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Industry enterprise
and RTO partnerships
DECEMBER 2010
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships
Page 1
Contact
NQC Secretariat
TVET Australia
Level 21/390 St Kilda Road Melbourne Vic 3004
Telephone: +61 3 9832 8100
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.nqc.tvetaustralia.com.au
Disclaimer
This work has been produced by Mitch Cleary from Precision Consultancy and has been
developed as part of a project commissioned by the National Quality Council in 2010 with
funding through the Australian Government Department of Education Employment and
Workplace Relations and state and territory governments.
The Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups seeking to establish or maintain effective
partnerships in the delivery and assessment of training at the workplace appears as an
appendix to this report together with a PowerPoint presentation which was used in the
interactive workshops conducted as part of this project. The guide may be downloaded at
http://www.nqc.tvetaustralia.com.au/nqc_publications to enable modification by users.
Acknowledgement
Precision Consultancy gratefully acknowledges SkillsDMC Ltd for providing copyright
permission to use the ideas that form the basis of the tool for contextualising units of
competency.
Industry and enterprise RTO partnerships
BACKGROUND AND METHODOLOGY
In its earlier research, Industry/ Enterprise and RTO Partnerships (2009) the NQC
sought to improve the responsiveness of training to industry and employer needs.
Precision Consultancy was contracted to undertake this work on behalf of the
NQC.
Using a case study and action learning approach, the project identified,
documented and disseminated good practice examples of industry/enterprise
partnerships and new ways of working between RTOs and industry/enterprises to
adopt more innovative, flexible approaches to training and skills development.
The project described:
•
strategies for the development of an enterprise learning and assessment plan,
and documentation of processes and procedures that were used in completing
the plan;
•
examples that reflected RTOs and enterprises collaborating in the
contextualising of units of competency; and
•
examples of collaboration between RTOs and enterprises, both in the
identification of relevant sources of evidence guiding assessment decisions
which reflected the enterprise context, and in the efficient and effective use of
third party reports.
The intention of the current project was to follow on from the earlier project and
draw on material used from the action learning sites to develop a guide and
associated resources for:
•
industry and enterprises working with RTOs (with a focus on industry and
enterprises as the audience); and
•
RTOs working with industry associations and enterprises (with a focus on RTOs
as the audience).
This project was also to include a series of interactive information sessions in each
State and Territory and with key industry groups to disseminate the guide and
supporting resources.
At the August meeting of the Quality Assurance Action Group the consultants
sought advice from members of the Action Group about whether they saw benefit
in combining enterprise and industry representatives and RTO representatives in
the interactive workshops or wished separate workshops to be developed. Advice
was also sought about whether two separate booklets should be developed, or
one which combined advice and tools for each audience. The outcome of this
meeting was a decision that the guide to be developed should be focussed on
both audiences, and that individuals from industry groups, enterprises and RTOs
should be invited together in the interactive information sessions.
The draft booklet included nine tools for use by RTOs or enterprises or both.
These are
1. Conducting an RTO skills analysis
2. Choosing an RTO
Industry and enterprise RTO partnerships
3. Negotiating, establishing and maintaining the relationship
4. Conducting a training needs analysis (TNA) and skills audit in the enterprise
5. Developing a learning and assessment strategy
6. Contextualising units of competency
7. Identifying language, literacy and numeracy (LLN) needs in training
specifications
8. Developing mentoring skills
9. Using authentic workplace tasks for training and assessment.
The tools were prefaced by a section which explained the background to the
project and why each of the tools had been developed. Not all tools were
developed from scratch as part of this project. Some were originally developed by
a particular Industry Skills Council and used in the industry, enterprise and RTO
partnership project of 2009, then modified to suit a broader industry context.
Industry and enterprise RTO partnerships
INTERACTIVE INFORMATION SESSIONS
The intention was to combine enterprises and RTOs and to conduct interactive
information sessions in each capital city. The communication strategy for the
project was circulated to the QA AG soon after its August meeting. If 20 people
had attended each of the eight originally planned sessions, a total of 160 people
would have been involved. Original enrolments were much higher than this.
When more than 400 individuals registered to attend, dates and times were
reorganised to try to accommodate the extra interest within the tight timelines of
the project.
One session was held in each of Hobart, Canberra, Darwin, Adelaide and Perth,
while Brisbane filled two sessions, and Melbourne and Sydney each filled four
sessions. Sessions were capped at 25, mainly because of venue constraints as well
as to enable interaction between participants. After 455 individuals had been
accepted into these workshops, there were still individuals attempting to register.
Rather than just respond by informing them that the sessions were
oversubscribed we asked if they wished to register interest in the project and any
future workshops. Before the online registration form was removed, another 145
people had expressed interest. Enquires were received from Cape York, Wagga,
Coffs Harbour and Kalgoorlie, all expressing disappointment that no sessions were
being conducted in regional areas and no provision had been made for web
seminar or other remote access.
Of those registering to attend, 75% were from RTOs, 11% identified as being from
enterprises or industry associations and another 9% from ‘both’ i.e. Enterprise
RTOs. The remaining 5% who selected ‘other’ included state training authority
representatives, VET in schools organisers, government departments both state
and federal, and individual auditors and consultants.
The intention of the interactive information sessions was to provide information
about the project, and the earlier research projects on which it was built, as well
as to provide an opportunity to test the draft tools and guidance materials. A
copy of the draft booklet and tools can be found at Appendix I.
Feedback from the sessions
The feedback from the sessions was overwhelmingly positive, particularly about the
usefulness of the tools.
Quotes from feedback sheets
General comments
Thoroughly enjoyed, multiple ‘light bulb’ moments.
The tools provided were brilliant! I have so many ideas that I can see will be easily
implemented and easily monitored and measured (re effectiveness).
RTOs need to have a more ‘service focused’ attitude. ‘Respect is earned.’
Industry and enterprise RTO partnerships
Can’t wait for the final copy of this, I can’t praise it enough – the content is well
thought out and easy to use/customise for our clients.
As [our organisation is] going through changes nationally, this workshop came in
such a timely manner – regarding our current practices and initiating discussions.
Thank you.
Very worthwhile event given the contestable environment we work in.
What actions will you take to follow up on this session?
Use the tools to fine tune the process between employers, RTO including business
developer and trainers. They are very useful.
Re-evaluate our processes.
Use tools to strengthen and develop partnerships.
Ensure other management attend this session.
Improve communication internally in our RTO between sales staff who talk to
clients directly and staff who actually deliver and organize the actual training.
Work closer with RTOs and really specify the requirements we need for effective
training to be delivered on communities.
There were some excellent points raised and discussed here. I will use some of
these concepts and resources to further develop my resources for management
and staff development.
Consider the skill areas in the tools along with expectations to help develop
individual development plans for team members (including self).
What support activities or products would you like to help
you to engage more effectively in partnerships?
66% said PD for RTO trainers and assessors
35% said PD for enterprise trainers and assessors
61% web based resources
59% networking events
36% print based guides
What else would help?
Models of success would be good
‘Best practice’ guidelines to minimize interpretation differences.
Feedback on the booklet and individual tools
Although most of the feedback was focussed on individual tools, there was
support for retaining the introductory sections which outlined the background to
Industry and enterprise RTO partnerships
the tool development. Suggestions were made to re order the tools against the
stages of a partnership. The consultants believe it is possible to organise the tools
around five stages in a partnership:
1. Readiness
2. Negotiating
3. Implementing
4. Maintaining
5. Evaluating
An additional tool on evaluation was agreed to be added to cover both evaluation
of the outcomes of the training or assessment, and evaluating the partnership
itself.
The table below summarises the feedback on each tool.
Name of Tool
Audience and
context
Description
Feedback
Conducting an
RTO skills analysis
RTOs – before
they consider
partnerships
An internal training needs
analysis tool which enables
an RTO to self assess
whether its staff have the
requisite skills to enter into
and maintain a partnership
with an enterprise.
Very useful but need to
provide clearer introduction
about how to use and who
with
Choosing an RTO
Enterprises –
before they enter
into a partnership
A set of questions for
enterprises to ask RTOs
Very useful for larger
enterprises but simplification
needed for small business and
consideration of a layered
approach – i.e. 3 key
questions – if RTOs pass that
test, move on to next stage
Negotiating,
establishing and
maintaining the
relationship
Enterprises,
industry
associations and
RTOs
A set of questions for each
group to check with the
other – sets up a dialogue to
agree parametersparticularly for longer term
projects or partnerships
Suggestion to realign to
remove overlap with top two
tools and maybe re-write into
three separate tools, one for
each stage.
Conducting a
training needs
analysis (TNA) and
skills audit in the
enterprise
Mainly the RTO
but will need
enterprise
agreement to the
approach
Step by step TNA tool
Some RTOs wanted a ‘simpler’
tool but enterprises often
stated that this step was
either missed altogether or
not done well. Consideration
given to revising into a two
level tool – overview
questions, then in depth TNA.
Developing a
training and
RTOs are required
to develop these
AQTF compliant training and
assessment strategy
Some RTOs claimed this tool
was unnecessary as it was a
Industry and enterprise RTO partnerships
Name of Tool
Audience and
context
Description
Feedback
assessment
strategy
but it should be
developed in
consultation with
the client
enterprise or
industry group
template which includes
instructions about how to
engage enterprises and get
their input
requirement of the AQTF, but
some enterprise participants
were unaware of the
requirement for industry
input and saw it as a useful
template to capture their
input
Contextualising
units of
competency
RTO trainers and
assessors
A tool to help trainers and
assessors contextualise a
unit of competency for a
specific enterprise or
worksite
Considered very useful but
not enough on its own to
develop this skill in trainers
and assessors. An additional
tool for RTOs to start from
‘where the enterprise is’
rather than a TP unit of
competency needed.
Identifying
language, literacy
and numeracy
(LLN) needs in
training
specifications
RTO trainers and
assessors
A tool to help trainers and
assessors identify the LLN
requirements in a unit of
competency or accredited
course
Considered useful but also a
need for a core skill
requirements tool at an
industry or occupational level,
i.e. what are the key LLN
requirements of a driver, or a
retail salesperson and how
can they be taught in context?
Developing
mentoring skills
RTOs and
enterprises
Advice about the availability
of a mentoring unit of
competency and an
associated workplace
supervisor skill set in the
new TAE10 Training Package
Enterprises keen on
mentoring and have different
approaches to it. The unit
provides a vehicle for RTOs to
engage with enterprises to
help develop the skill and the
system internally and
something for enterprises to
ask for from RTOs that are
training the enterprise’s own
trainers and assessors.
Using authentic
workplace tasks
for training and
assessment
RTO assessors and
enterprises
Advice for RTO assessors
about how to look for and
ask about ‘naturally
occurring evidence’ as a
component of assessment.
Also provides information
for enterprises to help them
engage in discussions with
RTO representatives about
how assessment is to be
done.
RTO representatives varied in
their comments about how
useful this tool would be.
Enterprises keen to have
information which they feel
empowers them to ask for
what they want from the
assessment process.
Industry and enterprise RTO partnerships
RECOMMENDATIONS
Issue: Extremely high demand and unmet demand for workshops
Recommendation: That the QAAG consider how best to encourage the take
up of the materials and provide assistance about how to use the tools.
Options include, conducting additional workshops as an extension of this
project, or encouraging states to conduct workshops for RTOs as part of their
overall VET workforce development plans.
Issue: Many RTOs expressed concern about the recent changes to the AQTF
that require a closer engagement with industry and enterprises and are
unsure about how to go about this.
Recommendation: That further work be undertaken in the area of AQTF
compliance requirements in relation to engagement with industry to provide
practical advice to RTOs about how to go about this and to develop the skills
of their own workforce. This extends beyond the idea of partnerships, into
broader consultation and feedback in relation to the industry areas that the
RTO delivers in.
Issue: Extension work in relation to some of the tools
Recommendation: That the LLN contextualisation tool be balanced by the
development of some tools which link to core foundation skills that are
industry specific.
Issue: Lack of awareness of previous NQC publications – almost no
interactive information session participants were aware of the two previous
research projects undertaken by the NQC in this area or of the fact that
reports could be freely downloaded from the NQC website, in relation to
various aspects of quality in assessment
Recommendation: That the publication of a pdf version of the booklet not be
the only mechanism by which RTOs, enterprises and industry groups receive
copies of the materials. Consideration could be given to sending copies
directly to RTOs, ISCs and other organisations.
Appendices:
I Working in Partnership: A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
II Powerpoint presentation : Working in partnership RTOs, enterprises and
industry groups
Note: The Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups may be downloaded from
http://www.nqc.tvetaustralia.com.au/nqc_publications to enable modification by users.
Industry and enterprise RTO partnerships
.
Working in
partnership
A guide for RTOs, enterprises and
industry groups
National Quality Council Industry
Enterprise and RTO Partnerships 2010
National Quality Council
Industry/Enterprise and RTO Partnerships
2010
DRAFT
IMPORTANT NOTE
This document has been produced by Precision Consultancy for use by participants in
interactive information sessions to be conducted from October to December 2010.
This material has been developed as part of a project “National Quality Council
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships 2010”.
It is in draft form and is provided solely for use in the sessions.
A final version of these materials will be presented to the NQC for acceptance in
December 2010 and final copies will be available for download from
www.nqc.tvetaustralia.com.au after that time.
Comments or queries about these draft materials can be sent to
[email protected]
Contact
NQC Secretariat
TVET Australia
Level 21/390 St Kilda Road Melbourne Vic 3004
Telephone: +61 3 9832 8100
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.nqc.tvetaustralia.com.au
Disclaimer
This guide was developed by Mitch Cleary from Precision Consultancy as part of the Industry
Enterprise and RTO Partnerships project, which was commissioned by the National Quality
Council in 2010 with funding through the Australian Government Department of Education
Employment and Workplace Relations and state and territory governments.
The Guide includes tools which may be used by RTOs, enterprises and industry groups seeking
to establish or maintain effective partnerships in the delivery and assessment of training at the
workplace. It may be downloaded at http://www.nqc.tvetaustralia.com.au/nqc_publications
to enable modification by users.
Acknowledgement
Precision Consultancy gratefully acknowledges SkillsDMC Ltd for providing copyright
permission to use the ideas that form the basis of the tool for contextualising units of
competency.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
Contents
Introduction .............................................................................................................................1
Background to the guide ....................................................................................................... 1
Investigation into industry expectations of vocational education and training (VET)
assessment ....................................................................................................................... 1
Industry/enterprise and RTO partnerships ......................................................................... 1
Who this guide is for ............................................................................................................. 3
Terms used in this guide........................................................................................................ 4
Key findings from the research.................................................................................................5
What do enterprises want? ................................................................................................... 5
What do RTOs want?............................................................................................................. 6
Key strategies........................................................................................................................ 7
Strategies used by enterprises ........................................................................................... 7
Strategies used by RTOs .................................................................................................... 8
Other strategies ................................................................................................................ 9
Skills developed through partnerships ................................................................................... 9
Enterprise personnel ....................................................................................................... 10
Limitations .......................................................................................................................... 11
Tools for an effective partnership – an ongoing process ........................................................ 12
Quick reference guide for partnership tools ........................................................................ 15
Are you ready for a partnership? ........................................................................................... 16
Getting ready for a partnership ........................................................................................... 16
TOOL: Getting ready for a partnership ................................................................................. 17
Conducting an RTO skills analysis ........................................................................................ 19
TOOL: RTO skills analysis ..................................................................................................... 20
Choosing an RTO ................................................................................................................. 23
TOOL: Choosing an RTO – a checklist for enterprises or industry groups .............................. 24
Step 1: Negotiation ................................................................................................................ 27
Steps for negotiating the partnership .................................................................................. 27
TOOL: Steps for negotiating the partnership ....................................................................... 28
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
Step 2: Implementation.......................................................................................................... 30
Implementing the partnership............................................................................................. 30
TOOL: Implementing the partnership .................................................................................. 31
Step 3: Maintenance .............................................................................................................. 34
Maintaining the partnership................................................................................................ 34
TOOL: Maintaining the partnership ..................................................................................... 35
Conducting a training needs analysis and skills audit in the enterprise ................................ 36
TOOL: Conducting a training needs analysis and skills audit in the enterprise ...................... 37
Developing a training and assessment strategy ................................................................... 40
TOOL: Developing a training and assessment strategy ......................................................... 41
Contextualising units of competency ................................................................................... 46
TOOL: The contextualisation process................................................................................... 48
Identifying language, literacy and numeracy (LLN) requirements of units of competency .... 53
TOOL: Identifying language, literacy and numeracy (LLN) requirements of units of
competency ........................................................................................................................ 54
Step 4: Evaluation and review ................................................................................................ 58
Evaluating the outcomes of training and assessment .......................................................... 58
TOOL: RTO focussed responsibility for evaluation – reaction and learning ........................... 59
TOOL: Enterprise/industry focussed responsibility for evaluation – behaviour and results... 60
Reviewing the partnership .................................................................................................. 61
TOOL: Reviewing the partnership ........................................................................................ 62
Supporting the partnership .................................................................................................... 64
Developing mentoring skills ................................................................................................ 64
Using authentic workplace tasks for training and assessment and identifying sources of
evidence ............................................................................................................................. 65
Some background ........................................................................................................... 65
Examples of evidence using workplace activities ............................................................. 65
Strategies to ensure third party evidence is genuine ....................................................... 65
Appendix I .............................................................................................................................. 67
Appendix II: Useful websites .................................................................................................. 70
Appendix III: Bibliography ...................................................................................................... 73
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
Introduction
This guide and the accompanying tools have been developed to encourage Registered Training
Organisations (RTOs), enterprises and industry associations to form effective partnerships. The
resources will assist them to develop and implement training solutions so that Australia has ‘a
productive, sustainable and inclusive future’. (Skills Australia 2010, Australian Workforce Futures: A
National Workforce Development Strategy)
<http://www.skillsaustralia.gov.au/PDFs_RTFs/WWF_strategy.pdf>.
Background to the guide
Investigation into industry expectations of vocational education and training (VET)
assessment
A project conducted by the National Quality Council (NQC) in 2008, Investigation into industry
expectations of VET assessment <http://www.training.com.au/documents/NQC_
VET_Assessment_Report.pdf> identified a growing requirement from industry for training
providers to reflect a closer client focused approach in the design and contextualisation of
training programs and assessment to reflect enterprise needs. The project report highlighted
that satisfaction with assessment processes and outcomes were highest when there was a
strong partnership between the enterprise and the RTO, and when training and assessment
was directly linked to the workplace.
The RTO working with The Westin Hotel is flexible in the way it conducts
training and assessment and has been chosen specifically by the hotel
because of this flexibility. When the RTO started working with The Westin
Hotel they were given an office in the hotel so they could organise the
training and assessment to meet the needs of the hotel. This included
examining job descriptions and organisation documentation, and having
open forums with key personnel, so that the training and assessment was
linked to the hotel’s tasks.
Investigations into industry expectations of VET assessment, p 27.
Industry/enterprise and RTO partnerships
In further research conducted in 2009, Industry/enterprise and RTO partnerships
<http://www.nqc.tvetaustralia.com.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/51021/Enterprise_RTO_p
artnerships_VET_Workforce_Development_final_report_All_Optimised.pdf> the NQC sought to
improve the responsiveness of training to industry and employer needs. Using a case study and
action learning approach, the project identified, documented and disseminated good practice
examples of industry/enterprise partnerships and new ways of working between RTOs and
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
Page 1
industry/enterprises to adopt more innovative, flexible approaches to training and skills
development.
The project described:

strategies for the development of an enterprise learning and assessment plan, and
documentation of processes and procedures that were used in completing the plan

examples that reflected RTOs and enterprises collaborating in the contextualising of
units of competency

examples of collaboration between RTOs and enterprises, both in the identification of
relevant sources of evidence guiding assessment decisions which reflected the
enterprise context.
During this project (the RTO and Vineyard staff) worked collaboratively,
with input from other vineyard site managers, to undertake the
following:

Current procedures, training and assessment tools and records
management systems were reviewed

Job tasks were mapped against individual training plans

A series of Assessor Refresher workshops were undertaken online as professional development opportunities for workplace
assessors

Individual training plans were modified.
Case Study: Fosters Barossa Valley Vineyards and River Murray Training,
Industry/Enterprise and RTO partnerships 2009.
Australian Quality Training Framework
The Australian Quality Training Framework, 2010, <www.training.com.au>, AQTF link, which is
the national set of standards to assure nationally consistent, high-quality training and
assessment services, highlights the need for RTO consultation with industry. Standard 1, which
is about the RTO providing quality training and assessment across all of its operations states:
Strategies for training and assessment meet the requirements of the relevant Training
Package or accredited course and are developed in consultation with industry.
(Standard 1, Element 1.2.)
An extract from the Users’ Guide to the Essential Conditions and Standards for Continuing
Registration, AQTF 2010, which describes the intent of this standards, key actions, guide to
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
Page 2
compliance and explanatory notes, plus suggestions for ‘doing it better’ is provided in
Appendix I.
Australian Workforce Futures: A National Workforce Development Strategy
The Australian Workforce Futures: A National Workforce Development Strategy, Skills Australia
2010, also has an emphasis on the development of stronger partnerships between education
and training providers and industry in order to ‘increase productivity, employee engagement
and satisfaction’ by making better use of skills in the workplace. They report that there are:
... many excellent examples, especially where firms are innovating or restructuring, and
where training providers have worked with enterprises to conduct skills audits of their
staff to identify gaps. Together these providers and enterprises have considered how
the work could be re-organised and jobs designed — potentially with better career
paths — to make the best use of existing and future skills. (p 4)
Who this guide is for
This guide is designed for enterprises and industry groups and RTOs who are planning to work
in partnership, or who are already working in partnership, to develop the workforce. It is
designed to benefit both partners.
The guide, accompanying tools and interactive information sessions draw on material from the
earlier NQC projects. It provides tools to assist industry associations and enterprises working
with RTOs and RTOs working with industry associations and enterprises. The focus of this guide
is on how these partnerships can be developed and maintained.
The guide and accompanying tools also supports and are informed by some of the
recommendations from the Skills Australia report, Australian Workforce Futures, 2010, which
encourages partnerships between industry and the education sector that align training with
business strategy; and provides strategies to lift the unacceptably low level of adult language,
literacy and numeracy.
Australia has the workforce capability required for a productive,
sustainable and inclusive future. Australian enterprises have the capacity
to develop and use the skills of their workforce to maximum advantage for
industry and community benefit.
Vision: Australian Workforce Futures, p 1.
It also supports the updated AQTF 2010 which emphasises RTO collaboration with industry.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
Page 3
Terms used in this guide
Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) are recognised providers of training which are
registered with the relevant state/territory training authority. RTOs are diverse and could be
TAFE and adult community education colleges, private training companies, enterprises,
industry and professional associates or schools. They all need to meet nationally recognised
standards of quality and deliver nationally recognised training and qualifications.
Enterprises are also extremely varied ranging through small, medium and large commercial
organisations.
Industry is a broad term used in this guide to describe representative bodies that have a stake
in the training, assessment and client services provided by RTOs. These representative bodies
could include industry skills councils, industry associations, unions, regulatory bodies, licensing
bodies and peak bodies.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
Page 4
Key findings from the research
The research undertaken as part of the NQC Investigation into industry expectations of VET
assessment project and the Industry/enterprise and RTO partnerships project identified many
successful partnerships between RTOs and industry/enterprises, and strategies for success
used in the partnerships. However, the research also highlighted that this successful practice
was not universal.
What do enterprises want?
The research identified a number of areas where enterprises and industry groups were
dissatisfied with previous relationships with RTOs. When working with an RTO, industry groups
have highlighted the following needs:

RTO has an understanding of the industry group or enterprise, including: its business
and complexity; the conditions of the industry; the need to tailor training to site
specific requirements; and a preparedness to induct their own staff so that they
understand the real needs of the industry.
This program ... involves the joint development of a training program for
the exclusive and internal use of Kuehne & Nagel Australia, using the
services of Myfreightcareer Pty Ltd to deliver the training. The
collaboration will ensure that the training programs are flexible, suit
Kuehne & Nagel’s specific needs and can be incorporated directly into
existing K&N internal training plans and requirements, while maintaining
the integrity of the units of competency, their elements, and performance
criteria.
Action learning report: Kuehne & Nagel Australia and My Freight Career,
Industry/enterprise & RTO Partnerships, Appendix III, p 9.

RTO delivers training to suit the needs of the enterprise or industry group including:
customising resources to suit the enterprise or industry and using up to date materials;
ensuring robust training outcomes so that the industry had confidence in the
assessment; being flexible in terms of time for training and assessment and being
prepared to change as industry needs change; using workplace personnel to be
involved in training and ensuring RTO trainers have current industry knowledge and
experience including an understanding of emerging technology; and building the
capacity of workplace assessors to gather evidence.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
Page 5
DHS allows for learning and assessment tasks to be carried out using on
the job tasks as required, within work time. Because the training and
assessment is based around real work tasks, there is little need to make
adjustments to work schedules.
Case Study: University of Ballarat and Department of Human Services, Grampians Region.
Industry/enterprise & RTO Partnerships, Appendix IV, p 6.

RTO provides solutions needed by the enterprise or industry group and be transparent
about their agenda rather than just selling training. This would require the RTO
personnel to: demonstrate their commitment as a partner; be a good communicator;
be innovative; understand the costs and benefits of training; understand the funding
arrangements; have the capacity to fill skill gaps; have an emphasis on continuous
improvement; and have good reporting mechanisms.
SMYL supports the program by negotiating the funding, preparing and
contextualising the training and assessment material to the mine site and
needs of learners, and providing the trainers, including an indigenous
trainer who has connections to the area.
Case study: South Metropolitan Youth Link (SMYL) Community Services and Kimberley
Diamond Co, WA, with the Bunuba people. Industry/enterprise & RTO Partnerships,
Appendix IV, p 20.
What do RTOs want?
The research also identified that RTOs also needed some commitment from the enterprises or
industry groups in order to foster a successful partnership. This included: a climate of mutual
commitment and respect along with honest communication; connection with management
and measurable KPIs; ongoing management of the training from within the enterprise; agreed
release times for people undertaking workplace based training and assessment; and pastoral
care policies within the enterprise.
This is the only training arrangement that I know of that is based so
exclusively around a working mine-site. The generosity of KDC and then
Gem diamonds cannot be overstated in terms of their willingness for the
workplace to be used as a training opportunity.
Case study: South Metropolitan Youth Link (SMYL) Community Services and Kimberley
Diamond Co, WA, with the Bunuba people. Industry/enterprise & RTO Partnerships,
Appendix IV, p 20.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
Page 6
Key strategies
The research highlighted many strategies used by RTOs and enterprises to build good
partnership arrangements in order to best develop the workforce of an enterprise or industry,
or even a community. These differed, of course, depending on the context, for example the
different context or training needs.
Partnerships that were successful reported that their success depended on a number of
factors including: having an ongoing dialogue; building trust and respect; working together to
develop the program; being flexible in training and assessment arrangements; having
commitment to a common goal; sharing ideas; and developing a common language.
Both parties commented on the importance of the continuous, open and
honest communication. They have discussions weekly by telephone or
email, and once a month a more formal meeting is held. Any issues are
discussed and resolved. As this is an ongoing relationship, these
discussions are vital as changes occur, for example in legislation, training
packages, expectations, changes in the aviation industry etc.
Case study: TAFE NSW, South Western Sydney Institute and Qantas Engineering,
Industry/enterprise & RTO Partnerships Appendix IV, p 15.
Strategies used by enterprises
Some of the strategies used by enterprises or industry groups in successful partnerships are
described below:

Commitment, such as driving the relationship by accepting the RTO as part of the
process; identifying and targeting talented people; appointing a training coordinator;
sharing facilities so smaller enterprises can obtain relevant training; and providing
effective management support.

Operational factors, such as adjusting operational demand to allow for training;
allowing time and facilities for the job skills development; and providing job
complexity for trainees, e.g. rotation to develop a variety of skills.

Support for the training process, such as: encouraging employees to be trained as
trainers and assessors so they could conduct training and assessment on-site;
providing technical expertise for training; providing coaching and mentoring in the
workplace; providing incentives, reward and recognition for training success;
encouraging ongoing learning; and providing networks.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Strategies used by RTOs
Some of the strategies used by RTOs in successful partnerships are described below:

Good planning and set up, such as: mapping of work tasks, policies and internal
training to the Training Package qualification; conducting a training needs analysis;
customising training, assessment and resources to workplace needs; ensuring training
personnel have authentic industry experience; and taking into consideration the needs
of the learners such as literacy needs.

Organisational strategies, such as: making sure that their own staff were embedded in
the enterprise; having a single point of contact in the RTO so the enterprise knew who
to contact; being flexible in terms of time and place for training and assessment;
collaborating with other RTOs to provide all the training needed; and obtaining
support from their senior management.

Delivery strategies, such as: training on-site to suit the enterprise’s work hours;
piloting the training; using innovative methods such as web-based, CD-ROM and using
a range of training locations; and involving enterprise staff in training and assessment.

Assessment strategies, such as: using naturally occurring evidence for assessment;
using workplace tasks as evidence for RPL assessment; and using a ‘skills passport’.

Evaluation, such as evaluating training and providing feedback to staff and
management.

Value adding, such as: providing help with funding arrangements; and assisting
enterprises with change, innovation, quality, new markets etc, not just training.
Training provider staff are extremely flexible with their time, because
there is a critical need for them to visit the apprentices/trainees on-site.
This may involve overnight stays, and flying to off shore oil rigs for visits.
The trainers and assessors who undertake these visits are trained in
Helicopter Underwater Escape Training (HUET). They gain an enormous
amount of knowledge about current technology while on these visits,
and the visits can be seen as ongoing professional development as well
as a necessary part of their role. In one case, CCIWA placed a trainer onsite for 10 days to save apprentices coming down to the training.
Case study: Challenger TAFE, CCIWA and the oil and gas industry, Industry/enterprise &
RTO Partnerships, Appendix IV, p 12.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Other strategies
Further research found other suggested strategies for the development of successful
partnership.
The AQTF Essential Conditions and Standards for Continuing Registration provides advice to
RTOs about industry consultation as follows:

Giving industry and enterprises the opportunity to collaborate in making joint decisions
about training and assessment strategies

Encouraging industry representation on committees and participation in award
ceremonies. (p 24)
The Australian Workforce Futures scan of current workforce development practice found many
good practices which can be translated into advice for RTOs and industry partners. This
includes:

the employer is engaged as a partner, not a ‘recipient’ in the skill solution

workplace champions with carriage of the project are identifiable and have the support
of management

the skill specifics of any training are customised to the business and there are ongoing
opportunities for workplace learning

there is allocated time and support for on-the-job training

the trainer is credible, an authoritative source of expertise and can integrate practical,
real examples from the workplace. (p 47)
Skills developed through partnerships
The research showed that people from RTOs and enterprises or industry groups involved in the
development and maintenance of partnership arrangements developed a range of skills in the
process. This means that partnerships are not only valuable for the development of the skills of
the workforce involved in the training or other service offered by the RTO, but is also valuable
for the people in the development and maintenance process.
Both RTO and enterprise personnel learnt the importance of open and clear communication
with all stakeholders, and the importance of flexibility, as well as the importance of
collaborating early in a project, for example between the RTOs and the industry specialists,
especially where extensive contextualisation of Training Package requirements is necessary.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Enterprise personnel
As well as developing negotiating skills, enterprise personnel also developed skills through the
partnership through exposure to RTO training and assessment practices. Some were trained as
trainers and assessor by undertaking the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment, or relevant
parts of the qualification such as skill sets; and they were also exposed to the recordkeeping
and quality assurance aspect of the Australian Quality Training Framework (AQTF). Others
gained exposure to the complexities of the VET sector. If they were not actually delivering the
training, many were involved in mentoring people in the workplace and gathering evidence for
assessment.
A development of cross cultural awareness across the mine-site is a
positive but unintended outcome of the training, with Indigenous and
non-Indigenous learning more about each others’ cultures. A story was
told about the village manager complaining that the Indigenous people
were using ‘lingo’ when in fact they were teaching the non-Indigenous
employees words from their traditional languages so they could take it
home and teach their children.
Case study, South Metropolitan Youth Link (SMYL) Community Services and Kimberley
diamond Co, WA, with the Bunuba people. Industry/enterprise & RTO Partnerships,
Appendix IV, p 22
RTO personnel
RTO personnel involved in the development and maintenance of partnership arrangements
developed a range of skills in the process. These included developing initiative and ability to
make decisions in the spot, away from the RTO; being able to sustain relationships with the
partner; creating ways of talking about change and strategic directions; planning and
development, and RTO business development; and change management.
Other skills learnt were around exposure to the industry through the partnership, for example
to gain a great knowledge of sustainability practices in the industry or emerging technologies;
an increased ability to customise training so that it is site specific; and the importance of
holistic assessment using authentic evidence.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Trainers from ACEPT and CCIWA all come from the oil and gas industry
and have wide contacts in the industry. As well, they remain up to date
with technology as they visit the sites for inspections and assessment, e.g.
on the offshore rigs ...
Case study: Challenger TAFE, CCIWA and the oil and gas industry, Industry/enterprise &
RTO Partnerships, Appendix IV, p 12.
(Training staff) are involved on committees discussing changes to and
impact of changes in legislation with the regulatory body, the Civil
Aviation Safety Authority (CASE), so are kept up to date with legislative
changes. As new planes are introduced, the Institute trainers are involved
in ‘type’ training delivered at Qantas, usually by the manufacturer, so
they remain up to date with the new technology.
Case study, TAFE NSW, South Western Sydney Institute and Qantas Engineering,
Industry/enterprise & RTO Partnerships, Appendix IV, p 15
Limitations
The research highlighted that even though there are many successful partnerships between
enterprises/industry groups and RTOs, there were some limitations and issues which
prevented successful partnerships being formed.
It was reported in some cases that RTOs needed different human resource management
processes to cater for flexible working arrangements; and that they needed to integrate more
with the local community so that they can cater for regional development needs.
In other cases it was reported that enterprises needed to encourage their workforce to engage
in learning; to develop information communication technology (ICT) skills to cater for elearning; and to provide learning opportunities for casual workers and those with lower levels
of education and training or with language, literacy and numeracy (LLN) needs.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Tools for an effective partnership – an
ongoing process
The research highlights that key features for successful partnerships between RTOs and
enterprise/industry included building trust and respect, having commitment to a common
goal, working together to develop the training program, ongoing dialogue, flexibility in training
and assessment arrangements, sharing ideas and developing a common language.
These features suggest a process the RTO and enterprise/industry group might go through
once they have determined they are ready for a partnership:
1. Negotiation: Once ready for a partnership, the RTO and enterprise/industry come
together to reach an agreement about what the partnership will deliver. Issues such as
cost, resourcing, obligations, and performance of specific tasks should be discussed
and agreed on at this stage.
2. Implementation: This is the RTO and enterprise/industry getting the partnership in
place in their organisation.
3. Maintenance: Once a partnership is in place, both the RTO and enterprise/industry will
need to contribute to its success.
4. Evaluation and Review: The RTO and enterprise/industry need to evaluate the
outcomes of the training and assessment. They also need to review how the
partnership performed. What were the benefits and challenges, and would they
continue the relationship?
The following tools are designed to assist RTOs and enterprise/industry groups in preparing for
and creating successful partnerships.
These tools may reflect some practices already in place at your RTO or enterprise/industry.
They may encourage RTOs and enterprise/industry to think differently about how they
approach their relationship with each other. There is no need to use all the tools, and some
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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tools may be more suitable for different types of RTOs and enterprise/industry than others.
However, they provide a framework for how RTOs and enterprise/industry groups can work
together to improve skills in the workplace.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Using the tools
For each tool, the following diagram will indicate when the tool should be used:
The following information is also provided for each tool:



Who is this tool designed for?
Why is this tool useful?
How is the tool used?
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Quick reference guide for partnership tools
Who is the tool for?
RTO or enterprise/
industry or both
Page
BOTH
15
RTO
18
Enterprise/industry
22
Steps for negotiating the partnership
BOTH
26
Implementing the partnership
BOTH
29
Maintaining the partnership
BOTH
32
BOTH
34
BOTH
38
BOTH
44
BOTH
51
BOTH
56
BOTH
59
Stage
Tool name
Getting ready for a partnership
Conducting an RTO skills analysis
Choosing an RTO
Conducting a training needs analysis
and skills audit in the enterprise
Developing a training and assessment
strategy
Contextualising units of competency
Identifying language, literacy and
numeracy (LLN) requirements of units
of competency
Evaluating the outcomes of training
and assessment
Reviewing the partnership
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Are you ready for a partnership?
Getting ready for a partnership
Who is the tool designed for?
BOTH
RTOs and enterprise/industry should both consider this tool individually before approaching a
potential training partner.
Why is this tool useful?
This tool will help determine the reasons for entering a partnership and measure your
organisation’s readiness to form partnerships. If this reveals some gaps in organisational
readiness, decide on actions to take before you can begin the partnership arrangements.
How is the tool used?
Identify the staff in your RTO or enterprise/industry who should be involved in a partnership.
Using the ‘Are your staff ready for a partnership?’ checklist, look at each item and consider
how your RTO or enterprise/industry responds. Look at any issues that need to be addressed
before you approach the other party for discussions. You may like to add further questions
relevant to your circumstances.
This tool could also then be used in consultation with the potential training partner to assist in
clear communication about goals and outcomes.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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TOOL: Getting ready for a partnership
Steps
Industry/enterprise group
RTO
Why
Why do you want a partnership with an
Why do you want a partnership with
RTO?
enterprise/industry?
Who will benefit and how?
Who will benefit and how?
Notes
What issues will training address?
What
What services do you need from the RTO?
Will training address your needs?
What services can you provide to the
enterprise/industry partner?
How flexible are you willing to be with your services?
Who
Who in your organisation needs to be
Who are your potential enterprise/industry partners
involved in the partnership?
and other stakeholders?
Who are the potential RTOs you will use?
Who are the other stakeholders?
How
How will you find information about RTOs?
How will you find current information about the
industry?
Key contact
Have you nominated a key person to
Have you nominated a key person to negotiate and
negotiate and manage the relationship?
manage the relationship?
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Steps
Industry/enterprise group
RTO
Staffing
Do you want your staff to be involved in the
Does your relevant staff have the skills required to
delivery of training and assessment (e.g. for
develop and maintain a relationship? (see tool
their expertise)?
‘Conducting an RTO skills analysis’)
Notes
Will you be able to:

release your staff from their day to day
work for training

provide them with opportunities to gain
skills through working with others

Safety
provide job rotations
Are you able to provide a safe workplace for
Does your staff understand the OHS requirements of
RTO personnel providing a service at your
the enterprise and the industry in general?
premises?
Quality
How will you ensure the services provided
Do you have the structures in place required by the
assurance
have met your needs?
Australian Quality Training Framework (AQTF), e.g.
staffing, recordkeeping, required units, or
qualifications on scope of registration?
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Conducting an RTO skills analysis
Who is the tool designed for?
RTO
Why is this tool useful?
The research has identified a wide range of skills needed by a variety of personnel within RTOs
to contribute to a successful partnership with enterprise/industry. It also found some whole of
organisation factors which need to be in place, linked to the RTO’s quality processes required
by the Australian Quality Training Framework (AQTF).
This will assist the RTO to identify the skills of its staff to contribute to a successful partnership
with enterprise/industry. The RTO may also use this tool to discover the development needs of
its own staff (e.g. an internal training needs analysis). Once completed, the RTO might provide
it to the enterprise/industry to demonstrate their readiness and commitment to the
partnership.
How is the tool used?
Identify the staff who should be involved in a partnership with enterprise/industry. Using the
‘RTO skills analysis’ checklist, conduct a skills audit of these staff and note any gaps you think
there are in their skills and/or in your RTO. This could be a broad audit of the organisation, or
you could use the checklist with specific members of staff rather than by position - either as a
self assessment or as an audit with their manager.
You may use ticks () to indicate a skill or knowledge is held, or a rating scale (1 – 5) to
demonstrate the level of a person’s ability, or you may make notes about what needs to be
done to ensure appropriate staff have the required skills or knowledge.
Modify the tool as needed – not all skills and knowledge important to a partnership are
included. Remember that not all staff at the RTO will be involved in the partnership, and not all
staff involved in the partnership will need all skills.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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TOOL: RTO skills analysis
Skills and knowledge needed
Managers
Business
Trainers,
development
assessors
Support staff
managers
Communication
ability to communicate with a
wide range of personnel
negotiation skills
listening to needs of
enterprise
ability to write proposals,
agreements and reports
demonstration of
commitment
Creativity, innovation
emphasis on continuous
improvement
basing training solutions on
enterprise needs
Management
understanding of funding
possibilities
planning, writing contracts
and agreements
costing of services
conducting a Training Needs
Analysis (TNA)
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Skills and knowledge needed
Managers
Business
Trainers,
development
assessors
Support staff
managers
conducting a cost benefit
analysis
Industry knowledge
knowledge and experience of
the industry, including
technical skills and emerging
technologies
understanding of the
enterprise’s business and
complexity
understanding of the
conditions of the industry
willing and able to induct own
staff into the needs of the
industry or enterprise
Training and assessment methodologies
able to cater for different
learning styles
uses authentic assessment
tasks
uses workplace tasks for
training
ability to tailor training to
specific site needs
able to customise units of
competency, resources and
assessment tasks to meet
enterprise or industry needs
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Skills and knowledge needed
Managers
Business
Trainers,
development
assessors
Support staff
managers
able to source up to date
training materials
mentoring skills for staff in
the enterprise/industry
application of VET knowledge
to enterprise e.g. able to
cater for enterprise or
industry needs, but still meet
requirements of AQTF
able to adjust training to
meet the language, literacy
and numeracy (LLN) needs of
learners
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Choosing an RTO
Who is the tool designed for?
Enterprise/industry
Why is this tool useful?
Becoming an informed consumer is critical to a successful relationship with an RTO.
RTOs vary in size, scope, training approach and expertise. This tool will assist
enterprise/industry to ensure they are choosing an RTO who understands their specific
characteristics and needs.
You may need to talk to a number of RTOs before you find the right one for your needs. Listed
in the Appendix II are some websites where you can find further information about the
vocational education and training (VET) sector, which can often appear complex for people
new to the sector.
How is this tool used?
Use the following checklist to identify some questions you could ask the RTO representative as
you are negotiating a partnership arrangement. Questions to ask include the RTO’s knowledge
of your enterprise/industry, how they train and assess, their flexibility in providing training and
assessment, communication and costs. These questions may assist you to identify the issues
that are important to you in choosing an RTO for a partnership, and gather information to
make a decision about which RTO you will work with.
You may not find all the questions relevant to your enterprise or industry, or you may need to
ask different questions. Depending on what you want to know about an RTO, you may need
evidence of procedures, policies or past/current work of the RTO to be satisfied of their ability
to meet your needs.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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TOOL: Choosing an RTO – a checklist for enterprises or industry groups
Questions
Does the RTO
satisfy this?
Knowledge of industry

Does the RTO have experience working with enterprises similar to
yours, or in your industry? Can they provide examples and details
of previous or current work or partnerships?

Does the RTO employ or use trainers and assessors with current
industry knowledge, qualification and experience? Can they
provide details of their experience (e.g. a CV, biography)? What
will they do to ensure trainers and assessors have the required
understanding of your enterprise/industry? Do you need to be
involved?

Does the RTO help their trainers and assessors maintain their
industry knowledge, and if so, how?
Training and assessment

Can the RTO provide training and assessment in ways which
reflect your specific enterprise and/or industry processes e.g. will
they base training and assessment on your enterprise’s processes,
equipment etc.?

Can the RTO involve relevant and experienced staff from your
enterprise in training and assessment?

Will the RTO assess your staff’s prior learning and experiences to
determine if they have particular skills and knowledge
(Recognition of Prior Learning or RPL)?

Does the RTO ensure their trainers and assessors keep their
specific skills relevant to training and assessment up to date, and if
so, how?
Flexibility
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Questions

Does the RTO
satisfy this?
Can the RTO provide training and assessment where you need it,
e.g. at your workplace, off site, at their premises?

Can the RTO provide training and assessment when you need it,
e.g. during business hours, during shifts, in the evenings, on
weekends?

Can the RTO provide training and assessment in a mode which
suits your workforce, e.g. on the job, face to face training sessions,
web-based training?

Can the RTO meet the individual needs of your staff, e.g. language,
literacy and numeracy?

Will the RTO consider feedback in response to their training and
assessment, and make changes where appropriate or requested?

Will the RTO adapt resources and training programs it has already
developed to meet your specific needs?

Will the RTO explain how the vocational education and training
(VET) sector works and its relevance to your staff?
Communication

Will the RTO have a key person, or position holder, for you to
contact?

Will the RTO communicate with you in a way that suits your
enterprise/industry e.g. email, telephone, face to face meetings,
video conferencing, etc.
Value for money

Does the RTO offer cost effective services? Is their costing easy to
understand?

Can the RTO explain how their services will benefit your business
or industry?
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Questions

Does the RTO
satisfy this?
Can the RTO access or suggest sources of government or other
funding for training?

Can the RTO provide low cost training materials?
Support

Will the RTO provide ongoing support to your business and your
staff?

Is the RTO committed to a long term partnership with your
enterprise/industry? How do they demonstrate this?

Can the RTO identify training needs of the enterprise (TNA) and
conduct skills assessments of individuals?

Will the RTO provide mentoring and other workplace support?
Administration

Will your staff gain a nationally recognised qualification at the end
of training, including certification?

Will the RTO provide evidence and records of training
participation and assessment of your staff’s participation in
training and assessment (e.g. attendance, copies of qualifications,
etc.)?

Will the RTO sign a written agreement for the training and
assessment services which includes their obligations and your
obligations, e.g. Purchase Agreement, Memorandum of
Understanding?

If the agreement is for Apprentices, does the RTO have the
appropriate legal processes in place?
Quality assurance

Will the RTO work with you to evaluate the training and
assessment for continuous improvement?
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Step 1: Negotiation
Steps for negotiating the partnership
Who is this tool designed for?
BOTH
RTOs and enterprise/industry
Why should they use this tool?
This tool can help RTOs and enterprise/industry understand what is expected of each of them
in the partnership. This tool will help you think about the steps that need to be put in place
during the negotiation process. You may change these steps to suit organisational needs and
the context.
How is this tool used?
Both the RTO and enterprise/industry will need to consider this tool separately.
Work with a small group consisting of relevant people in various positions in both the RTO and
enterprise/industry, for example, business development manager, training manager, trainer
and assessors, workplace supervisor. Consider each step and see how it applies to your specific
needs and circumstances.
Once completed, the tool can then be used as a discussion framework between the RTO and
enterprise/industry as they are starting the relationship, and can be referred to throughout the
partnership.
The steps in this tool are suggestions only and relevant staff from the RTO and
enterprise/industry will need to discuss and customise the tool to meet their own needs.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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TOOL: Steps for negotiating the partnership
Steps
Enterprise/industry group
RTO
Be prepared
Set objectives or outcomes of
Be aware of objectives or
training.
outcomes of training.
Think about what training or other
Help the enterprise with a Training
services you need and what you
Needs Analysis.
want people to do better as a
result.
Put needs on paper.
Interpret enterprise needs into
training solutions.
Be clear about the reasons for the
Be clear about the reasons the
entering into the arrangement.
enterprise or industry group is
entering into the arrangement.
Make sure the organisational
Examine the organisational
climate is favourable towards
climate of your RTO is such that an
establishing a relationship and
open, honest and respectful
there is a climate of commitment,
relationship can be developed.
respect and honest
communication.
Think of the likely strengths and
Think of the likely strengths and
weaknesses of the collaboration for
weaknesses of the collaboration
your enterprise or industry group,
for your RTO, e.g. do a SWOT
e.g. do a SWOT analysis (strengths,
analysis.
weaknesses, opportunities,
threats).
Know your budget
Decide how much you have to
Calculate how much training or
spend on the training or other
other services will cost. Is there
services.
any funding you can put the
enterprise in contact with?
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Steps
Enterprise/industry group
RTO
Come to a
Make sure you are clear about
Make sure you clear about what
common
what services you are being offered
services you are offering the
agreement
by the RTO. Agreement will depend
enterprise or industry group and
on the service needed, but could
come to a common agreement.
include content, cost, terms, timing
etc.
Confirm agreement Sign a contract or other agreement
Develop a contract or other
in writing
with the RTO, which clearly
agreement with the enterprise/
establishes the basic rules of the
industry group such as:
partnership arrangement.

memorandum of
understanding

letter of agreement.
A good formal agreement will
clearly establish the basic rules of
the partnership arrangement, e.g.:

Policies and procedures

How much each partner will
contribute to the partnership,
e.g. money, personnel, time,
resources

Measurable KPIs.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
Page 29
Step 2: Implementation
Implementing the partnership
Who is this tool designed for?
BOTH
RTOs and enterprise/industry
Why should they use this tool?
This tool looks at the specific requirements under the partnership – issues such as who needs
to do what and when.
How is this tool used?
This tool will help you think about the steps that need to be put in place to establish the
relationship once you have completed the initial negotiation and agreed on services.
Use this tool to come to an agreement about what obligations the RTO and enterprise/industry
has individually and jointly under the partnership. Both the RTO and enterprise/industry will
need to give this tool individual thought, but the issues should be discussed jointly.
The steps in this tool are suggestions only and relevant staff from the RTO and
enterprise/industry will need to discuss and customise the tool to meet their own needs.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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TOOL: Implementing the partnership
Steps
Enterprise/Industry
RTO
Resources
What resources will you be
What resources will you be
contributing, e.g. personnel
contributing, e.g. trainers
for mentoring, money, space,
and assessors, learning
equipment, time for staff to
materials?
undertake training?
Timelines
Document and clearly
Make sure timelines and
communicate timelines and
deliverables are
deliverables, and fit with the
documented. Check they fit
enterprise work patterns and
with the enterprise’s work
production deadlines.
patterns and production
deadlines, as well as the RTO
capacity to meet the
deadlines.
Contact
Provide a single point of
Provide a single point of
contact, with backup person.
contact, with backup person.
Make sure that if the contact
This is particularly important
changes because of job
for large RTOs.
rotation etc that the RTO is
informed of the new contact.
Reporting
Contribute to any reporting
Make sure that reporting and
and recordkeeping processes
recordkeeping fit with the
set up by the RTO, and which
AQTF requirements as well as
also fit with your own records,
the requirements of the
e.g. personnel records of
enterprise.
training completed.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Steps
Enterprise/Industry
RTO
Confidentiality
Ensure that the RTO has a
Put confidentiality
confidentiality agreement in
agreements in place, e.g.
place so that your proprietary
proprietary enterprise
knowledge and information
knowledge learnt while
about your own staff is
training and assessing in the
protected.
workplace is confidential, as
is knowledge of people being
trained and assessed.
Intellectual property
Discuss intellectual property of
Make decisions about
material developed for
intellectual property of
training, in particular around
material developed for
your own equipment or
training and assessment.
processes.
Insurances
Support for staff
Have the required insurances
Have the required insurances
in place, e.g. to cover RTO staff
in place, e.g. to cover RTO
entering your workplace.
staff working off site.
Have management/HR
Provide support to trainers
strategies to deal with issues
and assessors who are
that arise with staff during
working at workplaces, e.g.
training and assessment, e.g.
counselling, pastoral care.
regular communication,
visits.
Provide mentors in the
workplace.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Steps
Enterprise/Industry
RTO
Quality assurance
Make sure that the RTO is
Make sure all parties are
aware of your quality
aware of any quality
assurance processes and
assurance arrangements, in
factor this into services they
particular as they relate to
provide. Also be aware that
AQTF. You may need to
RTOs follow quality assurance
explain the AQTF to the
procedures set out in the
enterprise or industry group
Australian Quality Training
if they have not dealt with
Framework (AQTF).
RTOs in the past.
Also factor the quality
assurance policies of the
enterprise into services
provided.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Step 3: Maintenance
Maintaining the partnership
Who is this tool designed for?
BOTH
RTOs and enterprise/industry
Why should they use this tool?
This tool is a checklist for the successful maintenance of the partnership between the RTO and
enterprise/industry. It addresses issues such as communication, resources, flexibility and
training, and reflects that both partners need to consistently monitor how the relationship is
going.
How is this tool used?
Both the RTO and enterprise/industry should use this tool to check they are satisfied with the
progress of the partnership. Each partnership will raise unique issues, and this tool should be
customised to meet specific needs.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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TOOL: Maintaining the partnership
Steps
Enterprise/Industry
RTO
Communication
Participate in regular progress
Have regular progress meetings
meetings or conversations to
or conversations to ensure that
report on satisfaction with the
training activities or other
training activities or other
services being provided are on
services being provided.
target.
Make sure trainers and assessors
Follow all OHS and other
are inducted into the workplace,
workplace procedures.
Policies and procedures
especially into OHS procedures,
and provide a healthy and safe
training environment for trainers,
assessors and staff being trained
or assessed.
Have a complaints procedure
and conflict management plan
in place and make sure
enterprise is aware of the
procedure.
Be informed about the RTO’s
conflict management and
complaints policy.
Flexibility
Allow staff time off the job for
Provide flexibility in terms of
training, and opportunities on
time for training and
the job for skill development.
assessment to meet enterprise
Provide replacement for staff if
needs.
required if they are away from
workplace for training.
Training and assessing
Encourage workplace personnel
Use trainers and assessors with
to be involved in training and
assessing, e.g. by mentoring,
up to date training and
assessment methodology, e.g.
gathering evidence for
capacity to train and assess
assessment.
using authentic workplace
Help provide authentic workplace
tasks.
tasks for skills development and
Use trainers and assessors with
for evidence for assessment.
current industry knowledge and
experience.
Organisational
Allow a workspace for the trainer
Trainers and assessors to be
at the workplace.
placed on-site for time needed
for training and follow up.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Conducting a training needs analysis and skills audit in the enterprise
Who is this tool designed for?
RTOs with enterprise/industry
Why is this tool useful?
In order to make decisions about what services are needed by the enterprise or industry
group, and whether these services can be met by the RTO, a training needs analysis (TNA) and
skills audit needs to be conducted. This shows the enterprise/industry the current status of
their staff’s skills and knowledge, and what needs to be developed to perform their work. This
flowchart is a guide to conducting a TNA and skills audit. It provides some examples as starting
points for discussion.
How is the tool used?
Enterprises could use this tool independently, using a group of relevant personnel such as
training manager, workplace supervisor and representatives from the staff who may be
receiving the training.
Alternatively, an RTO could use the tool in conjunction with relevant personnel from the
enterprise or industry group. This could also form a framework for negotiating and maintaining
a partnership relationship.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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TOOL: Conducting a training needs analysis and skills audit in the enterprise
Examples:
What is the driver?








New legislation, regulations
Quality issues
IR/awards
New equipment
Competition
Succession planning
Training existing employees
Company amalgamation
What are the drivers for your
enterprise or industry group?
Examples:
What do we already
have in place?








Strategic plans/goals/objectives
Quality system
Policies/procedures
Training plan/strategy
Appraisal system
Competency framework
In-house training programs
Training manuals
What does your enterprise or
industry group already have in
place?
Who is the target group?
Example:




Who is your target group?
Job roles rather than people
New or long term employees
Skilled/unskilled employees
Apprentices or trainees
What is the context?
Example:
Target group?




What is the context?
Work individually or in team
Remote locations
Worksite
Small, medium or large
enterprises
Are there any particular learner
List any particular learner needs.
needs or equity issues?
Example:
 Language/literacy/numeracy
needs
 Different learning styles
 Gender issues, e.g. females in
traditional male occupations
 Age issues, e.g. cross
generational teams
 People with disabilities
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Major activities
What does their job
include?
What skills/knowledge do they
A
need to do job? Now? Future?
Look at:
List skills/knowledge required by
job role.
 Job descriptions/duty
statements
 Questionnaires (paper based,
online)
 Focus groups
 Observation
 Asking employees and
supervisors
Individual or team – can be
Skills audit
amalgamated into an enterprise
B
audit
Suggested methods:
List current skills/knowledge of
 Questionnaire – self
assessment
 Interview
 Observation
 Use performance reviews with
key indicators
 Previous training completed
 Third party report
Compare skills audit with
requirements of job
employees.
A – B = Gap
What are the gaps?
(Enterprise and/or
individual)
Examples:
Identify learning
solutions
 Map the skills gap to existing
units of competency for other
training specifications
What units of competency will
you use?
(or other training specifications)
Considerations, e.g.
Prioritise





Budget
Legislative needs
Competition
New equipment
Quality issues
What needs to be developed
first?
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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What is the preferred mode of
Choose preferred
mode of skill
development
What sources of
evidence will you use
for assessment?
Complete a learning and
assessment strategy
skill development e.g.
What is the preferred mode of
 On job training/off job
 In-house using current
organisational
courses/enterprise RTO
 External training, e.g. linked to
RTO – short term or long term,
e.g. Diploma
 Mentoring or coaching in
workplace
 Secondment to another
department or organisation
 Individual learning using
written learning materials or
online
 Special projects
skill development?
Examples:
 Samples of work products and
processes
 Observation of work in progress
Include:
 Third party reports
What, when, who, how etc.
(detail will depend on context)
What sources of evidence will
you use?
Complete learning and
assessment strategy (proforma)
Contextualise your units of
competency
Contextualise units for
enterprise/ industry
Contextualise units of
competency, using, for example:
 Policies and procedures
 Enterprise equipment
 Relevant legislation
 Work practices
 Required knowledge for
e codneliv
textery method
Usinwo
g prkp
reflaecrred
– to suit individual and work
needs
Delivery and
assessment
How will you evaluate your
training?
Examples:
 Self assessment – how effective
was training to assist you in your
job performance?
 Ask supervisor after period of
time – is work now more
effective?
 Measurements, e.g. have quality
and productivity improved, are
there less accidents?
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
Evaluation
Page 39
Developing a training and assessment strategy
Who is this tool designed for?
BOTH
RTOs with enterprise/industry
Why is this tool useful?
The purpose of this learning and assessment strategy template is to assist RTOs and
enterprises to plan and document the decisions made about the training and assessment
services being offered by the RTO.
How is the tool used?
This strategy template has been adapted from a template developed by the Australian
National Training Authority (ANTA) in its 2002 booklet, Learning and assessment strategies: the
how to kit. Many RTOs have developed their own strategy templates to assist to design
learning and assessment to meet the needs of clients, and to meet their requirements under
AQTF.
Use this template as a guide, but adapt it to suit your own RTO and enterprise/industry group
needs.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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TOOL: Developing a training and assessment strategy
Name of enterprise
Name of RTO
Learning and
assessment period
Gaps identified
List gaps in performance, knowledge, skills identified.
Target group
What is the context?
Are there any special needs to be catered for?
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Delivery and
assessment
Broad outline of the major approaches to skill/knowledge development
and assessment, e.g. workplace based training, project work, rotation,
arrangements
off the job training.
Learning strategy
Details of the specific activities to be used to develop the required
knowledge and skills. For example, authentic workplace activities
which will be used.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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What evidence
Give details of evidence which will be used for assessment, in particular
will be used for
authentic workplace tasks e.g. a project, product, third party report,
assessment?
presentation, observation of work.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Resources required
Resources
Who will provide the resources?
Link to
Qualifications
Qualification – code and name:
Units of
Code
Title
competency
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Contextualisation
Do the units of competency need to be contextualised for the
workplace processes, and analysed for language, literacy and
numeracy requirements? Who is going to do this?
Sign off
Enterprise/industry group
RTO
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
Page 45
Contextualising units of competency
Who is this tool designed for?
BOTH
RTOs and enterprise/industry
Why is this tool useful?
Contextualisation means ‘tailoring units of competency to suit specific needs’.
In practice this means that RTOs can ‘modify units of competency to reflect the local outcome
required by an individual and/or enterprise’. This can be achieved by including, modifying or
substituting text within the unit/s of competency, so that it is specific to the
enterprise/industry and/or individual learner need.
However, in all cases of contextualisation ‘the integrity of the outcome of the endorsed unit/s
of competency must be maintained’, e.g. elements and performance criteria must not be
removed, distorted or narrowed.
(Source: Training [email protected], Back 2 Basics, Edition 3, page 22.)
Examples of contextualisation:

Substituting enterprise specific requirements for generic terms in performance criteria,
e.g. policies and procedures

Adding to the range statement, and adding enterprise specific requirements, e.g. specific
equipment or processes

Identifying any particular skills and knowledge required to perform the tasks in the
workplace and adding to required skills and knowledge or make them more enterprise
specific

Identifying the kinds of evidence candidates may be able to provide in their job roles, and
add to the evidence guide

Making any modifications within the Training Package rules to meet special needs of target
group, e.g. literacy and numeracy.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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How is the tool used?
The contextualisation process is shown in a diagram on the following page, with an example of
a unit of competency which has been contextualised for a particular enterprise following.
Enterprise/industry should work with representatives from the RTO such as trainers, and the
enterprise or industry group such as training manager, safety officer, supervisors to
contextualise units of competency to the specific circumstances of the enterprise/industry
using the tool on the following page.
Examine the whole unit of competency, and think about any specific equipment or processes
that are used by the enterprise or industry group. As an example, you can insert or substitute
them where relevant in the elements and performance criteria and add any specific
requirements such as specific equipment in the range statement.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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TOOL: The contextualisation process
1. Identify relevant
qualifications and
competencies
Enterprise / Site
TNA
Senior Operator
Safety Officer
2. Identify who to work with
Training Officer
Supervisors
Elements and Performance
Criteria
3. Review each unit of
competency
Range Statement & Required
Skills and Knowledge
Evidence Guide
How do WE do it?
4. Contextualise relevant
units
How do WE know it is done
well?
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
Page 48
Example of contextualisation in action
MNCO1016A Conduct grader operations
Following is an example of a unit of competency, MNCO1016A Conduct grader operations,
which has been contextualised for an enterprise. This extract from a unit of competency
demonstrates what a contextualised unit might look like.
A third column has been added for additional questions which could assist in the
contextualisation process.
ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Possible contextualisation
question
prepare for
requirements in the form of shift briefings,
• Who does this happen
with?
operations.
handover details or work orders before proceeding.
• When does it happen?
1 Plan and
1.1
Obtain, interpret and clarify/confirm work
Verbally obtain, interpret and clarify/confirm
work requirements, in line with 24 hour work
1.2
• How are work instructions
for grader operations
usually communicated?
plan from shift boss during shift handover.
• Are there any standard
documents or procedures?
Access, interpret and apply geological and survey
• Where does it happen?
data required to complete the allocated work in
• Where is data available
from?
accordance with site procedures.
• Geological and survey data will be provided as
part of 24 hour work plan and work
instructions, as well as Grader Standard
Operating Procedures (SOPs) and Job Safety
Analysis (JSA) to detail specifications for
working with different materials
• What site procedures
exist?
• Operator able to identify material composition
of road-bed/wall composition to identify
appropriate ripping/grading processes.
1.3
Access and apply safety information and
procedures throughout the work.
• What safety procedures
and information exist?
• Safety Information and procedures may be
accessed and applied from relevant (JSA)and
Grader Training Sheets.
2 Operate the
grader.
2.1
Resolve coordination activities with others at the
• Who coordinates activities?
site prior to commencement of, and during, the
• Is any documentation
required?
work activity.
• All activities communicated with control,
supervisor, logistics or scheduler
• Observe site procedures for passing pedestrians
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Possible contextualisation
question
and other equipment during operation.
2.2
Carry out pre-start, start-up, parkup and
shutdown procedures in accordance with
manufacturer instructions and site procedures.
• Test operation of grader before
moving/beginning work, including condition of
blade and ensuring that all operational controls
and gauges are functioning
• Is there more than one
grader? If so, are there any
significant differences?
• Are manufacturers’
instructions available?
• Do site procedures exist?
• Pre-start and shutdown procedure as per
relevant SOP and should include look/listen
checks
• Grader 3 should be used only for highwall
operations.
2.3
Use grader controls and functions, including
blade, tyres, articulation and wheel tilt to
• What controls and
functions do you need?
manoeuvre and complete specified tasks.
• What kind of jobs are
graders used for?
• If required, safely move grader to work site
• Position grader at appropriate area for grading
operations as described in 24 hour work plan
• Monitor operations including
environmental/geological conditions and
windrow placement to adjust wheel lean, blade
angel and circle shift as required.
2.4
Carry out towing of equipment and plant safely
and in accordance with the authorised
• What equipment do you
tow?
equipment and connection capabilities.
• Do any standard
procedures exist for towing
or the equipment being
towed?
• Equipment to be towed identified in 24 hour
work plan
• Operator should ensure that weight to be
towed does not exceed manufacturer and site
limits as defined in instruction manual and SOP.
2.5
Act on or report monitoring systems and alarms
in accordance with manufacturer instructions and
site procedures.
• Refer to fault communication process
• Access gauges to monitor performance and
operational indicators are within parameters.
• What monitoring systems
and alarms are there? If
your organisation has more
than one model, you will
need to specify this for
each one.
• What site and
manufacturer instructions
exist?
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Possible contextualisation
question
2.6
Recognise and respond to hazardous and
emergency situations in accordance with
manufacturer instructions and site procedures.
• Refer to emergency evacuation procedures in
manufacturer’s instructions
• Refer to site risk management plan.
2.7
Complete work in accordance with the agreed
plan and outcomes and within the operating
capacities of the allocated equipment.
• Refer relevant JSA and work requirements as
outlined in 24 hour plan.
3 Carry out
operator
3.1
maintenance.
Carry out equipment inspections and fault-finding
in accordance with manufacturer instructions and
site requirements.
• Is there a risk management
plan?
• What types of hazards are
operators likely to
encounter?
• What site and manufacturer
instructions exist?
• What types of works are
typically carried out?
• What are the operational
specifications of the
grader(s)?
• According to manufacturer
and site requirements,
what should be inspected
and how often?
• Refer to grader maintenance procedures
• Look and listen check performed at shut-down
• Grader visually inspected for any physical
damage.
3.2
Carry out routine operational servicing,
lubrication and housekeeping tasks in accordance
with manufacturer instructions and site
authorised procedures and practices.
• Refer to equipment maintenance SOP, which
include visual inspections and cleaning to
maintain tidy cab and visual inspections of
blade and ripper for damage as well as
maintaining fuel, oil and air pressure levels.
3.3
Carry out minor maintenance to manufacturer
instructions and site requirements.
• Refer to equipment maintenance SOP for
description of minor maintenance tasks to be
carried out by operators .
3.4
Provide operator support during preparation for,
and conduct of, major maintenance tasks in
accordance with site requirements.
• Refer to equipment maintenance SOP
• Maintenance requests communicated promptly
to maintenance crew
• According to manufacturer
and site requirements,
what parts should be
lubricated and how are
housekeeping tasks
defined?
• Do operators carry out
minor maintenance?
• What maintenance
procedures exist for your
site?
• What maintenance
procedures exist?
• How are major
maintenance tasks
communicated in your
organisation?
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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ELEMENT
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Possible contextualisation
question
• Equipment is tagged as required and
appropriate.
3.5
Process records in accordance with site
• What site procedures exist?
requirements.
• What documentation is
required?
• Refer to equipment maintenance SOP
• Maintenance request forms completed and
returned to supervisor.
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Identifying language, literacy and numeracy (LLN) requirements of units of
competency
Who is this tool for?
BOTH
RTOs and enterprise/industry
Why is this tool useful?
Recent surveys have highlighted that 46% of Australians aged between 15 and 64 have literacy
levels below the minimum required to function fully in life and at work. (Australian Bureau of
Statistics (2008), Adult Literacy and Life Skills Survey, Australia. Summary results, Cat no.4228.0
(2006 reissue) p.5)
To improve skills for work, issues around low language, literacy and numeracy (LLN) skills need
to be addressed. RTOs can assist enterprise/industry by ensuring that learners develop
vocational LLN skills needed for job tasks. This requires identifying the gaps that exist between
the LLN levels of the learner, the LLN requirements of the workplace and the LLN requirements
of the training. Identified skills gaps need to be addressed, at least in part, by vocational
trainers.
Vocational trainers can develop skills to assist learners by completing the unit titled
TAELLN401A Address adult language, literacy and numeracy skills, an elective in the TAE40110
Certificate IV in Training and Assessment. This unit refers to the Australian Core Skills
Framework (ACSF) (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, 2008),
which is a framework that describes the levels of performance in the five core skills of learning,
reading, writing, oral communication and numeracy. The ACSF provides a common reference
point and a common language for discussions around LLN skills.
How is the tool used?
This tool will assist RTOs and enterprise/industry to understand the LLN requirements of the
training.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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TOOL: Identifying language, literacy and numeracy (LLN) requirements of units
of competency
Units of competency include the LLN skill requirements for a particular job task. These are
sometimes obvious, such as ‘Read and understand...’.
However, often the requirements are embedded. The LLN skills required can be teased out
with a careful examination of the elements, performance criteria, range statement and
assessment guidelines.
Together, the RTO and enterprise/industry should analyse the unit of competency by asking:

What do people have to listen to and understand?

What do people have to say?

What do they have to read?

What do they have to write?

Do they need to understand any diagrams, pictures or symbols?

What maths calculations do they need to do?
Highlight the words that indicate these areas to consider. Then decide what this means in the
workplace. For example, what workplace documents will learners need to read, what forms do
they need to complete, who do they need to report to.
‘Trigger words’ can help identify where LLN skills exist in a unit of competency. For example,

‘interpret’ and ‘follow written instructions’ requires reading skills

‘clarify’ and ‘discuss’ requires speaking and listening skills

‘report’ and ‘maintain records’ requires writing skills

‘calculate’ and ‘formulate’ requires numeracy skills.
Following is an example of how to analyse a unit of competency to identify LLN needs in a unit
competency. The example, an extract from the unit RIIVEH201A Operate light vehicle, has key
words identifying LLN skills highlighted.
Industry Enterprise and RTO Partnerships –A Guide for RTOs, Enterprises and Industry Groups
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Example of how to identify LLN needs
RIIVEH201A
Unit descriptor
Employability skills
Application of the
unit
Competency field
ELEMENT
Elements describe
the essential
outcomes of a unit of
competency.
1. Plan and prepare
for operations
2. Operate a light
Operate light vehicle
This unit covers the operation of a light
vehicle in the resources and infrastructure
industries. It includes planning and
preparing for operations, operating a light
vehicle, and carrying out operator
maintenance. Licensing, legislative,
regulatory and certification requirements
that apply to this unit can vary between
states, territories, and industry sectors.
Relevant information must be sourced
prior to application of the unit.
This unit contains employability skills.
This unit is appropriate for those working
in an operational role at worksites within:
 Civil construction
 Coal mining
 Drilling
 Extractive industries
 Metalliferous mining
Vehicle Operations
PERFORMANCE CRITERIA
Performance criteria describe the
performance needed to demonstrate
achievement of the element. Where bold
italicised text is used, further information is
detailed in the required skills and
knowledge section and the range
statement. Assessment of performance is
to be consistent with the evidence guide.
1.1. Access, interpret and apply
compliance documentation
relevant to the work activity
1.2. Obtain, interpret and clarify
information, work requirements
and details
1.3. Access and apply safety
information and procedures when
planning light vehicle operations
1.4. Select appropriate types of
equipment and attachments
according to job specifications to
maximise efficiency and
effectiveness
1.5. Identify, address and report
potential hazards and risks
1.6. Select appropriate personal
protective equipment for planned
work activities
1.7. Identify, address and report
environmental issues
2.1. Carry out pre-start, start-up, park-
Learners may not
be able to read
full detail but at
this level they
must understand
the meaning. How
is that conveyed?
How is reporting
carried out in the
particular
workplace?
Written? Oral?
Is there a form to
be completed?
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RIIVEH201A
vehicle
3. Carry out
operator
maintenance
Operate light vehicle
up and shutdown procedures
2.2. Operate light vehicle with or
without ancillary attachments
2.3. Operate equipment within
recommended speed, engine
capability and limitations
2.4. Operate ancillary attachments to
the light vehicle
2.5. Use vehicle lights and indicators in
accordance with traffic regulations
2.6. Identify and respond appropriately
to hazardous and/or emergency
driving situations
2.7. Complete light vehicle operations
according to work plan
3.1. Conduct visual inspections to
identify faults
3.2. Conduct routine operational
servicing and housekeeping
activities
3.3. Carry out minor maintenance and
repairs
3.4. Report defective or irregular
performance to relevant
authorities
3.5. Maintain and update vehicle
records in accordance with
workplace procedures
How is this
communicated?
Manual?
Procedure?
This will be site
specific:
electronic or
paper-based.
What steps would
assist a learner?
Word lists?
REQUIRED SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE
This section describes the skills and knowledge required for this unit.
Required skills
Specific skills are required to achieve the Performance Criteria of this
unit, particularly for its application in the various circumstances in
which this unit may be used. This includes the ability to carry out the
following as required to operate a light vehicle:
 apply legislative, organisation and site requirements and
procedures for the operation of light vehicles
 match ancillary equipment with appropriate tasks
 communicate effectively with others to coordinate light vehicle
operations
 diagnose vehicle instrumentation readings and vehicle faults
 maintain vehicle records
 plan and organise work tasks
 resolve maintenance and repair issues
 interpret plans, reports, maps, schedules and specifications
Required knowledge
Specific knowledge is required to achieve the Performance Criteria of
this unit, particularly for its application in the various circumstances in
which this unit may be used. This includes knowledge of the following
as required to operate a light vehicle:
 basic mine geological and survey data
 types of communication systems and equipment
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RIIVEH201A







Operate light vehicle
driving hazards and related defensive driving techniques
equipment and trailer characteristics, technical capabilities and
limitations
fatigue management techniques
light vehicle maintenance requirements/procedures
loading/offloading procedures
map reading and road navigation techniques
relevant road rules, regulations, permit and licence requirements
of the relevant state/territory road traffic authority
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Step 4: Evaluation and review
Evaluating the outcomes of training and assessment
Who is this tool for?
BOTH
RTOs and enterprise/industry
Why is this tool useful?
Evaluation is important for determining the outcomes of training. This tool can assist RTOs and
enterprise/industry to assess the outcomes of the partnership from perspectives that are
important to them. It can also reveal to each side of the partnership unexpected positives.
How is this tool used?
The tool is based on Kirkpatrick’s four levels of evaluation
<http://www.kirkpatrickpartners.com>, which is regularly used in training and assessment.
The first column lists the levels and type of evaluation. The second column explains what is
being evaluated, or measured. The third column offers suggestions on how to gather the
information.
It should be noted that the RTO and enterprise/industry involvement in all levels of evaluation
is important, but one will be better placed than the other to gather information. For example:

The first two levels, ‘reaction’ and ‘learning’, will be gathered by the RTO in their
assessment of training after delivery.

The last two levels, ‘benefits’ and ‘results’, will require the enterprise/industry
considering what was expected from the training and assessment process against what
was actually gained. The enterprise/industry group may need to monitor workplace
performance for a period of time after the training to determine the outcomes.
Both the RTO and enterprise/industry may use the information in different ways. For example,
information gathered from a ‘reaction’ evaluation may lead to the enterprise/industry
requesting a specific trainer to be used again, or it may provide direction for professional
development for RTO’s trainer.
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TOOL: RTO focussed responsibility for evaluation – reaction and learning
Level and
type of
What are you looking for?
evaluation
1. Reaction
How can you gather the
information?
How did the staff personally feel
Reactions should be gathered in an
about the training?
informal way - discussions,
Did they enjoy the training and how it
was delivered?
anonymous questionnaires, open
ended questions, opportunity to add
more comments or express feelings
Was it a good use of their time?
outside the formal training setting.
Did the assessment reflect the
The RTO should gather this
training?
information immediately after
training and assessment, but the
enterprise/industry can also collect
responses when staff are at work.
2. Learning
What did the staff gain from the
training?
What new knowledge, skills or
attitudes have staff gained as a result
of the training?
The RTO will measure the knowledge
and skills your staff gained through
assessment processes. However,
some gain is not as easy to measure
e.g. changes in attitudes.
Another measure of learning could
be through observation in the
workplace of staff using their new
skills and knowledge in their role, or
taking on new work tasks that reflect
their new learning.
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TOOL: Enterprise/industry focussed responsibility for evaluation – behaviour
and results
Level and
type of
How can you gather the
What are you looking for?
information?
evaluation
3. Behaviour*
How has the training impacted on
This will be more difficult to assess
staff behaviour?
than the reaction and learning
For example, the performance of
their role or their attitude to work.
evaluation, and may require time to
assess.
Diversity awareness training is an
area where people’s attitudes and
behaviour are impacted on directly –
have these changes been seen at
work?
The enterprise/industry may request
the RTO to come back to the
workplace to do follow up evaluation.
4. Results*
What changes has the training made
This evaluation will need to take
to the enterprise/industry?
place over time, and again, looks at
For example:

Has there been increased
productivity?

Has customer satisfaction
the before and after training.
increased?

Are staff more satisfied with their
roles?

Is this less staff turnover and/or
absences?
* Behaviour and results may also be relevant to the review of the partnership.
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Reviewing the partnership
Who is this tool for?
BOTH
RTOs and enterprise/industry – for individual consideration, and joint discussion
Why is this tool useful?
Once the training and assessment is complete, it is important for both the RTO and
enterprise/industry to look at how the partnership performed and if it met both the RTO’s and
enterprise/industry’s expectations.
Some key questions that might be asked at the end of the partnership are:

Was delivery of training and assessment services to time requirements?

Was delivery of these services within budget?

Was there quality in the delivery of these services?

Did the partnership achieve improved importance because of these services?
How is this tool used?
This tool has been developed through consideration of project management processes, namely
‘closing’ a project. In the case of a partnership, it may be that there is an agreement to review
the partnership:



every three months
at the end of delivery of every training program
at other defined points.
The relevant people from the RTO (trainers, assessors, business development managers, etc.)
and the enterprise/industry (managers, training managers, HR staff, workplace supervisors, a
sample of learners) should discuss the checklist and assess how they felt the partnership
progressed from their perspective. It is useful to refer back to the ‘Are you ready for a
partnership’ and ‘negotiation’ stages and tools of the process.
The outcomes of these discussions should then be brought to a meeting between the RTO and
enterprise/industry group for a frank and open discussion about the successes and difficulties
in the partnership, whether the partnership achieve what it was meant to, and the potential
for continuing or expanding the partnership.
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TOOL: Reviewing the partnership
How did the
partnership go?
Expectations
Successes
Challenges
Communication
Questions for the
enterprise/industry group
Questions for the RTO
Revisit why you entered the
partnership – what did you want
to gain? Refer to the tools in ‘Are
you ready for a partnership?’ and
‘Negotiation’.
Revisit why you entered the
partnership – what did you want
to gain? Refer to the tools in ‘Are
you ready for a partnership?’ and
‘Negotiation’.
Did the partnership meet, exceed
or fall short of your expectations?
Did the partnership meet, exceed
or fall short of your expectations?
Has everything that you agreed
to provide been provided?
Has everything that you agreed
to deliver been delivered?
Is there any dispute about this?
Is there any dispute about this?
What are you most pleased with
from the partnership?
What are you most pleased with
from the partnership?
What do you think worked well
and why?
What do you think worked well
and why?
Were there any unexpected
benefits from the partnership?
Were there any unexpected
benefits from the partnership?
Were there unanticipated
problems in the partnership?
Were there unanticipated
problems in the partnership?
How were these resolved?
How were these resolved?
Is there anything you were
particularly disappointed with in
the partnership?
Is there anything you were
particularly disappointed with in
the partnership?
Was it easy to communicate with
the RTO?
Was it easy to communicate with
the enterprise/industry?
Did the RTO provide a
person/position for regular
contact and discussion? Were
there any issues with this?
Did the enterprise/industry group
provide a person/position for
regular contact and discussion?
Were there any issues with this?
How were issues raised with the
RTO, and did they respond
appropriately?
How were issues raised with the
enterprise/industry group, and
did they respond appropriately?
Did you feel appropriately
Did you feel appropriately
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How did the
partnership go?
Questions for the
enterprise/industry group
Questions for the RTO
consulted and involved in the
partnership?
respected and involved for your
training and assessment services?
Commitment
How did the RTO demonstrate
their commitment to the
partnership?
How did the enterprise/industry
group demonstrate their
commitment to the partnership?
Budget
Was delivery of services to
budget?
Was delivery of services to
budget?
Could the delivery of services
have been more cost effective?
How?
Could the delivery of services
have been more cost effective?
How?
What would you do again?
What would you do again?
What would you do differently?
What would you do differently?
Would you work with the same
or other RTOs again? Why?
Would you work with the same
enterprise/industry group again,
or similar? Why?
Lessons learned
Can you use this experience to
improve training in your
enterprise/industry? How?
Can you use the experience
gained from this process in future
or other partnerships? How?
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Supporting the partnership
Developing mentoring skills
Mentoring is a skill that has been identified as key to the success of traineeships and
apprenticeship completion. A unit, TAEDEL404A Mentor in the workplace has been included in
TAE10 Training and Education Training Package.
The unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required to establish and
develop a professional mentoring relationship with a learner, in particular an apprentice or
trainee employed by, or undertaking work placement in, a workplace.
It includes establishing the need for mentoring, developing a mentoring plan or framework,
facilitating and monitoring the mentoring relationship, and evaluating the effectiveness of
mentoring.
(Source: TAE10 Training and Education Training Package, unit of competency TAEDEL402A
Mentor in the workplace.)
The training package also contains a workplace supervisor skill set which may be useful for
enterprises. It contains these units of competency:

TAEASS301A Contribute to assessment

TAEDEL301A Provide work skill instruction

TAEDEL404A Mentor in the workplace.
Any RTO with the TAE40110 Certificate IV in Training and Assessment on its scope of
registration would be able to deliver the unit of competency or skill set for an enterprise.
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Using authentic workplace tasks for training and assessment and identifying
sources of evidence
Some background
Evidence from our research (Investigation into Industry expectations of vocational education
and training assessment, NQC, 2008) showed that enterprises that had their own RTO or were
in a contracted relationship were more likely to be satisfied with the level of involvement in
the assessment process.
Some suggestions for increased enterprise involvement in assessment included using the
workplace to collect evidence for assessment.
Examples of evidence using workplace activities
Combination of the following to form a portfolio of evidence:

Sample of work products, e.g. document/report, model

Sample of process, e.g. minutes of meetings, notes of follow up, emails showing
communication about a process, action plans

Sign off from supervisor of activities satisfactorily completed in workplace, e.g. using
an observation checklist or skills passport

Discussion about what the person did, e.g. explaining how they dealt with problems

Simulated assessment, e.g. using a piece of equipment outside the normal operation
of the enterprise

Third party reports, e.g. reference from current or previous workplace supervisor, or
from customers/clients – see strategies below to ensure third party evidence is
genuine

Certificates of courses already completed, e.g. in-house training, external training for
which credit transfer has been established

Awards received, e.g. internal or community

Others?
Strategies to ensure third party evidence is genuine
Evidence for assessment can sometimes come from third parties. The following are some
strategies to ensure the evidence is genuine:

Ask to see original documentation

Contact the person who provided the third party report to discuss the content of the
report
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
Question the learner (staff member) about the third party report, e.g. talk more about
their involvement, background etc

Ask the learner about their relationship to the person providing the third party report

Check dates on the documents, to check for currency

Use a tool for the report, e.g. a form with checklist and questions

Use third party reports in conjunction with other forms of evidence to build a picture
of competence.
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Appendix I
Australian Quality Training Framework (AQTF), 2010, Element 1.2, from Users’ Guide to the
Essential Conditions and Standards for Continuing Registration.
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Appendix II: Useful websites

Australian Apprenticeships
<http://www.australianapprenticeships.gov.au/search/aacsearch.asp>
This website provides information for employers, students, job seekers, trainers and
others around the Australian Apprenticeships scheme, including benefits, training and
qualifications.

Australian Core Skills Framework
<http://www.deewr.gov.au/SKILLS/PROGRAMS/LITANDNUM/ACSF/Pages/default.aspx>
The ACSF was produced by the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace
Relations, and their website provides an understanding of how the framework can be used
to assist workers with their language, literacy and numeracy requirements.

Australian Qualification Framework
<http://www.aqf.edu.au/>
The AQF is a quality assured national framework of qualifications in the school, vocational
education and training (VET), and higher education. Their website provides information
about the framework, with specific information for students, education providers and
employers.

DEEWR 2006, Employability Skills – from Framework to Practice, an introductory guide
for trainers and assessors. (Precision Consultancy)
<http://www.training.com.au/documents/Employability%20Skills_From%20Framework%2
0to%20Practices.pdf>
This resource for individuals who provide competency based training and assessment in
the vocational education and training sector. Many of the activities and materials
contained in this guide could easily be used in a professional development session.

Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR)
<http://www.deewr.gov.au/>
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The ‘Skills’ section of this website provides news, programs and resources relating to
programs supported by DEEWR in relation to vocational education and training.

Industry Skills Councils
<http://www.isc.org.au/>
Industry Skills Councils bring industry, educators and government together to focus on
issues that impact on training. This website directs users to the relevant ISC for their
industry, as well as providing details on the role and services of ISC’s in general.

National Quality Council
<http://www.nqc.tvetaustralia.com.au/>
The NQC oversees quality assurance and ensures national consistency in the application of
the Australian Quality Training Framework standards for the audit and registration of
training providers.
This website also has links to the 2008 and 2009 NQC reports which provided the
background for this guide and tools.

National Training Information Service (NTIS) website
<http://www.ntis.gov.au/>
NTIS is the database on vocational education and training in Australia and allows you to
search for information on Training Packages, Qualifications, Courses, Units of Competency
and Registered Training Organisations (RTOs).

Skills Australia 2010, Australian Workforce Futures: A National Workforce Development
Strategy, Commonwealth of Australia
<http://www.skillsaustralia.gov.au/>
Skills Australia is an independent statutory body, providing advice to the Minister for
Tertiary Education, Skills, Jobs and Workplace Relations on Australia’s current, emerging
and future workforce skills needs and workforce development needs.

training.com.au
<http://www.training.com.au/>
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This website is a useful starting point for information about the VET sector in Australia, and
directs users to other related sites, such as the National Quality Council and the Australian
Quality Training Framework.
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Appendix III: Bibliography
Billett, Stephen (Editor), 2006, Making the most of Workplace Learning, A report on the 2006
Vet-Connect symposiums on Workplace learning, Griffith University, Brisbane.
Industry and Training 2007: Overview, exploring the relationship between industry and the VET
system, NCVER, Adelaide.
Kearns, Peter, Bowman, Kaye, Garlick, Steve 2008, The double helix of vocational education
and training and development, NCVER, Adelaide.
Mitchell, John et al, 2007, How VET enhances human capital: 31 examples, Reframing the
future, DEST, Canberra.
Mitchell, John and McKenna, Suzy 2008, Productivity and Participation Enhanced by VET,
Reframing the future, DEEWR, Canberra.
Mitchell, John, 2008, Improving the bottom line: Why industry values partnerships with TAFE
NSW, John Mitchell & Associates, Sydney.
Precision Consultancy 2009, Industry/enterprise and RTO partnerships, NQC, Melbourne.
Precision Consultancy 2008, Investigation into industry expectations of Vocational Education
and Training Assessment, NQC, Melbourne.
Skills Australia 2010, Australian Workforce Futures: A National Workforce Development
Strategy, Commonwealth of Australia, Canberra.
Smith, Andrew & Hawke, Geoff 2008, Human resource management in Australian registered
training organisations, NCVER, Adelaide.
Smith, Peter 2008, Insights from strategic and change management projects in Registered
Training Organisations, Reframing the future, DEEWR Canberra.
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