
They were in the car
with their mom, but
they were unharmed.
“What they went
through is horrific. I
can’t even fathom
that,” says dad Rob,
who also gets support at Lost & Found.
It’s time to get serious about
grilling. Food columnist Juliana
Goodwin shares recipes for a delicious charred pineapple salsa; her
grilled Thai beef salad; or tilapia
with capers, tomatoes paired with
rosemary potatoes on the grill.
DAILY PLANNER
Learn to speak Spanish
Grupo Latinoamericano is offering Spanish classes starting June 21.
Classes take place from 7 to 8:30
p.m. Tuesdays at Vandivort Center,
305 E. Walnut St., Suite 228. Cost for
the 10-week course is $90, which
includes the study materials. The
classes are taught by professional
native-speakers of the language.
For information, call 886-1348.
SONY HOCKLANDER
NEWS-LEADER
LOST & FOUND
GRIEF CENTER
NIGHT LIFE
What: A center for
children who are
grieving the loss of a
parent, sibling or primary caregiver.
Where: 1006 N.
Cedarbrook Ave.;
865-9998; lostand
foundozarks.com
Fee: None; donations
welcome
Ages: Groups of 6-12
kids are formed
based on ages: 3-11
years, grades 6-8 and
grades 9-12; there is
also a group for ages
19 to 20-something
and a group for
older adults
Meetings: Groups
meet 6:30-8 p.m.
twice a month; parents meet for support while children
go to groups
TODAY
Austin of Gas Pump Talent, 8-11
p.m., Ebbets Field South, 3662 S.
Glenstone Ave., 881-8780
Shawn Eckels, 9:30 p.m.-midnight,
Ebbets Field, 1027 E. Walnut St.,
865-5050
Diana Queen, 7:30-12:30 p.m.,
Cody’s South, 1440 E. Republic
Road, 883-0253
Quantum Groove, 9 p.m., Lindberg’s, 318 W. Commercial St., 8688900
WEDNESDAY
Dave Spencer, 6:30-9:30 p.m.,
American Legion Post 676, 5484 W.
Sunshine St., 882-4676
Mudsharks, 7:30-12:30 a.m.,
Cody’s South, 1440 E. Republic
Road, 883-0253
Dug & the Solar Panels, 7-10 p.m.,
Patton Alley Pub, 313 S. Patton Ave.
2 G’s, 8 p.m., Roadhouse Live, 5739
S. Campbell Ave., 887-3447
Quizzical with Joe Terry, 7 p.m.,
Q Enoteca, 308 W. Commercial St.
THURSDAY
ABS Band, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.,
Cody’s South, 1440 E. Republic
Road, 883-0253
Bobo, 8 p.m., Ebbets Field South,
3662 S. Glenstone Ave., 881-8780
Gas Pump Talent, 10 p.m.-1 a.m.,
Ebbets Field, 1027 E. Walnut St.,
865-5050
Norman Jackson Band, 8 p.m.midnight, Fusion Bar & Grill, 2609
N. Kansas Expressway, 869-3874
Allen Ross, 7-11 p.m., Harlow’s,
637 S. Kimbrough Ave., 864-5258
DJ’s of Lemondrop with The
Phase-tones, 9 p.m., The Highlife,
322 South Ave., 831-9155, cover
Ivan Crow, 9 p.m., Nathan P. Murphy’s, 218 S. Campbell Ave., 8631909, cover
Club Keylargo with DJ, 9 p.m.-1
a.m., The New Key Largo, 1281-B E.
Republic Road, 881-8144, cover
The Detectives, 9 p.m., The Outland, 326 South, 863-9779, cover
Art Bentley, 9 p.m., Roadhouse
Live, 5739 S. Campbell, 887-3447
Kristi Merideth, 8 p.m., Springfield Brewing Company, 301 S.
Market Ave., 832-8277
Last Mile, 9 p.m., Three 20’s, 3005
S. Kansas Expressway, 881-1520,
cover
Story by SONY HOCKLANDER • [email protected]
O
ne hot and sticky Friday
morning in August 2006,
Scott Klotz kissed his wife
Laura goodbye as she left for
work, then finished packing for
the long weekend trip he’d
planned with the couple’s son John
— not quite 5. Soon, father and son
were on the road to visit Scott’s
parents in southern Illinois.
It was the last time Laura would
see her husband of seven years.
That weekend, while changing
clothes in a bedroom of his parents’ house, Scott suffered a massive heart attack. In an instant, he
was gone, leaving his little boy
fatherless and his wife a widow.
Last May, Laura and John, now
9, remembered Scott together
when they wrote his name on an
environment-friendly balloon and
released it skyward as part of a
memorial event planned by the
Lost & Found Grief Center, a support facility for children where
Laura and John attend.
They plan to release another
memorial balloon on Thursday
when Lost & Found hosts its 2011
community event.
WANT TO GO?
MARK SCHIEFELBEIN / FOR THE NEWS-LEADER
Laura and John Klotz balance normal activities like soccer practice with
visits to Lost & Found to help deal with the loss of a husband and father.
ship up in the clouds and get
Daddy and bring him home?”
John missed his father and all
they did together, Laura says.
“They would go out to look at the
stars together. They would play basketball, football, catch. They loved
to go fishing; to go to the creek.”
An empty spot
Scott also enjoyed reading to his
Sending her husband’s name to son: “He read tons of bedtime stothe sky was a fitting tribute to ries. He really loved to be
Scott, who frequently shared his engaged. He loved to be a dad.”
interest in space and NASA with
One day at a time
his young son.
In fact, for nearly 18 months
After her husband died, Laura
after his father died, John — who did what was necessary to survive
didn’t quite understand the per- the sudden change in their lives.
manence of death — would ask,
“I couldn’t figure out how to use
“Mom, can’t I just take a rocket the lawn mower. I knew I had to get
Article originally published in
a will. I had to get life insurance. I
was on autopilot and it was a blur,”
she says. “I didn’t have time for a
pity-party. You think you can’t go
on but you just find the strength.
Was I not going to pick up my kid
from day care? Not make dinner?
You do what you have to do.”
The death of a parent is different from divorce, says Laura, who
also has a 3-year-old daughter,
Isabelle Lundstrom.
See LOST, Page 4C
What: Memorial
balloon release
When: 5:45 p.m.
Thursday; balloon
release at 6:30 p.m.,
run/walk at 7 p.m.
Where: Jordan Valley
Park, 635 East Trafficway
What: Purchase a balloon to release in
memory of a loved
one who died
Cost: $5 for balloon
(reserved in advance
or day of event);
run/walk registration
is $20 in advance, $25
day of race, $10 for
ages 12 and younger
Information: 8659998, www.lostand
foundozarks.com
Planting asparagus well worth the wait
IN SEASON
THIS WEEK
asparagus, berries
and fruit and
strawberries, beets,
broccoli, sprouts,
cauliflower, cucumbers, leeks, peas,
radishes, rhubarb,
lettuce, greens,
green onions,
spinach, local meat.
Springtime is the season of my
Sandy
favorite yearly visitor, asparagus. It’s
CLARK
like a vitamin shop full of B vitamins,
Ozark
folic acid, vitamin C, potassium, copLocavore
per, vitamin A, iron, phosphorus and
zinc, all in one long green pill. It is
also tasty, the flavor of spring.
The plant consists of roots, a crown
Good plantings can last 10 to 15
and spears. When planting from mid- years. You just can’t touch it the first
April to early May, you are making an year. Have patience. They have plenty
investment in the following year, and at the farmers market. You’ll be OK.
likely several beyond that.
It does mean you have to think
about where you want it, the University of Missouri Extension says.
Think before you plant.
Asparagus needs to be in a location
getting six hours of sun a day, well
away from the onion and its cousins,
like leeks and garlic. Light, sandy,
well-drained soils work best, and it
will want to stay put a while. Look
around your garden. What might
See CLARK, Page 4C
2C Tuesday, May 24, 2011
PEOPLE
ESSENTIALS
Bake sales and raffles?
So passé. Now that it
boasts Madonna as a parent, New York City’s
LaGuardia High School
was able to auction off a
pair of Chanel boots worn
by the Material Mom at its
spring fundraiser.
LaGuardia, the so-called
“Fame” school, is a public
high school specializing in
the visual and performing
arts. Madonna’s daughter
Lourdes enrolled there in
September.
The Daily News reports
that the LaGuardia auction
also featured an item
donated
by
novelist
Jonathan Letham, who’s
an alum. He auctioned off a
chance to become a character in his next book.
There was no information
on what the lots sold for.
own app by way of the Los
Angeles-based comic and
graphic novel publisher.
Dubbed the “Stan Lee
BOOM! Comics App,” the
program is being offered
through Apple’s iTunes app
store. Lee’s superhero
comic series “Soldier Zero,”
“The Traveler” and “Starborn” are also being made
available through it and
through Boom!’s own app.
The comics come with a
free preview of the first
issues but cost $1.99 for
subsequent issues. The
iVerse Media-developed
app will also be linked to
Lee’s Twitter musings.
The titles will also be available for download on desktops, including Windows and
Mac, through ComiXology,
Graphic.ly, iVerse and
MyDigitalComics.
The three new series,
penned by Lee, made their
debut last year in association with his company,
Pow! Entertainment.
Comic book legend
Lee going digital
Martin playing at
‘Capitol Fourth’
Stan Lee, whose career
writing comic books has
run from the golden age to
contemporary times, is
going digital.
Boom! Studios said Monday that the man who
helped create modern marvels like the Fantastic Four
and X-Men will see his current crop of comic series
available online and on
mobile devices through his
Steve Martin and his
banjo are taking on the
U.S. Capitol on July 4.
He is set to perform from
the Capitol’s west lawn at
the annual “A Capitol
Fourth” concert this year.
Josh Groban, Little Richard,
“Glee” star Matthew Morrison, “American Idol” winner Jordin Sparks and
Broadway star Kelli O’Hara
also share the bill.
Madonna’s boots
in school auction
CRYPTOQUIP
Housekeepers deserve tips more than anyone
Dear Abby: I was shocked
and angered by the letter
from “West Virginia Traveler” (April 16) on towel usage
and tipping hotel housekeepers. His priorities and
“knowledge” of hotel staff
are seriously skewed. This
man is taking his peevishness
out on hotel employees who
can least afford to take it.
The concierge is paid well
to deal with disgruntled
guests and make things right.
The bellman gets tipped to
carry a bag from the lobby to
your room. If a doorman calls
a cab for you, he gets tipped.
If there is a restaurant, the
servers are tipped.
FUOX MXXK BXZHOXSXB
V X X P - V H S E P, N X C V P X K Q U Z Z
PFXG PFX MSXXQF MCAE.
Today’s Cryptoquip clue: N equals W
Monday’s Cryptoquip: If you firmly intend to fire a slothful
employee, I suppose that’s termination determination.
The Cryptoquip is a substitution cipher in which each letter used stands
for another. If X equals O, it will equal O throughout. Solution is
accomplished by trial and error. ©King Features Syndicate Inc.
Dear Heloise: I read the
restaurant tipping hint in
the Houston Chronicle. The
reader suggests doubling
the tax as an easy way to
figure out the tip. Warning:
This will work only if you
don’t order alcoholic beverages.
There is no tax on alcohol
(Heloise here: This is not
the case everywhere and in
every situation), and since
it’s customary to tip on the
entire bill, doubling the tax
definitely will shortchange
your server.
I hope you’ll set the
record straight. Wait staff
members usually work for
less than minimum wage
and depend on tips. They
Dear Dr. Fox: My husband
watches the game show
“Jeopardy” in the afternoon; it features a tune reminiscent of “The Syncopated Clock.” When that particular song comes on
toward the end, Patch (our
Brittany spaniel) howls in
tempo with the music!
I videotaped those few
minutes of “Jeopardy,” and
we
have
occasionally
played it for friends. Each
time, Patch has performed
on cue. He also sings along
with the “ESPN SportsCen-
SUDOKU
Taurus (April 20-May 20). You
close an emotional distance.
You embrace a loved one and
forget about whatever it was
that kept you apart.
Gemini (May 21-June 21). The
problem you thought was
handled comes sneaking back.
Give this niggling little bother
a grand and pompous label
that will allow you to laugh at
the ridiculousness of it.
Cancer (June 22-July 22). A
playful person brings silliness
to your world. You will never
regret it if you join in.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). You’ll
probably find yourself fighting for something you never
intended to defend. Your passion is part of what makes
you great.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). Creative
endeavors are wonderfully
involving. Relinquish some
control. Collaboration brings
about a happy outcome.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Get
back out into the world and
meet new people. You will
expand interests and enlarge
your network.
JUMBLE
deserve
to
be
tipped on the entire
bill.
high on the TV,
which
is
very
annoying. And, I’m
sure like a lot of
— G.A. in Houston
couples, we often
disagreed on what
Of course wait
programs to watch.
staff should be
Well, I went out and
tipped accordingly!
As mentioned in the HELOISE bought an additional TV for the family
original
column,
room. While there, I
sales tax varies
across the country. Some found the savior, remote
restaurants tax beer and headphones. Now my wife
wine, and some tax liquor, puts on her headphones and
which may be absorbed by turns the volume as loud as
the establishment (you will she wants (the TV is muted
so I can’t hear). I turn my
not see it on the bill).
— Heloise TV on to the ballgame, and
everyone’s happy. We get to
Dear Heloise: My wife is watch TV together. We
hearing-impaired and had haven’t argued in 15 years.
to have the volume turned
— Scott V., via email
ter” theme and with
the “Star Trek: The
Next Generation”
opening. But he is
most vocal with the
“Jeopardy” theme.
ing that certain
notes on a particular
pitch trigger an
instinctive response
because those notes
are part of the animal’s vocal reper— K.P., St. Louis, Mo.
toire.
Howling
or
Dear K.P.: Your
Michael
“singing” is a comPatch is one of many
FOX
mon canid trait that
TV-exposed
dogs
Pet Doctor
can be triggered by
who are clearly more
certain notes that
tuned in to certain
programs than one might are similar to the natural
expect. Behavioral studies sounds that dogs, coyotes
can demystify why certain and wolves make.
As for watching TV, it is
songs appeal to them, show-
CROSSWORD
Aries (March 21-April 19). Usually, when someone keeps
you waiting, you see it as a
sign of disrespect. Don’t take
it personally.
Sudoku is a numberplacing puzzle based
on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers.
The object is to place
the numbers 1 to 9 in
the empty squares so
that each row, each
column and each 3x3
box contains the same
number only once. The
difficulty level of the
puzzle increases from
Monday to Sunday.
want to hurt me all the
time? Am I being too sensitive or is he being cruel?
— Feeling Insecure
in Massachusetts
Dear Feeling Insecure:
You’re not being too sensitive; what your husband is
doing is cruel. It’s also cowardly. I don’t know why he
wants to hurt you. But the
question you should be asking is not why he wants to
hurt you, but rather, why
you continue to tolerate it.
Write to www.DearAbby.com
or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069.
Hint on tipping could shortchange wait staff
Today’s birthday (May 24). In
June, you’ll reduce expenses
and increase your income.
Your lucky numbers are: 23,
10, 50, 39 and 28.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22). You cannot buy self-esteem with
money, and yet there is a cost.
Right now, that cost is called
“follow through.”
and I have always
The one person
received the best
who is most critical
room service imagto making your stay
inable.
comfortable
and
pleasant
is
the
— Luann in
maid/housekeeper.
Keene, N.H.
She is the one who
makes sure you
Dear
Luann:
have a clean bathThank you for your
Jeanne
room, fresh sheets
letter. Housekeepand plenty of toilet PHILLIPS ers
everywhere
paper. She does the
will be grateful for
Dear Abby
grungiest job in the
your support.
hotel, gets paid very little, is
rarely thanked in person
Dear Abby: Why would
and is the last to be tipped. someone make insulting
She needs these tips more remarks and then say, “I’m
than anyone else.
only kidding”? My husband
I make a point of tipping constantly berates and
every single day of my stay, insults me. Why does he
Dear Heloise: For people
in the hospital, I always
take a gift of lip balm, hand
lotion, a deck of cards, dice,
notebook, pen, crossword,
word search and a coloring
book and crayons.
Many people are confused by the last two items
but if you are lying in bed
with nothing to do, be creative!
My aunt loved it because
it gave her something to do
when her grandkids visited.
— A Reader, Sanford, Mich.
Have a helpful tip for Heloise?
Contact her at P.O. Box 795000,
San Antonio, TX 78279; or by
fax, 210-HELOISE.
Canine howls along to ‘Jeopardy,’ ‘ESPN’ tunes
EHKQX GA GUZX PNHKE
HOROSCOPE
NEWS -LEADER • News-Leader.com
Answer to previous puzzle:
especially amusing when
some dogs take a particular
dislike to certain newscasters and bark and growl
when they come on the
screen.
Dogs do enjoy some types
of music, especially classical, and the CD “Through a
Dog’s Ear” seems to be
appreciated
by
many
canine audiophiles.
Contact Dr. Michael Fox at
United Feature Syndicate, 200
Madison Ave, 4th Floor, New
York, NY 10016.
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
ACROSS
1 iPhone add-ons
5 Big name in
kibbles
9 Perturb
15 Quantum __
16 Ponce de __
17 Speak liturgically, perhaps
18 “Kiss the Girls”
actor (1993)
20 Leads off
21 Thanksgiving
mo. in Canada
22 Slightly
23 Look peaked
24 Ne’ertheless
25 “Gladiator”
Oscar winner
(2010)
31 Lease signatory
33 “Go ahead!”
34 Barracks bed
35 Golf’s
Ballesteros
36 Potted plant
spot
37 Furniture company named partly for its founder
Ingvar Kamprad
38 “Captain
Blood” star (1938)
42 Plumbing
joints
45 Skin cream
brand
46 Items included
in envs.
49 Island gift
50 Tabloid twosome
51 Agricultural
measure
53 “Field of
Dreams” star
(1991)
57 67.5 deg.
58 PC’s top-left key
59 Prefix with gram
60 “Because”
evoker
61 Player in front
of a net
64 Role played by
each of four actors
in the year
indicated in their
clues
66 Take flight?
67 Foxx who sang
“Mockingbird”
68 Unadulterated
69 Lunatics
70 Keep on looking at, and not in
a nice way
71 Ollie’s sidekick
By Gareth Bain
(c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
DOWN
1 “Little Men”
novelist
2 Often flambéed
fruit
3 Start of a saga,
maybe
4 Le Carré hero,
e.g.
5 Very nearly
6 “Surprised By
Joy” autobiographer C.S.
7 Ode writers
8 Put-__: pranks
9 Talk smack to
10 Not broken
11 Step in a flight
12 Eloi predator
13 Colony dweller
14 “It is so”
19 Breadwinner
26 Build up
spiritually
27 Lounge, as on
a chaise
28 Easter bloom
29 “__ is me!”
30 Greek vowel
32 Birds’ biological class
36 Condemns verbally
37 Quaint lodg-
ings
39 Univ. recruiter
40 Marg : Brits ::
__ : Americans
41 Cell with an
axon
42 Antlered
critter
43 Sheltered side
44 1985 multivenue charity concert for Ethiopian
famine
47 Read the riot
act
48 Portuguese
lady
50 Stir up
51 British
Honduras, now
52 __ jar: static
electricity storage
device
54 Imam’s faith
55 Beach
footwear
56 Prize name
61 Pinup’s leg
62 Egg cells
63 Dusk, to 7Down
64 Brazilian hot
spot
65 Some inkjets
Answer to previous puzzle:
By David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21).
You are part nurturer and
part mediator, using your
communication skills to
acknowledge each person, as
well as to nudge them toward
maximum productivity.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19).
You demand a lot. Then
again, you are willing to do
whatever you ask others to
do.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). If
you’re afraid to talk about
something, there’s a good
reason. Exhume it. Get it out
now and be free of it.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20). You
see how each person’s contribution is vitally important to
an organization’s success.
Share your observations.
Holiday Mathis, Creators
Syndicate
[email protected]
05/24/11
Tuesday, May 24, 2011 3C
NEWS-LEADER • News-Leader.com
DILBERT
AGNES
By Scott Adams
SPEED BUMP
GET FUZZY
GARFIELD
BLONDIE
BEETLE BAILEY
THE LOCKHORNS
By Bunny Hoest and John Reiner
FOR BETTER OR WORSE
By Lynn Johnston
DOONESBURY
By Garry Trudeau
By Jim Davis
By Dean Young & John Marshall
By Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman
By Chris Browne
By Dan Piraro
By Charles Schulz
BABY BLUES
HI AND LOIS
By Bil Keane
By Darby Conley
BIZARRO
PEANUTS
By Wiley
By Stephan Pastis
ZITS
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
NON SEQUITUR
By Tony Cochran
FAMILY CIRCUS
PEARLS BEFORE SWINE
By Dave Coverly
By Rick Kirkman and Jerry Scott
By Brian Walker and Greg Walker
PICKLES
By Mort, Greg and Brian Walker
By Brian Crane
4C Tuesday, May 24, 2011
LIFE
NEWS-LEADER • News-Leader.com
Lost/Children’s grief different than adults
Continued from Page 1C
Being a single mom is
tough for anyone, but often
with divorce, “there is at
least some connection,
some help, another person
in the child’s life,” she says.
“Being a widowed parent
— there is an added sense
of finality. It’s me or
nobody.”
Grief suppressed
What Laura didn’t realize
is that children don’t show
grief like adults do. Nor that
John’s grief, unexpressed,
would seep into new areas
of his life as he grew.
That’s common, says
counselor Karen Scott,
executive director and
cofounder of Lost & Found.
“Children grieve very differently than adults,” she
says. “They grieve in spurts
because children have
short attention spans. And
they will act as if everything is OK as long as they
possibly can. That’s their
way of attempting to gain a
normalcy in their lives.”
They also hide grief to
spare their hurting parents,
she says. But that becomes
problematic because they
bury it. “And it comes out
another way.”
That’s what happened
with John, Laura says. After
he started school, behavior
problems emerged. Laura
realized her son needed
grief counseling but she didn’t know where to turn.
Then someone told her
about Lost & Found and
they’ve attended support
groups for nearly two years.
It’s made a big difference
for John, who has opened
up about his father and can
talk about his memories —
and his death, Laura says.
Helping kids cope
Twice a month, Laura and
John trek from Nixa to
southeast
Springfield
where the Lost & Found
center is located in an old
converted two-story house.
Parents go upstairs for a
support session while kids
follow adult leaders into
what looks like a two-room
play area. Books and
stuffed toys live in tall
shelves along one wall, big
pillows and bean bag chairs
line another. A puppet theater and dress-up box are in
one corner.
The
adjacent
space,
labeled the “Tornado Room,”
is home to two punching
bags and a giant stuffed
gorilla. On one wall between
them hangs a large laminated “grief map” which
resembles a Candyland
board game.
This is no ordinary play
room.
Kids and adults sit in a circle while Children’s Coordinator Liz Viele goes over
group rules. Among them:
Members speak when
holding the soft “talking
stick.” Nothing said in
group leaves the room. It’s
OK to throw soft toys and
pillows but nothing else.
“And if you don’t want to
talk, what do you say?” she
asks. “I pass,” one youngster answers.
The talking stick starts
around the circle as members — including adults —
say their name, their age,
who died and how they died. tonight, or have an adult tell
Soon Viele produces the her?”
“An adult,” he says.
grief map, which includes
Putting their feelings into
such places as the Land of
the Lost, the Land of New words is important, Scott
Beginnings and the Land of says. “We teach them ways
Changes and Challenges, to commemorate the life of
the love one that is gone.”
among other places.
There’s a balance
“In the Land of New
between keeping the
Beginnings, it’s like
memory alive while
we’re getting Bandstill moving forward,
Aids and stuff,” says
she says.
Shane Horton, whose
“We are modeling
mother
died
in
that you can access
December.
“When
the sad places but you
you’re in the Land of Horton
don’t have to stay
the Lost, it’s like
you’re that teddy bear with there,” she says. “That’s
the tear. You’re just cry- how healthy grieving is
done. Because throughout
ing,” he adds.
Going around the circle, your life, there will be
kids say what “land” they times of sadness around
are living in that day or your loss. But you won’t be
week. “I’m back in the Land sad forever and you won’t
of Changes and Challenges be sad every day the rest of
because I heard Father’s your life. We want them to
Day is coming up,” John reach a place where life is
good again.”
volunteers
“And that makes you
sad?” Viele asks. John nods. Helping parents cope
Several mention they
Upstairs, parents talk
miss snuggling with Mom. about their struggles and
One wished Mom was there successes, and find support
the week of MAP Testing.
from one another.
That’s the kind of thing
“I feel bad for some of the
they can write in their grief people
coming
lately
books, Viele tells the group. because they are really
Making grief books is this fresh. I remember how that
evening’s activity. After felt and it’s so sad. I see
circle time, adults work them struggling and there’s
with kids to write or
nothing you can do to
draw their feelings, a
make them feel betmemory, or someter,” Laura says.
thing they want an
One of those is Rob
adult to know.
Gentry, whose wife
John writes that he
Crystal was killed in
wants to see his
February when her
father’s grave.
car skidded off a
Gentry
“Have you told that
snowy highway. The
to your mom?” Viele asks.
couple’s children were in
“No,” John says.
the car, but unharmed.
“Would you like to tell her
Unlike Laura, Rob learned
Clark/Roasted asparagus simple, but delightful
change in the next decade?
That is some long-term
gardening, but it is very,
very rewarding. Fresh
young asparagus picked on
a cool morning is about the
best thing to ever add a
crunch to a salad. There are
other things you can do as
well.
For fatter spears, simple
roasting at 450 degrees for
8 to 10 minutes will produce
something delightful. Just
give them a roll halfway
through or spread them on
racks. Trim a pound of thick
spears and toss with salt,
pepper, garlic and olive oil,
then spread in a single layer
Weather
LOCAL FORECAST
Today
6 a.m.
on a cooking sheet or glass
baking dish. I go with a
tablespoon of good olive oil,
lots of minced garlic and
plenty of pepper. After the
short trip in the hot oven, hit
this dish with a shot of
lemon juice or a drizzle of
balsamic
vinegar,
and
maybe a touch of butter,
then nom, nom, nom.
Last year, Laura and John
Klotz and hundreds of other
families released 2,000 environment-friendly blue and
orange balloons in memory
of someone who had died.
The memorial event was
sponsored by Lost & Found,
a grief center for children
and their parents.
“We did it in recognition of
the fact that the community
doesn’t have a family-oriented memorial activity,” says
Executive Director Karen
Scott. “It brought together a
community of people who
are grieving the death of
someone. It was beautiful.”
Not only does it provide
an uplifting way to remember family members who
have died, it helps raise
funds for the center.
This year the event is
Thursday in Jordan Valley
Park and includes a 5K
run/walk. It will also help
celebrate Lost & Found’s
10th anniversary.
“We decided that was
very fitting. We’ll be inviting all of our past families
and past volunteers and
board members.”
about Lost & Found quickly.
His kids go to Jeffries Elementary where Viele works
as a counselor. He and his
children — Avery, 5, and
Dien, 7 — started going to
the center two weeks after
his wife died.
“The kids need to talk to
someone other than me and
family, someone they feel
comfortable with,” Rob
says. “I wanted to get into it
right away so they could be
around other kids, so they
don’t think they are alone.”
It’s made a difference in
their lives already, he says.
“I see a definite change.
That they can heal and be
able to talk about Crystal
instead of not being able to
talk about her at all.”
His daughter still won’t
talk about the accident,
though. “What they went
through is horrific. I can’t
even fathom that,” he says.
It also helps to be around
parents like Laura who have
already experienced what
he’s going through now.
“It’s nice to know if you
have a question about what
you are going through, people have already gone
through it,” Rob says.
For the Gentrys, for Laura
and her son and the other
families, the center is a place
to find comfort as they learn
to live with a new reality.
“You just take it one step
at a time. They give you the
strength to be able to do
that,” Rob says.
Laura wishes she’d known
about Lost & Found sooner.
“John gets so excited about
going. He still gets sad about
his father but he always
wants to go,” Laura says.
“And I’m thankful. If it
makes him happy, we will
be going for as long as he
wants to.”
above. Blend the roasted
veggies with chicken stock,
probably in stages depending on how much you have
made. Warm in a saucepan.
What you have is a small
pot of distilled spring, the
divine essence of green.
Add a spoon of gremolata of
minced garlic, tarragon,
parsley and lemon zest for
the classic soup or get creative. Sour cream, yogurt, a
dash of Parmesan are all
things this soup will enjoy
and you will, too. Play with
your food. It is almost as
good for you as a spear of
springtime asparagus.
TM
News-Leader.com -
Do all lightning bolts strike the ground?
Live Doppler
Radar, and current conditions at Springfield
airhubs.
REGIONAL FORECAST
TODAY: Humid today with clouds and sunshine; a strong thunderstorm, but showers
and thunderstorms toward Jefferson City
and St. Louis.
NATIONAL
FORECAST
TODAY'S OUTLOOK: A cold front tracking into the Northeast will spark
showers and thunderstorms today from New England through the southern Plains. Thunderstorms may reach severe limits across the southern
Plains and Ohio Valley, with large hail and damaging winds possible. A few
tornadoes cannot be ruled out, especially across parts of eastern
Oklahoma, eastern Kansas and southern Missouri.
Maryville 82°
66° Overcast
Wind: SSE 7-14 m.p.h.
Chance of precip: 60%
Noon
75° Some sun
Wind: S 10-20 m.p.h.
Chance of precip: 55%
6 p.m.
79° Some sun
Wind: SSE 10-20 m.p.h.
Chance of precip: 55%
Hours of daylight:
14 hours, 23 minutes
Soil drying
conditions:
Moderate
Wednesday
Kirksville 80°
St. Joseph 81°
Mo.
Kansas
City 80°
Clinton
82°
Joplin
83°
Cape
Girardeau
84°
Springfield 81°
Harrison
80°
Ark.
The Ozarks today
Hi Lo W
MISSOURI
Ava
82
Bolivar
82
Branson
83
Buffalo
82
Camdenton
82
Cassville
82
Gainesville
80
Greenfield
82
Hermitage
84
Houston
82
Lebanon
83
Marshfield
80
67
66
67
66
67
67
66
66
66
67
65
66
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
Mountain
Home 80°
News-Leader.com -
Live Doppler Radar, and current conditions at Springfield airhubs.
Hi Lo W
Monett
83 67
Mountain Grove 80 66
Mount Vernon 82 66
Nixa
81 65
Osage Beach
84 68
Osceola
83 65
Stockton
82 66
West Plains
81 65
ARKANSAS
Eureka Springs 83 67
Jasper
82 65
Fayetteville
81 68
Fort Smith
85 69
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
t
SPRINGFIELD AIR HUBS
79° / 56°
Showers and t-storms
Chance of precip: 65%
Thursday
70° / 54°
Mostly cloudy
Chance of precip: 25%
Friday
74° / 61°
Sunny and pleasant
Chance of precip: 10%
Saturday
80° / 67°
Mostly sunny
Chance of precip: 15%
Forecasts and graphics provided
by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2011
-10s
-0s
0s
10s
20s
30s
40s
50s
60s
70s
80s
90s
100s
110s
Potosi 84°
Ft. Wood 82°
Atlanta 90°/68° Today: Warm with sunshine and patchy clouds. Tonight: Mainly
clear.
Chicago 60°/51° Today: Mostly cloudy,
breezy and cooler. Tonight: Mostly cloudy
with rain late.
Dallas 89°/71° Today: Breezy and humid
with clouds and sun. Tonight: Partly
cloudy; windy, humid.
Denver 66°/43° Today: Mostly cloudy,
rain tapering off; breezy. Tonight: Mostly
cloudy, showers around.
Las Vegas 83°/72° Today: Brilliant sunshine. Tonight: Clear.
Los Angeles 72°/57° Today: Low clouds
giving way to sunshine. Tonight:
Increasing clouds.
Memphis 88°/72° Today: Partly sunny,
breezy and humid. Tonight: Mainly clear;
breezy, humid.
Minneapolis 66°/49° Today: Partly
sunny. Tonight: Partly cloudy.
Orlando 94°/66° Today: Plenty of sunshine. Tonight: Clear.
Phoenix 88°/70° Today: Bright and
sunny. Tonight: Clear.
St. Louis 86°/70° Today: Mostly cloudy
with showers and thunderstorms.
Tonight: Rain and a thunderstorm late.
Tampa 92°/72° Today: Mostly sunny.
Tonight: Clear.
Sandy Clark is The Ozark Locavore. Find more local food,
recipes and information at
www.ozarklocavore.com. Got
a great resource, e-mail
[email protected]
Temperatures
Cooling
degree days
High: 69° at 12:15 a.m.
Low: 59° at 5:02 a.m.
Normal high: 78°
Normal low: 56°
Record high: 90° (1939)
Record low: 40° (1917)
National temperature
extremes Monday for
the 48 contiguous states:
Low: 23° in Bodie State Park,
Calif.
High: 106° in Laredo, Texas
Monday's total: 0
Total for month: 65, 5
above normal
Total for year: 103, 33
above normal
Cooling degree days are the
number of degrees by which a
day's average temperature is
above 65°, roughly the point at
which home cooling begins.
Precipitation
Ultraviolet Index
Pollen count
Sun & Moon
High: 6
By 5 p.m. Monday: 0.42"
Total this month: 3.66"
11+
Normal since first of month: 0
3.31"
Today’s ultraviolet radiation
Total this year: 19.49"
risk from the sun at noon on
Normal since Jan. 1: 15.83"
a scale from 0 to 11+.
St. Louis
86°
Jefferson
City 84°
— Sony Hocklander
SPRINGFIELD ALMANAC
Weather trivia :
No, a large percentage are cloud-to-cloud discharges
Continued from Page 1C
A step beyond roasting
for our little green friend is
soup. You’ll need a food
processor, blender or magic
wand-like soup-smoothing
immersion blender for this
one. You can use leftover
veggies for a small batch, or
if you want to get serious,
cut four pounds of asparagus into two inch chunks
and slice a couple of leeks
into disks before roasting as
Balloon release
recognizes loss
Precipitation
Pressure
Rain
Ice
Showers
Flurries
T-storms
Snow
Temperatures
(Fahrenheit)
Fronts
Cold
United States
Warm
55
51
53
45
57
67
58
75
64
50
71
56
47
49
79
68
58
38
74
61
68
42
60
65
67
69
64
46
66
64
47
62
64
50
72
64
52
56
35
57
63
49
61
64
62
51
48
75
76
64
72
66
43
60
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.02
0.00
0.00
0.57
0.00
0.04
0.02
0.00
0.11
Tr
0.11
0.00
0.04
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.02
0.00
0.34
Tr
0.46
0.24
0.00
0.63
0.17
0.89
0.33
0.14
Tr
0.31
Tr
0.00
0.71
0.06
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.17
0.20
0.04
0.02
0.04
0.10
0.11
0.00
0.00
0.50
Tr
0.00
0.06
0.00
High
Low
Prc=precipitation, W=weather, s=sunny, c= cloudy, i=ice, pc=partly cloudy,
r=rain, tr=trace, sf=snow flurries, sh=showers, sn=snow t=thunderstorms
Mon.
Today
Wed.
Hi Lo Prc Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Albany, N.Y.
69
Albuquerque
81
Amarillo
94
Anchorage
64
Asheville
85
Atlanta
92
Atlantic City
75
Austin
93
Baltimore
86
Billings
69
Birmingham
91
Bismarck
69
Boise
65
Boston
62
Brownsville
95
Buffalo
78
Burlington, Vt. 71
Casper
68
Charleston, S.C. 92
Charleston, W.Va.87
Charlotte, N.C. 89
Cheyenne
68
Chicago
81
Cincinnati
82
Cleveland
80
Columbia, S.C. 99
Columbus, Ohio 84
Concord, N.H. 62
Dallas
89
Dayton
81
Denver
75
Des Moines
83
Detroit
80
Duluth
71
El Paso
93
Evansville
85
Fairbanks
74
Fargo
64
Flagstaff
65
Grand Forks
64
Grand Rapids
78
Great Falls
67
Green Bay
73
Greensboro, N.C. 87
Harrisburg
81
Hartford
64
Helena
70
Honolulu
89
Houston
93
Indianapolis
82
Jackson, Miss. 91
Jacksonville
95
Juneau
61
Kansas City
83
Stationary
80
76
88
67
84
90
80
93
90
56
90
68
67
76
93
68
76
67
92
85
94
68
60
80
70
93
78
82
89
76
66
78
68
62
87
84
76
68
64
66
67
54
64
94
86
82
58
88
90
80
90
93
67
80
56
54
52
47
57
68
65
74
64
47
69
43
47
59
79
49
49
43
70
61
63
43
51
63
51
67
59
55
71
59
43
59
50
38
66
66
49
40
38
37
50
44
40
66
60
60
46
74
73
64
70
67
45
64
t
pc
s
s
pc
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90
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84
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96
83
76
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81
53
70
67
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85
79
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91
82
77
69
87
89
82
88
93
68
71
57 pc
54 s
47 pc
49 s
58 pc
66 pc
62 pc
68 pc
64 t
46 c
69 pc
38 pc
46 pc
56 pc
77 pc
57 pc
51 pc
43 c
69 s
63 t
64 pc
38 t
50 r
63 t
60 r
67 s
64 r
51 pc
64 t
62 t
42 c
50 r
56 r
36 pc
63 s
65 t
50 s
36 pc
40 s
30 pc
53 r
47 c
42 r
66 pc
63 pc
58 pc
48 t
75 s
74 pc
64 t
72 pc
67 s
45 pc
53 r
World
Mon.
Today
Wed.
Hi Lo Prc Hi Lo W Hi Lo W
Las Vegas
86
Little Rock
86
Los Angeles
70
Louisville
86
Lubbock
99
Memphis
86
Miami
89
Midland
98
Milwaukee
77
Minneapolis
75
Mobile
92
Nashville
86
New Orleans
92
New York City 68
Norfolk, Va.
88
North Platte
76
Oklahoma City 88
Omaha
81
Orlando
94
Pendleton
62
Philadelphia
79
Phoenix
92
Pittsburgh
78
Portland, Maine 55
Portland, Ore. 63
Providence
61
Raleigh
93
Rapid City
70
Reno
70
Richmond
89
Rochester, N.Y. 81
Sacramento
74
St. Louis
83
Salt Lake City 68
San Antonio
93
San Diego
65
San Francisco 64
Santa Fe
79
St. Ste. Marie 70
Savannah
99
Seattle
62
Shreveport
88
Sioux Falls
74
Spokane
66
Syracuse
78
Tampa
92
Topeka
85
Trenton
75
Tucson
92
Tulsa
80
Washington, D.C. 85
Wichita
87
Wilkes-Barre
73
Wilmington, Del. 80
65
73
59
67
68
65
79
68
61
59
71
63
75
54
70
44
69
59
69
43
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75
61
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39
55
73
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53
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64
76
61
56
60
67
64
64
57
60
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0.03
0.03
0.01
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0.03
0.00
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0.00
0.21
0.00
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0.06
0.00
0.05
0.00
0.00
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0.04
0.04
0.06
0.08
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69 t
76 pc
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46 r
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70 pc
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61 pc
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Today
Hi Lo W
Acapulco
Amsterdam
Athens
Auckland
Baghdad
Bangkok
Barbados
Barcelona
Beijing
Beirut
Berlin
Brasilia
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Cancun
Caracas
Dublin
Geneva
Hanoi
Havana
Hong Kong
Jakarta
Jerusalem
Johannesburg
Kabul
Kiev
Lima
London
Manila
Mexico City
Monterey
Montreal
Moscow
Nairobi
Nassau
New Delhi
Panama
Paris
Rio
Rome
San Juan
Sarajevo
Seoul
Singapore
Sydney
Taipei
Tehran
Tel Aviv
Tokyo
Toronto
Vancouver
Vienna
Warsaw
Zurich
93
60
74
66
101
91
86
72
80
81
73
76
59
95
90
91
57
72
90
87
84
88
77
70
89
75
71
64
91
88
59
68
63
82
86
108
90
66
78
75
86
73
85
86
65
79
80
81
70
68
63
75
73
73
77
50
66
53
66
79
78
66
63
65
44
54
48
72
73
76
45
55
74
71
74
76
55
49
54
52
55
43
79
57
49
46
47
59
76
85
75
46
70
63
75
53
61
79
47
72
66
63
58
53
48
64
52
48
pc
pc
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c
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pc
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pc
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Pollen: 194, Grass/Tree/Weed Sunrise 5:59 a.m. Set 8:22 p.m.
Moonrise 1:23 a.m. Set 1:00 p.m.
0
1000+
Mold: High, Ascospore
Low
Moderate
Last quarter
New moon
First quarter
Full moon
High
- SPRINGFIELD - GREENE COUNTY HEALTH DEPT.
May 24
June 1
June 8
June 15
RECREATION
Rivers & Lakes
KEY:
rising
falling
River and stream levels (in
feet) are as of 5 p.m. Monday.
steady
flooding BF is bank full
James River: Galena, down
0.2 to 8.3 (MFL 3.1, BF 15)
Lake levels are as of 5 p.m.
MFL is the level that is considered the minimum to be able to
Monday. The levels are measured
float or canoe a stream or river
from mean sea level. Normal is
at that access point as detertop power pool elevation.
mined by either the National Park
Beaver Lake: down 0.33 to
Service or local river outfitters.
1129.1 ft (normal 1120); flow rate
Beaver Creek: Bradleyville, 8443.0 cfs
down 0.7 to 4.3 (MFL 1, BF 20)
Bull Shoals Lake: up 0.06 to
Bryant Creek: Tecumsah, 692.9 ft (normal 654); flow rate
12650.0 cfs
down 0.7 to 9.9 (MFL 7, BF 19)
Lake Pomme de Terre:
Bull Creek: Walnut Shade, down 0.23 to 848.1 ft (normal
down 0.5 to 4.3 (MFL 5, BF 16)
839); flow rate 3500.0 cfs
Buffalo River: Boxley, down
Lake of the Ozarks: down
0.7 to 4.1 (MFL 4, BF 17); St. Joe, 0.70 to 658.7 ft (normal 660);
down 1.6 to 10.0 (MFL 4, BF 22) flow rate
Lake Taneycomo: up 0.11 to
Current River: Van Buren,
up 0.2 to 5.0 (MFL 4, BF 14); 701.8 ft (normal 701.2)
Stockton Lake: up 0.16 to
Doniphan, up 0.1 to 3.1 (MFL 3.5,
873.4 ft (normal 867); flow rate
BF 16)
69.0 cfs
Eleven Point River: Bardley,
Table Rock Lake: up 1.02 to
down 0.1 to 5.0 (MFL 4.5, BF 13) 929.7 ft (normal 915); flow rate
Jacks Fork River: Alley 11698.0 cfs
Spring, down 0.3 to 3.6 (MFL 3,
Truman Reservoir: up 1.12 to
BF 8); Eminence, down 0.1 to 4.1 713.8 ft (normal 706); flow rate
(MFL 4, BF 12)
10.0 cfs
Solunar tables
The solunar period schedule allows planning days so you will be
fishing in good territory or hunting in good cover during those
times. Major periods begin at the times shown and last for 1.5 to
2 hours. The minor periods are shorter.
Major
Today
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Monday
Minor
Major
Minor
6:05 a.m. 12:16 p.m. 6:26 p.m.
---6:47 a.m. 12:36 a.m. 7:07 p.m. 12:57 p.m.
7:25 a.m.
1:15 a.m. 7:45 p.m. 1:35 p.m.
8:01 a.m.
1:51 a.m. 8:22 p.m. 2:12 p.m.
8:38 a.m. 2:27 a.m. 8:59 p.m. 2:49 p.m.
9:16 a.m. 3:05 a.m. 9:39 p.m. 3:28 p.m.
9:58 a.m. 3:46 a.m. 10:22 p.m. 4:10 p.m.
QUICK HITS
BASEBALL
Medrano, Kickham
all-MVC first-team
Missouri State junior second baseman Kevin Medrano earned his third
consecutive first-team all-Missouri Valley Conference honor and junior closer
Dan Kickham joined him on the first
team as the Newcomer of the Year as
voted on by the league’s coaches and
announced Monday at the MVC Tournament banquet in Omaha, Neb.
Bears pitcher Nick Petree was
named the league’s Freshman of
the Year and Brock Chaffin was a
second-team selection.
Medrano hit .364 with 14 RBIs in
20 conference games this season.
The junior from Lee’s Summit is batting .321 for the season with 31
RBIs, 31 runs scored and 13 steals.
Kickham is Missouri State’s eighth
MVC Newcomer of the Year and
first since Chad Mulholland in 2003.
The junior from Springfield leads
the MVC with 13 saves, tying Shaun
Marcum’s 2003 total for the MSU
record. Kickham has allowed no
earned runs in 20 of his 23 outings.
» Teams, 4D
SPRINGFIELD
CARDINALS
8
TULSA
DRILLERS
7
Cardinals edge Drillers
Sports
NEWS LEADER
Tuesday •
May 24, 2011
1D
News-Leader.com
Francis named Lead-Off MVP
Parkview senior was
4-year starter; also
won football honor.
By Matt Schoch
[email protected]
For the second time this
year,
Parkview
High
School’s Darin Francis was
awarded a most valuable
player honor at Coyote’s
Adobe Cafe.
The Missouri State University-bound senior was named
Springfield baseball’s most
valuable player Monday by
the Lead-Off Club, a group
that
gathers
weekly to talk
baseball.
The
awards
were voted on
by
the
five
Springfield Pub- Francis
lic
Schools
coaches. Only seniors were
eligible.
Francis started every
game in four years for the
Vikings and also won the
Kickoff Club’s MVP award
in the fall after football season. This spring, Francis tied
the school’s career record
for runs scored and he bat-
ted .309 this year.
Parkview coach John
Thompson said it was fun
watching Francis progress
through the years. He joked
about Francis’ workout
habits.
“He’ll probably major in
weightlifting at
MSU,” Thompson quipped.
Tyler Lopez of
Kickapoo was
named pitcher
of the year.
Lopez was 5-0 Lopez
See LEAD-OFF, Page 3D
BASEBALL SECTIONALS
These area high school baseball sectional playoff
games are scheduled for today, except where
noted:
CLASS 4
Webb City at Ozark, 6 p.m.
Lebanon at Wentzville Timberland, 4:30 p.m.
CLASS 3
Mount Vernon at Catholic, 6 p.m.
CLASS 2
Cabool at Conway, 5:30 p.m.
Purdy at Clever, 4:30 p.m.
Windsor vs. Stockton, 5 p.m. at Southwest Baptist
University, Bolivar
CLASS 1
Wheaton at Dora, 1:30 p.m.
Liberal 5, Lakeland 2
On an even keel
Girls’ high school soccer sectionals
are today across the state, highlighted locally by a meeting
between two Springfield temas.
Glendale, which has won 13
straight, plays at 6 p.m. against
Parkview at Harrison Stadium.
Also in Class 3, Camdenton plays
at 6 p.m. at Columbia Rock Bridge.
In Class 2. Rogersville plays host to
Harrisonville in a 5:30 p.m. start.
In Class 1, Catholic plays a 4:30
p.m. game at Dixon.
ONLINE NOW
Follow the Cardinals online
Cardinals Corner Blog: Get the
latest news and notes on
the Springfield Cardinals
and the entire St. Louis
CARDS
Cardinals organization
from beat writer Kary Booher at
blogs.news-leader.com/cardinals
PADRES
1
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SAN DIEGO — Albert Pujols
NATHAN PAPES / NEWS-LEADER
Missouri State’s Brent Seifert has 9 home runs and 39 RBIs — both team highs — this season for the Bears.
The Bears’ Brent Seifert MVC TOURNAMENT
doesn’t get too high or
A look at the first-round schedule
too low during the game. of the double-elimination Missouri
By Lyndal Scranton
[email protected]
Growing up in the small northwest Missouri town of Cameron,
population 8,312, it was an understanding.
“If you’re a good athlete, you
played all three sports,” Brent
Seifert said of football, basketball and baseball.
“I’d like to think I was pretty
good in all of them,” he added.
He was good enough as a safety
in football to receive scholarship
offers from several area NCAA
Division II schools. But Seifert’s
heart was in baseball.
Even though he hit .553 with six
Western Community College to
play baseball. Missouri State
coach Keith Guttin is glad he did.
Seifert, in his first season at
MSU, has been the Bears’ top run
Valley Conference baseball tournaproducer in a bounce-back seament at T.D. Ameritrade Park in
son. He has 9 homers
Omaha, Neb. Seedings and overall
and 39 RBIs — both
record in parentheses:
team highs — entering today’s Missouri
GAMES TODAY
9 a.m. — (3) Illinois State (35-16) vs. Valley Conference
Tournament opening
(6) Indiana State (26-26)
12:30 p.m. — (2) Wichita State (36- game against Southern Illinois.
Guttin
24) vs. (7) Evansville (28-23)
“We had to become
4 p.m. — (4) Missouri State (31-21)
more physical,” Guttin said after
vs. (5) Southern Illinois (22-32)
a last-place Valley finish in 2010,
7:30 p.m. — (1) Creighton (39-13)
“and he’s helped us do that. He’s
vs. (8) Bradley (22-30)
just been so steady.”
Seifert said going to junior colhome runs as a senior, D-I base- lege was the best thing for his
ball offers did not come.
Instead, Seifert went to Iowa
See SEIFERT, Page 3D
hit his first homer in 106 at-bats
to end the longest drought of
his career and the St. Louis Cardinals scored two runs off
Heath Bell in the ninth to beat
the struggling San Diego
Padres 3-1 on Monday night.
The NL Central-leading Cardinals won for the seventh time
in eight games. The Padres
have lost six of seven, and their
8-19 home record is the worst in
the NL.
Pujols came » Cardinals,
into the game Royals orgawithout a homer nizations
in 103 at-bats. donate to
He flied out to Joplin tornathe
warning do victims. 3A
track in center
field in his first
at-bat, then flied out to rightcenter in his second at-bat.
He didn’t miss in his next atbat, driving a 1-2 pitch from
Dustin Moseley into the first
row in left field over a desperation leap by former teammate
Ryan Ludwick for a 1-0 lead
with one out in the sixth.
It was Pujols’ eighth home
run of the season.
Pujols has seven homers in 88
at-bats at Petco Park and five
homers in his last 11 games in
San Diego.
St. Louis’ Colby Rasmus made
a great leaping grab to rob Ludwick of a home run to straightaway center field for the final
out of the first. Ludwick rounded second and stared at Rasmus, his former St. Louis teammate, as if to say, “Are you kidding?”
Cardinals manager Tony La
Russa was ejected by plate
umpire Jim Joyce after Pujols
took a called third strike for the
second out of the eighth inning.
Pujols took a step toward first
base after Mike Adams’ 3-2
See CARDS, Page 3D
Cycling union denies allegations
No Armstrong drug
tests altered, UCI says.
By Graham Dunbar
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
GENEVA — The International
Cycling Union “categorically
rejects” Tyler Hamilton’s allegations that it helped cover up a
positive drug test by Lance Arm-
SL-0000258129
SAN DIEGO
By Bernie Wilson
Schumaker activated
Girls’ sectionals today
CARDINALS 3
St. Louis first baseman
goes deep as Cardinals
knock off San Diego.
» Box score, standings, 4D
SOCCER
ST. LOUIS
Pujols
snaps
homerless
streak
Monday: The Springfield Cardinals
won the final game of their fourgame series Monday afternoon, 87, against the Tulsa Drillers in Tulsa,
Okla. The win improves Springfield
to 19-24.
Key performance: Jose Garcia, Jermaine Curtis and Matt Adams each
had three hits with Curtis delivering
two RBI triples. Alex Castellanos
was named Texas League Player of
the Week prior to the game and
homered in the ninth, a three-run
shot, to propel Springfield.
Wednesday’s probables: Springfield RHP David Kopp (0-2, 5.59
ERA), Corpus Christi RHP Kyle
Greenwalt (2-4, 7.98 ERA), 7:07 p.m.
at Hammons Field.
Transactions: C Nick Derba
assigned to AAA Memphis, OF
Tommy Pham activated from the
disabled list
Radio: KWTO 98.7 FM
Visit the team’s Web site at
www.springfieldcardinals.com for
tickets, schedule and merchandise.
SAN DIEGO — The St. Louis Cardinals put backup catcher Gerald
Laird on the 15-day disabled list
with a broken right index finger
and activated second baseman Skip
Schumaker on Monday.
The Cardinals were 8-2 in Laird’s
starts before he was injured Sunday
when hit by a pitch. He’s batting
.214 with four RBIs.
Schumaker had been on the DL
since April 16 with a strained right
triceps.
The Cardinals sent right-hander
Mitchell Boggs to Triple-A Memphis
before Monday night’s game at San
Diego. He is 0-2 with a 3.66 ERA and
three saves, and briefly had been
the Cardinals’ closer.
Catcher Tony Cruz was recalled
from Triple-A. The Cardinals also
said right-hander Brian Broderick,
taken by Washington in the Rule 5
draft, was given back to St. Louis
and assigned to Memphis.
Section editor: Pam Clark
[email protected]
836-1120
made on the ‘60 Minutes’
strong at the 2001 Tour de
program aired by U.S. teleSuisse.
vision network CBS,” the
The UCI insisted Monday
body said in a statement.
that it had “never altered or
“The allegations of Mr.
hidden the results of a posiTyler Hamilton are comtive test” and that seventime Tour de France winner Armstrong pletely unfounded.”
Hamilton said in an interArmstrong had never been
view that aired Sunday that his
notified of a positive finding.
“The UCI is deeply shocked by former teammate Armstrong
the seriousness of the allegations used the blood-boosting hormone
EPO to prepare for his third Tour
win in 2001.
Armstrong told him the UCI
helped cover up a positive test at
the Swiss warm-up event, Hamilton alleged.
“The UCI can only express its
indignation at this latest attempt
to damage the image of cycling
See CYCLING, Page 3D
2D Tuesday, May 24, 2011 •
NEWS -LEADER • News-Leader.com
Major League Baseball
Standings
Results
American League
W
25
26
25
24
21
L
21
22
22
23
24
Pct.
.544
.542
.532
.511
.467
GB
—
—
½
1½
3½
Central
Cleveland
Detroit
Kansas City
Chicago
Minnesota
W
30
24
22
22
15
L
15
23
24
27
31
Pct.
.667
.511
.478
.449
.326
GB Strk.
— W-4
7 W-2
8½ L-2
10 L-1
15½ L-4
West
Texas
Los Angeles
Seattle
Oakland
W
25
25
23
22
L
23
24
24
26
Pct.
.521
.510
.489
.458
GB
—
½
1½
3
AL games
Last
Strk. 10
L-1 5-5
L-1 3-7
L-1 8-2
W-1 7-3
W-2 5-5
East
New York
Tampa Bay
Boston
Toronto
Baltimore
vs.
Div.
11-9
12-9
10-8
9-11
7-12
Last
10
7-3
5-5
3-7
6-4
3-7
Home
15-13
11-13
16-10
12-11
12-14
Away
10-8
15-9
9-12
12-12
9-10
vs.
Div. Home Away
11-8 19-4 11-11
8-5 12-8 12-15
9-12 17-13 5-11
5-7 10-13 12-14
5-6 4-12 11-19
Last
Strk. 10
W-2 5-5
W-2 4-6
W-6 7-3
L-6 3-7
vs.
Div.
9-9
6-8
8-7
10-9
Home
16-9
12-11
11-12
11-12
Away
9-14
13-13
12-12
11-14
National League
East
Philadelphia
Florida
Atlanta
New York
Washington
W
29
26
26
22
21
L
18
19
23
24
26
Last vs.
Pct. GB Strk. 10 Div. Home Away
.617 — W-1 4-6 16-10 17-9 12-9
.578 2 L-1 5-5 11-10 14-12 12-7
.531 4 L-1 5-5 11-10 14-10 12-13
.478 6½ L-2 6-4 10-11 10-12 12-12
.447 8 L-3 3-7 11-18 11-9 10-17
Central
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Chicago
Houston
W
29
25
25
22
20
18
L
20
23
23
24
25
30
Pct.
.592
.521
.521
.478
.444
.375
West
San Francisco
Colorado
Arizona
Los Angeles
San Diego
W
27
23
23
21
19
L
19
22
23
28
29
Pct.
.587
.511
.500
.429
.396
Last
10
7-3
4-6
8-2
4-6
4-6
4-6
vs.
Div.
11-9
20-12
12-11
11-9
6-11
9-17
Last
Strk. 10
W-5 7-3
L-3 4-6
W-6 8-2
L-3 2-8
L-4 4-6
vs.
Div.
16-9
8-10
8-11
8-12
9-7
GB Strk.
— W-3
3½ L-6
3½ W-4
5½ L-1
7 L-1
10½ W-2
GB
—
3½
4
7½
9
Home
14-9
15-11
17-6
9-12
9-13
10-13
Home
13-5
11-10
16-10
11-14
8-19
Away
15-11
10-12
8-17
13-12
11-12
8-17
Away
14-14
12-12
7-13
10-14
11-10
x-Monday’s game not included
Today in baseball
1918 Cleveland’s Stan Coveleski pitched 19 innings in
the Indians’ 3-2 victory over
the Yankees.
1964 Harmon Killebrew of
the Minnesota Twins hit the
longest home run in Baltimore’s Memorial Stadium, a
471-foot shot to left-center
off right-hander Milt Pappas.
1984 Jack Morris led the
Tigers to their 17th straight
road win, setting an AL record. Morris allowed four hits
and Detroit beat the California Angels 5-1.
1990 Chicago’s Andre
Dawson was walked intentionally five times by the Cincinnati Reds to break the record shared by Roger Maris
and Garry Templeton.
Major League leaders
AL batting
BATTING AVERAGE
Joyce, T.B.....................................................355
Bautista, Tor............................................ .353
Gonzalez, Bos. ....................................... .342
Young, Tex. ................................................339
Kendrick, LA-A ...................................... .322
Lowrie, Bos.............................................. .319
Kubel, Min. ................................................318
Betemit, K.C. .............................................315
Cabrera, Det..............................................313
HOME RUNS
Bautista, Tor................................................ 18
Granderson, NY-A................................... 16
Teixeira, NY-A............................................ 12
A. Beltre, Tex................................................10
Konerko, ChiA.............................................10
A. Cabrera, Cle. ..............................................9
Cano, NY-A ......................................................9
Francoeur, K.C. ............................................. 9
Gonzalez, Bos................................................9
Ortiz, Bos......................................................... 9
Quentin, ChiA ............................................... 9
Rodriguez, NY-A.......................................... 9
RUNS BATTED IN
Gonzalez, Bos. ........................................... 41
A. Beltre, Tex................................................37
Konerko, ChiA.............................................36
Granderson, NY-A................................... 34
A. Cabrera, Cle. .......................................... 32
Youkilis, Bos. .............................................. 32
Bautista, Tor................................................ 31
Young, Tex. ...................................................31
Cabrera, Det.................................................30
Teixeira, NY-A............................................ 29
STOLEN BASES
Andrus, Tex................................................. 15
Ellsbury, Bos............................................... 15
Crisp, Oak......................................................14
Aybar, LA-A ..................................................12
Davis, Tor.......................................................12
Fuld, T.B. ........................................................ 12
Suzuki, Sea. ................................................. 11
NL batting
BATTING AVERAGE
Holliday, St.L........................................... .349
Berkman, St.L...........................................338
Votto, Cin....................................................335
Polanco, Phi. .............................................335
Molina, St.L.............................................. .333
Castro, ChiN ............................................ .323
Wallace, Hou............................................318
Phillips, Cin. ............................................ .317
Kemp, LA-N............................................. .316
Carroll, LA-N.............................................316
G. Sanchez, Fla....................................... .316
HOME RUNS
Braun, Mil. ....................................................12
Berkman, St.L..............................................11
Bruce, Cin......................................................11
Soriano, ChiN..............................................11
Tulowitzki, Col.......................................... 11
Fielder, Mil. ..................................................10
Howard, Phi................................................ 10
Kemp, LA-N................................................. 10
Stanton, Fla. .................................................10
Upton, Ari. ...................................................... 9
Young, Ari. ...................................................... 9
RUNS BATTED IN
Braun, Mil. ....................................................37
Fielder, Mil. ..................................................36
Howard, Phi................................................ 36
Berkman, St.L..............................................35
Pence, Hou. ..................................................35
Kemp, LA-N................................................. 32
Holliday, St.L............................................... 31
Walker, Pit. .................................................. 30
Ludwick, S.D................................................29
Prado, Atl.......................................................28
Votto, Cin.......................................................28
STOLEN BASES
Bourn, Hou...................................................17
Reyes, NY-N .................................................17
Desmond, Was. .........................................14
Stubbs, Cin................................................... 14
Bourgeois, Hou..........................................12
Gomez, Mil...................................................12
Kemp, LA-N................................................. 12
Tabata, Pit. ................................................... 11
Venable, S.D.................................................11
AL pitching
WINS
The latest on baseball
news, notes and buzz at
dailypitch.usatoday.com
HOME team in caps
Cahill, Oak. ......................................................6
Lester, Bos........................................................6
Pineda, Sea......................................................6
Scherzer, Det..................................................6
Tomlin, Cle. .....................................................6
Weaver, LA-A .................................................6
EARNED RUN AVERAGE
Beckett, Bos. ............................................1.73
Cahill, Oak................................................ 1.79
Haren, LA-A..............................................1.84
Shields, T.B. ..............................................2.00
Ogando, Tex............................................ 2.13
Britton, Bal. ..............................................2.14
Pineda, Sea. ............................................. 2.16
Gonzalez, Oak. ...................................... 2.20
Tomlin, Cle. ............................................. 2.41
STRIKEOUTS
Hernandez, Sea. ........................................77
Shields, T.B. ..................................................73
Verlander, Det. ...........................................71
Haren, LA-A..................................................66
Weaver, LA-A ............................................. 65
Lester, Bos.................................................... 63
Pineda, Sea. ................................................. 61
Scherzer, Det.............................................. 60
Wilson, Tex. ................................................ 60
NL pitching
WINS
Correia, Pit...................................................... 6
Halladay, Phi. .................................................6
Marcum, Mil. .................................................6
McClellan, St.L.............................................. 6
EARNED RUN AVERAGE
Johnson, Fla.............................................1.64
Jurrjens, Atl............................................. 1.80
Garcia, St.L ............................................... 1.93
Lincecum, S.F. ........................................ 2.06
Lohse, St.L..................................................2.17
Halladay, Phi. ......................................... 2.21
Marcum, Mil. ......................................... 2.37
Morton, Pit. ............................................. 2.62
Chacin, Col............................................... 2.70
STRIKEOUTS
Halladay, Phi. ............................................. 80
Lee, Phi............................................................78
Lincecum, S.F. ............................................ 75
Kershaw, LA-N ...........................................70
Garza, ChiN ..................................................68
Hamels, Phi................................................. 64
Norris, Hou.................................................. 64
J. Sanchez, S.F............................................. 64
Marcum, Mil. ............................................. 62
Hanson, Atl.................................................. 61
Hudson, Ari................................................. 60
Cardinals 3, Padres 1
St. Louis ........ 000 001 002 — 3
San Diego ..... 000 000 100 — 1
St. Louis
Theriot ss
Jay lf
Pujols 1b
Berkman rf
Rasmus cf
Molina c
Schumaker 2b
Descalso 3b
Lohse p
Craig ph
Tallet p
Salas p
Totals
ab
5
5
4
2
3
4
3
4
3
1
0
0
34
r
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
3
h
1
3
1
1
0
0
1
2
0
0
0
0
9
bi bb so avg
1 0 0 .297
0 0 1 .329
1 0 1 .268
0 2 0 .341
0 1 2 .282
0 0 0 .324
0 1 0 .246
1 0 0 .223
0 0 1 .111
0 0 0 .314
0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 .000
3 4 5
Batting - 2B: Jay (3); Schumaker (5); Descalso (9). HR: Pujols (8). RBI: Theriot (17); Pujols (26); Descalso (16). GIDP: Rasmus; Molina. Team LOB: 8.
Baserunning - SB: Jay (3).
San Diego
ab r h bi bb so avg
Denorfia rf
4 0 1 0 0 0 .330
Bartlett ss
4 0 0 0 0 0 .255
Ludwick lf
4 0 0 0 0 2 .235
Hawpe 1b
4 0 1 0 0 1 .233
Headley 3b
4 0 2 0 0 1 .262
Maybin cf
3 1 2 0 1 1 .269
Hudson 2b
4 0 0 0 0 0 .218
Johnson c
2 0 0 0 0 0 .190
Cantu ph
0 0 0 1 0 0 .200
Adams p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Bell p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Moseley p
2 0 0 0 0 1 .200
Phillips ph-c
1 0 0 0 0 1 .150
Totals
32 1 6 1 1 7
Batting - 2B: Denorfia (4); Hawpe (9); Headley (11). SF: Cantu. RBI: Cantu (14). Team
LOB: 6.
Fielding - DP: 2.
Pitching
ip h r er bb so era
St. Louis
Lohse W,6-2
8 5 1 1 1 5 2.06
Tallet H,2
z 0 0 0 0 1 3.38
Salas S,8
Z 1 0 0 0 1 1.27
San Diego
Moseley
7 5 1 1 3 3 3.15
Adams
1 1 0 0 1 2 1.19
Bell L,2-1
1 3 2 2 0 0 2.12
IBB: Berkman (by Adams). Batters faced;
pitches-strikes: Lohse 30; 118-79; Tallet 1;
4-3; Salas 3; 9-6; Moseley 27; 104-60; Adams 5; 27-13; Bell 6; 28-15.
Umpires - HP: Joyce; 1B: Kulpa; 2B: Wolf;
3B: Cousins.
Game data - T: 2:50. Att: 16,513.
Look ahead
All times Eastern
Today’s probable AL pitchers, Bodog.net lines
J.P. Arencibia hit a three-run double during a
five-run sixth inning to back spot starter Carlos Villanueva. Starting in place of injured
Jesse Litsch, Villanueva limited New York to
two hits and a run in five innings.
RANGERS 4, Josh Hamilton and Nelson Cruz both hoWhite Sox 0 mered in their return to the Texas lineup and
Alexi Ogando threw a five-hitter for his first
career shutout. The sluggers were back in the
Texas lineup together for the first time in almost six weeks.
INDIANS 3, Asdrubal Cabrera’s two-out RBI double in
Red Sox 2
the eighth inning rallied Cleveland. Cabrera
drove his double to the wall in left field, scoring Michael Brantley and helping the Indians
win their fourth straight.
TIGERS 6,
Victor Martinez hit a two-run double and
Rays 3
Jhonny Peralta had a two-run single in the
eighth inning. Charlie Furbush pitched 32⁄3
scoreless innings of relief in his major league
debut after Detroit starter Phil Coke was injured.
Mariners 8, Luis Rodriguez hit a sacrifice fly in the 10th
TWINS 7 (10) inning as Seattle won its sixth game in a row.
Carlos Peguero’s single in the ninth scored
Michael Saunders and tied the game.
ANGELS 4,
Torii Hunter threw out the potential goAthletics 1
ahead run at the plate in the seventh inning
and doubled home the tiebreaking run in the
eighth. Hunter greeted reliever Michael
Wuertz with a double to the wall in rightcenter on a 2-2 pitch, easily scoring Bobby
Abreu.
Blue Jays 7,
YANKEES 3
NL games
Career
vs.
2011 season
opp.
W-L
IP ERA W-L
Pitchers
2010-11 vs. opp.
W-L
IP ERA
Last 3 starts
W-L
IP ERA
Kansas City at Baltimore, 7:05 ET (Line: Bal., -171; Total runs: 8)
K.C.-Duffy (L)
Bal.-Britton (L)
0-0
5-2
4
59
4.50
2.14
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
—
0-0
0-1
4
21z
4.50
1.27
2.77
1.35
1-0
0-1
19
19Z
0.47
5.49
—
2.57
1-2
2-0
18
25
5.00
1.44
4.91
1.08
2-1
2-1
19
20Z
3.32
3.92
8.53
—
1-0
0-0
15
17
2.40
3.71
0-1
1-0
21Z
21
3.32
1.71
—
0-0
—
22z
—
2.01
Boston at Cleveland, 7:05 ET (Line: Bos., -132; Total runs: 71⁄2)
Bos.-Beckett (R)
Cle.-Carmona (R)
3-1
3-4
57z
64z
1.73
4.76
3-5
2-3
1-1
1-1
13
20
Tampa Bay at Detroit, 7:05 ET (Line: Det/. -172; Total runs: 7)
T.B.-Davis (R)
Det.-Verlander (R)
4-4
4-3
57
73
3.47
2.96
0-0
5-1
—
1-1
—
14
Toronto at New York, 7:05 ET (Line: N.Y., -170; Total runs: 8)
Tor.-Romero (L)
N.Y.-Sabathia (L)
4-4
4-3
58
67Z
3.10
3.06
3-2
9-3
2-1
1-0
25Z
8z
Chicago at Texas, 8:05 ET (Line: Tex., -115; Total runs: 81⁄2)
Chi.-Peavy (R)
Tex.-Holland (L)
1-0
3-1
15
55Z
2.40
4.37
0-1
0-1
0-1
—
6z
—
Seattle at Minnesota, 8:10 ET (Line: Min., -113; Total runs: 71⁄2)
Sea.-Fister (R)
Min.-Blackburn (R)
2-4
3-4
58z
55Z
2.93
3.40
0-3
2-1
0-3
1-1
19Z
12z
3.66
3.65
Oakland at Los Angeles, 10:05 ET (Line: L.A., -160; Total runs: 71⁄2)
Oak.-Moscoso (R)
L.A.-Haren (R)
Lines by www.bodog.net
—
4-2
—
73z
—
1.84
—
2-0
—
1-0
—
13
—
1.38
Wednesday’s
games
Bos at Phi, 12:05
TB at Det, 1:05
Tor at NYY, 1:05
Sea at Min, 1:10
CWS at Tex, 2:05
KC at Bal, 7:05
Oak at LAA, 10:05
Thursday’s
games
KC at Bal, 12:35
Bos at Det, 1:05
Oak at LAA, 3:35
CWS at Tor, 7:07
3 Toronto’s Jose
Bautista blasts his
MLB-leading 19th
home run in the
first inning of
Monday’s game at
Yankee Stadium.
By Paul J. Bereswill, AP
PHILLIES 10, Jimmy Rollins, Placido Polanco and Raul
Reds 3
Ibanez homered to back Cole Hamels and
Philadelphia handed Cincinnati its sixth
straight loss. Chase Utley returned to Philadelphia’s lineup after missing the first 46
games with a right knee injury. The five-time
All-Star second baseman was 0 for 5, the only
starter without a hit.
ASTROS 4,
Hunter Pence hit a two-out RBI single in the
Dodgers 3
ninth inning. Houston trailed 3-1 entering the
ninth before Michael Bourn tied it with his
two-out, full-count double down the rightfield line that scored two against Kenley Jansen. Bill Hall started the rally with a one-out
single.
BREWERS 11, Corey Hart hit his first three home runs this
Nationals 3 season and drove in seven to tie both club records. Hitless in his previous 11 at-bats, Hart
smacked two-run shots in the first and fifth
innings and finished with a three-run homer
off Doug Slaten with two outs in the eighth.
Cardinals 3, Albert Pujols hit his first homer in 106 atPADRES 1
bats to end the longest drought of his career
and St. Louis scored two runs off Heath Bell
in the ninth. The Cardinals won for the
seventh time in eight games.
Today’s probable NL pitchers, Bodog.net lines
Career
vs.
opp.
2011 season
W-L
IP ERA W-L
Pitchers
2010-11 vs. opp.
W-L
IP ERA
Last 3 starts
W-L
IP ERA
Arizona at Colorado — Game 1, 3:10 ET (Line: Col., -185; Total runs: 81⁄2)
Ari.-Saunders (L)
Col.-De La Rosa (L)
0-5
5-2
52
56Z
5.02
3.34
3-1
6-3
2-1
2-1
23z
24z
3.86
2.96
0-2
1-2
18Z
19Z
3.86
4.12
1.20
—
2-1
2-0
18Z
12
1.45
0.75
—
3.00
2-1
3-0
20z
22
2.21
2.05
2-0
1-1
19
18
3.79
4.50
0-3
1-1
21
18
2.57
3.50
0-3
1-1
19
19z
3.79
1.40
2-0
1-0
12
19
0.00
2.37
2-1
1-0
22
19z
2.86
4.19
0-0
1-0
19z
22
3.26
3.27
Cincinnati at Philadelphia, 7:05 ET (Line: Phi., -119; Total runs: 8)
Cin.-Cueto (R)
Phi.-Worley (R)
2-1
2-0
18Z
16
1.45
1.13
1-2
—
1-0
—
15
—
Atlanta at Pittsburgh, 7:05 ET (Line: Atl., -130; Total runs: 7)
Atl.-Jurrjens (R)
Pit.-Morton (R)
5-1
5-1
50
55
1.80
2.62
1-3
0-1
—
0-1
—
6
New York at Chicago, 8:05 ET (Line: Chi., -125; Total runs: 91⁄2)
N.Y.-Niese (L)
Chi.-Dempster (R)
3-4
2-4
55z
56
4.39
6.91
1-1
9-5
1-0
0-1
11Z
4Z
3.86
5.79
Los Angeles at Houston, 8:05 ET (Line: L.A., -135; Total runs: 7)
L.A.-Billingsley (R)
Hou.-Happ (L)
2-4
3-5
62z
52Z
3.47
5.30
3-3
0-0
—
0-0
—
5
—
1.80
Washington at Milwaukee, 8:10 ET (Line: Mil., -155; Total runs: 8)
Was.-Hernandez (R)
Mil.-Narveson (L)
3-6
2-3
64z
52z
3.64
3.44
9-6
1-0
2-0
0-0
16
12Z
0.56
6.39
Arizona at Colorado — Game 2 (Line: Col., -150; Total runs: 8)
Ari.-Collmenter (R)
Col.-Chacin (R)
3-0
5-2
26
60
0.69
2.70
0-0
3-1
0-0
3-1
2
31z
0.00
2.01
St. Louis at San Diego, 10:05 ET (Line: St.L., -136; Total runs: 61⁄2)
StL.-McClellan (R)
S.D.-Harang (R)
6-1
5-2
57Z
54z
3.43 1-1
4.31 7-13
0-1
0-3
4z 10.38
17 5.29
Florida at San Francisco, 10:15 ET (Line: S.F., -140; Total runs: 61⁄2)
Fla.-Nolasco (R)
S.F.-Cain (R)
3-0
3-2
59Z
57Z
3.32
3.28
2-2
3-0
1-1
1-0
12z
14
2.92
3.21
Lines by www.bodog.net
Wednesday’s
games
Atl at Pit, 12:35
Was at Mil, 1:10
LAD at Hou, 2:05
StL at SD, 6:35
Cin at Phi, 7:05
NYM at ChC, 8:05
Ari at Col, 8:40
Fla at SF, 10:15
Thursday’s games
Cin at Phi, 1:05
NYM at ChC, 2:20
Fla at SF, 3:45
Ari at Col, 8:40
Sunday’s results
NL
Mil 3, Col 1
Interleague
NYY 9, NYM 3
Hou 3, Tor 2
Tex 2, Phi 0
Cle 12, Cin 4
Det 2, Pit 0
TB 4, Fla 0
Bal 2, Was 1
Sea 6, SD 1
CWS 8, LAD 3
SF 5, Oak 4 (11)
LAA 4, Atl 1
StL 9, KC 8 (10)
Bos 5, ChC 1
Ari 3, Min 2
Angels 4, Athletics 1
Astros 4, Dodgers 3
Indians 3, Red Sox 2
Brewers 11, Nationals 3
Phillies 10, Reds 3
Oakland ........ 001 000 000 — 1
Los Angeles .. 100 000 03x — 4
Los Angeles .. 010 000 200 — 3
Houston........ 001 000 003 — 4
Boston............ 001 010 000 — 2
Cleveland...... 000 100 02x — 3
Washington . 010 000 002 — 3
Milwaukee . 300 030 05x — 11
Cincinnati.... 000 300 000 — 3
Phila. ............ 207 100 00x — 10
Boston
ab r h bi bb so avg
Ellsbury cf
3 0 0 0 0 0 .290
Pedroia 2b
3 0 1 1 1 1 .246
Sutton pr-2b
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Gonzalez 1b
3 0 1 0 1 0 .342
Youkilis 3b
3 0 0 0 0 0 .275
Ortiz dh
4 0 1 0 0 0 .298
Drew rf
4 0 1 0 0 0 .240
Lowrie ss
4 0 1 0 0 1 .317
Crawford lf
4 2 2 1 0 0 .215
Saltalamacchia c 3 0 0 0 0 1 .229
Totals
31 2 7 2 2 3
Washington
ab r h bi bb so avg
Bernadina cf
5 0 2 1 0 1 .266
Desmond ss
5 0 1 0 0 3 .230
Werth rf
5 0 0 0 0 2 .240
Nix lf
4 0 2 0 0 1 .308
Ramos c
4 0 0 0 0 0 .262
Morse 1b
4 1 1 1 0 2 .267
Storen p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Slaten p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Espinosa 2b
2 0 0 0 1 0 .204
Bixler pr
0 1 0 0 0 0 .133
Hairston Jr. 3b
4 1 2 1 0 0 .248
Gorzelanny p
2 0 0 0 0 2 .000
H. Rodriguez p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Stairs ph
1 0 0 0 0 0 .097
Burnett p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Cora 1b
1 0 0 0 0 0 .240
Totals
37 3 8 3 1 11
Batting - 2B: Desmond (10); Nix (7). 3B:
Hairston Jr. (1). HR: Morse (3). RBI: Bernadina (6); Morse (12); Hairston Jr. (13). Team
LOB: 9.
Fielding - E: Cora (1).
Milwaukee
ab r h bi bb so avg
Weeks 2b
3 3 1 0 1 2 .288
Kotsay 1b
0 0 0 0 0 0 .256
Hart rf
4 3 3 7 1 0 .262
Braun lf
5 1 2 0 0 1 .302
Boggs pr-lf
0 1 0 0 0 0 .158
Fielder 1b
4 1 1 1 1 1 .282
Dillard p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
McGehee 3b
5 0 1 0 0 1 .256
Lucroy c
4 1 2 1 0 1 .327
Betancourt ss
4 1 2 1 0 0 .231
Gomez cf
4 0 0 0 0 2 .225
Gallardo p
3 0 0 0 0 1 .185
Estrada p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .250
Counsell ph-2b
1 0 0 0 0 1 .224
Totals
37 11 12 10 3 10
Batting - 2B: Braun 2 (7); Lucroy (6); Betancourt (7). HR: Hart 3 (3); Fielder (11). RBI:
Hart 7 (8); Fielder (37); Lucroy (19); Betancourt (17). Team LOB: 6.
Baserunning - SB: Hart (2).
Fielding - E: Betancourt 2 (5).
Pitching
ip h r er bb so era
Washington
Gorzelanny L,2-4 5 8 6 6 1 6 4.25
H. Rodriguez
1 0 0 0 0 2 0.90
Burnett
1 0 0 0 1 0 5.71
Storen
Z 2 3 3 1 1 1.48
Slaten
z 2 2 1 0 1 2.31
Milwaukee
Gallardo W,6-2
7 5 1 1 1 9 4.35
Estrada
1 1 0 0 0 1 3.89
Dillard
1 2 2 2 0 1 18.00
Cincinnati
ab r h bi bb so avg
Stubbs cf
4 0 0 0 0 3 .262
Janish ss
4 0 0 0 0 0 .223
Votto 1b
4 0 0 0 0 0 .327
Phillips 2b
4 1 1 0 0 0 .316
Ondrusek p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Rolen 3b
3 1 1 0 0 1 .265
Bruce rf
4 1 3 3 0 1 .282
Lewis lf
4 0 0 0 0 1 .231
Hanigan c
2 0 0 0 2 0 .267
1 0 0 0 0 0 .222
Arroyo p
Maloney p
1 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Frazier ph
1 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Arredondo p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Cairo 2b
0 0 0 0 0 0 .275
Totals
32 3 5 3 2 7
Batting - HR: Bruce (12). RBI: Bruce 3 (30).
Team LOB: 5.
Philadelphia
ab r h bi bb so avg
Rollins ss
5 2 2 3 0 1 .266
Utley 2b
5 0 0 0 0 1 .000
Baez p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Polanco 3b
4 2 2 2 1 0 .339
Howard 1b
4 1 2 0 0 1 .249
Ibanez lf
4 2 2 2 0 0 .239
Ruiz c
3 1 3 0 1 0 .241
Brown rf
4 0 1 0 0 1 .125
Mayberry cf
4 1 1 2 0 2 .232
Hamels p
3 1 1 1 0 0 .250
Stutes p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Gload ph
1 0 0 0 0 0 .294
Bastardo p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Valdez 2b
0 0 0 0 0 0 .234
Totals
37 10 14 10 2 6
Oakland
ab
Crisp cf
3
Barton 1b
3
Sweeney lf
2
Willingham ph-lf 1
Matsui dh
3
4
Jackson 3b
DeJesus rf
4
Suzuki c
4
LaRoche 2b
4
Pennington ss
4
Totals
32
r
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
h
2
0
0
0
1
1
1
1
1
1
8
bi bb so avg
0 1 1 .278
0 1 1 .214
0 1 1 .313
0 0 0 .233
1 0 0 .236
0 0 0 .255
0 0 1 .232
0 0 1 .245
0 0 0 .221
0 0 1 .236
1 3 6
Batting - 2B: Crisp (11); DeJesus (5). SF: Matsui. RBI: Matsui (18). GIDP: LaRoche. Team
LOB: 8.
Fielding - DP: 1.
Los Angeles
ab r h bi bb so avg
Izturis 2b
3 1 0 0 1 0 .302
Aybar ss
2 0 0 0 1 0 .305
Abreu dh
4 1 1 1 0 1 .269
Hunter rf
3 1 2 1 1 1 .238
Callaspo 3b
3 0 1 0 1 0 .296
Trumbo 1b
4 1 0 0 0 0 .252
Mathis c
4 0 2 2 0 0 .202
Bourjos cf
3 0 1 0 1 1 .242
Willits lf
2 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Totals
28 4 7 4 5 3
Batting - 2B: Hunter 2 (7). S: Aybar; Willits.
RBI: Abreu (21); Hunter (25); Mathis 2 (7).
GIDP: Trumbo. Team LOB: 7.
Baserunning - SB: Abreu (8).
Fielding - PB: Mathis (4). DP: 1.
Pitching
ip h r er bb so era
Oakland
Outman
7 5 1 1 3 2 1.29
Fuentes L,1-7
z 0 1 1 1 0 5.06
Wuertz
Z 2 2 2 1 1 2.13
Los Angeles
Weaver
7 6 1 1 3 5 2.35
Downs W,2-1
1 2 0 0 0 0 0.66
Walden S,9
1 0 0 0 0 1 2.82
IBB: Callaspo (by Wuertz). Batters faced;
pitches-strikes: Outman 28; 102-69; Fuentes 2; 10-6; Wuertz 5; 19-10; Weaver 28;
110-67; Downs 5; 20-10; Walden 3; 10-8.
Umpires - HP: Danley; 1B: Carapazza; 2B:
Blaser; 3B: Nauert.
Game data - T: 2:45. Att: 36,215.
Mariners 8, Twins 7
Seattle........ 211 000 021 1 — 8
Minnesota 100 310 200 0 — 7
Seattle
ab r h bi bb so avg
Suzuki rf
4 1 2 1 1 0 .292
Figgins 3b
5 0 1 0 1 0 .211
Smoak 1b
5 0 1 0 0 2 .269
Saunders pr
0 1 0 0 0 0 .180
Rodriguez 1b
0 0 0 1 0 0 .186
Cust dh
5 2 2 2 1 2 .230
Gutierrez cf
5 0 1 0 0 0 .167
Peguero lf
5 0 2 2 0 1 .222
Ryan ss
5 1 2 0 0 0 .232
J. Wilson 2b
5 3 1 0 0 0 .253
Gimenez c
3 0 1 1 0 0 .214
Kennedy ph
1 0 1 1 0 0 .283
Olivo c
1 0 1 0 0 0 .228
Totals
44 8 15 8 3 5
Batting - 2B: Gutierrez (1); Gimenez (1).
HR: Cust (1). S: Suzuki. SF: Rodriguez. RBI: Suzuki (17); Rodriguez (10); Cust 2 (16); Peguero 2 (8); Gimenez (4); Kennedy (11).
Team LOB: 11.
Baserunning - SB: Saunders (4); J. Wilson
(5).
Minnesota
ab r h bi bb so avg
Span cf
5 1 3 2 1 0 .291
Plouffe ss
5 0 0 0 0 1 .212
Kubel rf
5 0 0 0 0 1 .309
Morneau 1b
5 0 0 0 0 0 .229
Cuddyer 2b
3 3 2 0 1 0 .267
Casilla 2b
0 0 0 0 1 0 .188
Thome dh
3 2 2 4 2 0 .237
Young lf
3 1 1 1 1 1 .234
Repko lf
1 0 0 0 0 0 .200
Valencia 3b
5 0 1 0 0 1 .226
Butera c
5 0 1 0 0 1 .115
Totals
40 7 10 7 6 5
Batting - 2B: Cuddyer (5). HR: Span (2);
Thome 2 (4). RBI: Span 2 (10); Thome 4 (11);
Young (10). Team LOB: 9.
Baserunning - SB: Span (4).
Pitching
ip h r er bb so era
Seattle
Vargas
4Z 7 5 5 4 2 3.86
Laffey
2z 2 2 2 0 1 1.90
Ray
1 1 0 0 0 2 9.58
Wright W,1-1
1 0 0 0 2 0 1.64
League S,11
1 0 0 0 0 0 6.16
Minnesota
Pavano
7 9 4 4 2 3 5.28
Nathan H,2
z 2 2 2 0 1 8.22
Capps BS,4
1Z 2 1 1 0 1 5.09
Swarzak L,0-2
Z 2 1 1 1 0 7.71
Dumatrait
z 0 0 0 0 0 2.70
WP: Wright; Nathan. IBB: Thome (by
Wright); Figgins (by Swarzak). Batters
faced; pitches-strikes: Vargas 25; 95-59; Laffey 9; 33-26; Ray 4; 13-10; Wright 5; 26-13;
League 3; 7-6; Pavano 32; 108-72; Nathan 4;
21-12; Capps 7; 31-21; Swarzak 5; 20-11;
Dumatrait 1; 4-2.
Umpires - HP: Rapuano; 1B: O’Nora; 2B:
Marquez; 3B: Hickox.
Game data - T: 3:40. Att: 37,498.
Los Angeles
Furcal ss
Miles 2b
Loney 1b
Kemp cf
Gibbons rf
Gwynn Jr. lf
Sands lf-rf
Navarro c
Mitchell 3b
Kershaw p
Ethier ph
MacDougal p
Guerrier p
Jansen p
Totals
ab
4
4
4
4
3
1
1
4
3
2
1
0
0
0
31
r
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
0
3
h
1
1
1
1
1
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
7
bi bb so avg
0 0 0 .171
0 0 0 .285
0 0 0 .240
1 0 1 .315
0 0 1 .206
0 0 1 .200
0 3 1 .239
0 0 0 .133
0 1 1 .080
0 0 1 .190
1 0 0 .311
0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 .000
0 0 0 .000
2 4 6
Batting - 2B: Navarro (1). HR: Kemp (11).
RBI: Kemp (33); Ethier (22). Team LOB: 5.
Baserunning - SB: Kemp (13). CS: Sands (2).
Fielding - DP: 1.
Houston
ab r h bi bb so avg
Bourn cf
4 1 1 2 1 0 .270
Barmes ss
3 0 1 0 1 2 .216
Pence rf
5 0 2 1 0 0 .298
Lee 1b-lf
3 0 0 0 1 1 .240
Michaels lf
3 0 0 0 0 2 .156
Wallace ph-1b
1 0 0 0 0 0 .315
Johnson 3b
4 0 0 0 0 2 .220
Hall 2b
4 2 4 0 0 0 .244
Quintero c
3 0 1 1 0 1 .252
Downs ph
1 0 0 0 0 1 .264
Norris p
1 0 0 0 0 1 .118
Bogusevic ph
1 0 0 0 0 0 .231
Escalona p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Fulchino p
0 0 0 0 0 0 .000
Sanchez ph
0 1 0 0 1 0 .270
Totals
33 4 9 4 4 10
Batting - 2B: Bourn (11); Hall 2 (7). S: Norris.
RBI: Bourn 2 (12); Pence (36); Quintero (9).
GIDP: Quintero. Team LOB: 9.
Baserunning - SB: Bourn (18); Hall (1); Sanchez (2).
Fielding - E: Bourn (1). DP: 2.
Pitching
ip h r er bb so era
Los Angeles
Kershaw
6 4 1 1 2 7 2.96
MacDougal H,2
1 1 0 0 0 0 1.69
Guerrier H,8
1 1 0 0 1 1 3.28
Jansen L,1-1; BS,1 Z 3 3 3 1 2 6.30
Houston
Norris
7 6 3 2 3 5 3.77
Escalona
z 1 0 0 0 0 3.00
Fulchino W,1-2 1Z 0 0 0 1 1 3.48
IBB: Mitchell (by Norris). HBP: Barmes (by
Jansen). Balks: Norris. Batters faced; pitches-strikes: Kershaw 24; 84-54; MacDougal
3; 7-4; Guerrier 5; 25-13; Jansen 7; 38-23;
Norris 28; 116-72; Escalona 2; 4-3; Fulchino
5; 25-11.
Umpires - HP: B. Welke; 1B: Estabrook; 2B:
Nelson; 3B: Foster.
Game data - T: 3:07. Att: 22,579.
Blue Jays 7, Yankees 3
Toronto .......... 100 005 010 — 7
New York ....... 000 101 010 — 3
Toronto
Davis cf
Patterson lf
Bautista rf
Escobar ss
Rivera 1b
Hill 2b
Thames dh
Arencibia c
Encarnacion 3b
McDonald 3b
Totals
ab
5
5
3
3
3
4
3
4
3
1
34
r
0
1
2
0
1
2
1
0
0
0
7
h
1
1
1
1
1
2
0
2
0
0
9
bi bb so avg
0 0 0 .250
0 0 1 .268
1 2 0 .353
0 0 0 .284
0 1 0 .228
1 0 1 .250
1 1 1 .250
4 0 2 .252
0 0 3 .239
0 0 0 .202
7 4 8
Batting - 2B: Patterson (12); Hill (10); Arencibia (7). HR: Bautista (19). S: Escobar. RBI:
Bautista (32); Hill (17); Thames (3); Arencibia 4 (23). Team LOB: 5.
Baserunning - CS: Davis (5).
Fielding - E: Escobar (4); Encarnacion (11).
New York
ab r h bi bb so avg
Jeter ss
5 0 0 0 0 2 .261
Granderson cf
2 3 0 0 3 2 .260
Teixeira 1b
4 0 1 0 0 2 .249
Rodriguez 3b
4 0 2 0 0 1 .289
Cano 2b
3 0 1 3 0 0 .274
Martin c
4 0 0 0 0 0 .263
Posada dh
4 0 0 0 0 0 .176
Gardner lf
4 0 2 0 0 1 .274
Dickerson rf
4 0 0 0 0 2 .333
Totals
34 3 6 3 3 10
Batting - 2B: Gardner (5). SF: Cano. RBI: Cano 3 (31). Team LOB: 8.
Baserunning - SB: Granderson (5); Gardner
2 (8).
Pitching
ip h r er bb so era
Toronto
Villanueva W,2-0 5 2 1 1 1 5 1.53
Frasor
1 1 1 1 1 0 1.83
Rauch
1z 1 1 1 1 3 4.19
Perez
Z 1 0 0 0 0 7.36
Francisco
1 1 0 0 0 2 5.11
New York
Colon L,2-3
6 7 6 6 4 8 3.77
Noesi
3 2 1 1 0 0 1.29
IBB: Rivera (by Colon); Bautista (by Colon).
Batters faced; pitches-strikes: Villanueva
19; 75-45; Frasor 6; 23-12; Rauch 6; 29-18;
Perez 3; 5-3; Francisco 4; 20-13; Colon 28;
102-64; Noesi 11; 35-25.
Umpires - HP: Barry; 1B: Hirschbeck; 2B:
Bell; 3B: Diaz.
Game data - T: 3:00. Att: 41,946.
Batting - HR: Crawford (2). RBI: Pedroia
(11); Crawford (14). GIDP: Youkilis; Ortiz;
Crawford. Team LOB: 6.
Baserunning - CS: Ellsbury (6).
Cleveland
ab r h bi bb so avg
Brantley cf
4 1 1 1 0 1 .294
A. Cabrera ss
4 1 3 2 0 0 .312
Choo rf
4 0 0 0 0 3 .244
Buck dh
3 0 0 0 0 0 .231
LaPorta 1b
3 0 0 0 0 1 .256
O. Cabrera 2b
3 0 0 0 0 0 .267
Hannahan 3b
2 0 1 0 1 0 .242
Everett pr
0 1 0 0 0 0 .276
Kearns lf
2 0 1 0 1 0 .210
Marson c
2 0 0 0 0 0 .244
Santana ph
1 0 0 0 0 0 .207
Totals
28 3 6 3 2 5
Batting - 2B: A. Cabrera (10); Kearns (4). HR:
A. Cabrera (10). RBI: Brantley (23); A. Cabrera
2 (34). GIDP: Marson. Team LOB: 3.
Baserunning - SB: A. Cabrera (7). CS: Hannahan (1).
Fielding - E: Masterson. DP: 3.
Pitching
ip h r er bb so era
Boston
Buchholz
7z 4 2 2 2 4 3.30
Bard L,1-4; BS,2
z 2 1 1 0 0 3.65
Hill
z 0 0 0 0 1 0.00
Cleveland
Masterson
7Z 4 2 2 2 3 2.50
R. Perez
0 1 0 0 0 0 1.13
Smith W,2-1
z 0 0 0 0 0 2.19
C. Perez S,13
1 2 0 0 0 0 2.70
R Perez pitched to 1 batter in the 8th. HBP:
Youkilis (by Masterson); Ellsbury (by Masterson). Batters faced; pitches-strikes:
Buchholz 26; 94-55; Bard 3; 11-8; Hill 1; 4-3;
Masterson 29; 112-70; R. Perez 1; 4-3; Smith
1; 3-1; C. Perez 4; 11-6.
Umpires - HP: Emmel; 1B: Drake; 2B: Rackley; 3B: Dreckman.
Game data - T: 2:49. Att: 19,225.
Tigers 6, Rays 3
Tampa Bay.... 000 100 002 — 3
Detroit ........... 000 011 04x — 6
Tampa Bay
Upton cf
Damon dh
Longoria 3b
Zobrist rf-2b
Rodriguez 2b-ss
Lopez 1b
Kotchman 1b
Shoppach c
Jaso ph
E. Johnson ss
Joyce rf
Fuld lf
Totals
ab
3
5
2
4
3
3
1
2
0
2
2
3
30
r
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
0
3
h
0
2
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
6
bi bb so avg
0 2 3 .247
0 0 0 .269
1 1 0 .221
0 0 0 .260
0 1 0 .209
0 0 1 .213
0 0 0 .349
0 0 1 .167
0 1 0 .211
0 0 0 .258
0 0 0 .357
2 0 0 .229
3 5 5
Batting - 2B: Damon (6). S: Fuld. SF: Longoria. RBI: Longoria (9); Fuld 2 (18). Team LOB:
8.
Baserunning - SB: Upton (8). CS: E. Johnson
(3).
Fielding - DP: 2.
Detroit
ab r h bi bb so avg
Jackson cf
3 0 1 0 0 0 .226
Sizemore 2b
4 1 1 0 0 0 .211
Boesch rf
4 1 1 0 0 2 .266
Wells rf
0 0 0 0 0 0 .245
Cabrera 1b
3 1 1 1 1 1 .313
Martinez dh
3 1 1 2 1 0 .303
Dirks lf
3 1 1 1 1 0 .278
Peralta ss
3 0 1 2 1 2 .295
Avila c
2 0 0 0 2 1 .286
Inge 3b
2 1 0 0 1 0 .208
Totals
27 6 7 6 7 6
Batting - 2B: Boesch (11); Martinez (11).
HR: Dirks (1). S: Jackson. RBI: Cabrera (31);
Martinez 2 (25); Dirks (2); Peralta 2 (26).
GIDP: Avila. Team LOB: 5.
Baserunning - CS: Cabrera (1).
Pitching
ip h r er bb so era
Tampa Bay
Hellickson L,5-3 6z 4 2 2 4 4 3.14
Howell
1z 1 2 2 1 1 7.71
Cruz
0 2 2 2 2 0 3.63
Ramos
z 0 0 0 0 1 3.77
Detroit
Coke
3z 2 1 1 1 1 3.81
Furbush W,1-0
3Z 2 0 0 1 3 0.00
Benoit H,6
1 0 0 0 1 1 7.02
Valverde
1 2 2 2 2 0 3.43
WP: Cruz; Valverde. IBB: Dirks (by Cruz);
Martinez (by Hellickson). HBP: Shoppach
(by Furbush). Batters faced; pitches-strikes:
Hellickson 25; 100-60; Howell 5; 20-13;
Cruz 4; 16-8; Ramos 1; 4-3; Coke 13; 47-29;
Furbush 14; 53-35; Benoit 4; 18-10; Valverde 7; 27-13.
Umpires - HP: Holbrook; 1B: Davis; 2B: Gibson; 3B: Tichenor.
Game data - T: 3:21. Att: 21,550.
HBP: Weeks (by Gorzelanny). Batters faced;
pitches-strikes: Gorzelanny 25; 95-64; H.
Rodriguez 3; 11-7; Burnett 4; 15-6; Storen 5;
25-16; Slaten 4; 17-12; Gallardo 28; 102-71;
Estrada 5; 25-16; Dillard 5; 22-15.
Umpires - HP: T. Welke; 1B: Barksdale; 2B:
Johnson; 3B: Culbreth.
Game data - T: 2:56. Att: 22,906.
Batting - 2B: Howard (10); Ruiz (4); Brown
(1). HR: Rollins (3); Polanco (3); Ibanez (5).
RBI: Rollins 3 (15); Polanco 2 (27); Ibanez 2
(20); Mayberry 2 (10); Hamels (1). Team
LOB: 5.
Pitching
ip h r er bb so era
Cincinnati
Arroyo L,3-5
2Z 10 9 9 1 2 5.28
Maloney
3z 3 1 1 1 2 7.20
Arredondo
1 1 0 0 0 1 1.93
Ondrusek
1 0 0 0 0 1 2.10
Philadelphia
Hamels W,6-2
6 5 3 3 2 4 3.06
Stutes
1 0 0 0 0 2 2.35
Bastardo
1 0 0 0 0 0 1.10
Baez
1 0 0 0 0 1 4.19
HBP: Rolen (by Hamels). Balks: Hamels. Batters faced; pitches-strikes: Arroyo 19; 7846; Maloney 13; 50-30; Arredondo 4; 11-10;
Ondrusek 3; 13-8; Hamels 26; 102-65;
Stutes 3; 13-9; Bastardo 3; 12-7; Baez 3;
15-8.
Umpires - HP: Vanover; 1B: Gorman; 2B:
Randazzo; 3B: Bellino.
Game data - T: 2:45. Att: 45,841.
Sunday’s late game
Red Sox 5, Cubs 1
Rangers 4, White Sox 0
Chicago......... 000 000 000 — 0
Texas ............... 100 002 01x — 4
Chicago
ab r h bi bb so avg
Pierre lf
4 0 1 0 0 0 .261
Ramirez ss
4 0 0 0 0 1 .282
Dunn dh
4 0 0 0 0 2 .189
Konerko 1b
3 0 1 0 1 1 .302
Quentin rf
3 0 0 0 1 1 .255
Pierzynski c
3 0 1 0 0 0 .263
Rios cf
3 0 0 0 0 1 .202
McPherson 3b
3 0 0 0 0 0 .182
Beckham 2b
2 0 2 0 1 0 .232
Totals
29 0 5 0 3 6
Batting - GIDP: Pierre; Ramirez. Team LOB:
5.
Texas
ab r h bi bb so avg
Kinsler 2b
4 0 2 0 0 0 .230
Andrus ss
3 0 0 0 1 0 .266
Hamilton dh
4 2 2 1 0 0 .349
Young 1b
4 0 3 0 0 0 .348
Gentry 1b-cf
0 0 0 0 0 0 .188
A. Beltre 3b
2 1 0 1 1 0 .257
Cruz lf-rf
4 1 1 2 0 2 .220
Murphy cf-lf
3 0 1 0 0 0 .243
Napoli c
3 0 0 0 0 1 .185
Moreland rf-1b
3 0 0 0 0 0 .270
Totals
30 4 9 4 2 3
Batting - 2B: Kinsler (14); Hamilton (4);
Murphy (5). 3B: Young (3). HR: Hamilton (1);
Cruz (8). SF: A. Beltre. RBI: Hamilton (8); A.
Beltre (38); Cruz 2 (20). GIDP: Andrus. Team
LOB: 5.
Baserunning - CS: Young (1).
Fielding - E: Kinsler (6).
Pitching
ip h r er bb so era
Chicago
Danks L,0-7
8 9 4 4 2 3 4.34
Texas
Ogando W,5-0
9 5 0 0 3 6 1.81
Batters faced; pitches-strikes: Danks 33;
105-71; Ogando 32; 115-76.
Umpires - HP: Runge; 1B: McClelland; 2B:
Hudson; 3B: Barrett.
Game data - T: 2:05. Att: 30,861.
Chicago ......... 000 000 100 — 1
Boston............ 000 210 20x — 5
Chicago
Fukudome rf
Barney 2b
Castro ss
Ramirez 3b
Pena 1b
Baker lf
Campana pr-lf
Soriano dh
Castillo c
Johnson cf
Totals
ab
4
4
4
4
4
3
0
3
3
3
32
r
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
h
0
0
1
1
0
1
0
1
1
0
5
bi bb so avg
0 0 1 .310
0 0 1 .315
0 0 1 .323
0 0 0 .296
0 0 1 .216
1 0 2 .376
0 0 0 .500
0 0 1 .265
0 0 0 .182
0 0 0 .370
1 0 7
Batting - 2B: Castro (12); Ramirez (12);
Baker (7). RBI: Baker (14). GIDP: Castillo.
Team LOB: 4.
Fielding - E: Castillo (2). DP: 2.
Boston
ab r h bi bb so avg
Ellsbury cf
4 0 1 0 0 0 .295
Pedroia 2b
4 1 2 0 0 0 .244
Gonzalez 1b
4 2 4 0 0 0 .342
Youkilis 3b
3 1 1 2 1 1 .281
Ortiz dh
4 0 2 0 0 0 .299
Lowrie ss
2 0 1 1 0 0 .319
Cameron rf
3 0 0 1 0 1 .143
Crawford lf
3 0 0 0 0 1 .209
Saltalamacchia c 4 1 1 1 0 0 .237
Totals
31 5 12 5 1 3
Batting - 2B: Gonzalez (15); Ortiz (9). 3B:
Youkilis (1). HR: Saltalamacchia (3). SF: Lowrie; Cameron. RBI: Youkilis 2 (32); Lowrie
(20); Cameron (5); Saltalamacchia (12).
GIDP: Cameron; Saltalamacchia. Team LOB:
7.
Baserunning - CS: Ellsbury (5).
Fielding - DP: 1.
Pitching
ip h r er bb so era
Chicago
Russell L,1-5
4 7 3 3 1 2 6.33
Berg
1 1 0 0 0 0 3.75
Grabow
1Z 3 2 2 0 1 4.67
Wood
Z 1 0 0 0 0 2.41
Maine
Z 0 0 0 0 0 20.25
Boston
Wakefield W,1-1 6Z 4 1 1 0 3 4.50
Bard H,9
1z 0 0 0 0 2 3.33
Papelbon
1 1 0 0 0 2 2.29
J.Russell pitched to 2 batters in the 5th. WP:
Wakefield (2). HBP: Lowrie (by Wood). Batters faced; pitches-strikes: Russell 19; 5739; Berg 3; 18-11; Grabow 8; 25-19; Wood 5;
18-10; Maine 1; 4-2; Wakefield 24; 75-54;
Bard 4; 22-14; Papelbon 4; 17-13.
Umpires - HP: Hickox; 1B: Rapuano; 2B:
O’Nora; 3B: Marquez.
Game data - T: 2:44. Att: 37,688.
Tuesday, May 24, 2011 3D
NEWS -LEADER • News-Leader.com
Mavericks rally to
stun Oklahoma City
Dallas trailed by 15
with five minutes left.
De Silvestro counts
blessings after crash
22-year-old will race at
Indy 500 despite severe
burns on her hands.
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
INDIANAPOLIS — Simona de Sil-
By Jeff Latzke
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OKLAHOMA CITY — Trailing by
15 points with only 5 minutes to
play in one of the NBA’s rowdiest
arenas, the Dallas Mavericks
were just wishing and hoping for
the best.
Dirk Nowitzki
NBA
and Jason Kidd
PLAYOFFS delivered, and
the Mavs suddenly find themselves only one win away from
the NBA finals.
Nowitzki scored 40 points,
Kidd hit the go-ahead 3-pointer
with 40 seconds left in overtime
and the Mavericks staged an
improbable rally to stun the
Oklahoma City Thunder 112-105
on Monday night and take a 3-1
lead in the Western Conference
finals.
“You’re lying if you’re not surprised. Down 15 with 5 minutes
to play you’re thinking hopefully
something can happen,” Dallas
center Brendan Haywood said.
“You’re just kind of wishing.”
Dallas didn’t lead until Nowitzki hit two free throws 16 seconds
into overtime, needing to rally
from a 99-84 deficit in the final 5
minutes of regulation.
The Mavericks never let the
Thunder — who were one win
shy of tying an NBA record with
eight OT wins in the regular season — go ahead in the extra period.
“There’s times and situations
where they are going to test the
courage and the mental inner
strength of your team,” said
Jason Terry, who scored 20 for
Dallas. “This was one of those
times.”
Kevin Durant missed a 3-pointer on Oklahoma City’s opening
ERIC GAY / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Oklahoma City forward Nick Collison (4) attempts to score as Dallas'
Dirk Nowitzki defends in the first half of Monday’s game.
possession of overtime then didn’t get another shot until he
missed a 3 off the front rim in the
final 10 seconds with the Thunder down by five.
Durant finished with 29 points
and 15 rebounds, and Serge
Ibaka had 18 points and 10
boards for Oklahoma City.
The Thunder suffered their
first consecutive losses of the
postseason and first back-toback home losses in six months.
» Playoff glance, 4D
vestro’s hands are wrapped in
thick gauze and tape from her
wrists to fingertips, protecting
the raw tissue beneath from exposure as it heals from the burns
caused by a horrific crash during
practice for the Indianapolis 500.
She jokingly called them her
“Mickey Mouse” gloves and is
planning to wear a much more
streamlined version Sunday under
her protective driving gloves.
This is Indy. As long as she can
grip the wheel, the 22-year-old
Swiss driver plans to be racing at
The Brickyard.
“I’m going to try. You never
know,” de Silvestro said. “Sometimes, it’s too risky. But I’m going
to try as much as I can to stay out
there.”
De Silvestro is actually thankful
her hands, which are healing
from second- and some thirddegree burns, were the only casualty in the crash that could have
easily killed her Thursday.
The car slammed into a wall,
flew off the track and flipped several times before coming to a stop
upside down and in flames.
Smoke billowed from the wreckage as her crew worked to turn it
over and get her out. The burning
fuel was hot enough to get
through her protective gloves,
but that was the only physical
damage on de Silvestro.
“Just coming out with a couple
burns, I think it’s not so bad,” she
said. “I usually close my eyes
when I crash. I thought it was
over and all of a sudden I open my
eyes and I’m flying off again. You
just hope it’s over as soon as possible, and then you just try to get
out of it. I was lucky that I didn’t
pass out or anything.”
Mentally, she was rattled and
remained so until she got into her
INDIANAPOLIS 500
When: 11 a.m. Sunday
Where: Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Pole-sitter: Alex Tagliani
TV: ABC
backup car on Saturday. After a
few tentative laps, she had
enough confidence to go for it and
ended up qualifying 24th.
“She’s my hero,” said Tony
Kanaan, who is No. 23 in Sunday’s
lineup for the 100th anniversary
race. “What a great spirit that she
has. I saw it because she came and
talked to me about it. It looked
bad. Real bad. What she did gives
me goose bumps.”
De Silvestro and fellow drivers
Will Power and Justin Wilson
were in Boston on Monday during
a promotion for Indy car racing’s
return to New England. The circuit will race at New Hampshire
Motor Speedway in August for
the first time since 1998.
Each driver was presented with
a large, freshly cooked lobster,
which de Silvestro nibbled on,
picking off tiny pieces with the
very ends of her fingers while
trying to keep her hand dressing
from getting soaked with butter.
The bandages are changed twice
a day as doctors see how the burned
flesh is recovering. On Sunday, she
had layers of dead skin removed,
exposing the raw underlayers and
causing another round of pain.
“They just kind of peel it off. It
looks like in the movies after,” she
said. “It’s pretty disgusting.”
De Silvestro said she also
burned her hands last summer in a
crash at Texas, although not nearly as severely. She will learn this
week if she’ll need skin grafts.
“I think it will take a while for
them to get better,” she said. “But,
we’ll see if we can do a good race
with them.”
» Lineup, 4D
Bruins a win away Seifert/Credits time at juco
from Eastern crown
of times by the seventh or eighth
inning, they’re cooked.”
Seifert credits his time in
junior college for that.
“More than anything I learned
‘next day.’ If you go 0-for-4, you
have the next day, and it’s been a
great gift for me here where
pitching’s a little
b e t t e r, ” S e i f e r t
said.
“If you get too
high, you’re gonna
get too low sometimes. Staying even
really helps in base- Seifert
ball.”
Continued from Page 1D
Thomas has 33 saves,
Marchand scores winner.
By Jimmy Golen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
BOSTON — Tim Thomas stopped
NHL PLAYOFFS
after the final whistle.
Thomas bounced back after
allowing four straight goals in
Game 4 and may have saved the
season when he stopped Steve
Downie with about 11 minutes
left, reaching out to put his stick
in front of the open net and protect a 2-1 lead.
Two nights after Tampa Bay rallied with five straight goals to overcome a 3-0 deficit and win Game 4,
Boston shrugged off Simon
Gagne’s goal just 69 seconds in and
staged a comeback of its own.
Gagne, who scored the winner
in Game 4, converted a 2-on-1
with Steve Stamkos to beat
defenseman Johnny Boychuk and
put the puck past Thomas. Horton
tied it on a one-timer from Milan
Lucic 4:24 into the second period
— just Boston’s seventh shot.
Marchand also took a penalty in
the second, then came back to
score. After Zdeno Chara kept the
puck in the zone, Patrice Bergeron went to the faceoff circle to
retrieve it, then passed it over to
Marchand for an easy chip-in past
Smith.
33 shots after allowing another
early goal, and Brad Marchand
scored the game-winner to lead
Boston to a 3-1 victory over the
Tampa Bay Lightning on Monday
night and put the Bruins one win
away from the Stanley Cup finals.
The victory gave Boston a 3-2 lead
in the best-of-7 Eastern Conference
finals, with a chance to clinch
Wednesday night in Tampa Bay.
Nathan Horton scored to tie it in
the second period, 17 seconds after
returning from the penalty box.
Marchand scored with 4:04 left in
the period to give Boston a 2-1 lead.
Boston managed just 19 shots on
Mike Smith as he made his first
career playoff start in place of
Dwayne Roloson.
Tampa Bay finally managed to
pull the goalie with 42 seconds
left, but Rich Peverley scored an
empty-netter with 12.1 seconds
left to clinch it. The Lightning left
the extra skater on the bench for
the ensuing faceoff, but they
couldn’t come through with any- » Playoff glance, 4D
thing more than some shoving
Lead-Off/Lewallen, Reed honored
Continued from Page 1D
with a 1.48 earned run average.
He walked only 15 batters.
Josh Lewallen of Hillcrest was
named defensive player of the
year. An outfielder, the senior had
a .960 fielding percentage and
four assists. He also batted .389.
Payton Reed of Kickapoo was
named offensive player of the
year. Reed batted .455 with eight
home runs and 40 RBIs.
As for action on the field, four
small-class sectional baseball
games were moved to today
because of inclement weather.
They are: Windsor at Stockton,
Cabool at Conway, Purdy at
Clever and Wheaton at Dora.
baseball career. He developed
physically and emotionally in his
two seasons at the Council
Bluffs, Iowa, school.
He hit .485 with 18 homers and
92 RBIs last year in leading Iowa
Western to the national championship.
“He has a great idea of the
strike zone,” said MSU pitcher
Dan Kickham, who played for
Crowder College against Iowa
Western last year at the Juco
World Series. “You could tell
right away that he’s a tough out.”
Nearly as endearing to Guttin
as on-field production is Seifert’s
personality. He relates a
response to a text message he
received from Seifert’s juco
coach, Mark Rardin, last fall.
“He asked how (Seifert) was
doing, and I said, ‘Doesn’t talk.
Just hits,’ ” Guttin said.
“He’s not a big talker, he just
plays. He has a great mental
Tourney time
NATHAN PAPES / NEWS-LEADER
Missouri State’s Brent Seifert is
“not a big talker, he just plays,”
says his coach, Keith Guttin.
make-up. A lot of times his best
at-bats are late in games.
“Guys that are emotional, a lot
Nick
Petree
(8-2) pitches
today’s opener against SIU’s
Cody Forsythe (8-4). Petree and
the Bears defeated the Salukis
11-4 on April 16, as he allowed
one run in seven innings.
Forsythe defeated MSU 11-1 the
next day, also pitching seven
innings.
Cards/La Russa ejected in eighth
Continued from Page 1D
pitch at the knees, then turned
and jumped in frustration after
Joyce punched him out. La Russa
came out to get the slugger and
as he turned toward the dugout,
said something to Joyce and was
ejected.
It was La Russa’s eighth game
back since missing six games to
be treated for shingles.
The Padres pitched to Pujols
with first base open after Jon Jay
hit a one-out double.
Padres pinch-hitter Jorge
Cantu hit a sacrifice fly to tie the
game at 1 in the seventh.
San Diego had runners on first
and third and no outs after Chase
Headley hit a leadoff double and
advanced on Cameron Maybin’s
bunt for a single. Orlando Hudson grounded to Pujols, who
threw home to catch Headley in a
rundown, which moved Maybin
to third.
The Cardinals broke through
against Bell (2-1) in the ninth.
Skip Schumaker hit a one-out
double to right and scored on
Daniel Descalso’s single to medium right. Chris Denorfia’s throw
was up the first-base line. Ryan
Theriot hit a two-out single to
bring in Descalso.
Kyle Lohse (6-2) held the
Padres to one run and five hits in
eight innings, struck out five and
walked one. Fernando Salas got
the final two outs for his eighth
save in as many chances.
Moseley allowed one run and
five hits in seven innings, struck
out three and walked three.
The loss came hours after the
light-hitting Padres shook up
their lineup by demoting leadoff
batter Will Venable to Triple-A.
Denorfia moved into Venable’s
starting spot in RF. To take his
spot on the 25-man roster, the
Padres purchased the contract
of Blake Tekotte from Double-A.
» Box score, 2D
Cycling/Legal action against Hamilton possible
Continued from Page 1D
by a cyclist who has not hesitated
to abuse the trust of all followers
of cycling on several occasions in
the past,” the statement said.
Hamilton, who admitted to “60
Minutes” that he doped during his
career, twice tested positive for
banned substances.
“At no time did he see fit to
inform the UCI of the events he
claims to have witnessed 10 years
ago, and which he is now using in
his attempt to harm the UCI,” the
cycling body said.
“The UCI can only confirm that
Lance Armstrong has never been
notified of a positive test result
by any anti-doping laboratory.”
The UCI said it reserves the
right to take legal action against
Hamilton.
CBS’ “60 Minutes” also reported that UCI officials helped
arrange a meeting involving
Armstrong and the World AntiDoping Agency-accredited laboratory at Lausanne, which tested
the Swiss race samples.
The UCI and its former president Hein Verbruggen, whose 14year spell in office ended in 2005,
denied such a meeting took place.
Verbruggen told The Associated Press that Armstrong’s doping
controls had never been hidden.
“There has never, ever been a
cover-up. Not in the Tour de
Suisse, not in the Tour de France,”
the Dutch official said. “I don’t
know anything about suspicious
tests. I was not aware of that.”
The UCI has previously said the
2001 Swiss race was clear of dop-
ing and denied suggestions that
Armstrong gave it money for covering up a failed test.
Armstrong donated $25,000 in
2002 for the Swiss-based organization’s anti-doping program and
$100,000 in 2005 for the purchase
of a Sysmex machine used for
analyzing blood.
Tour de Suisse spokesman Rolf
Huser told the AP that organizers
knew nothing about the race test
results, which are conducted by
cycling federations and anti-doping agencies.
“We are never in the loop about
doping controls. We have to be
neutral,” Huser said. “We can’t
say anything about these rumors
from 2001. We had the (race)
results and everything was OK.”
The Tour de Suisse allegations
are similar to those made by
Floyd Landis, who had his 2006
Tour de France title stripped for
doping. After years of denying he
cheated, Landis came out last
year acknowledging he used
PEDs and alleged Armstrong did,
as well.
4D Tuesday, May 24, 2011 •
SCOREBOARD
TV/RADIO
Djokovic extends winning streak
TODAY
Win at French puts
him at 38-0 in 2011.
BASEBALL
College: MVC tournament,
first round, Missouri St. vs.
Southern Illinois, at Omaha,
Neb., 3 p.m.— KBFL1060 AM
By Howard Fendrich
American League: Kansas
City at Baltimore, 6:05 p.m.—
Mediacom Channel 22, KWTO
560 AM
AP TENNIS WRITER
PARIS — Shhhhhh! Don’t
say a word. Novak Djokovic
is perfect so far in 2011, and
superstition
demands
silence, lest he be jinxed.
Djokovic himself insists
he isn’t keeping tabs on his
unbeaten
run,
which
reached 38-0 this season —
and 40 consecutive victories dating to December —
thanks to a 6-2, 6-1, 6-3 win
over Thiemo de Bakker of
the Netherlands in the first
round of the French Open
on Monday.
“I’m not counting,” the
second-seeded
Djokovic
National League: N.Y. Mets
at Chicago Cubs, 7 p.m.— WGN
National League: St. Louis at
San Diego, 9:05 p.m.— Fox
Sports Network, KTXR 101.3 FM
BASKETBALL
NBA: Playoffs, conference
finals, game 4, Chicago at
Miami, 7:30 p.m.— TNT
HOCKEY
NHL: Playoffs, conference
finals, game 5, San Jose at Vancouver 8 p.m.— VERSUS
TENNIS
French Open: First round, at
Paris, 11 a.m.— ESPN2
College: NCAA Division I playoffs, championship match, Virginia vs. Southern California, at
Palo Alto, Calif. (same-day tape),
9:30 p.m.— ESPN2
22
KC
BASEBALL
1:10
National League: St. Louis at
San Diego, 5:35 p.m. — Fox
Sports Network, KTXR 101.3 FM
COL
29
2:10
For ticket information call 314-345-9600
For ticket information call 800-6ROYALS
23
24
25
SD
SD
SD
9:05 9:05 5:35
30
31
26
1
2
SAT.
27
STANDINGS
North Division
Texas League: Corpus Christi
at Springfield, 7:07 p.m. —
KWTO 98.7 FM
W
L
Pct.
GB
NW Arknss (Royals) 21
18
.538
—
Tulsa (Rockies)
23
20
.535
—
Arkansas (Angels) 19
20
.487
2
Sprngld (Cardinals) 19
24
.442
4
South Division
W
L
Pct.
GB
Sn Antnio (Padres) 30
14
.682
—
Frisco (Rangers)
23
21
.523
7
Midland (Athletics) 18
26
.409
12
Crps Chrsti (Astros) 17
27
.386
13
Monday's Games
Arkansas at Northwest Arkansas, 1st game,
ccd., rain
Frisco 6, San Antonio 4, 10 innings
Springfield 8, Tulsa 7
Arkansas at Northwest Arkansas, 2nd game,
ccd., rain
Midland 3 Corpus Christi 0
Today's Games
No games scheduled
Wednesday's Games
Tulsa at Midland, 6:30 p.m.
Northwest Arkansas at Frisco, 7 p.m.
Corpus Christi at Springfield, 7:07 p.m.
San Antonio at Arkansas, 7:10 p.m.
BASKETBALL
NBA: Playoffs, conference
finals, game 5, Oklahoma City at
Dallas, 8 p.m. — ESPN
HOCKEY
NHL: Playoffs, conference
finals, game 6, Boston at Tampa
Bay, 7 p.m. — VERSUS
TENNIS
French Open: Second round,
at Paris, 11 a.m. — ESPN2
College
CALENDAR
Baseball
College:MVCtournament,firstround,Missouri
St. vs. Southern Illinois, at Omaha, Neb., 3 p.m.
High school: Class 3 Sectional, Mount Vernon at Catholic, 6 p.m.
Soccer
High school girls: Class 3 Sectional, Glendale vs. Parkview, at Harrison Stadium 6 p.m.
High school girls: Class 1 Sectional, Catholic
at Dixon, 4:30 p.m.
AUTO RACING
Sprint Cup
Points Leaders
Through May 15
1. Carl Edwards, 416; 2. Jimmie Johnson, 392; 3.
Kyle Busch, 379; 4. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 364; 5.
Kevin Harvick, 362; 6. Matt Kenseth, 342; 7. Ryan
Newman, 340; 8. Clint Bowyer, 336; 9. Kurt
Busch, 336; 10. Tony Stewart, 328; 11. Mark Martin, 324; 12. Greg Biffle, 311; 13. Denny Hamlin,
304; 14. Jeff Gordon, 299; 15. Juan Montoya, 296
IRL
Indianapolis 500 Lineup
After qualifying; race Sunday, May 29
At Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Indianapolis
Lap length: 2.5 mile
All cars were Dallara-Honda
1. (77) A. Tagliani, 02:38.2613 (227.472).
2. (9) Scott Dixon, 02:38.3528 (227.340).
3. (2) Oriol Servia, 02:38.4727 (227.168).
4. (99) Townsend Bell, 02:38.6696 (226.887).
5. (12) Will Power, 02:38.7493 (226.773).
6. (98) Dan Wheldon, 02:38.9477 (226.171).
7. (44) Buddy Rice, 02:39.4431 (225.786).
8. (67) Ed Carpenter, 02:39.9137 (225.121).
9. (10) Dario Franchitti, 02:39.0253 (226.379).
10. (5) Takuma Sato, 02:39.4785 (225.736).
11. (14) Vitor Meira, 02:39.5814 (225.590).
12. (4) JR Hildebrand, 02:39.5895 (225.579).
13. (06) James Hinchcliffe, 02:39.5942 (225.572).
14. (30) Bertrand Baguette, 02:39.7973 (225.285).
15. (11) Davey Hamilton, 02:39.8223 (225.250).
16. (3) Helio Castroneves, 02:39.8464 (225.216).
17. (43) John Andretti, 02:40.0133 (224.981).
18. (59) EJ Viso, 02:40.1907 (224.732).
19. (41) Bruno Junqueira, 02:40.2203 (224.691).
20. (22) Justin Wilson, 02:40.3488 (224.511).
21. (88) Jay Howard, 02:40.3685 (224.483).
22. (07) Tomas Scheckter, 02:40.4040 (224.433).
23. (82) Tony Kanaan, 02:40.4156 (224.417).
24.(78T)SimonadeSilvestro,02:40.4335(224.392).
25. (23) Paul Tracy, 02:40.0433 (224.939).
26. (7) Danica Patrick, 02:40.0987 (224.861).
27. (6T) Ryan Briscoe, 02:40.2572 (224.639).
28. (26) Marco Andretti, 02:40.2648 (224.628).
29. (83) Charlie Kimball, 02:40.3574 (224.499).
30. (38) Graham Rahal, 02:40.4424 (224.380).
31. (19) Alex Lloyd, 02:40.7451 (223.957).
32. (36) Pippa Mann, 02:40.7600 (223.936).
33. (24) Ana Beatriz, 02:40.8012 (223.879).
Local
At Lebanon I-44 Speedway
Late Models
Feature — 1. Mike Sloan, Rolla; 2. Chrissy Wallace, Concord, N.C.; 3. Ken Dickinson, Lake of
the Ozarks; 4. Cole Williams, Sellersburg, Ind.;
5. Dale Roper Jr., Fair Grove; 6. Jimmy Vanzandt,
Springfield; 7. Austin Fullerton, Chelsea, Okla.;
8. Jim Reaves, Springfield; 9. Crispen Beavers,
Joplin; 10. Grant Sharp, Conway; 11. Jeremy
Manes, Nixa; 12. Steve Holt, Strafford
Modifieds
Feature — 1. Tyler Scott, Nixa; 2. Mike Coryell,
Lebanon; 3. Jason Otto, Richland, 4. Rodrick Icenhower;5.TerryTaylor,FairGrove;6.RockyRash,Elkland; 7. Payton Lucas, Fair Grove; 8. Michael Stake,
Phillpsburg;9.StephenCounterman,FairGrove
Sportsman
Feature — 1. Rick Sharp, Fair Grove; 2. JC
Newell, Stoutland; 3. Toby Harden, Lebanon; 4.
Aaron Douglas, Lebanon
Road Warrior
Feature — 1. Mike Scott, Rogersville; 2. Gary
Ball, Lebanon
Chargers
Feature — 1. Jimmy Poindexter; 2. Nick Cherry; 3. Caston Jones; 4. Larry Hunter; 5. Ben
Kramer; 6. John Sims; 7. Jeff Kaut; 8. Shawn
Jones; 9. Gary Davenport
OMSRA
Feature — 1. Michael Deschenes; 2. Ashley
Deschenes; 3. Joe Bunkers; 4. Dave Wilson; 5.
Kevin Hunt; 6. JW Blankenship
BASEBALL
Texas League
bi
2
1
3
0
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7 17 7
Springfield
022 000 103—8
Tulsa
000 120 130—7
E—Perez (5), Gomez (5). DP—SPG 0, TUL 1.
LOB—SPG 7, TUL 11. 2B—Garcia (5), Wheeler
(11), Schaeffer (2). 3B— Curtis 2(2). HR—Perez
(1), Castellanos (10), Paulsen (5). SB—Gomez
(4). CS—Gomez (2)
IP
H R ER BB SO
Springfield
Cleto
6.0
8
3 3 1 4
King
0.2
3
1 1 2 0
Simpson
0.1
4
3 3 0 0
Freeman W, 1-0 1.0
1
0 0 0 0
Greenwood S, 2 1.0
1
0 0 0 0
Tulsa
Cook
5.0
7
4 4 0 6
28
COL COL
7:40 6:10
3
SF
SF
SF
SF
CHI CHI
3:15 6:09 7:15 7:15 7:15 3:10
Sullivan
3.0
4
1 1 1 3
Jorgenson L, 0-2 1.0
3
3 3 0 1
Umpires—HP, Seth Buckminstern; 1B, Ryan
Blakney; 3B, Gabriel Morales. T—3:08. A—5,443.
h
3
2
3
1
2
2
1
2
0
0
0
1
0
0
FRI.
HOME GAMES SHADED
American League: Kansas
City at Baltimore, 6:05 p.m. —
Mediacom Channel 22, KWTO
560 AM
Win that, and Djokovic
could take on 25th-seeded
Juan Martin del Potro of
Argentina.
The 2009 U.S. Open champion hasn’t been the same
player since right wrist
surgery last year but got
past 6-foot-10 Ivo Karlovic
of Croatia 6-7 (7), 6-3, 7-5, 64, then declared: “I’m not
thinking about Djokovic
yet.”
Way down the line,
Djokovic’s semifinal oppoCHRISTOPHE ENA / THE ASSOCIATED PRESS nent could be Federer, who
his
career
Novak Djokovic returns the ball to Thiemo de Bakker during completed
Grand Slam by winning the
their first round match at the French Open.
2009 French Open, part of
The Serb, who won his by a man, John McEnroe's his 16 major titles overall.
second Australian Open 42-0 in 1984.
Two other seeded men
title in January, is closing in
In the second round, he’ll lost: No. 22 Michael Llodra
on the Open era record for meet 60th-ranked Victor of France, and No. 26 Milos
best start to a tennis season Hanescu of Romania.
Raonic of Canada.
ROYALS CALENDAR
National League: Cincinnati
at Philadelphia, 6 p.m. — ESPN2
r
1
1
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
1
0
1
0
0
said with a smile.
“I’m not trying to think
about the streak that I
have,” he added, “even
though it’s definitely something that makes me
proud.”
Others certainly are
thinking about it. Indeed,
it’s the talk of the year’s second Grand Slam tournament. Straight-set victories
Monday at Roland Garros
by other top players such as
Roger Federer, top-seeded
Caroline Wozniacki or
defending
champion
Francesca Schiavone — and
even 2010 semifinalist
Tomas Berdych’s surprising five-set loss to a French
qualifier — didn’t merit as
much attention as Djokovic
did.
CARDS CALENDAR
SUN. MON. TUE. WED. THU.
WEDNESDAY
SPRINGFIELD 8, TULSA 7
At ONEOK Field, Tulsa, Okla.
Springfield
Tulsa
ab r h bi
ab
Garcia 2b 5 3 3 0 Wheeler cf 5
Curtis 3b 5 1 3 2 Gomez ss 4
Adams 1b 5 1 3 1 Paulsen 1b 5
Castellns cf 5 1 1 3 Rosario c 5
Duncan lf 4 1 1 0 Beerer lf 4
Simpson p 0 0 0 0 Rike rf
4
Freeman p 0 0 0 0 Field 2b
4
Pham ph
1 0 0 0 Schaeffr 3b 5
Greenwod p 0 0 0 0 Cook p
1
Perez c
5 1 1 2 Cesario ph 0
Swagr rf/lf 3 0 1 0 Sullivan p 1
Jackson ss 4 0 1 0 Mitchell ph 1
Cleto p
3 0 0 0 Jorgenson p0
King p
0 0 0 0 Holcomb ph1
Ahmady rf 1 0 0 0
Totals
41 814 8 Totals
35
NEWS -LEADER • News-Leader.com
All-Missouri Valley Conference Teams
Player of the Year: Chris O’Brien, Wichita State
PitcheroftheYear: CharlieLowell,WichitaState
Newcomer of the Year: Dan Kickham, Missouri State
Freshman of the Year: Nick Petree, Missouri
State
First team
Johnny Coy, Wichita State, First base; Kevin
Medrano, Missouri St., Second base; Jimmy
Swift, Creighton, Shortstop; Ryan Court, Illinois
State, Third base; Chris O’Brien, Wichita State,
Catcher; Preston Springer, Wichita State, Designated hitter; Cody Fick, Evansville, Utility;
Trever Adams, Creighton, Outfield; Tyler
McNeely, Illinois State, Outfield; Robby Ort,
Indiana State, Outfield; Jonas Dufek,
Creighton, Pitcher; Cody Forsyth, Southern Illinois, Pitcher; Charlie Lowell, Wichita State,
Pitcher; Dan Kickham, Missouri State, Pitcher;
Kenny Long, Illinois State, Pitcher
Second team
Trentt Coplenad, Evansville, Second base;
Tyler Grimes, Wichita State, Shortstop; Jeremy
Lucas, Indiana State, Catcher; Brock Chaffin,
Missouri State, Designated hitter; Luke Voit,
Missouri State, Utility; Mike Gerber, Creighton,
Outfield; Mike Tauchman, Bradley, Outfield;
Joe Bircher, Bradley, Pitcher; Ty Blach,
Creighton, Pitcher; Nick Petree, Missouri State,
Pitcher; Kurt Spomer, Creighton, Pitcher; Cale
Elam, Wichita State, Pitcher
Honorable Mention
Kevin Tokarski, Illinois State, Second base;
Jason Leblebijian, Bradley, Shortstop; Brad
Kimball, Bradley, Designated hitter; Jared
Baehl, Evansville, Outfield; Greg Wallace,
Evansville, Outfield; JD Learnard, Illinois State,
Pitcher; Corey Maines, Illinois State, Pitcher;
Justin Hauer, Illinois State, Pitcher
BASKETBALL
NBA
Daily Playoff Glance
CONFERENCE FINALS
(Best-of-7)
(x-if necessary)
Sunday, May 15
Chicago 103, Miami 82
Tuesday, May 17
Dallas 121, Oklahoma City 112
Wednesday, May 18
Miami 85, Chicago 75
Thursday, May 19
Oklahoma City 106, Dallas 100
Saturday, May 21
Dallas 93, Oklahoma City 87
Sunday, May 22
Miami 96, Chicago 85, Miami leads series 2-1
Monday
Dallas 112, Oklahoma City 105 (OT), Dallas
leads series 3-1
Today
Chicago at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday
Oklahoma City at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Thursday
Miami at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.
Friday
x-Dallas at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Saturday, May 28
x-Chicago at Miami, 7:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 29
x-Oklahoma City at Dallas, 8 p.m.
Monday, May 30
x-Miami at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.
FOOTBALL
AFL
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
West Division
W L
T Pct PF
Arizona
8 2
0 .800 608
Utah
5 4
0 .556 582
San Jose
5 5
0 .500 590
Spokane
4 6
0 .400 562
Central Division
W L
T Pct PF
Chicago
7 3
0 .700 528
Dallas
6 4
0 .600 570
Tulsa
4 6
0 .400 426
Kansas City
3 7
0 .300 491
Iowa
2 7
0 .222 450
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
South Division
W L
T Pct PF
Jacksonville
9 1
0 .900 637
Orlando
6 3
0 .667 495
Georgia
5 5
0 .500 559
Tampa Bay
4 6
0 .400 441
New Orleans 2 8
0 .200 400
Eastern Division
W L
T Pct PF
Cleveland
6 3
0 .667 426
Pittsburgh
5 4
0 .556 421
Milwaukee
3 6
0 .333 395
Philadelphia 3 7
0 .300 517
Thursday’s Game
Orlando at Milwaukee, 7 p.m.
Friday’s Games
New Orleans at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
Utah at Iowa, 7:05 p.m.
Tulsa at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Spokane at Kansas City, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Dallas, 7:30 p.m.
Cleveland at Arizona, 9 p.m.
Georgia at San Jose, 9:30 p.m.
PA
476
552
579
561
PA
470
552
464
551
568
PA
436
457
540
532
518
PA
387
439
451
565
GOLF
Hole in one
At Island Green Country Club
Roy Cirillo aced the 146-yard 7th hole with an
8-iron. Witnesses were Don Heavin, Larry
Cockrell and Darrel Moreland.
HIGH SCHOOLS
Track and field
Boys
CLASS 4 SECTIONALS
Saturday
At West Plains
Team scores
1. Rock Bridge, 103 points; 2. Waynesville,
SUN. MON. TUE. WED. THU.
STL
22
23
1:10
4
29
TEX
2:05
30
24
25
26
FRI.
SAT.
27
28
BAL BAL BAL TEX TEX
6:05 6:05 11:35 7:05 6:10
31
1
LAA LAA LAA MIN
3:10 7:10 3:10 7:10
2
3
MIN MIN
7:10 6:10
4
For ticket information call 863-2143
SUN. MON. TUE. WED. THU.
22
23
TUL TUL
2:05 12:35
29
30
SA
SA
6:07 12:07
HOME GAMES SHADED
79.50; 3. West Plains, 73; 4. Ozark, 71; 5. Branson, 54; 6. Jefferson City, 51; 7. Webb City, 49; 8.
Willard, 42.50; 9. Nixa, 34.50; 10. Parkview, 33;
11. Carthage, 32; 12. Kickapoo, 16; 13. Lebanon,
14. Hickman, 12; 15. Joplin, 11; 16. Neosho, 8;
17. Glendale, 6; 18. Camdenton, 3.50
State qualifiers
100 — 1. Jeffrey Fraley, Waynesville, 11.19; 2.
Jarvis Jones, Webb City, 11.26; 3. Mark Pickeral,
Rock Bridge, 11.40; 4. Maddy Johnson, Webb
City, 11.43
200 — 1. Jeffrey Fraley, Waynesville, 22.00; 2.
Brady Adams, Nixa, 22.21; 3. Quintin Smith,
Parkview,22.35;4.AaronEsterle,WestPlains,22.62
400 — 1. Aren Martin, Waynesville, 48.41; 2.
Daniel Anderson, Ozark, 49.49; 3. Skyler Verfurth, Ozark, 50.57; 4. Mark Pickeral, Rock
Bridge, 50.80
800 — 1. Evan Adams, Carthage, 1:56.93; 2.
Andrew Pisechko, Webb City, 1:57.88; 3. Miles
Migliara, Waynesville, 1:58.32; 4. Collin Sees,
Rock Bridge, 1:59:12
1,600 — 1. Drew Cargill, West Plains, 4:20.17;
2. Brandon Brott, Branson, 4:20.56; 3. Caleb
Wilfong, Rock Bridge, 4:21.64; 4. Andrew
Pisechko, Webb City, 4:21.76
3,200 — 1. Caleb Wilfong, Rock Bridge,
9:36.43; 2. Drew Cargill, West Plains, 9:36.91; 3.
Brandon Brott, Branson, 9:42.23; 4. Nathan
Keown, Rock Bridge, 9:43.93
110 hurdles — 1. Cameron Chancey, Branson, 14.77; 2. Ryan Brassfield, West Plains,
15.23; 3. Kramer Patterson, Ozark, 15.27; 4.
Devon Moore, Jefferson City, 15.44
300 hurdles — 1. Cameron Chancey, Branson, 40.14; 2. Kramer Patterson, Ozark, 40.72;
3. AJ Miller, Jefferson City, 41.38; 4. Devon
Moore, Jefferson City, 41.88
400 relay — 1. Parkview, 42.95; 2. Nixa, 43.01;
3. Jefferson City, 43.20; 4. Waynesville, 43.67
800relay—1.Waynesville,1:28.65;2.WestPlains,
1:28.84;3.WebbCity,1:29.31;4.Ozark,1:29.46
1,600 relay — 1. Ozark, 3:21.77; 2. West
Plains, 3:22.59; 3. Waynesville, 3:24.19; 4.
Lebanon, 3:27.50
3,200 relay — 1. Rock Bridge, 8:05.53; 2. West
Plains, 8:07.74; 3. Ozark, 8:09.90; 4. Jefferson
City, 8:12.04
High jump — 1. Tyler Calhoun, Ozark, 6-4; 2.
Andrew Smith, Willard, 6-2; 3. Dominic Jones,
Waynesville, 6-0; 3. Nakoah Brown, Nixa, 6-0
Pole vault — 1. Sawyer Vincent, Willard, 153; 2. Brady Melugin, Nixa, 15-3; Josh Morgan,
Branson, 14-6; 3. Josh Morgan, Branson, 14-6; 4.
Joey Burkett, Jefferson City, 14-0
Long jump — 1. Ryan Brassfield, West Plains,
22-7 1/2; 2. Alex Christian, Webb City, 27-7 1/2;
3. Dominic Jones, Waynesville, 21-7; 4. Keaton
Knudsen, Branson, 21-1
Triple jump — 1. Keith Lawrie, Carthage, 451 1/2; 2. Daniel Brennan, Rock Bridge, 44-8 1/4;
3. Keaton Knudsen, Branson, 43-7; 4. Alex
Christian, Webb City, 43-0
Shot put — 1. Skyler Frazier, Willard, 56-7
3/4; 2. Nick Sublett, Rock Bridge, 54-9; 3. Austin
Ray, Rock Bridge, 51-9 1/4; 4. Hampton
Mayson, Jefferson City, 49-10 1/2
Discus — 1. Jordan Kukal, Parkview, 172-7; 2.
Skyler Frazier, Willard, 168-8; 3. Nick Sublett, Rock
Bridge 161-11; 4. Austin Ray, Rock Bridge, 161-6
CLASS 3 SECTIONALS
Saturday
At Marshfield
Team scores
1. Grandview 125, 2. Grain Valley 66, 3. Warrensburg 65, 4. Maryville 47, 5. St. Pius X (Kansas
City) 42, 6. Excelsior Springs 41, 7. Chillicothe 40,
8. Oak Grove 38, 9. Smithville 34, T10. Harrisonville 30, T10. Cameron 30, 12. Lincoln College Prep 23, T13. Odessa 19, T13. Savannah 19,
T15. Richmond 14, T15. Platte County 14, 17.
O'Hara 12, 18. Benton 10, T19. Liberty North 6,
T19. Lafayette (St. Joseph) 6, 21. Central
(Kansas City) 5, T22. Pleasant Hill 4, T22. Holden
4, T24. Center 1, T24. Pembroke Hill 1
State qualifiers
100 — 1. Jaron Alexander, Grandview, 11.19;
2. Cliff Scott, Grandview, 11.36; 3. Naron
Rollins, Platte County, 11.40; 4. Kortez Woolen,
Warrensburg, 11.46
200 — 1. Larry Carter, Grandview, 22.98; 2.
Cliff Scott, Grandview, 22.99; 3. Naron Rollins,
Platte County, 23.08; 4. Kortez Woolen, Warrensburg, 23.12
400 — 1. Tyler Banks, Oak Grove, 49.78; 2.
Markell Trotter, Lincoln College, 49.86; 3.
Jasper Greeson, O'Hara, 50.65; 4. Nick Cintron,
Excelsior Spring, 50.70
800 — 1. Tyler Banks, Oak Grove, 1:59.42; 2.
Kellin Loch, Warrensburg, 1:59.53; 3. Tyree
Meadows, Grain Valley, 2:03.04; 4. Taylor Sinclair, Savannah, 2:04.38
1,600 — 1. Tyree Meadows, Grain Valley,
4:32.02; 2. David Stodden, St. Pius X, 4:32.96; 3.
Kain Ellis, Benton, 4:34.01; 4. Drew Keefer
SR St. Pius X, 4:36.15
3,200 — 1. Drew Keefer, St. Pius X, 10:03.65;
2. Tyree Meadows, Grain Valley, 10:13.06; 3.
Cody Gorham, Richmond, 10:14.47; 4. Chance
Malott, Odessa, 10:14.59
110 hurdles — 1. Dapo Akinmoladun, Grandview, 14.56; 2. Marcus Cody, Excelsior Spring,
15.65; 3. Zach Hoover, Grain Valley, 15.84; 4.
Harvey Kendall, Grandview, 15.88
300 hurdles — 1. Dapo Akinmoladun, Grandview, 40.17; 2. Chance Alexander, Harrisonville,
41.39; 3. TC Shippy, Odessa, 41.49; 4. Trevor
Douglas, Excelsior Spring, 41.74
400 relay — 1. Grandview, (Dontai Davis, Darion Moore, Cliff Scott, Jaron Alexander, 43.61;
2. Grain Valley, 43.70; 3. Maryville, 44.04; 4.
Smithville, 44.20
800 relay — 1. Grandview, (Travis McMillan,
Cliff Scott, Jaron Alexander, Jalin Brown),
1:30.61; 2. Harrisonville, 1:30.98; 3. Grain Valley, 1:31.63; 4. Maryville, 1:31.84
1,600 relay — 1. Oak Grove, (Kyle White,
Corey Martin, Pedro Rameriz, Tyler Banks),
3:28.80; 2. Excelsior Springs, 3:29.24; 3. Grandview, 3:29.90; 4. Warrensburg, 3:30.97
3,200 relay — 1. St. Pius X (Kansas City),
(Drew Keefer, Mike Anderson, David Stodden,
James Winkler), 8:07.95; 2. Oak Grove, 8:12.19;
3. Warrensburg, 8:12.97; 4. Smithville, 8:15.63
High jump — 1. Mitch Hatten, Cameron, 6
feet-6 inches; 2. Riley Willaims, Savannah, 6-4;
3. Jordan Carlisle, Savannah, 6-0; 4. Harold Foster, Warrensburg, J6-0
Long jump — 1. Tyler Lamb, Smithville, 23
feet-2 1/2 inches; 2. Riley Williams, Grain Valley, 22-1; 3. Alex Thompson, Chillicothe, 21-9
1/2; 4. Casey Johnson, Central (K.C.), 21-1 3/4
Shot put — 1. Sawyer Marlay, Cameron, 51
feet-11 inches; 2. Alec Whiteside, Chillicothe,
47-4 3/4; 3. Layne Fischer, Warrensburg, 46-7
1/4; 4. Zavon Moore, Grandview, 46-4
Discus — 1. Lucas Tunks, Cameron, 148 feet11 inches; 2. Caleb Mather, Maryville, 145-4; 3.
Zavon Moore, Grandview, 143-11; 4. PJ Patton,
Harrisonville, 143-01
Pole vault — 1. Romey Reaws, Grandview, 14
feet-0 inches; 2. Cameron Duthoy, Warrensburg, 13-06; 3. Tanner Hull, O'Hara, 13-0; 4.
Derek Steins, Maryville, 12-6
Triple jump — 1. Dapo Akinmoladun, Grandview, 44 feet-7 inches; 2. Peyton Mizera,
Maryville, 44-6; 3. Riley Williams, Grain Valley,
44-3; 4. Tyler Lamb, Smithville, 44-2 3/4
Girls
CLASS 4 SECTIONALS
Saturday
At West Plains
Team scores
1. Hickman, 82 points; 2. Jefferson City, 79; 3.
Neosho, 69; 4. Waynesville, 62; 5. Rock Bridge,
49; 6. Branson, 42; 7. Kickapoo, 39; 7. Carthage,
39; 9. Rolla, 37; 10. Washington, 36; 11. Ozark,
28; 12. Glendale, 23; 13. West Plains, 19; 13.
Nixa, 19; 15. Lebanon, 18; 16. Camdenton, 16;
17. Joplin, 11; 17. Webb City, 11; 19. Parkview
10; 20. Willard, 6
State qualifiers
100 — 1. Ekate Lymon, Waynesville, 12.45; 2.
Kaylee Morgan, Carthage, 12.81; 3. Darriana
Wilson, Hickman, 13.00; 4. Emily Paullus,
Neosho, 13.01
200 — 1. Ekate Lymon, Waynesville, 25.96; 2.
Taalor Stevenson, Hickman, 26.04; 3. Caryn
Ranney, Rolla, 26.19; 4. Kaylee Morgan,
Carthage, 26.37
400 — 1. Caryn Ranney, Rolla, 57.61; 2. Nora
Kueny, Lebanon, 58.41; 3. Taylor McDannold,
24
CC
25
7:07
31
1
CC
7:05
FRI.
SAT.
26
27
28
2
3
4
SOFTBALL
CC
CC
SA
7:07 7:07 6:07
CC
CC
SA
7:05 7:05 7:05
Schwark
all-academic
HOME GAMES SHADED
Rock Bridge, 59.06; 4. Josie Dyke, Ozark, 59.27
800 — 1. Liz Reida, Kickapoo, 2:11.79; 2. Jessica
Jackson, Neosho, 2:12.38; 3. Dana Roberson, West
Plains, 2:18.98; 4. JJ Shockley, Lebanon, 2:19.34
1,600 — 1. Liz Reida, Kickapoo, 5:11.81; 2. Jessica Jackson, Neosho, 5:14.11; 3. Courtney Wood,
Neosho, 5:14.76; 4. Shannon McCaul, 5:15.17
3,200 — 1. Liz Reida, Kickapoo, 11:14.56; 2.
Jessica Jackson, Neosho, 11:23.33; 3. Courtney
Wood, Neosho, 11:27.92; 4. Samantha Garrett,
Rock Bridge, 11:30.08
100 hurdles — 1. Destineee Holder, Waynesville, 15.51; 2. Mallory Short, Rock Bridge,
15.80; 3. Ellie Schmidly, 16.34; 4. Victoria Jackson, Hickman, 16.37
300 hurdles — 1. Sienna Trice, Rock Bridge,
45.45; 2. Victoria Jackson, Hickman, 46.25; 3.
Shattera Johnson, Waynesville, 46.46; 4. Emily
Paullus, Neosho, 47.22
400 relay — 1. Hickman, 49.65; 2. Carthage,
50.01; 3. Glendale, 50.39; 4. Jefferson City, 50.51
800 relay — 1. Waynesville, 1:44.24; 2. Jefferson City, 1:45.46; 3. Rock Bridge, 1:46.04; 4.
Rolla, 1:47.13
1,600 relay — 1. Hickman, 4:01.92; 2. Rolla,
4:03.31; 3. Ozark, 4:04.97; 4. Lebanon, 4:07.10
3,200 relay — 1. Neosho, 9:42.67; 2. West
Plains, 9:50.44; 3. Rock Bridge, 9:52.06; 4. Jefferson City, 9:53.01
High jump — 1. Rana Thomas, Parkview, 5-2;
2. Ruby Stevens, Branson, 5-2; 3. Jasmine
Reynolds, Waynesville, 5-2; 4. Emily Collum,
Camdenton, 5-0
Pole vault — 1. Lucy Givens, Branson, 10-3; 2.
Kirstie Leslie, Washington, 10-0; 2. Galit Rudelson,
Hickman, 10-0; 4. Mariah Sanders, Joplin, 9-9
Long jump — 1. Victoria Jackson, Hickman,
17-8 1/2; 2. Kezia Martin, Jefferson City, 17-7; 3.
Kaylee Morgan, Carthage, 16-9; 4. Kirstie
Leslie, Washington, 16-5 1/2
Triple jump — 1. Kezia Martin, Jefferson City,
37-2; 2. Kirstie Leslie, Washington, 36-10; 3.
Monique Townson, 36-0 1/2; 4. Hailey
Roderique, Webb City, 35-6 1/2
Shot put — 1. Sarah Hall, Hickman, 42-4 1/2;
2. Shelby Mustain, Jefferson City, 38-7 1/2; 3.
Michaela Dapprich, Branson, 37-7 1/2; 4. Alex
Giett, Carthage, 36-7 1/2
Discus — 1. Michaela Dapprich, Branson,
135-2; 2. Olivia Brand, Glendale, 134-2; 3. Shelby Mustain, Jefferson City, 127-1; 4. Emily
Goeken, Carthage, 123-2
CLASS 3 SECTIONALS
Saturday
At Marshfield
Team scores
1. Lincoln College Prep 102, 2. Warrensburg 87,
3. Maryville 78, 4. Smithville 48 , 5. Chillicothe
39, 6. Notre Dame de Sion 38, 7. Excelsior
Springs 35, 8. St. Pius X (Kansas City) 34, 9.
Odessa 23, 10. Grandview 22, 11. Platte County
21 1/2, T12. Pleasant Hill 20, T12. Liberty North
20, T12. O'Hara 20, 15. Grain Valley 19, 16. Center 16, 17. Benton 14, 18. Savannah 13, 19. Harrisonville 12, T20. Pembroke Hill 9, T20. Imagine
Renaissance Academy 9, 22. Oak Grove 6 1/2,
T23. Holden 3, T23. Cameron 3, 25. Richmond 1
State qualifiers
100 — 1. Jewel Dixon, Lincoln College, 12.71;
2. Briana Carter, Warrensburg, 12.78; 3. Taylor
Gadbois, Maryville, 12.79; 4. Alexis Coleman,
Lincoln College, 12.82
200 — 1. Taylor Gadbois, Maryville, 25.97; 2.
Jewel Stovall, Lincoln College, 26.51; 3. Alexis
Coleman, Lincoln College, 27.09; 4. Jasmine
Thomas, N.D. de Sion, 27.14
400 — 1. Taylor Gadbois, Maryville, 57.20; 2.
Briana Carter, Warrensburg, 57.61; 3. Lexie
Oak, St. Pius X, 57.85; 4. Taylor Parris, Pleasant
Hill, 58.54
800 — 1. Mary Frances Donnelly, N.D. de Sion,
2:22.52; 2. Brooke Guiot, Warrensburg, 2:22.98;
3. Lexie Oak, St. Pius X, 2:23.50; 4. Hanna Miller,
Savannah, 2:23.56
1,600 — 1. Sammy Laurenzo, Liberty North,
5:21.78; 2. Katie Tuck, Smithville, 5:23.28; 3.
Hanna Miller, Savannah, 5:23.40; 4. Siara Stahl,
Smithville, 5:23.89
3,200 — 1. Sammy Laurenzo, Liberty North,
12:22.50; 2. Mary Kate Taylor, Chillicothe,
12:25.71; 3. Amber Preist, Warrensburg,
12:27.52; 4. Katie Berger, Smithville, 12:32.22
100 hurdles — 1. Holly Wilmarth, Maryville,
15.98; 2. Kayla McGee, Lincoln College, 16.30;
3. Chelsea Gabriel, Grain Valley, 16.47; 4. Madison Whisler, St. Pius X, 16.71
300 hurdles — 1. Erin Gilliland, Chillicothe,
47.44; 2. Sheilahn Puryear, Lincoln College,
47.46; 3. Avery Loyd, N.D. de Sion, 48.26; 4.
Holly Wilmarth, Maryville, 48.59
400 relay — 1. Lincoln College Prep, (Erica
Boyer, Alexis Coleman, Shaquille Shanklin, Jewel
Dixon), 49.37; 2. Center, 51.24; 3. Grandview,
51.63; 4. Imagine Renaissance Academy, 51.67
800 relay — 1. Lincoln College Prep,
(Sheilahn Puryear, Jewel Stovall, Shaquille
Shanklin, Jewel Dixon), 1:46.03; 2. Pleasant Hill,
1:47.45; 3. St. Pius X (Kansas City), 1:48.10; 4.
Chillicothe, 1:48.35
1,600 relay — 1. Warrensburg, (Bionca Coats,
Christy Crouse, Brooke Guiot, Samantha Stokes),
4:05.45; 2. Lincoln College Prep, 4:05.79; 3.
Maryville, 4:09.43; 4. Pleasant Hill, 4:13.41
3,200 relay — 1. Smithville, ( Katie Tuck,
Leigh Carlson, Olivia Sloan, Siara Stahl)
9:43.89; 2. Warrensburg, 10:05.94; 3. Chillicothe, 10:13.44; 4. Platte County, 10:18.71
High jump — 1. Anna Soyck, Excelsior
Spring, 5 feet-7 inches; 2. Miranda Migletz,
Smithville, 5-2; 3. Rebecca Mardikes, Pembroke
Hill, J5-2; 4. Selina Kendall, Platte County, 5-1
Long jump — 1. Erica Boyer, Lincoln College,
18 feet-1 1/4 inches; 2. Kayla McGee, Lincoln College, 17-4 3/4; 3. Jasmine Thomas, N.D. de Sion,
16-10; 4. Brianna Latson, N.D. de Sion, 16-0 3/4
Shot put — 1. Heavin Warner, Benton, 38
feet-8 3/4; 2. Rachael Monteil, Odessa, 37-10
1/2; 3. Kylie Guthier, Platte County, 37-8 3/4; 4.
Skyler Young, O'Hara, 37-8 1/2
Discus — 1. Cydnee Reese, O'Hara, 122 feet-3
1/2; 2. D'Andria Blow, Grandview, 118-10; 3.
Jess Pfost, Maryville, 106-9; 4. Cierra Collins,
Warrensburg, 103-7 1/2
Pole vault — 1. Lisa Petty, Excelsior Spring, 10
feet-6 inches; 2. Kaylee VanBlarcum, Warrensburg, 10-0; 3. Haley Hughes, Excelsior Spring
9-9; 4. Dakota Waggerman, O'Hara, J9-9
Triple jump — 1. Briana Carter, Warrensburg
37 feet-5 inches; 2. Jaquela Stewart, Center,
36-3 1/4; 3. Anna Soyck, Excelsior Spring, 36-2
1/4; 4. Holly Wilmarth, Maryville, 36-2
HOCKEY
NHL
BRIEFLY
IN SPORTS
SPRINGFIELD CALENDAR
Daily Playoff Glance
CONFERENCE FINALS
(x-if necessary)
(Best-of-7)
Saturday, May 14
Tampa Bay 5, Boston 2
Sunday, May 15
Vancouver 3, San Jose 2
Tuesday, May 17
Boston 6, Tampa Bay 5
Wednesday, May 18
Vancouver 7, San Jose 3
Thursday, May 19
Boston 2, Tampa Bay 0
Friday, May 20
San Jose 4, Vancouver 3
Saturday, May 21
Tampa Bay 5, Boston 3
Sunday, May 22
Vancouver 4, San Jose 2, Vancouver leads
series 3-1
Monday
Boston 3, Tampa Bay 1, Boston leads series 3-2
Today
San Jose at Vancouver, 8 p.m.
Wednesday
Boston at Tampa Bay, 7 p.m.
Thursday
x-Vancouver at San Jose, 8 p.m.
Friday
x-Tampa Bay at Boston, 7 p.m.
Saturday, May 28
x-San Jose at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
SOCCER
MLS
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Philadelphia
5
3
2 17
8
7
New York
4
2
4 16 15
8
Houston
3
3
5 14 15 12
Columbus
3
3
4 13
8 10
New England
3
4
4 13 10 14
D.C.
3
4
3 12 13 18
Toronto FC
2
4
6 12 11 17
Chicago
1
4
5
8 13 17
Sporting KC
1
6
1
4 11 18
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W L T Pts GF GA
Los Angeles
6
2
5 23 18 12
FC Dallas
5
3
3 18 13 10
Portland
5
3
2 17 13 14
Seattle
4
3
5 17 14 11
Real Salt Lake 5
1
2 17
9
2
Colorado
4
3
4 16 12 10
Chivas USA
3
4
3 12 11 10
San Jose
3
4
3 12 12 12
Vancouver
1
5
5
8 12 16
Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Wednesday’s Games
Colorado at New York, 6:30 p.m.
FC Dallas at Seattle FC, 9 p.m.
Houston at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Philadelphia at Toronto FC, 11:30 a.m.
New York at Vancouver, 4:30 p.m.
Chivas USA at Columbus, 6:30 p.m.
Los Angeles at New England, 7 p.m.
San Jose at Chicago, 7:30 p.m.
FC Dallas at Houston, 7:30 p.m.
Seattle FC at Real Salt Lake, 8 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at Colorado, 8 p.m.
WPS
W L
T Pts GF
Western NY
5 0
1
16 16
magicJack
3 1
0
8 5
Philadelphia 2 1
2
8 8
Boston
2 4
1
7 9
Sky Blue FC
1 3
1
4 6
Atlanta
1 5
1
4 5
Three points for victory, one point for tie.
Saturday’s Games
Atlanta at magicJack, 6 p.m.
Boston at Sky Blue FC, 6 p.m.
GA
6
4
6
10
7
16
SOFTBALL
College
NCAA Division I Super Regionals Glance
(Best-of-3)
(x-if necessary)
Host school is home team for Game 1; visiting
school is home team for Game 2; coin flip determines home team for Game 3:
At Athens, Ga.
Saturday, May 28: Baylor (43-12) at Georgia
(50-12), 6:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 29: Baylor vs. Georgia, noon or
2:30 p.m.
x-Sunday,May29:Baylorvs.Georgia,2:30or5p.m.
At Gainesville, Fla.
Friday, May 27: Oregon (42-14) at Florida (5010), 1 p.m.
Saturday, May 28: Oregon vs. Florida, 11 a.m.
x-Saturday, May 28: Oregon vs. Florida, 1:30 p.m.
At Lexington, Ky.
Saturday, May 28: California (42-10) at Kentucky (39-14), 11 a.m.
Sunday, May 29: California vs. Kentucky, noon
x-Sunday, May 29: California vs. Kentucky,
2:30 p.m.
At Tuscaloosa, Ala.
Thursday, May 26: Stanford (41-15) at Alabama (49-8), 7 p.m.
Friday, May 27: Stanford vs. Alabama, 3:30 p.m.
x-Friday, May 27: Stanford vs. Alabama, 6 p.m.
At Columbia, Mo.
Saturday, May 28: Washington (37-14) at Missouri, 8 p.m.
Sunday, May 29: Washington vs. Missouri,
2:30 or 6 p.m.
x-Sunday, May 29: Washington vs. Missouri, TBA
At Stillwater, Okla.
Friday, May 27: Houston (43-16) vs. Oklahoma
State (40-17), 6 p.m.
Saturday, May 28: Houston vs. Oklahoma
State, 1:30 p.m.
x-Saturday, May 28: Houston vs. Oklahoma
State, 4 p.m.
At Tempe, Ariz.
Thursday, May 26: Texas A&M (44-13) at Arizona State (53-6), 9 p.m.
Friday,May27:TexasA&Mvs.ArizonaState,8p.m.
x-Friday, May 27: Texas A&M vs. Arizona
State, 10:30 p.m.
At Tucson, Ariz.
Friday, May 27: Oklahoma (40-17) at Arizona
(43-16), 10:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 28: Oklahoma vs. Arizona, 4 p.m.
x-Saturday, May 28: Oklahoma vs. Arizona,
6:30 p.m.
TENNIS
French Open
Seeds Fared
Monday
At Stade Roland Garros; Paris
Mens’ first round
Novak Djokovic (2), Serbia, def. Thiemo de
Bakker, Netherlands, 6-2, 6-1, 6-3.
Roger Federer (3), Switzerland, def. Feliciano
Lopez, Spain, 6-3, 6-4, 7-6 (3).
Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic, lost to
Stephane Robert, France, 3-6, 3-6, 6-2, 6-2, 9-7.
Gael Monfils (9), France, def. Bjorn Phau, Germany, 4-6, 6-3, 7-5, 6-0.
Mardy Fish (10), United States, def. Ricardo
Mello, Brazil, 6-2, 6-7 (11), 6-2, 6-4.
Mikhail Youzhny (12), Russia, def. Go Soeda,
Japan, 7-5, 6-2, 6-4.
Richard Gasquet (13), France, def. Radek
Stepanek, Czech Republic, 7-5, 6-3, 6-0.
Viktor Troicki (15), Serbia, def. Julian Reister,
Germany, 6-4, 6-3, 6-3.
Michael Llodra (22), France, lost to Steve Darcis, Belgium, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 6-3, 6-3.
Thomaz Bellucci (23), Brazil, def. Andrey Golubev, Kazakhstan, 6-4, 6-4, 6-7 (4), 7-6 (5).
Juan Martin del Potro (25), Argentina, def. Ivo
Karlovic, Croatia, 6-7 (7), 6-3, 7-5, 6-4.
Milos Raonic (26), Canada, lost to Michael
Berrer, Germany, 6-4, 4-6, 6-3, 6-4.
Marcos Baghdatis (27), Cyprus, def. Frederico
Gil, Portugal, 7-6 (4), 6-2, 6-2.
Nikolay Davydenko (28), Russia, def. Denis
Gremelmayr, Germany, 7-6 (2), 6-1, 6-3.
Janko Tipsarevic (29), Serbia, def. Brian
Dabul, Argentina, 7-6 (1), 6-1, 6-0.
Womens’ first round
Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Kimiko
Date-Krumm, Japan, 6-0, 6-2.
Vera Zvonareva (3), Russia, def. Lourdes
Dominguez Lino, Spain, 6-3, 6-3.
Francesca Schiavone (5), Italy, def. Melanie
Oudin, United States, 6-2, 6-0.
Petra Kvitova (9), Czech Republic, def. Greta
Arn, Hungary, 6-2, 6-1.
Marion Bartoli (11), France, def. Anna
Tatishvili, Georgia, 1-6, 6-2, 6-1.
Agnieszka Radwanska (12), Poland, def. Patricia Mayr-Achleitner, Austria, 6-1, 6-2.
Kaia Kanepi (16), Estonia, def. Sofia Arvidsson, Sweden, 7-5, 6-1.
Maria Kirilenko (25), Russia, def. CoCo Vandeweghe, United States, 7-6 (5), 6-2.
Nadia Petrova (26), Russia, lost to Anastasia
Rodionova, Australia, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 6-4.
Daniela Hantuchova (28), Slovakia, def. Zhang
Shuai, China, 6-3, 6-3.
Peng Shuai (29), China, def. Tamira Paszek,
Austria, 6-3, 6-2.
Roberta Vinci (30), Italy, def. Alberta Brianti,
Italy, 6-3, 3-6, 6-3.
Klara Zakopalova (31), Czech Republic, lost to
Chan Yung-jan, Taiwan, 7-5, 6-1.
Missouri State softball
player Jenna Schwark was
named to the Missouri Valley Conference’s all-academic team for the second
consecutive year, as the
senior utility player was an
honorable mention.
Schwark, who was a firstteam scholar-athlete selection in 2010, ranked second on
the team in hitting with a .287
average in 49 games this season.TheBrokenArrow,Okla.,
native also clubbed two home
runs and scored 21 runs to finish the year third on the team
in both categories.
Schwark is a finance
major who maintains a 3.46
grade-point average.
AUTO RACING
Pearson among Hall
inductees
CHARLOTTE,
N.C.
—
There was shock, maybe
even outrage, when David
Pearson didn’t make the
inaugural class of the
NASCAR Hall of Fame.
If Pearson felt slighted,
he never said.
Pearson made the wait
worth it Monday night,
headlining the inauguration
of the five-member second
class. As he did last year,
when he was passed over
for induction, Pearson
called on the voting panel to
elect NASCAR’s pioneers
before anyone else.
But Pearson, winner of
three championships and
105 races, understood why
he was selected. He was
introduced by longtime
rival Richard Petty and
inducted by car owner
Leonard Wood, who called
Pearson “the greatest driver
in the history of NASCAR.”
Pearson was inducted
along with 84-race winner
Bobby Allison, Petty Enterprises patriarch and threetime Cup champion Lee
Petty, Bud Moore, a decorated World War II veteran and
two-time Cup championship
team owner, and two-time
champion and noted broadcaster Ned Jarrett.
GOLF
Players honor Seve
VIRGINIA WATER, England
— Several top European
golfers have honored Seve
Ballesteros by playing a
pro-am event at Wentworth
to raise money for cancer
charities.
Two weeks after the Spanish great died at 54 following a brain tumor, Jose
Maria Olazabal, Colin Montgomerie, Paul Casey and
Justin Rose joined Ballesteros’ brother, Manuel, to
play in the “Ole Seve” event.
Ballesteros won seven
times at Wentworth.
TENNIS
EU signs Roland
Evangel
University’s
women’s tennis program
has signed Kailey Roland
out of Lamar High School.
Roland was named Big 8
Conference Singles Player
of the Year after winning
the Big 8 Conference tournament championship this
season. Roland also ended
her high school career with
67 career singles wins.