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MEMPHIS COMIC AND FANTASY CONVENTION P47
11.20.14 | FREE | 1343RD ISSUE
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COVER STORY P. 19
B RUCE V ANW YNGARDEN
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Managing Editor
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OUR 1343RD ISSUE | 11.20.14
There’s a pile of books beside my bed, most of which I’ve started, few of which I’ve
finished. The last book I finished was a short novel that was compelling enough
that I actually went to bed early and finished it over the course of a week earlier
this month. But that’s rare, these days.
I’m a fast reader, and I used to immerse myself in a book until I turned the last
page. Lately, I’m more likely to start a book, set it aside, and never get back to it.
My attention span isn’t long enough to get me across Lick Creek. I’m running out
of bookmarks.
Distractions are the new, you know... whatever. Go see some live music, and
half the audience is holding up their phone to put a video on Facebook instead of
actually listening to the music. Go out to eat, and you’ll often see two people at a
table staring at their phones or taking Instagrams of their food, instead of talking
and eating. Walking in the woods, communing with nature? Hey, look at that
maple foliage! I need to get a picture of that to share. Watching the Grizzlies on
TV? It’s a lot more fun if you’re on Twitter, too. It’s called double-screening, and the
attendant GIFs, snarky tweets, and Vines just add to the experience. Did you know
they’re now calling Jon Leuer “Tennessee Dirk”?
Information is served to us like a vast, weird, never-ending buffet where the
Cheetos are next to the prime rib, which is next to the gummi bears. Here is a small
sampling of Tuesday’s headlines on Huffington Post: “Missouri Declares State of
Emergency Ahead of Grand Jury Decision”; “Adrian Peterson Suspended for Rest
of Season”; “Japanese PM Calls Special Elections as Country Slides Into Recession”;
“Hacker Group Goes to War with KKK”; “Why We Never Got Those 250 Emoji
We Were Promised”; “You’re Buying Your
Sheets All Wrong”; “The Three-Minute
Skill That Will Totally Change Your
NEWS & OPINION
Breakfast”; “Legendary Photog Snaps The
LETTERS - 4
World’s Most Beautiful Women (NSFW)”;
THE FLY-BY - 6
“GOP Hires Constitutional Lawyer in
TRUTH BE TOLD - 11
Obama Lawsuit.”
POLITICS - 12
Where to sart? Sure, I need to know
VIEWPOINT - 14
about
what’s going on in Ferguson and in
EDITORIAL - 16
Cover Story - “Getting Buck”
Washington, D.C., but I’m curious about
by Chris Davis - 19
that secret breakfast skill. And I certainly
STEPPIN’ OUT
don’t want to continue buying my sheets
WE RECOMMEND - 24
all wrong. And I wonder just how NSFW
MUSIC - 26
those pictures are... Oh wait, I just got
AFTER DARK - 30
an email. Hey, someone wants to be my
BOOKS - 35
friend on Facebook. Oops, need to answer
CALENDAR OF EVENTS - 36
this text, first. BRB. Oooh, puppy video!
FOOD - 43
Whew! It’s an ADHD world, but I
FILM - 47
really want to reconnect with that pile of
THE RANT - by Tim Sampson - 55
books. Maybe it would help if I started
C L A S S I F I E D S - 50
live-tweeting as I read them?
Featuring - The Times crossword puzzle.
Bruce VanWyngarden
[email protected]lyer.com
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CHRISTOPHER MYERS
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3
The earliest experiences in
a baby’s life lay the foundation
for future success.
What They Said...
Letters and comments from Flyer readers
To find out how you can make these years count, visit:
urbanchildinstitute.org/firstyears
PUSH PILATES IS MOVING TO
A POP-UP LOCATION UNTIL
WE FIND A NEW HOME.
IN DECEMBER, PUSH PILATES WILL
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call 901-278-9022 For more inFormation.
greg cravens
About Bruce VanWyngarden’s Letter
from the Editor on urban vs. rural voters
and fear …
You’re seriously comparing racism to a
fear of... cows?
Count Dracula
“Aren’t you worried about those cows
coming after us?” That’s the funniest
line I’ve read in a long time.
Nobody
November 20-26, 2014
One of my favorite movies is Defending
Your Life with Albert Brooks, Meryl
Streep, and Rip Torn. In a nutshell,
Brooks’ character dies and finds out
the afterlife is a review of one’s life,
and it’s to determine if you have to
return to earth and try it again or get to
move on to the “next destination.” The
determining factor is fear. If you let
fear rule your life, then you will return
to earth and try again in a new life.
Rip Torn’s character explains it with
this quote: “Fear is like a giant fog. It sits
on your brain and blocks everything
— real feelings, true happiness, real joy.
They can’t get through that fog. But you
lift it, and buddy, you’re in for the ride of
your life.”
Charley Eppes
About Harold Ford Jr.’s Viewpoint
column, “A New Day in Washington” …
Yikes, a lot of that made sense. How
did that slip into this week’s Flyer? It’s
not sour grapes like every other piece.
Not a Midtown Liberal
Open Mic/Spoken Word
Tuesdays 7-9:30PM $5
The Indo Pagan Path Saturday
November 22, 6-8:00pm FREE
recycle
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Readings $25.00 Dec 5, 7-10PM
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4
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this issue is printed on
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memphis flyer | memphisflyer.com
Why should the president take
advice from a perennial loser?
Yes, this election is a wonderful
opportunity for soulless, bottomfeeding Democrats to suck up to
Republicans and sell out your party
and your people for an invitation to a
Washington cocktail party.
Thanks ever so much for bringing
up our old friend, the Keystone
Pipeline. This Canadian boondoggle
that promises to bring thousands
of well-paying, short-term jobs
(not including strippers, I suppose)
in exchange for a leaky pipeline
delivering, as Charles Pierce says,
the world’s dirtiest fossil fuel across
an aquifer that waters America’s
breadbasket — and then to the
world’s, but not America’s, gas tanks.
It’s such a sweet deal, the Canadians
themselves didn’t want it crossing
their land, so they looked south for a
sucker and found one named Harold
Ford Jr.
Jeff
Was he out of the country during
the 2010 and 2014 elections? Blue
Dogism is dead, so are the careers of
Lieberman, John Barrow, and all the
others. On Election Day we settled all
family business, and we are drifting
rightward as a party no more.
LeftWingCracker
About Clay Skipper’s cover story,
“Drake’s Dad” …
How nice that you featured Dennis
Graham. Excellent approach to
journalism. Terrance and I have met
him at DKDC for one of Marcella’s
shows, and he rocks! Very cool man —
down to earth, warm, and friendly.
Cynthia Simien
This was a very good article. People
rarely write articles like this, these days.
It was like a novel.
Odera Okoye
About Toby Sells’ post, “Big River
Crossing Construction Begins on
Harahan Bridge” …
This is one of the biggest boondoggles
ever concocted. Total waste of money.
The proponents must have never been
to West Memphis. It ranks as the
mother of all armpit jewels in the U.S.
Can’t this colossal waste be stopped? I
sure hope so.
xtraxtra
Talk about a bridge to nowhere. What a
waste of money.
Wicketr
It’s not a bridge to nowhere. It will
connect with the Mississippi River
Trail and, once across, you will be able
to ride the levee to New Orleans and
eventually north to the river’s source
in Minnesota. From what I have seen,
projects like this boost a city’s draw,
making people want to live inside
the city limits. Having people stay or
move into the city will be a long-term
benefit to the tax base. Think of it as an
investment.
Mark Hendren
REALITY IS
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OR A LEG.
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5
11/14/14 12:53 PM
the
f
fly-by
ly on the wall
verbatIm
Finally, after years of uncertainty
regarding bathroom habits, the
citizens of Memphis know where
MLGW CEO Jerry Collins stands on
the issue of public urination. When
WREG ran a news story about some
guy from East Memphis who took
pictures of another guy from MLGW
peeing in the street, Collins responded with unambiguous language. “If
an employee was using the bathroom
in public, it would be inappropriate
and would be subject to disciplinary action.” Thanks to Channel 3 for
finally clearing this up.
November 20-26, 2014
hot haIr
Let’s face it. There comes a time in every person’s life when they must weigh
the facts and determine whether or
not they are going to buy some cheap
and probably stolen hair from a street
weave-hustler. In very few sentences,
this police report from an attempted
wig theft at Memphis’ Chic Beauty
supply illustrates why buying hot hair
is a bad idea: “Both suspects went to
the rear of the store looking at wigs.
Suspect Blair Crumes started stuffing
her wig (The Straight Flush, valued
at $30) down the front of her pants.
Suspect Sarah Metcalf started stuffing
her wig (The Niki Menaj, valued at
$35) down the front of her pants. Both
then went past the point of sale without paying for the wigs.” Remember
people: Stolen hair is crotch-warmed
hair. And nobody wants that. 6
Questions, Answers + Attitude
Edited by Bianca Phillips
Joining Our Fight {
cIty r e p orte r
By Toby Sells
Manhattan district attorney puts up $35 million to help clear nation’s backlog of untested rape kits.
Memphis law enforcement got a new national ally last
week in its fight to clear the city’s backlog of untested rape
kits while leaders here promised survivors they’d keep that
fight alive.
Memphis Police Department (MPD) Deputy Chief Jim
Harvey said last Thursday that the city still needs about $3.7
million to complete its rape kit testing project. The day before that, the Manhattan District Attorney’s
Office announced a new, $35 million fund to help cities like
Memphis clear their backlogs. That fund will be the largest
single donation to help clear the nation’s rape kit backlog,
which the Department of Justice says includes more than
400,000 untested kits. The announcement from New York City came as a
surprise to Memphis leaders even though Manhattan DA
Cyrus Vance name-dropped Memphis in his national news
conference announcing the fund. Q&A}
“What stands in the way of identifying the scope [of
the untested rape kit backlog] across the country and then
having local law enforcement testing them is, quite simply,
money,” Vance said. The new funds come from money forfeited from national
banks that violated U.S. sanctions in aiding rogue regimes
across the world, Vance said, specifically pointing to Libya
and Sudan.
Applications for the new funds will br available in the
spring, and when they are, Memphis will be at the table,
said Doug McGowen, director of the Mayor’s Innovation
Delivery Team. Meanwhile, McGowen said the city will
“leave no stone unturned” to find the resources to test the
city’s rape kits. McGowen and Harvey both spoke last week in one of a
series of events called “Sexual Assault Survivor Services: A
Community Conversation.” with Billy Orgel,
New Owner of Tennessee Brewery
The 124-year-old Tennessee Brewery building may live on another 100-plus
years, thanks to developer Billy Orgel.
Earlier this month, Orgel closed on his purchase of the much-beloved
former home of Goldcrest beer. Before Orgel stepped in this summer, the
fate of the long-vacant, historic, downtown structure seemed grim.
The building’s leasing agent, James Rasberry, had said the building would
meet the wrecking ball by the end of the summer unless a serious buyer
stepped in. That motivated a group of investors — restaurateur Taylor
Berger, attorney Michael Tauer, commercial real estate executive Andy
Cates, and communications specialist Doug Carpenter — to organize a popup beer garden inside the brewery to raise awareness about the need to save
the building. Hundreds attended the “Untapped” beer garden event from
late April to early June.
Shortly after “Untapped” ended, news broke that a then-anonymous
buyer had a contract on the building. That buyer turned out to be Billy
Orgel, Shelby County Schools board member and president of cell phone
tower development firm Tower Ventures. Now that the purchase is a done
deal, Orgel is speaking out about his plans for the space. — Bianca Phillips
Flyer: What are your plans for the breWery?
tImberlake tWeets
And speaking of stolen hair pieces,
Justin Timberlake recently answered
a Twitter critic who accused J-Tim
of being a “bandwagon” Memphis
Grizzlies fan. Timberlake’s response:
“Uh ... I’m from Memphis and I’m an
owner. Anyone else? #WigSnatch.”
By Chris Davis. Email him at
[email protected]
Billy Orgel: It needs to be residential because it’s a residential neighborhood.
It’s not Overton Square. It’s not in the middle of a commercial area. You’ve
got office, a little commercial, and residential on South Main, so it needs to be in line with the rest of the area. We’ve got a lot
of great projects going on with the Chisca [Hotel being turned into apartments] and other things, so I think the brewery is a
natural fit for residential.
It’s a huge buIldIng. Would all of that be resIdentIal?
The funny thing is, is not a huge building. It’s 64,000 square feet. It looks like a huge building because it has volume. But it’s
not big. It’s just that architecturally, it sucks you in.
What dreW you to save that buIldIng?
It’s outstanding, architecturally. It’s a natural progression for things to get rehabilitated downtown. If you walk in there and
The open meetings were mandated in an executive order by Memphis Mayor
A C Wharton. He said during the meeting last week that rape is “a cancer that has
to be wiped out.” He vowed to the small group gathered at First Baptist Church on
Broad Avenue that he’d keep the process transparent. “If we find more, you’ll hear about them, as embarrassing as that may be,”
Wharton said. “Hopefully, we’ve gotten all of them. But if not, and we find more,
we’re not going to sweep it under the rug. We’re going to come right out and tell
you that we found some more.”
Harvey likened the situation here to the Titanic. The Memphis media has
portrayed it as a sinking ship, he said, but “we’ve sent the cameras down, and we’re
pulling treasure out of the Titanic.” Clues are the treasures he said will lead his
agency to arrest “hard-core criminals,” whose crimes likely go beyond rape.
“These are violent criminals,” he said. “It’s not about sex. It’s about violence. So,
if we can get one of these guys off the street,
then we’ve stopped them from committing any
“It’s not about sex.
number of other crimes.” It’s about violence.
Meanwhile, Congress is sitting on a $51.2
So, if we can get
billion spending bill that includes $41 million
one of these guys
for “a new community-based sexual assault
response reform initiative.” Congressman Steve
off the street, then
Cohen (D-Memphis) secured $5 million for
we’ve stopped them
sexual assault program that appeared in
from committing any the
versions of the bill that got approvals from
number of crimes.”
House and Senate committees. The reform program would include
— Jim Harvey
funds for testing rape kits but also for the
investigation and prosecution of sexual assault crimes, training law enforcement
officers, and victim services. The program is intended to improve law
enforcement’s response to sexual assault and services to victims.
A budget vote, which includes the rape kit funding, is one of several
issues before the lame-duck Congress this week. The government faces
another shutdown unless lawmakers can pass a budget or a stop-gap measure
by December 11th.
look up at that grand staircase, you’ll see all the natural light coming in. Once you
get above the first floor, you’ve got a fantastic view of the river, and it only gets
better as you ascend the stairs.
ARE YOU PLANNING TO KEEP THE BUILDING’S BONES AS THEY ARE?
WILL IT LOOK THE SAME?
JAMES RASBERRY HAS SAID THE BREWERY BUILDING CAME WITH A
LOT OF CHALLENGES AND THAT’S WHY IT TOOK SO LONG TO FIND A
BUYER. ARE YOU UP FOR IT?
Historic renovations are tough. That’s why the government gives you some
incentives [with tax credits]. It’s easier to go out to Collierville or East Memphis
and build something new, but you don’t have the same character in those cases.
Architecture was art [when the brewery was built], so you’re trying to preserve a
piece of art.
My experience downtown has been to either build or rehabilitate older buildings,
which I’ve done with a series of partners over the years. Jason Wexler and Adam
Slovis and I did some buildings on Main Street, and then we began to partner with
Henry Turley. Along with Henry, we’ve worked on South Junction, [a new building
project adding] 280 apartments on South Main. We were involved in [rehabbing]
The Cornerstone Flats at 114 South Main and the Main Street Flats, where we
combined four buildings into about 12,000 square feet of commercial and 33
apartments. That’s at 99, 101, 103, and 105 South Main. And we did Radio Center
Flats at Union and Main. That has the big radio marquee on it.
news & opinion
DO YOU HAVE EXPERIENCE WITH REHABILITATING HISTORIC
BUILDINGS?
m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m
When you do historic rehab, you try to get it back as close as possible to what it
looked like. In order to make the project work, you apply for historic tax credits, so
you have standards you have to uphold. The building needs to look substantially as
it did when it was constructed. The National Park Service applies a reasonable-ness
to that. Just because you like distressed brick, that’s not the way it ever looked. You
have to go back to the way the building looked. The windows have to be restored.
The brewery was built in 1890. We don’t have that many structures left like that.
WHAT’S THE TIMELINE FOR COMPLETION OF THE BREWERY REHAB?
7
I think it will take eight to 10 months, a 2016 completion.
Bridge to Somewhere {
city r e p orte r
By Toby Sells
West Memphis officials are working to make their side of the Big River Crossing a draw for Memphis pedestrians, cyclists.
When Big River Crossing is in the news, you can bet
someone in Memphis will, again, call it the “bridge to
nowhere.”
Construction began on the project last week, and
officials said it will open in the spring or summer of 2016. Big River Crossing is the $17.5 million project that will
transform part of the Harahan Bridge over the Mississippi
River into a path for bicyclists and pedestrians. The
Crossing is part of the 10-mile, $43 million Main Street
to Main Street Multi-Modal Connector project that will
create bike paths and walkways from Uptown Memphis to
West Memphis, Arkansas. Calling the Crossing a “bridge to nowhere” is a twosided insult. On one side, the slur means the Crossing
is a boondoggle, a costly and unnecessary government
infrastructure project. The other side is aimed directly at
West Memphis. That the bike and pedestrian walkway will
lead Memphians there implies that the small Arkansas
town is “nowhere” or that there’s nothing for bikers or
pedestrians to do when they get there. “We obviously know those comments,” said Jim
Jackson, director of the West Memphis Office of Tourism.
“We want to, and are working on, dispelling any of those.” Plans have been developed for an eco-park on the West
Memphis side of the Crossing. The park would span the
area between the bridges at I-55 and I-40, Jackson said.
The plans feature a wildlife refuge, education spaces, trails
along the river’s edge, and farming exhibits. If that’s not
Before and after
images of Big River
Crossing
enough of a draw, Jackson is banking on at least one thing
West Memphis has that Memphis doesn’t. “Everyone in Memphis can look toward us and see
… a bean field,” Jackson said. “From our perspective
looking back … it is a phenomenal view, looking at the
Memphis skyline.” He said West Memphis and Arkansas are committed
to making the Crossing a major attraction and pointed to
Little Rock’s Big Dam Bridge, the longest bridge built for
pedestrian and bicycle traffic in North America. But, he
said, projects take money, and West Memphis and state
officials are hard at work to find it for the Crossing.
Meanwhile, cyclists are already riding the levee tops
around West Memphis along the Big River Parkway.
That project’s backers want to open the Mississippi River
levees up to bikers on a 660-mile trail from Memphis to
New Orleans. National Geographic is working with those in the Big
River Strategic Initiative to brand the parkway as a National
Geographic geotourism destination. The society’s Center
for Sustainable Destinations serves as a tour guide for
people looking to travel to natural spaces. It has worked in
the past with places like Greater Yellowstone, California’s
Redwood Coast, and the East Tennessee River Valley. Back in July, board members of the St. Francis Levee
District of Arkansas unanimously approved bikers on
their 63-mile segment of the levee system. Bicyclists hit
the trail in August on the first ever Big River Parkway
Levee Ride that ran from West Memphis all the way to
Marianna, Arkansas.
Your holiday memories begin here.
photos with santa
located in suite 737 near charming charlie
november 15:
photos: 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.
november 16 & 30:
sunday: 12 p.m. - 6 p.m.
november 17 - november 26:
monday - Thursday: 1 p.m. - 6 p.m.
november 28 & 29:
Friday - saturday: 11 a.m. - 8 p.m.
November 20-26, 2014
no phoTos on ThanKsgiVing DaY
December 1 - December 23:
monday - saturday: 11 a.m. - 8 p.m.
sunday: 12 p.m. - 6 p.m.
December 24:
9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
pet photos with santa
november 30:
sunday: 12 p.m. - 6 p.m.
December 1, 8 & 15
4 p.m. - 7 p.m.
all pets must be on a leash and up to date on vaccinations.
santa will occasionally need to check his lists. please check shopcarriagecrossing.com for photo break times.
www.shopcarriagecrossing.com
8
Breast in Peace
{
on th e s ce n e
By Alexandra Pusateri
Marchers in the second
line displayed signs.
amendment were manipulating votes
by not also voting for governor, which
they say is against the state Constitution’s
Article IX, Section 3. The “Yes on 1”
campaign called for voters to sit out the
governor’s race — as it was “doubling” the
vote for the amendment.
Shelby County and Hardeman County,
along with the counties that house
Nashville, Chattanooga, Knoxville, and
other pockets of rural areas across the
state, voted against the amendment.
“So many of our sister cities in
Tennessee voted the same way as we
did,” Ledbetter said. “The only thing
that makes me sad is that Shelby County
doesn’t vote in the numbers that it really
should be.”
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There may not have been a body to bury,
but last weekend, a “second line funeral”
allowed many to mourn how the passage
of Amendment 1 may affect their bodies.
Accompanied by musicians on drums
and brass, a crowd paraded through
Midtown from Overton Park, circling to
Madison and walking directly through
Overton Square. The mourners also
made a stop at CHOICES on Poplar.
Honks and cheers came from passersby
as marchers danced, sang, and twirled.
“This is not a protest,” said Sarah
Ledbetter, one of the organizers for the
event. “This is a second line funeral,
which is a very specific cultural tradition
meant to honor loss and regather the
energies of that thing in a new direction.
A protest is a statement of what you’re
against. This is a demonstrative act of
emotional and energetic loss.”
The second line parade — based on
New Orleans tradition — may not have
been a traditional one, but the symbolism
remained. Organizers’ portrayal of a jazz
funeral was executed well as mourners
appeared with parasols, umbrellas, and
signs. Some wore black to further drive
home the point.
Planning for the event spawned
immediately after it was revealed that
Amendment 1 had passed.
“I went to all my friends who I
encouraged to vote and said, ‘I just want
you all to feel proud that you voted
today,’” Ledbetter said. “From there, the
grief and the emotion that was swimming
just in this text [message] chain, it was
just like an engine that needed to go. In
that very text chain, I was like, ‘We are
going to take to the streets. What day are
you free?’”
While the amendment to the state’s
Constitution itself may not limit access
to abortion, nine days after it passed,
Rep. Rick Womick (R-Rockvale) filed a
bill that would require an ultrasound of
the fetus to be offered to the patient two
days before a scheduled abortion, unless
there’s a medical emergency.
If the patient declines, the medical
provider would be required to give “a
simultaneous verbal explanation of the
results of the live, real-time ultrasound
images, including a medical description
of the dimensions of the embryo or fetus,
the presence of cardiac activity, and the
presence of arms, legs, external members
and internal organs, and provide a copy
of the ultrasound image to the woman,”
according to the bill. The patient would
also be required to hear the heartbeat of
the fetus.
A federal lawsuit has been filed by
some opponents of Amendment 1,
including Rev. Kenneth T. Whalum,
Jr., who claims some voters for the
news & opinion
AlexAndrA pusAteri
Supporters of reproductive rights gathered for a second line funeral.
9
Double Duty {
s p otli g ht
By Chris Shaw
More local veterans who find themselves on the
wrong side of the law will receive treatment instead
of jail time, thanks to a $1.5 million federal grant
received by the Tennessee Department of Mental
Health and Substance Abuse Services (TDMHSAS).
Currently, the Shelby County Veterans Court
is able to treat 60 veterans at a time, but the grant
money will allow the program to expand to a
capacity of 117 veterans.
Since its 2012 launch, the Shelby County
Veterans Court has offered mental health or
drug treatment to certain offenders with military
service backgrounds. The offenders are paired with
mentors, who have also served in the military, and
are enrolled in appropriate rehabilitation services.
Their participation in the veterans court is an
alternative to serving jail time.
Cases that qualify for the court include all
misdemeanors (except DUIs and certain weapons
charges) and most drug cases that would normally
be referred to the Shelby County Drug Court.
In addition to offering rehabilitation options, the
veterans court also allows those who are enrolled
in the program to secure a stable home, receive job
assistance, and complete their GED or enroll in
college-level classes. The treatment time in veterans
court normally ranges from 12 to 16 months.
“It’s much more than just a way for veterans
to avoid a jail sentence,”
said E. Douglas Varney,
commissioner of
TDMHSAS. “This is a
voluntary decision for
a service member who’s
arrested on a nonviolent offense to seek
help, get into recovery,
and start receiving
the mental health
and substance abuse
treatment they need.”
Other counties in Tennessee will also benefit
from the federal grant. Montgomery County
Veterans Court will see its enrollment increase from
40 to 78, and Davidson County Veterans Court
will increase enrollment from 35 to 68. In total, the
Tennessee Veterans Court will be assisting 263 more
veterans over the next three years.
Ellen Abbott, the director of the Office of
Criminal Justice Services for TDMHSAS and
the author of the grant that secured the funds
for Tennessee veterans, said that because of the
expansion, the court will need more mentors.
“The Veterans Treatment Courts will need
additional mentors to work in the courts to help
provide peer mentoring to the expanded veterans
Laura GanGi | Dreamstime.com
Federal grant will allow local veterans court to double enrollment.
courts’ population,” Abbott said. “A mentor may
initially start volunteering with a veterans court that
has a trained mentor already on board. They will
work in conjunction with the trained mentor while
they wait to receive the training.” An application for Shelby County Veterans Court
mentors is posted on www.shelbycountytn.gov.
Abbott said Memphis has more veterans wanting
to get into the program and more total veterans
than the other two counties where a court is located.
“Shelby County has a veteran population of
61,165. Montgomery County, where Fort Campbell
is located, has a veteran population of 25,331,
and Davidson County has a veteran population
of 40,066,” Abbott said. “The higher the veteran
population, the larger the veterans court will be.”
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t r u t h b e t o l d B y We n d i C . T h o m a s
Bicycling Bias?
protests, did bike advocates lead with their
commitment to reducing racial/structural
inequality? Did they throw their fundraising prowess behind the failed 2012 gas
tax referendum that would have raised up
to $6 million for public transportation?
They did not. And that’s okay, but it’s
disingenuous to bristle when the article’s
authors note the class privilege inherent in
the $2 million raised for the Shelby Farms
Greenline, used primarily for recreation.
Take the $4.1 million in tax breaks won
by a developer to build an apartment complex along a planned pedestrian-bicycle
route connecting Main Street in Memphis
to Main Street in West Memphis. How will
the profits from these and related projects
build wealth for black families, where the
median household wealth is $6,446 compared to $91,405 for white families?
How do we secure bikes for those who
have lost their driver’s licenses because of
unpaid traffic tickets — while advocating
for changes in criminal justice policies?
How can a single mother of two kids
(the typical makeup of a low-income
Memphis family) get to her job by bike?
Where would she shower when she arrives? Where would she store her bike?
There are bike advocates considering
these tough questions, but if it’s true that
only a hit dog hollers, why did this article
strike such a nerve?
“Studies show that inequalities are
reproduced by social processes, sometimes
despite the best efforts and best intentions
of good citizens,” said Wanda Rushing, a
sociology professor at the U of M and one
of the article’s three authors. “Sometimes
good intentions lead to unexpected, and
sometimes undesirable consequences.”
(Disclosure: Rushing and I will co-teach
an economic inequality class this spring.
The journal article was written months
before we met.)
The awful efficiency of racism is that it
persists even when there are no cross-toting, white-hooded Klansmen to be found.
You can be a spandex-wearing, blackfriend-having, progressive white bicyclist
and still unwittingly replicate racist systems
that advantage some and neglect others.
The question isn’t whether bike lanes
run through black neighborhoods (they
do) or whether bicycling advocates are
bigots (most probably aren’t).
The question is: How will biking be
different from the other well-intentioned
movements that still leave brown and black
people and poor people behind?
Wendi C. Thomas is a columnist, journalist, and founder of Common Ground
Memphis. Her blog is wendicthomas.com;
Twitter: @wendi_c_thomas.
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news & opinion
Those who sit left
of center often
gloat at the relative
ease with which we
broach the tender
topic of race, at least
as compared to the
right. But given the
oversized defensive
reactions to a recent journal article about
the primary beneficiaries of Memphis’
bike lanes, perhaps we progressives should
pump our brakes. Without the thick skin
that conservatives earned during decades
of regressive racial politics, some Memphis
progressives winced like spin-class rookies
at the assertion that the movement does
more for the creative class than it does for
the 30 percent of city residents who live
below the poverty line.
In “Behind a Bicycling Boom: Governance, cultural change, and place character
in Memphis, Tennessee,” published last
month in the journal Urban Studies, the
authors quantified in detail the rise of the
biking movement in Memphis.
Despite the advent of 60-plus miles
of bike lanes, the development of the
Shelby Farms Greenline, and plans for the
Harahan Bridge project: “…change does
not automatically benefit all citizens,” the
authors wrote. “In fact, changes in place
character of cities may play an active part
in perpetuating inequalities in who has
power and for whom that power is used.”
What the article did not do is call the
bicycling bunch classist and racist, but that
seems to be what some heard.
A commenter on the Memphis Flyer’s
website wrote: “Because we should obviously tilt our city to the ‘uncreative class’
and the ‘stagnation machine elite’ instead,
for the sake of ‘inclusion’. (sic) … I’m as
liberal as anybody, but cities cannot survive
or grow on the backs of the apathetic,
the unemployed, the dependent, and the
criminal.” Another online reaction: “Idiots
(both black & white BTW) who choose to
try to stand in the way of positive changes
with claims of racial inequality are what’s
wrong with this city.”
In a far more sophisticated rebuttal,
Kyle Wagenschutz, the city’s bicycle/pedestrian program manager, noted that the
percentage of black cyclists was 57 percent
in 2013, which almost mirrors the city’s
black population.
Although the number of bicycle commuters has more than doubled between
2005 and 2013, the actual number of twowheeled commuters is fewer than 650.
Does this mean that bicycling is bad?
Of course not. But in backing Madison
Avenue bike lanes despite business owners’
m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m
A recent report on the skewed benefits of bike lanes has Memphis
progressives spinning their wheels in protest.
O O H L A L A S I N C E 1 94 9
408 Perkins Ext | Memphis, TN 38117 | 901-682-7575
11
POLITICS By Jackson Baker
A Truce Prevails on County Commission
Chairman Ford and an aggrieved majority reach an agreement on power-sharing, but factional differences may linger.
November 20-26, 2014
Ford. Weeks later, Ford would get his way on the committee matter, but in the meantime, the battle had shifted to
the matter of an agenda item that Basar kept proposing
and Ford kept rejecting.
That agenda item, which proposed a rules change
allowing agenda items to be added on the basis of simple
majority votes and not by a two-thirds super-majority,
became the basis of a Democratic coalition lawsuit against
Ford’s alleged violations of commission rules via his
persistent rejections.
Two weeks ago Chancellor Kyle declined to rule outright on the suit, finding instead that the commission had
no rules because it had adopted none for the new body
and directing commissioners to adopt new rules or to
readopt the body’s former rules.
Hence a motion for an amended rules package
presented as an add-on by Basar on Monday, igniting
another round of the ongoing factional dispute — partly
tedious, partly fascinating — and going over all of the
same old issues dividing the body.
The amended rules package contained new clauses
calling for the majority-rule principle and essentially
removing the chairman from any control over agenda
items. Deleted from the package, on a finding by County
Attorney Marcy Ingram that it
conflicted with the county charter,
was a clause declaring that the
chairman served “at the will and
pleasure of the commission.”
When the deal finally came
sometime after 6 p.m. on Monday,
the two sides had agreed (on a
motion by Ford!) to defer the rules
matter to the next meeting of the
general government committee, to
drop their respective legal actions,
and to do the trade-off indicated
above: Ford can feel secure in his
chairmanship, though he has had to
sacrifice the power over the agenda
that he had previously claimed and
employed.
Either both sides won or both sides lost. The question
now becomes: Do the two party-line-plus-one coalitions
continue to cohere, or do they break apart, a major part of
their raison-d’être having dissolved.
• An indicator of whether the coalitions might hold was
implicit in another vote taken by the commission on
Monday. Two votes, actually, on related ordinances
proposed by Roland — to strike language in existing ordinances requiring that contractors with the county observe
living wage and prevailing wage standards, respectively.
Roland’s premise is that the existing ordinances are
inconsistent with legislation passed by the Republican
dominated General Assembly establishing state standards in such matters and prohibiting local requirements that might clash with them. The issue, both in
Shelby County and in Nashville, has been a clear divider
between Democrats and Republicans.
Since this was the second reading for both Roland
ordinances, and since the commission was girding for
the later clash on the rules matter, it was tacitly agreed
that there would be no extended debate and that any
knock-down, drag-out clash between factions would be
postponed until the crucial third reading of the ordinances, at the commission’s next full public session.
Both the Roland ordinances got a tentative okay by
the margin of 7-6, with Basar voting along with other Republicans and Democrat Ford voting with them as well.
On that evidence of Ford’s continued solidarity with
his Republican supporters, coupled with Basar’s reversion to ideological form on a power-neutral issue, it
would seem that the GOP may have come out ahead in
the power struggle. It remains to be seen how long that
state of affairs exists.
• One other matter of both short- and long-term
significance was taken by the commission on Monday.
This concerned a resolution from GOP member David Reaves putting the commission on record as wanting to see the matter of a court-ordered payment to
Shelby County Schools (SCS) resolved as a precondition for any vote to approve a city-sponsored Fairgrounds Tourist Development Zone (TDZ) proposal
by city housing and community development director
Robert Lipscomb.
The TDZ proposal, outlined by Lipscomb to the
commission during its committee sessions last week,
had been favorably received in general. The commission’s approval of the proposal is not required but
would clearly assist the TDZ’s chances in being okayed
by the Tennessee Building Commission, where the
submitted proposal has lingered for at least a year.
The matter of the city’s debt to SCS — inherited
from a 2008 default of $57 million owed to the former
Memphis City Schools system — has periodically accounted for controversy between the city of Memphis
and Shelby County governments, inasmuch as the
county is now responsible for all public-school funding including the delinquent maintenance-of-effort
amount incurred by the city.
Reaves’ resolution passed 8-4, with four Democrats — Bailey, Turner, Reginald Milton, and Eddie
Jones — dissenting and another Democrat, Willie
Brooks, abstaining.
• A former Memphis media personality had a role in
a controversy that flared up last week regarding the
possibility that Minneapolis Mayor Betsy Hodges may
have flashed a gang sign while posing for a news photo
with a volunteer in a get-out-the-vote campaign during
the week before the November 4th election.
The picture shows Hodges and the volunteer, who
has something of a criminal record, pointing at each
other, as a sign of solidarity on the GOTV effort. An
official of the Minneapolis police union, noting that
both Hodges and the volunteer had raised thumbs
while pointing, charged that they had thereby exchanged a known gang greeting.
The charge has been the source of much derision in
the national media, a good deal of which was directed
at KSTP-TV, an ABC affiliate that first aired it. Bill
Lunn, a former longtime anchor with Memphis’ Channel 24, was a co-anchor of the KSTP broadcast.
In an exchange of texts, Lunn told the Flyer that
Hodges may have “unknowingly” flashed the gang sign
while reciprocating the volunteer’s gesture but, without
elaborating further, said the station had done a good
deal of “vetting” before airing the original segment.
JACKSON BAKER
With the apparent reaching of a
compromise on Monday between
feuding factions of the Shelby
County Commission, a lawsuit
may have been resolved and a modus vivendi of sorts achieved, but
the ideologically polarized body
still has issues.
It took a while, both in the long
run (two and a half months since the standoff began, in
the immediate wake of the August 7th election) and in the
short term (two hours of mind-bending intricacy at Monday’s climactic public meeting), but the commission’s
simmering power struggle finally ended — or seemed to
— with a win-win solution.
Both of the warring party-line-plus-one factions were
claiming victory, in any case — the one composed of
six Democrats and one Republican (Steve Basar), and
the one containing five Republicans and one Democrat
(Justin Ford).
The solution involved a willingness by the D-PlusOnes to give up their ongoing Chancery Court lawsuit
against Chairman Ford (for his seemingly high-handed
control of what could be placed on the commission
agenda) in return for the R-PlusOnes’ agreement to drop their
appeal of an adverse decision by
Chancellor Jim Kyle, coupled with
Ford’s acceptance of majority rule
in determining agenda items.
Ford and his Republican allies
claimed victory because they had
fended off what Republicans Heidi
Shafer and Terry Roland saw as
an effort by the D-Plus-Ones to
“overthrow” Ford’s chairmanship.
The Democratic coalition — whose
ad hoc leaders were newbie Van
Turner and the veteran Walter
Bailey — claimed victory because
they had forced Ford to yield on his
arbitrary control of the agenda.
Virtually lost sight of in the twoJustin Ford
sided celebration (which followed
an exhausting and repetitious squabble settled evidently
in an off-to-the-side chat by competing lawyers Turner
and Ron Krelstein) was the origin of the dispute, in the
chairmanship election held on September 8th by a freshly
elected commission with six new members.
Basar, who had been vice chair in 2013-14, had
expected to be elected chairman and was shocked when
the majority of Republicans opted instead for the candidacy of Roland, then switched to Democrat Ford when
the Millington Republican seemed obviously about to
fall short.
Ford was ultimately elected on the basis of his own
vote and that of the commission’s six Republicans (including the stunned Basar, who would shortly have a change
of mind). Bailey, the commission’s senior Democrat, was
meanwhile outraged by his second-place finish to Ford,
whose long-term chumminess with Republicans and
openness to their agenda were no secret.
At the commission’s next meeting, on September 22nd,
12 Bailey and five other Democrats, along with Basar, voted
together to block the committee appointments made by
13
news & opinion
m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m
V I E W P O I N T B y B r y c e W. A s h b y a n d
Michael J. LaRosa
The Raging Bull in D.C.
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Please Drink Responsibly
It’s ironic that one day after his reelection
to a sixth term as senator from Kentucky,
Mitch McConnell, the soon-to-be
Senate majority leader, characterized the
Congress as an angry, raging bull. In a
stern, public admonition, McConnell
warned President Obama against invoking
executive action to alleviate our chronic
immigration crisis, comparing such action
to “waving a red flag in front of a bull.”
Ironic and sinister. The Republican
leadership, which gained control of the
U.S. Senate in the November 4th election
and now controls both houses, blocked
all attempts at reasonable immigration
reform during the most recent session
of Congress. Then, they blamed the
president for any and all immigration
crises, including the arrival of thousands
of women and children from Central
America this past summer. Then, they
accused the president of being weak/soft
on immigration and as frustration set in,
the president’s numbers with Hispanics
fell precipitously. Then, the day after
their victory, the Republican leadership
warned the president against taking
much-needed action to solve our broken
immigration system — action favored by
the majority of Americans.
November 20-26, 2014
On immigration,
Dems need to hold
together and support
a president who has
very few options.
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14
This script, written in Washington,
seems to have emerged out of a Gabriel
García Márquez novel. President Obama has the opportunity
to lead via executive action, and he
should do so immediately. He can end
deportation of those in the country
under irregular circumstances, excluding,
of course, those who have committed
serious, violent crimes. Rolling through
a stop sign should not be grounds for
deportation. He can put in place a
program whereby millions of people are
offered authorization to remain in the
country, if they wish. They could apply for
work permits; they could pay taxes with
greater ease, and live here — temporarily
— in relative peace. Obama’s ratings with Hispanics
dropped 20 percent during the past two
years. People are frustrated by the lack
of action on immigration reform, and
they blame one man, the occupant of
1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, rather than
Congress, with its many faces, multiple
agendas, and 50 shades of long-term
deception on the immigration issue.
Executive action on immigration
is not what any of us had hoped for
as the solution to our broken system.
But it looks like it will happen, and any
executive action can be signed away by
the next executive. It’s entirely possible
the next executive will be a Republican,
assuming Democrats behave as badly and
awkwardly as they behaved in the most
recent election cycle.
The most cited example involves
McConnell’s Kentucky opponent, Alison
Lundergan Grimes, who wouldn’t say
whether she voted for Obama, when asked
by reporters. It’s not a trick question, and
it’s not an unfair question for a woman
running as a Democrat for the United
States Senate. Democrats lost (Grimes
lost by 16 points) because they refused,
in many places, to run as Democrats or
to champion the many accomplishments
of the past six years. Instead, they ran as
lite, low-calorie Republicans, and many
moderate Democrats and Independents
simply voted for the real thing. On immigration, Democrats need
to hold together as a party and support
a president who has very few options at
this point. Democrats need to develop
a short-term strategy to support those
with irregular immigration status who
want to live and work here. Then, the
Democratic leadership needs to develop
a long-term plan to win the White House
in 2016, retake the Congress, and pass
comprehensive immigration reform.
Americans are demanding this type of
activist, bold leadership. The American
people are much further ahead of their
political leaders on this issue, and when
the Democratic Party realizes this, they’ll
return to power.
But it might be time for some new
ideas within the Democratic leadership.
Many pundits assume that Hillary Clinton
is a lock for the Democratic nomination,
but Clinton’s glide-path to the White
House is fraught with turbulence.
Elizabeth Warren, the senior senator from
Massachusetts, claims she’s not running,
but we’d like to see her energy, brilliance,
fearlessness, charisma, and leadership in
the White House.
Can the nation endure an actual liberal
from Massachusetts in the White House?
We know what we can’t endure: the raging
bull that’s de rigueur in D.C. these days.
Bryce Ashby is a Memphis-based attorney
and board member at Latino Memphis Inc.
Michael J. LaRosa is an associate professor
of history at Rhodes College.
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single mother at that. Even before the Great Crash of 2008-9,
there was a general sense that we had let
our ambitions on the development front
soar a little too much. Take our riverfront:
Organized opposition on the part of
Friends of the River and other environmentally interested citizens was, along
with alarms about the anticipated costs of
the project, a major reason why some of
the more ambitious iterations proposed
by the Riverfront Development Corporation did not come to fruition. What was left on the plate was Beale
Street Landing (BSL). Beset with delays,
cost overruns, design controversies, and
intermittent failures to cooperate by a
sometimes unruly river, it finally got
done within the past year. The public
spaces are welcoming, the views are spectacular, and BSL has proved, if nothing
else, to be a great place to have a party.
The Flyer’s own annual Best of Memphis
celebration was held there to good effect
earlier this year. It brings to mind the phrase — and
the concept of — “less is more,” a term
which, we discovered upon doing a little
research, was originated not by the minimalist architect Mies van der Rohe, as
was long supposed, but by Robert Browning in the British master’s 1855 poem,
“Andrea del Sarto (Called ‘The Faultless
Painter’).” We were stirred into admiration of
a sort a few months back at an insight
offered by Mayor A C Wharton (whom
we had previously taken to desk, along
with city planning maven Robert Lip-
scomb, for the grandiosity embedded
in some of the ideas floated out of City
Hall): Frustrated by the scarcity of the
times, by the drying up of public and
private funding sources, and by overt
warnings about fiscal over-reach from
the state Comptroller’s office, Wharton
offered a new, leaner version of development, which cast downtown Memphis
as an open-air arena, with its parts —
among them FedExForum, the National
Civil Rights Museum, the soon-to-be
Bass Pro Pyramid, and, yes, Beale Street
Landing — being connected by relatively
inexpensive public transportation. This was how the mayor saw us
responding to tourist and convention
competition from, say, Nashville, with its
massive (and massively expensive) new
Convention Center. “Less is more.” Yes, indeed. And even
the nascent Main Street to Main Street
Big Water Crossing project (aka Hanrahan Bridge project), establishing pedestrian connections between downtown
and West Memphis, involves minimal
transformation of existing natural surroundings at relatively low cost — the key
component being a $14.9 million “Tiger
Grant” from the federal government.
Greg Maxted, the project’s executive director, made that modest but far-reaching
project sing when he described its prospective glories to a luncheon meeting of
the Rotary Club of Memphis on Tuesday. We have much to look forward to, and
much of what is to come is already there,
in a landscape that needs only some judicious tweaking, not a massive overhaul.
November 20-26, 2014
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SPECIAL GUESTS
CHARLES ”Lil BUCK” RILEY
MAXX REED
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COVER STORY BY CHRIS DAVIS
ew York Times dance critic Alastair Macaulay came to Memphis earlier
this year to learn more about jookin, a home-grown dance style he went
on to describe as, “a virtuoso hip-hop descendant of the Gangsta Walk,”
and “the single most exciting young dance genre of our day, featuring, in
particular, the most sensationally diverse use of footwork.”
Though Memphis has produced a number of extraordinary jookers, none is better
known than Charles “Lil Buck” Riley, who’s coming home this week to perform in New
Ballet Ensemble’s (NBE) annual holiday show, Nut Remix.
Riley, who trained for a time with NBE, appeared in Memphis dance historian
Young Jai’s video documentary Memphis Jookin: Vol. I. He first achieved notoriety when
filmmaker Spike Jonze posted a cell phone video of Buck performing Camille SaintSaëns’ The Swan, accompanied by celebrated cellist Yo-Yo Ma. Buck has since starred
in a series of Gap commercials, danced with Madonna, and performed with the New
York City Ballet and Cirque du Soleil. In 2012, he was listed as one of Dance Magazine’s
“25 to Watch,” and he has more than lived up to the prediction. As it happens, he’s also a
great interviewee.
Memphis Flyer: You’re a really fantastic ambassador for Memphis. Everywhere you go
you make us look good.
Charles “Lil Buck” Riley: I love it. And I love the city. It made me who I am now. And
I’ve learned so much from living in Memphis. We do have so much to offer. And jookin is
only one of those things. It came out of the gangsta walk, and that’s been around since the
1980s. My mom used to do it. So it’s more than just a dance, we’ve made it into a tradition.
And I love being an ambassador for the style because I understand it wholeheartedly.
BUCK
You’re only 26 and have achieved a level
of pop star success most dancers never
know. How are you still so grounded?
It’s easy to be. I think it’s harder not to be
grounded. It’s really simple to be grounded
and stay humble. Some people try not to
be. Some people gravitate toward that, and
you see a lot of that in the industry. But —
and this is something I don’t think I’ve ever
talked about — I was born in Chicago and
raised in Memphis. I moved to Memphis
at a very young age. And I’ve been through
so much in my life. I grew up with nothing.
And I lived with my mom and my whole
family in my grandmama’s basement. It’s all
we could afford.
When you come from things like
this, and you have so much perspective
as to how your life has changed and
turned around for the better, you want
to do everything you can to uphold that.
Because it’s more than just my skills that
have gotten me to where I’m at now. It’s
who I am as a person.
Talking Memphis with
international dance star
Charles “Lil Buck” Riley.
And, like you always say, jookers take
their power from the earth.
Well, you know, it is a really spiritual
dance. It was something born here. Kids
grow up into it. We use our feet and it’s
predominantly freestyle, so it comes from
the soul. You spend time with just you and
your body, you know? You learn a lot about
yourself with this style.
Jookin isn’t just a Memphis thing
anymore, it’s all over the world. But it’s
still growing here with jookin studios
and companies, and folks meeting in
parking lots and barber shops learning
the original gangsta walk. Do you keep
up with what’s happening at home?
Absolutely. I already know what you’re
getting at. I’m coming back to Memphis
and whenever I come home, we have
exhibition battles just for the fun of it. And
I’ll get in and dance with anybody. I go to
people’s houses and we have sessions in the
garage. Those are my favorite moments,
and those are the things I miss about
Memphis. I miss my family the most.
But then I miss the old way we used to
do things. Sometimes I just can’t wait to
get back home and in the garage with my
friends where we can just go at it like we
used to, and dance.
When you see your old friends after
dancing with Madonna, is it weird?
I’m the same Lil Buck that left. They love
it when I come back because they know
how much I love Memphis and how much
I love jookin. People don’t get star struck
because they know where I’m from. They
knew me before, and I still don’t consider
myself a star. I’m just getting appreciated
for doing what I love.
But you are kind of a star. We have lots
of movie stars and rock stars. But pop
culture only taps a few dancers every
generation and you get to be one of them.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 20
cover story m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m
COURTESY OF NEW BALLET ENSEMBLE & SCHOOL
Getting
19
BUCK
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 19
Exactly. That was my goal. Dancers used
to be seen on the same platform as actors.
Especially triple threats like Gene Kelly
and Fred Astaire. They looked good. They
dressed nice. They had a passion for what
they were doing and went full out 100
percent. I want to bring that back. That
level of respect.
It doesn’t seem to matter if you’re street
performing or on TV in front of millions,
you exude comfort and confidence. Everybody puts on their pants the same
way. And street performing helped get me
to that point. When I first started street
performing, it was on Beale Street. When
you’re street performing, you really have
to develop your communication skills and
learn how to be a people person. When
I first moved to California, I performed
in Santa Monica on the Third Street
Promenade. And you’d get so many people
down there and so many celebrities. If I
noticed a celebrity was watching us, I’d
make a joke. Everybody would laugh and
they’d laugh too. And you get comfortable.
You’ve taught a lot of celebrities how to
gangsta walk, from Madonna to Meryl
Streep and Katie Couric. Who gets it and
who needs to go home?
First of all, Stephen Colbert, he’s money.
He absolutely should learn. He caught on
to the buck jump so fast it was ridiculous.
When you’re doing a buck jump it’s knee
up, not foot down. A lot of people don’t
get that. It used to frustrate the hell out of
me. But Stephen Colbert caught on, and he
looked good doing it. So he could do it for
sure. Katie Couric? She would need a lot
of work, especially if she wants to keep her
heels on. But I love her to death. She did all
right for a first time.
Who are some of your biggest Memphis
influences?
I never really get to share about the
people who really started me off and
got me to this level and who gave me
information that has stuck with me
throughout my life and career. You
know they call Marico Flake “Dr. Rico”
for a reason: He’s a doctor of dance. He
doesn’t just know about jookin; he’s a
renaissance man who knows about a little
bit of everything, from ballet to country
dancing. Daniel Price is one of my biggest
influences. When I sucked, he’d say, “All I
can say, it don’t look gangsta enough.” And
that would kill me.
Keviorr, aka “Tip Toe,” also kept it
real. We used to be rivals. He was already
known as an explosive jooker, because
he’d been around all the old-school guys
and had a reputation. I battled him at the
Crystal Palace, not knowing who he was,
because he used to go to East End Skating
rink. I was the man in Crystal Palace,
which was closer to Westwood. When me
November 20-26, 2014
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Lil Buck in New Ballet Ensemble’s
2008 production of Springloaded
COURTESY OF NEW BALLET ENSEMBLE & SCHOOL
Getting
and him finally battled, everybody was
around. And Keviorr was kicking my butt.
He said, “You’re good. I’m not going to
talk bad about you. But you’re just going
too fast. Your waves are too fast and people
can’t see what you’re doing. You’ve got to
slow down a little, that’s all.”
To hear that from the underground
master of jookin? Man! Because he was like
a ninja: Battle hungry and battle ready. If he
said you were good, you were good.
And now you’re a citizen of the world,
dancing your way around the world.
But you still take time to come back and
perform with New Ballet Ensemble.
Of course. Why wouldn’t I? That’s as simple
as I can put it. That’s my home. I love living
everywhere. It’s always fun to meet people
and learn new cultures. But I love coming
home. There’s beautiful and negative stuff
all over the world. And in Memphis there is
more beauty and negativity. It’s just the way
it’s been advertised and the way we look
at ourselves.
That attitude makes what you do really
important, you know?
I am very aware of it. I know that with
this great power I have comes great
responsibility. It’s true. Corny as it sounds,
it’s one of the realest lines I’ve ever heard.
Happy Holidays
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Memphis • 61 South McLean • 901.725.4200
New Ballet Ensemble
great power. great responsibility. great dance.
NBE dancer
Briana Brown
Company first started sharing space at
NBE in 2005. At first, there wasn’t much
crossover between the street dancers and
Smythe’s ballet students, but that changed.
In April, NBE’s reputation earned the
company an invitation to the Kennedy
Center in Washington D.C. to perform
original work commissioned for the
National Symphony Orchestra’s “New
Moves” mini-festival. NBE’s “Harlem” was
choreographed by Smythe, set to music
continued
on page 22
by Duke Ellington, and showcased the
talents of NBE company member Shamar
Rooks. The Washington Post described
the company’s performance as, “simply
dazzling, eliciting an audience response
that dwarfed all that had gone before.”
This month, Smythe returned once
again to the nation’s capital, this time
with 17-year-old dancer and student
Briana Brown in tow. Brown, who started
training with NBE at age 7, represented
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Katie Smythe doesn’t know when she’ll
retire, but the founder and CEO of
Memphis’ New Ballet Ensemble (NBE)
is looking ahead and fantasizing a little,
imagining what her life might be like in the
future, when she finally passes the baton to
a new leader, preferably a former student
who knows the school and understands
the mission.
“Maybe I could call myself the Chief
Creative Officer,” she says, smiling, trying
on one of several new titles she might
assume when she’s no longer running the
show. “I could be that.”
Smythe has every reason to contemplate
a happy future — 2014 has been an
especially affirming year for her and for all
the dancers, teachers, and students at NBE,
a 13-year-old professional dance company
and school that helped to launch the
spectacular career of jookin ambassador
Charles Riley, known to dance fans around
the world as Lil Buck.
“In the beginning, I think everybody
thought I’d lost my mind, even my
husband,” Smythe says, recalling early
responses to her business pitch. In 2001,
the lifelong dancer and sometimes soap
opera actress wanted nothing more than to
create professional dance opportunities in
Memphis, and to train as many students as
possible, regardless of their ability to pay.
Smythe had a specific vision for the
future, but even she couldn’t have predicted
the impact that moves born in Memphis
clubs, skating rinks, and parking lots
could have when they were blended with
traditional ballet and the various other
international dance styles that would find a
home at NBE.
“New Ballet sees the value in the
fusion,” Lil Buck says, remembering when
Terran Gary’s Subculture Royalty Dance
photographs by Justin Fox burks
NBE founder
and CEO Katie
Smythe with
dancers
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BUCK continued from page 21
her fellow students when the White
House honored New Ballet’s educational
branch, alongside 11 other life-changing
after-school arts programs selected to
receive the National Arts and Humanities
Youth Program Award. Brown, whose smile threatened to break
her face as she accepted a hug from First
Lady Michelle Obama, called NBE’s award,
“A huge responsibility.”
NBE brings its landmark 2014 season
to a close this weekend, when the company
partners with the Memphis Symphony
Orchestra for a very special revival of
Nut Remix, the company’s locally bent
but internationally flavored take on The
Nutcracker. In addition to moving the
company’s annual holiday show from
GPAC to the Cannon Center, this year’s
Remix also reunites two of NBE’s most
successful alumni, Lil Buck and Maxx
Reed, who spent five years web-slinging in
red-and-blue tights, playing Spider-Man in
the U2-scored Broadway musical, SpiderMan: Turn Off the Dark.
Lil Buck’s unprecedented journey from
relative obscurity, dancing at The Crystal
Palace skating rink in South Memphis
to dancing with Madonna at Superbowl
XLVI, is well documented. But Reed’s
quieter story is also indicative of the kind of
work that happens at NBE, and his career
path represents a more realistic trajectory
for working dancers.
“Ms. Katie literally found me dancing
on the street corner,” says Reed, who was
13 and performing at the Cooper-Young
2:55:08 PM
festival with other dancers from DeWayne
Hambrick’s Graffiti Playground, a
Midtown-based program that offered free
performing arts training to young people.
“Ms. Katie asked if I’d like to dance with
some ballerinas and I said, ‘Nope,’” Reed
recalls. “That just didn’t sound fun to me at
all.” Instead of giving up, Smythe offered to
get tickets for Reed and his mother to see
the Chicago-based Hubbard Street Dance
Company at GPAC.
“It was amazing,” Reed says, recalling
how the Hubbard Street performance
awakened something in him. “I used
to dance competitively, but it was
expensive,” he explains. “And I quit after
I heard my parents arguing about a
credit card. I felt like I was too much of a
burden or something.”
The Hubbard Street concert changed
Reed’s mind about dancing with ballerinas.
If Smythe could train him to dance like the
men he’d seen and there was a chance that
he could someday make money doing that,
he was all in. “Here were these incredible technical
dancers,” Reed says of Hubbard Street.
“These powerful men were doing all
these jumps and turns. They were like
bears moving through space and eating
up space in this incredible display of
power and beauty.” The teenaged street
performer was especially impressed by the
chair-jumps and spins of a dancer named
Christopher Tierney.
“Here’s the crazy thing,” Reed says.
“On my first day doing Spider-Man on
Broadway, I went back to the dressing
room to meet my castmates for the first
time. It turns out I was sharing a dressing
room with Chris Tierney, the same dancer
that I remembered jumping up on that
chair. The dancer who made me want to be
like him. We shared a dressing room and
both played Spider-Man for three years
after that.
In addition to playing the world’s most
popular superhero eight shows a week for
five years running, Reed has appeared in
numerous commercials and music videos.
He was hand-picked by Michael Jackson to
audition as a dancer for Jackson’s farewell
tour, and although he didn’t make the
final cut, Reed says it was an honor just to
“share airspace” with the King of Pop. Not
too shabby for a dyslexic, severely ADD
kid who remembers an elementary school
teacher telling his mother that her son
would never develop the skills required to
succeed in life.
NBE alum
Maxx
Reed
Reed knows as well as anybody how
difficult things can be for kids who are
socialized to believe they can’t succeed.
He was reminded this summer, when he
returned to Memphis to teach a youth
dance program at NBE. After introducing
himself to a class of young students, and
telling them about all the cool things he’s
done, an incredulous little girl’s voice rang
out from the back of the room: “But you’re
from France,” she said.
Reed shook his head and assured his
pint-sized heckler that he was every bit
as Memphis as she was. He describes
the summer class and his students’
self-choreographed performance as the
highlight of his career. “I want to come
back and do this every year,” he says.
Even if she’s not planning to retire soon,
Smythe has what she calls a dream scenario: “I’d love for Charles and Maxx to become my succession plan,” she says. “They
could run the place, and I could graduate
to chairman of the board. And I could
teach ballet whenever they need me.”
— Chris Davis
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steppin’ out
We R e c o m m e n d : C u l t u r e , N e w s + R e v i e w s
Bringing Back Mr. Bingle
Mr. Bingle
By Michael Finger
A surprising number of Memphians of a certain age can still remember the happy song that begins, “Mr. Bingle makes us tingle with his joy and
cheer / When he comes to town, Christmas time is near.” But before you get the wrong impression of this Bingle guy, please remember that he — or it —
was a cute little stuffed snowman puppet, adorned with an ice cream cone hat, holly-leaf wings, and a candy cane, who served as the holiday mascot for
Lowenstein’s department store.
Originally conceived by the Maison Blanche store in New Orleans and later “adopted” by Lowenstein’s, Mr. Bingle had his own song, books, records,
and even a TV show, co-hosted by Miss Holly. Every kid in town, it seemed, wanted a Mr. Bingle plush doll or puppet for Christmas, and sometimes
Santa obliged them. But Mr. Bingle retired when Lowenstein’s closed, and Memphians have had to rely on their memories of the little guy — until now.
The Memphis Potters Guild Show, held this weekend at Memphis Botanic Garden, will feature Mr. Bingle himself. Shoppers will get a chance to
see one of the original puppets and other memorabilia that has been in storage for years, and guild members will create special works featuring his
image. These will be offered in a silent auction, with proceeds benefiting the Harwood Center, an organization founded in 1957 that works with children who have special
developmental needs.
Although we don’t normally associate pottery with puppetry, it’s an interesting tie-in, and really, we can’t see how anyone can resist a visit with this beloved Christmas
character, especially when he sings his little song, which ends like this:
“Oh, Bingle, Bingle, Bingle, Bingle, Bingle, Bingle, Bingle, Bingle, Bingle, Bingle, Bingle, Bingle. We love Mr. Bingle!”
MEMPHIS POTTERS GUILD SHOW AT MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN. RECEPTION: FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21ST, 5-8 P.M. SHOW: SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 22ND, 9 A.M. TO 6 P.M. AND SUNDAY,
NOVEMBER 23RD, 11 A.M. TO 5 P.M. ADMISSION IS FREE.
November 20-26, 2014
(Above) Michael Connolly has a vision for the music industry. Local Beat, p. 27
(Right) Memphis Comic and Fantasy Convention returns. Film, p. 47
24
THURSDAY November 20
FRIDAY November 21
Talk by Richard Follett
The Cotton Museum, 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Historian Richard Follett delivers
a talk titled “White Fright:
Tracing the Origins of Black
Male Stereotypes,” based on his
upcoming book White Fright: Slave
Revolts in American Memory. The
evening will include a meet-andgreet with Follett and cocktails.
65th Annual Holiday Bazaar
Preview
Memphis College of Art, 7-9 p.m.,
$20
This popular annual holiday
bazaar features works by students,
staff, and alumni. Tonight, guests
can get first dibs on the goods
while enjoying complimentary
champagne. The bazaar continues
Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Booksigning by Eugenia Bone
The Booksellers at Laurelwood,
6:30-8 p.m.
Food writer Eugenia Bone signs
her latest cookbook, The Kitchen
Ecosystem, which focuses on dishes
made from 40 ingredients in a “life
cycle” — fresh, preserved, and in
leftovers.
“A Feast for Eyes”
Glitch (2180 Cowden), 6-11 p.m.
A collaborative installation
featuring work by Slade Bishop,
Mim Brooks, Beth Edwards, Adam
Farmer, Lance Turner, and others.
There will also be a potluck and
“soundscapes” by DJ Tastefool.
Nut ReMix
The Cannon Center of Performing
Arts, 7:30 p.m., $10-$65
New Ballet Ensemble presents
its annual funky take on The
Nutcracker, set on Beale Street and
featuring dance styles ranging from
ballet and African dance to jookin’
and breakin’. The performances
include the ensemble’s graduate
stars Charles “Lil Buck” Riley and
Maxx Reed accompanied by the
Memphis Symphony Orchestra.
Encore shows on Saturday at
5:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2:30 p.m.
Read more about Lil Buck in this
week’s cover story on page 19.
Graceland Lighting Ceremony
Graceland, 6 p.m.
The holiday season is kicked
off with this annual ceremony
at Graceland. The lights will be
switched on to reveal hundreds of
blue lights lining the driveway, a
life-size Nativity scene, and Santa
and his sleigh. Doing the flipping
honors this year is John Stamos
(voice of the new Graceland iPad
tour) and patients from Le Bonheur
Children’s Hospital. Santa will also
make an appearance, arriving in a
police-escorted limo.
Spillit Grand Slam contestants
The Big Tell
THE MARK
By Susan Ellis
On Friday, it all comes to a head. Since November 2013,
storytellers, both experienced and raw, have been spilling it
on stage, sharing stories as part of the Spillit slam series. At
each slam, with preordained themes ranging from heroes to
redemption, participants have spun their tales, with the winner
promised a spot in the Storytelling Grand Slam.
The theme for the Grand Slam is silver lining. The winner gets
a crown, a sash, and a scepter. There may or may not be confetti
canons involved.
Spillit creator Leah Keys says that participating in Spillit is a leap of faith. “We have no idea what’s going to happen,” she says.
The stories can be funny or touching or crude. The ultimate goal is to connect with the audience. Preselected judges measure
the stories in two categories. First is story content. Did it have a strong beginning? Did it arc? How did it end. The second category
is presentation. Did the storyteller engage the audience? Was the story kept within the time limit?
Of the participants, Keys says, “There are many repeat slammers. They come for blood. And then there are people there who
just want to tell stories and forget there is a contest.”
Vying for the Grand Slam crown (and sash and scepter) are Victor Sawyer, Francesca Tronchin, Ray Belli, Dana Wilson, Sean
Mosley, Sam Scherer, John Adcock, and Eildh Jenness.
“Any story, if it’s descriptive and engaging and invokes emotion, whether it’s humor or empathy,” says Keys, “if it holds some
power, is a great story.”
“MULEMAN”
MASSEY
BLUES BAND
NOVEMBER
21 & 22
9PM – 1AM
SPILLIT STORYTELLING GRAND SLAM AT AMURICA WORLD HEADQUARTERS, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 21ST, 8-10 P.M., $10.
SPILLITMEMPHIS.ORG
JUSTIN FOX BURKS
JERRY
BRAXTON
SATURDAY November 22
SUNDAY November 23
TUESDAY November 25
Ralph Stanley
Germantown Performing Arts
Center, 8 p.m., $45-$75
Bluegrass legend Ralph Stanley
brings “Man of Constant Sorrow,” his
farewell tour, to Memphis tonight.
Bollywood Choreography
Workshop
Co-Motion Studio
(416 N. Cleveland), 2:30-4:30 p.m.,
$25
A beginner-level workshop on
Bollywood-style dance moves.
A Christmas Story: The Musical
The Orpheum, 7:30 p.m., $20-$120
The beloved 1983 Christmas classic,
following Ralphie and his dire need
for a Red Ryder BB gun (carbine
action, 200-shot range model air
rifle) has been made into a musical.
Continues through Sunday,
November 30th.
Cranksgiving
Peddler Bike Shop (Highland),
9 a.m., $20
A bike race benefiting the Urban
Bicycle Food Ministries, featuring
checkpoints at various locations
throughout the city. The event
includes the 50-mile race, as well
as a 10- to 15-mile casual ride. On
Sunday, it’s the Cyclocross starting
at 9 a.m.
For more information, go to
ubfm.org/cranksgiving.
British Arrow Awards
Memphis Brooks Museum of Art,
2 p.m., $9
Last day to check out this annual
showing of the British Arrow
Awards, featuring the weirdest and
the wildest British commercials.
9PM – 1AM
FREE ON
THE SALOON STAGE
www.ballystunica.com
Bally’s Tunica and RIH Acquisitions MS II, LLC have no
affiliation with Caesars License Company, LLC and its
affiliates other than a license to the Bally’s name.
Must be 21 or older.
Gambling Problem? Call 1-888-777-9696.
arts & entertainment
Love Pop Soda Shop is soon to open on Main Street.
Food News, p. 44
m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m
NOVEMBER
28 & 29
25
m u s i c f e at u r e B y J o e B o o n e
American Fiction
Smart Luck
November 20-26, 2014
“
t
his guy worked with
Zeppelin and now
he’s yelling at me,”
thought Landon
Moore, guitarist for
American Fiction, a
Memphis band celebrating the vinyl release
of its debut album at Lafayette’s on Tuesday,
November 25th. That record, Dumb Luck,
was produced and engineered by Eddie
Kramer, the renowned recording engineer
who engineered the Beatles, Jimi Hendrix,
and the Rolling Stones at Olympic Studios
in London, as well as Led Zeppelin, more
Hendrix, and David Bowie in the late 1960s
and early ’70s.
The title has something to it. American
Fiction is composed of seasoned Memphis
musicians: Chris Johnson (Ingram Hill),
Blake Rhea (the Gamble Brothers, CYC),
Landon Moore (Fast Planet, Chris Dodd
Band), and musically promiscuous jazz
pianist Pat Fusco. Peewee Jackson recently
replaced Zach Logan on drums.
On a lark, they sent a demo to Kramer’s
email address. Why not?
“The genesis of the story is this,” Kramer said last spring during a break from
tracking the record at Ardent Studios with
engineers Jeff Powell and Lucas Peterson.
“There’s a lot of stuff that comes to my
computer. Very fortunately, my better half
was scrolling through some of the stuff
[and said] ‘Honey, This is pretty good.
Come check it out.’ I listened to it, just
the first few bars of what Chris had sent.
I said, ‘That’s pretty damn good.’ I went
through the whole thing and got very
interested with his voice and what he had
sent. So I called him up. He almost had a
heart attack and needed several pairs of
Depends and all the rest.”
Upon learning that they would work
with one of rock’s best engineers, Fusco
told Moore, who usually plays bass, “You
realize the first time you play guitar in
front of anybody, it’s going to be a dude
that cut Hendrix, Zeppelin, the Beatles,
the Stones, Traffic.” No pressure. Fortunately, Kramer has a wicked sense of
humor and knows talent when he hears it.
“It was fun,” Kramer said. “I really liked
the songs, and I liked what he was trying
to do and what the band was trying to
do. It’s not often that I hear something
right off the bat that I instinctively go to.
It’s happened a few times, and this was
one of those. I really felt that they were a
band in the making that had the makings
of something really good. That started
the process. The original concept was to
film the process of the band coming from
Memphis to Nashville or L.A. or wherever it was going to be, that whole sort of
journey. I said, then forget about L.A., I’ll
fly to Nashville. There are a great couple of
studios there, one that I like called 16 Ton.
I said, ‘Why don’t you just have the band
come to Nashville, and we will rehearse
there and track there?’ I remember working with the band for the first time. They
were on this big stage that we had rented.
It was pretty magical. It seemed to work
right from the get-go.”
While he agreed to produce American
Fiction, there was still work to do. I was
fortunate to witness Kramer working the
band through an arrangement. Tearing
up someone’s musical work — even for
the better — can be emotionally difficult.
Kramer kept things moving, mainly
through his sense of humor and an energy
level that is rare in a man his age.
“The coolest part to me about some-
thing like that is that you don’t see it,”
Fusco says. “You don’t hear it. You didn’t
think of it. Then when he brings it up,
you’re kind of shocked at first. Then you
try it, and you’re like, ‘He’s right.’”
“He also produced this band more
than I have ever been produced,” Moore
adds. “But he didn’t really change much.
The first song on the record is called
‘Mercy on Me.’ We played the song down
for him. Blake, our bass player, is playing
this line at the end. He flipped out about
that and said, ‘I want to center that at the
beginning.’ It’s like a feature. It’s really cool:
It’s melodic, but it’s really tight. He didn’t
rewrite anything. He just changed focus
points. His attention to detail on every
instrument is so focused. Sometimes, you
think a guy gets older and he softens. No.
He’s turning up distortions, telling Pat,
‘Make the B-3, dirty it up.’ He’s still very
much a rock-and-roll producer.”
“I’m not going to take on a band that
doesn’t have their act together, Kramer
said. “I’m not going to take on a band that
can’t play. That would be impossible. I’ve
been there, done that. It’s not very pleasing. They have great musicianship. That’s
for sure. It’s only getting better. This time
around, they are way tighter than they
were before. They’ve learned an awful lot.
In the recording process, when we were
recording in Nashville and then going to
L.A. to do the overdubs, I beat them up
pretty severely. Not physically. But it’s a
tough process making a record. I think
they learned the discipline, or at least the
basic disciplines, of how to make a record.
The wonderful thing about them that I did
notice from the get-go — even from the
early stuff a few months back —they were
very ready to take new information in,
Don Keeton
American Fiction’s long shot to a musical legend hits the bull’s eye.
and they were curious about my direction.
Fortunately, it all worked out. It is a band
decision. But it’s mine in the middle of all
of that. I try not to say, ‘You have to do it
this way.’ I love to hear all of the various
parts from all of the various directions that
each individual has. I try to guide it gently
along a path. Sometimes, I have to put
my foot down. But for the most part, I try
not to put a two-by-four over their heads.
Although, as I said, I would like to.”
As much as Kramer longs to put a
two-by-four over their heads, he remains
impressed by these young Memphians.
“Landon is a master of quirkiness,”
Kramer said. “Pat, our keyboard player, is
phenomenal at keeping parts of the blues
going. Chris has a wonderful voice. He has
a gift, a fabulous voice. I try to guide him
as much as possible in terms of not being
too repetitive in a certain range and all
that sort of thing. But that’s all the technical thing. The bottom line is he sings his
ass off. Great guitar player. And Blake
is superb about being understated and
playing just the right thing on bass. Our
drummer is phenomenal. It’s a great band
now. Before, they were just sort of parts
that were trying to fit together. Now they
are fitting together. It’s really gratifying for
me to work with these guys. They have
done their homework. When I walked
in here, it made it very easy for me to go,
‘OK, there, there, and there; we need to
do some editing. We need a better bridge.
We need a better thing.’ Within minutes,
we are there. That’s fantastic. Some bands
you work with, you could be frickin’ hours
trying to pull things together.”
American Fiction Vinyl Release Party,
Tuesday, November 25th, at Layfayette’s
Music Room
This year’s LiTeracy Mid-souTh hoLiday card is a greaT way To Make a donaTion To LiTeracy Mid-souTh and honor soMeone you Love!
helping to serve more than 120,000 Memphians struggling with low literacy.
26
For more information please go to LiteracyMidsouth.org
l o c a l b e at B y J o e B o o n e
Back to Roots
A Memphian’s approach to an ethical music industry.
m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m
was shocked at how difficult that is to
do. The fact is that they are for-profit
companies. You can make something,
but that does not mean that everyone
has access to it. That was frustrating.
Meanwhile, I kept recording people and
playing in bands. I got asked to come
out on tour, and, eventually, I was in a
position to quit my day job about five
years ago. Since then, I have been doing
music full time. I was in a band called
Coyote Grace. We spent a lot of 2010
opening for the Indigo Girls. That was
eye opening: to see someone of that level
of fame still struggling to make money. I
was like, ‘Man, this is kind of broken.’ It
was disillusioning about what kind of big
time I thought I was going to achieve.”
Connolly’s model partially grew out of
a community-oriented musical experience
he had growing up in Memphis. He owns
Empty Sea Studios in Seattle, where
he built a 40-seat listening room
Michael
and films his own concert series.
Connolly
“My band played at Otherlands,
and my English teacher Judy Kitts
was in the Memphis Acoustic
Music Association,” Connolly says.
“She hooked me into that world,
and I got hooked on the listeningroom thing. The studio has an
active concert series. The programs
are shot at my studio, and we do
those as four-camera HD shoots. So
my first attempt at doing this three
years ago was just my own subscrip“I think [we need] to get to the point
tion channel for my own stuff. I realized
socially that the educated media consumer that a lot of people were fighting to have
feels at a moral level that they should have
their own proprietary subscriptions serlabeling on what they are consuming,”
vices, but nobody could generate enough
Connolly says. “Just like what happened
content fast enough.”
in the food movement. My fantasy is that
At that point, Connolly made the move
you have this video and off to the side
from content creator to content aggregator,
there is this little tab that’s styled after the
or — more precisely in his case — curator.
nutrition facts. There it is, in black and
“I know the people who I’m trying
white, how these people get paid. If you’re
to help out with this,” he says. “On the
in the media business and you’re not
patron side, it’s the people who come
willing to say where the money goes, it’s
to these shows. Maybe they don’t come
socially embarrassing.”
to the shows, but they are the people I
That’s Connolly’s long-term hope.
meet at the farmers’ market. I know how
Unlike many dreamers in a chaotic music
to speak to this specific niche of people.
industry, Connolly has a unique backThe Fretboard Journal [a contributor] is a
ground that has led him to a possible
great example. They are kind of a Cook’s
solution: an advertising-free, subscription
Illustrated, a glossy magazine for acoustic
service offering lifestyle and entertainguitar people. They have over 100,000
ment programming to a community of
Facebook people. Their demographic is
like-minded media consumers. Subscribvery well aligned.”
ers can watch anything from a Donovan
Some content is available for free, but
concert to instrument lessons.
free music is not worth it to connoisseurs.
“I almost went to college for clarinet
“You’re wading through the ads and
performance,” Connolly says. “I was
the bad amount of signal to noise, Consuper serious about that. But I decided to nolly says. “The idea is to curate it and put
do computer stuff and got into medical
it behind a socially responsible financial
device software for seven years. I was
model. That’s my long-term plan.”
www.therootschannel.com
trying to do something good there and
arts & entertainment
Amy Flesicher
On November 3rd, Taylor Swift pulled
her entire catalog, including the week-old
album 1989, from the streaming service
Spotify to protest her compensation. Her
Nashville label boss bickered in the media
with Spotify CEO. Of course, Dave Grohl
had to chime in, and nobody has figured
anything out. That’s the state of contemporary mass-market music: a mess. But a
former Memphian has a better idea.
Michael Connolly launched The Roots
Channel two weeks ago. He graduated
from White Station High School in 2000
and had played in and recorded a few local bands before he left Memphis to attend
the University of Michigan. The Roots
Channel — a collection of streaming
shows including concerts and instructional programs — is a first step toward a
better relationship between musicians and
their marketplace.
27
November 20-26, 2014
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10/21/14 1:53 PM
R A N DY R OG E R S BAN D
M I N G LE WOOD HAL L
SATU R DAY, N OVE M B E R 22N D
TH E S I N G L E S
BAR D K D C
FR I DAY, N OV E M B E R 21S T.
PU R L I N G H I S S
H I-TO N E
W E D N E S DAY, N OV E M B E R 2 6 T H
After Dark: Live Music Schedule November 20 - 26
Jerry Lee Lewis Cafe &
Honky Tonk
310 BEALE - 654-5171
Alfred’s
197 BEALE - 525-3711
Karaoke Thursdays, 9 p.m.1 a.m., Sundays-Mondays,
10 p.m.-2 a.m., and TuesdaysWednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.;
Jim Wilson Fridays, Saturdays,
6-9 p.m.; DJ J2 Fridays,
Saturdays, 9:30 p.m.-5 a.m.;
Kevin and Bethany Paige
Fridays, Saturdays, 10 p.m.2 a.m.; Memphis Jazz
Orchestra Sundays, 6-9 p.m.
B.B. King’s Blues Club
147 BEALE - 524-KING
B.B. King All Stars Thursdays,
7 p.m., Fridays-Saturdays,
8 p.m., and Mondays, 8 p.m.;
The Will Tucker Band Fridays,
4:30 p.m.; Lisa G and Flic’s
Pic’s Band Sundays, 2 p.m.;
Blind Mississippi Morris
Sundays, 5 p.m.; Preston
Shannon Sundays, 7 p.m.
and Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m.;
Memphis Jones Mondays,
5 p.m.; Blake Ryan Trio
Tuesdays, 5 p.m.; King Beez
Tuesdays, 8 p.m.
Flynn’s Restaurant and
Bar
159 BEALE
Chris Gales noon-8 p.m.;
Karaoke ongoing, 8:30 p.m.
Itta Bena
145 BEALE - 578-3031
King’s Palace Cafe
162 BEALE - 521-1851
Natalie and The Professor
Thursdays, 5:30-9:30 p.m.;
David Bowen Fridays,
Saturdays, 6:30-10:30 p.m.
King’s Palace Cafe’s
Patio
162 BEALE - 521-1851
Mack 2 Band ThursdaysFridays, MondaysWednesdays, 2-6 p.m.; Fuzzy
Jeffries and the Kings of
Memphis Thursdays, Fridays,
6:30-10:30 p.m.; McDaniel
Band Saturdays, 2-6 p.m.;
Delta Crush Saturdays,
Sundays, 6:30-10:30 p.m.;
Cowboy Neil Sundays, 26 p.m. and Mondays, 6:3010:30 p.m.; Nate Dogg
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 6:3010:30 p.m.
King’s Palace Cafe’s
Tap Room
168 BEALE - 576-2220
Don Valentine Thursdays,
Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight;
Delta Crush Friday, Nov. 21,
9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Delta Project
Saturday, Nov. 22, 8 p.m.midnight; Plantation All Stars
Wednesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight.
November 20-26, 2014
Susan Marshall Fridays,
Saturdays, 7-10 p.m.
The Jason James Trio FridaysSundays, 7-11 p.m.; Rockin’
Joey Trites and the Memphis
Flash Saturdays, 3-7 p.m. and
Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.
New Daisy Theatre
Silky O’Sullivan’s
330 BEALE - 525-8981
183 BEALE - 522-9596
Nocando, Defy the Architect,
1 Last Chance, and The Jet
Pack Crew Friday, Nov. 21,
7 p.m.; This is Memphis Music
Festival featuing Mason Jar
Fireflies, Deering and Down,
Drew Erwin, Mary Owens,
Idle & Wild, Austyn Michael,
and more Saturday, Nov. 22,
7 p.m.
Rum Boogie Cafe
182 BEALE - 528-0150
The Boogie Blues Band
Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight,
Friday-Saturday, Nov. 21-22,
9 p.m.-1 a.m.; Pam and
Terry Fridays, 5:30-8:30 p.m.;
Memphis Blues Society Jam
Sundays, 7-11 p.m.; Ghost
Town Blues Band MondayTuesday, Nov. 24-25, 7-11 p.m.;
McDaniel Band Wednesday,
Nov. 26, 7-11 p.m.
Rum Boogie Cafe’s
Blues Hall
182 BEALE - 528-0150
Plantation All Stars
Thursdays-Saturdays, 37 p.m.; Memphis Bluesmaster
Thursdays, 8 p.m.-midnight
and Wednesday, Nov. 26,
8 p.m.-midnight; 2 Weeks
Notis Sundays, 3-7 p.m.; The
Dr. “Feel Good” Potts Band
Sundays, Mondays, 8 p.m.midnight; McDaniel Band
Tuesday, Nov. 25, 8 p.m.midnight.
Wet Willie’s
209 BEALE - 578-5650
Live Bands Fridays, Saturdays,
7-11 p.m.; Roxi Love Friday,
Nov. 21, 7-11 p.m.
124 E. G.E. PATTERSON
335-0251
Live Music Thursdays,
7-11 p.m., Fridays-Saturdays,
9 p.m.-1 a.m.
Grawemeyer’s
Paulette’s
RIVER INN, 50 HARBOR TOWN
SQUARE - 260-3300
Brennan Villines Thursdays,
6:30 p.m.; John Lane
Williamson Thursdays,
6:30 p.m. and Sundays, 59 p.m.; Eddie Harrison
Fridays, 6 p.m.; Evan Farris
Saturdays, 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.
and 4:30-10 p.m. and Sundays,
10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.; Wally
Wright Wednesdays, 6 p.m.
The Green Beetle
414 S. MAIN
325 S. MAIN - 527-7337
“The $1 Jump Off ” featuring
live hip-hop and R&B
Saturdays, 8 p.m.
Andrew Cabigao Saturday,
Nov. 22, 8-11 p.m.
Blind Bear Speakeasy
77 S. SECOND - 527-2700
Live Music ThursdaysSaturdays, 10 p.m.
Brass Door Irish Pub
152 MADISON - 572-1813
Live Music Fridays.
Brinson’s
341 MADISON - 524-0104
Melting Pot: Artist Showcase
Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.; Reggae
Sundays featuring Ras
Empress and more Sundays,
7 p.m.-midnight.
412 S. MAIN - 552-4609
Smooth R&B Thursdays,
Fridays, 8:30 p.m.;
Jazz Fridays, Saturdays,
8:30-11:30 p.m.
520 S. MAIN - 526-6751
414 South Main
119 S. MAIN, PEMBROKE
SQUARE - 417-8435
Onix Restaurant & Jazz
Lounge
Huey’s Downtown
The Chaulkies Sunday,
Nov. 23, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.
Kudzu’s
603 MONROE - 525-4924
JW Teller, Pocket Gypsies
Thursday, Nov. 20; Rhythm
Hounds Friday, Nov. 21;
Matt Davis, The Pistol &
The Queen Saturday, Nov. 22;
Open Mic Mondays; Blues
Jam Tuesdays.
Memphis Sounds Lounge
22 N. THIRD - 590-4049
Grown Folk’s Music 7:30 p.m.
Live Pianist Thursdays, 5:308:30 p.m., Fridays-Saturdays,
5:30-9 p.m., Sundays,
11 a.m.-2 p.m., and MondaysWednesdays, 5:30-8 p.m.
The Plexx
380 E.H. CRUMP - 744-2225
Old School Blues & Jazz
Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m.
Purple Haze Nightclub
140 LT. GEORGE W. LEE
577-1139
DJ dance music ongoing,
10 p.m.
Rumba Room
303 S. MAIN - 523-0020
Dance and Salsa Night
Fridays, 6:30-9:30 p.m.;
Saturday Salsa Night
Saturdays, 8:30 p.m.-3 a.m.
The Silly Goose
100 PEABODY PLACE
435-6915
DJ Cody Fridays, Saturdays,
10 p.m.
Spindini
383 S. MAIN - 578-2767
Jeff Crosslin Thursdays,
7-11 p.m.
F O R T I C K E T S A N D I N F O R M AT I O N V I S I T L A FAY E T T E S M U S I C R O O M . C O M
N OV. 2 5
AMERICAN FICTION
VINYL RELEASE PARTY
30
Barbara Blue ThursdaysFridays, 7-9 p.m., Saturdays,
5-9 p.m., Sundays, 4-9 p.m.,
and Wednesdays, 7-9 p.m.;
Dueling Pianos ThursdaysSaturdays, 9 p.m., Sundays,
Tuesdays, 8 p.m.-midnight,
and Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.
Double J’s Smokehouse
& Saloon
IN THE HEART OF OVERTON SQUARE
2 1 1 9 M A D I S O N AV E N U E M E M P H I S , T N 3 8 1 0 4
11/20 HANDMADE MOMENTS 6 PM
DUWAYNE BURNSIDE 9 PM
11/21 MARCELLA SIMIEN TRIO 6 PM
ORI NAFTALY BAND 9:30 PM
11/22 WILL GRAVES & SOUL 6 PM
MIGHTY SOULS BRASS BAND 9:30 PM
11/23 THE SETTLERS 52ND ANNIVERSARY 4 PM
THE LOCAL SAINTS 7:30 PM
11/24 JOYCE COBB &
THE RHODES FACULTY JAZZ BAND 6 PM
11/25 AMERICAN FICTION
VINYL RELEASE PARTY 9 PM
11/26 SUSAN MARSHALL BAND 9PM
LUNCH | DINNER | WEEKEND BRUNCH
Blue Monkey
Dru’s Place
Minglewood Hall
2012 MaDiSon - 272-bLue
1474 MaDiSon - 275-8082
1555 MaDiSon
866-609-1744
2120 MaDiSon - 432-2222
Sunday Brunch with Joyce
Cobb Sundays,
11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.
The Buccaneer
1368 Monroe - 278-0909
Ori Naftaly BaNd at lafayette’s
Ori Naftaly sees his experience in the United States through the greasy,
smoky, and possibly cracked lens of Memphis.
“When we came to Memphis, we were very surprised. For me, it was the first
time to be in America. And to be in Memphis is kind of a miracle,” Naftaly says.
The Israeli blues guitarist had a pretty dang fortuitous adventure in getting here.
“I grew up near Tel Aviv, next to the beach,” Naftaly says. “Pretty normal. I
started playing when I was 5. My dad being a big jazz and blues fan, I listened to
a lot of those records. I didn’t know pop or any other kind of music until I got
into high school. Just jazz, blues, and soul: A lot of Memphis music, but I wasn’t
aware of it.”
Naftaly met singer Eleanor Tsaig when they were in middle school together.
“She grew up right next to me,” Naftaly says. “We knew each other since
middle school, went to high school together, and we went to music class together.
She’s been singing all of her life and plays guitar and cello. She writes most of our
songs. She is a brilliant songwriter.”
After a romp through the 2013 International Blues Challenge to the semifinals, the band felt at home in Memphis and decided to stay. Their sound is evolving as they wrap up their third album.
“We were never strictly blues, you know,” Naftaly adds. “But it doesn’t matter what I play. I work with other musicians and bands. Whatever I play is just
bluesy. All of our new songs are soulful and funky and our version of R&B. But
it’s bluesy, and I can’t get away from that.” — Joe Boone
Ori Naftaly Band plays at Lafayette’s Music Room on Friday, November 21st,
with Marcella and Her Lovers.
Toy Trucks and Time
Thursday, Nov. 20, 10 p.m.;
John Paul Keith Friday,
Nov. 21, 10 p.m.; Yamille and
Troy Saturday, Nov. 22, 47 p.m.; Nerves and
Ghostbones Saturday, Nov. 22,
10 p.m.; Devil Train Mondays,
8 p.m.; Richard James and
Dave Cousar Tuesdays,
11 p.m.; Stammer Wednesday,
Nov. 26, 10 p.m.
Camy’s
Bhan Thai
1324 peaboDy - 272-1538
409 S. Main
South Main artS DiStrict
Lyfe Is Dope Nov. 26,
8 p.m.-1 a.m.
Bar DKDC
964 S. cooper - 272-0830
The Singles with Richard
James Friday, Nov. 21; Papa
Top West Coast Turnaround
Saturday, Nov. 22.
Two Peace Saturdays, 710:30 p.m.; Loveland Duren
Sundays, 6-9 p.m.
613 univerSity - 274-3740
First Tuesdays at 4 Concert
Series: Music of Samuel
Barber featuring Rhodes
College music faculty
Tuesdays, 4 p.m.
Hi-Tone
412-414 n. cLeveLanD
278-tone
Hundred Yard Dash,
Strengths, Capgun, Three
Kings, Marco Pave and more
Thursday, Nov. 20, 7 p.m.;
“Gone To The Dogs Festival”
featuring Iron Tongue,
Tanks, Klaxxon, Reserving
Dirtnaps, Chaos Order, and
more Friday, Nov. 21, 8 p.m.
and Saturday, Nov. 22, 8 p.m.;
Open Mic Comedy Night
Tuesdays, 9 p.m.; Purling Hiss
Wednesday, Nov. 26, 9 p.m.
3 S. barkSDaLe - 725-1667
House of Mtenzi
Celtic Crossing
The Soul Experience featuring
Poetry and Neo Soul Friday,
Nov. 21, 8 p.m.
Live Music Fridays.
903 S. cooper - 274-5151
Chris Johnson Thursdays,
10 p.m.; DJ Tree Fridays,
10 p.m.; DJ Eggroll Saturdays,
10 p.m.; The Reel McCoy
Sundays, 11 a.m.; Jeremy
Stanfill and Joshua Cosby
Sundays, 5 p.m.; The Candy
Company Wednesdays,
10 p.m.
Cooper Walker Place
1015 S. cooper
303-990-3999
Bluezday Thursday hosted
by Abdul Wahid Mostafa
Thursdays; Cowboy Bob’s
Roundup Mondays.
The Cove
2559 broaD - 730-0719
South Main
Evergreen Presbyterian
Church
Jazz with Jeremy & Ed
Thursdays, 9 p.m.; The Scruffs
Friday, Nov. 21, 10 p.m.;
Martini Madness Saturdays,
5-8 p.m.; Hope Clayburn
Saturday, Nov. 22, 10 p.m.;
Open Jam Sundays, 6 p.m.;
Open Mic with Justin White
Mondays, 6-10 p.m.; Karaoke
Wednesdays, 9 p.m.
1289 MaDiSon
Huey’s Midtown
1927 MaDiSon - 726-4372
Duwayne Burnside Sunday,
Nov. 23, 4-7 p.m.; Beat
Generation Sunday, Nov. 23,
8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.
Java Cabana
2170 young - 272-7210
Open Mic Nite at Java Cabana
Thursdays, 8-10 p.m.
The Midtown Crossing
Grill
394 WatkinS - 443-0502
Karaoke Thursdays, 8 p.m.;
Zazerac Friday, Nov. 21,
7 p.m.; The Southern Drive
Fridays, 8 p.m.
The Black Lillies, Guthrie
Brown, and Dan Tedesco
Thursday, Nov. 20, 8 p.m.;
Kickman Teddy CD Release
Party with Mike Sweep, Elliot
Ives, and more Friday,
Nov. 21, 8 p.m.; Randy Rogers
Band with Brandon Lay Band
Saturday, Nov. 22, 7 p.m.;
Artistik Lounge Featuring
Devin Crutcher Every third
Sunday, 7-11 p.m.
Otherlands Coffee Bar
641 S. cooper - 278-4994
The Gypsy Hombres with
Peter Hyrka Friday,
Nov. 21, 8-11 p.m.; Zigadoo
Moneyclips Album Release
with Switchblade Kid and The
Warp & The Weft Saturday,
Nov. 22, 8-11:30 p.m.
P&H Cafe
1532 MaDiSon - 726-0906
Rock Starkaraoke Fridays;
Strong Martian Saturday,
Nov. 22; Open Mic with
Tiffany Harmon Mondays,
9 p.m.-midnight.
The Phoenix
1015 S. cooper - 338-5223
Bluezday Thurzday
Thursdays, 8-11:45 p.m.;
Cowboy Bob’s Roundup
Mondays, 8-11:45 p.m.; Sing
for Your Supper Last Tuesday
of every month, 6:30-9 p.m.
Rhodes College,
McCallum Ballroom of
the Bryan Campus Life
Center
2000 n. parkWay - 843-3470
“Swing Dance Night”
featuring The Rhodes Jazz
Band Thursday, Nov. 20,
7:30 p.m.
Wild Bill’s
1580 voLLintine - 207-3975
Soul Survivors FridaysSundays, 10 p.m.-3 a.m.; The
Soul Connection Fridays,
Saturdays, 11 p.m.-3 a.m.
Young Avenue Deli
2119 young - 278-0034
Mischief in Memphis
Saturday, Nov. 22,
9 p.m.-2 a.m.
continued on page 33
m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m
Boscos Squared
Karaoke Fridays-Sundays.
arts & entertainment
Karaoke Thursdays, 9 p.m.midnight; Reemus Bo Deemus
Friday, Nov. 21, 10 p.m.; Eric
Hughes Saturday, Nov. 22,
10 p.m.
31
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After Dark: Live Music Schedule November 20 - 26
Mortimer’s
590 n. PerkinS - 761-9321
Van Duren Thursdays, 6:308:30 p.m.
T.J. Mulligan’s
1817 kirby - 755-2481
Karaoke Tuesdays, 8 p.m.
Lannie McMillan Jazz Trio
Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
BeRatus
1482 e. SHelby dr.
922-8839
Summer/Berclair
Laidback Mondays featuring
Live Music and Karaoke
Mondays, 7 p.m.
Maria’s Restaurant
6439 SuMMer - 356-2324
Juicy Jim’s Pizzeria
Karaoke Fridays, 5-8 p.m.
551 S. HigHland - 435-6243
L.G.B.T. Sunset Sundays
Sundays, 9 p.m.-2 a.m.; “Toke
Up Tuesdays” Open Mic &
Hookah Nite Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight; Wet Wednesdays
Wednesdays, 9 p.m.-2 a.m.
RockHouse Live
5709 raleigH-lagrange
386-7222
Arlington/Eads/
Oakland
Rizzi’s/Paradiso Pub
6230 greenlee - 592-0344
Live Music Thursdays,
Wednesdays, 7-10 p.m.;
Karaoke and dance music
with DJ Funn Fridays, 9 p.m.
Tony Butler Fridays, 6-8 p.m.
Collierville
Newby’s
Huey’s Collierville
2130 w. PoPlar - 854-4455
Randal Morton and Friends
Happy Hour Bluegrass Jam
Fridays, 7-10 p.m.
Afterglow Sunday, Nov. 23,
8-11:30 p.m.
Cordova
Oasis Hookah
Lounge & Cafe
Fox and Hound English
Pub & Grill
663 S. HigHland - 729-6960
Live DJ Saturdays,
9 p.m.-2 a.m.
847 exoCet - 624-9060
Karaoke Tuesdays, 9 p.m.
Ubee’s
Huey’s Cordova
521 S. HigHland - 323-0900
1771 n. gerMantown Pkwy.
754-3885
Karaoke Wednesdays,
9 p.m.-2 a.m.
East Memphis
The Booksellers at
Laurelwood
Grace Askew Saturday,
Nov. 22.
Dan McGuinness Pub
4698 SPottSwood
761-3711
2015 Fiat 500 POP
34 mpg/hwy
Open Mic Night with
Frankie Hollie Thursdays,
8 p.m.-midnight; Karaoke
Wednesdays, 8 p.m.
2809 kirby Pkwy. - 759-0593
1901 COVINGTON PIKE • 901.388.8989
GOSSETTFIAT.COM
Karaoke and dance music
with DJ Funn Mondays,
7-10 p.m.
#FT504054-MSRP $18945- GOSSETT DISCOUNT $1457-MANUF. REBATE $1500-BONUS
REBATE COUPON $100-INCLUDES ALL REBATES & INCENTIVES-EXCL T,T&L,WAC
D E A L E R S T O C K O N LY- P F $ 4 9 8 . 7 5 - O F F E R E N D S 11 / 3 0 / 1 4
Folk’s Folly Prime Steak
House
Intimate Piano Lounge
featuring Charlotte Hurt
Thursdays, MondaysWednesdays, 5-9:30 p.m.;
Larry Cunningham Fridays,
Saturdays, 6-10 p.m.
Fox and Hound English
Pub & Grill
5101 Sanderlin - 763-2013
Karaoke Tuesdays, 9 p.m.
Huey’s Poplar
4872 PoPlar - 682-7729
Memphis All Stars Sunday,
Nov. 23, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.
14988
$
GOSSETT FIAT
El Toro Loco
551 S. MendenHall
762-8200
Shelby Forest
General Store
7729 benjeStown
876-5770
539 S. HigHland - 452-8408
387 PerkinS ext. - 683-9801
Karaoke Thursdays, 8 p.m.midnight; Live Bands Fridays,
Saturdays, 8 p.m.; Open Mic
Mondays Mondays,
8 p.m.-midnight; Live Music
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 8 p.m.midnight.
The Windjammer
Restaurant
786 e. brookHaven CirCle
683-9044
Karaoke ongoing.
Poplar/I-240
The Other Place
Bar & Grill
4148 waleS - 373-0155
Karaoke Saturdays, 9 p.m.1 a.m. and Wednesdays,
8 p.m.-midnight.
Neil’s Music Room
1459 elviS PreSley
503-5544
Old School and Blues Fridays,
7 p.m.; Hottest Track Show
with various artists Sundays,
6 p.m.
Hawaiian Isle
Bar and Grill
5727 QuinCe - 682-2300
Phil Vaught Thursday,
Nov. 20, 8-10 p.m.; Eddie
Smith Fridays, 8 p.m.; IngleButler Band Saturday, Nov. 22,
9 p.m.; Flashback Sunday,
Nov. 23, 3-5 p.m.; Sax on
Sunday Jazz Series: StraightAhead and Mainstream
Jazz Fourth Sunday of every
month, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; Eddie
Harrison and Debbie Jamison
Tuesdays, 6 p.m.; Elmo and
The Shades Wednesdays,
8 p.m.-midnight.
Club Superior
South Memphis
Stax Museum of
American Soul Music
926 e. MCleMore - 946-2535
“Live in Studio A” Tuesdays,
2-4 p.m.
1542 elviS PreSley
569-3217
Happy Hour with Live
DJ Thursdays, MondaysWednesdays, 4-6 p.m.
Marlowe’s
Ribs & Restaurant
4381 elviS PreSley
332-4159
Karaoke with DJ Stylez
Thursdays, Sundays, 10 p.m.
Bartlett
Hadley’s Pub
2779 wHitten - 266-5006
TWIN SOUL DUO Thursday,
Nov. 20; The Southern Edition
Band Friday, Nov. 21, 9 p.m.1 a.m.; Swingin’ Leroy at
Hadley’s Saturday, Nov. 22,
9 p.m.-1 a.m.; SUNday
FUNday with The Lineup
Sunday, Nov. 23, 5:30-9:30 p.m.
Old Whitten Tavern
2800 wHitten - 379-1965
Live Music Fridays, 9 p.m.1 a.m.; Karaoke with Ricky
Mack Mondays, 10 p.m.1 a.m.; Open Mic with Susie
and Bob Salley Wednesdays,
8 p.m.
The Chaulkies Thursday,
Nov. 20, 8:30 p.m.-midnight;
Soul Shockers Sunday,
Nov. 23, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.
Loose Goose Bar & Grill
8014 Club Center
343-0860
Charvey Every third Friday;
DJ Tree Saturdays.
SkiMo’s
1166 n. HouSton levee,
Suite 107 - 756-5055
Live Music Fridays,
8:30-11:30 p.m.
T.J. Mulligan’s 64
2821 n. HouSton levee
377-9997
Karaoke Wednesdays, 10 p.m.
T.J. Mulligan’s Cordova
8071 trinity - 756-4480
Nuttin Fancy Friday,
Nov. 21; Frankie Hollie and
The Noise Saturday, Nov. 22;
The Lineup Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight; Save the Turkey
Party featuring Mudflap King
Wednesday, Nov. 26.
Germantown
Germantown Performing
Arts Center
1801 exeter - 751-7500
Jazz in the Box: Stephen Lee
Friday, Nov. 21, 7 and
8:30 p.m.; Ralph Stanley: Man
of Constant Sorrow Farewell
Tour Saturday, Nov. 22,
8 p.m.; GPAC Youth
Symphony Orchestra Winter
Concert Sunday, Nov. 23,
3 p.m.
continued on page 34
m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m
University of
Memphis
Whitehaven/
Airport
Owen Brennan’s
tHe regalia, 6150 PoPlar
761-0990
arts & entertainment
continued from page 31
33
After Dark: Live Music Schedule
THIS YEAR
YEAR,
PLAYERS BECOME
PLAYMAKERS.
continued from page 33
Huey’s Southwind
7825 Winchester
624-8911
Gary Escoe’s Atomic Dance
Machine Sunday, Nov. 23,
8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m.
Huey’s Germantown
7677 Farmington
318-3034
Memphis vs. USF
NOV. 22
Breeze Cayolle Sunday,
Nov. 23, 8-11:30 p.m.
Ice Bar & Grill
4202 hacks cross
757-1423
Unwind Wednesdays
Wednesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight.
Mesquite Chop House
3165 Forest hill-irene
249-5661
Pam and Terry Wednesdays,
7-10 p.m.
Russo’s New York
Pizzeria & Wine Bar
9087 PoPlar - 755-0092
gotigersgotix.com
Live Music on the patio
Thursdays-Saturdays, 710 p.m.; Half Step Down
Fridays, 7-10 p.m.
North Mississippi/
Tunica
Buffalo Bill’s
Wild West Grill
1686 main, southaven, ms
662-470-6549
HOLIDAY
SPECIAL
FOR NEW PATIENTS
November 20-26, 2014
$10 OFF your first visit
& FREE SHOT of your choice!
• Phentermine,
Adipex,
& others
available
Live Music Thursdays, 7 p.m.;
Karaoke Fridays, Saturdays,
Tuesdays, 7 p.m.
welcome to
grizz
season
Club Emotions 2.0
143 Brickhouse Dr.,
slayDen, ms - 662-551-1522
DJ Ty Sundays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.
The Crossing
Bar & Grill
Fitz Casino & Hotel
Mesquite Chop House
711 lucky ln., tunica, ms
5960 getWell, southaven,
ms - 662-890-2467
Live Entertainment
Thursdays-Sundays,
Wednesdays, 6 p.m.
Fox and Hound English
Pub & Grill
Split Creek Bar &
Restaurant
6565 toWne center,
southaven, ms
662-536-2200
5766 olD hWy. 78, olive
Branch, ms - 362-0512
Live Music Thursdays, 5 p.m.;
Karaoke Tuesdays.
Gold Strike Casino
1010 casino center in
tunica, ms - 1-888-24k-Play
In Stage 2 Bar: Brena
Thursday-Sunday, Nov. 20-23.
Ground Zero
Zero Blues alley,
clarksDale, ms
662-621-9009
Charlie Burgan and The
Southbound Train Friday,
Nov. 21, 9 p.m.; All Night
Long Blues Band Saturday,
Nov. 22, 9 p.m.; Kingfish
Wednesday, Nov. 26, 8 p.m.
Hollywood Casino
1150 casino striP resort,
tunica, ms - 662-357-7700
Live Entertainment Fridays,
Saturdays, 9 p.m.-1 a.m.
Horseshoe
Casino Tunica
38664 casino center,
tunica, ms - 800-357-5600
In Legends Stage Bar: Live
Entertainment Nightly
ongoing; In Bluesville: An
evening with Willie Nelson
and family Friday, Nov. 21.
Live Music Fridays, Saturdays.
Wadford’s Grill & Bar
474 church, southaven,
ms - 662-510-5861
662DJ, Karaoke/Open Mic
Saturdays, 7-11 p.m.
Raleigh
Mugs Pub
4396 raleigh-lagrange
372-3556
Karaoke Fridays, Saturdays,
9 p.m.-1 a.m.
Precious Moments
2794 coleman
Therapeutic Thursdays Third
Thursday of every month,
7 p.m.
Stage Stop
2951 cela - 382-1576
Open Mic Blues Jam with
Brad Webb Thursdays, 711 p.m.
West Memphis
7090 malco, southaven,
ms - 662-349-7097
1550 n. ingram, West
memPhis, ar - 800-467-6182
The Dantones Sunday,
Nov. 23, 8 p.m.-midnight.
Isle of Capri
Dan McGuinness
1800 main, southaven, ms
662-253-8451
Acoustic Music Tuesdays.
Tunica Roadhouse
1107 casino center Drive,
tunica, ms - 662-363-4900
Southland Park
Gaming & Racing
777 isle oF caPri, lula, ms
3964 gooDman, southaven,
ms - 662-890-7611
Roxi Love Saturday, Nov. 22,
7-11 p.m.
Huey’s Southaven
7281 hacks cross, olive
Branch, ms - 662-893-6242
Karaoke with Buddha
Thursdays, Tuesdays, 8 p.m.midnight; Acoustic Show
Wednesdays, 7-11 p.m.
Pam and Terry Thursdays,
7-10 p.m.
In Palm Terrace Stage: Billy
Jones Friday-Saturday,
Nov. 21-22.
DJ Crumbz Thursdays,
8 p.m.; Club Night Fridays,
Saturdays, 9 p.m.; Live Band
Karaoke Sundays, 7:30 p.m.;
Karaoke Tuesdays, 7 p.m.;
Boot Scootin’ Wednesdays,
7 p.m.
Main Street Pizza
Gary Wayne and The
Mainstreet Band Saturdays,
9 p.m.-midnight.
• B-12, Lipo,
& Vitachrom
shots
• Walk-ins
welcome!
• Open Monday
Thru Saturday
Kevin Lipe on the
Memphis Grizzlies
before, during, and
after the game.
34
1660 Bonnie Lane
Cordova TN
cordovamedical.com
@FlyerGrizBlog
memphisflyer.com/blogs/BeyondTheArc
M E M PH
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S, TN 38104 | 90
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books By Leonard Gill
Health-Care Hell
A Memphis doctor pays a visit.
1
11/17/14 8:52 AM
m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m
resident physicians at UT. Bailey calls it
a process of disillusionment that comes
after witnessing a system that sometimes
separates health-care workers from the
very people they were trained to serve: the
sick. But Bailey is not without hope:
“There is hope at the end of The End of
Healing, just as I see hope in the idealistic
young healers I teach. I also see it in
the innovative, caring people inside the
insurance and pharmaceutical industries
who want to put patients first. Yes, my
book is hard on every component of the
health-care industry, but there are people
in that industry who do want to be part of
the solution.”
Part of the solution lies in the
classroom, and it’s been heartening for
Bailey to see his novel already used in the
sociology-of-medicine coursework at Ole
Miss and Rhodes College. The dean of the
school of public health at the University
of Alabama-Birmingham has even called
The End of Healing one
of the best summaries
of health-care policy
he’s found.
eighty3-MemphisFlyer_11-20.indd
As with reader
response, such
positive support from
colleagues has thrilled
Bailey too. What
doesn’t please him in
today’s headlines is
the faulty perspective
granted to Ebola by
the media. Compare
that plague (and Bailey
certainly doesn’t deny
the gravity of it) to a
plague that is already
widespread in America and the source of
so much suffering. It’s what the wise Dr.
Sampson at the end of The End of Healing
calls “the plague of plenty,” which helps to
account for this country’s high incidence
of obesity, which in turn too often leads to
cardiovascular disease and cancer.
Should the focus be on a medicine to
end the plague of plenty? As with Ebola,
Bailey believes a cure won’t come until
we also eliminate the social conditions,
environmental factors, and human
behaviors that allow for it in the first place,
and addressing the national emergency on
all fronts should be one, to quote a phrase,
end of healing.
Jim Bailey will be reading from and signing
copies of The End of Healing on Saturday,
November 22nd, from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Burke’s
Book Store is handling it, but the event is at
Tsunami restaurant (928 S. Cooper), next
door to Burke’s.
arts & entertainment
I
s Dr. Jim Bailey in any way Dr.
Don Newman? Bailey, professor
of medicine at the University of
Tennessee Health Science Center,
says in two respects definitely not.
Newman, resident physician and
protagonist in Bailey’s novel, The End of
Healing, is, for one thing, “much betterlooking,” according to Bailey. And another
thing: Newman once played football.
But Bailey’s being asked the question a
lot: Just how autobiographical is The End
of Healing? It’s an obvious question to ask,
whether the author’s here in Memphis or
on the road, including recent signings in
Annapolis, Birmingham, and Knoxville.
Bailey says he’s been thrilled by reader
response to the novel, but he’s been a little
surprised to hear the book compared to
works by Dan Brown and John Grisham
— and yes, there’s a little of each author in
the novel’s conspiratorial subplots. More
striking, Bailey’s heard The End of Healing
compared to Ayn Rand
— and yes, there are
lengthy philosophical
discussions in these
pages too.
Those discussions
are headed by Dr. Gil
Sampson as he leads
his three seminar
participants in a course
that questions how
health care in America
does and does not
work. Bruce Markhum
is a star surgeon in the
making but with his eye
on the financial bottom
line. Frances Hunt is
a talented nurse practitioner who isn’t
quite sure where to put her trust in today’s
health-care system. And Don Newman
is having a crisis of conscience, both
professionally and personally.
“My goal was to write a story that
exposed some of the dark underside of
modern health care, which is not always
working for the patient’s benefit,” Bailey
says, and continues:
“I also wanted to write in a way that
was accessible to everyone, to tell an
engaging story, but also a story that sees
through all the rhetoric to see both sides:
health-care workers and patients. It’s the
story of every young, idealistic healer
who, faced with the hard realities, finds
it difficult to be true to the oath he or she
has taken.”
Thus, Newman’s crisis of conscience,
which Bailey says he’s seen time and again
in his work with medical students and
35
Calendar of EvEnTS:
november 20 - 26
Send the date, time, place, cost, info, phone number, a
brief description, and photos —
two weeks in advance — to [email protected]
or P.O. Box 1738, Memphis, TN 38101.
Due TO SPace liMiTaTiONS, ONgOiNg weekly
eveNTS will aPPear iN The Flyer’S ONliNe
caleNDar ONly.
T h eaT e r
on g oi n g arT
Cannon Center for the
Performing Arts
1910 Frame Works
“Another Fine Mess,” exhibition of original, single-panel
cartoons by H. Allen Rankin.
Through Dec. 6.
Nut Remix, in this modernday ballet (set on Beale Street)
the traditional score bows to
contemporary rhythms as an
exciting Hip-Hop battle pits
man against mouse. www.
newballet.org. $15-$50. Fri.Sun., Nov. 21-23.
2029 uNION AVENuE (274-1910).
Art Museum at the
University of Memphis
(AMUM)
MEMPHIS COOK CONVENTION CENTER, 255 N. MAIN (525-1515).
The Evergreen Theatre
The Amazing Acrocats, featuring Tuna and the Rock Cats,
a troupe of former orphan,
rescue, and stray house cats
that purrform feats of agility:
rolling on balls, balancing on
beams, riding skateboards,
and more. www.theatreworksmemphis.org. $24. Thurs.-Sun.
Through Nov. 23.
1705 POPLAR (274-7139).
The Orpheum
Beyond Glory, dramatic oneman play starring Stephen
Lang presenting the stories
of eight veterans from World
War II, Korea, and Vietnam.
$37.50-$67.50. Sat., Nov. 22,
7:30 p.m.
A Christmas Story the Musical,
based on the classic 1983
movie, the story takes place
in 1940s Indiana, where a bespectacled boy named Ralphie
has a big imagination and one
wish for Christmas. www.
orpheum-memphis.com. $20$125. Tues., Nov. 25, 7:309:45 p.m., and Wed., Nov. 26,
7:30-9:45 p.m.
203 S. MAIN (525-3000).
Playhouse on the
Square
Peter Pan, Wendy, John, and
Michael Darling’s worlds are
turned upside down when Peter
Pan swoops into their nursery
and leads them to Neverland.
www.playhouseonthesqare.org.
$22. Nov. 21-Jan. 4.
November 20-26, 2014
66 S. COOPER (726-4656).
36
Theatre Memphis
Tintypes, set between the turn
of the 20th century and the
onset of World War I, this
musical journey takes the
audience through an exciting
and tumultuous period of
American history. www.theatrememphis.org. $30. Thurs.Sun. Through Nov. 22.
630 PERKINS EXT. (682-8323).
a r Ti s T r e c e p Ti o n s
Crosstown Arts
Opening reception for “Taken
Out of Context,” exhibition of
new collage work by Rachael
Grant. www.crosstownarts.
org. Fri., Nov. 21, 6-9 p.m.
430 N. CLEVELAND (507-8030).
David Lusk Gallery
Opening reception for
“Stranded,” new works by
Maysey Craddock. Fri.,
Nov. 21, 6-8 p.m.
4540 POPLAR (767-3800).
www.DAVIDLuSKgALLERy.COM
“Uncontrollable
Insides” by Claire
Brumleve at Cafe
Pontotoc
A Feast for Eyes
Collaborative exhibition of
installation art, music, community potluck, and food
drive. Fri., Nov. 21, 6-11 p.m.
gLITCH, 2180 COwDEN (734-6136).
T Clifton Art Gallery
Artist reception for Glenda
Kronke, attending artist will
discuss her unique approach
to kiln-formed art glass in
celebration of T. Clifton’s 30th
anniversary. www.tcliftonart.
com. Fri., Nov. 21, 6-8:30 p.m.
2571 BROAD (323-2787).
oT h e r a r T
h a ppe n i n g s
ArtSocial
Featuring live performances, visual artists, exclusive membership from Opera
Memphis, Dixon Gallery and
Garden, and 3 Penny Theater.
Canned food donation for
entry. Sun., Nov. 23, 2-6 p.m.
LEADERSHIP MEMPHIS, 365 S. MAIN
ST. (278-0016), www.FACEBOOK.
COM/PAgES/ARTSOCIAL.
The GirlPower Project
All-women music and entertainment showcase benefiting
The South Memphis Alliance.
$10. Sat., Nov. 22, 7-10 p.m.
THE 1524, 1524 MADISON
(218-1453).
IRIS Orchestra
Presents: The Prinz
Project Student Art
Contest
Submit a photograph, painting, sketch, or short poem
expressing what the concept
of “everybody’s neighbor”
means to you in today’s world.
Through Dec. 15.
VARIOuS LOCATIONS, SEE wEBSITE
FOR MORE INFORMATION (751-7669),
www.IRISORCHESTRA.COM.
“Fijiji Blocks,” exhibition of
ArtLab works by Eduardo
Benamor Duarte. Through
Nov. 26.
“Here and There,” exhibition
of caseworks by Ruxandra
Olariu. Through Nov. 26.
“Juvenile-in-Justice,” exhibition of photographs by Richard Ross. Through Nov. 26.
“Perceptions of Me: Memphis
Project,” exhibition by Penny
Dodds. www.memphis.edu/
amum. Through Nov. 26.
“Africa: Art of a Continent,”
permanent exhibition of African art from the Martha and
Robert Fogelman collection.
Ongoing.
142 COMMuNICATION & FINE ARTS
BuILDINg (678-2224).
Belz Museum of Asian
and Judaic Art
“Chinese Symbols in Art,”
exhibition of ancient Chinese
pottery and bronze. www.
belzmuseum.org. Ongoing.
119 S. MAIN, IN THE PEMBROKE
SQuARE BuILDINg (523-ARTS).
Buckman Arts Center at
St. Mary’s School
“Birds and Botanicals,”
exhibition of new works by
Sally Markell and furniture by
Stephen Crump. www.buckmanartscenter.com. Through
Dec. 17.
60 N. PERKINS EXT. (537-1483).
Cafe Pontotoc
“Uncontrollable Insides,”
exhibition of photography
by Claire Brumleve. www.
cafepontotoc.com. Through
Dec. 31.
314 S. MAIN (249-7955).
Church Health Center
Wellness
Amy Hutcheson and Jurgen
Tarrasch, exhibition of recent
works. www.churchhealthcenter.org. Through Nov. 30.
1115 uNION (761-1278).
Circuit Playhouse
“Luminosity,” exhibition of
works by Janice Nabors Raiteri. www.playhouseonthesqare.org. Through Jan. 5.
51 S. COOPER (725-0776).
Clough-Hanson Gallery
“Pandora’s Children,” exhibition of work by regional and
national artists. www.rhodes.
edu. Through Dec. 7.
RHODES COLLEgE,
2000 N. PARKwAy (843-3442).
Crosstown Arts Gallery
“Trance,” exhibition of digitalmedia work by Derek Larson.
www.crosstownarts.org.
Through Dec. 20.
422 N. CLEVELAND.
David Lusk Gallery
“Stranded,” exhibition of
works by Maysey Craddock.
www.davidluskgallery.com.
Through Dec. 20.
4540 POPLAR (767-3800).
Diane’s Art, Gift, and
Home
“Holiday Open House,”
exhibition of silk scarves by
Rollin Kocsis, photography by
Suzánne Galloway McClain,
and forged steel crowns by
Stephanie Savic Polk. www.
dianesartgifthome.com.
Through Dec. 23.
1581 OVERTON PARK (276-7515).
The Dixon Gallery &
Gardens
“Portraits and Figures,” exhibition of works by Joyce Gingold
and Carl E. Moore. Through
Jan. 4.
“Rodin: The Human Experience,” exhibition of the human
figure in bronze, ranging from
small-scale sketches to monumental works. www.dixon.org.
Through Jan. 4.
4339 PARK (761-5250).
HOLIDAYS AT THE PINK PALACE • NOV 15 - DEC 31
Best selection of pianos in the Mid-South
from all around the world.
• The Enchanted Forest • Pictures with Santa • The Light Before Christmas 3D
Concert Tuning • Sales • Restoration • Commercial rebuilding facilities
4447 Summer Ave, Memphis, TN
(901) 682-1172 • coltharppianoworld.com
Calendar: november 20 - 26
242 S. COOPER (276-3937).
Fountain Art Gallery
“Small Treasures,” www.
fountainartgallerymemphis.
com. Through Dec. 31.
3092 POPLAR, SUITE 1 (458-7100).
Fratelli’s
“Arboreal Effulgence,” exhibition of works by Miriam
Oliphant. www.memphisbotanicgarden.com. Through
Nov. 30.
750 CHERRY (766-9900).
Gallery Ten Ninety One
“MCA Horn Island 30
Selects,” exhibition featuring
works from this year’s 30th
anniversary exhibition. www.
wkno.org. Through Nov. 26.
WKNO STUDIO, 7151 CHERRY
FARMS (458-2521).
Germantown
Performing Arts Center
“Melodies from the Brush,”
exhibition of portraits on
paper using the ink historically used to arrange music
for Stax musicians and acrylics on repurposed wood.
Through Nov. 30.
“Trending,” exhibition of
art by Tricia Franklin. www.
gpacweb.com. Through
Nov. 30.
1801 EXETER (751-7500).
Jay Etkin Gallery
Recent Works by Pamela
Hassler. Through Nov. 24.
942 COOPER (550-0064).
The Salvation Army
Kroc Center
“Art+Five,” exhibition by
students of Fred Rawlinson.
www.krocmemphis.org.
Through Dec. 20.
800 E. PARKWAY S. (729-8007).
L Ross Gallery
“You, Me, and Us,” exhibition
of paintings and drawings by
Melissa Dunn. www.lrossgallery.com. Through Nov. 29.
5040 SANDERLIN (767-2200).
The Memphis Potters’
Guild’s Holiday Show
and Sale at Memphis
Botanic Garden
Lichterman Nature
Center
“Scarecrows,” exhibition
of life-size (or larger!)
scarecrows created by garden
clubs, master gardeners,
school groups, scout troops,
and local area artists. www.
memphismuseums.org.
Through Nov. 21.
5992 QUINCE (767-7322).
Marshall Arts Gallery
Bobby Sillman and Bachrun
LoMele, exhibition of paintings, illustrations, and installation work. Through Dec. 30.
639 MARSHALL (679-6837).
Memphis Botanic
Garden
The Artist Group of Memphis
Annual Art Show, exhibition
of work by Marie Babb, Lisa
Balton, Mary Pera, Sandra
Hill, Julie Hooker, Joy Phillips
Routt, Linda Lucchesi, Judy
Nocifora, Lisa Ann Sulipeck,
Ron Olson, and more. www.
memphisbotanicgarden.com.
Through Nov. 30.
750 CHERRY (636-4100).
Memphis Brooks
Museum of Art
“In Print,” exhibition of
prints by Federico Castellón.
Through Jan. 9.
William Wegman: Video
Works: 1970-1974, Wegman
was one of the many artists
who proclaimed that the
medium of painting was
“dead,” creating playful and
imaginative short video
works. Through Jan. 10.
Recent Photography Acquisitions, exhibition of photographs acquired between
2006 and 2012 includes many
images that have not been
exhibited. Through Jan. 11.
“Soulful Creatures,” exhibition features 69 works of
Egyptian art related to the
ceremonial use of animal
mummification and 30
animal mummies. Through
Jan. 18.
“Looking at Women,” exhibition of images of women
appearing in a variety of
roles: goddess, harlot, mother,
or femme fatale. www.
brooksmuseum.org. Through
Feb. 22.
1934 POPLAR (544-6209).
Memphis College of Art
2014 Fall BFA Exhibition,
www.mca.edu. Nov. 25Dec. 11.
Eszter Sziksz, exhibition of
art. Nov. 25-Dec. 11.
1930 POPLAR (272-5100).
Memphis College of Art
Downtown Gallery
“Things That Were,” 2014 Fall
MFA thesis exhibition. www.
mca.edu. Nov. 21-Dec. 13.
477 S. MAIN (272-5100).
Metal Museum
Myra Mimlitsch-Gray, exhibition by master metalsmith.
www.metalmuseum.org.
Through Nov. 30.
374 METAL MUSEUM DR.
(774-6380).
Painted Planet
Gallery Artists on View, exhibition by gallery artists. (3385223), Tuesdays-Saturdays,
11:45 a.m.-6 p.m.
1015 S. COOPER (725-0054).
Playhouse on the
Square
“Cold Wax in Color,” exhibition of works by Rebecca
Chappell. Through Jan. 5.
“Symbols and Flowers, Enamels and Paintings,” exhibition by Leigh Ann Wilmot.
Through Nov. 28.
“Pile,” exhibition of art by
Leandra Urrutia. www.mca.
edu. Through Jan. 4.
“This Green and Pleasant Land,” exhibition of
watercolors and block prints
by Martha Kelly. www.
playhouseonthesqare.org.
Through Jan. 5.
66 S. COOPER (726-4656).
Qahwa Coffee Bar
“City Currents,” exhibition of
new works by Janice Nabors
Raiteri. Through Nov. 30.
109 N. MAIN (800-2227).
Ross Gallery
Bernard Freiden, exhibition of landscape paintings.
Through Dec. 4.
“Creative Fire,” exhibition of
paintings by Sue S. Miller.
www.cbu.edu. Through
Dec. 4.
CHRISTIAN BROTHERS UNIVERSITY,
PLOUGH LIBRARY, 650 E. PARKWAY S.
(321-3000).
Stax Museum of
American Soul Music
“Soul: Memphis’ Original
Sound,” exhibition of photography by Thom Gilbert. www.
soulsvillefoundation.org.
Through June 13.
926 E. MCLEMORE (946-2535).
TOPS Gallery
“Here & There,” exhibition of
six paintings by Jered Sprecher. www.topsgallery.com.
Through Dec. 7.
400 S. FRONT.
Da n ce
Bollywood Choreography Workshop
Learn simple and fun Bollywood dance moves in this
beginner-level workshop. $25.
Sun., Nov. 23, 2:30-4:30 p.m.
CO-MOTION STUDIO, 416 N. CLEVELAND (316-7733), WWW.CLIENTS.
MINDBODYONLINE.COM.
m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m
“An Awkward Pose,” exhibition of portraiture by Maggie
Russell. www.eclectic-eye.
com. Through Dec. 1.
arts & entertainment
Eclectic Eye
37
37
continued on page 39
NOVEMBER 16-22
3-course & special dinners
$20.14
Two-for-one & special lunches
$10.14
Ado’s Pizza Pies, Lunch & Dinner
The Arcade Restaurant, Lunch
Automatic Slim’s, Dinner
Bardog Tavern, Lunch & Dinner
Bangkok Alley Downtown, Dinner
BB King’s Blues Club, Dinner
Belle Diner, Lunch an Dinner
Bleu Restaurant, Dinner
Bluefin Restaurant, Dinner
Bon Ton Cafe, Dinner
Brass Door Irish Pub, Dinner
Cafe Keough, Dinner
Cafe Pontotoc, Dinner
Capriccio Grille, Dinner
November 20-26, 2014
Central BBQ Downtown, Lunch & Dinner
Chez Philippe, Afternoon Tea
City Market, Lunch and Dinner
DeJa Vu, Dinner
Double J Smokehouse, Dinner
eighty3, Lunch & Dinner
Evelyn & Olive, Lunch & Dinner
Felicia Suzanne’s, Dinner & Fri Lunch
Front Street Deli, Lunch
Grawemeyer’s, Lunch & Dinner
The Green Beetle, Lunch & Dinner
Havana’s Pilon, Lunch & Dinner
Itta Bena, Dinner
Kooky Canuck, Lunch & Dinner
Local Downtown, Dinner
Lunchbox Eats, Lunch
Main Street Cafe, Dinner
The Majestic Grille, Lunch & Dinner
McEwen’s on Monroe, Dinner
Onix Restaurant, Dinner
Oshi Burger Bar, Dinner
Paulette’s, Dinner
Riverfront Bar & Grill, Lunch
SOB l South of Beale, Dinner
Terrace at River Inn, Dinner
Trolley Stop Market, Lunch & Dinner
Tug’s Casual Grill, Dinner
Wrapzody, Lunch
View menus, special discounted parking info
and more at
DowntownDiningWeek.com
38
Calendar: november 20 - 26
Members of the Argentine
Tango Society give lessons
and tango demonstrations in
the Rotunda. Included with
museum admission. Third
Thursday of every month,
6:30 p.m.
MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART,
1934 POPLAR (544-6209).
C o m e dy
Flirt Nightclub
Trippin on Thursday, hosted
by K-97 Funny Man Prescott.
Thursdays, 6 p.m.
3659 S. MENDENHALL (485-1119).
P&H Cafe
Sneak Attack Comedy Show,
Wed., Nov. 26, 9:30 p.m.
Open Mic Comedy, Thursdays, 9 p.m.
1532 MADISON (726-0906).
P oet ry/ S P ok e n
Wor d
Amurica World
Headquarters
Spillit Storytelling Grand
Slam: Silver Linings, final
round of storytelling features
the winners throughout 2014:
Victor Sawyer, Francesca
Tronchin, Ray Belli, Dana
Wilson, Sean Mosley, Sam
Scherer, John Adcock, Eilidh
Jenness vying for Grand
Master Storyteller of Memphis
2014. (289-6276). $10. Fri.,
Nov. 21, 8-10 p.m.
410 CLEVELAND.
Brinson’s
Melting Pot: Artist Showcase,
open mic night hosted by
Darius “Phatmak” Clayton. $5.
Thursdays, 7-11 p.m.
341 MADISON (524-0104).
The Broom Closet
Open Mic Night, an evening
of spoken word and music
featuring rhythm and rhyme
with Rootz. www.thebroomclosetmemphis.com. $5. Tuesdays, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Through
Dec. 23.
3307 PARK (443-5692).
House of Mtenzi
The Soul Experience featuring
Poetry and Neo Soul, Fri.,
Nov. 21, 8 p.m.
1289 MADISON.
The HUB
LoveSpeaks, Fridays, 11 p.m.2 a.m.
515 E.H. CRUMP.
Java Cabana
Open Mic Nite, www.
javacabanacoffeehouse.com.
Thursdays, 8-10 p.m.
2170 YOUNG (272-7210).
Wor k S h oPS &
C l aS S e S
The Broom Closet
Hearth Magick, learn about
home, hearth, herbs, gems,
and kitchen witchery. Each
month a specific magickal
tool, practice, or item is
discussed and crafted. $15.
Thurs., Nov. 20, 7-9 p.m.
Flying Solo, workshops,
discussions, and activities of
interest including energetic
attraction, making magical
potions, intimate companion-
2-3 p.m.
3307 PARK (443-5692).
AGRICENTER INTERNATIONAL,
SHOWPLACE ARENA, 105 S. GERMANTOWN (888-214-6607), WWW.
BETTERLIVINGHOMEANDGARDENSHOW.COM.
THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS,
4339 PARK (761-5250), WWW.
DIXON.ORG.
e x P oS / Sa le S
Better Living Home &
Garden Show
Featuring seminars, giveaways, and live entertainment.
$5. Fri., Nov. 21, noon-8 p.m.
Cleveland Street Flea
Market
Flea Market Friday, handson workshops for ages 10+
featuring Turkigami. www.
crosstownarts.org. Fri.,
Nov. 21, 3:30-5 p.m.
Fe St iva lS
Jewish Literary and
Cultural Arts Festival
438 CLEVELAND (276-3333).
Hosting six author events over
a four-week period and an
Israeli Artist Market held
Nov. 16-21 showcasing artists
from Israel. See website for
more information. Through
Nov. 23.
Co-Motion Studio
Holiday Hoop Making Workshop, make your own hula
hoop and bonus holiday card
making. (316-7733), www.
clients.mindbodyonline.com.
$30-$40. Fri., Nov. 21, 6:308:30 p.m.
MEMPHIS JEWISH COMMUNITY
CENTER, 6560 POPLAR (761-0810),
WWW.JCCMEMPHIS.ORG.
416 N. CLEVELAND.
The Dixon Gallery &
Gardens
S P or t S / Fit n e S S
Open Studio, bring sketchbook and pencils, the Dixon
will provide an art instructor
to answer questions and give
advice on how to advance
skills. www.dixon.org. Free
with regular admission.
Fridays, 4-5 p.m.
Walk
Supporters in more than
65 communities across the
country will participate in
this family-friendly event
benefiting St. Jude Children’s
Research Hospital. Sat.,
Nov. 22, 7-10 a.m.
4339 PARK (761-5250).
First Unity Church
Essential Oil Class, learn,
share, and experience therapeutic grade essential oils and
how to use them to balance,
restore, and enhance the wellness of body, mind, and spirit.
(662-874-5293), Free. Third
Thursday of every month,
6:30-8:30 p.m.
9228 WALNUT GROVE (753-1463).
Memphis Botanic
Garden
Five-week Painting series with
Marilyn Wannamaker, drawing
and painting classes for those
with beginner skills through advanced levels of experience. Call
for times. $200 members, $230
nonmembers. Tues., Thurs., Sat.
Through Nov. 22.
Holiday Floral Design, join
Rick Pudwell and Regina
Berryman for this hands-on
design program, and take
home a completed Thanksgiving centerpiece and Christmas
wreath. $65 members, $75
nonmembers. Tues., Nov. 25,
9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Intermediate Digital Photography-Part 1: From Camera to
Computer, in the first session
of this two-part series, the
advanced features of a DSLR
camera will be covered. www.
memphisbotanicgarden.com.
$95-$200. Tuesdays, Thursdays, 5-9 p.m.
750 CHERRY (636-4100).
Memphis College of Art
MCA Community Education Classes, adult continuing education courses and
Saturday School for grades
K-12. For schedule, registration, and more information,
visit website. www.mca.edu.
Through Nov. 30.
1930 POPLAR (272-5100).
2014 St. Jude
Give Thanks
Shelby Farms Park
Adult Greenline Garden
Workshops, www.shelbyfarmspark.org. $5. Every third
Saturday, 9 a.m. Through
Nov. 30.
PARKING LOT WHERE MULLINS
STATION CROSSES THE RAILROAD
TRACKS.
Shelby Farms
Intro to Hooping, combines
fitness, fun, and dance using
handmade hoops designed
for adults of all sizes. www.
shelbyfarmspark.org. $10.
Wednesdays, 9:30 a.m.
500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK).
University Club of
Memphis
Third Thursday: Lectures On
Local Design, hosted by local
architects and designers as
they share their knowledge and
experience with projects in the
Mid-South and beyond. www.
aiamemphis.org. $20 member,
$25 nonmember. Every third
Thursday, 11:30 a.m.
1346 CENTRAL (722-3700).
Various locations
Metal Clay Jewely Classes by
Mildred Schiff, $300. Thursdays, 6:30-9 p.m. Through
Nov. 28.
Dichroic Glass Jewelry Classes
by Mildred Schiff, (683-8446),
www.dreamcastersoriginals.
com. $175. Saturdays.
CALL FOR INFORMATION.
BookS ig n i ng S
Booksigning by
Jack Kenner
Author discusses and signs
Dogs I’ve Nosed from Here to
Naples. Sat., Nov. 22, 2 p.m.
THE BOOKSELLERS AT LAURELWOOD, 387 PERKINS EXT.
(683-9801), WWW.THEBOOKSELLERSATLAURELWOOD.COM.
Booksigning by Curtis
Wilkie
Author discusses and signs Assassins, Eccentrics, Politicians,
and Other Persons of Interest.
Fri., Nov. 21, 6:30 p.m.
THE BOOKSELLERS AT LAURELWOOD, 387 PERKINS EXT.
(683-9801), WWW.THEBOOKSELLERSATLAURELWOOD.COM.
Booksigning by Eugenia
Bone
Author discusses and signs
The Kitchen Ecosystem. Thurs.,
Nov. 20, 6:30-8 p.m.
THE BOOKSELLERS AT LAURELWOOD, 387 PERKINS EXT.
(683-9801), WWW.THEBOOKSELLERSATLAURELWOOD.COM.
Booksigning by Jim
Bailey
Author discusses and signs
The End of Healing: A Novel.
Sat., Nov. 22, 2 p.m.
TSUNAMI, 928 S. COOPER (274-2556),
WWW.BURKESBOOKS.COM.
l e Ct u r e / S P e a k e r
Munch & Learn
Lectures
Bring brown bag lunch. Sodas
and water will be supplied.
Listen to lectures on art by
“Stranded” exhibit
of works by Maysey
Craddock at David
Lusk Gallery
various speakers. Free for
members, $5 nonmembers.
noon-1 p.m.
THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS, 4339
PARK (761-5250), WWW.DIXON.ORG.
White Fright:
Tracing the
Origins of Black Male
Stereotypes
Professor Richard Follett will
discuss his upcoming book,
White Fright: Slave Revolts
in American Memory. Enjoy
cocktails and meet the historian. Free. Thurs., Nov. 20,
5:30-7:30 p.m.
THE COTTON MUSEUM, 65 UNION
(531-7826), WWW.MEMPHISCOTTONMUSEUM.ORG.
to u r S
Shelby County
Courthouse Tour
CARRIAGE CROSSING, HOUSTON
LEVEE & BILL MORRIS PKWY.
(373-5051), WWW.GIVETHANK
SWALK.ORG.
Break-A-Leg 5K
Course will start and end at
the Orpheum Theatre, featuring post-race block party. Dust
off your Christmas sweaters
and Santa hats for the costume
contest. Sun., Nov. 23, 2 p.m.
THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN
(525-3000), WWW.ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM.
Shelby Farms BMX
Trophies and medals are
awarded for 1st, 2nd, and 3rd
place. $10 entry. Sat., 3:306 p.m. Through Nov. 22.
SHELBY FARMS BMX, 6435 WALNUT
GROVE (687-4056), WWW.SHELBYFARMSBMX.COM.
Sunrise Yoga
Yoga class with Peggy Reisser.
Free for members, $5 nonmembers, all levels welcome.
Wednesdays, 6:15-7:15 a.m.
THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS,
4339 PARK (761-5250),
WWW.DIXON.ORG.
Tai Chi
Newcomers and beginners
welcome. Thursdays, 5:30 p.m.
Hear the stories of people,
events, and history of Shelby
County with Jimmy Ogle.
Free. Every third Thursday,
noon. Through Jan. 15.
QUAN AM MONASTERY,
3500 GOODLETT (679-4528).
SHELBY COUNTY COURTHOUSE,
ADAMS AND SECOND STREET
(604-5002), WWW.JIMMYOGLE.COM.
BRIDGES, 477 N. FIFTH ST.
Tours at Two
Join a Dixon docent or member of the curatorial staff on a
tour of the current exhibitions.
Free for members. $5 nonmembers. Tuesdays, Sundays,
Zumba
Thursdays, 6:30 a.m., and
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, 6 p.m.
continued on page 40
m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m
Brooks Milongas
ship, what not to wear, and
more. $15. Third Friday of
every month, 7:30-9:30 p.m.
Through March 20.
Wicca 101 Seeker Class, the
Fellowship of Avalon will
cover the basics of the Wiccan
faith, traditions, core beliefs,
and tenets. www.thebroomclosetmemphis.com. $10.
Every other Sunday, 7-9 p.m.
Through April 5.
arts & entertainment
continued from page 37
39
Calendar: november 20 - 26
continued from page 39
M e et i n g s
Being Spiritual and
LGBTQ: Group
Conversation
Ongoing discussion group
facilitated by a rotating group
of local clergy supportive
and encouraging of LGBTQ
people. Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m.
MEMPHIS GAY AND LESBIAN COMMUNITY CENTER, 892 S. COOPER
(278-6422), WWW.MGLCC.ORG.
Meditation and Dharma
Talk
Featuring chanting (led by
the Monk), silent “sitting
meditation,” and Dharma talk
with Q&A or book discussion.
Sundays, 10 a.m., and Fridays,
6 p.m.
QUAN AM MONASTERY,
3500 GOODLETT (362-8070).
Memphis Music Monday
After-work music business
networking with performances by Memphis musicians and
free appetizers. Mondays,
6-9 p.m.
HARD ROCK CAFE, 126 BEALE
STREET (529-0007),
WWW.MEMPHISMUSIC.ORG.
MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN,
750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.
MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.
Fall Ballet Classes
For ages 3-10, classes will gently introduce children to the
dynamics of music and dance
through movement, rhythmic
exercises, and games. $210$300. Through Dec. 9.
GERMANTOWN PERFORMING ARTS
CENTER, 1801 EXETER (751-7500),
WWW.GPACWEB.COM.
Fall Campfire Party
Join us for a cozy campfire
and evening activities for the
kids. Featuring a night hike,
hot dogs, s’mores, and cider.
$8 members, $12 nonmebers.
Fri., Nov. 21, 6-8 p.m.
MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN,
750 CHERRY (636-4131), WWW.
MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.
HackNight
After-school program for ages
10+ that jumps head-first
into science, technology, and
design. Emphasis on web and
game design. Free. Thursdays,
4:30-6:30 p.m.
APRIL WOODS APARTMENTS COMMUNITY TECHNOLOGY CENTER,
262 CHELSEA (300-2796).
Homeschool Day
Kids
Caterpillar Club
November 20-26, 2014
Six-class semester for toddlers to 5 years. For more
information and registration,
call 636-4122. $40 members,
$70 nonmembers. Through
Dec. 10.
40
Homeschool families can choose
from activities and docent-led
guided tours to learn about animals in ancient Egypt through
special exhibition. Thurs.,
Nov. 20, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF ART,
1934 POPLAR (544-6200), WWW.
BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.
Kaleidoscope Club
For ages 5-9, this after-school
club is colorful, inspiring, and
always in motion. Meant to
spark creativity and critical
thinking with weekly projects.
Wednesdays, 4-5 p.m.
Nutcracker Story Time
with Ballet Memphis
Members of the cast will be on
hand for stories and dancing
with photos and autographs to
follow. Sat., Nov. 22, 11 a.m.
THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS,
4339 PARK (761-5250),
WWW.DIXON.ORG.
THE BOOKSELLERS AT LAURELWOOD, 387 PERKINS EXT.
(683-9801), WWW.THEBOOKSELLERSATLAURELWOOD.COM.
Kids Night Out, Parents
Night Off!
TheatreKids Dance
Bootcamp
Fun-filled night for kids
including movie, popcorn,
crafts, group games, jumping,
and fun. $20/1st child, $15/
siblings. Saturdays, 6-9 p.m.
ABA DEVELOPMENT, 7953 STAGE
HILLS (634-8005), WWW.ABADEVELOPMENT.ORG.
Moses(es)
Grounded in Zora
Neale Hurston’s novel and
Reggie Wilson’s travels to Israel,
Egypt, Turkey and Mali, the
work looks at diasporic movement out of Africa. $15-$25.
Fri., Nov. 21, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
THE ORPHEUM, 203 S. MAIN
(525-3000), WWW.ORPHEUM-MEMPHIS.COM.
Nature Scene
Investigators
For children ages 6-9, answer
nature questions and more
while being a real nature
detective. $150 members,
$175 nonmembers. MondaysFridays, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN,
750 CHERRY (636-4100), WWW.
MEMPHISBOTANICGARDEN.COM.
Registration is open for kids ages
12-17 with a showcase performance of Mr. Otis on Nov. 21-22.
See website for more information. Through Nov. 21.
BARTLETT PERFORMING ARTS AND
CONFERENCE CENTER, 3663 APPLING (385-6440), WWW.BPAC.ORG.
Antarctica Revisited
Challenges
Pink Palace Manager of
Education Alex Eilers is going
to Antarctica this winter to
study Weddell Seals. Join in
on special challenges at the
museum. Ongoing.
MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM,
3050 CENTRAL (636-2362), WWW.
ANTARCTICAREVISITED.COM.
Cancer Center
Luncheon featuring
Rob Lowe
$125. Fri., Nov. 21, 11:45 a.m.
THE PEABODY HOTEL, 149 UNION
(529-4000), WWW.METHODISTHEALTH.ORG.
Deal Cancer Out II:
Return To Sin City
“60 Years of Elvis”
Texas Hold’em paying five
places with great prizes
benefitting Mid-South Men’s
Health Organization and the
Fight against Prostate Cancer.
$45. Sat., Nov. 22, 2-5 p.m.
GRACELAND, 3734 ELVIS PRESLEY
(332-3322), WWW.GRACELAND.COM.
DAN MCGUINNESS PUB,
4698 SPOTTSWOOD (336-7700),
WWW.CALL-TO-DUTY.ORG.
s pe cia l ev e n t s
Exhibit of rare artifacts as part
of the VIP tour experience.
Through Feb. 28.
Trousseau Anniversary
Trousseau celebrates 65 years
with wine and cheese. Thurs.,
Nov. 20, 7-9 p.m.
TROUSSEAU, 408 PERKINS EXT.
(682-7575).
Annual Food Drive
For each bag of at least five cans
of food a person donates, the
donor can suggest the name of
someone in need of a free vision
screening. Through Nov. 30.
THE EYEWEAR GALLERY,
428 PERKINS EXT. (763-2020).
Red Boa Ball
Enjoy live and silent auctions,
dinner, an interactive mission
station, and music by the
Jimmy Church Band benefiting American Red Cross of
the Mid South. Sat., Nov. 22,
6:30 p.m.
MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN,
750 CHERRY (636-4100),
WWW.REDCROSS.ORG.
Team Trivia with
Kevin Cerrito
Featuring weekly themes
including Disney, ’90s Movies
& TV, Logos, Memphis Trivia,
and more. Includes N64 Mario
Kart tie breaker and prizes
for the top 3 teams and best
team name. Free. Wednesdays,
7-9 p.m.
TAMP & TAP, 122 GAYOSO (207-1053),
WWW.TAMPANDTAP.COM.
Transgender Day of
Remembrance
Memorial service to commemorate the deaths and celebrate the lives of transgender
victims of violence. Thurs.,
Nov. 20, 5:30 p.m.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH,
1000 S. COOPER (278-6786).
Wise Trek
Program for Park users ages
50+ providing participants
with healthy lifestyle tips, recreational opportunities, fitness
programs and social events.
$5. Saturdays, 8 a.m.
PARKING LOT WHERE MULLINS
STATION CROSSES THE RAILROAD
TRACKS, SHELBY FARMS PARK,
WWW.SHELBYFARMSPARK.ORG.
Wonders of the Universe
Flatscreen tour through the
current night skies showing
constellations and related classical stories of mythology with
historical notes and seasonal
astronomical events. $4.50.
Through Feb. 28.
MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM,
3050 CENTRAL (636-2362),
WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.
Calendar: november 20 - 26
H o l i day EvE n t s
Community Thanksgiving Dinner
Pre-Thanksgiving dinner for those in need in the
community. IBEW Local 1288 is sponsoring up
to 500 dinners. To volunteer, call 363-1563. Sun.,
Nov. 23, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.
MISS GIRLEE’S SOUL FOOD RESTAURANT, 629 CHELSEA.
Cranksgiving
Featuring race, tour, or casual ride benefiting the Urban Bicycle Food Ministry. $10-$25.
Nov. 22-23, Sat.-Sun., 9 a.m.
Cranksgiving at Peddler Bike
Shop benefiting the Urban Bicycle
Food Ministry
SunTrust Zoo Lights
See Santa, reindeer, thousands of holiday lights, and
more. Tree lighting ceremony on Nov. 21, 5 p.m. $6
members, $8 nonmembers. Nov. 21-Dec. 30.
MEMPHIS ZOO, 2000 PRENTISS, OVERTON PARK (333-6500).
Annual Turkey Giveaway
PEDDLER BIKE SHOP, 2095 EXETER (757-8485),
WWW.UBFM.NET.
Join the annual event for those in need. Sponsorship
forms on website. Sat., Nov. 22, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Drop N Shop
HOLLYWOOD COMMUNITY CENTER, 1560 N. HOLLYWOOD
(458-4084), WWW.THETROSSLOVEFOUNDATION.ORG.
Get holiday shopping done by dropping your
child off for fun activities while you shop. $45$55. Wed., Nov. 26, 8 a.m.-1 p.m.
ABA DEVELOPMENT, 7953 STAGE HILLS (634-8005),
WWW.ABADEVELOPMENT.ORG.
continued on page 42
Enchanted Forest Festival of Trees
Benefiting Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital. $6.
Through Dec. 31.
MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL
(636-2362), WWW.THEENCHANTEDFOREST.ORG.
Graceland Lighting Ceremony
John Stamos will “flip the switch” on the
traditional lights and decorations. Special visit
from Elvis Santa. Fri., Nov. 21, 6 p.m.
GRACELAND, 3734 ELVIS PRESLEY (332-3322),
WWW.GRACELAND.COM.
Holiday Arts
Pop-up shop featuring local artists from Eastern
Arkansas. Opening-night reception is Mon.,
Nov. 24, promoting the sale of art painted by local celebrities. Mon., Nov. 24, 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
MAIN STREET WEST MEMPHIS, 113 BROADWAY
(870-735-8814), WWW.BROADWAYWESTMEMPHIS.COM.
Holiday Bazaar
Special preview hours on Friday from 5–7 p.m.
$20, includes complimentary champagne, tote
bag, and purchasing during the preview. Fri.,
Nov. 21, 7-9 p.m., and Sat., Nov. 22, 10 a.m.5 p.m.
MEMPHIS COLLEGE OF ART, 1930 POPLAR
WWW.MCA.EDU.
Holiday Gala
Featuring buffets, cocktails, prizes, drawings,
and music by the Memphis Symphony Orchestra
benefiting Salvation Army Angel Tree. $20. Fri.,
Nov. 21, 6:30-9:30 p.m.
RONNIE GRISANTI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT, SHEFFIELD
ANTIQUES MALL, 684 W. POPLAR (850-0191),
WWW.SHEFFIELD-ANTIQUES.COM.
Holiday Magic of Science
Holiday Show and Sale
Showcase of jewelry, homewares, sculpture, and
more by artists and special ornament display
crafted by students and professionals. Nov. 22Jan. 4.
METAL MUSEUM, 374 METAL MUSEUM DR. (774-6380),
WWW.METALMUSEUM.ORG.
The Memphis Potters’ Guild Holiday
Show & Sale
Meet artists working in porcelain, stoneware,
earthenware, raku, and other ceramic techniques.
Find unique handcrafted works perfect for gifting
or collecting. Fri., Nov. 21, 5-8 p.m., Sat., Nov. 22,
9 a.m.-6 p.m., and Sun., Nov. 23, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
MEMPHIS BOTANIC GARDEN, 750 CHERRY (636-4100),
WWW.THEMEMPHISPOTTERSGUILD.COM.
Photos with Santa
Through Dec. 24.
CARRIAGE CROSSING, HOUSTON LEVEE & BILL MORRIS
PKWY. (854-8240), WWW.SHOPCARRIAGECROSSING.COM.
Starry Nights
Featuring new lights display, camel rides, photos
with Santa, and more. $20 per car. Nov. 21Dec. 28, 6 p.m.
SHELBY FARMS, 500 N. PINE LAKE (767-PARK),
WWW.SHELBYFARMSPARK.ORG.
arts & entertainment
MEMPHIS PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL
(636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.
m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m
Family-friendly program using many different
science concepts as decorations for the holiday
season. All ages can participate in physical science demonstrations. $4.75. Through Dec. 19.
41
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Germantown: 756-4444
U of mem: 327-6111
Memphis Family Owned
& Operated Since 1975
THANK
DOG FOR
NEIGHBORHOOD
BARS
Calendar: november 20 - 26
continued from page 41
Food & d r i n k
EvE nts
Bluegrass Brunch
Brunch with live entertainment.
Saturdays, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., and
Saturdays, Sundays, 9 a.m.2 p.m.
TAMP & TAP, 122 GAYOSO (207-1053),
WWW.TAMPANDTAP.COM.
Cooking Demo by
Eugenia Bone
Author will lead a cooking
demonstration with local
produce to recreate recipes
from her newest cookbook,
The Kitchen Ecosystem. Sat.,
Nov. 22, 9:30-11 a.m.
MEMPHIS FARMERS MARKET,
PAVILION OF CENTRAL STATION,
S. FRONT & G.E. PATTERSON AVE.
Happy Hour
Happy Hour features $1 off
most liquor, beer, and mixed
drinks. Ongoing, 4-7 p.m.
WESTY’S, 346 N. MAIN (543-3278).
Happy Hour with
Panda
Voted Best Happy Hour in
Memphis by the readers of
the Memphis Flyer for five
years in a row. MondaysFridays, 5-7 p.m.
BARDOG TAVERN, 73 MONROE
(275-8752), BARDOG.COM.
Misses and Martinis
Featuring drink specials,
shopping from womenowned businesses, and live
music. Thursdays, 311:45 p.m. Through Dec. 25.
WADFORD’S GRILL & BAR,
474 CHURCH, SOUTHAVEN, MS
(662-510-5861), WADFORDS.COM.
Mrs. Murray’s
Supper Club
Evening of elegant fun with
a dinner catered by Coletta’s
Italian Restaurant, a classic
musical revue, and auction
items benefiting Germantown
Community Theatre. $75.
Sat., Nov. 22, 5:30 p.m.
JOIN US ON THANKSGIVING EVE.
BARDOG.COM • 901.275.8752
November 20-26, 2014
73 MONROE • DOWNTOWN MEMPHIS
Holiday entertaining?
Fresh Dessert trays,
baked breads, & pastries
for your party.
Many hard to find ingredients for
those holiday recipes you have
been wanting to try.
NAPOLEON DESSERT
42
Germantown Pkwy at Willow Tree Lane in Cordova
901.308.2404 | johnspantry.com
GERMANTOWN COMMUNITY
THEATRE, 3037 FOREST HILL-IRENE
(754-2680), WWW.GCTCOMEPLAY.
ORG.
Bone
Special Evening
with Eugenia
Evening includes tasting from
The Kitchen Ecosystem with
wine and a signed book. $45.
Sun., Nov. 23.
ELEGANT FARMER, THE,
262 S HIGHLAND (324-2221),
WWW.THEELEGANTFARMERRESTAURANT.COM.
Speed Dating
Spend 10 minutes with each
person. Includes domestic
beer and house wine. $20.
Fourth Tuesday of every
month, 7-9 p.m.
WADFORD’S GRILL & BAR,
474 CHURCH, SOUTHAVEN, MS
(662-510-5861), WADFORDS.COM.
T-shirt Pickup Party
Celebrate the brand new MM
taproom, grab your shirts,
kick back, and grab a drink
with friends. Fri., Nov. 21,
11 a.m.-6 p.m.
MEMPHIS MADE BREWING COMPANY, 768 S. COOPER (207-5343).
Wine Down
Thanksgiving-themed hors
d’oeuvres will be served and
paired with a “Thanksgiving dinner” wine selection.
Guests will also enjoy live
music by Charvey McLemore.
$25 members, $35 nonmembers. Fri., Nov. 21, 6-8 p.m.
THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS,
4339 PARK (761-5250),
WWW.DIXON.ORG.
Wine, Music, and a
Book
Featuring half-price wine
and live music. Every other
Saturday.
THE BOOKSELLERS AT LAURELWOOD, 387 PERKINS EXT. (3740881), WWW.THEBOOKSELLERSATLAURELWOOD.COM.
Fi lm
British Arrows
Awards
An eclectic mix of minidramas, outrageous wit, and
awe-inspiring innovation
celebrating commercial creativity. $9. Thurs., Nov. 20,
7-8:15 p.m., Sat., Nov. 22,
2-3:15 p.m., and Sun.,
Nov. 23, 2-3:15 p.m.
MEMPHIS BROOKS MUSEUM OF
ART, 1934 POPLAR (544-6200),
WWW.BROOKSMUSEUM.ORG.
Cinema Showcase
Featuring the 100-year history
of blues, jazz, and culture on
Beale Street in the feature film
Take Me Back to Beale. $3.
Fridays, Sundays, 1-2:30 p.m.
CENTER FOR SOUTHERN FOLKLORE,
123 S. MAIN AT PEABODY TROLLEY
STOP (274-5502/525-3655),
WWW.CFAPRODUTIONS.ORG.
Flight of the Butterflies
A film about the monarch
butterfly migration and the
scientist who spent 40 years
trying to discover where the
butterflies disappear to when
they fly south for the winter.
$9. Through Nov. 21.
IMAX THEATER, MEMPHIS PINK
PALACE MUSEUM, 3050 CENTRAL
(636-2362), WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.
“Taken Out of
Context” exhibit of
works by Rachael
Grant at Crosstown
Arts
Jerusalem
Explore the crossroads of
civilization and faith. Experience the story of Jerusalem in
all its beauty and diversity. $9.
Through Nov. 21.
IMAX THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS
PINK PALACE MUSEUM,
3050 CENTRAL (636-2362),
WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.
The Light Before
Christmas 3D
Join two children lost in a
snowstorm who learn about
the true meaning of Christmas in this stop-motion
animated holiday film. $9.
Through Dec. 31.
IMAX THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS
PINK PALACE MUSEUM,
3050 CENTRAL (636-2362),
WWW.MEMPHISMUSEUMS.ORG.
Polar Express 3D
On Christmas Eve, a doubting boy boards a magical
train that’s headed to the
North Pole and Santa’s home.
$11.50-$13.50. Through
Dec. 31.
IMAX THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS
PINK PALACE MUSEUM, 3050
CENTRAL (636-2362).
Rodin: The Gates of
Hell
Enjoy selections from Mark’s
Food Truck as you learn more
about Rodin, his sculpting process, and his importance to the
medium. Sodas and tea will be
provided. Fri., Nov. 21, noon.
THE DIXON GALLERY & GARDENS,
4339 PARK (761-5250),
WWW.DIXON.ORG.
Tornado Alley
Join stormchaser Sean Casey
as he chases down and
photographs the inside of
a tornado and tracks some
of the deadliest storms ever
seen. $9. Through Nov. 21.
IMAX THEATER, IN THE MEMPHIS
PINK PALACE MUSEUM,
3050 CENTRAL (636-2362).
GET ONE 2 PC Dark
Indians, Pilgrims,
DINNEr FrEE
f o o d f e at u r e B y A r i L e Va u x
ou probably got
the memo that
Thanksgiving, as it is
currently celebrated, is a
far cry from what probably
transpired at the original
feast. Rather than a cross-cultural love
fest, the first Thanksgiving was more like
a poker game where each player had one
hand on his cards and the other hand
on his pistol, under the table, aimed at
another man’s lap. The party did not
include a quick game of tag football while
the turkey cooked, because there wasn’t
even a turkey. Or a pumpkin pie. Or
women and children at the dining table.
But who can’t get behind a holiday
that, stripped to its bare essence, is about
being grateful for what one has? In this
sense, every day should be Thanksgiving,
as far as I’m concerned. And there should
always be pudding. Pie is optional.
Tapioca, Coconut, Squash Pudding
Little known fact: A tablespoon or two
of tapioca will improve any pudding
or pie filling immeasurably. Tapioca
adds a toothy elasticity to the finished
product, bestowing it with the body
you’re looking for. My mother-in-law
uses tapioca in apple pie, and since I
started messing around with the tapioca
trick myself, it hasn’t failed me. And for
what it’s worth, tapioca has long been a
food of indigenous peoples of Central
and South America. So there’s an obtuse
Thanksgiving Indian angle for ya.
This recipe also includes corn meal,
which thickens the pudding, while
adding more complexity to the flavor.
It also adds a pinch of indigenous
authenticity.
I use molasses here because I really
like the dark, intense flavor combined
with these ingredients. I opt for the extraintense blackstrap variety of molasses, but
if you’ve got a sensitive palate, you should
probably avoid blackstrap, and perhaps
skip the molasses altogether in favor of
sugar or brown sugar.
Final note: This dish is unquestionably
better after a night in the fridge.
Indian Pudding with Apples
This recipe comes from an old recipe
booklet called Apple Talk that was
published by the Northern Pacific
Railroad in the early 1900s, apparently
in an attempt to boost its apple shipping
business. My copy of Apple Talk was
found in an old homestead in Missoula,
Montana, beneath a dusty stack of
recipes. Apples, like squash, are in season.
When finished, the pudding will bear
a black hue on top, as if you burned it.
Don’t worry, it’s just the molasses.
Instructions
“Scald two quarts of sweet milk [also
known as whole milk]. Stir in one cup
of cornmeal until the mixture thickens.
Remove from the fire. Add one and onesixth cups of molasses, one teaspoonful of
salt, one-half teaspoonful each of nutmeg
and cinnamon and two cups of sweet
apples, pared, cored, and quartered. Pour
into a deep pudding dish and bake for
four hours. [I went with 275 degrees, and
it was perfect.] When the pudding has
baked for one and one-half hours, add
one pint of cold milk without stirring.
Serve with cream and sugar and syrup.”
I’ve played around with variations
like doubling the apples and corn meal,
which makes it sweeter and thicker. It’s a
forgiving recipe. Maybe not as decadent
as your average serving of tiramisu, but
it’s better for you, and closer to what may
have been served in the original feast, for
whatever that’s worth. Like the squash
pudding, this pudding is exponentially
better the next day, so plan ahead.
2pc Dark Dinner & 2 MeD Drinks.
with this coupon.
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m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m
Y
Apples and
squash
Ingredients
2 cups cooked squash
(preferably kabocha), or 1 cup each
of cooked squash and sweet potato
2 tablespoons granulated tapioca
(aka cracked tapioca)
2 tablespoons cornmeal
2 tablespoons molasses
1 can full fat coconut milk
3 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
Instructions
Combine ingredients in a food
processor or blender. Whizz until
smooth. Pour into a buttered baking pan.
Bake at 300 degrees until an inserted
knife comes out clean. Let cool to room
temperature. Refrigerate overnight.
It’s not an overly sweet dish, but the
sweetness of the squash/sweet potato and
coconut combine with the molasses for
an amazing pudding experience. Or pie, if
you’re crusty.
w/ purchase of one
YOUR
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43
FOOD NEWS By John Klyce Minervini
Something New, Something Bleu
Love Pop on South Main; Bleu’s new lounge.
November 20-26, 2014
44
Four of Love Pop Soda Shop’s 200+ varieties of soda
Co-owner Mignonne Wright says she dreamed up Love Pop back in 2005, when
she and her son, Brendan, were on a road trip through the American West. While
driving down Route 66, they happened on a place called Pop Soda Ranch, and
JUSTIN FOX BURKS
T
here isn’t any furniture at Love Pop Soda Shop. That’s right: no tables,
no chairs, no display cases. Instead, they’ve got 700 white plastic milk
crates. Milk crates to sit on, milk crates to rest your glass on. The bar is
actually a long row of — you guessed it — stacked milk crates, topped by
a smooth wood panel. You really have to see it to believe it.
You might think that such an arrangement would be the product of necessity, a lastminute fix for a shop that didn’t have the time or money to buy proper furniture. Far
from it. The design, by Memphis-based brg3s architects, is actually pretty nifty.
Think about it. Turn a milk crate on its side, stick an LED light behind it, and what
do you get? A stylish, semitranslucent display case. Like Legos, Milk crates are cheap
and infinitely rearrangeable.
More important, the design reflects the simplicity of Love Pop’s concept: Do one
thing. Do it well. As you may have guessed, Love Pop serves soda — more than 200
varieties and counting — but you won’t find any Mountain Dew around here. Instead,
they focus on small-batch bubbles, the kind of pop that is produced like craft beer.
A good example is Simpson Springs Sarsaparilla ($3) — a close cousin to root
beer. Whereas the ingredient labels on most corporate sodas read like a chemistry
textbook, this 100-year-old recipe, produced at a mom-and-pop shop in South
Easton, Massachusetts, includes just four ingredients — and one of them is
carbonated spring water.
And the taste? It’s like A&W Root Beer without the jet fuel (high-fructose corn
syrup, phosphoric acid, sodium benzoate, etc.). I am no shill for soda, but Simpson
Springs surprised me. It’s rich and smooth with undertones of vanilla and sassafras.
TAILGATING TIGERS LOVE JACK PIRTLE’S!
s o m e t h i n g n e w, s o m e t h i n g b l e u
Brendan says he thought he had died and gone to heaven.
“Back then I was an 8th-grader,” Brendan explains, “So the idea of over 600 different
kinds of soda — that sounded like the best thing in the world to me.”
Wright says she wants Love Pop to be an all-ages hangout, the kind of soda
bar that will be refreshingly new to millennials and comfortingly familiar to baby
boomers, nostalgic for the lunch counters of the 1950s and 60s. At the grand opening
on Saturday, they will give out free ice cream to make floats. How many kinds of ice
cream, you ask?
“Just one,” says co-owner Taylor Berger. “Vanilla. We figure you’ve got enough
choices with 200 kinds of soda, so you shouldn’t have to stress about ice cream.”
Love Pop Soda Shop, 506 S. Main
www.lovepopsodashop.com
Over at Bleu — the restaurant in the Westin — they’ve updated their lounge with new
paint and furniture. And there’s a brand-new tap system for beer. But the real news at
Bleu isn’t the lounge. It’s the revamped menu by chef Ana Gonzalez.
A ball of energy with a tight ponytail, Gonzalez comes to Memphis by way of
Colombia. After attending culinary school at Johnson and Wells, she went on to work
at Disney’s Contemporary Resort and the Peabody’s Capriccio Grill. In the three
months since she came on at Bleu, she has given the restaurant a bold new flavor,
emphasizing small plates that feature fresh, local ingredients.
Take the Bacon-Wrapped Shrimp with Polenta Cake ($8). A pair of tiny towers
draped with micro-greens from Memphis’ Green Girl Produce, it’s Gonzalez’s
mischievous take on shrimp and grits. (Grits and polenta are essentially the same
thing; the only difference is the type of corn used and the fineness of the grind.)
Drizzled with deliciously vinegary barbecue sauce, Gonzalez’s shrimp strikes
the right balance. At the top, there is the fresh taste of micro-greens like radish and
daikon sprouts. In the middle, the plump richness of shrimp and bacon. And at
bottom, the crisp crunch of fried polenta. The best part? It’s inexpensive, so you can
order a second round.
Bleu Restaurant, 221 S. Third (334-5950)
www.downtownbleu.com
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46
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film review By Chris McCoy
Let Your Geek Flag Fly
The Memphis Comic and Fantasy Convention celebrates
fantastic visions.
Johnson says making Geekland has introduced her to
a new community: “The Memphis Comic and Fantasy
Convention, along with a lot of other geeky people in
Memphis, have totally embraced me.”
The evening will close with a screening of Mike
McCarthy’s 2009 sci-fi film Cigarette Girl. Set in a
dystopian future Memphis where tobacco is contraband,
the Cigarette Girl, played by Cori Dials, must live by her
wits and a handy .45.
The film is the godfather of Memphis independent
cinema. “You combine Sexual Persona with Elvis Presley,
and you get a great deal of my work,” McCarthy says
of his art-house-meets-grind-house aesthetic. He calls
Dials his “Gothic Brigitte Bardot.” “If you don’t quite
have a million bucks, but you have somebody who looks
like a million bucks, then you have a million bucks,”
Memphis Comic and Fantasy Convention
November 21-23
Memphis Hilton, 939 Ridge Lake Blvd.
arts & entertainment
but Baker says he is looking forward to his hometown
premiere. “Memphis Comic and Fantasy Contention
is the con that we kind of cut our teeth on. We’ve been
going there since 2011,” he says.
Geekland, director Lara Johnson’s documentary, was
funded by the Rhodes College Institute for Regional
Studies. “I grew up in Nashville, so I saw there was
a conflict between traditional Southern culture and
conservatism and geek culture,” Johnson says. “I had
a friend in high school who is interviewed in the film
whose father was a Southern Baptist pastor. She wasn’t
allowed to read Harry Potter until she rebelled when
she was 16. So I was going to see what that looked like
in Memphis. But once I started getting into it, I found
that it didn’t really exist in Memphis. People here are
really cool about that kind of stuff, and there’s not really
any conflict that you find in a lot of other places in the
South. Memphis is unique in that way. So the film kind
of turned into a showcase of all of the different, cool,
geek things that are happening here.”
m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m
S
ince a few dozen proto-geeks gathered
for the first WorldCon in 1939, sci fi,
fantasy, and anime fan conventions
have grown into a huge phenomenon.
Dozens of regional and speciality cons
have sprung up all over the world, with 150,000 people
gathering for Comic Con in San Diego and Dragon Con
in Atlanta every year. Now in its 5th year, the Memphis
Comic and Fantasy Convention has not yet achieved that
level of success, but founder Joe Thordarson likes to think
big: “I still have big plans for this. We want to grow every
year.”
This weekend, the Hilton Memphis will play host
to a few thousand people of all ages browsing through
the wares of dozens of comics and collectables vendors,
meeting some of their heroes, playing games, and
generally letting their geek flags fly. “Even though the
convention is basically a three-day geek celebration,
when you walk through it, you can’t help but be struck
by all of the talented artists, writers, and filmmakers,”
Thordarson says.
“My goal from the beginning was to make it more
than just a once-a-year event,” he says. “I wanted to
make it a year-round thing and use the talented artists
and filmmakers we deal with as a way to promote art in
schools. Throughout the year, we host workshops and
filmmaking camps and animation camps and things
like that.”
One of the ongoing student projects is Live
Cartoon.“We take a character created by one of the
students, and then we write a script around it.” Students
collaborate to create storyboards for the script, which
are then projected behind voice actors who read the
script live to a con audience. This year, Live Cartoon
will be hosted by voice actor and host of That Anime
Show J Michael Tatum. “It’s a neat thing for the kids,”
Thordarson says. “It teaches them about what a real
production is, it teaches them about deadlines. It
hopefully gets them excited enough to go out and do
it themselves.” The same program will include a sneak
peek of Department of ReQuests, a pilot produced for
the Cartoon Network by animators Travis Fowler and
Krickett King, alums of both Memphis College of Art and
previous Live Cartoon projects.
A series of Memphis-rooted films will screen at the
con this year. Timid Monster will premiere their new
short film After Light, a Kickstarter-funded sciencefiction film that began life as a book trailer for Cameo
Renae’s zombie apocalypse novel ARV-3 before growing
into a fully realized short. “After Light takes a chapter
out of the ARV-3 book,” says director Dan Baker. “A
group of survivors who have weathered the apocalypse
underground are trying to navigate their way through
the city. They get lost and confused. Their map says
they’re in the right place, but there have been barricades
thrown up, which confuses them. So the young girl,
the hero of the story, volunteers to climb to the top of
a nearby building so she can get a bird’s eye view and
scout ahead. So she and the male lead embark on a trip
to the top of the building where they get ambushed by
these zombie creatures called ARVs.”
The project had its genesis at Nashville’s Utopia Con,
47
film review By Chris McCoy
Rockabilly Death Trip
Very Extremely Dangerous captures legendary Memphis music outlaw Jerry McGill.
When Robert Gordon was writing
his seminal 1995 book It Came From
Memphis, a name kept popping up
amid the wide cast of musicians and
freaks who populated the city’s music
scene. “I knew around here he was a
legend,” Gordon says. “A great talent
who kind of got on the wrong side of
the law, liked it, and stayed there.”
Jerry McGill had done one rocking
single on Sun Records in 1959, and
had reportedly been a crony of Elvis,
Johnny Cash, and Waylon Jennings
before disappearing in the 1970s. Years
later, when Gordon was working on
Stranded In Canton, a documentary
−
MOVIES
he edited together out
of the raw, chaotic
video footage of the
Memphis underground
shot by William
Eggleston around 1973,
he found some scenes
with someone who
was said to be McGill
brandishing a gun and
playing Russian roulette
with art provocateur
Randall Lyons.
Gordon had filed the story of the
missing rockabilly outlaw with the
rest of his extensive collection of
SINCE
1915
−
Ridgeway
Cinema
Grill
CAFE • IMPORTED BEER & WINE • LUXURY SEATING
November 20-26, 2014
The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 PG13
Rosewater R
Dumb and Dumber To PG13
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Birdman R
St. Vincent PG13
Gone Girl R
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Part 1 PG13
Dumb and Dumber To PG13
Beyond the Lights PG13
Interstellar PG13
Big Hero 6 (non 3-D) PG
3-D Big Hero 6 PG
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John Wick R
Ouija PG13
Addicted R
The Equalizer R
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Metropolitan Opera: Il Barbiere
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Memphis music history, never really
expecting to find out what happened
to him. “Then Jerry popped up on the
internet,” says Gordon.
It was 2010, and McGill, now
70 years old, had just gotten out of
prison, and Irish director Paul Duane
wanted to meet him. “Paul is a guy
who is drawn to characters, like I am,”
Gordon says.
Duane got a grant from the Irish
Film Board and flew to America to
shoot a documentary about the outlaw
that would become Very Extremely
Dangerous. “They trust him to turn a
really out-there idea into a good film.
I’m not sure they expected as outthere a film as this one,” Gordon says.
Three days before the cameras
rolled, McGill was diagnosed with
lung cancer. “He bared his soul. He
was staring into the face of death,”
Gordon says. “He said, ‘Ask me
anything’. So we got these great true
crime stories.”
Word spread McGill was back
in town, and a recording session
sprang up at Sam Phillips Studio with
Roland Janes and a host of Memphis
all stars, and a gig was scheduled for
the Hi-Tone. But Duane and Gordon,
tagging along with the cameras,
soon discovered they had gotten
more than they bargained for. What
they thought was going to be a story
of redemption turned out to be a
film vérité ride-along through the
Memphis netherworld with a genuine
hard drinking, hard drugging man
who always seemed one shot of rotgut
away from epic violence. “What none
of us could know when we started
this project was that we were catching
a 70-year-old outlaw on what he
thought was going to be his last great
tear,” Gordon says. “There were times
when we thought Jerry had a death
wish, and we were being careful to
not go with him when he finally took
himself out.”
With Duane flying back and forth
from Dublin to Memphis and Gordon
(Left) Memphis’ underground
musicians; (Above) Jerry McGill
acting as producer and often camera
man, Gordon says they captured a
once-in-a-lifetime story. “It was a
really interesting combination of me,
the local, and Paul, the outsider. It
took his distance to see this. In the
beginning, Jerry was charismatic, but
there are lots of charismatic people. It
took Paul’s vision from afar to see that
there was more going on here, and
we needed to persevere. This movie is
made out of our perseverance. That’s
what happens in a documentary. All
of the sudden, the movie is not about
what you thought it would be about.
So you have to enter the editing room
and find out what it’s about.”
One day, when the duo picked
up McGill to take him for a doctor’s
visit, McGill demonstrated for the
filmmakers how to prepare and inject
prescription opiates while the camera,
and the car, rolled. “When he shot
up in the back of the car, I couldn’t
believe it,” Gordon says. “Every time I
would go out with him, it would be a
new surprise, until I kind of thought I
had seen it all. That just goes to show
you how naive I was.”
Very Extremely Dangerous screened
at Indie Memphis in 2012 and will
soon be released on DVD by Fat
Possum Records along with the film’s
soundtrack, a retrospective of McGill’s
work with some Memphis legends,
including Jim Dickinson and Mud
Boy & the Neutrons. “Jerry’s album
is really great,” Gordon says. “To me,
it’s got some of the best Mud Boy and
& the Neutrons performances ever.
When I heard them, I was shocked
that something this good had never
made it out of the box. If the only
thing that this movie accomplishes is
to bring attention to the album, it was
all worth it.”
Very Extremely Dangerous
To be released on DVD November 25th
BMW Certified
Pre-Owned
bmwusa.com/cpo
1-800-334-4BMW
HAPPIER HOLIDAY
There’s no easier way to ensure a happier holiday than with a Certified Pre-Owned BMW. Each is thoroughly inspected,
comes with complimentary BMW Roadside Assistance, and an up to 6-year/100,000-mile warranty.2 Visit cpo.bmwusa.com
to learn more about exceptional offers from BMW Financial Services.
ROADSHOW BMW
405 N. Germantown Parkway, Cordova, TN 38018
901.365.2584 | roadshowbmw.com
10.9%
APR financing on all 2011 or 2012 BMW Certified Pre-Owned model years 6 and 7 Series and all 2011 BMW Certified Pre-Owned model year 3
Series. A one-payment $500 credit also available on model year 2011 Certified Pre-Owned BMW 328i xDrive models. BMW FS will reimburse up to $500
per monthly payment due, and customer will be billed for payment in excess of $500 per month. All credits offset purchase price. APR and credit offer
valid through 1/2/15. Rates available from participating BMW dealers to eligible, qualified customers with excellent credit history who meet BMW FS credit
requirements. Visit your authorized BMW dealer for important details. 2 For full information on the Certified Pre-Owned protection plan, visit cpo.bmwusa.com.
©2014 BMW of North America, LLC. The BMW name, model names and logo are registered trademarks.
arts & entertainment
0.9% APR ON MANY 2011 AND 2012 CERTIFIED PRE-OWNED MODELS.1
m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m
THE BEST GIFTS
DON’T COME IN PACKAGES.
49
help wanted • Real eState
901-575-9400
[email protected]
Adoption
ADOPTING
your newborn is our dream. Security,
family, endless love awaits. Robyn &
Jacob 800-992-9070. Exp. pd.
LegAL notices
IN SEARCH OF TITLE
1996 Ford Econo Van. VIN#
1FBJS31H1THA883. Contact within
10 days 901.351.1918
Business
opportunities
$1,000 WEEKLY!!
Mailing Brochures from home. Helping
home workers since 2001. Genuine
Opportunity. No experience required.
Start immediately. mailingmembers.
com (AAN CAN)
drivers/
trAnsportAtion
NOW HIRING CDL-A
Drivers in Memphis!
BE HOME DAILY!
MDS is looking for dry bulk drivers
to joinus in Memphis. Stable, steady
work, homedaily and you
will have a solid benefitspackage. In
order to be eligible drivers musthave
1-year experience required and a
good driving/work history. Don’t
pass upthis great opportunity to work
with arewarding company. Call a
recruitertoday to learn more! 866-5465157 or schillicorp.com
educAtion
AIRLINE CAREERS
start here - Get trained as FAA
certified Aviation Technician. Financial
aid for qualified students. Housing
and Job placement assistance. Call
Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800725-1563 (AAN CAN)
COMMERCIAL ROOFERS
NEEDED
Now hiring Commercial Roofers and
Laborers. Must have valid driver’s
license and experience. Holiday pay,
vacation pay and health benefits.
Submit application to 1300 Lincoln
Street, Memphis, TNCall 901-3464384 or fax resume to 901-346-4388.
CONCERT TICKET SALES
Room for advancement. Dental, Life,
Vision Insurance, Paid Holidays,
Vacations and Sick Days. Free tickets
to local events. Call (901) 324-4199
to set up interview.
LIT RESTAURANT
SUPPLY: Customer Service, Driver
& Stocker position available. Do
you have experience organizing
inventory in a freezer? Fantastic
Opportunity with Established
Memphis Company! If you are a
goal-driven person with strong
leadership skills, please email your
resume to: [email protected]
PHONE ACTRESSES
From home. Must have dedicated land
line and great voice. 21+. Up to $18
per hour. Flex HRS./ most Wknds.
1-800-403-7772 Lipservice.net (AAN
CAN)
HeLp WAnted
GIBSON BRANDS, INC.
(f/k/a - Gibson Guitars Corp.)CNC
Operator and Tour GuideGibson seeks
a full-time, split shift CNC Operator.
Incumbent will be responsible for
set up and operation of mill CNC
machines for guitars. Must have G
and M Code knowledge. Must be able
to determine product specifications
from blueprints and drawings. Must
be able to work independently.
At least 2-3 years of experience
required in production.Gibson also
seeks a full-time Tour Guide for its
Memphis location with 2-3 years
retail experience. Knowledge of
guitar and music preferred. Must
have demonstrated presentation and
interpersonal communication skills
with public speaking experience.
Laurie Stark
• 28 Years of Experience
• Life Member of the Multi
Million Dollar Club
• From Downtown to
Germantown
• Call me for your Real
Estate Needs
Candidates must have a stable work
history. Position includes competitive
benefits package. Send resume and
salary history to [email protected]
gibson.com. Gibson Brands, Inc. is an
Equal Opportunity Employer
LICENSED BARBERS
NEEDED
At Next N Line Barber Shop located
at 4945 American Way, Suite #6,
Memphis, TN 38118. Affordable booth
rent. To apply please call Justin Bell
at 901.650.0418 or Gloria Bell at
901.643.8944
Instagram: next_n_line901
SAM’S TOWN HOTEL
& Gambling Hall in Tunica, MS is
looking for the next Direct Marketing
Pro, is it you? We need someone who
has excellent organizational skills,
knows Direct Mail and Database
Marketing, previous Casino Marketing
experience preferred. Must have
strong written and oral
communicationskills and the ability to
meet deadlines in the fast paced
casino environment, proficient in
Microsoft Office, CMS and LMS. Must
be able to obtain and maintain a MS
Gaming Commission Work Permit,
pass a prescreening including but not
limited to background and drug
screen.To apply, log on to
boydcareers.com and follow the
prompts to Tunica. Boyd Gaming Corp
is a drug free workplace and equal
opportunity employer. Must be at least
21 to apply.
U.S. CENSUS BUREAU
Is hiring Field Representatives
in Memphis, TN in the following
counties: Fayette, Shelby,
and Tipton for the American
Housing Survey! Pay is $12.07
to $18.78 per hour. Please
call (800) 563.6499 for more
information and to be scheduled
for testing. The Census Bureau is
an Equal Opportunity Employer
and provides reasonable
accommodations to applicants
with disabilities.
generAL
AFRICA, BRAZIL
Work/Study! Change the lives of
others while creating a sustainable
future. 6, 9, 18 month programs
available. Apply today! oneworldcenter.
org. 269-591-0518 (AAN CAN)
HospitALity /
restAurAnt
MOLLY’S LA CASITA
2006 Madison. Immediate need for
line cook & prep cook. 2-3 yrs exp.
FT. Flexible schedule. Refs. Solid work
history. Must pass background check.
Ready to become part of great Molly’s
staff in Overton Square.
Applications available 2pm-5pm.
professionAL/
MAnAgeMent
U.S. CENSUS BUREAU
Is in search of Field Leader/ Field
Supervisors and Field Representatives
in Memphis, TN in the following
counties: Fayette, Shelby, and Tipton
for the American Housing Survey.
Field Leader/Field Supervisor pay
is $15.15 to $24.40 per hour and
Field Representatives pay is $12.07
to $18.78 per hour. Please call (866)
563-6499 for more information and
how to apply. The Census Bureau is
an Equal Opportunity Employer and
provides reasonable accommodations
to applicants with disabilities.
Now HiriNg
CDL-A Drivers
iN MeMpHis!
BE HOME DAILY! MDS IS LOOkIng
fOr DrY BuLk DrIvErS tO jOIn
uS In MEMpHIS.
• Stable, steady work, home daily and you will
have a solid benefits package.
• In order to be eligible drivers must have
1-year experience required and a good
driving /work history.
Don’t pass up this great opportunity to work with
a rewarding company. Call a recruiter today to
learn more! 866-546-5157 or www.schillicorp.com
5384 Poplar Ave., Suite 250, Memphis, TN 38119
(901)761-1622 • Cell (901)486-1464
Distribution Warehouse
Positions
Digital Content Manager
Distribution Warehouse Order Selector
This position works closely with editorial and digital staff on the planning and
execution of digital content across four local consumer websites; including but not
limited to content optimization and timing, copy editing, reader/user management,
slideshow/image management, and enforcing editorial standards. Additionally, this
is looking for highly motivated
position entails creating engaging digital content for company event and marketing
looking
people experienced is
with
fast-paced production
needs, editing email newsletters, and participation in social media initiatives.
for highly motivated
people
environments
for Warehouse
Order Selector
experienced
in
fast-paced
production
Positions.
You should be: a good editor and familiar with Google Analytics. You
environments for
Responsible
selecting,
stacking
and wrapping
should be ready to work in custom content management systems, have a
Warehouse for
Order
Selector
Positions.
largeisquantities
storemotivated
products in an accurate,
fast knowledge of InDesign, possess basic photo editing skills, and have a
working
KROGER
looking forofhighly
paced
productive
and safe
manner.
stand
people experienced
with fast-paced
production
Responsible
for selecting,
stacking Ability tosophisticated
understanding of social media platforms and strategy. You should
for for
12+hours.
AbilityOrder
to consistently
lift. Candidates
environments
Warehouse
Selector
and wrapping
of center.
be comfortable with both giving and taking direction, and also managing a daily
must be able to work aPositions.
flexible schedule
within alarge
24/7quantities
distribution
store products in an accurate, fast paced productive and safe manner.
workflow that crosses several departments.
Ability
to consistently
lift. Candidates
must
be able to
work
flexible
Responsible
for requirements
selecting,
stacking
wrapping
Candidates
that meet
the following
areaand
preferred.
large quantities
of store products in an accurate, fast
• 1 orwithin
moreayear(s)
of continuous
employment
schedule
24/7 distribution
center.
A journalism background is essential to this full-time position and familiarity with
paced headset
productive and safe manner. Ability to stand
• Experience with talk-man
Memphis is a plus. You should be a self-starter that requires minimal supervision.
for 12+hours.
Ability to consistently lift. Candidates
• Experience
with
pallet-jack
Candidates
that meet
theelectric
following
requirements
are preferred.
must
be able
to work
a flexible
schedule
within
a 24/7 distribution
center.
After a brief training period, it is expected that you will be able to hit the ground
•
Previous
fast-paced
production
environment
• 1 or more year(s) of continuous employment
running.
Candidates
that meet
following
requirements are preferred.
• Experience
with the
talk-man
headset
KROGER
Kroger
November 20-26, 2014
Distribution Warehouse Order Selector
• 1 or
more
year(s)
of continuous
employment
We
offer
Excellent
Benefits with a Competitive
• Experience
with
electric
pallet-jack
• Experience with talk-man headset
•
Previous
fast-paced
production
environment
Plus
Production
Incentive!
• Experience with electric pallet-jack
• Previous fast-paced production environment
Please apply on line at www.kroger.com
We
50
Salary
Required skills: HTML, comfort with various CMS, SEO, Google Docs, Google
Analytics, basic photo editing, digital best practices, editing standards.
At the bottom of the page, click on Careers. Next, select Distribution Center Jobs. Then, select
Casual workplace
offer Excellent
BenefitsCenter,
with
a Bledsoe
Competitive
Salary
Kroger Distribution
5079
Road, Memphis,
TN 38141.
Plus Production Incentive!
Please apply on line at www.kroger.com
At the bottom of the page, click on Careers. Next, select Distribution Center Jobs. Then, select
Kroger Distribution Center, 5079 Bledsoe Road, Memphis, TN 38141.
that offers a competitive salary, excellent benefits, and lots of
additional perks. EOE.
Send your resume to [email protected], with
the subject line: Digital Content Manager. No phone calls, please.
help wanted • Real eState
Tn Must have own tools, reliable
Transportation, and pass drug and
backgroundCk. Call Wade @ 800341-9963
doWntoWn Apts
IMMEDIATE OPENINGS
for CDL Drivers, Tank Washers &
Diesel Mechanics in Memphis ,
3 MINS FROM D’TOWN
Furnished kichenette, $395/mo.
Someutils.,greatforseniorcitizen.
No drugs, No alcohol. Quiet persons
only. 596.3985
3 MINS FROM D’TOWN
2BR/2BA, some utils, unfurnished.
Nodrugs,noalcohol.$525/mo.Quiet
persons only. 596.3985
MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN
Come visit the brand new Cleaborn
PointeatHeritageLanding.Located
justminutesfromhistoricDowntown
Memphis. 2BR Apts & Townhomes
$625. 3BR Apts &Townhomes $725.
Community Room, Computer
Room, Fitness Room. A smoke
free community. 440 South
LauderdaleMemphis, TN 38126 |
901-254-7670.
Downtown Loft/
ConDo
THE WASHBURN
Ideal Location. Stunning Spaces. One
of a Kind. 60 S. Main St.Memphis TN.
901.527.0244thewashburn.com
East MEMphis
hoMEs for rEnt
U OF M AREA
3794 Kearney, 2BR/1BA, hdwd flrs,
CH/A, DW, W/D hookups, fncd yd.
$750/mo +$400/dep. 328-8294
E. Mphs – Sea Isle
1483 Vera Cruz – remodeled
3BR/1.5BA, den w/gas
fireplace, C/H&A,garage $1095
Parkway Village
3125 Arrendale – 3BR/2BA,
C/H&A, $645
5248 Bucksport – 3BR/2BA,
C/H&A $725
U of M Area
3480 Hadley – 3BR/1BA,
C/H&A $550
3760 Park – brick 2BR/1BA,
C/H&A $585
3823 Maid Marion – remodeled
3BR/2BA, C/H&A, $765
DUPLEX
Hickory Hill
3719 Firethorne -3BR/2BA,
C/H&A $675
Midtown
497 Dickinson – 2Br/1.5BA,
appl, C/H&A $875
U of M
756 Houston Cv. – 2BR/1BA,
C/Heat, carpet $525/mo
3589 Clayphil – 2BR/1BA,
C/H&A $565
150 N.MCLEAN @ POPLAR
2BR/1BA condo, new hdwd, carpet
& paint, CH/A, W/D, $650/mo.
412-1021
AUDUBON DOWNS APTS
ï 2BR Special $575ï Beautiful
Groundsï 1 & 2 Bedroom
Aptsï Hardwood Floorsï 24
Hour Laundryï Pool & Picnic
Area1-866-690-1037 or
901-458-3566Hablamos Espanol
1-888-337-65212639 Central
Ave.Makowsky Ringel Greenburg,
LLCEHO | mrgmemphis.com
MIDTOWN HOME
Elegant Central Gardens 2BR/2.5ba,
LR, DR, study, hdwd flrs dn, all
appls, CH/A, spacious closets,
alarm sys, fenced back yard, 2 car
carportbasement, $1500/mo+dep.
Call 299-1029 or 260-7257.
EVERGREEN HIST. DIST.
1BR Apt or 1BR Duplex $475$595, W/D, remodeled, hardwood
floors, pets ok. Great neighbors.
$25 cc fee. 452-3945
GALLOWAY GARDENS APTS
Clean, safe and updated midtown
living.Conveniently located within 2
miles of the zoo, medical district,
Rhodes college, college of art and
college of optometry-spacious closetscovered parking-safe neighborhood-pet
friendly with green space -beautifully
landscaped property-security cameras.
Starting at $700. Ask about our $299
move in special.
Call 901-272-0404 for more details
people experienced with fast-paced production
MADISON/OVERTON
SQ
environments for Warehouse Order
Selector
Positions.
Move In Special! 1BR, hdwd flrs,
sm.
fncd yd, all appls, W/D, DW, sm. pet
Kroger
MIDTOWN HOME
For Rent: 2BR/1BA, hardwood floors,
all appliances, W/D, sun porch, $825/
mo. 725-7769
sHAred Housing
ALL AREAS
ROOMMATES.COM Browse hundreds
of online listing with photos and maps.
Find your roommate with a click of
the mouse! Visit: Roommates.com
(AAN CAN)
FURNISHED ROOMS
For rent In Midtown Area: Furnished
rooms ideal for student or retirees.
Includes living/dining room. Off street
parking. Close to stores, restaurants &
bus. 356.9794
NICE ROOMS FOR RENT
S. Pkwy & Wilson. Utilities and Cable
included. Fridge in your room. Cooking
and free laundry privileges. Some
locations w/sec. sys. Starting at
$435/mo. + dep. 901.922.9089
ROOM FOR RENT
Midtown: Large, private, furnished,
microwave, WiFi, fridge, a/c, nice
area & bus lines. $120/wk + dep.
725-3892.
ROOMS FOR RENT
$110/wk, cable, utls & W/D included.
I 40/ Whitten Rd. location. Owner/
Agent 901.461.4758
services
FASHION REWIND
Online Consignment & Resale.stores.
ebay.com/fashionrewind
Responsible for selecting, stacking and
ok.wrapping
CC $425/mo. 340-7005
large quantities of store products in an accurate, fast
MIDTOWN
paced productive and safe manner. Ability
to stand APTS FOR RENT
for 12+hours. Ability to consistently lift.
Candidates
Large
1 Br. Midtown Apt.. Off Overton
must be able to work a flexible schedule within a 24/7 distribution center.
Square. Water incl. on-site mgr. $495.
is looking for highly motivated people for Driver
that
meet thework
following
are preferred.
Positions. These positionsCandidates
offer local
regional
andrequirements
do not require
• 1 or more year(s) of continuous employment
overnight stays. We offer competitive
paytalk-man
and a comprehensive
benefits
• Experience with
headset
Experience
with&
electric
pallet-jack as well as
package, including health, •dental,
vision
life insurance,
• Previous fast-paced production environment
outstanding pension & 401k programs.
Huge 3Br. 2 Bth. Apt. Midtown area.
1 mile from Overton Park. Water/gas
incl, gated, hardwood floors, CH/A,
onsite laundry $695. 2Br. Apt. $525.
Call 901-458-6648
ROSECREST APARTMENTS
YourSalary
apartment home is waiting.
We offer Excellent Benefits with a Competitive
Qualified Drivers:
Come live the difference. 1BRs
Plus Production Incentive!
starting at $650/mo.- Controlled
• Be over 21 years of age
access building- Beautiful Historic
Please apply on line at www.kroger.com
• Have a Class A CDL and 3Atyears
of verifiable driving experience
Midtown
location- Community lounge
the bottom of the page, click on Careers. Next, select Distribution Center Jobs.
Then, select
& business center- Inviting swimming
Kroger Distribution Center, 5079 Bledsoe Road, Memphis, TN 38141.
• Be able to work any shift
pool- 24 hour fitness center & laundry
• Have a clean MVR and be able to pass background check, drug
facility- Balconies- Fully equipped
kitchens- Huge closets- Recycling
screen, and physical requirements
center. Call 888.589.1982 M-F
10:30am -6:00 pm. Saturday by
appointment only. 45 S. Idlewild,
Memphis, TN 38104
If you meet the above requirements, please apply online at
rosecrestapts.com
www.kroger.com. At the bottom left hand side of the page, click on
jobs/careers. Next, select distribution then choose the Kroger Distribution Center
THE PINNACLE APTS
In Midtown Now Leasing
on 5079 Bledsoe in Memphis. You can then begin the application process,
Renovated 1 & 2 Bedrooms
selecting driver when it aks for the position for which you are applying.
Apartment Homes! The Pinnacle
Offers 18 Stories Of Breathtaking
Views! Located at 305 S. Bellevue
Blvd, Memphis. 901.726.1575.
See
More At: thepinnaclemidtown.com
3707 Macon Rd. • 272.9028 • lecorealty.com
Visit us online, call, or office for free list.
HOUSES
Downtown – Near Fed Ex
Forum
523 Pontotoc – 3BR/2BA,
C/H&A, HW & carpet $595
MidtoWn Apt
EDISON PLACE APARTMENTS
1, 2, & 3 bedroom apartment
homes w/controlled access &
covered parking. 1BR $545-$585.
2BR $605-$655. 3BR $725$755. Convenient to Midtown &
Downtown. Walking distance to
Med Center. Call 901.523.8112
for more info.
Distribution Warehouse Order Selector
Gibson seeks a full-time, split shift CNC Operator.
Incumbent will be responsible for set up and
operation of mill CNC machines for guitars. Must
have G and M Code knowledge. Must be able to
determine product specifications from blueprints and
drawings. Must be able to work independently. At
least 2-3 years of experience required in production.
Gibson Brands, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity
Employer
LECO REALTY, INC.
FOR RENT - FREE LIST Houses,
Duplexes & Apartments. Please visit
us on the web @ lecorealty.com or call
901-272-9028
MidtoWn HoMes
for rent
Truck Drivers
CNC Operator and Tour Guide
Candidates must have a stable work history.
Position includes competitive benefits package.
Send resume and salary history to
[email protected]
GEnEraL hoMEs
for rEnt
CENTRAL GARDENS
2BR/1BA, hdwd floors, ceiling fans,
french doors, all appls incl. W/D, 9ft
ceil, crown molding, off str pking.
$720/mo. Also 1BR, $610/mo. 8336483.
KIMBROUGH TOWERS
Unique Community Features
Include:- Historic Central
Gardens District- Controlled
access building- Garage parking
available- Parquet wood flooring- 9
foot ceilings- 24 hour fitness and
laundry centers- Private park
with picnic and grilling- Central
heat and airReserve your place
today at the historic Kimbrough
Towers. Call 888.446.4954,
office hours 9:00am -6:00pm,
M-F. 172 Kimbrough Place at
Union Ave. Memphis, TN 38104.
kimbroughtowers.com
KROGER is looking for highly motivated
Gibson Brands, Inc.
(f/k/a – Gibson Guitars Corp.)
Gibson also seeks a full-time Tour Guide for its
Memphis location with 2-3 years retail experience.
Knowledge of guitar and music preferred. Must
have demonstrated presentation and interpersonal
communication skills with public speaking experience.
WHITESTATION
Close to Park. 3BR/1BA, CH/A,
fenced back yard. $800/mo.
901.417.9588
APARTMENTS
Midtown -Mayflower Apts @
35 N. Mclean
Spacious 1BR, appl, radiatior
heat, window air, HW floors,
$625 + RUBS
Winchester/Mendenhall
@ Cambridge Station Condos
- 2BR/1BA, stove, C/H&A $525
Sonia Veach
c/o Leco Realty, Inc
3707 Macon Rd.
Memphis, TN 38122
901.272.9028
Many others to choose from!
lecorealty.com
Part-time
stylist
needed to work in salon.
SERVPRO OF MIDTOWN
“Under New Management!” SERVPRO
of Midtown Memphis is now
owned and operated by a Midtown
Memphian! Call Jay Sheffield for
emergency flood and fire restorationyour satisfaction is our company’s
mission!SERVPRO of Midtown
Memphis2766 Broad Avenue,
Memphis, TN 38112Tel: (901) 4544975Fax: (901) 454-4999 “Like It
Never Even Happened”
TAXES
Personal/Business + Legal work by a
CPA-Attorney. Bruce Newman (901)
272-9471. newmandecoster.com
TREAT THE CONDITION
Transform your life! Are you dependent
or addicted to painkillers, opiates,
methadone or heroin? SUBOXONE:
Introduction, maintenance, medical
withdrawal & counseling. Opiate
dependence exists in all walks of
life. Private, confidential, in-office
treatment. Staffed by a suboxone
certified physician. Call (901) 7618100 for more information.
Must be licensed and have insurance.
Please apply at
460 S. Lauderdale • Memphis, TN 38126
No calls please.
NOW LEASING
Renovated 1 & 2 Bedroom
apartment homes!
R E S TAU R A N T S U P P LY
CUSTomER SERviCE,
DRivERS & SToCkERS
PoSiTioNS AvAiLAbLE
NOW LEASING Renovated 1 & 2 Bedroom apartment homes!
The Pinnacle offers 18 Stories
of Breathtaking Views!
The Pinnacle offers 18 Stories of Breathtaking Views!
305 South Bellevue Blvd • Memphis
(901) 726-1575 • See more at:
http://www.thepinnaclemidtown.com
305 South Bellevue Blvd, Memphis, TN 38104 (901) 726-1575
See more at: http://www.thepinnaclemidtown.com
if you have a strong work ethic and a good attitude,
we would like to hear from you.
Apply in person at 309 Union Ave or
send email to [email protected]
REAL ESTATE memphisflyer.com
trucking
901-575-9400
[email protected]
51
Real eState • SeRviceS • auto
901-575-9400
[email protected]
Buy, seLL, trAde
COMMUTER BIKE:
Scott Sub 30 27 speed bicycle. 1 year
old. Good as new. $470, 461.5065
MOBILE HOME
16’ x 80’ . Good shape except needs
carpet, kitchen floor vinyl. $6500.
901-598-2149
MAssAge
$39 1HR SWEDISH
MASSAGE
Xu Wellness Center. Call 737-8282
[email protected] 235
Germantown Bend Cove, Cordova,
38018.
TOM PITMAN, LMT
Massage The Way You Like It.
Swedish/Deep Tissue - Relaxation,
Hot Stones. Credit Cards. Call 7617977. tompitmanmassage.com,
[email protected]
TONYA FOGG LMT
901-406-3891. Book online at
tonyafogglmt.com 1010 June Rd. Ste.
103. By appointment only.
WILLIAM BREWER
Massage Therapist (Health & Wellness
offer) 377-6864
IF YOU USED THE BLOOD
THINNER XARELTO and suffered
internal bleeding, hemorrhaging,
required hospitalization or a loved
one died while taking Xarelto between
2011 and the present time, you may
be entitled to compensation. Call
Attorney Charles H. Johnson 1-800535-5727
STRUGGLING
with Drugs or Alcohol? Addicted to
Pills? Talk to someone who cares.
Call The Addiction Hope & Help Line
for a free assessment. 800-978-6674
(AAN CAN)
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puzzle page
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Tel: (901) 454-4975 Fax: (901) 454-4999
ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE
R
U
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A
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30 Correct, as a
manuscript
31 Comic Cenac
formerly of “The
Daily Show”
32 Half of a vote
33 Red as ___
34 “Sure, go ahead”
35 White’s
counterpart
36 Great work
37 At nine and a
half months, say
1
27
49 Didn’t stay put
50 Deep black
51 Israel’s Barak
52 “An old silent
pond / A frog
jumps into the
pond / Splash!
Silence again,”
e.g.
6
7
8
9
14
29
24
30
31
21
39
40
42
43
49
25
26
32
35
36
37
38
SUMMER CAMPS
WEDDINGS
Treat the condition- Transform your life!
life.
Suboxone
Introduction, maintenance,
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SPORTING EVENTS
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53
12
22
34
45
11
18
20
28
10
SHUTTLING
15
17
33
61
47 Lab item
48 Alternative to
a fade-out in a
movie ending
5
23
40 Places where
wheat is stored?
46 Some preppy
shirts
4
19
48
42 Swirl
43 Meaningful sets,
for short?
44 New U.N.
member of 2011
45 Resolution unit
3
16
38 Architect Louis
39 English county
closest to
Continental
Europe
41 Org. with an
antipiracy stance
2
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PUZZLE BY JOEL FAGLIANO
53 Hold up
54 Seven-time Rose
Bowl winner, for
short
58 Leader of a
race?
65 Recovers from
injury
59 It’s a snap
66 Diving position
60 Store sign
67 Be a fall guy?
55 Offerer of
61 Skirt
package deals, in
brief
62 T.S.A.
requirements
56 Buffalo hunters,
once
63 Be unsuited?
57 Firebug
64 Currency of Laos
memphisflyer.com
16 Subject of
National
Federation of
Independent
Business v.
Sebelius
17 Quaint wear
18 Parkinson’s
disease drug
19 Engage in an
extreme winter
sport
20 La starter
21 First name
in children’s
literature
22 Mil. mess
personnel
23 Sixer rival
24 Sing like a bird
25 Feature of
Polyphemus from
“The Odyssey”
26 Word origin
27 Dessert often
made with
cream cheese
frosting
28 Not up
29 Tear apart
C O R P O R AT E E V E N T S
68 Ben & Jerry’s
alternative
69 2014 N.B.A.
champ
70 What a prophet
may look for
Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday
crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS.
AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit
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PUZZLE PAGE
Crossword
CLUES
1 Corn or cotton
2 Rhyme scheme
for “Stopping
by Woods on a
Snowy Evening”
3 Have the lead
4 Blood: Prefix
5 Western wear
6 Letters that don’t
go to the post
office
7 Canada or Jordan
preceder
8 Bygone brand in
the shaving aisle
9 Where the
Pilgrims first
landed in the
New World
10 Came to
11 Animated
12 Record over, say
13 Put on a scale
14 Many a fête
d’anniversaire
attendee
15 Homer Simpson’s
workplace
Edited by Will Shortz
53
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[email protected]
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th e rant By Tim Sampson
Well, I’m not quite sure where to even start. If you haven’t
seen the viral “I don’t like mens no more” video, just drop whatever
you are doing right this second and go to YouTube. Really. Hurry and do it now. It was
the rant
though I’ll try.
A young man gets “delivered” from being gay and, with a grand dose of pomp and circumstance, shouts
to the churchgoers, “I’m not gay no more!” “I don’t like mens no more!” “I like women, women, women,
women!” “I will not date a man!” “I will not carry a purse!” “I will not wear makeup!” “I will like a women!”
And then he does some incredible dance moves on his own... right before he begins dancing with several
men. Or mens. And then the minister gives him 100 bucks (one can only assume for turning straight right
there on the spot).
Then he shouts that there are probably about 50 other people in the crowd who need to be delivered,
and he invites them all to come on down to where the action is taking place. Suddenly a stampede of men
pushes forward, and they all start dancing, and it looks like a giant gay bar. This is real, people.
At least I think it must be real. It does look like a spoof at first, but I just don’t think anyone could have
scripted this — unless the young man really thought this through and practiced it. Scary. I read somewhere
that he has now turned his famous “deliverance” into a ring tone on iTunes, so maybe he’s laughing all the
way to the bank with more than just the hundred bucks the preacher gave him.
At first, I kind of felt sorry for him, knowing that millions of people would see the video and laugh at
him. And I was thinking he would probably look back one day and realize that he didn’t really turn straight
and might never live this down, but I think he might really believe it. He did a radio interview and talked
about how it was God’s will that the video is “in homes” and that because of his good looks he has dated
Screenshot from the viral YouTube video
“ministers and celebrities,” but he isn’t going to do that anymore.
As it turns out, the minister in the video is from Memphis. I’m not sure where the young man is from. A
lot of people accused him of simply trying to get his 15 minutes of fame and staging his deliverance, but he has spoken out, saying that it was not scripted and that he is
really a changed man.
He also said he’d been bullied for much of his life. No one should have to go through that. And the church’s public relations department issued a statement citing the
many other good things that happened during the convention, including helping children learn to read, providing food and clothing to people in need, cleaning up
blighted areas of St. Louis, and that “224 Christians were filled with the Holy Spirit.” Exactly 224.
So no, I’m not poking fun at COGIC. I have friends who are members of that church. And I love their liturgical dancers. But I have my doubts that the young man
suddenly turned straight — which is almost as fascinating as the fact that at 21, he has published 14 books. Those I really want to read. Right after I buy the young
man’s ring tone. And wish him the best of luck because I have a feeling he might need it.
On a completely unrelated note... Are automobile manufacturers really going to install Facebook and other forms of social media on car dashboards? I just saw a
news segment about this new form of “infotainment,” and it worries
me. A guy just said people are going to be able to post “LOL” on cat
videos while driving 60 miles an hour. Forget that all we need are
more distractions while we’re driving. The real question is, why have
we reached the point where we can’t go to the store without being
on Facebook?
Right now I’m in the process of learning the detailed ins and
outs of social media for work, and it’s frightening. I accidentally did
something to my phone, and now I get Facebook comments via text
on my phone. I also just realized I have something like 452 friend
requests on my rather dormant personal Facebook page, and these
people probably think I’m ignoring them. Granted, I’ve never met or
heard of most of them, but I still don’t want to offend anyone. Oh, and the messages. There are dozens and dozens of them
dating back years, and I had no idea they were in what I assume is
my newsfeed. I didn’t even know I had a newsfeed. And I had no
idea that so many people I know now communicate almost solely
on Facebook. So, Sally, I’m sorry I didn’t return your message from
2011 until the other day! I’ll get the hang of all this soon, even
though I’m told you can do only so much, because it’s all based on
algorithms and people’s personal social media behavior.
I’m scared to death that I am going to do something so
monumentally wrong that I might either shut down the entire
Facebook site or alienate everyone I know. And does this mean that
I’m going to have to be able to answer everyone while I’m driving,
because if that’s so, I’m not gonna like Facebooks no more! I will
not send Facebook messages to ministers and celebrities no more!
I’m gonna Facebook message “a women”! So now I want my 100
bucks and a dance party. I’ll post something about it later once my
algorithm kicks in.
m e m p h i s f l y e r. c o m
filmed recently at the Church of God in Christ (COGIC) Holy Convocation in St. Louis, and it defies description,
55
NEW DAISY THEATRE
330 Beale St. • 525-8981
newdaisy.com
11/19: White Chapel, Glass Cloud
11/21: Nocando
11/22: THIS IS MEMPHIS Music Festival
11/28: THE HIDDEN JEWELS OF JAZZ Silent Auction &
Music Event
12/6: Circa Survive, Title Fight
12/19: SLEEPING SEASONS
12/20: SOUTHERN CREED REUNION
Tickets on Sale at ticketweb.com. Local Bands
Needed, Call (901) 525-8981. The Best Place to
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MURPHY’S
Pool Table • Darts • WI-FI • Digital Jukebox
11/19: Liquid Teens, Unwed Teenage Mothers
11/21: One O’Clock Jump 7-9pm, Rockabilly Trio,
The By Gods
11/22: Over Night Lows, Days N Dazed
11/24: Strengths, The Weights, Kitchen Dwellers
KITCHEN OPEN LATE, OPEN FOR LUNCH!
1589 Madison • 726-4193
murphysmemphis.com
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11/22: Backup Planet
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12/6: UFC 181 Hendricks v. Lawler II
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12/27: Devil Train
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11/19- Wizard Rifle w/ Strengths, 11/20- Hundred
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To The Dogs Festival”, 11/26- Purling Hiss, 11/27Thanksgiving w/ La Pistola & Liquid Teens, 11/28Memphis Dawls, 11/29- Be Kind Memphis, A Charity
Concert for Operation Tucci w/ Dirty Streets, Chinese
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BUCCANEER LOUNGE since 1967
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11/19: Nuevo Ambiente
11/20: Toy Trucks, Time
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11/24: Devil Train
11/25: Dave Cousar
DACH ORIENTAL IMPORTS
Self Defense Supply
Martial Arts Supply
dach.us
4491 Summer
901.685.3224
Tues – Sat 11:00 – 6:00
MEMPHIS ARTS COLLECTIVE
HOLIDAY ARTIST MARKET
Nov. 28-Dec. 24, 1501 Union Ave.
(near Kimbrough Towers).
Opening night silent auction (6-9 pm) to benefit
CASA, music by The Adam Brooks Band.
Store Hours: Mon-Sat 10:30-6:60; Fri til 7:30,
Sun 12-5 with live craft demos at 1:30.901338-4943, memphisartscollective.com
SELL YOUR HOUSE, TODAY! CASH! 273.7007
GONER RECORDS
New/ Used LPs, 45s & CDs. We Buy Records!
2152 Young Ave 901-722-0095
I BUY RECORDS!
901-359-3102
MINGLEWOOD HALL
1555 Madison Ave. * 901-312-6058
ON SALE FRIDAY: V3Fights, Black Jacket
Symphony
11/20: Wild Fire Wrestling – Brawl in the Fall
11/22: Randy Rogers Band w/ Brandon Lay
11/28: North Mississippi Allstars
12/3: St. Paul & the Broken Bones
12/8: Halestorm w/ New Medicine & The Dead
Deads
12/11: Eli Young Band w/ Erik Dylan
12/19: Lucero w/ Mighty Souls Brass Band
12/20: Bobby Rush
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11/20: The Black Lillies w/ Guthrie Brown & Dan
Tedesco
11/21: Kickman Teddy CD Release w/ Mike Sweep
12/2: Aaron Carter w/ Dyllan Murray
12/26: Zoogma w/ Agori Tribe
MORE EVENTS LISTED AT
MINGLEWOODHALL.COM
ROCKHOUSE LIVE MIDTOWN
2586 Poplar - Formerly The
Poplar Lounge
Happy Hour 11a-7p Daily
Lunch • Dinner • Late night
CALL for Lunch Delivery 901.324.6300
Thu & Sun - College Night, $2 drafts, $7 pitchers
11/21 - Grasping Thin Air
11/22 - Strange Wave Connection
11/23: Chris Johnson
11/29: Delta Crush
12/5: Freeworld
Tickets: rockhouselive.com
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HEALTHY SMILES
BEGINS WITH GOOD DENTAL
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Our Dental Hygienist can enhance your smile
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Make your Appointment Now - Near Downtown 901791-4920 with our Dental Hygienist - Dr. Brown’s
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Two locations - “Let Us Be Your Dentist. We
Care”. Accepts Credit/Debit and Most Dental
Insurance plus Our Own SPT Dental Plan.
Tarot Readings $35, Runes $25 443-5692
RENTAL SPACE
250 sq. ft. of East Memphis rental space starting
at $35 p/hr. Can be used as a Photography Studio,
meetings, etc... and 4 more information please
contact Just4u Digital Imaging at 901-205-9515.
TREES FOR SALE: $5 Each. 901.396.0451
TUT-UNCOMMON ANTIQUES
421 N. Watkins St. 278-8965
1500 sq. ft. of Vintage & Antique Jewelry. Retro
Furniture and Accessories. Original Paintings,
Sculpture, Pottery, Art & Antiques. We are the
only store in the Mid-South that replaces stones in
costume jewelry.
FITNESS KICKBOXING
BURN BETWEEN 800 – 1000 CALORIES PER
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No experience necessary….Beginners welcome
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Ditch the typical gym routine. Get in shape fast
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Itching to go Shopping?
Hop on in to Cleveland Street
Flea Market
438 N Cleveland | 901-276-3333
Fri 10-6, Sat 9-6, Sun 12-6
GOD’S CREATION
LEARNING CENTER
A loving in-home daycare center is now hiring
Caregivers & Teachers, full-time for 2nd shift. Open
6am-12midnight. Located in the Cordova area in a
friendly neighborhood just off Germantown Pkwy.
Fax resume to 901.752.1297
WaterBed Supplies & Sheets
Call (901) 496-0492