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Woonsocket
man killed
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Accident under
investigation
By RUSS OLIVO
[email protected]
HOSPITAL
DEATH SUIT
SETTLED
BOSTON (AP) — The
parents of a mental health
patient who died at
Bridgewater State Hospital
five years ago will receive $3
million to settle a civil rights
lawsuit alleging that prison
guards were responsible for
the death, their lawyer said.
The $3 million for the
parents of Joshua Messier,
23, will be paid by the state
and the insurer for MHM
Correctional Services, the
Virginia-based company that
provides medical and mental
health care to inmates.
Messier, who had been
diagnosed with paranoid
schizophrenia, died after
guards secured him spreadeagled in four-point restraints
on a small bed in 2009.
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Vol. CXXII
No. 84
Please
recycle
this paper
The Call/Ernest A. Brown
A Special Place owner Tom Stone-Tatro is forced to sell store items on the sidewalk on North Main Street Saturday after
Christopher’s Restaurant next door was shutdown after the utilities were shutoff.
No power, no business
Store, eatery shuttered
By RUSS OLIVO
[email protected]
WOONSOCKET – Two
well-known businesses
located in the same building at 614 North Main St.
– Christopher’s Restaurant
and A Special Place – have
shut their doors after the
electric power was turned
off last week.
The future of both is
uncertain. Tom Tatro, the
owner of A Special Place,
said he’s already looking
for a new location to run
the store, which specializes
in religious articles and
greeting cards. Tatro and
his wife, Jane B. Stone-
Tatro, just took over the
business from the founders
last September.
“All I really know for
sure is that the power was
turned off,” he said.
But Sylvan Quallo, a
Boston banker who bought
Christopher’s as an investment in 2012, said the closure of the businesses
stems from a dispute
between himself and the
owner of the building,
Brian Lahousse.
Not long ago, Quallo
said he discovered that he
was paying the gas, water
and electricity for both
Christopher’s and A
See CLOSED, Page A2
Sylvan A. Quallo, CEO of the Seventeen Group Corp. finds
himself locked out of Christopher’s Restaurant in
Woonsocket after the eatery was closed.
WOONSOCKET – A
city man died after his
pickup truck slammed into
a tree in Falmouth, Mass.,
Tuesday night, the town’ s
police department said.
The victim was identified as Ronald G. Conn, 50,
of 65 Ruskin Ave., according to Lt. Sean Doyle of the
Falmouth Police
Department.
Police said Conn’s 1978
Chevy pickup crashed into
the tree on the driver’s side.
The accident happened on a
stretch of 240 Hayward
Road just before 6 p.m.
Rescuers used the Jaws
of Life to sever the roof off
Conn’s pickup in an operation to free him from the
vehicle that took nearly an
hour, according to police.
He was the sole occupant
of the vehicle.
Though gravely injured,
Conn was still alive after
being extricated from the
demolished truck, but his
condition continued to
deteriorate en route to
Falmouth Hospital.
A MedFlight helicopter
was called to the scene, but
Conn was rushed to
Falmouth Hospital by
ambulance instead.
There’s no word from
the police on whether speed
of other factors might have
contributed to the cause of
the crash.
Lt. Doyle said the incident remains under investigation by the Cape Cod
Regional Law Enforcement
Vehicle Crash
Reconstruction Team.
Follow Russ Olivo on
Twitter @russolivo.
Bryant student wants to help service members call home
Cellphones collected tonight
will be refurbished for soldiers
BY JOSEPH B. NADEAU
[email protected]
SMITHFIELD – When a
soldier in the military is
very far from home it helps
to have an inexpensive way
to get in touch with the
people they love.
Nicholas Alberti, 22, a
Bryant University senior,
has been aware of that fact
for several years as a result
of his friends, Robbie and
Brittnay Bergquist’s work
to make inexpensive calls
for overseas service mem-
bers a real option.
Tonight, Alberti will host
a special cellphone collection for the Bergquist’s
organization in Bryant’s
Fisher Student Center
which will also include a
presentation by Robbie
Bergquist about his organization’s work. The collection drive will begin in
Room 2AB of the Fisher
Student Center at 7 p.m.
The Bergquist siblings set
up a non-profit foundation,
Cell Phones for Soldiers in
2004 when they were just
teenagers and with the help
of several large sponsors
such as AT&T have raised
over $10 million to help
soldiers to make calls home
since that time.
The organization’s success is the result of the
Bergquists collecting over
12 million cellphones and
donating over 150 million
minutes of pre-paid talk
time to U.S. service members.
It was the adjunct professor in his class on
advanced public relations,
Dana Nolfe from Cox
Communications, who got
Alberti involved in the colSee PHONES, Page A2
The Call/Joseph Nadeau
Nicholas Alberti, a Bryant University senior, shows some of
the cellphones he has already collected as part of a drive to
provide soldiers overseas with an inexpensive way to phone
home.
FROM PAGE ONE/NATION
A2 THE CALL
Closed
Special Place because
there is only one metering
system for the building.
Quallo said that information was not disclosed to
him in his lease.
Quallo claims Lahousse
refused to make financial
adjustments in the lease and
that he tried to evict him
after the metering issue was
brought to his attention.
Quallo countersued in
Superior Court, accusing
Lahousse of fraud in a suit
which is pending.
“We are seeking damages,” Quallo said.
Quallo said he finally
stopped paying the electricity and shut the doors late
last week, laying off about
15 waitpersons, kitchen
staff and other restaurant
workers.
Quallo said he wants to
open another restaurant, but
he doesn’t think it will be
in Woonsocket.
Reached by phone,
Lahousse initially said he
had “no clue” why the businesses were closed. “I have
no comment,” he added
after being asked about the
dispute with Quallo.
Follow Russ Olivo on
Twitter @russolivo.
Phones
lection effort. Nolfe asked
her students to organize a
fundraising event as a class
project, and Alberti decided
to do his project as a benefit
for the Bergquists’ “Cell
Phones for Soldiers” campaign.
“What we had to do was
team up with an organization and host an event to
benefit its work,” Alberti
said while taking a break
from his studies at Bryant on
Tuesday.
“Some of the class members decided to do their projects for organizations like
Mother’s Against Drunk
Mass. House approves anti-shackling bill
BOSTON (AP) — The
Massachusetts House has
unanimously approved a bill
outlawing the practice of
handcuffing women prisoners to hospital beds during
childbirth.
The bill approved
Wednesday would create a
uniform ban on restraining
women during pregnancy,
labor and delivery in state
139 Hamlet Avenue
Woonsocket, RI 02895
[email protected]
and county correctional
facilities unless they present
a specific safety or flight
risk.
The bill also creates basic
standards of prenatal and
postpartum care to ensure
safe, healthy outcomes for
female prisoners and their
newborns.
They include standards
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for the treatment and medical care of pregnant
inmates, nutrition, prenatal
and postnatal care and counseling services.
Although the Department
of Correction, which controls state prisons, already
prohibits prisoners in labor
from being restrained, each
county jail has had its own
policies.
The Massachusetts
Senate has already approved
the bill.
Gov. Deval Patrick supports the ban.
New thrill
ride debuts
TAMPA, Fla. (AP) —
Thrill ride developers at
Busch Gardens acknowledge
that the park's newest attraction might not be everyone's
idea of a good time.
Falcon's Fury opens on
May 1. Riders will be seated
upright and whisked to the
top of a 335-foot tower, then
the seat will pivot 90 degrees
so the guest is looking
straight down. That's when
the ride plunges in a six-second free fall. Jeff Hornick,
director of design and engineering said riders will reach
speeds of up to 60 mph on
the plunge.
by the Bergquists has grown
into a larger non-profit effort
that now, with its help from
sponsors such as AT&T,
operates over 20,000 cell
phone drop-off locations in
the 50 states.
As part of the collection
effort he is running for his
class project, Alberti had to
come up with a “media advisory” to get the word out
about his upcoming collection event and arrange for a
place to hold the collection.
He also plans to offer the
first 50 people to show up
coffee and doughnuts.
“Anyone can come and it
would actually be nice if
people from outside the
campus came to drop off
BOSTON (AP) — The
Department of Children and
Families failed to check
whether registered sex
offenders were living in or
near foster homes and neglected to ensure all children
get required medical screenings within seven days of
being placed in
Massachusetts' care, according to a state audit released
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Television Judge Joe Brown
challenges contempt charge
MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP)
— Joe Brown gained fame
by meting out justice as a
TV judge. Now he's the one
facing charges.
Brown, the star of the television show "Judge Joe
Brown" and present-day
political candidate, has a
court hearing April 4 in
Tennessee on his challenge
of contempt of court charges
handed down Monday by a
Shelby County Juvenile
Court magistrate.
Brown, 66, was arrested
and sentenced to five days
in jail during an outburst in
a child support hearing
before Juvenile Court
Magistrate Judge Harold
"Hal" Horne. Brown was
later released from jail by a
Circuit Court judge who
will hear arguments next
week about dropping the
charges and sentence,
Brown's lawyer said
Tuesday.
Brown, whose nationally
syndicated TV show was
canceled last year, is running in the Democratic primary for district attorney
general in Shelby County,
Tennessee's largest county.
Some have described
Brown's outburst as a way
to gain publicity for his
campaign, while others say
the magistrate should not
have locked up Brown, a
former criminal court judge
in Memphis.
In an interview aired
Wednesday on ABC's
"Good Morning America,"
Brown said his actions were
not out of line and he would
do the same thing again.
Brown said most lawyers
would say "that's what we
do every single day."
During Monday's
Juvenile Court session,
Brown said he was representing a woman who
appeared before Horne on a
paternity warrant, according
to Dan Michael, the juvenile
court's chief magistrate.
Horne had set a future
hearing for the woman, but
Brown was pushing for dismissal of the case.
In audio provided by the
Juvenile Court, Brown
repeatedly challenged the
magistrate's authority and
Horne threatened to find
Brown in contempt.
Magistrates are appointed
by the elected Juvenile
Court judge. Brown contin-
Wednesday.
Also, the agency could
not adequately document
that required background
checks had been performed
on all people living in foster
homes, the report from
Auditor Suzanne Bump
found. DCF additionally
could not adequately document that the personal information of children in its care
was being safeguarded,
opening the door to possible
identity theft.
"The importance of this
audit is not in its tally of
how many health checks or
background checks are performed, but in DCF's inability to account for them,"
Bump said in a statement.
"Without proper documenting, DCF's management
cannot effectively supervise
its staff and ensure the public that it is achieving its
mission," the auditor added.
The audit covers July
2010 to September 2012,
and is not related to the case
of Jeremiah Oliver, a 5-yearold Fitchburg boy who is
missing and feared dead.
The agency has been under
intense scrutiny after it was
revealed that social workers
lost track of the boy, whose
family was being monitored
by DCF.
The agency released a
statement Wednesday saying
it was taking steps to make
sure that all foster children
underwent medical checks
and improve documentation
of background checks.
"We are working day in
and day out to enhance our
ability to protect children
and strengthen families,"
said Olga Roche, the commissioner of the department,
in a statement.
Bump noted that some of
the recommendations in her
report were already being
implemented.
The auditor said a crosscheck of reported home
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phones,” Alberti said. While
not expecting to collect a lot
of phones given how many
people have smart phones
and hang on to them longer
these days, Alberti said he
also sees the collection as an
opportunity to get the word
out about Cell Phones for
Soldiers.
“Robbie said it will help
if they just friend the organization on Facebook,” Alberti
said. The Facebook page is
Facebook.com/joincellphonesforsoldiers, Alberti
said. The Fisher Student
Center is located on the
Bryant University Campus
at 1150 Douglas Turnpike,
Smithfield, Rhode Island,
02917.
ued questioning Horne's
authority with a raised
voice, and Horne made
good on his threat.
Brown then offered to
pay a fine by pulling out
cash.
"Now you want to get
into this, let's get into it.
This sorry operation needs
to stop," Brown told Horne.
Horne replied: "Twentyfour hours, Shelby County
jail for contempt."
Brown kept arguing, calling the court a "circus." By
the time the exchange was
over, Horne had slapped
Brown with five contempt
charges and ordered his
arrest.
His lawyers petitioned
for his release on his own
recognizance. Brown was
let out of jail around 7 p.m.
after spending about three
hours inside.
Brown's lawyer, Taylor
Eskridge, says the charges
and the sentence were not
lawful. She said the outburst
was not a planned publicity
stunt.
"I don't think he had any
way to know that somebody
would put him in jail,"
Eskridge said.
Audit finds problems in state foster care
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Driving and I decided to
help my friends’ organization, Cell Phones for
Soldiers, Alberti said.
Alberti, a resident of
Marshfield, Mass., had met
Robbie Bergquist while the
two were attending Boston
College High School in
South Boston, and helped
him do some of the shipping
work involved in recycling
old cell phones for calling
cards that could then be sent
to military service members.
“His entire living room
was filled with boxes used
for packing up the phones
and sending them to the
recycling company,” Alberti
said.
The organization created
Thursday, March 27, 2014
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Newsroom fax: (401) 765-2834
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e-mail: [email protected]
[email protected]
SUBSCRIBER SERVICES
addresses of the two more
serious levels of sex offenders and of DCF caregivers,
including foster homes,
turned up 25 matches during the audit. DCF said
none of the registered sex
offenders were living in the
same home as a child and
there were no reports of
children being abused.
Bump recommended that
the agency use information
held by the Sex Offender
Registry Board to ensure
that children are not placed
in any danger.
A preliminary report
issued this month by the
Child Welfare League of
America, which had been
asked by Gov. Deval
Patrick to conduct an independent review of DCF, recommended heightened monitoring of foster homes and
reduced caseload for social
workers.
Patrick has asked lawmakers for more funding for
the agency to help lower
caseload.
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LOCAL
Thursday, March 27, 2014
THE CALL A3
BMR hires Keough as new superintendent
who was appointed by the
committee last August when
former School Supt.
Kimberly Shaver-Hood
resigned to become the superintendent of schools in
Wareham, Mass.
Both Keough and Austein
spent the day
Tuesday
meeting with
school
administrators and
staff, before
being introduced to parents at an
Keough
hour-long
"community group" meeting
at the Middle School.
That session was followed
by a final round of public
interviews with the School
Committee.
During his interview,
Keough said budget constraints, teacher morale and
addressing costs associated
with out-of-district students
are major issues he wants to
tackle as superintendent.
The Blackstone-Millville
Regional School District
serves 1,882 students, has a
135-member teaching staff
and is overseen by an elected
eight-member School
Committee, with four members from each town.
Was once principal
at local high school
By JOSEPH FITZGERALD
[email protected]
BLACKSTONE – It’s a
sort of homecoming for
Andrew W. Keough.
A former assistant principal at Blackstone-Millville
Regional High School in the
1990s, Keough is returning to
the regional school district 12
years later as its new superintendent.
Keough, principal of
Wellesley High School for the
past six years, was offered the
superintendent’s job Tuesday
night by the BlackstoneMillville Regional School
District Committee following
final interviews with Keough
and finalist Margo S. Austein,
assistant superintendent of
schools in Sutton.
The eight-member committee voted unanimously to
appoint Keough effective July
1, subject to negotiating an
employment contract, which
school officials have said will
offer a regionally competitive
salary and benefits commensurate with Keough’s experience and qualifications.
Keough will replace interim School Supt. Perry Davis,
The district is comprised
of five schools: BlackstoneMillville Regional High
School, Frederick W. Hartnett
Middle School, Millville
Elementary School, John F.
Kennedy Elementary School
and Augustine F. Maloney
Elementary School.
The district’s fiscal 2014
budget is $20 million.
“From everything I’ve
heard, people are feeling that
it’s tough to move the district
forward if we’re constantly
fighting financial pressures
and trying to keep expenses
down,” Keough said. “As for
teacher morale, I’m not saying teachers are not happy,
but I think many teachers are
feeling discouraged by myriad issues, including mandates
and the expectations of
administrators to satisfy those
mandates.”
Keough, of Sherborn,
Mass., has been principal of
Wellesley High School since
2007. Before that he was
principal at Medfield High
School and assistant principal
at Hopkinton High School.
From 1995 to 1999, he
was assistant principal at
Blackstone-Millville Regional
High school.
Keough began his career
in education as a teacher at
Milford High School and
Douglas Memorial High
School.
He received his bachelor’s
degree in history from Roger
Williams University; master’s
degrees in moderate special
needs and public school
administration from
Framingham State College;
and a doctorate of education
in educational leadership
from Boston College.
Keough and his wife,
Christine, are the parents of
three daughters, Julia, Mary
and Sophie.
“Both finalists were strong
candidates that possessed the
qualities needed to lead the
Blackstone-Millville Regional
School District,” said
Blackstone-Millville Regional
School District Committee
Chairman William F. Chaplin.
“While not successful, we are
confident that Ms. Austein
has all the qualities needed to
lead a school district and wish
her the best in her endeavors.”
“The School Committee
looks forward to the leadership we are confident that Dr.
Keough can bring to the district, and we are very happy
with the selection,” he said.
“We know that the real benefactors of this decision are the
children of Blackstone and
Millville.”
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• Sea Broil • Baked Stuffed Shrimp
• Baked Scrod • Seafood Newburg
• Shrimp Scampi • Surf & Turf
SUNDAY SPECIAL
Family Style Chicken
2.00 OFF
$
Cannot be combined with any other offer.
SUNDAY BREAKFAST BUFFET 8-12 noon
Wedding •Funeral • Collations • Banquets • Special Appetizer Menu
476 Rathbun St., Woonsocket, RI
401-762-5114 • www.savinisrestaurant.com
74 So. Main Street, Woonsocket, RI
Steak •Seafood
f • Pasta
401-597-0885
www.yamafujiri.com
Sunday Special:
Hours:
Wed-Thurs 4pm-9pm
Fri & Sat 11am-10pm
Sun 8am-9pm
Sushi Bar • Full Bar Lounge
Gluten Free Menu Available
Mon. & Wed.
Kids Eat FREE Buy 1 Get 1 FREE
Up to 2 children w/an adult
purchase of $30.00 or more.
Not valid with any other offers.
Exp. 04/17/2014
HiBachi Grill Area Only. Of equal
or lesser value. Not valid with any
other offers. One coupon per party.
Exp. 04/17/2014
$
10.00 OFF
with purchase of $60.00 or
more with this coupon.
Not valid with any other offers.
One coupon per purchase.
Exp. 04/17/2014
Lunch: Mon-Fri 11:30am to 3pm • Dinner: Mon-Thurs 3 to 10pm, Fri 3 to 11pm, Sat 11:30am to 11pm, Sun 12:30 to 10pm
Thursday, March 13 at 11a.m.
Thu 11am-8pm; Fri & Sat 11am-9pm
Sun 11am-7pm;
Closed Mon-Wed until April
100 Broncos Highway, Mapleville, RI
401-567-4500 www.crystallakegolfclub.com
Now taking reservations for our
“Comedy Night” Easter
Brunch
Mark Your Calendar:
Friday,
Room
y, March 28th in our Waterfront
f
Show begins at 8:30pm
Tickets $15 advance - $16 at door (show only)
(401) 567-4500
ext. 10 for the office & ext. 18 for the Tavern
34 Years Later & Still
Going Strong!
SEAFOOD SPECIALS EVERY DAY
900 Victory Hwy. Suite 3, North Smithfield, RI
Best Ke
pt
Secret
In
Northern
R.I.
www.TAVERNONMAINRI.com
HAPPY EASTER
Japanese Hib
J
Hibachi
b hi
Steakhouse
Sunday, April 20
Reservations Required
(401) 567-4500 ext. 10
ALL YOU CAN EAT • 188 Items
Hibachi & Sushi Bar Included in Buffet - Full Liquor License
EVERY MONDAY AND WEDNESDAY
Limited Time Offer
LUNCH SPECIAL .............. $4.99
DINNER SPECIAL............. $7.99
10% OFF LUNCH & DINNER
EXCLUDING MONDAY & WEDNESDAY
2000 Diamond Hill Road, Woonsocket, RI 02895
Tel: 401-766-8300 Fax: 401-766-8303
401-235-9026
To have your ad in next week’s
www.RiverFallsComplex.com
Dining Guide
Call (401)767-8505
Today!
Tue. 4:00-9:00 p.m.; Wed. 3:00-9:00 p.m.
Thurs. 4:00-9:00 p.m; Fri. & Sat. 4:00-10:00 p.m.;
Sun. 12:00-8:00 p.m.
Spring Wine Dinner
5 Course Meal Paired with Select Wine
Chicken Saltimbocca Skewers • Warm Goat Cheese Salad
Seared Ahi Tuna • Braised Lamb Chops • Sweet Potato Clouds
Guest arrive and 1st course served 6:30-7pm
Dinner served promptly at 7pm
Saturday, April 5th • $50pp
tax & gratuity included
OPINION
Page A4
PUBLISHER: Mary Lynn Bosiak
Executive Editor: Bianca Pavoncello
Managing Editor: David Pepin
Sports Editor: Eric Benevides
Assistant Editor/News/The Call: Russ Olivo
Assistant Editor/News/The Times: Donna Kenny Kirwan
Controller: Kathleen Needham
Circulation Manager: Jorge Olarte
THE CALL — Thursday, March 27, 2014
Will you go gluten-free?
Woonsocket
Several years ago an interesting book
called Wheat Belly by cardiologist Dr.
William Davis cautioned his readers about
eating wheat products. He says the culprit
is today's genetically engineered wheat —
and the agribusiness that pushes it on us in
every aisle of the grocery
store. In fact, Davis
reached the disturbing
conclusion that wheat is
the single largest contributor to the nationwide
obesity epidemic.
Drawing on decades of
clinical studies and
extensive gluten-free diet
research, Dr. Davis
observed that wheat can Roger Bouchard
cause a broad spectrum
of health problems including cancer, diabetes, heart issues, dementia, digestive
complications, aging, acne, and even wrinkles. The anti-wheat crusade has both those
suffering from celiac disease and others
who just have suspicions that wheat is a
product to avoid.
Locally restaurants and retailers are
responding to customer demand to offer
gluten free (no wheat, rye, barley and oats)
products. Ronzio Pizza on Providence
Street has been baking gluten free pizza
and calzones for several years. Kitchen
staff has reserved a special gluten free
preparation area to gather ingredients to
make their pizza. Lil General Convenience
Stores is preparing to carry
Gluten free bread and rolls baked locally to serve customer demand. Dave Gouin
at Rivers Falls reports his chefs are working on a gluten free pasta recipe to accommodate customer demand. In the book
"Wheat Belly", Dr. Davis explains how
introducing themselves to a gluten-free diet
can provide benefits like weight loss, alleviation of metabolic syndrome and Type 2
diabetes, improvement in total cholesterol,
LDL cholesterol counts, improvement in
bone density, reversal of osteopenia, relief
of skin conditions from rashes, psoriasis to
oral ulcers, suspension of hair loss, reduction of inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis
pain and enhanced brain activity.
Woonsocket
Woonsocket Council President Albert
Brien is among the missing in city government. And for good reason: Brien was hospitalized with pancreatitus 10 days ago.
Add a case of pneumonia and Brien reports
he has a low energy level and he is slowly
recovering from the double dose of illness.
Now out of the hospital, Brien and his doctor are monitoring his progress and he is
anxious to get back to his duties.
Meanwhile, council vice president Robert
Moreau is covering for Brien.
Woonsocket
Covering the Woonsocket business
scene, Christopher's Restaurant closed its
doors last Thursday.
(See Russ Olivo’s story Page 1).
U-Haul trucks have been seen at the
North Main Street building being loaded
with fixtures from the restaurant. Opened
in 1983, the Restaurants has seen two owners within the last three years. Their web-
site describes the business as"temporarily
closed." If you have an unredeemed
Groupon voucher for this location, the
website asks to call (857) 210-9073 or call
Groupon at (888) 350-9061.
We stopped by the new Koto Japanese
Steak House under construction on Clinton
Street. It is being built out within the space
of the former Boston Buffet. Workers on
the site say the place is about a month
away from completion. The format follows
the popular Shogun Restaurant of Warwick
featuring hibachi cooking with patrons
seated around the grill watching the chef
slice, cut, dice,chop, mix and prepare the
food table-side. Sushi will also be prepared
for customers.
Another business on Main Street reports
business is booming. In a conversation
with owner Tammy Irwin, the new location
of Timeless Antiques & Collectibles at 91
Main Street is working out great. The husband and wife team of Frank and Tammy
Irwin moved into the former Cakery shop
at 91 Main St. and tripled the squarefootage they had at their past shop down
the street. She told me they may expand
their hours to serve additional customer
interest.
Cranston
Next month, Saturday April 26, the
Rhode Island Heritage Hall of Fame will
induct its roster of 2014 honorees. Locally
John Dionne, of Woonsocket will be
among the others chosen this year. Dionne
joins Warren Alpert, Artie Cabral,
Catherine Collette, General Morphis
Jamiel, Albert Klyberg, Ambassador J.
William Middendorf, Bernard Thomas Pina
and Thomas Verdi. Tickets are available
locally from Albert Beauparlant at 3560476.
The venue is Rhodes-on-the -Pawtuxet
at 6 p.m.
Woonsocket
For those of us receiving the trash bills
tomorrow, take consolation with these
hefty tax tabs.
A recent property tax analysis prepared
for the Budget Commission running
Woonsocket finances lists the city's top ten
taxpayers. Listed number one is CVS with
a tax bill of 2.9 million; Nation Grid 1.1
million; Walnut Hill Plaza $623,000;
Woonsocket Plaza $506,000; Plaza Village
apartments $407,000; Boucher Real Estate
holdings $376,000; Walnut Hill apartments
$341,000; Lowe's next to Woonsocket
Plaza $ 310,000; Wal-Mart, Diamond Hill
Road $ 261,000; Woonsocket Health
(Poplar Street) $221,000.
It is hoped that Landmark Medical
Center will find its way into the top ten
next year now that they are a for-profit
business.
The same reports says the average twofamily tax bill is $4600 while the average
single family property pays $3700 per year.
The report prepared by James Savage,
supervisor, of the Division of Municipal
Finance in the Department of Revenue
documents how Woonsocket taxpayers
carry the highest rates and assessments of
any city or town in Rhode Island. A
depressing document to say the least.
As others see it: Doctors
The following editorial appeared in
Wednesday's Washington Post:
Of all the manifestations of
Washington dysfunction, none is more
absurd than the annual "doc fix." The origins of the problem lie in a 1997 attempt
by Congress to rein in Medicare physician
reimbursements.
Lawmakers devised a "sustainable
growth rate" that was supposed to link
payments to statistical indicators of doctors' costs and workload. Alas, the growth
rate perversely encouraged excessive tests
and procedures; when it actually began to
reduce physicians' pay rates significantly
in 2003, medical lobbies got it temporarily repealed in what turned out to be the
first of 16 doc fixes.
The cumulative cost of these fixes
now exceeds $150 billion, and the most
recent one expires March 31.
The Medicare Payment Advisory
Commission has proposed any number of
ways to reform the payment system, but
Congress has balked at a permanent doc
fix because doing away with the current
rules, however discredited, would force
lawmakers to acknowledge a huge hole in
the federal budget.
Filling it would require either taxes or
spending cuts; most past short-term "doc
fixes" have been paid for with offsetting
health-care trims.
Last year, the Congressional Budget
Office ran the numbers again, factoring in
the recent slowing of growth in healthcare costs, and determined that the tab
might be about $140 billion over 10
years, not $300 billion, as previously
thought. That encouraged both the House
and Senate, Democrats and Republicans,
to seek a permanent solution while it was,
in effect, "on sale."
Each chamber is working on a bill that
would essentially keep the current reimbursement rate unchanged for the next
five years, after which a new system that
tilts physicians' incentives in favor of
quality of care, not quantity, would take
effect.
Alas, even when a permanent doc fix
could be had for cheap, it turns out that
Congress can't, or won't, agree on a plausible way to pay for it.
The Republican-controlled House
passed a bill that would come up with the
money by — you guessed it — delaying
Obamacare's individual mandate for five
years, which would be unwise policy even
if it weren't blatant political grandstanding
and, hence, a non-starter.
Over in the Senate, Finance Committee
Chairman Ron Wyden, D-Ore., is talking
about either not paying for the bill at all
or doing so by "cutting" the projected
costs of overseas military operations that
exist only on paper.
To be sure, it makes a kind of sense, in
Washington terms, to stop pretending that
you were ever going to cut doctors' fees
and pay for that by "saving" money that
you were never really going to spend.
Still, past doc-fix pay-fors were mostly
real — to the tune of $140 billion, according to the Committee for a Responsible
Federal Budget — and derived from
health-care programs.
Now is not the time to break that fiscally sound precedent, not even to get a
permanent doc fix. Better to pass another
short-term fix and keep working on a genuine way to pay for a permanent one.
Paul Ryan's conservative
agenda on poverty
Alas, poor Paul Ryan. I take the House
Budget Committee chairman at his word
that he did not intend to offend AfricanAmericans with his statements about how some
men "in our inner cities in
particular" do not value
hard work.
After all, as other fairminded folks have pointed
out, it is not as though
Rep. Ryan, R-Wis., said
something that was new,
untrue or — in today's
Clarence Page
world — distinctly right
wing.
We've heard similar statements, sometimes delivered even more bluntly, by Bill
Cosby, President Bill Clinton, President
Barack Obama, Harvard sociologist
Orlando Patterson and Philadelphia Mayor
Michael Nutter, among others.
But unlike those spokesmen, Ryan has
the handicap of being white and a conservative Republican. Perhaps his own culture failed to sufficiently value the double
meanings that some words take on when
they cross racial or partisan lines.
The 2012 GOP vice presidential candidate's linguistic miniscandal erupted on
Bill Bennett's "Morning in America" radio
show. It was there that Ryan previewed his
proposals for reforming America's poverty
programs.
"We have got this tailspin of culture, in
our inner cities in particular," he said, "of
men not working and just generations of
men not even thinking about working or
learning the value and the culture of work,
and so there is a real culture problem here
that has to be dealt with."
Was Ryan's use of the term "inner city"
a veiled racial reference, pandering to
white conservatives? The euphemistic
"inner city" has edged out the less elegant
"ghetto" to describe low-income urban
neighborhoods — although it sounds
increasingly obsolete in today's age of
gentrification.
Nevertheless, liberal critics in the media
and the Congressional Black Caucus
erupted with accusations.
Ryan later clarified that he had been
"inarticulate" in the heat of a live radio
interview. Please don't listen to what he
said, he asks, only to what he meant.
Fair enough. It is too bad, in my view,
that Ryan did not internalize more of the
formidable cross-cultural people skills
exhibited by his late political mentor, Rep.
Jack Kemp. The conservative Buffalo,
N.Y., Republican and 1996 GOP vice pres-
idential candidate won widespread support
in heavily Democratic black and Latino
communities by promoting market-driven
public-private partnerships for social
remedies.
Critics of Ryan's remarks also cited his
favorable reference to Charles Murray, coauthor of "The Bell Curve," a controversial 1994 book about, among other matters, racial differences in intelligence. Like
Ryan's remarks, Murray's book also says
things that sound more sinister about black
capabilities than what Murray claims he
meant.
Yet Murray has since redeemed himself
in my view with his more recent book,
"Coming Apart: The State of White
America, 1960–2010." By focusing only
on the socioeconomic changes that white
Americans have experienced since the
1950s, the book actually provides support
for a long-running liberal argument: The
"tailspin of culture" to which Ryan
referred — including out-of-wedlock
births and "generations of men not even
thinking about working" — is crippling
poor and blue-collar Americans of all
races.
As one who has known Murray for
years and who has debated him onstage, I
believe Ryan was referring to "Coming
Apart" as well as similar work by
Harvard's Robert Putnam on class divisions and social isolation, not "The Bell
Curve."
I also am relieved to hear that Ryan,
unlike the libertarian Murray and numerous other conservatives, appears to hold to
the old-fashioned belief that government,
properly utilized, can provide real remedies to social calamities.
I don't necessarily support all of Ryan's
ideas, but let's give this aspiring presidential hopeful his due. At least he has ideas.
He's been touring urban neighborhoods
in his attempt to formulate a new conservative agenda on poverty.
He has indicated that he wants to
reform welfare programs in ways that will
incentivize work. He also wants to enlist
community groups and other institutions
of civil society to fight social breakdown,
he said, and deal with the "real culture
problem" in those communities.
In short, Ryan appears genuinely interested in competing for us voters of color
with new ideas. Before we condemn what
he has to offer, let's hear what it is.
Clarence Page is a syndicated columnist for The Chicago Tribune.
Visit woonsocketcall.com and cast
your vote in today’s online poll
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OBITUARIES/LOCAL
Thursday, March 27, 2014
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Driver charged in
Glocester accident;
man still hospitalized
GLOCESTER — An 18year-old local man was
arraigned in Third District
Court Wednesday on one
count of driving to endanger
resulting in personal injury to
an elderly man who has been
in the hospital over two
weeks.
Erik Medeiros was
released on personal recognizance and is due for another
hearing on May 28.
Capt. Joseph Mattera said
the charge stems from a
motor vehicle accident that
Medeiros was involved in on
March 11 on Anan Wade
Road. At approximately 9:45
p.m., Medeiros was traveling
northbound when he came
upon another vehicle heading
in the same direction. Both
vehicles were leaving
Ponaganset High School at
the time, Mattera said.
When Medeiros reached
the second vehicle, he
crossed over the double yellow line into the southbound
lane to pass it.
As he did so, Medeiros
attempted to reenter the
northbound lane and lost
control, striking an oncoming
vehicle head-on.
The operator of the
oncoming vehicle, Ronald
Ellis, 64, was trapped in the
wreckage and had to be extricated by the Glocester Fire
Department.
ADVERTISING DEADLINES
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MEMORIAMS
BIRTHDAY REMEMBRANCES
AND HAPPY BIRTHDAYS
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3 Business Days Prior To Run Date
Any Questions or For More Information
Please Call: Karen at 767-8503
THE CALL A5
Pawtucket native taking on
Cicilline for House seat
By JIM BARON
[email protected]
PROVIDENCE – Saying
he wants to bring “a new
perspective” to Washington,
a Pawtucket man is challenging 1st District U.S.
Rep. David Cicilline in the
Democratic primary this
year.
“I am just concerned and
disappointed in Congress,”
Matt Fecteau, 31, told The
Times Wednesday.
“Congress has been in a
state of paralysis for years
now, and I am dissatisfied
with the incumbent.”
Fecteau said Cicilline
“promised a lot and he just
hasn’t delivered.”
He said he wants to enter
the political realm “because
I want to change the system, or attempt to change
the system and, unfortunately, I don’t think we can
get that done with the current incumbent.
An Iraq war veteran, he
was a platoon leader in the
U.S. Army.
Fecteau said he grew up
in Pawtucket and graduated
from St. Raphael Academy.
He said his mother had to
sell her stocks to pay his
tuition there.
Fecteau also attended
CCRI, High Point
University in North
Carolina, Texas A&M and
St. Mary’s University of
San Antonio, Texas. He
Matt Fecteau
holds an associate’s degree,
a bachelor’s degree, an
MBA and a master’s degree
in International
Relations/National Security
Policy.
He was an intern for
then-Rep. Patrick Kennedy
and served as a national
security intern in the
Obama administration.
Improving the nation’s
infrastructure is one of the
goals Fecteau has if he is
elected — not just roads
and bridges, but more
expansive projects like
high-speed rail. Not only
would such work create
jobs in the short-term, he
said, but it would also
increase the gross domestic
product (GDP).
Reining in the nation’s
debt is also important,
Fecteau said, but he
believes it can be done at
the same time we build up
our infrastructure.
He says he would like to
examine the idea of allowing people to vote online,
“securely and anonymously.” But he said he would
like to study the concept
more before making it a
policy.
He also wants Election
Day to be a federal holiday.
“The American people are
already overworked and, if
anything, it could be a day
to celebrate our democracy.”
In a written announcement of his candidacy,
Fecteau said, “I intend to
bring new ideas, a fresh
perspective, and years of
military leadership to
Washington DC. I am a not
political insider, definitely
not a millionaire, and certainly am not famous. I am
a regular American, just
like you, who is fed up with
the inertia in Washington.
This was not an easy decision for me, but I believe it
is the right one.”
It wasn’t an easy decision, he explained,
“because I don’t want to put
my family through hell just
so I can run for office.”
Follow Jim Baron on
Twitter @Jim_Baron
Lincoln budget hearing tonight
Administrator hopes to fund
capital items with no tax hike
By JOSEPH B. NADEAU
[email protected]
LINCOLN – The town is finishing up
another phase of its 2014-2015 budget
review this week with a public hearing on
Thursday for local residents to comment on
the proposals before the Budget Board.
Town Administrator T. Joseph Almond
was to attend Budget Board work sessions
Tuesday and Wednesday to answer any
questions the panel’s members might have
in advance of the public hearing.
The municipal budget Almond forwarded to the Budget Board has been fine-tuned
by an increase of $50,000 to a current total
for municipal spending of $19 million, an
increase of $118,000 over current spending.
The proposed school budget of $51 million under review by the Budget Board represents an increase of $1.4 million over current spending, a sum that includes an
$850,000 increase in state support to the
district under the state’s school aid formula.
Although the budget would add
$690,000 to the town’s tax levy, Almond
said it has not yet been determined whether
that sum would result in a small tax
increase or be covered by growth in the
town’s property valuation for no impact on
the tax rate. That projection likely won’t be
known for certain until after the budget is
considered by local residents attending the
Financial Town Meeting on May 12.
Almond said that even with the potential
for no impact on local taxes this year, he
could not speculate about the potential for
interest in the budget public hearing.
“There could be two local residents in
attendance or 100, there is just no way to
predict it,” he said.
What residents might review during the
session includes several town projects making use of the funding available in the
town’s capital reserve account, according to
Almond.
The School Department would receive
$1.5 million in new capital funding, which
Almond said would largely go to the project
to install artificial turf at the high’s school
football field.
A total of $3.5 million in town reserve
funding would be used for the proposed
improvements to the Police Station at the
Municipal Building at 100 Old River Road,
a project originally proposed as two phases
and now planned as a single improvement
project, as recommended by the town’s
architect.
The town would approve a $350,000
improvement project for Albion Park that
would be contingent on the town receiving
$175,000 in grant funding to cover that portion of the total cost.
The town would also fund $20,000 of a
$120,000 DEM project to install composting toilets at Chase Farm under another capital reserve fund proposal, according to
Almond.
The Farmhouse at the town’s Chase
Farm property would be improved under a
$13,500 award that would also allow for the
building to be used as a home for a park
curator.
And finally, the administrator said, the
capital items also include a $20,000 contribution from the town to be combined with
$22,000 from private donations to allow for
the Hot Potato one-room school house at
Angell Road to repaired and moved to
Chase Farm.
In addition to this week’s budget board
meetings, town officials are also scheduled
to tour town properties involved in the
budget changes on Saturday beginning at 8
a.m.
Visits by town, school and budget board
officials will be made to Albion Park, the
Public Library, the Police Department, the
town garage, Quinnville Park, Barney’s
Pond Dam Walkway, Chase Farmhouse, the
Hot Potato School and Lime Acres Park.
Almond said the Budget Board is
expected to wrap up its recommendation on
the budget by the end of April and in time
for the May 12 Town Meeting.
THANK YOU NOVENAS
For Favors Or Prayers Answered
10.00
$
15.00
$
20.00
$
A PRAYER TO THE
ST. JUDE NOVENA BLESSED VIRGIN
May the Sacred Heart of Jesus be
(never known to fail)
Thank You Sacred Heartadored, glorified, loved andOh most beautiful flower of Mt.
throughout the world,
Carmel, Fruitful Vine, Splendour of
& St. Jude For Favorspreserved
now and forever. Sacred HeartHeaven,
of
Blessed Mother of the Son of
Jesus, pray for us. St. Jude, worker
God, Immaculate Virgin, assist me in
Granted.
this, my necessity. Oh Star of the Sea,
C.G.of miracles, pray for us. St. Jude,
help me and show me here you are my
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helper of the hopeless, pray for us.
O Holy Mary, Mother of God,
Say this prayer 9 times a day, by mother.
the
Queen of Heaven and Earth, I humbly
9th day your prayer will beseech
be
you from the bottom of my
answered. It has never been known
heart to secure me in my necessity
to fail. Publication promised. (make
My request). There are none that
prayers have been answered. can withstand your power. O Mary
conceived without sin, pray for us who
C.D.
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To Place Your Ad
In This Publication
have recourse to thee (3 times). Holy
Mary, I place this cause in your hands
(3 times). Say this prayer for 3
consecutive days and then you must
publish it and it will be granted to you.
Thank you Holy Mother.
E.F.
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PRESENTS YOUR COMMUNITY CALENDAR
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
Pawtucket
Central Falls
Pawtucket
Blackstone
Woonsocket
Central Falls
Burrillville
The Major Walter Gatchell VFW
Post 306 and it Ladies Auxiliary
celebrate their 94th and 93rd
anniversaries at 1 p.m at the
post home, 171 Fountatin St.
Public is invited. Tickets are
$20 and can be purchased by
calling Nancy at 722-6596 by
March 18.
•Forand Manor holds Bingo every
Monday and Wednesday, starting
at 5:15 p.m.
• The Leon Mathieu Senior
Center and Shri Studio have partnered to offer a “Yoga for
Seniors” on Tuesday mornings
from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri
Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee
for Leon Mathieu Senior Center
members is $5 per person per
month. 728-7582.
• Ecumenical Lenten service, 7
p.m., St. James Baptist Church,
340 South Main St. The Rev.
Sammy Vaughn. Refreshments
to follow. 766-8633.
• Cribbage League meets at the
Senior Center, 84 Social St.,
every Thursday from 6 to 8 p.m.
For more information, call Helen
Nichols at 762-2739.
• Written Word Writing Group
Thursdays, 7:15 p.m. at Harris
Public Library. An outlet for adult
writers of all leanings: poetry,
journaling, prose, short story,
sermon, comedy, script writing,
puppets. No critiquing. All are
welcome and there is no
charge.
• Storage America presents the
6th annual carnival, March 28
through April 6, benefitting the
RISPCA. Location: Storage
America, 558 Roosevelt Ave.
• Fundraising dinner for the
Franklin Farm community garden, at the Madeira Club, 46
Madeira Ave. Cash bar at 6, dinner at 7 p.m. Specialty food stations featuring local chefs; drawings; and music. Tickets $35 in
advance from Pam Thurlow,
[email protected]
• Breakfast with the Easter
Bunny, sponsored by the
Burrillville Parks and Recreation
Department, 10 to 11 a.m. at
the Burrillville Middle School
cafeteria, Broncos Highway.
Rain/snow date April 5. Tickets
are $6 per person and can be
purchased by calling 568-9470
or emailing [email protected]
• Egg Hunt, 11 a.m. at Branch
River Park, next to the high
school. Children must bring a
bag or basket to collect eggs.
Rain/snow date April 5.
Woonsocket
Pawtucket
• Stations of the Cross at
Sacred Heart Church, 415 Olo
St., 6:30 p.m., each Friday during Lent (March 7-April 11).
•Pawtucket Family YMCA Parents
Night Out from 6 to 11 p.m.
Children between 6 and 12 can be
dropped off at the YMCA, 20
Summer St., where they can have
dinner and enjoy activities $5 per
child. Call (401) 727-7900.
• “The Rescue!” the
Providence Animal Rescue
League’s fundraiser at the
Pawtucket Armory, 7 to 10
p.m. Sample signature bites
from a variety of RI’s top restaurants and catering companies.
www.parl.org.
•An “Irish Bayerisch Fest,” a
celebration of Celtic and
German cultures, will be held at
the German-American Cultural
Society, 78 Carter Ave.
Woonsocket
• Ranger Day Lecture Series
continues at the Museum of
Work and Culture at 1:30 p.m.
Elyssa Tardif speaks on “Diaries
of New England: Women from
the 1700s.” Free program.
Public invited.
• St. Stanislaus Kostka
Church, 174 Woonsocket, flea
market, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
clothes, household items,
linens, Polish/American food.
Burrillville
• Special Lenten Mission with
guest presenter Fr. Michael
Najim at St. Joseph's Church,
183 Sayles Avenue, Pascoag, 7
p.m.
Burrillville
• Special Lenten Mission with
guest presenter Fr. Michael
Najim at St. Patrick's Church, 45
Harrisville Main Street, Harrisville,
7 p.m.
Woonsocket
• The monthly business meeting
of the Knights of Columbus
Woonsocket Council will be held
at 7 p.m. in the All Saints
Church hall on Rathbun Street.
If you have any questions please
401-356-1024
Lincoln
• Presentation by historian Jane
Lancaster on World War II
through the diary of a Rhode
Island woman, Helen Clarke
Grimes, at 6:30 p.m. at the
Lincoln Public Library. To register call 333-2422 ext. 17.
www.lincolnlibrary.com.
Cumberland
• TOPS Club (Take Off Pounds
Sensibly) meets every Tuesday at
6:30 p.m. at Filibuster Club, 25
High St. Visitors are always welcome (preteens, teens, adults,
male and female). First meeting is
free.
Burrillville
• Special Lenten Mission with
guest presenter Fr. Michael
Najim at St. Joseph's Church,
183 Sayles Ave., Pascoag, 7
pm.
30
31
1
Woonsocket
Central Falls
Pawtucket
Avon Walk for Breast Cancer
fundraiser, Club Lafayette, 289
Aylworth Ave., 1 to 6 p.m. Lots
of raffles, refreshments, DJ.
Tickets sold at the door or by
calling 775-9834. Donation:
$15.
•Forand Manor holds Bingo every
Monday and Wednesday, starting
at 5:15 p.m.
• The Leon Mathieu Senior
Center and Shri Studio have partnered to offer a “Yoga for
Seniors” on Tuesday mornings
from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri
Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee
for Leon Mathieu Senior Center
members is $5 per person per
month. 728-7582.
Cumberland
• Widow support group meets
every Sunday — the first two
Sundays of the month are at the
Community Chapel on Diamond
Hill Rd. The second two are at
Emerald Bay Manor, Diamond
Hill Road. All meetings 2 p.m.
Call 401-333-5815.
Pawtucket
•The Major Walter Gatchell
Ladies Auxiliary will hold bingo
at 171 Fountain St. Doors open
at 11 a.m., bingo starts at 1
p.m. There are prizes, raffles
and a pot o’ gold. Free coffee
and pastry are provided and
sandwiches and drinks are
available for purchase.
Pawtucket
•Kickoff of the cafe at the Leon
Mathieu Senior Center, 420
Main St., at 11 a.m. on the third
floor. If you are not currently a
participant of the Café please
contact Blackstone Health, Inc.
at 728-5480 to register for a
meal for March 31st as prior
reservations are required.
• Fogarty Manor Tenant
Association hosts Bingo, Mondays
and Wednesdays from 6:30 to 8
p.m., 214 Roosevelt Ave. Doors
open at 4.
April
Cumberland
• TOPS Club (Take Off Pounds
Sensibly) meets every Tuesday at
6:30 p.m. at Filibuster Club, 25
High St. Visitors are always welcome (preteens, teens, adults,
male and female). First meeting is
free.
•The newly formed BMR Alumni
and Friends Band meets at 6:30
at BMR High School every
Wednesday. All Blackstone Valley
residents of all ages and experience are welcome. For details call
508-883-1291.
Pawtucket
• Fogarty Manor Tenant
Association hosts Bingo, Mondays
and Wednesdays from 6:30 to 8
p.m., 214 Roosevelt Ave. Doors
open at 4.
Woonsocket
•GrowUp! Community Garden
Information Session to be held
at the Woonsocket Harris Public
Library from 5:30 -6:30pm.
Currently seeking plot renters
and volunteers to join us for the
2014 season. Come and learn
how you can get involved and
give back to your community.
RSVP to Wendy Pires at 401235-6096, walk-ins are welcome.
•The Blackstone Valley Amateur
Radio Club will meet Monday,
March 31, at 7:30 p.m. in the
McAvinn Auditorium of the
Rehabilitation Hospital of Rhode
Island, Route 146A. New members and guests are invited.
• The Major Walter G. Gatchell
VFW Post 306 will hold a
spaghetti and meatball dinner
fundraiser from 4 to 7 p.m. at
the post home, 171 Fountain
St.. The cost is $8 per person at
the door.
Pawtucket
2
3
4
5
Blackstone
Woonsocket
Burrillville
Woonsocket
• Ecumenical Lenten service, 7
p.m., Polish Natinoal Catholic
Church, 500 Smithfield Road.
Father Henryk Wos.
Refreshments to follow. 7623072.
• Cribbage League meets at the
Senior Center, 84 Social St.,
every Thursday from 6 to 8 p.m.
For more information, call Helen
Nichols at 762-2739.
• Written Word Writing Group
Thursdays, 7:15 p.m. at Harris
Public Library. An outlet for adult
writers of all leanings: poetry,
journaling, prose, short story,
sermon, comedy, script writing,
puppets.
• Pascoag Council, 383,
Knights of Columbus Friday
Night Bingo at the Columbus
Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games
begin at 6:20 p.m.; doors open
at 4:30 p.m.
• Quota International of
Woonsocket will hold its annual
Spring Flea Market from 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Elks Hall,
380 Social St.For more information, please call Lucille at
401-769-6434.
•Spring Fling Craft Fair
Market, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at
Calvary Worship Hall, 120
Prospect St.For information
call 241-1301 or email [email protected]
• Precious Blood spring yard
sale, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the
church hall, 94 Carrington Ave.
For information call Paulette at
(401) 766-4347.
•The newly formed BMR Alumni
and Friends Band meets at 6:30
at BMR High School every
Wednesday. All Blackstone Valley
residents of all ages and experience are welcome. For details call
508-883-1291.
Cumberland
• Cumberland Relay For Life
monthly meeting 6-7pm at the
Cumberland Public Library,1464
Diamond Hill Road. New members welcomed.
www.RelayForLife.org/Cumberl
andRI.
Burrillville
•Easter floral and craft workshop
at 1 p.m. at the Burrillville
Community Recreation Center, 50
Lodge Road, Pascoag, demonstrated by owner of Elaine’s
Flowers and Country Mouse. $10
materials fee. Pre-registration
required by calling Burrillville Park
and Rec at 568-9470 or [email protected]
North Smithfield
Pawtucket
Cumberland
Woonsocket
• Stations of the Cross at
Sacred Heart Church, 415 Olo
St., 6:30 p.m., each Friday during Lent (March 7-April 11).
Lincoln
Pawtucket
• Special Olympics Fashion
Show, Twin River Event Center,
5:45 p.m. reception, 6:30 dinner, 8:15 fashion show. The
largest Charity Fashion Show in
the state. Donation: $50 per
person, includes dinner, show
and more. For tickets call the
SORI Office at 349-4900 by
March 28. Tickets are not sold
at the door.
• Park Place Congregational
Church is sponsoring a Trivia
Night from 7-9:30pm to benefit
the Pawtucket Relay for
Life.The cost is $5 per person.
Play alone or in teams of up to
four persons. First prize is
$100. Kitchen will be open
from 6:30-8:30. For more
information call the church at
401-726-2800.
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
Pawtucket
Central Falls
Pawtucket
Blackstone
Burrillville
Bellingham
•Forand Manor holds Bingo every
Monday and Wednesday, starting
at 5:15 p.m.
• The Leon Mathieu Senior
Center and Shri Studio have partnered to offer a “Yoga for
Seniors” on Tuesday mornings
from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri
Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee
for Leon Mathieu Senior Center
members is $5 per person per
month. 728-7582.
•The newly formed BMR Alumni
and Friends Band meets at 6:30
at BMR High School every
Wednesday. All Blackstone Valley
residents of all ages and experience are welcome. For details call
508-883-1291.
Woonsocket
• The annual Chopstick
Auction of the Dusza-Almeida
VFW Auxiliary and Burns Manor
Association will be held on
Sunday, April 6 at the Burns
Manor Community Hall, 95
Park St. Doors open at noon
and the auction starts at 1:30
p.m. Everyone is welcome.
Free refreshments. Admission
is free. The prices are: $2 for a
chopstick and bid individually or
a flat fee of $20 and in for all
100 auction prizes. There will
also be special raffles.This
event is the main fundraiser of
the year and proceeds go to
help local veterans.
• Ecumenical Lenten service, 7
p.m., Holy Family Roman
Catholic Church, 414 South
Main St. Father Edward StGodard. Refreshments to follow.
762-0830.
• Cribbage League meets at the
Senior Center, 84 Social St.,
every Thursday from 6 to 8 p.m.
For more information, call Helen
Nichols at 762-2739.
• Written Word Writing Group
Thursdays, 7:15 p.m. at Harris
Public Library. An outlet for adult
writers of all leanings: poetry,
journaling, prose, short story,
sermon, comedy, script writing,
puppets.
• Pascoag Council, 383,
Knights of Columbus Friday
Night Bingo at the Columbus
Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games
begin at 6:20 p.m.; doors open
at 4:30 p.m.
•The First Baptist Church of
Bellingham will be having its
annual Easter Egg Hunt at
1p.m. on the Bellingham town
common, with a rain date of
Saturday, April 19. There will
also be a reading of the
Resurrection story. This is a
free event for kids ages 2 thru
12. .
Cumberland
• TOPS Club (Take Off Pounds
Sensibly) meets every Tuesday at
6:30 p.m. at Filibuster Club, 25
High St. Visitors are always welcome (preteens, teens, adults,
male and female). First meeting is
free.
Uxbridge
The Blackstone Valley Coin and
Collectables Club will host a coin
show at Brian’s Restaurant from
3 to 8 p.m.
Woonsocket
• Stations of the Cross at
Sacred Heart Church, 415 Olo
St., 6:30 p.m., each Friday during Lent (March 7-April 11).
• The GFWC Uxbridge
Woman's Club will be hosting its
3rd annual Craft & Vendor Fair
from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the
McCloskey Middle School
Gymnasium, 62 Capron St.
This year’s event including face
painting, sand art, and a visit
from the Uxbridge Police & Fire
departments! There will be food
& refreshments served.
The proceeds from this event
will aid the club to help provide
assistance in funding for community service projects and for
2 yearly scholarships given in
the community. Free admission.
Woonsocket
• Fun Family Activities at YWCA
Rhode Island. Registration is now
open for a free six-week Fun
Family Activities training for parents and guardians of infant, toddler and preschool-age children;
first session from 6 to 8:30 p.m.
The trainings will meet on
Tuesday from 6:00 to 8:30pm
starting April 8 thru May 15. To
register call 401-769-7450.
13
14
15
16
17
18
North Attleboro
Central Falls
Pawtucket
Blackstone
Woonsocket
Burrillville
•Forand Manor holds Bingo every
Monday and Wednesday, starting
at 5:15 p.m.
• The Leon Mathieu Senior
Center and Shri Studio have partnered to offer a “Yoga for
Seniors” on Tuesday mornings
from 9:30am-10:30am at Shri
Studio, 21 Broad Street. The fee
for Leon Mathieu Senior Center
members is $5 per person per
month. 728-7582.
•The newly formed BMR Alumni
and Friends Band meets at 6:30
at BMR High School every
Wednesday. All Blackstone Valley
residents of all ages and experience are welcome. For details call
508-883-1291.
• Cribbage League meets at the
Senior Center, 84 Social St.,
every Thursday from 6 to 8 p.m.
For more information, call Helen
Nichols at 762-2739.
• Written Word Writing Group
Thursdays, 7:15 p.m. at Harris
Public Library. An outlet for adult
writers of all leanings: poetry,
journaling, prose, short story,
sermon, comedy, script writing,
puppets.
• Pascoag Council, 383,
Knights of Columbus Friday
Night Bingo at the Columbus
Club, 98 Roosevelt Ave. Games
begin at 6:20 p.m.; doors open
at 4:30 p.m.
• Emerald Square Mall’s Caring
Bunny event will offer families
that have children with special
needs a subdued environment
to participate in the Bunny Photo
Experience. From 9 a.m. until
10:30 a.m., many steps will be
taken to reduce sensory triggers, creating a more comforting environment for children’s
cherished visit with the Bunny.
The subdued environment is
likely to include (specific elements or aesthetics may vary):
turning off in-mall music, stopping escalators located near the
photo set, dimming the lights
and shutting down fountains for
the duration of the event; eliminating queue lines through the
use of a numbering system; special activities geared toward the
needs of the child during the
‘wait’ period. For more information about the Simon Kidgits
Club and Emerald Square Mall’s
Easter events, visit
www.simon.com/kidgits
Cumberland
• TOPS Club (Take Off Pounds
Sensibly) meets every Tuesday at
6:30 p.m. at Filibuster Club, 25
High St. Visitors are always welcome (preteens, teens, adults,
male and female). First meeting is
free.
Uxbridge
Blackstone
•The Blackstone Valley coin and
Collectables Club will hold its
monthly meeting at 7 p.m. in
the lower level of the Blackstone
Town Hall. If you have any questions call Mike at 774 280
4333.
Send your community events to [email protected]
19
AMUSEMENTS
Thursday, March 27, 2014
THE CALL A7
Friends urge Grandma to let
younger grandson be adopted
DEAR ABBY: I’m 62
and own my own home. I
have legal guardianship of
my eldest grandson, who is
5. Another grandchild is 2
1/2 and in foster care. I
would like to keep both
children together because I
have been told that in the
long run it is better so they
won’t lose contact with
each other.
Some friends of mine
have been telling me I
should let the little one get
adopted through the state in
a closed adoption. This is
really traumatic for me and
I’m not sure what to do.
Please give me some
advice. I love both of my
grandchildren and want the
best for them, now and in
the long term.
— QUANDRIFIED
IN CALIFORNIA
DEAR QUANDRIFIED:
Many grandparents raise
their grandchildren successfully. If your health is
good, and you have a high
energy level and relatives
who can provide respite
when you need it, have
both of your grandchildren
live with you. If not, you
must consider what could
happen to them if something should happen to you.
AARP can be a helpful
resource. It offers information on a wide variety of
issues related to raising
grandchildren, financial
DEAR ABBY
Jeanne Phillips
***
DEAR ABBY: I take
pride in my looks, and
when I go to parties, the
dresses and accessories I
choose. I am often asked
where they came from, and
I feel the question is rude
and inappropriate. Am I
being rude to evade the
question, or is there a proper response when I’m
asked?
— TIME AND PLACE
DEAR TIME AND
PLACE: When someone
asks where you found an
item you’re wearing, it is
usually intended as a compliment because the person
would like to find something similar. If you prefer
not to share that information, smile and thank the
person for the compliment,
then change the subject.
assistance and advocacy. To
find out more, go to
www.aarp.org/grandparents.
***
DEAR ABBY: I have
been divorced for about 10
years and have dated far
more since my divorce than
I did before I married. The
marriage ended because my
wife was emotionally abusive.
What disturbs me is that
somehow I either attract, or
am attracted to, emotionally
abusive women. They are
usually successful, confident, good looking and controlling, and the results are
always the same. The relationships don’t last long.
How do I stop being
attracted to the same type
of partner?
Horoscope
A - Cox B - Uxbridge, Millville Comcast
C - Blackstone, Franklin Comcast D - Bellingham Comcast
By HOLIDAY MATHIS
ARIES (March 21-April 19).
Before you present your ideas,
either qualify them by confessing
their hypothetical nature, or do
the research and development
necessary to prove beyond a
doubt that they really work.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20).
It takes the same amount of time
to see the bright side of life as it
does to see the depressing side.
The difference is that when you
look for sunshine, you’ll be energized by your findings.
GEMINI (May 21-June 21).
Mischief making is a fun kind of
flirting, though it’s riskier than
the usual types of flirting because
it’s hard to predict how your
object of affection (and mischief!) is going to take the joke.
CANCER (June 22-July 22).
Handling problems with business
entities will be easy. The hardest
part is getting over the dread you
have of hold times, call menus,
talking to robots and the like. You
may actually get to talk with a
real person!
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). It’s a
kind of quest. Week after week
you tend to your duty with ambitious aims that go far beyond
what others in your position
expect of the work. If no one
acknowledges this, it still will be a
source of private pride.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22).
When you were little, it was fun
to hide under tables and anywhere the “seeker” wasn’t likely
to find you. Nowadays, you can
hide in plain view if you want to,
and today you’ll find it beneficial
to do so in a certain situation.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23).
Your refusal to automatically go
to the literal interpretation will
prove wise. You’ll notice the
humor level people are operating
on, and you’ll be careful to take
them as seriously as they intend
to be taken.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
You are fascinated by the intangible world and feel somehow in
touch with its vibration. Using
your physical senses to their
fullest will lead to the development of your sixth sense.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21). Your intention for this
day is strong, but that doesn’t
make it the best and highest one
you could possibly choose for all
involved. Be willing to give up on
your original plan when something more suitable is revealed.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19). Tasks that look Herculean
from your position outside the
window are in fact not so difficult
to the ones acting the scene
inside. You might enjoy getting
involved. Knock on the door and
see who needs help.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
18). You will hear words that are
defined one way in the dictionary
and mean something quite different as they are used in conversation and daily life. You will rely
heavily on context to inform you
about your surroundings.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20).
Cosmic question: Would you
rather be wise and have people
think you’re not, or be “not” and
have people believe you are? If
you chose the first category,
you’ll find yourself in it today.
— REPEATING PATTERNS
DEAR REPEATING: In
order to break any cycle, a
person needs to understand
how the pattern became
established in the first
place. People are usually
attracted to the familiar,
and it may have something
to do with the dynamics of
the family in which you
grew up. Ask your doctor
for a referral to a psychologist who can help you to
understand, so you won’t
make the same mistake
again. It’s the quickest fix
for what ails you.
A
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6:30
PBS NewsHour (N) Å
WBZ News
CBS Evening
(N) Å
News/Pelley
NewsCenter 5 ABC World
at 6:00 (N)
News
ABC6 News at 6 ABC World
(N) Å
News
7 News at 6PM NBC Nightly
(N)
News (N)
NBC 10 News at NBC Nightly
6pm (N)
News (N)
12 News at 6 CBS Evening
News/Pelley
Fox 25 News at Fox 25 News at
6 (N) Å
6:30 (N)
Modern Fam- Modern Family Å
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World News
Nightly BusiAmerica
ness Report
Two and a Half Two and a Half
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Men
Well Read Å Nightly Business Report
The Middle Å The Middle Å
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11
Tonight (N)
News
Law & Order: Criminal Intent
20 15 15 Self-help guru implicated.
Law & Order: Criminal Intent
7
Self-help guru implicated.
CABLE
6 PM
A&E
37 64 37 37
A-P
42 56 63 63
AMC
25 71 59 59
BET
79
BRAV
70 63 57 57
CNBC
48 44 46 46
CNN
49 41 42 42
COM
58 67 61 61
CSNE
55 36 52 52
67
DISC
24 59 39 39
DISN
34 53 24 24
E!
63 72 34 34
ESPN
30 34 49 49
ESPN2
29 35 50 50
ESPNC
132 309 258 258
EWTN
22 96 56 56
FAM
38 50 26 26
FOOD
28 62 53 53
FX
53 30 30 30
HGTV
44 61 32 32
HIST
41 69 58 58
LIFE
40 28 36 36
MTV
60 76 28 28
NESN
56 37 51 51
NICK
35 52 25 25
SYFY
69 73 62 62
SPIKE
26 74 55 55
TLC
39 55 38 38
TNT
27 32 33 33
TOON
36 51 60 60
TVL
43 48 64 64
USA
52 31 35 35
WTBS
45 33 31 31
PREMIUM
ENC
292 630 326 326
HBO
200 400 301 301
MAX
220 450 341 341
SHOW
240 500 361 361
STARZ
280 600 321 321
TMC
260 550 381 381
6:30
7 PM
***
Dear Abby is written by
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known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Write Dear Abby at
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Sudoku solution
THURSDAY EVENING MARCH 27, 2014
7:30
8 PM
8:30
9 PM
9:30
10 PM
10:30
11 PM
11:30
Greater BosRick Steves’
Extraordinary Women “Coco
ton Å
Europe Å
Chanel” Å
2014 NCAA Basketball Tournament (N) Å
Extraordinary Women Wallis
Extraordinary Women Writer
Simpson marries Edward VIII.
Agatha Christie’s career.
2014 NCAA Basketball Tournament (N) Å
Charlie Rose (N) Å
Inside Edition Chronicle Å
Once Upon a Time in Wonder(N) Å
land “To Catch a Thief”
The Insider
Inside Edition Once Upon a Time in Wonder(N) Å
(N) Å
land “To Catch a Thief”
Access HolHollywood Game Night Å
Extra (N) Å
lywood (N)
NBC 10 News at Extra (N) Å
Hollywood Game Night Å
7pm (N)
2014 NCAA Basketball Tournament (N) Å
Grey’s Anatomy Cristina thinks Scandal The Grant kids prepare
about her future. (N)
for an interview. (N)
Grey’s Anatomy Cristina thinks Scandal The Grant kids prepare
about her future. (N)
for an interview. (N)
Hollywood Game Night “How I Parenthood Adam takes Max on
Met Your Buzzer” Å
an adventure. (N) Å
Hollywood Game Night “How I Parenthood Adam takes Max on
Met Your Buzzer” Å
an adventure. (N) Å
2014 NCAA Basketball Tournament (N) Å
NewsCenter 5 (:35) Jimmy
at 11:00 (N)
Kimmel Live
ABC6 News at (:35) Jimmy
Eleven (N)
Kimmel Live
7 News at
Tonight Show
11PM (N)
NBC 10 News at Tonight Show
11pm (N)
TMZ (N) Å
Fox 25 News at TMZ (N) Å
11 (N)
Two and a Half Two and a Half The Office
The Office
Men
Men
“Money”
“Moving On”
Makers: Women Who Make
BBC World
(Off Air)
America Å (DVS)
News Å
WBZ News
Seinfeld “The Seinfeld “The The Office
(N) Å
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losis. (N) Å
(N)
Reign Francis helps Bash uncov- 7 News at 10PM on CW56 (N) Å The Arsenio Hall Show Å
er the threat. (N) Å
American Idol Surviving Jack Eyewitness
(:45) Sports
Seinfeld “The Family Guy
(N) Å
“Pilot”
News at 10
Wrap
Ex-Girlfriend” “Peterotica”
Law & Order: Criminal Intent
Criminal Minds Pursuing a killer Criminal Minds A recently
Detectives investigate doctor.
who targets women.
paroled man commits murder.
Law & Order: Criminal Intent
Criminal Minds Pursuing a killer Criminal Minds A recently
Detectives investigate doctor.
who targets women.
paroled man commits murder.
Dish Nation
(N) Å
The Big Bang The Big Bang
Theory Å
Theory Å
Cook’s Country Are You Being
Served?
The Big Bang The Big Bang
Theory Å
Theory Å
Sara’s Week- America’s Test
night Meals
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Modern Fam- Modern Family Å
ily Å
Access HolTMZ (N) Å
lywood (N)
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“Baggage” Å
Law & Order: Criminal Intent
“Baggage” Å
7 PM
7:30
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involves pigs and potatoes. (N)
The Vampire Diaries Bonnie has
an encounter with Luke.
Makers: Women Who Make
America Å (DVS)
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remember who she is.
The This Old House Hour Installing a front walk; chair rail.
The Vampire Diaries Bonnie has
an encounter with Luke.
Hell’s Kitchen A challenge
involves pigs and potatoes. (N)
Law & Order: Criminal Intent
“Suite Sorrow” Å
Law & Order: Criminal Intent
“Suite Sorrow” Å
8 PM
8:30
American Idol Surviving Jack
(N) Å
“Pilot”
Reign Francis helps Bash uncover the threat. (N) Å
Makers: Women Who Make
America Å (DVS)
House “Help Me” Helping at the
scene of an emergency.
NOVA “Cold Case JFK” Å
9 PM
9:30
2
10 PM
10:30
11 PM
11:30
The First 48 A young mother is After the First 48 A woman is
Beyond Scared Straight (N) Å (:01) Beyond Scared Straight Å
gunned down. Å
beaten and set on fire. (N)
Alaska: The Last Frontier “Leg- Ice Cold Gold: After the Thaw
Ice Cold Gold Team splits Red
Ice Cold Gold: After the Thaw
end of Terrible Island”
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Zone and river below. (N)
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(:31) } Invincible (2006)
and a criminal lead double lives. Å
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for gas and becomes a hostage. Å
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discusses the series. (N)
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Goes Bust”
turn a profit.
comes to town.
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(5:00) The Situ- Crossfire (N)
Erin Burnett OutFront (N)
Anderson Cooper 360 (N) Å
Chicagoland Mayor Emanuel
Chicagoland Chance the Rapper Anderson Cooper 360 Å
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reflects on 4th of July.
performs Lolapalooza. (N)
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Naked and Afraid Jeff and Eva Lords of the Car Hoards A hoard Lords of the Car Hoards Custom- Fast N’ Loud Aaron buys a ’63 Fast N’ Loud Aaron overrides
Rods N’ Wheels The Billys chaljourney to Madagascar.
of Corvettes. Å
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Ford Falcon. Å
Richard’s instructions. Å
lenge Steve and Shane.
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Jessie Å
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Liv & MadGood Luck
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Jessie Å
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(N) Å
die Å
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(4:30) } Whip It (2009, E! News (N)
Chrisley Knows Chrisley Knows Sex and the
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Sex and the City Samantha’s
Chelsea Lately E! News
Comedy-Drama) Ellen Page.
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City “Splat!”
City Å
chemotherapy. Å
(N)
SportsCenter (N) Å
SportsCenter Special (N)
E:60 (N)
2013 World Series Film (N)
Baseball Tonight (N) Å
SportsCenter (N) Å
Around the
Pardon the
ATP Tennis Sony Open, Men’s Quarterfinals and Women’s Semifinal. From Miami. (N) Å
Olbermann (N) Å
Horn (N)
Interruption (N)
MLB Baseball From Oct. 9, 1988. Å
Global Supercard Wrestling Å Friday Night Lights Jason goes Friday Night Lights Cash’s dark Global Supercard Wrestling Å
to New York. Å
side comes to light.
Lenten Reflec- Let Me Walk
Daily Mass Å
World Over Live (N)
Crossing the
Rosary
Sudan: And You Do Not Cry With Defending
Women of
tions
This Path
Goal Å
Us Sudanese Muslims.
Life Å
Grace
} Twister (1996, Action) Helen Hunt, Bill Paxton, Cary Elwes. Storm chasers } Twister (1996, Action) Helen Hunt, Bill Paxton, Cary Elwes. Storm chasers The 700 Club Å
race to test a new tornado-monitoring device.
race to test a new tornado-monitoring device.
Chopped Seafood sausage appe- Chopped “Charge!” Spaghetti in Chopped Rounds of breakfast,
Chopped Canada Chefs work
Beat Bobby
Beat Bobby
Diners, Drive- Diners, Drivetizers; tiny pasta.
a can; tile fish.
lunch and dinner.
with smelts and smoky eel.
Flay (N)
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Ins and Dives Ins and Dives
Two and a Half } Friends With Benefits (2011) Justin Timberlake, Mila Kunis. ComplicaSaint George Anger Manage- } Friends With Benefits (2011, Romance-Comedy) Justin
Men
tions unfold when two friends add sex to their relationship.
(N)
ment (N)
Timberlake, Mila Kunis, Patricia Clarkson.
Hunters Int’l
Hunters Int’l
Hunters Int’l
House HuntRenovation Raiders (N) Å
Rev. Run’s
Rev. Run’s
House Hunters Hunters Int’l
New House
New House
ers Å
Renovation
Renovation
(N) Å
New Life (N)
New Life (N)
Pawn Stars Å Pawn Stars
Pawn Stars Å Pawn Stars Å Pawn Stars Å Pawn Stars Å Pawn Stars
Pawn Stars
Vikings Lagertha and Ragnar
(:02) Vikings Lagertha and Rag“Zoodoo”
(N) Å
(N) Å
unite again. (N) Å
nar unite again. Å
Wife Swap “Lassell/Nazario”
Project Runway: Under the
Project Runway: Under the Gunn Project Runway: Under the Gunn (:01) Celebrity (:31) Celebrity (:02) Bring It! Å
Free-spirited; authoritarian.
Gunn Å
“Crossing Teams”
(N) Å
Home Raiders Home Raiders
Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness Ridiculousness
“Tyga”
(N)
“Tyga”
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The Instigators Sports Today
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time Live (N) LIVE (N)
(N)
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iCarly “iPsycho” Carly, Sam and iCarly “iStill Psycho” Nora cap- Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Full House Å Friends “The Last One” The six
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friends say goodbye.
}
} Alien vs. Predator (2004) Sanaa Lathan, Raoul Bova. Ant- Jim Henson’s Creature Shop
} Skyline (2010) Eric Bal(4:30)
Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End (2007)
Johnny Depp. Jack Sparrow’s friends join forces to save him.
arctic explorers encounter deadly extraterrestrials. Å
Challenge Å
four, Scottie Thompson. Å
(4:30) } } The Expendables (2010, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Jason Statham, Jet Li. iMPACT Wrestling (N) Å
Ink Master Tattooing “X-Men”
Rambo (2008) Mercenaries embark on a mission to overthrow a dictator.
characters. Å
Here Comes
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Here Comes Honey Boo Boo “New Years Revolu- America’s
Here Comes Honey Boo Boo
Honey
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Honey
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tions” (N) Å
Worst Tattoos “New Years Revolutions”
Castle A family finds a dead man Castle “Suicide Squeeze” A for- Castle A half-naked body is
(:01) Castle Castle and Beckett (:02) Castle “Boom!” The serial (:03) Hawaii Five-0 “Hoa Pili” Å
in the house.
mer ballplayer is murdered.
found in a park.
hunt a serial killer. Å
killer remains at large.
Uncle Grandpa Regular Show World of Gum- Uncle Grandpa Teen Titans Go! Johnny Test Å King of the
The Cleveland American
American
Family Guy Å Family Guy Å
ball
Hill Å
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Dad Å
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Island Å
mond
mond
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mond
of Queens
Law & Order: Special Victims
Law & Order: Special Victims
Law & Order: Special Victims
Suits “Heartburn” (N) Å (DVS) (:01) Sirens (N) (:31) Modern (:01) Psych “The Break-Up” Å
(DVS)
Unit “Undercover Blue”
Unit “Born Psychopath”
Unit “Girl Dishonored”
Family
NCAA Tip-Off (N)
(:15) 2014 NCAA Basketball Tournament (N)
(9:55) 2014 NCAA Basketball Tournament (N)
6:30
7 PM
7:30
8 PM
8:30
9 PM
9:30
6
6
6
2
2
4
4
5
5
6
7
10 PM
10:30
11 PM
11:30
} Platoon (1986, War) Tom Berenger. A soldier embarks } Unforgiven (1992) Clint Eastwood. Clint Eastwood’s
(:15) } L.A. Confidential (1997) Kevin Spacey. A young
on a yearlong tour of duty in Vietnam. ‘R’ Å
Oscar-winning portrait of an aged gunman. ‘R’ Å
police officer searches for justice in 1950s L.A. ‘R’
} Snitch (2013) Dwayne Johnson. A man infiltrates a drug
Girls “Two
Game of
John Leguizamo’s Ghetto Klown The comic dis- (:45) Girls Å (:15) Real Sex Partying ladies;
cartel to save his son from prison. ‘PG-13’ Å
Plane Rides”
Thrones
cusses his acting career. Å
Los Angeles speak-easy.
}
}
} Mission: Impossible (1996, Action) Tom Cruise. Treachery
(:15)
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The Purge (2013, Suspense) Ethan
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Hawke, Lena Headey, Adelaide Kane. ‘R’ Å
in Prague puts an agent on the run. ‘PG-13’ Å
} People Like Us (2012, Drama) Chris Pine. A young man
} Lawless (2012) Shia LaBeouf. The Bondurant brothers
(5:00) } Byzantium
Gigolos (Sea- } On the
(2012) Gemma Arterton. ‘R’
suddenly discovers the existence of a sister. ‘PG-13’ Å
become bootleggers in Depression-era Virginia. ‘R’ Å
son Finale) (N) Road (2012)
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fect Stranger ‘R’ military soldiers take over the White House. ‘PG-13’ Å
ist and his gang hijack the U.S. president’s plane. ‘R’ Å
Adam Sandler. ‘PG-13’ Å
} The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 1 (2011) Kristen } The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn Part 2 (2012,
} Passion Play (2010, Drama) Mickey
(:35) } Gone (2012)
Stewart. Bella and Edward marry. ‘PG-13’ Å
Romance) Kristen Stewart, Robert Pattinson. ‘PG-13’ Å
Rourke, Megan Fox, Bill Murray. ‘R’ Å
7
10
10
10
10
12
12
12
12
28
28
9
9
36
36
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8
18
3
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Fox 25 News at 10 (N) Å
The First 48 A love triangle that The First 48 Killing of a Dallas
turned deadly. Å
couple. Å
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dence “Frozen Bigfoot” Å
Resources sets out. Å
}
(5:30)
Jaws 2 (1978) Roy Scheider, Lorraine Gary. Tourist
town and police chief dread huge white shark at beach.
106 & Park: BET’s Top 10 Live Movie
“Top 10 Countdown” (N)
The Millionaire Matchmaker
The Millionaire Matchmaker
“The Fixer and the Dick”
Mad Money (N)
The Kudlow Report (N)
6 PM
DISH DTV P-VF BrVF BuVF
8
44
26
64
64
11
12
11
15
15
15
CABLE
265 118 181 181 181
282 184 130 130 130
254 130 231 231 231
329 124 270 270 270
273 129 185 185 185
355 208 102 102 102
202 200 100 100 100
249 107 190 190 190
77
77
77
278 182 120 120 120
290 172 250 250 250
236 114 196 196 196
206 140
70
70
70
209 144
74
74
74
208 143
71
71
71
422 261 285 285 285
311 180 199 199 199
231 110 164 164 164
248 137
53
53
53
229 112 165 165 165
269 120 128 128 128
252 108 140 140 140
331 160 210 210 210
623 434
76
76
76
299 170 252 252 252
244 122 180 180 180
262 168
54
54
54
280 183 139 139 139
245 138
51
51
51
296 176 257 257 257
301 106 244 244 244
242 105
50
50
50
247 139
52
52
52
PREMIUM
526 340 350 350 350
501 300 400 400 400
512 310 420 420 420
537 318 365 365 365
520 350 340 340 340
544 327 385 385 385
WEATHER/ENTERTAINMENT
A8 THE CALL
Thursday, March 27, 2014
Today’s Forecast
Narragansett
Buzzards
Merrimack to
Chatham to
Bay
Bay
Chatham
Watch Hill
Weather
Wind (knots)
..............Mostly sunny........
NW-SW 10-20
Seas (feet)
Visibility (miles)
THU
FRI
SAT
SUN
2-3
NW-SW 10-20
NW-SW 10-20
NW-W 10-20
2-3
4-8
4-6
5+
5+
5+
5+
MON
Mark Searles’s Southern New England Area Forecast
38-43 50-55
12-17 30-35
Incr. Sun
Ch PM Shwr
48-52
37-40
40-44
38-42
Aftn Shwrs
Cool Rain
48-53
28-34
Sunny
Much less wind today but still breezy at times with a northwest wind shifting into
the southwest around 10-20mph. Highs today will reach into the lower 40s with
coastal areas staying in the upper 30s due to the onshore wind in the afternoon.
Milder air arrives tomorrow with mid 50s on tap...just a scattered shower possible
in the late afternoon. Afternoon showers are likely Saturday into Saturday night
with the potential for a chilly northeast wind and some rain on Sunday.
S
Five Day Forecast data supplied by Storm Team 10
S
O
Despite its flaws, ‘Flashdance — The Musical’ dazzles at PPAC
By KATHIE RALEIGH
Special to the Times
PROVIDENCE –
“Flashdance – The
Musical,” the nationally
touring production now at
the Providence Performing
Arts Center, has a lot of
things going for it, but a few
Elton John Experience “Almost Elton John”
Go back to the days of big hair,
outrageous clothes and cheap gasoline!
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Rockapella A Capella that ROCKS!
Rockapella is one of the world’s most
sophisticated and lasting pop vocal groups!
The astonishing full-band sound seems to be
impossible coming from just five guys !
"13*- at 1.t5JDLFUT
Queen Experience - One Night of Queen
A show that brings Freddie Mercury back to
life! At this rock concert, you’ll pay for the
whole seat, but you’ll only use the edge!
"13*-BU1.t5JDLFUT
4QPOTPSFECZ$JSPT5BWFSOPO$IFSSZ4BWJOJT3FTUBVSBOU
Annie Jr.
Leapin’ Lizards! The popular comic
strip heroine takes the Stadium’s stage
in one of the world’s best-loved musicals.
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4QPOTPSFECZ"NJDB.VUVBM*OTVSBODF
401-762-4545 stadiumtheatre.com
28 Monument Square, Woonsocket, RI
… not so much. None of the
latter, however, is enough to
mean fans won’t enjoy the
show.
The story first was told
31 years ago in a hit film
that has endured as a pop
culture phenomenon. The
stage adaptation launched in
2013 from Pittsburgh, which
is the setting for the story of
Alex Owens, a steel mill
welder and bar “flashdancer,” who dreams of a
professional dance career.
Complications, like her own
fears and a from-differentworlds romance with her
steel mill boss, have to be
overcome before she gets
her chance to audition for a
prestigious dance school.
Around the main story
are several subplots, including one about the bar owner
struggling to keep his business alive, and an on-andoff love story between
dancer Gloria and would-be
comedian Jimmy.
Whether you regard these
stories as inspiring or hackneyed is personal, and for
the sake of full disclosure, I
was in the latter camp.
That’s why I was surprised
that how much of this live
production I enjoyed.
My reservations about a
familiar story have been
overcome in the past by
actors and vocalists who
blew me away, and while
the “Flashdance” group was
good, it was uneven.
Because of illness, understudies had the lead roles on
opening night, and Haley
Hannah, who played Alex,
and Derek Carley, as her
love interest Nick Hurley,
sounded great in duets but
didn’t always hit it alone.
Both handled the acting
requirements better; Hannah
had a good grasp on the
blue-collar, chip-on-hershoulder demeanor, and
Carley was convincingly
sincere.
The major drawback is
that Hannah didn’t dance as
well as the supporting cast,
notably Alison Ewing as
Tess and DeQuina Moore as
Kiki, Alex’s fellow bar
dancers. Both were good
with their comic lines, as
well.
The ensemble dancing is
what dominates, however,
and unlike some shows
where the production numbers go on too long, the big
“Flashdance” performances,
with direction and choreography by Sergio Trujillo, are
exciting. Performances of
“Flashdance – The Musical”
continue through Sunday at
the Providence Performing
Arts Center, 220 Weybosset
St. Tickets are $77 to $40
and are available at the
PPAC box office in the theater, online at ppacri.org, or
by calling (401) 421-ARTS
(2787).
2nd Story delivers a timeless bedroom farce
By KATHIE RALEIGH
Special to The Times
WARREN – French playwright Georges Feydeau once
had people flocking to theaters to see his comedies. He
was the master of the bedroom farce, and among his
more than 60 works was “Le
Dindon” (“The Dupe”).
No problem for 2nd Story
Theatre that Feydeau hit his
stride nearly a century and a
quarter ago. Director Ed Shea
has written his own translation of that 1892 play, and
now is directing a fabulous
cast in a production that
makes Feydeau a hit all over
again.
While Shea maintains a
sense of the play’s origins, he
has knack for making 19thcentury foibles look hilarious
in the 21st century. Actually,
hilarious isn’t a good enough
word to describe this 90minute tsunami of gags,
groans and boisterous belly
laughs.
Typical of the genre, the
play is all about sexual dalliances, angling for such dalliances or trying to get
revenge for someone else’s
dalliance. Mix in improbable
coincidences and well-timed
exits and entrances – so characters just miss encountering
one another – and you’ve got
the idea of what stands for a
plot.
Feydeau’s characters are
hysterical, but Shea ramps up
the comedy with meticulous
timing and rapid-fire dialogue. Sometimes the joke is
set up, so you see it coming;
other times, it just happens.
Either way, it’s going to make
you laugh.
Everyone in the cast has a
moment in the spotlight, but
the major roles are played by
the unflaggingly funny
Ashley Hunter Kenner as
Lucienne, the smooth Ara
Boghigian as the rakish
Pontagnac, and quirky Jeff
Church as Redillon.
A host of well-played supporting characters adds to the
manic mix, including an officious hotel clerk, a clueless
maid, a protective butler, and
an older couple who inadvertently get entangled in a
mixup of hotel rooms; you
won’t forget Jim Sullivan’s
bewildered Pinchard, the husband.
Performances continue
through April 13 at 2nd Story
Theatre, 28 Market St.
Curtain is Thursdays, Fridays
and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m.,
Sundays at 2:30 p.m. Tickets
are $25 in general, $20 for
persons 21 and younger; visit
the box office in the theater,
call (401) 247-4200 or log on
to
www.2ndStoryTheatre.com.
SPORTS
Blackstone Valley
THE CALL, Thursday, March 27, 2014 — B1
The Central
Falls High unified basketball
team was all
smiles and all
business when
it posed for this
team picture
before the
Warriors’ game
against Mount
Pleasant on
Thursday afternoon. The host
Warriors posted
a thrilling 57-51
win before a
packed gymnasium that featured most of
the school’s student body.
Blackstone
Valley Sports
photo by ERIC
BENEVIDES
High school sports
At Central Falls, there’s joy playing unified basketball
DID YOU KNOW?
Thirty-two schools in Rhode Island have
unified basketball teams, including Tolman,
Woonsocket, and the Warriors in the Central
Division, and Burrillville, North Smithfield, Lincoln and Cumberland in the North Division.
Central Falls seized the Division II state
championship in 2012, and Woonsocket (Div.
II) and Cumberland (Div. V) captured titles last
spring.
Central Falls owns the most regular-season victories (20) in the four-year history of
R.I. unified basketball.
There are 18 high schools that also take
part in the unified volleyball league that takes
place each fall, including C.F., Woonsocket,
North Smithfield, Cumberland, and Lincoln.
This league has also been in existence for
four years. The Villa Novans claimed the Div.
I title in 2011, while the Northmen took the
Div. III crown ithe following year.
Warriors’ coach: ‘At the end of the day, everyone’s a winner’
By JON BAKER
[email protected]
CENTRAL FALLS — Up until the final
four-plus minutes, it had been a tight contest
between two fierce combatants, each hustling
up and down the court to muster a victory.
No one wanted that “W” more than Central
Falls High senior Yeire Cepeda. Honestly, it
couldn't have been more obvious.
During the course of this hoop contest
against Mount Pleasant inside the Warriors'
jam-packed gym on Wednesday afternoon,
Cepeda looked disgruntled at times with several turnovers, failures to snatch a critical
rebound or inability to drop a necessary basket.
He made it known on a couple of occasions, one in particular midway through the
second half. After head coach Manny Silva
had replaced him with a teammate, he walked
angrily to a water fountain, took a few sips and
returned to the bench determined to make
Baseball
Webster struggles; Orioles
grab 5-4 win over Red Sox
Bogaerts, Middlebrooks belt homers for Boston
FORT MYERS, Fla. (AP) — Miguel
Gonzalez got through five innings in his final
spring start, giving up four runs as the split-squad
Baltimore Orioles posted a 5-4 victory overs the
Boston Red Sox on Wednesday afternoon.
Gonzalez allowed seven hits, including backto-back home runs by Xander Bogaerts and Will
Middlebrooks leading off the fourth.
Middlebrooks hit his fourth homer and singled,
raising his average to .341.
Baltimore's Nick Markakis also is hitting .341.
He doubled, scored a run and drove in one.
Steve Clevenger hit his second homer for the
Orioles and Ryan Flaherty had two hits.
Dustin Pedroia also had two hits for Boston,
and Mike Carp drove in a run in the third.
Starting in place of Jon Lester, righthander
Allen Webster went 5 2-3 innings, giving up five
runs on 11 hits. He struck out three and walked
two.
"I thought he made some big pitches with men
on base," manager John Farrell said. "There were
a number of sinkers he left on the plate that, with
their aggressive approach, particularly to fastballs,
he gave up obviously a high number of hits.
"But I thought, more than anything, he maintained mound presence and composure out there
and did make some pitches, particularly with
men in scoring position," he said.
To avoid facing the team he will see on opening Day, Lester pitched in a minor league game.
Throwing for high Class A Salem against a
Twins squad, he went six innings, giving up one
run on three hits with three walks and seven
strikeouts.
"It was good. Got my work in," Lester said.
"Better after probably the first two. It's hard to
duplicate anything when you get into a stadium
and you get crowd noise and all that stuff.
Biggest thing is healthy, and made it through."
Notes: Red Sox lefthander Craig Breslow is
scheduled to pitch in a minor league game on
Thursday. He has been delayed this spring after a
heavy workload last season. This will be his second appearance in a game, both in minor league
contests. ... Center fielder Grady Sizemore
played in the second of what is expected to be
three straight games for him. It will be the first
time he has played on three consecutive days
since July 2011. ... Lefthander Chris Capuano
also pitched in a minor league game. For SingleA Greenville, he went five hitless innings, striking out 10. ... The crowd of 10,147 was the
largest in the three-year history of JetBlue Park.
PawSox ride homers to 10-1 win over Rochester
LEE COUNTY, Fla. — The Pawtucket Red
Sox belted five home runs and got a big game
from Boston Red Sox outfielder Daniel Nava to
cruise past the Rochester Red Wings, 10-1 on
Wednesday afternoon in Lee County, Fla.
Nava led the PawSox’s offese by going 3-for6 with a two-run homer and an RBI single, and
right fielder Bryce Brentz also blasted a two-run
homer and added an RBI double.
Alex Hassan, Brandon Snyder, and Mike
Brenly all smacked solo home runs, and Heiker
Meneses chipped in with a pair of hits, including
a run-scoring double to round out the PawSox’s
15-hit attack.
Mike McCarthy, who most likely will begin
the season with Double-A Portland, turned in a
strong start for the PawSox by pitching four
shutout innings. The win went to reliever Alex
Wilson, who worked two scoreless innings with
three strikeouts.
The PawSox evened their spring training
record at 5-5-2 with just two Grapefruit League
games remaining on Thursday and Saturday,
both at home against the Red Wings.
amends on his next call.
When Cepeda re-entered, his demeanor
changed. Undaunted, and with the Warriors
nursing a one-point lead, he turned a steal into
a layup with 4:11 left, then took a pass from
junior Jason Almeida 19 seconds later and
canned a short jumper.
That had given his C.F. bunch a 48-43
cushion.
Down the stretch, he canned a trey, then
dropped a running one-hander before draining
a putback with 16.3 seconds left to pace his
Warrior teammates to a thrilling 57-51 triumph
over the Kilties.
“The last time we played them, we lost,
and here, we wanted to prove we could beat
them,” stated Cepeda, who had notched a
game-high 25 points to lead his squad, which
pushed its regular-season mark to 2-1. “I kept
thinking, 'We've got to win this! We've got to
win this!'”
See WARRIORS, page B2
SPORTS
B2 THE CALL
Thursday, March 27, 2014
Warriors strike gold with unified basketball program
Continued from page B1
When asked if he felt like a hero,
he simply said, “No, because I'm a
basketball player. I watch the NBA
on TV all the time; that's how I
learned how to play. I'm proud to be
a unified basketball player. This had
a lot to do with my teammates.”
This wasn't the usual varsity hoop
game, but it had the look and feel to
it. Yes, several of his teammates and
foes have intellectual disabilities, but
players on both sides took it so seriously that they would sulk after a
chance gone awry or revel in a stellar
three-point bomb.
Disability? What disability?
Excepting officials not calling an
occasional travel or double-dribble
infraction, it still produced the fervor
of a a typical varsity tilt, and that's
just what Silva, assistant Katie
Gomes, numerous “able-minded”
teammates (called partners) and volunteers strive for within this unified
competitive league.
“That was a close one; the game
kept going back and forth, but we
found a way to pull it out in the end,”
offered Silva after the triumph.
“Coaching unified, I try to get across
to the athletes that one team has to
win and the other has to lose, but – at
the end of the day – everyone's a
winner.
“I talk to the kids all the time
about just going out there and having
fun; they need to play defense first,
and then let the offense come to
you,” he continued. “I really enjoy
doing this, and it's because I enjoy
coaching. Any sport, any game,
whatever it is, I love giving back, and
they all know I'm there for them.”
***
Unified hoop at CFHS began five
years ago on the whim of former
special education teacher Bobby
Marchand and Gomes, the latter
claimed.
“Bob and I started this, and it
wasn't much back then, but it's grown
a lot,” explained Gomes, a
Woonsocket High graduate now
working as a special educator at
Central Falls. “There were special
needs kids begging to play, and we
wanted to give them something to
look forward to. Their skills weren't
fantastic then, but they've improved
10-fold.
“More importantly, these young
people have developed very strong
friendships and relationships, and I'm
excited about that,” she added. “It
gives me a sense of pride. They all
want to compete, just like the varsity
“I don’t want anything out of this; it just
makes me feel good to see other people
happy, doing great things.”
— Junior guard/partner Jason Almeida-Araujo
athletes. They want to score, they
want to pull down the rebound and
run down the floor to grab a pass.”
For those who may not know
much about unified basketball, the
rules are rather simple. Just like any
other interscholastic hoop contest,
each team fields five players.
In this, however, three athletes (or
those with special needs) join two
partners (who are intellectuallyabled), and the ultimate goal is for
the athletes to do most of the scoring,
rebounding, etc.
The National Federation of High
Schools dictate that they should play
16-minute halves (as opposed to 20
for JV and varsity tilts); that everyone on each bench must play a
meaningful amount of minutes; no
possession shot clock be involved;
and that partners score no more than
50 percent of the points throughout.
Likewise, no varsity of JV hoopsters may compete for their school,
though other athletes – those
involved with football, baseball, soccer, swimming, tennis, track and field
and the like – may. Each squad must
maintain a maximum of 16 players,
with eight or nine roster spots going
to those with intellectual disabilities
and the other seven or eight to those
without.
“Originally, it was hard to find
partners, but not anymore,” Gomes
indicated. “They all love it. They
want to help these kids succeed, to
do well. After all, they're all high
school students, and most of them
love sports. That's a common denominator right there.”
Junior guard/partner Jason
Almeida-Araujo is one of them. He
didn't have to sign up to play unified,
but he had an impetus – his cousin,
classmate Rosario Almeida (who
notched 21 points on this day).
“I just wanted to help out,” noted
Jason, who represents the Warriors'
football and outdoor track and field
squads. “He's a unified player, and I
wanted to help him and the team, but
I also wanted to give back to the
school.
“I don't want anything out of this;
it just makes me feel good to see
other people happy, doing great
things.”
On The Banner
PHOTO FEATURED IN PIC OF THE DAY LAST WEEK
February 28, 2014 - Cumberland’s Andrew Plata (2) shoots on
North Smithfield goalie Mark Pasquariello (31) and defenders
William Degnan (17) and Noah Menard (19) during second period
action at Levy Arena Friday night. Cumberland prevails 3-1 final.
Ernest A. Brown/RIMG photo
Mentioned junior Karomlay
Osorio, another junior guard/partner
and a member of the girls' varsity
volleyball program: “I really wanted
to get involved with a unified team; I
wanted to gain experience and know
what happens with the special athletes. This is only my first year,
though I really like it. At first, I
thought it would be a little weird and
uncomfortable.
“The first time we were out here
(on the court for a practice), I felt like
an outcast because I didn't know
much about basketball,” she added.
“But once I got to know the people
and how much they like it – the athletes and the partners – it was all really cool. When I have a career someday, I think I'd love to work with special athletes as a side job. I've learned
a lot.”
***
Warriors' boys' varsity basketball
mentor and high school English
teacher Brian Crookes watched
intently at the goings-on, and he had
every reason.
“I'm a huge fan of unified hoop; I
was actually a partner about 15 years
ago at the Fogarty Center in North
Providence, and I learned so much,”
he stated. “It's so rewarding to work
with the athletes and see them have
success.
“Look at these kids; man, they
can play,” he continued as senior forward Carlos Rivera rushed down the
floor for a layup. “I work with Carlos
in the classroom. You know he went
with his partner, (junior) Sebastian
Zuleta, to Washington, D.C. for a
Project Unity event in early March?
They both went to represent our high
school and Rhode Island at the unified sports conference.”
Noted Gomes: “At one point during that trip, Carlos, the athlete, told
me his partner, Sebastian, was his
best friend. That's what it's all about –
getting the athletes and the partners,
the entire school, involved with unified.
“I'm beyond impressed with the
inclusion that takes place in the classrooms, the hallways, the lunchroom
and throughout the community,” she
added. “Everyone really backs this.”
At that very moment, massive
senior forward Luis Rosario took a
pass from his partner, sophomore
Gina Mendoza, and prepared to put
up perhaps a six-footer. The Kilties
were ready, standing with hands up,
but they didn't try to knock the ball
out of his hands. Instead, they waited
for the 21-year-old to put up his onehander, one that tickled the twine.
As soon as the bucket hit the
floor, the wide-eyed Mendoza
grinned, then took Mendoza's hand
for the jaunt back down the floor for
a bit of defensive pressure.
“That's typical,” Gomes laughed.
“These kids, regardless of the team,
are all about sportsmanship. That's
what's so rewarding. You see a kid
like Luis score and get so excited
about it. It's fantastic!”
As for the crowd of students, they
were given added incentive to spend
a buck for admission: First, it was a
chance to miss a class (how typical!);
but, second, they had the opportunity
to win a free pass to any 2014-15
athletic event by backing their team.
Athletic director Anthony
Ficocelli was supposed to announce
two victors at halftime, but he opted
for a third; he did so via the numbers
on the 300 or so fans' tickets.
And why not? He did so in the
spirit of the fine event taking place.
“I have three kids on my team
who can't play, but they chose to be
involved anyway,” Crookes offered.
He pointed at seniors Elser Colindres
and Brad Zeno, not to mention freshman Jose Alvarado, barking out
orders by the team bench and
remarked, “They don't get anything
out of it except gaining the satisfaction of helping the athletes out with
their skills, telling them how to play
defense. I'll tell you, I'm proud of
them.”
After the win, Rosario Almeida
could barely contain his thrill.
“This feels great! I love playing,
and it's because I choose to. I'm a
unified athlete, and I want to play
with and help the kids in my class
and school. I just love basketball; it's
so fun. I have a lot of fun with my
teammates.”
Added junior forward Andrew
Cornell: “I'm here because I wanted
to play ball with a team and help
them win. This is good. I thought we
played alright. Yeire surprised me
with so many baskets at the end. He
tricked (the Kilties) out with all of his
moves. That's how he scored.
“He came up big for us.”
No question about it, but didn't
they all?
NFL
Allen lands
$15.5M deal
from Bears
CHICAGO (AP) — The Chicago
Bears were looking to jolt their struggling defense. How does adding Jared
Allen sound?
The Bears agreed to a four-year contract with the five-time Pro Bowl defensive end on Wednesday afternoon,
replacing one accomplished pass rusher
with another as they rebuild a defense
that ranked among the league's worst last
season.
A person with knowledge of the
agreement told The Associated Press that
Allen will get $15.5 million guaranteed
on a deal that could be worth as much as
$32 million. The person requested
anonymity because the terms have not
been announced.
Allen's deal can be voided down to
three years and $24 million, but the first
two years of his salary and a roster
bonus next March are fully guaranteed.
The 31-year-old Allen spent the previous six years with the NFC North rival
Minnesota Vikings. He will take over for
Julius Peppers, who signed with Green
Bay as a free agent after being released
by the Bears. Chicago's defense ranked
30th in the NFL last season and was
32nd and last against the run.
"This is another important step in our
continued efforts to build our team
towards a championship level," general
manager Phil Emery told the team's
website.
In a statement, Allen thanked his
teammates and coaches in Minnesota
along with the fans.
"I can only hope that I have left with
you all, with even a fraction of the positive support and impact you have had on
my life, my foundation and my family,"
he said. "I am very excited about this
next chapter in my career with the
Chicago Bears and can't wait to see what
the future holds for us."
He had 11½ sacks last season, reaching double digits in sacks for seven
straight years, and is considered a solid
run defender.
The Vikings acquired Allen from
Kansas City in 2007 and signed him to a
six-year, $73 million contract that at the
time made him the highest-paid defensive player in the league.
AREA ROAD RACE SCHEDULE
Saturday’s Races
NORTH SCITUATE — Seventh annual Run the Reservoir 15K, 9 a.m., N. Scituate
Community House, 546 W. Greenville Rd. (Includes a 5K option). Contact: Milton
Schumacher (Rhode Island Road Runners) at 1-401-647-3905.
CUMBERLAND — Cumberland Town Wide Learning 5K, 10 a.m., McCourt
Middle School, Highland Avenue. Pre-entry fee is $18, Post entries on day of race
are $20. Cumberland students are $15 and teams of 10 or more are $12. For
more information, see www.active.com, call Jenny Copans at 1-401-640-1441,
or send an e-mail to [email protected]
WRENTHAM, Mass. — Olde Irish Pub 5k & 10k Road Race, 9 a.m., McDooley’s
Olde Irish Village Pub, 303 Shears Street (Post race buffet at Olde Irish Pub. Tshirts 1st 100 by March 16.) Contact: Kathy McDonald at 1-508-543-7777.
Sunday’s Races
SMITHFIELD — Miles for Michelle Memorial Road Race, 8 a.m., Bryant
GATOR’S PUB ADULT SUMMER VOLLEYBALL LEAGUE SEEKS TEAMS
NORTH SMITHFIELD — The Gator's Pub Adult Summer Volleyball League is again seeking teams
for the upcomign season, and information and registration forms are now available and can be downloaded online at www.gatorspub.com. The registration deadline is March 28 for returning teams.
CoEd, Any 4's, Men's and Women's divisions are offered and will run nightly from Sunday through
Thursday. League play will begin at the end of April. For more information, or for new teams looking to
join a league, contact Deb at [email protected] or call 401-769-2594.
LINCOLN LITTLE LEAGUE PLANS FINAL SIGNUPS
FOR T-BALL, JUNIOR LEAGUE PROGRAMS ON SATURDAY
LINCOLN — A final walk-in registration for the Lincoln Little League is being held on Saturday,
March 29, from 10:00-11:30 a.m. at the Knights of Columbus Hall on Jenckes Hill Road in Lincoln for
the T-Ball (ages 4-6) and Junior Baseball (ages 13 and 14) leagues.
Online registrations can also be done at http://www.eteamz.com/lincolnlittleleague for the Junior
League baseball program only.
Additional information can be found on the league website or by contacting the player agent, Joan
Dion, at [email protected] or the league president, John Sharkey, at [email protected]
Residency and School Attendance Eligibility: In an effort to accommodate Little Leaguers who
want to play with their classmates and ease the burden on parents and guardians, Little League has
amended its residency requirements to allow children to play in the local league whose boundaries
where they attend school is located. To verify enrollment, parents will need to bring an official school
document, such as a report card or school enrollment form, confirming enrollment in the school for
the current academic year, dated before October 1, 2013.
NORTH SMITHFIELD WOMEN’S SOFTBALL LEAGUE BEGINS SIGNUPS
NORTH SMITHFIELD — The North Smithfield Women’s Softball League, a non-competitive league
for players ages 18 and over, is currently conducting its signups for the upcoming season.
Anyone interested in signing up or would like more information should contact Jessi Mottola (401749-0121) or Alycia Fox (401-651-2250)
The cost to play is $40. The league plays on Tuesday nights starting in May. The deadline for registrations is April 10. There is a $10 late fee for registrations received after this date.
TRIPLE CROWN UMPIRES SEEKS NEW MEMBERS FOR 2014 SEASON
WOONSOCKET — Triple Crown Umpires is looking for umpires for the 2014 season. Those interested must have two years experience working the bases or behind the plate at the Little League, or Big
Diamond level. For more information, contact Tommy Brien at (401) 765-3419.
University, 1150 Douglas Pike (Run Walk 1k, 5k and 10k) Contact: Carla Mulhern
(Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of Rhode Island) at 1-401-692-1211
EAST PROVIDENCE — Mohawk Hustle: East Providence Mohawks Youth Sports
5K Run/Walk, 10 a.m., Pierce Stadium, Mercer Street. Contact: Amy Frese
Parker (East Providence Mohawks Youth Organization) at 1-860-324-2578
Sunday, April 13
WARWICK — 11th Annual Nutrition Fuels Fitness 5K, 10 a.m., Goddard Memorial
Park, 1095 Ives Road (Kids Events and awards.) Contact: Sue Manchester (RIDA)
at 1-401-264-2006
Saturday, April 26
GREENVILLE — Smithfield YMCA F. Monroe Allen Memorial 5k Road Race and
Kids Run, 8:30 a.m., Smithfield YMCA, 15 Deerfield Drive (1st 150 registered get
t-shirt. USATF course.) Contact: Tanya LaRoche (Smithfield YMCA) at 1-401-9492480.
MOUNT ST. CHARLES ATHLETIC HALL OF FAME WELCOMES
CLASS OF 2014 ON MAY 16 AT SAVINI’S RESTAURANT
WOONSOCKET — Thirteen inductees will comprise the Class of 2014 that will be inducted into the
Mount St. Charles Athletic Hall of Fame on Friday, May 16, at 6:30 p.m. at Savini's Restaurant.
The Class of 2014 includes Normand "Bill” Belisle (Class of 1948), Angela (Martinelli) Burke (1996),
Keith Carney (1988), Michele (Merten) Diodati (1991), Anthony Garganese (1982), Sarah Gervais (2000),
John Harwood (1970), Lyse-Anne (Wante) Lepine (1982), Brenna Leveille (2003), Marcel Peloquin
(1941), Richard Rondeau (1939), David Roy (1998), and Al Thurier (1936).
A special recognition award will also be presented to Rev. Charles Quinn.
Tickets may be purchased by contacting the school or going on the school website.
WOONSOCKET LITTLE LEAGUE HAS ONLINE REGISTRATION
WOONSOCKET — All children who live or are enrolled in a school in Woonsocket are eligible to register for the Woonsocket Little League. Online registration is open for the following ages — Baseball
(T-Ball, Instructional): Boys and girls ages 4-12 (at least 4 and not more than 12 on or before April 30);
Softball: Girls ages 6-16 (at least 6 on Jan. 1 and not more than 16 on or before Dec. 31).
The registration fees for baseball and softball are $55 for the first child in a family, $45 for the second child, and a max of $125 per family. The registration fee for T-Ball is $35. Those who register their
children will need to complete a registration form and a medical release, and bring a copy of the player's birth certificate and three proofs of residency (must be dated prior to Feb. 1, 2014).
BLACKSTONE-MILLVILLE GIRLS’ SOFTBALL LEAGUE POSTS SIGNUPS
BLACKSTONE, Mass. — The Blackstone-Millville Softball Association, which is open to all girls
between the ages of 6 and above, is accepting registration for the upcoming season, as well as for its
travel softball program. You do not have to live in Blackstone or Millville to join/register.
You may register in person at the Blackstone Town Library from 10 a.m.-1 p.m. on Saturday, March
29 or download the application from the website at www.bmsasoftball.com and mail it to BMSASoftball,
P.O. Box 265, Blackstone, MA 01504. Include the form along with your check.
CUMBERLAND TOWN WIDE LEARNING 5K TAKES PLACE MARCH 29
CUMBERLAND — The Cumberland Town Wide Learning 5K will take place on Saturday, March 29, at
10 a.m. at McCourt Middle School on Highland Avenue in Cumberland.
The race will benefit the town’s middle school sports, and there will also be a health fair before and
after the race for the public. The pre-entry fee is $18, and post entries on the day of the race are $20.
Cumberland students will be $15 and teams of 10 or more will be $12.
You can enter online at www.active.com, and for more information, contact Jenny Copans at 401-6401441 or e-mail her at [email protected]
SPORTS
Thursday, March 27, 2014
THE CALL
B3
College sports
Federal agency: College athletes can unionize
Northwestern football players are ‘definition of employees’ in precedent-setting decision
CHICAGO (AP) — In a stunning
ruling that could revolutionize college
sports, a federal agency said
Wednesday that football players at
Northwestern University can create the
nation's first union of college athletes.
The decision by a regional director
of the National Labor Relations Board
answered the question at the heart of
the debate over the unionization bid:
Do football players who receive full
scholarships to the Big Ten school
qualify as employees under federal law
and therefore can legally unionize?
Peter Sung Ohr, the NLRB regional director, said in a 24-page decision
that the players "fall squarely" within
the broad definition of employee.
Pro-union activists cheered as they
learned of the ruling.
"It's like preparing so long for a big
game and then when you win — it is
pure joy," said former UCLA linebacker Ramogi Huma, the designated
president of Northwestern's would-be
football players' union.
An employee is regarded by law as
someone who, among other things,
receives compensation for a service
and is under the strict, direct control of
managers. In the case of the
Northwestern players, coaches are the
managers and scholarships are a form
of compensation, Ohr concluded.
The Evanston, Ill., university
argued that college athletes, as students, do not fit in the same category
as factory workers, truck drivers and
other unionized workers. The school
announced plans to appeal to labor
authorities in Washington, D.C.
Supporters of the union bid argued
that the university ultimately treats
football as more important than academics for scholarship players. Ohr
sided with the players on that issue.
"The record makes clear that the
employer's scholarship players are
identified and recruited in the first
instance because of their football
prowess and not because of their academic achievement in high school,"
Ohr wrote. He also noted that among
the evidence presented by
Northwestern, "no examples were
provided of scholarship players being
permitted to miss entire practices
and/or games to attend their studies."
The ruling also described how the
life of a football player at
Northwestern is far more regimented
than that of a typical student, down to
requirements about what they can and
can't eat and whether they can live off
campus or purchase a car. At times,
players put 50 or 60 hours a week into
football, he added.
Alan Cubbage, Northwestern's vice
president for university relations, said
in a statement that while the school
respects "the NLRB process and the
regional director's opinion, we disagree with it."
The next step would be for scholarship players to vote on whether to formally authorize the College Athletes
Players Association, or CAPA, to represent them, according to the NLRB
decision.
The specific goals of CAPA
include guaranteeing coverage of
sports-related medical expenses for
current and former players, reducing
head injuries and potentially letting
players pursue commercial sponsorships.
But critics have argued that giving
college athletes employee status and
allowing them to unionize could hurt
college sports in numerous ways,
including raising the prospect of
strikes by disgruntled players or lockouts by athletic departments.
For now, the push is to unionize
athletes at private schools, such as
Northwestern, because the federal
labor agency does not have jurisdiction over public universities.
Outgoing Wildcats quarterback
Kain Colter took a leading role in
establishing CAPA. The United
Steelworkers union has been footing
the legal bills.
Colter, who has entered the NFL
draft, said nearly all of the 85 scholarship players on the Wildcats roster
backed the union bid, though only he
expressed his support publicly.
He said the No. 1 reason to unionize was to ensure injured players have
their medical needs met.
"With the sacrifices we make athletically, medically and with our bodies, we need to be taken care of,"
Colter told ESPN.
The NCAAhas been under increasing scrutiny over its amateurism rules
and is fighting a class-action federal
lawsuit by former players seeking a
cut of the billions of dollars earned
from live broadcasts, memorabilia
sales and video games. Other lawsuits
allege the NCAA failed to protect
players from debilitating head injuries.
NCAA President Mark Emmert
has pushed for a $2,000-per-player
stipend to help athletes defray some
expenses. Critics say that is not nearly
enough, considering players help
bring in millions of dollars to their
schools and conferences.
In a written statement, the NCAA
said it disagreed with the notion that
student-athletes are employees.
"We frequently hear from studentathletes, across all sports, that they
participate to enhance their overall
college experience and for the love of
their sport, not to be paid," the NCAA
said.
The developments are coming to a
head at a time when major college programs are awash in cash generated by
new television deals that include separate networks for the big conferences.
The NCAA tournament generates an
average of $771 million a year in television rights itself, much of which is
distributed back to member schools by
the NCAA.
Attorneys for CAPA argued that
college football is, for all practical purposes, a commercial enterprise that
relies on players' labor to generate billions of dollars in profits. The NLRB
ruling noted that from 2003 to 2013
the Northwestern program generated
$235 million in revenue — profits the
university says went to subsidize other
sports.
Louisville-Kentucky showdown highlights Friday’s NCAA basketball regional semifinals
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) —
Louisville's quest of fulfilling coach
Rick Pitino's hopes for the Cardinals
repeating as national champions and
becoming a "mini-dynasty" hinge on
beating archrival Kentucky.
That's going to be a tough challenge
against the Wildcats, who have been a
thorn in the Cardinals' side.
Eighth-seeded Kentucky (26-10)
enters Friday night's Midwest Regional
showdown against fourth-seeded
Louisville (31-5) with a 3-2 edge in the
NCAA tournament and a 31-15 series
lead. The Wildcats have won five of
the last six against Louisville, including
at the 2012 Final Four en route to their
eighth national championship, and a
73-66 victory last year in Lexington on
Dec. 28.
Kentucky would love to dash
Louisville's dream of a third straight
Final Four appearance, considering the
Wildcats are trying to win their own
second title in three years.
For Louisville to win, the Cardinals
need to forget history and focused on
what they've been doing to win 14 of
their last 15.
"We're looking for revenge," former
Louisville great Darrell Griffith said
Wednesday. "We didn't play a good
game at Kentucky, and they've got a
real good team (that's) playing the way
a lot expect them to play now.
"We've got a great team. We're
undersized, but that doesn't matter. You
see a lot of teams on the sidelines now.
You play to your strengths and which
team's strengths prevail is the one that's
going to win. Everybody's got to have
their 'A' game from here on out."
Both teams practiced on Wednesday
before heading to Indianapolis and were
unavailable for comment.
MARCH MADNESS
2014 NCAA Basketball Championship Tournament
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B4
SPORTS
THE CALL
SPORTS ON THE AIR
SCOREBOARD
TODAY
PRESEASON BASEBALL
Noon — Washington vs. N.Y. Mets, at Port St. Lucie, Fla., ESPN.
COLLEGE BASEBALL
7:30 p.m. — Missouri at Auburn, ESPNU.
MEN'S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
(NCAA Division I tournament, regional semifinals)
7:15 p.m. — Stanford vs. Dayton, at Memphis, Tenn., CBS.
7:47 p.m. — Wisconsin vs. Baylor, at Anaheim, Calif., TBS.
9:45 p.m. — Florida vs. UCLA, at Memphis, Tenn., CBS.
10:07 p.m. — Arizona vs. San Diego St., at Anaheim, Calif., TBS.
GOLF
3 p.m. — PGATour, Texas Open, opening round, at San Antonio,
TGC.
6:30 p.m. — LPGA, Kia Classic, first round, at Carlsbad, Calif.,
TGC.
Midnight — European PGA Tour, Eurasia Cup, second round, at
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, TGC.
NHL HOCKEY
7 p.m. — Chicago at Boston, NESN, WBZ (98.5 FM).
TENNIS
1 p.m. — ATP World Tour/WTA, Sony Open, women's semifinal/
men's quarterfinal, at Key Biscayne, Fla., ESPN2.
7 p.m. — ATP World Tour/WTA, Sony Open, women's semifinal/
men's quarterfinal, at Key Biscayne, Fla., ESPN2.
NBA
Golden State
44
27 .620
6
Phoenix
43
29 .597 7½
Sacramento
25
45 .357 24½
L.A. Lakers
24
46 .343 25½
x-clinched playoff spot
———
Tuesday's Games
Orlando 95, Portland 85
Cleveland 102, Toronto 100
Dallas 128, Oklahoma City 119, OT
L.A. Lakers 127, New York 96
Wednesday's Games
Phoenix 99, Washington 93
Charlotte 116, Brooklyn 111, OT
Toronto 99, Boston 90
Cleveland 97, Detroit 96
Atlanta at Minnesota, (n)
L.A. Clippers at New Orleans, (n)
Miami at Indiana, (n)
Denver at San Antonio, (n)
New York at Sacramento, (n)
Memphis at Utah, (n)
Thursday's Games
Portland at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m.
Philadelphia at Houston, 8 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Charlotte at Orlando, 7 p.m.
Indiana at Washington, 7 p.m.
Boston at Toronto, 7 p.m.
Cleveland at Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m.
Miami at Detroit, 7:30 p.m.
Portland at Chicago, 8 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at Minnesota, 8 p.m.
Sacramento at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m.
Utah at New Orleans, 8 p.m.
San Antonio at Denver, 9 p.m.
New York at Phoenix, 10 p.m.
Memphis at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
L Pct GB
Toronto
40
31 .563
—
Brooklyn
37
33 .529 2½
New York
29
42 .408 11
Boston
23
48 .324 17
Philadelphia
15
56 .211 25
Southeast Division
W
L Pct GB
x-Miami
48
21 .696
—
Washington
36
35 .507 13
Charlotte
35
37 .486 14½
Atlanta
31
38 .449 17
Orlando
20
52 .278 29½
Central Division
W
L Pct GB
x-Indiana
51
20 .718
—
Chicago
40
31 .563 11
Cleveland
29
44 .397 23
Detroit
26
45 .366 25
Milwaukee
13
58 .183 38
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
W
L Pct GB
x-San Antonio
54
16 .771
—
Houston
48
22 .686
6
Memphis
42
28 .600 12
Dallas
43
29 .597 12
New Orleans
30
40 .429 24
Northwest Division
W
L Pct GB
Oklahoma City
52
19 .732
—
Portland
45
27 .625 7½
Minnesota
34
35 .493 17
Denver
32
39 .451 20
Utah
23
48 .324 29
Pacific Division
W
L Pct GB
L.A. Clippers
50
21 .704
—
NHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-Boston
72 49 17 6 104230 153
Montreal
74 41 26 7 89 190 184
Tampa Bay
72 39 24 9 87 214 193
Detroit
72 33 25 14 80 191204
Toronto
74 36 30 8 80 216 231
Ottawa
72 29 29 14 72205 243
Florida
73 27 38 8 62 178237
Buffalo
72 20 44 8 48 138 212
Metropolitan Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
Pittsburgh
72 46 21 5 97 224 180
N.Y. Rangers 73 40 29 4 84 194 178
Philadelphia 71 38 26 7 83205 201
Columbus
72 37 29 6 80204 196
Washington 73 34 27 12 80 212 218
New Jersey 72 31 28 13 75 175 187
Carolina
72 31 32 9 71 181205
N.Y. Islanders 72 28 35 9 65202 243
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-St. Louis
72 49 16 7 105233 163
Chicago
73 42 16 15 99 244 188
Colorado
72 45 21 6 96 221 198
Minnesota
73 37 25 11 85 182 183
Dallas
72 34 27 11 79203 207
Nashville
73 31 31 11 73 177 218
Winnipeg
73 32 32 9 73202 213
Pacific Division
GP W L OT Pts GF GA
x-San Jose
74 47 18 9 103227 177
x-Anaheim
71 46 18 7 99228 180
Los Angeles 73 42 25 6 90 182 155
Phoenix
73 35 26 12 82202 207
Vancouver
74 34 30 10 78 181 198
Calgary
72 30 35 7 67 183 211
Edmonton
73 25 39 9 59 180 241
NOTE: Two points for a win, one for OT loss.
x-clinched playoff spot
———
Tuesday's Games
Los Angeles 5, Washington 4, SO
Florida 3, Ottawa 2, SO
Colorado 5, Nashville 4, SO
St. Louis 5, Toronto 3
Phoenix 3, Pittsburgh 2
N.Y. Islanders 5, Carolina 4
Montreal 2, Buffalo 0
Columbus 4, Detroit 2
Chicago 4, Dallas 2
San Jose 5, Edmonton 2
Wednesday's Games
Vancouver 5, Minnesota 2
Philadelphia at N.Y. Rangers, (n)
Anaheim at Calgary, (n)
Thursday's Games
Chicago at Boston, 7 p.m.
Phoenix at New Jersey, 7 p.m.
Los Angeles at Pittsburgh, 7 p.m.
Montreal at Detroit, 7 p.m.
N.Y. Islanders at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m.
Carolina at Florida, 7:30 p.m.
Minnesota at St. Louis, 8 p.m.
Buffalo at Nashville, 8 p.m.
Vancouver at Colorado, 9 p.m.
Winnipeg at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Friday's Games
Toronto at Philadelphia, 7 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Columbus, 7 p.m.
Chicago at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m.
Nashville at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
N.Y. Rangers at Calgary, 9 p.m.
Anaheim at Edmonton, 9:30 p.m.
MLB PRESEASON
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W
L
Pct
Tampa Bay
15
6 .714
Cleveland
18
8 .692
Los Angeles
17
10 .630
Baltimore
13
8 .619
Seattle
17
11 .607
New York
15
12 .556
Detroit
13
12 .520
Oakland
13
13 .500
Toronto
13
13 .500
Kansas City
11
15 .423
Chicago
9
13 .409
Houston
10
15 .400
Texas
10
15 .400
Minnesota
8
14 .364
Boston
9
16 .360
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W
L
Pct
San Francisco
17
10 .630
Pittsburgh
14
9 .609
Miami
17
11 .607
Arizona
12
9 .571
Colorado
14
13 .519
New York
14
13 .519
Washington
14
13 .519
St. Louis
11
12 .478
San Diego
10
12 .455
Milwaukee
12
16 .429
Atlanta
12
17 .414
Cincinnati
12
17 .414
Chicago
12
18 .400
Los Angeles
6
10 .375
Philadelphia
9
16 .360
NOTE: Split-squad games count in the standings; games against non-major league teams
do not.
———
Tuesday's Games
Boston 4, Tampa Bay 2
Atlanta 12, Detroit 3
Miami 6, St. Louis 5
Pittsburgh 22, Toronto 5
Washington 7, N.Y. Mets 3
Minnesota 4, Baltimore 1
Texas 5, Cleveland 0
San Francisco 5, Milwaukee 4
Oakland 8, Cincinnati 4
Colorado 4, Chicago White Sox 1
L.A. Angels 8, Chicago Cubs (ss) 4
Philadelphia 6, N.Y. Yankees 0
Seattle 9, Kansas City 6
San Diego 5, Chicago Cubs (ss) 5, tie
Wednesday's Games
Atlanta 9, Miami 2
Pittsburgh 2, Minnesota 1
Toronto 10, N.Y. Yankees 6
Detroit 1, Philadelphia 0
Baltimore (ss) 5, Boston 4
St. Louis 3, Washington 2
San Diego 9, Kansas City 5
L.A. Angels 6, Oakland 2
Texas 5, Seattle 3
Chicago White Sox 9, Cincinnati 5
Cleveland 10, Milwaukee 3
San Francisco 8, Colorado 6
Arizona 14, Chicago Cubs 4
Houston 9, N.Y. Mets 6
Baltimore (ss) vs. Tampa Bay at Port Charlotte,
Fla., (n)
Thursday's Games
Washington vs. N.Y. Mets at Port St. Lucie,
Fla., 12:10 p.m.
Atlanta vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Toronto vs. Philadelphia at Clearwater, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Miami vs. St. Louis at Jupiter, Fla., 1:05 p.m.
N.Y. Yankees vs. Pittsburgh at Bradenton,
Fla., 1:05 p.m.
Arizona (ss) vs. Cincinnati (ss) at Goodyear,
Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Cincinnati (ss) vs. Milwaukee at Phoenix, 3:05
p.m.
Chicago White Sox vs. Chicago Cubs at
Mesa, Ariz., 3:05 p.m.
Cleveland vs. Arizona (ss) at Scottsdale, Ariz.,
4:10 p.m.
Minnesota vs. Boston at Fort Myers, Fla., 7:05
p.m.
Tampa Bay vs. Baltimore at Sarasota, Fla.,
7:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Oakland at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
Friday's Games
Tampa Bay vs. Detroit at Lakeland, Fla., 1:05
p.m.
Boston vs. Minnesota at Fort Myers, Fla.,
1:05 p.m.
Pittsburgh at Philadelphia, 7:05 p.m.
N.Y. Mets vs. Toronto at Montreal, Quebec,
7:05 p.m.
Miami vs. N.Y. Yankees at Tampa, Fla., 7:05
p.m.
Houston vs. Texas at San Antonio, Texas,
8:05 p.m.
Kansas City at Milwaukee, 8:10 p.m.
Cleveland vs. San Diego at San Diego, Calif.,
9:10 p.m.
Chicago Cubs at Arizona, 9:40 p.m.
Colorado vs. Seattle at Peoria, Ariz., 10:05 p.m.
L.A. Angels at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Oakland at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.
AHL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Manchester 67 42 17 2 6 92 212 169
St. John's
66 41 21 1 3 86 221 176
Providence
67 35 23 2 7 79209 190
Worcester
65 32 29 3 1 68 168 193
Portland
64 23 31 2 8 56 191 231
East Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Binghamton 64 38 21 1 4 81237 195
WB/Scranton 66 36 22 3 5 80 185 164
Norfolk
65 34 22 2 7 77 172 169
Hershey
65 32 25 4 4 72 190 185
Syracuse
65 26 29 4 6 62 163 192
Northeast Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Springfield
66 40 20 1 5 86 211 184
Albany
65 34 20 4 7 79 193 170
Hartford
65 28 30 1 6 63 172 201
Bridgeport
65 27 31 2 5 61 168 204
Adirondack 65 25 35 1 4 55 151 191
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Midwest Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Grand Rapids 66 41 19 2 4 88 211 162
Chicago
64 37 19 5 3 82 194 157
Milwaukee
65 31 21 6 7 75 185 178
Rockford
65 31 25 5 4 71 199 219
Iowa
64 25 29 6 4 60 148 190
North Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Toronto
64 39 20 2 3 83 187 162
Rochester
66 30 26 6 4 70 181 193
Utica
64 29 28 3 4 65 156 183
Lake Erie
63 28 28 0 7 63 163 188
Hamilton
65 28 32 1 4 61 151 190
West Division
GP W L OL SL Pts GF GA
Texas
67 42 17 3 5 92237 179
Abbotsford
66 35 24 5 2 77 196 189
Charlotte
66 33 30 1 2 69 199 209
Oklahoma City 66 30 27 2 7 69206 226
San Antonio 65 26 30 3 6 61 178 195
NOTE: Two points for a win, one for OT or SO loss.
———
Tuesday's Games
Toronto 3, Rochester 1
Charlotte 2, Iowa 1
Oklahoma City 2, San Antonio 1
Texas 4, Hamilton 0
Wednesday's Games
Springfield 3, Adirondack 0
Syracuse 3, St. John's 2
Worcester 5, Portland 3
Milwaukee 3, Rochester 1
Providence 2, Wilkes-Barre/Scranton 1
Lake Erie at Chicago, (n)
Charlotte at Iowa, (n)
Thursday's Games
No games scheduled
Friday's Games
Adirondack at Syracuse, 7 p.m.
Abbotsford at Utica, 7 p.m.
Providence at Portland, 7 p.m.
Worcester at Manchester, 7 p.m.
Albany at Hershey, 7 p.m.
Springfield at Hartford, 7 p.m.
St. John's at Binghamton, 7:05 p.m.
Toronto at Rochester, 7:05 p.m.
Wilkes-Barre/Scranton at Norfolk, 7:30 p.m.
Lake Erie at Milwaukee, 8 p.m.
Grand Rapids at Rockford, 8 p.m.
Hamilton at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m.
TRANSACTIONS
Wednesday's Sports Transactions
The Associated Press
BASEBALL
American League
BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Assigned LHP Kelvin De
La Cruz outright to Norfolk (IL). Optioned RHP Steve
Johnson, OF Henry Urrutia and RHP Brad Brach to
Norfolk (IL). Reassigned OF Quintin Berry and INF
Alexi Casilla to minor league camp.
CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Claimed RHP Javy
Guerra off waivers from the L.A. Dodgers.
CLEVELAND INDIANS — Optioned RHP Josh Tomlin to Columbus (IL).
DETROIT TIGERS — Selected the contract of SS
Alex Gonzalez from Toledo (IL).
KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Traded C Adam Moore
to San Diego for a player to be named. Optioned 2B
Johnny Giavotella to Omaha (PCL).
LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Waived RHP Joe Blanton for the purpose of granting him his unconditional release.
MINNESOTA TWINS — Released OF Jermaine
Mitchell. Agreed to terms with RHP Matt Guerrier on
a minor league contract.
NEW YORK YANKEES — Optioned C John Ryan
Murphy to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL).
SEATTLE MARINERS — Agreed to terms with OF
Endy Chavez and C Humberto Quintero on minor
league contracts.
TAMPA BAY RAYS — Released RHP Mark Lowe.
TEXAS RANGERS — Claimed RHP Seth Rosin off
waivers from the L.A. Dodgers and INF Donnie
Murphy off waivers from the Chicago Cubs. Placed
RHP Tommy Hanson on irrevocable waivers for the
purpose of giving him his unconditional release.
Placed OF Engel Beltre on the 60-day DL.
National League
CHICAGO CUBS — Released C George Kottaras.
MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Optioned RHP Rob
Wooten and INF/OF Elian Herrera to Nashville
(PCL).
NEW YORK METS — Agreed to terms with RHP
Kyle Farnsworth on a minor league contract.
Selected the contract of RHP Jose Valverde from
Las Vegas (PCL). Optioned RHP Vic Black to Las
Vegas.
PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES — Optioned C Cameron
Rupp to Lehigh Valley (IL).
ST. LOUIS CARDINALS — Agreed to terms with
RHP David Aardsma on a minor league contract.
SAN DIEGO PADRES — Agreed to terms with OF
Jeff Francoeur on a minor league contract.
WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Voided their option
of RHP Ross Ohlendorf and placed him on the 60day DL. Agreed to terms with INF/OF Kevin
Frandsen.
American Association
AMARILLO SOX — Traded RHP Josh Giles to Sioux
Falls for a player to be named.
GRAND PRAIRIE AIR HOGS — Signed INF
Matthew Burns, OF Tommy Barksdale, C Vince
DiFazio and RHP David Teasley.
KANSAS CITY T-BONES — Signed RHP Bobby
Shore.
LAREDO LEMURS — Signed INF Omar Luna.
SIOUX FALLS CANARIES — Signed C Dallas
Tarleton.
Atlantic League
CAMDEN RIVERSHARKS — Signed LHPs Sergio
Espinosa and Bryan Morgado and 3B Bryan
Pounds.
LONG ISLAND DUCKS — Signed INF Josh Brodin.
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
MILWAUKEE BUCKS — Signed G/F D.J. Stephens
to a 10-day contract.
Women's National Basketball Association
ATLANTA DREAM — Re-signed C Erika de Souza.
FOOTBALL
National Football League
KANSAS CITY CHIEFS — Signed DT Cory
Grissom.
NEW ORLEANS SAINTS — Agreed to terms with
QB Luke McCown on a one-year contract.
Canadian Football League
B.C. LIONS — Signed OL Hunter Steward.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
DALLAS STARS — Signed F Justin Dowling to a twoyear contract.
DETROIT RED WINGS — Assigned LW Mitch
Callahan to Grand Rapids (AHL).
FLORIDA PANTHERS — Reassigned F Joey Crabb
and D Ryan Whitney to San Antonio (AHL).
MONTREAL CANADIENS — Signed D Mac
Bennett to a two-year contract.
NASHVILLE PREDATORS — Assigned F Zach
Budish from Milwaukee (AHL) to Cincinnati (ECHL).
NEW YORK RANGERS — Recalled F J.T. Miller
from Hartford (AHL).
PHOENIX COYOTES — Recalled D Connor
Murphy from Portland (AHL).
SAN JOSE SHARKS — Signed F Ryan Carpenter to
an entry-level contract.
American Hockey League
BINGHAMTON SENATORS — Assigned F Danny
Hobbs to Elmira (ECHL). Recalled F Jakub Culek
from Elmira.
HAMILTON BULLDOGS — Signed F Nick Sorkin to
a professional tryout agreement.
TORONTO MARLIES — Assigned F Wade
MacLeod to Orlando (ECHL).
WILKES-BARRE/SCRANTON PENGUINS —
Recalled F Carter Rowney from Wheeling (ECHL).
SOCCER
Major League Soccer
MLS — Suspended Toronto M Jackson one game
and fined him an undisclosed amount for aggressive
inflammatory behavior during Saturday's game.
North American Soccer League
NEW YORK COSMOS — Signed G Kyle Zobeck.
COLLEGE
MID-AMERICAN CONFERENCE — Announced
the UMass football team will be leaving conference
after the 2015 season.
MARQUETTE — Announced the resignations of
men's basketball assistant coaches Brad Autry and
Isaac Chew.
MUHLENBERG — Named Joshua Carter quarterbacks/wide receivers coach and special teams
coordinator.
RICE — Named Mike Rhoades men's basketball
coach.
TARLETON STATE — Announced the retirement of
women's basketball coach Ronnie Hearne. Named
Misty Wilson women's basketball coach.
MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W
L T Pts GF GA
Houston
2 0 0 6
5 0
Columbus 2 0 0 6
5 1
Toronto FC 2 0 0 6
3 1
Philadelphia 1 1 1 4
3 3
Kansas City 1 1 1 4
2 2
Chicago
0 1 2 2
4 5
New York
0 1 2 2
3 6
New England 0 2 1 1
0 5
Montreal
0 3 0 0
2 6
D.C. United 0 2 0 0
0 4
WESTERN CONFERENCE
W
L T Pts GF GA
FC Dallas
2 0 1 7
7 4
Seattle
2 1 0 6
4 2
Vancouver 1 0 2 5
5 2
Real Salt Lake1 0 2 5
5 4
Chivas USA 1 1 1 4
5 6
Colorado
1 0 1 4
3 1
Portland
0 1 2 2
2 4
San Jose
0 1 1 1
3 4
Los Angeles 0 1 1 1
1 2
NOTE: Three points for a victory, one for a tie.
———
Saturday’s Games
Chicago at D.C. United, 4 p.m.
Montreal at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Sporting Kansas City at Colorado, 6 p.m.
Houston at Vancouver, 7 p.m.
Portland at FC Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Toronto FC at Real Salt Lake, 9:30 p.m.
Columbus at Seattle FC, 10 p.m.
New England at San Jose, 10:30 p.m.
Sunday’s Game
Chivas USA at New York, 3 p.m.
NCAA MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT
By The Associated Press
FIRST ROUND
Tuesday, March 18
Albany (N.Y.) 71, Mount St. Mary's 64
N.C. State 74, Xavier 59
Wednesday, March 19
Cal Poly 81, Texas Southern 69
Tennessee 78, Iowa 65, OT
———
EAST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 20
Connecticut 89, Saint Joseph's 81, OT
Villanova 73, Milwaukee 53
Harvard 61, Cincinnati 57
Michigan State 93, Delaware 78
Friday, March 21
Memphis 71, George Washington 66
Virginia 70, Coastal Carolina 59
North Carolina 79, Providence 77
Iowa State 93, North Carolina Central 75
Third Round
Saturday, March 22
Connecticut 77, Villanova 65
Michigan State 80, Harvard 73
Sunday, March 23
Virginia 78, Memphis 60
Iowa State 85, North Carolina 83
Regional Semifinals
At Madison Square Garden, New York
Friday, March 28
Connecticut (28-8) vs. Iowa State (28-7), 7:27
p.m.
Michigan State (28-8) vs. Virginia (30-6), 9:57
p.m.
Regional Championship
Sunday, March 30
Semifinal winners
———
SOUTH REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 20
Dayton 60, Ohio State 59
Syracuse 77, Western Michigan 53
Pittsburgh 77, Colorado 48
Florida 67, Albany (N.Y.) 55
Friday, March 21
Stanford 58, New Mexico 53
Kansas 80, Eastern Kentucky 69
Stephen F. Austin 77, VCU 75, OT
UCLA 76, Tulsa 59
Third Round
Saturday, March 22
Dayton 55, Syracuse 53
Florida 61, Pittsburgh 45
Sunday, March 23
Stanford 60, Kansas 57
UCLA 77, Stephen F. Austin 60
Regional Semifinals
At FedExForum, Memphis, Tenn.
Thursday, March 27
Dayton (25-10) vs. Stanford (23-12), 7:15 p.m.
Florida (34-2) vs. UCLA (28-8), 9:45 p.m.
Regional Championship
Saturday, March 29
Semifinal winners
MIDWEST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 20
Saint Louis 83, N.C. State 80, OT
Louisville 71, Manhattan 64
Michigan 57, Wofford 40
Texas 87, Arizona State 85
Friday, March 21
Mercer 78, Duke 71
Tennessee 86, UMass 67
Wichita State 64, Cal Poly 37
Kentucky 56, Kansas State 49
Third Round
Saturday, March 22
Louisville 66, Saint Louis 51
Michigan 79, Texas 65
Sunday, March 23
Tennessee 83, Mercer 63
Kentucky 78, Wichita State 76
Regional Semifinals
At Lucas Oil Stadium, Indianapolis
Friday, March 28
Michigan (27-8) vs. Tennessee (24-12), 7:15 p.m.
Kentucky (26-10) vs. Louisville (31-5), 9:45 p.m.
Regional Championship
Sunday, March 30
Semifinal winners
———
WEST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday, March 20
Wisconsin 75, American 35
Oregon 87, BYU 68
North Dakota State 80, Oklahoma 75, OT
San Diego State 73, New Mexico State 69, OT
Friday, March 21
Baylor 74, Nebraska 60
Creighton 76, Louisiana-Lafayette 66
Arizona 68, Weber State 59
Gonzaga 85, Oklahoma State 77
Third Round
Saturday, March 22
Wisconsin 85, Oregon 77
San Diego State 63, North Dakota State 44
Sunday, March 23
Baylor 85, Creighton 55
Arizona 84, Gonzaga 61
Regional Semifinals
At The Honda Center, Anaheim, Calif.
Thursday, March 27
Wisconsin (28-7) vs. Baylor (26-11), 7:47 p.m.
San Diego State (31-4) vs. Arizona (32-4), 10:17
p.m.
Regional Championship
Saturday, March 29
Semifinal winners
———
FINAL FOUR
At AT&T Stadium, Arlington, Texas
National Semifinals
Saturday, April 5
East champion vs. South champion
Midwest champion vs. West champion
National Championship
Monday, April 7
Semifinal winners
Thursday, March 27, 2014
NBA
Celts drop seventh
game in last eight
contests; Raptors
soar to 99-90 win
BOSTON (AP) — Terrence Ross scored 24 points, Kyle Lowry
23 and the Toronto Raptors edged closer to their first playoff berth
since 2008 with a 99-90 win over the Boston Celtics on Wednesday
night.
DeMar DeRozan added 20 points for Toronto, which increased
its Atlantic Division lead to 2 1/2 games over Brooklyn, which lost
in Charlotte. The Raptors can clinch a playoff spot if the New York
Knicks lose at Sacramento later Wednesday.
Jared Sullinger led Boston with 26 points, going 4 of 6 from 3point range. Boston lost for the seventh time in eight games.
It was Lowry's eighth straight game of 20 or more points and
helped the Raptors snap an 11-game losing streak in Boston.
Toronto captured its 19th road win, one off the club record set
2000-01.
Boston guard Rajon Rondo was cut on the forehead midway
into the third quarter and received nine stitches. He returned to the
bench early in the fourth quarter with a bandage that ran from the
bridge of his nose straight up to his forehead and he re-entered the
game with 8:05 to play.
The Raptors had opened a 79-64 lead early the fourth quarter,
but Boston went on a 9-0 run. Toronto pushed it back to 85-75
before Sullinger nailed consecutive 3s 34 seconds apart, narrowing
it to four points with just under 6 minutes to play.
Chris Johnson's basket — on an officials' reviewed goaltending
call — closed it to 93-90 with 1:49 left, but Lowry and Ross hit
consecutive 3s on the next two possessions to send the Raptors to
the victory.
In the third quarter, Lowry nailed consecutive 3s on Toronto's
first two possessions, pushing the Raptors' lead to 61-46. They held
at least a nine-point lead for the rest of the quarter, opening it to 7762 after Ross nailed a 3 at the buzzer.
Toronto, which blew an 11-point second-quarter lead in less than
2 minutes, held a 55-46 advantage at halftime.
Notes: A few minutes before the opening tip-off and about 10
after the National Anthems were completed, the Celtics asked the
crowd to rise for a moment of silence to honor two Boston firefighters that were killed battling a fire in the city's Back Bay section
— about two miles away. ... Boston coach Brad Stevens praised
Raptors guard Lowry before the game. "(He) is playing terrific,"
Stevens said. "He makes a lot of plays that don't go talked about." ...
Sullinger had 25 points and 20 rebounds when the Celtics beat the
Raptors at home on Jan. 15. He had eight boards on Wednesday.
THIS WEEK IN AUTO RACING
NASCAR
SPRINT CUP
STP 500
Site: Martinsville, Va.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Fox Sports 1, noon-1:30 p.m.), qualifying (Fox Sports 1, 4:30-6 p.m.);
Saturday, practice (Fox Sports 1, 10-11 a.m.; Fox Sports 2, 1-2 p.m.); Sunday, race, 1 p.m. (Fox,
12:30-5 p.m.).
Track: Martinsville Speedway (oval, 0.526 miles).
Race distance: 263 miles, 500 laps.
Last year: Jimmie Johnson raced to his eighth Martinsville victory, leading 346 laps.
Last week: Kyle Busch won at Fontana for the second straight year, holding off Kyle Larson, Tony
Stewart and brother Kurt Busch in a two-lap sprint.
Fast facts: The race is the sixth of the season. Dale Earnhardt Jr. won the season-opening Daytona 500,
Kevin Harvick took the Phoenix race, Brad Keselowski won in Las Vegas and Carl Edwards at Bristol.
... Jeff Gordon won the October race at the track. He also has eight Martinsville victories. ... Richard
Petty won a record 15 times at Martinsville, the only remaining venue from NASCAR's inaugural 1949
season.
Next race: Duck Commander 500, April 6, Texas Motor Speedway, Fort Worth, Texas.
Online: http://www.nascar.com
———
CAMPING WORLD TRUCK
KROGER 250
Site: Martinsville, Va.
Schedule: Friday, practice (Fox Sports 1, 3:4:30 p.m.; Saturday, qualifying (Fox Sports 1, 11 a.m.12:30 p.m.), race, 2:30 p.m. (Fox Sports 1, 2:30-5 p.m.).
Track: Martinsville Speedway (oval, 0.526 miles).
Race distance: 105.2 miles, 200 laps.
Last year: Johnny Sauter raced to his second straight victory to open the season.
Last race: Kyle Busch won at Daytona on Feb. 21 to become the first driver to win Truck, ARCA,
Nationwide and Sprint Cup races at the track.
Fast facts: Darrell Wallace Jr. won the October race at the track to become the second black driver to
win on NASCAR's national level and first in a half-century. Wendell Scott won in Jacksonville, Fla., in
December 1963 in what is now known as the Sprint Cup Series, the highest of NASCAR's three national levels. ... Busch has 35 series victories, winning five times in 11 starts last year.
Next race: North Carolina Education Lottery 200, May 16, Charlotte Motor Speedway, Concord, N.C.
Online: http://www.nascar.com
———
NATIONWIDE
Next race: O'Reilly Auto Parts 300, April 4, Texas Motor Speedway, Fort Worth, Texas.
Last week: Kyle Larson raced to his first Nationwide victory, holding off Kevin Harvick and Kyle Busch
at Fontana.
Online: http://www.nascar.com
———
VERIZON INDYCAR
FIRESTONE GRAND PRIX OF ST. PETERSBURG
Site: St. Petersburg, Fla.
Schedule: Friday, practice; Saturday, practice, qualifying; Sunday, race, 3:20 p.m. (ABC, 3-6 p.m.).
Track: Streets of St. Petersburg (street course, 1.8 miles).
Race distance: 198 miles, 110 laps.
Last year: James Hinchcliffe won the season-opening race for Andretti Autosport.
Fast facts: Juan Pablo Montoya is driving for Roger Penske in his return to IndyCar after 12 seasons in
Formula One and NASCAR. The Colombian won seven races and the CART championship in 1999
and took the Indianapolis 500 and two other races in 2000 for Chip Ganassi. ... Ganassi's Scott Dixon
won the season title last year. He's the active leader with 33. ... Indy 500 winner Tony Kanaan has replaced the retired Dario Franchitti at Ganassi Racing. ... Verizon replaced Izod as the series title sponsor.
Next race: Toyota Grand Prix of Long Beach, April 13, Streets of Long Beach, Long Beach, Calif.
Online: http://www.indycar.com
———
FORMULA ONE
MALAYSIAN GRAND PRIX
Site: Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
Schedule: Friday, practice (NBC Sports Network, 2-3:30 a.m.); Saturday, qualifying (NBC Sports
Network, 4-5:30 a.m.); Sunday, race, 4 a.m. (NBC Sports Network, 3:30-6:30 p.m., 2:30-5:30 p.m.).
Track: Sepang International Circuit (road course, 3.44 miles).
Race distance: 192.88 miles, 56 laps.
Last year: Red Bull's Sebastian Vettel won after ignoring team orders and overtaking teammate Mark
Webber for the lead. Vettel won 13 races last year en route to his fourth straight season title.
Last race: Mercedes' Nico Rosberg won the season-opening Australia Grand Prix on March 16.
Fast facts: Red Bull's Daniel Ricciardo was disqualified after finishing second in Australia for exceeding
the new limits on fuel flow. The team appealed the penalty, blaming the problem on a malfunction of the
FIA-approved sensor. The appeal will be held April 14. ... Vettel's engine failed early in Australia. He has
39 victories in 121 career starts.
Next race: Bahrain Grand Prix, April 6, Bahrain International Circuit, Sakhir, Bahrain.
Online: http://www.formula1.com
———
NHRA MELLO YELLO DRAG RACING
SUMMITRACING.COM NHRA NATIONALS
Site: Las Vegas.
Schedule: Friday, qualifying; Saturday, qualifying (ESPN2, 8-10 a.m.); Sunday, final eliminations
(ESPN2, 11 p.m.-1:30 a.m.).
Track: The Strip at Las Vegas Motor Speedway.
Last year: Allen Johnson swept the K&N Horsepower Challenge event and regular Pro Stock competition. Tony Schumacher won in Top Fuel, and Cruz Pedregon topped the Funny Car field.
Last event: Robert Hight won the Gatornationals on March 26, beating boss John Force in the Funny
Car final. Doug Kalitta won in Top Fuel, Johnson in Pro Stock, and Steve Johnson in Pro Stock
Motorcycle.
Fast facts: The event is the fourth of the season. ... Force leads the Funny Car standings. The 64-yearold driver won the season-opening Winternationals in Pomona, Calif., for his record 139th victory. He
won his record 16th season title last year.
Next event: NHRA Four-Wide Nationals, April 11-13, zMAX Dragway, Concord, N.C.
Online: http://www.nhra.com
BOXING
Fight Schedule
The Associated Press
(Televised fights in parentheses)
Friday’s Fights
At 4 Bears Casino & Lodge, New Town, S.D.
(ESPN2), "Boxcino" lightweight tournament
semifinals: Chris Rudd vs. Petr Petrov; Miguel
Gonzalez vs. Fernando Carcamo (8 rounds).
Saturday’s Fights
At Berlin, Yoan Pablo Hernandez vs. Pawel
Kolodziej, 12, for Hernandez's IBF cruiserweight
title.
At Newcastle, England, Stuart Hall vs. Martin
Ward, 12, for Hall's IBF bantamweight title.
At the Ballroom, Boardwalk Hall, Atlantic City,
N.J. (HBO), Sergey Kovalev vs. Cedric Agnew,
12, for Kovalev's WBO light heavyweight title;
Thomas Dulorme vs. Karim Mayfield, 10, for the
vacant NABF junior welterweight title.
Thursday, April 3
At Fantasy Springs Casino, Indio, Calif. (FS1),
Luis Ortiz vs. Monte Barrett, 10, heavyweights;
Gerald Washington vs. Skipp Scott, 10, heavyweights.
COMICS
Thursday, March 27, 2014
Retail
By Norm Feuti
For Better or Worse
By Lynn Johnston
Blondie
By Dean Young & Denis Lebrun
Mother Goose & Grimm
Baby Blues
By Mike Peters
By Rick Kirkman & Jerry Scott
By Pat Brady
Rose Is Rose
Funky Winkerbean
By Tom Batiuk
By Johnny Hart
B.C.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.
CHIDT
©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.
RIREV
LACAAP
TAYREE
Jumble puzzle magazines available at pennydellpuzzles.com/jumblemags
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Lio
By Mark Tatulli
Crankshaft
By Tom Batiuk
Garfield
Gasoline Alley
Zits
By Jim Davis
By Jim Scancarelli
By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
Marvin
By Tom Armstrong
Pearls Before Swine
By Stephan Pastis
Get Fuzzy
By Darby Conley
Su Do Ku Tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com.
For solutions, check “JRC Publications” on the
solutions page of www.sudoku.com.
© Puzzles by Pappocom
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.
Ans.
here:
Yesterday’s
Cryptoquote
THE CALL B5
(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles: ABATE
FOCAL
COUPLE
FERVOR
Answer: When the instructor didn’t charge for the
parachute lesson, it was a — FREE FALL
THE
Blackstone
CALL Valley alues
V
Thursday, March 27, 2014
Legals
100 Legals
100 Legals
MORTGAGEE'S NOTICE
OF SALE OF
REAL ESTATE
261-263 ELM STREET,
WOONSOCKET, RI
02895
The premises described
in the mortgage will be
sold subject to all encumbrances and prior
liens on April 18, 2014
at 11:00 AM on the
premises, by virtue of
the power of sale contained in a mortgage by
David Alencar and
Nalzira Alencar dated
May 13, 2005 and
recorded
in
the
Woonsocket Land Evidence Records in Book
100 Legals
1437 Page 345, the ORLANS MORAN PLLC
conditions of said mortAttorney for the
gage having been bro- Present Holder of the
ken.
Mortgage
P.O. Box 540540
TERMS OF SALE:
Waltham, MA 02454
A deposit of FIVE Phone: 781-790-7800
THOUSAND DOLLARS
362.7152
AND
00
CENTS
NOTICE
OF
($5,000.00) in the form
of a certified check or MORTGAGEE'S SALE
263 Morin Street
bank treasurer s check
Woonsocket,
will be required to be
Rhode Island
delivered at or before
the time the bid is offered. The description The premises described
of the premises con- in the mortgage will be
tained in said mortgage sold, subject to all enshall control in the cumbrances, prior liens
event of an error in this and such matters which
publication.
Other may constitute valid
terms will be an- liens or encumbrances
after sale, at public aucnounced at the sale.
tion on April 17, 2014
at 10:00 AM, on the
premises by virtue of
the power of sale in
continued next column
said mortgage made by
Edward J. Magner and
Julie A. Magner, dated
continued next column
continued next column
Harrisville Fire District
COLLECTOR’S SALE OF ESTATES FOR TAXES AND/OR ASSESSMENTS
DUE AND UNPAID
The undersigned, Tax Collector of the Harrisville Fire District located in the
Town of Burrillville, hereby gives notice that she will sell at public auction to the
Highest Bidder in the Harrisville Fire District Office, located at, 115 Central
Street, Harrisville, Rhode Island, 02830, on the 18TH day of April 2014 at 10:00
a.m., local time, the following described parcels of real estate (for the levy upon
which notice is hereby given) or so much thereof as may be necessary to pay the
Harrisville Fire District taxes and/or assessments of the Harrisville Fire District
located in the Town of Burrillville which constitute a lien thereon, together with
the costs and interest thereon, and the costs and charges incident to this sale.
Each of the following described parcels of real estate will be sold for the payment
of the taxes and/or assessment assessed. Information as to the nature of the said taxes and/or assessment and the amounts due on the several parcels may be obtained
from the undersigned, and will be announced at the sale.
Be advised that if your property in which you have a substantial interest is sold
at tax sale, then you have one year to redeem it through the Collector’s Office or
through the tax sale purchaser by tendering the real estate taxes, sewer and/or assessments paid, plus a ten percent penalty on the tax sale amount, plus one percent
interest on the tax sale amount per month from the seventh month onward.
After the passage of one year, you may exercise your right to redeem through the
tax sale purchaser or his attorney, or, if a petition to foreclose your right of redemption has been filed in Superior Court, you may redeem through the Court until a
final decree is entered forever foreclosing your right of redemption.
For a more particular description of the said estates, reference is hereby made to
the records and plats in the office of the Clerk of said Town of Burrillville.
TERMS: CASH OR BANK CHECK ONLY
Brenda M. Gingell, Tax Collector
Harrisville Fire District
Estate Taxed to:
Estate Taxed to:
Parcel ID: 141/95/4-3
Michael F. Methot
Jay B Godleski & Monique Title Code: 10
Property Location:
R. Deroche
234 Jefferson Road
Property Location:
Estate Taxed to:
33 Tall Timber Trail Drive US Bank National Associ- Harrisville, RI 02830
Harrisville, RI 02830
ation as Indenture Trustee Parcel ID: 160/34-10-2
Title Code: 25
Parcel ID: 159/15
for American Home
Title Code: 1
Mortgage Investment Trust
Estate Taxed to:
2005-4A
Ronald Normandin, Leah
Estate Taxed to:
Property Location:
Brown & Patrick T. Conley
Mark W Baker & Julie A 58 Hill Road
Property Location:
Baker
Harrisville, RI 02830
165 Callahan School Street
Property Location:
Parcel ID: 142/13
Harrisville, RI 02830
311 Chapel Street
Title Code: 11
Parcel ID: 142/95
Harrisville, RI 02830
Title Code: 26
Parcel ID: 142/69
Estate Taxed to:
Title Code: 3
Ralph A Hopkins Jr
Estate Taxed to:
Property Location:
Richard E Ross & Carolyn
Estate Taxed to:
0 Chapel Street
D Ross
Deutsche Bank National Harrisville, RI 02830
Property Location:
Trust Company
Parcel ID: 158/21
1145 Sherman Farm Road
Property Location:
Title Code: 12
Harrisville, RI 02830
1584 Round Top Road
Parcel ID: 057/11
Harrisville, RI 02830
Estate Taxed to:
Parcel ID: 021/11
Dennis C Leahey & Paula Title Code: 34
Title Code: 7
Leahey
Estate Taxed to:
Property Location:
Gerard S Smith
Estate Taxed to:
735 Steere Farm Road
Property Location:
Federal National Mortgage Pascoag, RI 02859
283 Chapel Street
/ Fannie Mac
Parcel ID: 230/9
Harrisville, RI 02830
Property Location:
Title Code: 21
Parcel ID: 142/66
295 Joslin Road
Title Code: 35
Glendale, RI 02826
Estate Taxed to:
Roland Martin & Janice A
Parcel ID: 112/4
Martin
Estate Taxed to:
Title Code: 8
Property Location:
Richard Williams
650 Cherry Farm Road
Property Location:
Estate Taxed to:
0 Union Avenue
Harrisville, RI 02830
David J Harrop
Pascoag, RI 02859
Parcel ID: 092/4
Property Location:
Parcel ID: 141/131
63 Sanwood Drive, Unit #3 Title Code: 23
Title Code: 40
Harrisville, RI 02830
“There’s More $$$ In That Old Car, Truck,
Van or Motorcycle That You Thought.”
You’ll fill up when you sell that old set of wheels through
the Classifieds and this offer available only to subscribers.
5 LINES ONLY
$
19.95
ad appears up to 60 days
(No Dealers)
100 Legals
g
July 26, 2006, and
recorded
in
the
Woonsocket, RI Land
Evidence Records in
Book 1560 at Page 305,
the conditions of said
mortgage having been
broken. $5,000.00 in
cash, certified or bank
check required to bid.
Other terms to be announced at the sale.
SHECHTMAN
HALPERIN SAVAGE,
LLP
1080 Main Street
Pawtucket,
Rhode Island
Attorney for the
present
Holder of the Mortgage
MORTGAGEE S NOTICE
OF SALE OF
REAL ESTATE
329 SECOND AVENUE,
WOONSOCKET, RI
02895
The premises described
in the mortgage will be
sold subject to all encumbrances and prior
liens on April 11, 2014
at 01:00 PM on the
premises, by virtue of
the power of sale contained in a mortgage by
Richard S. Shepard
a/k/a Richard S. Shephard and Michael Salas
dated December 8,
2004 and recorded in
the Woonsocket Land
Evidence Records in
Book 1402 Page 511,
the conditions of said
mortgage having been
broken.
100 Legals
Patricia M. Murphy,
Chairman
Bellingham
Planning Board
The Call - 767-8503
or The Times - 365-1438
Reaching Over 120,000 Homes
WHOLESALE nursery, specializing in, but not limited to aquatic plants & related supplies looking for
individuals
willing
to
learn, work and grow.
Outside
work,
office
work, deliveries, shipping-all positions are
multi function. We work
regardless of weather and
some tasks are physically
demanding. Call and tell
us how you can be an asset: 508-634-1914 Mendon Mass.
Livestock
241 Free Pets
information, call toll free FREE Cats (2) to a good
1-877-FTC-HELP. A pub- home, neutered, update
lic service message from with shots. 769-6211
The Call and the Federal
Trade Commission.
Merchandise
Vehicles
257 Camping –
Sports - Outdoors
Rhode Island Housing is
seeking proposals from
property
owners
and
developers for participation in the Section 8
Project-Based VASH (Veterans Affairs Supportive
Housing) Program.
For more information,
please visit
ited. 4dr., 4x4, 3 seat,
auto, leather, mint, one 5424
owner, must see $2250. TEA Wagon, has 2 drop
Call 401-426-1054
leafs, pine, $70.00. 401258-5424
2002 MURCURY Grand
Marquis LS 4dr, auto,
loaded, showroom, 1
owner, must see $2,500.
401-426-0975
2008 Dodge Caravan SE. 7
passenger van. Loaded,
V6, auto, nice, runs new,
must see, one owner.
$2850firm 401-241-0413
TOWN OF
BELLINGHAM
PLANNING BOARD
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
The Bellingham Planning Board will conduct
a public hearing on
Thursday April 10,
2014 at 7:00 PM in the
continued next column
267 Health/Exercise
Equipment
Cross country exercise
machine. $50. Call 7252057
273 Miscellaneous
Merchandise
98 Acura Legend LS. 4 dr, 24 INCH folding dog crate,
loaded, auto, V6, black, excellent
condition,
moonroof, wheels, 2nd $15.00. 401-765-0422
owner, new inspection,
$1450. 401-663-7977
276 TV – Video –
Stereo
126 Trucks
rhodeislandhousing.org
Call one of our Classified
Customer Service Reps
England 582 Quaker Hwy,
Uxbridge
golf clubs,
Will be sold subject to 123 Autos For Sale OVERSIZED
steel, Max Fli, $65.00.
all encumbrances and
401-765-2519
prior liens at public
Dodge Neon SE, 4dr, 261 Coins & Stamps
auction on April 10, 02loaded,
auto, 4cyl., silver,
low
mil, must see & drive
2014, at 10:00 a.m. lo1936-PS, 1939-PS, 1940$1450. 401-426-1054
cal time on the premisD silver dimes, all 5 about
uncirculated,
$32.00.
es by virtue of the Pow401-597Grand Cherokee Woonsocket
er of Sale contained in 02Ltd.Jeep
4dr., loaded, auto, 2 6426
the certain Mortgage or 4 wheel, alloys, ex- Buying US coins dated beblack, with saddle, fore 1965: dimes $1.25,
Deed made and execut- tra's,
$2500 401-301-0056
quarters $3.12, halves
ed by Ethel M. Chan
$6.25. Woonsocket. 401dated October 21, 1999 VOLKWAGON Pas- 597-6426
2011, and recorded in sat, 4 door, loaded, V6,
wheels, nice, must
265 Furniture book 1937 at page 68 blue,
see. $1,250. 401-301Household
0056
with the Records of
Land Evidence of the
Corian
sink
DODGE RAM 4x4, GREAT
City of Woonsocket, 2000
1500 series, five speed 31”x21” and two Delta
faucets.
$50.
766-2416.
State of Rhode Island, transmission, inspected.
Leave message if no anthe conditions of said $2,000 /best 401-787- swer.
4764
mortgage having been
PERFECT WW 22 medal
broken. $5,000.00 in 2000 VOLKSWAGON Jetta desk, seven drawers, two
sliding shelves, 5' by 2'.
cash, certified check or GXE edition, 4 dr, loaded,
32MPG, mint 2nd 766-2416 leave message
bank check required to auto,
owner, low miles $1,900. if no answer.
bid. Other terms and 401-426-0975
PINE Dry Sink, 30 in
length, 18 in wide, 31 in
conditions will be an2002 Ford Expedition Lim- high, full door on bottom
nounced at the sale.
rd
$50.00/best.
401-258-
MADDEN |
BROCKMANN, LLC
Attorneys for
the Mortgagee
400 Westminster
Street, Suite 200
Providence,
Rhode Island 02903
401-274-1155
304 Apartments
Unfurnished
Municipal Center s Ar5 ROOMS, 1st floor rear,
cand Meeting Room on
parking, no pets/smokthe Harris & Co., LLC,
ing, 1 mo. security $650
mo. Apply @ 463 Front
57
Louisa
Drive,
St. 1st floor front 401Whitinsville, MA, appli769-5709
cation for Development
BELLINGHAM 1st, 5 room,
2 bed, 1 bath, coin ops,
Plan Review under 204 General Help
heat & hot water includ§240-16 of the BellingWanted
ed, private driveway, detached garage $1,050mo.
ham Zoning Bylaw. The
4 room, 1 bed, 1
HELP
wanted
drivers
needproposal is for the con- ed to transport special 3RD,
bath, heat, hot water,
electric
included, coin op
struction a new 5,000 needs students to school.
positions available, detached garage, private
s.f. garage with offices 10
must be 21 yrs. old with driveway $700mo. Call
for
use
as
a valid drivers license for 3 765-2791
7D Driver license a OAK Grove 2nd , 2 bed, apcontractor s yard at 306 yrs.
plus. Call Renee/Jan at
heat, $950 + seMaple Street. The exist- Mark's Transportation pliances,
curity. Call after 12 Noon.
508-473-3600
or
drop
in
401-762-2949
ing residential house is at 51 East Main Street,
UPPER Grove st. 2 bed,
proposed to remain. Milford, MA
2nd , no utilities, no smok306 Maple Street is lo- Operations Assistant Man- ing,
no pets, garage, apcated north of the High ager. Must have at least 2 pliances, laundry, $750yrs managerial experi- mo. $750 security 401Street intersection on ence. Full time with bene- 766-4353
the east side of Maple fits. No phone calls, must
in person. AdStreet,
Assessor s apply
305 Apartments
vanced Auto Recycling,
Map/Lot 37-6A and 37- 290 Curran Road, CumFurnished
6B in the Industrial berland, RI. 02864
Zone. Project plans Part Time - Credit and $95/week & up. 1-2 room
Specialist
single occupancy. Safe,
were designed by Land WeCollection
are seeking a detailed, secure & clean. Laundry.
Planning, Inc. 167 Hart- efficient team member to Sober community. Utiliin our accounting ties
incl.
Main
St.
ford Avenue, Belling- work
Woonsocket 401-766-4931
department.
ham, MA. Interested Must have High School 1 BED All new, all utilities,
or equivalent and
to
move
in
parties are invited to at- diploma
a minimum of one year ready
Woonsocket.
401-447related
experience, in- 4451 or 769-0095
tend the public hearing.
computerized
The application may be cluding
accounting system.
NEW TODAY
viewed at the Planning Computer experience in DOWNTOWN area 1 room
QuickBooks a plus.
Board Office, 2 Mewith kitchen & bath, all
Email: pdreesen@
utilities furnished, private
excellentcoffee.com
chanic Street, Tel: 508entrance 401-524-1361
Fax:
401-729-6833
657-2892, on Tuesday
(no phone calls)
or Thursday 9:00 AM
Specialist 306 House/Duplexes
3:00 PM and Friday WAREHOUSE
Plumbing/Heating
&
For Rent
from 9:00 AM 1:00 HVAC Distributor looking
for warehouse specialist. PRIVILEDGE St. 4 bed
PM and also at the Exp w/forklifts, RF Gun, &
hook ups, new
Town Clerk s Office, computer skills. Heavy house,
hardwood, large yard, no
required 75lbs. De- pets. $1200mo.765-6065
Municipal
Center, lifting
pendable, self-motivated
Bellingham, MA during & hard working. Pre-emdrug screen.
regular Town Hall busi- ployment
Benefits & 401K. Apply in
ness hours.
person at Supply New
TERMS OF SALE:
A deposit of FIVE Annoucements
THOUSAND DOLLARS
AND
00
CENTS
($5,000.00) in the form
of a certified check or
bank treasurer s check
will be required to be
delivered at or before
the time the bid is offered. The description 111 Special Notices
of the premises contained in said mortgage
shall control in the Notice To Our
event of an error in this
Readers
publication.
Other Companies that do busiby phone can't ask
terms will be an- ness
you to pay for credit benounced at the sale.
fore you get it. For more
ORLANS MORAN PLLC
Attorney for the
Present Holder of the
Mortgage
P.O. Box 540540
Waltham, MA 02454
Phone: 781-790-7800
231.8612
MORTGAGEE S SALE
62 Cato Street
Woonsocket,
Rhode Island
Employment
98 FORD Ranger, 4x4, extended cab, 6 cyl., runs
great. $2,495. 401-7690095 or 401-447-4451
129 Motorcycles Mopeds - ATVs
SONY 50 inch flat screen,
$75.00. 401-769-1899
277 Toys –
Children's Items
Britax car seat. Silver and
black. New. Holds 5-65
lbs. $60. Call 603-7519
304 Apartments
Unfurnished
2004 HARLEY Davidson,
Superglider, 1 owner, 13k
miles, like new $6,500. Central Falls 36 Hadwin St:
769-0095 or 401-447- 3 bed $650. Call 401640-0351
4451
Cars?
Jobs?
Homes?
Find
Them
Here.
www.woonsocketcall.com
B6 THE CALL
THE CALL B7
Thursday, March 27, 2014
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
FOR $2.00 A DAY ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS HERE
CALL FOR DETAILS 401-767-8510
Wolf Construction
“we’re ahead of the pack”
All phases of construction
Full Licensed & Insured
Ray
401-787-0731
Call 765-2360
Priority Waste Disposal
Woonsocket, RI
DECKS
ADDITIONS
ROOFING & SIDING
TAX
PREPARER
Have your personal or
business income taxes
done by an experienced
tax accountant with a
graduate degree.
Free Estimates
F I N I S H & PA I N T I N G
• Container Services
• Residential/Commercial
• Container Sizes 2yds-10yds
• Trash Services Available Weekly
• Cleanouts • Junk Removal, Demo
• Sheds, Pools, Garages
(401) 626-9748 • www.prioritydisposal.com
CRITTER CONTROL OF GREATER RHODE ISLAND
RACCOONS • MICE
SQUIRRELS • SKUNKS
FLYING SQUIRRELS
WOODCHUCKS • OPOSSUMS
SPIDERS • OTHER PESTS
Protecting People, Property & Wildlife©
401-637-7991
ANIMAL DAMAGE REPAIRS
ATTIC & CHIMNEY SCREENS INSTALLED
Or 1-800-CRITTER
EXCLUSION & PREVENTION
rhodeisland.crittercontrol.com
24 HOUR SERVICE
Custom Made
Fabric
Awnings
Since 1926
“Let’s Cover You in Style”
Residential
Specialty for
Windows &
Decks
Free Estimates • 401-769-4195 • www.woonsocketawning.com
68 S. Main St. Bldg. 2, Woonsocket, RI 02895
LEMAY’S SHARPENING
Saws, Chains
Skates, Carbide Scissors,
Many Other Tools
Winter Hours: Sept 1 - April
Mon 12pm-8pm, Tue, Wed & Thur 10am-8pm, Fri 10am-7pm, Sat 8am-7pm
SUNDAY 10AM-5PM
STARTING OCT THRU MARCH
206 St. Barnabe St., Woonsocket, RI
(401) 769-1095 • Cell: 401-762-2660
Mark S. Brizard
Lic. #132
BRIZARD & SON GENERAL PAINTING
~Interior/Exterior Painting Professionals~
Affordable Quality & Service Since 1980
Free Consultation
And Estimate
401-568-0033
Fully Insured
Martel (401)724-4129
Family Owned Since 1926
Plumbing & Heating
Oil to Gas Conversion
Hot Water Tanks Replaced (same-day replacement)
New Toilets, Sinks, Tubs Installed
BONA FIDE HOME INSPECTIONS
A+ Rating with Better Business Bureau
Easy to read reports with digital pics
R.I. General Contractor # 34474
Over 15,000 homes inspected
10% DISCOUNT WITH THIS AD
www.bonafideforyou.com
100’ Crane • Bucket Truck • Back Hoe & Bobcat Work
Storm Damage • Tree Climbing • Stump Grounding
Tree Trimming/Pruning • Firewood/Log Loads
Noel (401) 309-6186
CHILD CARE OPENINGS
Children 1-5 years of age - Full or Part-Time Care
Offering: Nutritious Meals • Activities • Large Yard
• Home Environment • Easy Access for 146/ 295/ 99
Licensed Since 1993 • CPR & First Aid Certified
Little Explorer’s Childcare
CONTACT LAURIE 401-766-0237 • 401-487-0713
595 Logee Street, Woonsocket, RI 02895
ANIMAL ARTS
PROFESSIONAL
Dog & Cat Grooming
7 Main Street, Blackstone, MA
Friendly, caring, family oriented full
service grooming shop since 2009.
You will always see the same faces
each & every time you visit us! We use
hypoallergenic shampoos & conditioners
only. Combined 30 years experience.
By appointment only & require vaccinations.
Call today and ask for Kim (Owner/Dog
Groomer) or Heidi (Dog/Cat Groomer)
(508) 876-9900
RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL
Over 30 Years • Insured • RI Lic#7271
Ron Nichols 401-766-5175 • Cell 401-339-4625
[email protected]
48 Norman Street, Woonsocket, RI 02895
161 Hawthorn Circle
Woonsocket
Rhode Island
(401) 766-3443
New seeding & lawn repairs • Lawn mowing
Trimming & pruning of Shrubs & Evergreens
Prune trees •Spring cleanups, Fall cleaning • Snow plowing
www.dandblandscapinginc.com
Don Heroux Cell: (401) 474-9703 • Brian Heroux Cell: (401) 996-8989
KLEEN SWEEP JANITORIAL, LLC
Servicing All Your Cleaning Needs
Professional Building, Office, Home & Facility Cleaning
Restroom Cleaning & Hygiene Service
Disease Prevention & Odor Control
Expert Carpet Cleaning / Strip & Wax Floors
Construction Site Cleanup
22 Years in
Business
375 Putnam Pike, Suite 7, Smithfield, RI 02917
TEL. (401) 949-3100/FAX. (401) 949-2250
NEW ENGLAND WINDOW SIDING & REMODELING
General Contracting
Kitchen & Bath Remodeling • Replacement Windows
Vinyl & Wood Siding • Decks • Additions & More
Licensed & Insured in RI and MA
FREE ESTIMATES - CALL 1-800-696-7160 OR 508-478-7160
www.newsremodeling.com
WINTER SPECIAL - 10% OFF WITH THIS AD
Expires 4/1/14
Mike T’s Hauling Services
If you have a small haul, make that call!
401-241-5950
Pick-up/delivery services
• Construction Material
• Mulch • Gravel • Firewood
• Small Furniture • Home Appliances
Construction debris removal
Scrap Metal removal
Basement clean outs
Snow removal (insured)
Affordable Rates! Mike T’s Hauling Services
Call 401-241-5950
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&
CLEAR OUT
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to Subscribers Only!
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Items Under $250 ......$5.00
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OVER 166,000 READERS
Call one of our Classified Customer Service Reps
The Call - 767-8503 or The Times - 365-1438
PRIVATE PARTY ONLY. NO VEHICLES OR PETS.
its financial health, he said
in a written statement.
As with Citigroup, the
Fed said it found deficiencies in the capital plans of
HSBC North America
Holdings, RBS Citizens
Financial Group, Santander
Holdings USA, which
recently bought Sovereign
Bank branches in Rhode
Island, and Zions Bancorp.
The central bank, however,
approved requests outright
from the other 25 tested
banks, which included
JPMorgan Chase, Wells
Fargo and Morgan Stanley,
in addition to Bank of
America and Goldman
Sachs.
The dividends and share
buybacks that the Fed was
weighing are important to
ordinary investors, and
banks. The banks know that
their investors suffered big
losses in the financial crisis,
and they are eager to reward
them. Some shareholders,
especially retirees, rely on
dividends for a portion of
their income.
Raising dividends costs
money. The regulators don’t
want banks to deplete their
capital reserves, making
them vulnerable in another
recession. Buybacks also
are aimed at helping shareholders. By reducing the
number of a company’s outstanding shares, earnings
per share can increase.
Hope fades to find
D&S Painting missing in deadly
Interior/ Exterior • Free Estimates
Washington mudslide
Singing Phone-a-gram
For All Occasions
Surprise Someone Special
Anywhere in the United States
$10.00
WASHINGTON (AP) —
Citigroup cannot raise its
dividend or buy back its
own stock because it needs
better plans to cope with a
severe recession, the
Federal Reserve ruled
Wednesday, a disappointing
reversal for one of the
nation's largest banks.
The Fed also rejected the
capital plans of four other
big banks, including RBS
Citizens Financial Group,
parent company of Citizens
Bank, as part of its socalled “stress tests,” an
annual check-up of the
nation's 30 biggest financial
institutions.
The Fed said that the
capital plans of Citigroup
fell short in some areas,
including its ability to forecast revenues and losses in
parts of its global operations, should they come
under economic stress.
Citi said it asked the Fed
for permission to buy back
$6.4 billion in shares
through the first quarter of
next year, and to raise its
dividend to 5 cents each
quarter.
Citi CEO Michael Corbat
said the company was
“deeply disappointed” by
the Fed decision. The dividend and buyback would
have been a “modest level
of capital” for shareholders,
and Citi still would have
exceeded requirements for
401.644.3930
(401) 725-6854
(401) 434-0095
(401) 334-1357
FREE
Licensed & insured
Estimates
in RI and MA
In Business Over 40 Years
ACCREDITED
BUSINESS
bbb.org
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barred from raising
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has iimmediate
h
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i
ffor
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carriers
Earn Extra Cash delivering
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We’re looking for special people who are
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To learn more about independent contractor
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The Call, 75 Main St., Woonsocket, RI
DARRINGTON, Wash.
(AP) — Becky Bach watches and waits, hoping that
search crews find her brother and three other relatives
who are missing in
Washington state’s deadly
mudslide.
Doug Massingale waits
too, for word about his 4month-old granddaughter.
Searchers were able to identify carpet from the infant’s
bedroom, but a log jam
stood in the way of a more
thorough effort to find little
Sanoah Huestis, known as
“Snowy.”
With little hope to cling
to, family members of the
missing are beginning to
confront a grim reality:
Their loved ones might
never be found, remaining
entombed forever inside a
mountain of mud that is
believed to have claimed at
least 24 lives.
“It just generates so
many questions if they
don’t find them,” Bach said.
“I’ve never known anybody
to die in a natural disaster.
Do they issue death certificates?”
Search crews using dogs,
bulldozers and their bare
hands kept slogging through
the mess of broken wood
and mud again Wednesday,
looking for more bodies or
anyone who might still be
alive nearly five days after a
wall of fast-moving earth
destroyed a small rural
community. But authorities
have acknowledged they
might have to leave some
victims buried.
Trying to recover every
corpse would be impractical
and dangerous.
The debris field is about
a square mile and 30 to 40
feet deep in places, with a
moon-like surface that
includes quicksand-like
muck, rain-slickened mud
and ice. The terrain is difficult to navigate on foot and
makes it treacherous or
impossible to bring in heavy
equipment.
To make matters worse,
the pile is laced with other
hazards that include fallen
trees, propane and septic
tanks, twisted vehicles and
countless shards of shattered homes.
“We have to get on with
our lives at some point,”
said Bach, who has spent
the past several days in the
area in hopes that searchers
would find her brother, his
wife, her 20-year-old great
niece and the young girl's
fiance.
Sixteen bodies have been
recovered, but authorities
believe at least 24 people
were killed. And scores of
others are still unaccounted
for, although many of those
names were believed to be
duplicates or people who
escaped safely.
Study: Smartphone app
helps alcoholics stay sober
CHICAGO (AP) — A
smartphone app for recovering alcoholics that
includes a panic button and
sounds an alert when they
get too close to taverns
helped keep some on the
wagon, researchers who
developed the tool found.
The sober app studied
joins a host of others that
serve as electronic shoulder angels, featuring a
variety of options for trying to prevent alcoholics
and drug addicts from
relapsing.
Adults released from inpatient alcoholism treatment centers who got free
sober smartphones reported
fewer drinking days and
more overall abstinence
than those who got the
usual follow-up support.
The results were based
on patients’ self-reporting
on whether they resumed
drinking, a potential limitation. Still, addiction
experts say the immediacy
of smartphone-based help
could make them a useful
tool in fighting relapse.
Mark Wiitala, 32, took
part in the study and says
the app helped save his
life. He said the most helpful feature allowed him to
connect to a network of
peers who’d gone through
the same recovery program. The app made them
immediately accessible for
an encouraging text or
phone call when he needed
an emotional boost.
“It’s an absolutely
amazing tool,” said
Wiitala, of Middlesex
County, Mass. He said he’s
continued to use it even
though the study ended.
The study was published
online Wednesday in
JAMA Psychiatry.
It involved 271 adults
followed for a year after
in-patient treatment for
alcoholism at one of several U.S. centers in the
Midwest and Northeast.
NATION
B8 THE CALL
Thursday, March 27, 2014
Ukraine crisis taking toll on Obama job approval rating
Positives plummet
to 41 percent in poll
CONNIE CASS
and JENNIFER AGIESTA
Associated Press
WASHINGTON — Foreign policy used to stand out as a not-sobleak spot in the public’s waning
assessment of Barack Obama. Not
anymore. He’s getting low marks
for handling Russia’s swoop into
Ukraine, and more Americans than
ever disapprove of the way Obama
is doing his job, according to a
new Associated Press-GfK poll.
Despite the poor performance
reviews, Obama’s primary tactic so
far — imposing economic sanctions on key Russians — has
strong backing.
Close to 9 out of 10 Americans
support sanctions as a response to
Russia’s annexation of the Crimean
Peninsula, the poll indicates. About
half of that group says the U.S.
sanctions so far are about right,
while the other half wants to see
them strengthened, the AP-GfK
poll found.
Most Democrats say the sanctions were OK, while a majority of
Republicans find them too weak.
“We’re supposed to be a country
that helps smaller countries in
need,” said Christopher Ashby, 29,
a Republican in Albemarle, N.C.,
who wants a more powerful
response. “Ukraine at this time is
definitely in need.”
Ashby, a stay-at-home dad caring for three young daughters, said,
“When I look at Obama, I see my
5-year-old daughter looking at
something that just happened and
saying ‘What do I do?’'”
Overall disapproval of the job
Obama is doing ticked up to 59
percent — a record high for his
presidency — in the poll released
Wednesday. That’s still well below
the 72 percent disapproval rate that
former President George W. Bush
recorded in the AP-GfK poll in
October 2008. Still, Obama’s 41
percent approval rating is a sobering number for fellow Democrats
running in this fall’s House and
Senate elections.
Americans are now divided over
which party they would rather see
in control of Congress. Democrats
held a slight edge over
Republicans in the January APGfK poll.
Obama gets lowest marks for
his handling of the federal budget,
immigration and the economy.
Support for Obama’s education
policies, which had been a strong
point, dipped into negative territory this month, too.
Republicans have long criticized
the president as too weak in asserting American power abroad. Yet
until now, foreign policy hasn’t
been a drag on Obama’s second
term: Americans were about as
likely to endorse his actions as to
disapprove.
Now he’s hit a new low on
international relations — just 40
percent approval.
Majorities say they dislike
Obama's handling of the Ukraine
situation (57 percent) and his interactions with Russia (54 percent).
Almost half of those polled say
they support imposing tougher
sanctions if Russia pushes into new
regions or other countries; only 14
percent are opposed. That backs up
threats from Obama and Western
allies to target Russia’s economy
with damaging sanctions if
President Vladimir Putin goes further.
About a third of those surveyed
said they oppose giving monetary
aid to nations targeted by Russia.
Only about 20 percent approve of
financial support, while the biggest
share is neutral. This week
Congress is considering $1 billion
in loan guarantees for Ukraine
sought by Obama.
The idea of lending any type of
military support to Ukraine is
unpopular, the poll says.
Obama has said there are no
plans to use military force to dislodge Russia from the Crimean
Peninsula.
`