B oardview Featured Articles

issue no.12 - September 2014
KDN PP 16092/12/2013 (033154)
Boardview
Featured Articles
Demystifying Board Role in Talent
Management
IT Governance, Risk and
Compliance (1st of the series)
by Professor Sattar Bawany
by Alan Simmonds
Three Problems With The Corporate
Governance Agenda –
The Malaysian Third Way :
A Public-Private Partnership
by Datuk John Zinkin
by Michael Hershman
MALAYSIAN DIRECTORS ACADEMY
1
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
Contents
3
Foreword
From The CEO’s Desk
FEATURED ARTICLES
6
Article One
Demystifying Board Role in Talent Management
by Professor Sattar Bawany, Chief Executive Officer
Centre for Executive Education (CEE Global)
9
Article Two
Three Problems With The Corporate Governance Agenda
by Datuk John Zinkin, Managing Director
Zinkin Ettinger Sdn Bhd
11
Article Three
IT Governance, Risk and Compliance (1st of the series)
by Alan Simmonds, PreterLex (Cambridge) UK,
developed by CG Board Asia Pacific
14
Article Four
The Malaysian Third Way
A Public-Private Partnership
by Michael Hershman
22
Book Review
Triple Crown Leadership
by Bob Vanourek & Gregg Vanourek
23 Programme Highlights
31 Premier Programme Alumni lists
Editorial
Team
Editor In Chief
Dato’ Abdul Aziz Abu Bakar
Content Management
Mazni Ahmad Norilah
Premkumar
Diana Seow
Simren Kaur
Communications and Marketing
Diana Seow
Simren Kaur
Creative Designer & Printer
A & S Cetak Sdn. Bhd.
(KKDN: PQ1780/3869)
Publisher & Distributor
Malaysian Directors Academy (MINDA)
2
SEPT 2014
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
DRIVING INNOVATION:
THE BOARD AS A CATALYST
From The CEO’s Desk
Welcome to MINDA’s 12th issue of BoardView
“Innovation distinguishes between a leader and a follower.” – Steve Jobs
It has been a few months since I last wrote in our 11th Issue of BoardView.
I still hear people relate innovation solely to products. They tend to forget
that it also applies to Process, Marketing, Organisation, Business Model
etc.
In one of my recent conversations with Professor Jean-Philippe Deschamps,
IMD Business School and Dr Suraya Sulaiman, Executive Director of Alpha
Catalysts Consulting (ACC) at the recent Innovating Malaysia Conference
2014, my views were concurred that innovation goes beyond products
and is needed in every part of the business. According to the ACCCambridge InnovAsian Study 2014, the real perceptions of employees
towards Innovation are as follows: creativity; products and services;
invention, value creation, R&D/ Research/ prototyping, processes, culture,
mindset, design, business model, risks, patents and external collaboration.
Personally, I view innovation as a transformational approach or tool, if you like; to change the way a business is done.
And to drive such transformation is no other than having the right mindset among the Board of Directors. I can’t help to
applaud the belief of Professor Jean-Philippe Deschamps, Emeritus Professor of Technology & Innovation Management
from IMD Business School, Lausanne, Switzerland whom we recently invited as a guest speaker in our Q3 Awareness Talk.
He thinks that Boards today can and should be treated as competitive advantage for companies. The fact that Board sits
“outside” of management gives it an advantage to overcome blind spot and raise awareness of risks. And Board diversity
in itself offers different industry background and knowledge to foresee sudden industry shifts or disruptive moves. I couldn’t
agree more.
Putting on the Innovation hat in MINDA, I am proud to announce we will be launching our irst programme on Innovation as
part of the Corporate Directors Advanced Programe (CDAP) Series on the 12 & 13 November 2014. And the programme
faculty is none other than Dr Suraya Sulaiman and Mr Azim Pawanchik from ACC.
And there are many other programmes MINDA has introduced to make our Boards continue to stay relevant. For example:
The 7th Directors Forum @ 12-14 October 2014
People or Human Capital is the fundamental of an organisation’s existence. It is also the very core of an organisation’s
culture, ability to innovate and be creative and uphold a sustainable business ethics. This time around, the forum will
be focusing on how Board can inluence the organisations in seeking and cultivating the right characteristics to drive
corporate growth and creativity.
The International Directors Summit @ 27-28 October 2014
Fondly known as IDS 2014, the event will be featuring thoughtful and in-depth discussion that covers important innovation
challenges facing businesses and governments today for a cutting-edge yet durable Public-Private Partnerships.
Building High Performance Directors @ 16-20 August 2015
Yes. It’s correct. 16-20 August 2015. We understand the time commitment Board of Directors need to make away in
advance. So, we made the effort to lock down our programme faculty so that you can plan your 2015 schedule by
leaving this period SOLELY for the sake of Enhancing Board Effectiveness.
BoardView Feedback to [email protected]
Nothing gives us more comfort than your constructive feedback because it means you care. We want to hear what you
think of the articles we have in BoardView and what you would like to see more.
Please enjoy the rest of BoardView.
Dato’ Abdul Aziz Abu Bakar
MALAYSIAN DIRECTORS ACADEMY
3
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
Corporate Directors
Advanced Programme :
Innovation
Date: 12 & 13 November 2014
Venue: The Majestic Hotel, Kuala Lumpur
Why You Should Be With Us
1. Enable BOD to set an overall frame for innovation;
2. Enable BOD to have long term strategy on safeguarding current investments towards future;
3. Enable BOD to have strategy for long-term growth and value creation;
4. Enable BOD to have a visibility of how management team is considering innovation;
5. Enable BOD to have cultural integration in support of idea generation, sharing of ideas,
experimentation, controlled failure, innovative action and learning thus enabling good ideas to thrive;
6. Be able to aligning Board’s strategy and decision-making process to allow room to test/act on new
ideas/make agile decisions;
7. Be able to enhance perception of the management towards the board not only as a reporting
“mechanism” but as a resource to tap into for new ideas;
8. Enable BOD to have a capacity in discovering new areas to innovate, to allocate resources, or to
implement new solutions;
9. Enable the organisation to have a capacity in human capital development for creation of talent pool and
expertise (internal and external) to embed innovation within an organisation.
Facilitators
Mr. Azim Pawanchik
Co-founder and Principal
Consultant, Alpha Catalyst
Consulting (ACC)
Has extensive experience in measuring
innovation and in establishing innovation
frameworks and approaches within
organisations.
Dr Suraya Sulaiman
Executive Director - Innovation
Capabilty & Culture, Alpha Catalyst
Consulting (ACC)
Specialises in innovation culture and capability,
helping organisations address their growth and
transformational challenges, through innovation.
In 2010, she had also co-authored the book
‘Leading InnovAsian®: Embedding Innovation
Culture in Malaysian Organisations.’
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
Programme Topic
Part 1: Fundamentals of Innovation
Recognising what is innovation and how people perceive it forms a key component of mastering
innovation. This shall be supplemented with data from the ACC-Cambridge InnovAsian Study 2014, on
real perceptions of employees towards innovation and the types of innovation practised by organisations.
Once a clear understanding of innovation is achieved, everyone in the organisation is able to participate in the
Part 2: Innovating Innovation
There are many new approaches to innovation that have currently been incorporated and ingrained within strong,
forward-looking organisations globally. What used to be viewed as novel practices are now increasingly becoming
mainstream or key innovation strategies for directly contributing to business growth. These practices include
innovation by strategic acquisitions, Crowdsourcing, Open Innovation, and Crowdfunding, among others. Having a
good grasp on what these initiatives are all about will help build the repertoire of possibilities within the minds of
the strategists or innovation leaders.
Part 3: Innovation Strategy
leveraging on available resources. Key to setting up this innovation roadmap is having the foresight and openness,
yet clarity, to identify new areas of opportunity, while recognising existing capabilities within the organisation, and
balancing the risk appetite of the organisation.
Part 4: Innovation Strategy
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Does your company have an innovation strategy?
Why do you need to innovate?
Where should you innovate?
Foresight and opportunities for innovation
How much risk are you willing to take?
How do you want to innovate?
Role of the board
Part 5: Building Capacity & Culture to Innovate
be sustained is imperative. Once employees are primed to churn out innovative solutions, the organisation must
bringing feasible ones to fruition or commercialisation. This innovation management process involves multiple
stages with key decisions being made.
Part 6: Innovation Governance
Demanding or overseeing innovation is increasingly becoming a common responsibility or key agenda in the Boardroom
can be monitored from an arm’s length, which can be used to discuss the state of innovation in the organisation
objectively and accurately. Understanding what these parameters are, and how they are essential in approaching and
holistically driving innovation, are important to set the organisation for innovation success.
Part 7: Leadership for Innovation
In this day and age, the need for organisations to take action to always remain competitive has never been more
important and challenging. The fast-evolving competitive landscape demands that leaders have the clarity and
courage to drive and lead sustainable growth. Key to this, is identifying what characteristics are needed to lead
organisations into the new realm.
Don’t wait! Reserve your seat today
Call 03-2780 5031
Ms. Diana or Ms. Simren
MALAYSIAN DIRECTORS ACADEMY
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
FEATURED ARTICLES _ARTICLE
ONE
DEMYSTFYING BOARD’S ROLE IN TALENT MANAGEMENT
by Professor Sattar Bawany
SUMMARY
In
today’s
challenging
economy
and
hypercompetitive business environment, CEOs
and senior executive teams are facing enormous
challenges when it comes to achieving and
sustaining breakthrough operating results. Intensifying
War for Talent, globalisation, economic change,
more stringent regulation, and tougher governance
make realising shareholder value increasingly
dificult. But, there is a tougher challenge: identifying
and developing new leaders which is critical for
developing the sustainable competitive advantage
for the organisation and its eventual success.
Talent management and retention is perennially at
the top of CEO’s most pressing worries. A company’s
leadership pipeline is expected to deliver its “next
generation” of ready-now leaders. The key to ensuring
an organisation has the leaders it needs when it
needs them, is to accelerate the performance of
future leaders including high potential employees, so
that their skills and leadership abilities are as strong
as possible when they are needed particularly as
leaders transition from role to role.
According to Ram Charan in his article published
in the 2005 Harvard Business Review, as CEO tenure
continues to shrink, with two out of every ive new
CEOs failing in their irst 18 months, it has become
absolutely critical for companies to cultivate internal
candidates for top positions. Yet corporations are
beginning to realise that executive geographic and
organisation culture succession pipelines are broken
and will adversely affect the ability to identify and
nurture future leaders.
6
SEPT 2014
This can be alleviated however by establishing ongoing programmes that correctly ascertain the
high potential executives and provide them with
meaningful and measurable development.
A company’s leadership pipeline is expected to
deliver its “next generation” of ready-now leaders.
The payoff is a supply of leadership talent that
simultaneously achieves targets, bolsters and protects
ethical reputation, and navigates transformational
change in pursuit of a bright competitive future.
Unfortunately, some Boards and CEOs neglect their
talent management accountability - consequently,
their pipelines run dry. When this occurs, the
downward spiral of competitive capability becomes
discernable, the edge is lost, and the “magic”
disappears. The competition begins to outwit,
outlank and outperform these companies.
BOARD’S ROLE IN TALENT MANAGEMENT
In most organisations, talent is the essential resource —
In fact, your talent is the one thing that can distinguish
you from your competitors. Without the right people
to execute and deliver the organisation’s strategy
and objectives at all levels, the business will fail to
reach its full potential.
A board’s oversight responsibility is well understood in
the areas of risk governance, ethics, and corporate
responsibility, but less often mentioned with regard to
talent. Yet, talent is an intrinsic part of the risk culture
of an organisation.
Instances where talent is at the core of major
organisational risk are increasingly prevalent. Talent is,
however, an area of organisational risk where boards
often fail to implement comprehensive controls.
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
FEATURED ARTICLES _ARTICLE
ONE
THE BOARD OVERSIGHT OF TALENT MANAGEMENT IN
ORGANISATIONS
The Talent-Intelligent Board
Risk oversight is the foundation for the board and
management to govern the organisation and make
sound business decisions. Organisational risks include
talent-related risks and are frequently identiied by
organisations as some of the most critical issues they face.
Oversight of an organisation’s talent clearly falls within
the board’s responsibilities. Traditionally, talent had
been focused on hiring the chief executive oficer,
determining executive compensation, planning senior
executive succession, and recruiting and developing
board members. Yet the board’s responsibility for
talent extends well beyond those duties. The ability
to attract, develop, and retain talent, particularly
at the leadership level, has become a major factor
in all capital investments, business strategies, and
organisational growth. As a result, it is an important
consideration for boards of multinational and ownermanaged businesses alike.
HOW CAN THE BOARD HELP THE ORGANISATION
ATTRACT, DEVELOP, AND RETAIN TALENT?
Boards play a key role in overseeing that talent
strategies are in place to execute on the overall
business objectives as well as manage the talentrelated risk inherent in the commercial world
today. In this role, the board should conirm that
its organisation has an effective and robust talent
management programme capable of delivering
value for shareholders. Talent is one of the ive
critical governance elements over which the board
provides active oversight. Executing active oversight
with regard to the ive elements—performance,
strategy, governance, talent, and integrity—cannot
be delegated to management.
Questions for Board Directors to ask:
1. What is the key talent risks associated with our core
business strategies? With our major investments?
2. What is our talent bench strength? How is our
organisation mitigating succession risks?
3. What plans are in place to bring about smooth
succession or substitution of our key talent, if the
need arises?
4. How can we strengthen our talent-related due
diligence in joint venture and M&A situations of
any of our holdings or subsidiary entities?
Talent-related risks traditionally include lack of
succession planning; planned or sudden loss of key
personnel; lack of return on leadership investment or
senior external hires; and failure to attract, develop,
and retain talent. These risks can extend to poor
talent planning to support capital investments and
business strategy; for example, limited leadership
bench strength reputational exposure, productivity
risk, and inability to execute due to lack of workforce
planning.
To more effectively oversee risks related to talent,
boards should periodically and proactively consider
the following talent-related risks identiied in a Deloitte
report :
• Reputational risks: Financial missteps, ethical
breaches, legal problems, or even poor
performance by executives can have an impact
on a company’s revenue, proits, and market
value for years to come, particularly when publicly
reported in the media. This is particularly important
because decisions are often made by one or
more key individuals in an organisation.
• Crisis management: “Black swan” events—
low-probability events that have far-reaching
impact—are increasingly common. Does senior
management have a detailed crisis management
plan that governs how the organisation addresses
these issues? Risks include changes in economic
and market trends, the sudden departure of
business-critical talent, poaching of whole teams
by external sources, and health and safety
incidents.
• Business and regulatory risks: Boards should
satisfy themselves that their talent strategies,
compensation, and incentive plans are aligned
to create a culture that supports the pursuit of
business goals within regulatory constraints.
• Broader HR risks: HR risks have expanded beyond
compliance with labor regulations. While those
remain important, companies now face a broad
range of talent-related risks that can undermine
organisational performance. These range from
security, intellectual property, employee fraud,
and inancial risks to the risks of incompetence,
poor judgment, and lack of loyalty.
MALAYSIAN DIRECTORS ACADEMY
7
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
FEATURED ARTICLES _ARTICLE
ONE
IMPROVING BOARD OVERSIGHT OF TALENT-RELATED
RISKS
Improving the oversight of talent risk begins with
understanding those risks and management’s
approach to addressing them. Here are ive key steps
for boards to consider in their talent oversight role:
• Review talent-related risks: Many boards have
adopted a twice-a-year talent review in which the
chief human resources oficer (CHRO) summarises
the external talent trends, and workforce and
talent strategy for the business, including a
comprehensive review of talent, HR risks and the
associated mitigation strategies.
• Develop measurable outcomes: It is also wise
to request a benchmark analysis that covers
employee engagement, top performer and
executive attrition, and other factors related to
talent retention at the senior levels and for other
critical positions. This can be accomplished by
leveraging industry or HR data and/or using
historical organisational data as comparisons.
• Assign the responsibility: More and more boards
designate a director and/or members of the
remuneration committee to address talentrelated issues and risks (often a former or current
CHRO), and ask for frequent “in camera” sessions
with the board on talent-related risks. The head of
HR could report to both the CEO and the board.
For the board, this designated director can help
raise awareness of talent issues; moreover, this
individual has the appropriate background to
question management and inform the board
about talent-related risks and how management
is addressing them.
• Monitor the talent pipeline: Talent supply and
demand data should be reviewed as part of
capital investments and business strategy reviews
at least annually, and ideally more frequently.
In addition, the need to develop new products,
enter new markets, or combat new competitors
will dictate the demand for speciic experience
and skills. The board should ascertain that
management and the HR team have plans in
place to meet that demand.
• Align the talent and business strategy: In reviews
of strategy, the board should ask management
how it aligns the talent strategy with the business
strategy.
Forward-looking
talent
strategies
maintain this alignment while helping target
investments in talent development for optimal
eficiency and effectiveness. The board should
also be aware of talent issues related to any
initiative that comes up for its review or approval.
8
SEPT 2014
For example, in merger and acquisition (M&A)
situations, talent due diligence is often neglected
and talent the organisation intended to acquire
on Day 1 may be lost.
CONCLUSION
In general, sound talent management strategies and
programs can greatly reduce risk, improve sustainable
performance, and improve the organisation’s ability
to attract external talent. Board oversight into this
process can not only provide experienced insight,
but help to identify and reduce the risks and take
talent management to the next level.
BIBLIOGRAPHY
Bawany, Sattar, “Maximising the Potential of Future Leaders:
Resolving Leadership Succession Crisis with Transition Coaching” in
‘Coaching in Asia – The First Decade’., Candid Creation Publishing
LLP, September 2010. Available as e-download at: http://www.
cee-global.com/6/publication
Bawany, Sattar, “Winning the War for Talent”, Human Capital,
Singapore Human Resources Institute, (September-October 2007);
54-57.
Charan, Ram. “Ending the CEO Succession Crisis”. Harvard Business
Review, (February 2005); 83-86.
Charan, Ram. “Leaders at All Levels”, Jossey-Bass, Wiley, San
Francisco, California, (2008); 1-4.
Deloitte Human Capital Trends 2012: Leap Ahead, Published by
Deloitte, www.deloitte.com
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Professor Sattar Bawany is the
Chief Executive Oficer and the
C-Suite Master Executive Coach
of the Centre for Executive
Education (CEE Global).
He is an astute advisor and
Executive Coach especially skilled
at helping senior executives work
through
leadership
transition
issues, whether individually or
systemically. He has coached a
range of leaders, from CEOs, to
senior vice presidents, and high
potential managers across various industries globally.
RELEVANT MINDA PROGRAMMES
• 7th Directors Forum @ 12-14 Oct 2014, Koh Samui
• CDAP: Human Capital @ 13-14 Mar 2015, KL
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
FEATURED ARTICLES _ARTICLE
TWO
Three Problems
WiTh The
CorPoraTe
GovernanCe
aGenda
by Datuk John Zinkin
The corporate governance (CG) agenda seems
mainly to be about public listed companies, while
good governance applies equally to unlisted family
irms, SMEs, charities, cooperatives and NGOs. The
focus of regulation and academic literature on
the problems of principal-agent conlicts has led
to boards being regarded by some as adversaries
of management as opposed to their partners and
sounding boards. Finally, because so much of the
discussion is seen through the eyes of lawyers and
auditors, the ethical dimension is often missing. That
is a pity, since sustainable businesses always have an
ethical foundation.
WHAT ABOUT UNLISTED ORGANISATIONS?
Public listed organisations are not the only form
of human enterprise. SMEs are recognised as the
engines of economic growth for countries and
millions of people around the world are employed
by NGOs, charities and mutual. In Malaysia there
are also the many companies owned by the Ministry
of Finance, which are not listed. How much value is
created and destroyed in these organisations? How
much more value could we create if we had the right
governance focus in such organisations – a focus
designed to help them choose the right strategies
and execute them well?
I believe we focus on listed companies because the
primary agenda of regulators is to protect public
investors by ensuring fairness and transparency looking at what to do with the money once it has
been made. There are two reasons for this. First, the
principal-agent conlict which has been at its most
extreme in the US, where CEOs get paid huge sums
regardless of how well they reward shareholders and
where business schools teach that managers cannot
be trusted to look after shareholders’ interests.
Second, regulators and auditors focus on reported
results, recognising they are not qualiied to advise on
the choice of strategy or its implementation. Yet, as I
have argued in previous articles, 60% of shareholder
value destruction is the result of choosing the wrong
strategy; 27% through poor implementation; and only
13% through failures of compliance. It is a sobering
thought that Sarbanes-Oxley has not prevented a
single collapse of a public listed entity when that was
what it was designed to do.
The right choice of strategy and ensuring its effective
implementation is an issue for every organisation,
regardless of whether it is listed or not.
WHY MUST DIRECTORS BE TURNED INTO POTENTIAL
ADVERSARIES?
The tone of some of the language of CG portrays
the role of non-executive directors as potential
adversaries of CEOs. Maybe this is the result of the
principal-agent theory and of past failures of boards
to check CEOs from destroying great companies.
Such tonality seems to me to miss the point that
boards and their CEOs are in fact in the same boat,
sharing the same objective – the sustainable success
of the organisation.
MALAYSIAN DIRECTORS ACADEMY
9
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
FEATURED ARTICLES _ARTICLE
TWO
The failure of the CEO is the failure of the board. It is
the failure of the board because boards are required
to hire the right person for the job in the irst place.
They are then required to help the CEO through the
provision of independent thought and challenge,
designed to ensure the business case is as robust as
possible.
The purpose of challenge is not to second guess
management or undermine the CEO, though that is
often how it is interpreted, but to protect the CEO and
the top management team from the consequences
of strategic myopia, groupthink and human fallibility.
If boards do not have the “courage to speak truth to
power”, how can we expect people reporting to the
CEO to have it? The inal failure of the board comes
when there is no adequate succession plan.
Yet choosing a sustainable strategy (the key role of
good governance) requires the board to ensure that
the business purpose is ethical. It is one of the lessons
of the global inancial crisis that western banks got
into trouble because they abandoned their moral
and socially valuable business purpose in the pursuit
of unethical proits, achieved through sub-prime, misselling, and market ixing. If organisations are known
to be unethical, they ultimately lose their “licence to
operate” and one of the key tasks of good governance
is to maximise the long-term “licence to operate”.
Toyota’s quality problems and currently those of GM
in the US were caused by putting market share and
proits ahead of ethics. Boards must remember the
reputation damage caused by unethical behaviour
is long-term and expensive to remedy.
In short, directors are there to protect CEOs from their
own fallibility and mortality. When their role is seen
in this light, there is no reason, other than vanity and
ego, for CEOs to see their directors as adversaries
who need to be controlled through the provision of
inadequate or asymmetrical information.
CONCLUSION
The importance of good governance is clear once
we remember it covers unlisted entities as well as
listed ones; that boards are not adversaries but share
the same objectives as management; and that there
must be an ethical foundation to achieve long-term
business success.
WHY DO WE DOWNPLAY ETHICS?
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Datuk John Zinkin is the Managing Director of Zinkin
Ettinger Sdn Bhd and faculty member of the ICLIF
Leadership and Governance Centre, specialising
in training Boards in ethics and governance.
Datuk John has been asked to speak regularly on
the subject by the Securities Commission; Bursa
Malaysia; Bank Negara; the Malaysian Institute
of Corporate Governance (MICG); the Minority
Shareholders Watchdog Group (MSWG); the
Malaysian Association of Company Secretaries
(MAICSA); MIA; and MICPA. He was a member of the “Malaysian Corporate
The CG agenda is driven primarily by regulators,
lawyers and auditors. Regulators focus on fairness,
transparency and investor protection. Lawyers
focus on due process and auditors report what has
happened. The unintended consequence is an
excessive regard for box-ticking when it comes to
CG reporting – for observing the letter of the law
rather than its spirit. The law is not about ethics, nor
are audits. External pressures on organisations to
have good governance tend to pay lip service to
the importance of an ethical business foundation what business a company is in and how it does it. The
normal view is that “as long as it is legal, that is what
matters”.
Governance Blueprint 2011” working party.
RELEVANT MINDA PROGRAMMES
• CDAP : Ethics @ 22-23 Apr 2015, KL
• CDOP @ 8-9 Apr 2015, KL
@ 26-27 Nov 2015, KL
The lip service to ethics comes with the regulatory
exhortation that organisations must have the right
“tone at the top” and that boards must not encourage
management to meet their targets regardless of how
they get there. Investors, however, seem to care less, as
long as their short-term required rates of return are met.
10
SEPT 2014
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
FEATURED ARTICLES _ARTICLE
IT Governance,
Risk and
Compliance
by Alan Simmonds
(1st of the series)
THREE
MOVING AHEAD …
This series of articles will look at governance, risk and
compliance considering information technology and
will build an approach that will help identify core
aspects of GRC and will culminate in a proposed
operating model that integrates best practice and
industry standards. This journey requires that we set
the scene with a few general deinitions and hints as
to the subject matter that will come under scrutiny
during this series.
Technology,
speciically
information
and
communications technology (ICT), is one of
the core mechanisms that organisations utilise
to meet and sustain their strategic objectives.
The assets that comprise the organisation’s ICT
universe include hardware, software, architecture,
intellectual property, skills, vendor and service
provider management (including cloud(1)), market
awareness, customer management, culture to name
a few. Just having these available on the balance
sheet, as processes or as ‘ways of working’ is not
suficient – they must be made to work in harmony
to provide measurable beneit(2) to the organisation.
ASSETS
INTRODUCTION
PRISM, Accumulo, NSA, surveillance, privacy and
intrusion – recent events make these dificult to ignore.
Should we be concerned about the types of events
brought about by Ellsberg, Woodward, Manning,
Snowden and countless others in an article aimed at
risk professionals? – only in as much as we recognise
that risk is everywhere. The often-quoted ‘eternal
vigilance is the price of freedom’ (Wendell Phillips, 1852
and attributed to many others thereafter) provides a
good segue into the basic theme of this set of articles
– governance, risk and compliance (GRC) – by way
of recognising that freedom for organisations to meet
their objectives must be balanced by the appropriate
accountabilities, responsibilities and actions.
While we might be tempted into a discussion
on ethics, morality, liberty, public interest and
whistleblowing – these remind us what the difference
between management and governance is. Whether
this is at country level or within a small department
the distinction is the same – management is typically
about ‘running the business’ while governance is
about ‘ensuring that the right things are done’.
This is where we leave PRISM behind.
The assets outlined above must be fully and
effectively utilised by organisations in order to deliver
their strategies – in order to do these we recognise 3
core GRC capabilities:
• Protection of assets
• Compliance
• Consistent service provision
Protection of assets is a broad term that includes
all assets (see list above) – we recognise that each
of these assets has associated use, ownership/
stewardship, operation, involvement, inluence, and
adoption across the organisation all leading to a
complex web of interactions and requirements for
governance. One particular challenge we have
on the ICT asset front is that the pace of change is
accelerated and any down/up-side impact can
therefore occur with increasing uncertain frequency
and magnitude.
Compliance includes the adherence to rules,
designs, regulations and standards as well as includes
the acknowledgement of both static (decision
rights, structures and authority remit) and dynamic
(proper and timely execution of decisions, policies,
standards, performance measurement and BRR)
sides of governance.
MALAYSIAN DIRECTORS ACADEMY
11
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
FEATURED ARTICLES _ARTICLE
THREE
Consistent service provision is the concept of delivery
that includes timing, channels, metrics, audience,
improvement and recognising that …
These 3 capabilities are linked through a backbone
of standards which is also an umbrella term that
includes regulation, legislation, internal organisational
standards, policies, principles, guidelines and
standard operating procedures.
Central to GRC is the requirement to mitigate risk,
deliver strategic objectives and provide beneit over this series of articles we will be exploring how
these can be made to work together to drive the
correct organisational behaviours and sustain the
organisation’s strategy. The ‘GRC Overview’ diagram
provides the overall structure that we’ll be following
to show this approach.
To close this irst article on GRC we’ll highlight some
risk challenges both within the ICT and business sides
of organisations that must be addressed to support
our approach:
• Risk-aware culture must be established in the
organisation – all stakeholders must understand
the IT risks that affect them
• Measurement and reporting of the effectiveness
and eficiency of IT risk management must
become business-as-usual
• Risk strategies and architectures must extend
beyond near-term regulatory situations
• Well-deined IT risk management processes have
been implemented
Footnotes:
(1) Cloud computing - an umbrella term for
everything from web-based email to business
software that is run remotely via the internet
instead of only on-site to reduce costs and add
lexibility to IT divisions.
(2) Measurable beneit is the preferred metric rather
than proit as not all organisations are driven by
proit – e.g. NGOs, cooperatives etc.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Alan Simmond has over 29 years of practical
experience
in
governance
(technology,
corporate and contract) and strategy across
a broad spectrum of industry and commerce
resulting in a proven capability of helping
IT GOVERNANCE
Information technology governance is both a
necessary and formal partner in this journey and we’ll
be exploring how frameworks such as COBIT® can be
used to provide the support necessary to integrate
many of the concepts and constructs mentioned in
this article.
RISK MANAGEMENT
The 3 capabilities outlined above will all contribute to
risk management – as we’ll see the use of frameworks
is necessary – indeed the ISO31000 will provide us
many opportunities to exercise the direction, control
and necessary discipline to help embed effective
GRC in the organisation.
Often however the beneits of risk management
are ‘sold’ using threats rather than focussing on risk
itself - this leads to a reactive and tactical approach
– which is the exact problem we’re trying to avoid
through proper, informed and established GRC.
12
SEPT 2014
organisations meet their regulatory and legislative
obligations.
He has signiicant practical experience of how
governance and regulatory issues are successfully
managed and adopted by organisations through
the innovative use of organisational structures,
processes, controls, audit and assurance.
Alan is a key contributor to COBIT 5 ( ISACA) and TOGAF ( Open Group) in
the area of architecture governance and is the prime author of the research
paper Governance of Outsourcing for the ITGI.
RELEVANT MINDA PROGRAMMES
• CDAP : Strategy & Risk @11-12 Mar 2015, KL
@2-3 Sept 2015, KL
• CDOP @ 8-9 Apr 2015, KL
@ 26-27 Nov 2015, KL
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
MALAYSIAN DIRECTORS ACADEMY (MINDA)
presents
Building High Performance Directors
(BHPD)
16 - 20 August 2015 (Open for registration now!)
BHPD is designed to give Malaysian Directors a platform to share with other Board Members their
wide range of experiences in different cultures, industries and governance frameworks.
This programme typically caters for experienced Board Members who wish to broaden their
knowledge and strengthen their effectiveness.
Why You Should Be With Us
1. Specially designed for the needs of
Chairmen, CEOs and Corporate
Directors at Board level.
2. Exclusive peer-to-peer experience
sharing in the spirit of driving Board
Effectiveness.
3. Learn from actual Malaysian case
studies and benchmark with
international case.
Target Participants
Chairmen, CEOs and Directors of Boards (Main and Subsidiary)
For inquiries call us at
+603-2780 5031
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
FEATURED ARTICLES _ARTICLE
FOUR
The malaysian Third Way:
a PubliC-PrivaTe ParTnershiP
by miChael hershman
The debate in Malaysia between those who want more government and those in the private sector who
believe prosperity and job creation can best occur with less government is not unusual. It is occurring all over
the world—in the U.S., in the EU and the recent French presidential elections, and throughout nations in Asia
and the Paciic Rim.
But it is apparent that the ultimate solution is neither total reliance on government nor the private sector,
but rather, a third-way path—a public-private partnership to bring prosperity and economic progress to the
average citizen.
That is the model that, in the last several years, Malaysian Prime Minister YAB Dato’ Sri Mohd Najib bin Tun
Haji Abdul Razak has followed to implement his Economic Transformation Program (ETP) and Government
Transformation Programme.
When he began the ETP in 2011, he established speciic goals to be achieved by the year 2020—to transform
Malaysia into a higher development nation with a per-capital income of at least RM15,000 and to attract and
channel RM444 billion in most private investments to break Malaysia out of the “middle-income” trap and
economic stagnation that it had experienced in recent years.
Consistent with the “third way” mixture of government and private market leadership, he turned to one of his
ministers, Dato’ Sri Idris Jalal, a former successful chief executive of Malaysia Airlines, to lead the ETP. Prime
Minister Dato’ Sri Najib and Dato’ Sri Jala have committed to reduce the country’s chronic budget deicits
over ive-to-seven years, streamline government to make it more conducive to private sector investment and
job creation. And they already have made considerable progress.
For example, the ETP has moved to cut by half 761 varieties of licenses that under the current system are
required for most business start-ups to acquire. And under Dato’ Sri Najib and Dato Sri Jala’s leadership, the
government has reduced the state’s large role in the economy by divesting stakes in 33 companies.
On a variety of social progress fronts, Dato’ Sri Najib’s government has moved aggressively to improve the
quality of life of the average Malaysian. In 2010 and 2011 participants in the GTP conducted “laboratory
sessions” to establish speciic, achievable social goals in six areas: raising public living standards; improving
education outcomes; reducing crime; advancing the ight against government corruption; enhancing urban
public transportation; and improving rural basic infrastructure.
14
SEPT 2014
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
FEATURED ARTICLES _ARTICLE
Results have been apparent and measurable. By the
end of 2011, Malaysia witnessed a 35% reduction in
street crime in high-crime neighbourhoods and built
over 35,000 low-cost housing units. The government
created anti-corruption courts to adjudicate
corruption cases within 12 months and passed a
strong whistle-blower law to protect the courageous
individuals who come forward to report and identify
corrupt practices and public oficials.
Further measures were enacted to strengthen
private-sector competitiveness, including a new
law that levels the playing ield for businesses and
guards against anti-competitive practices. And the
movement to reduce government ownership and
to divest functions to
the private sector,
where
eficiencies
and jobs can be
allowed to lourish,
continued. The oil,
gas
and
energy
sector
realised
signiicant incentives
for exploration of
marginal oil and gas
ields.
By the end of 2011,
Malaysia had moved
ahead of advanced
economies
of
Germany,
Japan
and Switzerland on
the World Bank’s
2012 “Doing Business
Report”—and
had
achieved the highest
Gross
Domestic
Product in its history.
But Prime Minister Dato’ Sri Najib knows that serious
challenges remain, especially in the implementation
of reform through his two-year-old Government
Transformation Program (GTP), and that there is a
way to go to guarantee all citizens equal civil rights,
the right of political assembly and free speech, and
guarantees of equal economic opportunities and
justice for all.
FOUR
the New Economic Model that would permit needbased preferences, not ethnic-based preferences.
Unlike most politicians who forget their campaign
promises, Dato’ Sri Najib has asked to be judged and
held accountable for the progress he has, or has
not, made. Over the past year, I have served as a
member of Malaysia’s International Review Panel
created to review the results of both the Government
Transformation
Programme
and
Economic
Transformation Programme, and I have seen irsthand that real progress is being made.
In other words, Prime Minister Dato’ Sri Najib wanted
a report card—and better yet, he wanted everyone
to see it. And they
will.
Ultimately,
he is prepared
to be judged
by the ultimate
arbiters
of
success or failure
in a democracy:
the voters of his
country.
The third pathway
of
progressive
government
in
partnership
with a vibrant
private sector has
been powering
Malaysia towards
its
goals
and
helping to create
a
better
life
for its citizens.
Whatever
the
results of the next
election,
the
Malaysian model is already an enduring legacy of
Dato’ Sri Najib’s government.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Michael J. Hershman is a cofounder of Transparency
International, a former senior staff investigator for the
U.S. Senate’s historic “Watergate” Committee, and
a paid consultant to the Malaysia Anti-Corruption
Commission tasked with building a national strategy
against corruption. He is the principal in the
This includes the long-term objective of eliminating
the vestiges of discrimination, as seen from the past
acceptance of the so-called Bumiputra policy
favouring Malays in jobs and opportunities over
Chinese, Indians and other ethnic groups constituting
about 40% of the population. For example, Dato’ Seri
Najib has launched a new edition of the policy called
Washington D.C.-area irm The Fairfax Group.
RELEVANT MINDA PROGRAMMES
International Directors [email protected] Oct 2014
MALAYSIAN DIRECTORS ACADEMY
15
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
IDS 2014 SPECIAL PULL OUT
“Inculcating
Innovation, Catalysing Growth
Through Public-Private Partnerships”
To Be Officiated By:
YB Dato' Seri Haji Ahmad
Husni Mohamad Hanadzlah,
Minister of Finance, Malaysia (invited)
Luncheon Talk:
YABhg. Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad
Former Prime Minister of Malaysia
Special Session:
Mr Stuart Dean,
Chief Executive Officer, GE ASEA
With more than 300
Corporate Directors
And over 20 local and
international speakers
Organisers
Silver Sponsor
Supporting Organisations:
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
IDS 2014 SPECIAL PULL OUT
INTRODUCTION
Current leadership trends encompass more than merely maximising revenue. Focus has shifted into
inculcating innovation, ensuring sustainable growth and amplifying business effectiveness. This can be
realised through cutting-edge yet durable Public-Private partnerships.
Directors and leaders should leverage further on their corporate culture experiences to innovate the ways
of maximising performance and business growth. Policymakers, conversely, stands at bridging efficiency
and effectiveness, using best practices and advice in developing its strategies towards public good. The
emphasis now lies on how these two key stakeholders, working hand in hand, could contribute towards
stimulating, steering and sustaining innovation.
THE SUMMIT
IDS 2014 features thoughtful and in-depth discussion that covers important innovation challenges facing
businesses and governments today. Best practices and future trends will be explored in improving the
effectiveness of policy implementation and decision-making.
The summit aims to provide a platform where a community of more than 300 leading local and regional
directors and leaders to convene in addressing emerging issues, exchange ideas, sharing of knowledge
and impart experience, all in pursuit of exemplary leadership.
IDS 2014 is designed specifically for those holding the following responsibilities:
C-SUITE EXECUTIVES
• POLICY MAKERS
•
•
BOARD MEMBERS • SENIOR MANAGEMENT
THOUGHT LEADERS • DECISION MAKERS
MALAYSIAN DIRECTORS ACADEMY (MINDA)
MINDA was established in December 2006 following the launch of the Government-Linked Companies
(GLCs) Transformation Programme Initiatives in July 2005. It was formed as a non-profit organisation with
initial funding from the Government. Since 2012, MINDA has opened its doors to all local and regional
Corporate Directors.
With the objective to address Board Performance, MINDA strives to equip Directors with world-class
knowledge, skills and mindset required to perform to a consistently high standard. MINDA’s strategy to
achieve this is by assisting Boards in focusing on their fundamental roles and responsibilities such as
strategy setting, corporate performance management, development of future leaders and human capital,
risk management, innovation and creativity.
RAZAK SCHOOL OF GOVERNMENT (RSOG)
The Razak School of Government (RSOG) is a unique educational and training institution, built upon the
courage to lead in personal and professional development. Formed at the heart of the public service
sector engine of the Malaysian’s Government Transformation Programme (GTP), RSOG aspires to be the
leading centre in leadership development, research and knowledge sharing platform for the public sector.
RSOG is mandated to groom the future public sector leaders across all service sectors in Malaysia.
Founded in 2010, RSOG primary focus is to transform public sector leadership in striving for excellence
and to be a point of reference and a leading authority on public sector leadership and policy.
RSOG provides customised knowledge skills development programmes and the publication of refereed
journals and other publications. Above all, RSOG provides an important platform for dialogue, knowledge
sharing and synergistic collaboration.
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
IDS 2014 SPECIAL PULL OUT
DAY 1
8:00 am
Arrival and Registration of Participants
9:00 am –
Panel Discussion: NEW ECOSYSTEM FOR CREATIVITY AND SUSTAINABILITY
10:15 am
Moderator: Dr Suraya Sulaiman, Executive Director, Alpha Catalyst Consulting
Panellists:
•
•
YB Senator Datuk Paul Low Seng Kuan, Minister in the Prime Minister’s Department, Malaysia
Mr Azman Ismail, Managing Director, Shell Malaysia Trading Sdn Bhd
Synopsis: Risks are part and parcel of innovation. However, global economic recession and climate change have the
potential to disrupt businesses and service delivery. This inadvertently impacts on how decisions are undertaken and
minimises the potential of risk-taking, in pursuit of stability. Pragmatic policies are needed to reflect new realities; one that
improves risk management yet provides room for innovation.
10.15 am10.30 am
Networking Break
10:30 am –
Welcoming Address
10:50 am
Speaker: YBhg. Tan Sri Mohamad Zabidi Zainal, Director–General of Public Service Malaysia
10:50 am –
Keynote Address and Official Opening: INCULCATING INNOVATION, CATALYSING GROWTH
11:30 am
VIP: YB Dato’ Seri Haji Ahmad Husni Mohamad Hanadzlah, Minister of Finance Malaysia (invited)
VIP Reception and Engagement
11:30 am –
Special Session: INNOVATION ZONE – UNLEASHING THE MINDSET
12:30 pm
Speaker: Mr Stuart Dean, Chief Executive Officer, GE ASEAN
Synopsis: In a globalised world, the remaining sustainable advantage is in consistent innovation. Networks inside
and outside organisations are key to successful innovation in products, processes, and strategies. When ideas are
connected, it generates powerful outcomes. A rich knowledge-based relationship has enormous advantage in innovating
more effectively.
12:30 pm –
2:15 pm
Networking Lunch
2:15pm –
Panel Discussion: GETTING THE MODEL RIGHT ON P3 DEVELOPMENT
3:45 pm
Moderator: YBhg. Datuk Hj. Shamsuddin Bardan, Executive Director of Malaysian Employers Federation
Panellists:
• YBhg. Dato’ Zohari Haji Akob, Secretary General, Ministry of Works Malaysia
• Dr Surapit Promsit, President, Bangkok Training International
Synopsis: The Public Private Partnership (PPP) played an important role on Malaysia Incorporated concept. PPP in
Malaysia is defined broadly as an arrangement whereby the private sector provides its expertise and invests in
infrastructure assets which would traditionally have been undertaken by the Government. The panel will look at Malaysia’s
approach in the implementation of PPP programmes and the experiences within the region.
3:45pm –
4:00 pm
Tea Break, Networking Session and Exhibition
4:00pm –
Panel Discussion: MALAYSIAN HEALTHCARE PLAN - WELFARE FOR CITIZENS
5.00 pm
Moderator: YBhg. Dato’ Abdul Aziz Abu Bakar, Executive Director & Chief Executive, MINDA
Panellists:
•
YBhg. Datin Paduka Siti Sa’diah Sheikh Bakir, Director and Corporate Advisor, KPJ Healthcare Berhad
Synopsis: Malaysia boosts of an all rounded healthcare plan for its citizens – offering the right for every citizen to seek
healthcare benefits with minimal or at zero cost. How does Malaysia propose to showcase its infrastructure and innovative
plans, aligned with best practices in medical advice, treatment and care for its people? The session aims to look into the
innovative ways of attaining an affordable and universal healthcare.
5:00 pm
End of Day One
Disclaimer / Notes:
Organisers reserve the right to alter the content and timing of the programme in the best interest of the Summit and are not responsible for cancellations due to unforeseen circumstances. MINDA & RSOG accept no
responsibility for statements made orally or in written materials distributed by any speakers at the Summit. In addition, the organisers are not responsible for any copying, re-publication or redistributions of such statements.
Copyright © Malaysian Directors Academy(MINDA) & Razak School of Government (RSOG) ® All Rights Reserved. Programme as of 2/10/2014.
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
IDS 2014 SPECIAL PULL OUT
DAY 2
8:00 am
Arrival and Registration of Participants
9:00 am –
SPECIAL ADDRESS: CO-CREATION INITIATIVES – RISKS VS REWARD
Moderator: YBhg. Tan Sri Dr Mohd Irwan Serigar Abdullah, Secretary General to the Treasury, Ministry of Finance Malaysia
Panellists:
• Professor Janine O’Flynn, Professor of Public Management, School of Social and Political Sciences, Melbourne
School of Government, Australia
• Mr Afzal Abdul Rahim, Chief Executive Officer, TIME dotCom Berhad (invited)
10:30 am
Synopsis: Technological advancements have enabled value creation opportunities, or known as co-creation, where
businesses and governments are able tap and engage ideas from the consumers and the general public. Activities such
as these allow innovation at a low cost and at the same time, engaging with its intended audience – the public. Despite
its potential reward, co-creation has its risks. How can these be risks be mitigated? What kind of strategies should be
employed to ensure meaningful and sustained collaboration?
10:30 –
11:00 am
11:00 am –
12:30 pm
Coffee Break and Networking Session
Panel Discussion: SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP: THE NEW WAY FORWARD?
Moderator: Dr David Bobker, Director of the Centre For Economics and Risk, Malaysia University of Science and
Technology
Panellists:
• Mr Na Boon Chong. Managing Director, Talent and Rewards, Southeast Asia, Aon Hewitt
• Ms Cheryl Yeoh, Chief Executive Officer, Malaysian Global Innovation & Creativity Centre (MaGIC)
• Ms Grace Sai, Co-Founder, The Hub Singapore / Advisor, Social Entrepreneurship Initiatives Malaysia
Synopsis: Social entrepreneurships are businesses with social objectives in which their profits are directed towards selfdevelopment, public good or resolving social issues. Social enterprise is aimed at creating the ideal of empowering the
community, providing innovative solutions to social problems.
12:30 pm –
2:00 pm
Sponsored Luncheon Talk:
RECOUNTING THE SUCCESSES STORIES IN PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR INTERACTIONS
Moderator: Mr Reza Ghazali, Korn Ferry International
Speaker: YABhg. Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad, Former Prime Minister of Malaysia
Synopsis: During YABhg Tun Dr Mahathir’s tenure as Prime Minister, Malaysia experienced rapid modernisation and
economic growth. His innovative policies ignited a series of bold infrastructure projects through Public Private Partnership
Initiatives. The session aims at uncovering the challenges faced and lessons learned in attaining its success.
2:00 pm –
3:00 pm
Panel Discussion: NEW LANDSCAPE IN MALAYSIA’S EDUCATION SYSTEM
Moderator: Dr Hamidin Abd Hamid, Chief Executive Officer, Razak School of Government
Panellists:
• YBhg. Tan Sri Datuk Dr. Madinah Mohamad, Secretary General, Ministry of Education Malaysia
• Ms Shahnaz Al-Sadat Abdul Mohsein, Managing Director, Arise Asia Sdn Bhd
• YBhg. Datuk Dr Khair Mohamad Yusof, Director General , Ministry of Education Malaysia (invited)
Synopsis: Education is central to Malaysia’s growth as it is fundamental to the development of human capital and
knowledge base of the country. The session aims to discuss the concept and applicability of PPP, in improving quality,
efficiency, effectiveness and delivery.
3:00 pm –
3:30 pm
3:30 pm –
4:45 pm
Coffee Break and Networking Session
PANEL DISCUSSION: DIVERSITY AND GOVERNANCE IN INNOVATIVE DECISION-MAKING
Moderator: YBhg. Datuk John Zinkin, Managing Director, Zinkin Ettinger Sdn Bhd
Panellists:
• Ms Rita Benoy Bushon, Chief Executive Officer, Minority Shareholder Watchdog Group (MSWG) (invited)
• YBhg. Dato’ Siti Zauyah Haji Mohd Desa, Secretary, Government Investment Companies Division, Ministry of Finance
Malaysia (invited)
Synopsis: Good practice in governance includes finding the right people to lead. In a diverse world such as ours, this
involves embracing the full spectrum of skills, a variety of experience and connections available. Capitalising on our
immensely diverse talent pool is an imperative for today’s public and private sector growth.
4:45 pm –
KEYNOTE CLOSING ADDRESS
5:00 pm
YBhg. Datuk Azzat Kamaludin, Board of Director, MINDA
Disclaimer / Notes:
Organisers reserve the right to alter the content and timing of the programme in the best interest of the Summit and are not responsible for cancellations due to unforeseen circumstances. MINDA & RSOG accept no
responsibility for statements made orally or in written materials distributed by any speakers at the Summit. In addition, the organisers are not responsible for any copying, re-publication or redistributions of such statements.
Copyright © Malaysian Directors Academy(MINDA) & Razak School of Government (RSOG) ® All Rights Reserved. Programme as of 2/10/2014.
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
IDS 2014 SPECIAL PULL OUT
VIPS
YB Dato’ Seri Haji Ahmad
Husni Mohamad Hanadzlah
Minister of Finance, Malaysia
(invited)
YABhg. Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad
Former Prime Minister of Malaysia
Mr Stuart Dean
Chief Executive Officer, GE Asean
SPEAKERS
YBhg. Tan Sri Mohamad
Zabidi Zainal
Director–General,
Public Service Malaysia
(invited)
YB Senator
Datuk Paul Low Seng Kuan
Minister,
Prime Minister’s Department,
Malaysia
Mr Azman Ismail
Managing Director,
Shell Malaysia Trading Sdn Bhd
Dr Suraya Sulaiman
Executive Director,
Alpha Catalysts Consulting
YBhg. Datuk Hj. Shamsuddin
Bardan
Executive Director,
Malaysian Employers Federation
YBhg. Dato’ Zohari Haji
Akob
Secretary General,
Ministry of Works Malaysia
YBhg. Tan Sri Dr Mohd
Irwan Serigar Abdullah
Secretary General to the
Treasury,
Ministry of Finance Malaysia
YBhg. Dato’ Abdul Aziz
Abu Bakar
Executive Director & Chief
Executive,
MINDA
YBhg. Datin Paduka Siti
Sa’diah Sheikh Bakir
Director and Corporate
Advisor,
KPJ Healthcare Berhad
Dr Surapit Promsit
President,
Bangkok Training International
Professor Janine O’Flynn
Professor of Public
Management, School of
Social and Political Sciences,
Melbourne School of
Government, Australia
Mr Afzal Abdul Rahim
Chief Executive Officer,
TIME dotCom Berhad
(invited)
Dr David Bobker
Director of the Centre For
Economics and Risk,
Malaysia University of
Science and Technology
Mr Na Boon Chong
Managing Director, Talent
and Rewards, Southeast
Asia, Aon Hewitt
Ms Cheryl Yeoh
Chief Executive Officer,
Malaysian Global Innovation
& Creativity Centre (MaGIC)
Ms Grace Sai
Co-Founder, The Hub
Singapore & Advisor, Social
Entrepreneurship Initiatives
Malaysia
Mr Reza Ghazali
Office Managing Director,
Korn Ferry International
Dr Hamidin Abd Hamid
Chief Executive Officer,
Razak School of
Government
YBhg. Tan Sri Datuk Dr
Madinah Mohamad
Secretary General,
Ministry of Education Malaysia
YBhg. Datuk Dr Khair Bin
Mohamed Yusof
Director General,
Ministry of Education Malaysia
(invited)
Ms Shahnaz Al-Sadat
Abdul Mohsein
Managing Director,
Arise Asia Sdn Bhd
YBhg. Datuk John Zinkin
Managing Director,
Zinkin Ettinger Sdn Bhd
Ms Rita Benoy Bushon
Chief Executive Officer,
Minority Shareholder Watchdog Group (MSWG) (invited)
YBhg. Dato’ Siti Zauyah
Haji Mohd Desa
Secretary,
Government Investment
Companies Division,
Ministry of Finance Malaysia
(invited)
YBhg. Datuk Azzat
Kamaludin
Board of Director,
MINDA
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
IDS 2014 SPECIAL PULL OUT
abouT our silver sPonsor
At Korn Ferry, we design, build, attract and ignite talent. Since our inception, clients have trusted us to help
recruit world-class leadership. Today, we are a single sourcefor leadership and talent consulting services to
empower businesses and leaders to reach their goals.
Through our vision, research and tools across 80 ofices and 3,500 employees, we convert potential into
greatness. Our solutions range from executive recruitment and leadership development programs, to
enterprise learning, succession planning, and recruitment process outsourcing (RPO).
Korn/Ferry has been operating in Malaysia since 1978. We are NYSE-listed, a full- service executive-search irm
and the longest established among the few international irms in this market.
We cover ive main business sectors – Financial Services, Consumer Goods, Industrial, Life Science and
Telecommunications /Advanced Technology – although our experience base in Malaysia is very broad and
we have executed searches in almost all sectors of business, for local as well as multinational companies.
Currently, our client base is a mix between multinationals and local conglomerates /Government-linked
companies.
Where there’s
talent, there’s
Korn Ferry.
We design, build, attract and ignite greatness.
At every level of an organization, there is
potential for leadership, growth and knowledge.
We have the tools, research and know-how to
turn potential into momentum.
www.kornferry.com
© Korn Ferry 2014. All rights reserved.
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
BOOK REVIEW
In horseracing, it takes more than speed for a
horse like Secretariat to win the Triple Crown.
In organisations, it takes both head and heart,
commitment to an inspiring cause, steel and
velvet leadership, stewardship, and alignment-the practices of Triple Crown leadership. Triple
Crown Leadership also provides hard-hitting,
practical advice on leading turnarounds,
startups, and social ventures--and addresses the
leadership needed from CEOs, boards, senior
managers, and even people without authority.
What’s in it For You
In today’s iercely competitive world, it takes
more than “business as usual” to stay strong
and stay ahead of the curve. It takes Triple
Crown Leadership. Inspired by the most elusive
championship in sports, the Triple Crown of
horseracing, this compelling road map is
designed for leaders who want to win.
Triple Crown Leadership provides helpful tools
for any leader seeking a better way. The book
shows you how to:
• Be
excellent
(achieve
exceptional
performance), ethical (do the right thing),
and enduring (stand the test of time)
• Align your organisation for peak performance
• Instill a culture of character
• Lead with both “steel” and “velvet”
• Achieve impact and sustainability while
maintaining high performance.
• Turn your company around after a breakdown.
Based on the authors’ experience and interviews
with over sixty organisations in eleven countries,
this book provides compelling leadership lessons
from an array of enterprises, including Zappos,
Google, eBay, Infosys, Xerox, Spotify, Mayo
Clinic, KIPP, Ashoka, and more. Executives
Bob and Gregg Vanourek--a dynamic father
and son team--show you how to achieve high
performance, integrity, and sustainability.
22
SEPT 2014
The book shares wealth of tips on:
• How leaders can achieve exceptional
performance, with integrity, and sustain it
over time
• How entrepreneurs can position their ventures
for high performance, integrity, and impact
• What must leaders do differently during
transformational turnarounds and crises
• How to align your organisation for peak
performance
• How to use purpose to ground, values to
guide, and vision to inspire
• How to create a sustainable organisation
• How to stay true to your vision, mission, and
values
• How to bake integrity into the heart of your
business
• How to create a culture of character
• How organisations can achieve a positive
social impact – on employees, customers,
shareholders, suppliers, communities, the
environment, and the world – even as they
achieve exceptional performance
• How to develop people more fully in terms of
head and heart
• How can leaders assess progress in building
excellent, ethical, and enduring organisations
• How to interview and assess for character
and cultural it
The book “Triple Crown Leadership” by Bob and
Gregg Vanourek is a must-have for leaders who
want to win.
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
PROGRAMME HIGHLIGHTS
Corporate Directors Onboarding Programme (CDOP) 2014
Type: Customised Programme
Date: 16 & 17 April 2014
Venue: Le Meridien Hotel Kuala Lumpur
Next Sessions:
• 8&9 Apr 2015, Kl
• 26&27 Nov 2015, Penang
MINDA organised its irst CDOP programme for 2014
which focused on knowledge, skills and behavioural
mindsets. CDOP methodology involved facilitated
learning through active interactions, dynamic
discussions and the use of case studies. Among the
topics covered during the two-day programme were:
• The Dynamics of a Company
• Key Role Players in a Company – Roles and
Responsibilities
• Effective Director’s Proile – ‘Knowledge, Skills and
Mindset’
• Enhancing Board Effectiveness
• Anatomy of Corporate Governance
• Optimum Board Performance : Best Practices for Board Performance and Risk Management
The programme was facilitated by Ravinderjit Savinder Singh, Companies Commission of Malaysia, Datuk
John Zinkin, Managing Director of Zinkin Ettinger Sdn Bhd and Dato’ Abdul Aziz Abu Bakar CEO of MINDA. A
total number of 32 pax attended the programme.
Corporate Directors Advanced Programme (CDAP): Human Capital
Type: Customised Programme
Date: 6 – 7 May 2014
Venue: The Majestic Hotel, Kuala Lumpur
Next Session:
• 13&14 May 2015, KL
The programme was attended by Directors and Chairmen from various GLCs and PLCs. Some of the key
topics covered during the two-days programme were Corporate Performance Management, Strategic
Workforce Planning, Development of Future Leaders, Talent Management and Development Strategies,
Board Performance and Compensation, and Human Capital Risk Management in Corporate Transformation
and Transaction.
The key highlights of the programme include:
• The many insights from the research and benchmarking done by Aon Hewitt across the globe.
• Discussion on how Board can drive talent management and development strategies and culture in the
organisation.
• Discussion and ways to overcome conventional compensation model.
• The panel discussion moderated by Dato Aziz Bakar, CEO of MINDA with panelist, Datuk Dr Syed Muhamed
Syed Abdul Kadir, Senior Independent Non-Executive Director, CIMB Group on the practical application of
all the modules discussed.
MALAYSIAN DIRECTORS ACADEMY
23
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
PROGRAMME HIGHLIGHTS
Building High Performance Directors (BHPD) 7/2014
Type: Premier Programme
Date: 18 – 22 May 2014
Venue: Hotel Soitel Legend Metropole, Hanoi, Vietnam
Next Session:
• 16-20 Aug 2015
BHPD 7/2014 was held in Hanoi, Vietnam and attended exclusively by a group of very seasoned senior
executives that comprise of Chairmen, Directors and CEOs.
The highest ever rating of 4.7 out of 5, the programme was led
by world class faculty with extensive experience in business
and academia:
• INSEAD Professor, Dr. Randel Carlock, facilitated sessions on
leadership which encompasses of building and leading high
performing board teams with case studies being discussed
to enhance board effectiveness;
• Dr. Yeah Kim Leng formerly the Group Chief Economist
of RAM Holdings, shared insights on Malaysia and vision
2020 with an overview of heading towards a high income
economy;
• Mr. Stuart Dean, CEO of GE Asean whom presented on Corporate Sustainability;
• And His Excellency Ambassador of Malaysia to Vietnam, Dato’ Azmil Mohd Zabidi who was our “Fireplace
Chat” guest, enlightened participants on the business opportunities available in Vietnam.
The key highlights of the programme include:
• The in-depth discussion of many case studies such as Everest
Climb, Apple, 3M, HP-Compaq, Axiata, Pharma UK and
Silver Bird.
• The role-play session on HP’s Boardroom Drama that got
everyone acting out real people in the real situation.
• Understanding of Vietnam’s education history and culture
via the ield trip to the oldest university in Hanoi – Temple of
Literature
• Board Effectiveness Assessment Tool – helped participants to
have a 360 degrees view of their own board’s effectiveness.
BHPD is a course that designed to give Malaysian Directors a
platform to share with other Board Members their wide range
of experiences in different cultures, industries and governance
frameworks. This programme typically caters for experienced
Board Members who wish to broaden their knowledge and
strengthen their effectiveness.
24
SEPT 2014
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
PROGRAMME HIGHLIGHTS
Corporate Directors Advanced Programme (CDAP): Financial Language in the Boardroom
Type: Customised Programme
Next Sessions:
Date: 9 – 10 June 2014
• 27-28 Jan 2015, KL
Venue: The Majestic Hotel, Kuala Lumpur
• 9-10 Jun 2015, KL
“Corporate Directors Advanced Program (CDAP): Financial
Language in the Boardroom” is the only inancial related programme
in the market that is tailored for Board Members. The programme was
well-attended by a good mix of Chairmen, Directors and CEOs of
various GLCs and PLCs where they now have the following within
their ingertips:
• The legal reporting requirements for companies
• How to interpret inancial reports and make sound analysis of
business performance for board discussion
• Some “golden rules” of inancial management to improve
business performance and viability
• How businesses are valued for acquisition
The key highlights of the programme include:
• Rated highly on its ability to impart practical inancial language
understanding in the boardroom context with extensive discussion
on Faber Group’s case study. Many other local and regional
cases are also being referred to throughout the programme.
• Led by the experienced inancial expert, Mr Vincent Loh who has more than 35 years of experience in
auditing, inance, managing companies and management consultancy in the UK, Singapore, Cambodia,
Indonesia, Hong Kong and Malaysia.
• Peer-to-peer experiences sharing among seasoned Board Members and benchmarked against Vincent’s
regional experience.
Corporate Directors Advanced Programme (CDAP) 2014 –
“Ethics in Business : Creating Sustainable Value”
Type: Customised Programme
Date: 11 & 12 August 2014
Venue: The Majestic Hotel Kuala Lumpur
Next Session:
• 22-23 Apr 2015, KL
CDAP Ethics in Business: Creating Sustainable Value was launched irst under the CDAP series year 2014. It
was held on the 11 & 12 August 2014 at the Majestic Hotel Kuala Lumpur. The programme was attended by
sixteen (16) participants and facilitated by Datuk John Zinkin, Managing Director of Zinkin Ettinger Sdn Bhd
and faculty member of the ICLIF Leadership and Governance Centre.
CDAP Ethics in Business provide the necessary knowledge and skills for the directors of listed companies using
a blended learning approach of teach pieces, case study discussion, videos and participant presentations.
The key topics of this programme are Ethics in Principle, Ethics in Practice, Who is the Custodian of Ethics, Are
Ethics situational, Creating an Ethical Culture.
MALAYSIAN DIRECTORS ACADEMY
25
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
PROGRAMME HIGHLIGHTS
Corporate Directors Advanced Programme (CDAP) 2014 : Strategy & Risk
Type: Customised Programme
Date: 27 & 28 August 2014
Venue: The Majestic Hotel Kuala Lumpur
Next Sessions:
• 11&12 Mar 2015, KL
• 2&3 Sept 2015, KL
The programme was attended by fourteen (14) participants and facilitated by Dr David Bobker, Director of
the Centre for Economics and Risk at the Malaysia University of Science and Technology.
CDAP – SR provides the necessary knowledge and skills for the Company Directors to be able to provide
inputs, make sound judgment and critical probing questions on matters related to company’s strategy and
risk oversight. Central to the programme is the concept of “inverse risk logic” which will equip directors with a
solid framework within which to implement effective risk oversight. It provides directors with a new perspective
of “looking outside, looking forward”. The key topics of this programme are Strategic planning and the Business
Model, The Meaning of Risk Inverse Risk Logic, Viability and Risk Appetite, Strategic Risk Governance and
Strategic Operational Risks.
Tea Talk With Professor Jean-Philippe Deschamps
Innovation Governance in Practice - “How Top Management Promote, Steer and Sustain Innovation”
Type: Awareness & Networking (3/4)
Date: 27 August 2014
Venue: The Majestic Hotel, Kuala Lumpur
As part of the MINDA Tier 3 programme, Tea Talk was organised at The
Majestic Hotel Kuala Lumpur and we were privileged by having Professor
Jean-Philippe Deschamps, as our speaker for the talk.
It was indeed a knowledgeable evening spent with thirty eight (38)
attendees; sharing their exciting views on Innovation.
26
SEPT 2014
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
PROGRAMME HIGHLIGHTS
Breakfast Talk With Mr Bob Vanourek
“Triple Crown Leadership: Building Excellent, Ethical, and Enduring Organisations”
Type: Awareness & Networking (2/4)
Date: 18 June 2014
Venue: Shangri-la Hotel Kuala Lumpur
MINDA organised its second Breakfast Talk for the year and this round was with Mr Bob Vanourek who is coauthor of the “Triple Crown Leadership: Building Excellent, Ethical, and Enduring Organizations”, the 2013
USA Best Book Awards Winner. Based in Greater Denver, USA, his writing has been featured in Fast Company,
American Management Association, the Center for Creative Leadership, Leader to Leader, Leadership
Excellence, and many more.
The session was attended by a total of thirty two (32) guests that consist of Chairmen and Directors from
various GLCs, PLCs and private companies. These guests are made of MINDA Alumni and corporate directors
who are new to MINDA.
Bob shared how his concept of Triple Crown Leadership emphasises on leadership as a group rather than
individual. Triple Crown Leadership is inspired by the most elusive championship in sports, the Triple Crown
of horseracing. The concept brings a compelling road map designed for leaders who seek a better way to
achieve high performance, integrity and sustainability of an organisation.
Bob has introduced the following 5 leadership practices to the guests:
•
•
•
•
•
Practice 1: Head and Heart: New approaches to hiring and promoting the right people
Practice 2: The Colors: Inspiring and engaging your colleagues
Practice 3: Steel and Velvet: Flexing your leadership style
Practice 4: Stewards: Leadership as a group performance
Practice 5: Alignment for sustained high performance
He also shared some of the leadership approaches for organisations that are in the various stages of life-cycle
from start-up to growth and turnaround. Guests were very engaged throughout the session with thoughtprovoking questions and sharing of exclusive peer-to-peer experiences.
MALAYSIAN DIRECTORS ACADEMY
27
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
PROGRAMME HIGHLIGHTS
Women Directors Onboarding Training Programme (WDOTP) Series 2014
Type: Customised Programme
Venue:
Session 1: 21 – 23 April 2014 - Ministry of Women Family and Community Development,Putrajaya
Session 2: 27 – 29 May 2014 - Securities Commission Malaysia
Session 3: 11 – 13 June 2014 - Securities Commission Malaysia
Session 4: 5 – 7 Aug 2014 - Putrajaya International Convention Centre
Session 5: 13 – 15 Aug 2014 - Shangri-la Putrajaya
In response to the recent government mandate
stipulating that women must comprise at least
30 percent of decision-making positions in the
corporate sector by 2012, the Ministry of Women,
Family and Community Development (KWPKM)
through its agency, NAM Institute for the
Empowerment of Women (NIEW) has initiated a
comprehensive Women Directors Programme
(WDP) Framework which consist of REGISTRATION,
ASSESMENT, COACHING, TRAINING OF TECHNICAL
AND SOFT SKILLS and BOARD SIMULATION. MINDA
has been given the task by NIEW to design the
technical training module to prepare potential
and qualiied women to fully understand their
roles as board directors.
Among the topics covered during the three-day programme were The Fiduciary Duties, Roles and
Responsibilities of Corporate Directors as stipulated in the Companies Act, The Corporate Governance of
company directors as best practices, Financial Language in the Boardroom, Strategy & Risk and Various
board roles vis a vis the organisation and stakeholders.
The programmes were facilitated by Ms. Ravinderjit Savinder Singh, Mr Vincent Loh; Datuk John Zinkin, Mr.
Wee Hock Kee and Mr Thakurdas Naraindas.
28
SEPT 2014
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
PROGRAMME HIGHLIGHTS
3rd Party Events
Event
Organiser
Date
Venue
: Corporate Governance Practices in State-Owned-Enterprises (SOEs)
: The World Bank and Undersecretariat of Treasury Turkey
: 10 June 2014
: Ankara, Turkey
The conference brought together over 200 participants, including
oficials from the Treasury and Ministry of Energy, and representatives of
Turkish state-owned Enterprises (SOEs) in order to discuss a wide range of
issues pertaining to SOE governance reform in the country.
In the opening remarks, Mr. İbrahim Çanakci, Undersecretary of
Treasury, called for reforms in the area of state-owned enterprise
governance, while Sunita Kikeri, Programme Manager for Corporate
Governance at the World Bank, presented global trends in SOE
governance. Representatives from the public sector in Turkey, along
with representatives from SOEs in the energy, transport, and agriculture
sectors, had the opportunity to hear about the current status and
challenges posed by the legal and institutional framework for SOEs in
the country.
The event featured a number of distinguished guests and speakers from
a variety of countries, including Finland, Malaysia, Australia, Singapore
and Pakistan whom all shared good practices and lessons learned in
the sphere of SOE governance. MINDA’s CEO, Dato’ Abdul Aziz Abu
Bakar was invited to present the topic on “Professionalising SOE Board
of Directors –The Malaysia Experience”. The slides have been shared
and can be downloaded at http://www.worldbank.org/content/dam/
Worldbank/Event/ECA/Turkey/tr-soe3-aziz-bakar.pdf
Event
Organiser
Date
Venue
: Innovating Malaysia Conference 2014 (IMC 2014)
: Agensi Inovasi Malaysia (AIM)
: 28 & 29 August 2014
: Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre
MINDA’s CEO, Dato’ Abdul Aziz Abu Bakar was invited to
be one of the panelists in the session “Driving Innovation:
The Board as a Catalyst” where the panellists deliberated
how the Board of Directors can be a powerful force in
driving innovation and many insights were shared on
how successful organisations have managed the role of
the board and learn best practices for drawing on its full
potential for promoting innovation. Other panellists in the
session include Professor Jean-Philippe Deschamps, Author
& Professor Emeritus, IMD Business School and Dato’ Seri
Mohamad Iqbal Rawther, Chairman MIM.
IMC2014 is a platform to showcase the signiicance of
Return on Investment in Innovation; to promote business
opportunities and support networking to participants across
all industries.
MALAYSIAN DIRECTORS ACADEMY
29
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
We unlock your time and capacity so you
can unleash your full business potential
Our Profile
Boardroom Group is a leading provider of ‘Smart
Business Solutions’ in Malaysia servicing local
and international clients. Our suite of professional
accounting, business advisory, corporate
secretarial, directors’ training, HR consultancy,
payroll, share registry and taxation services has
helped our clients maximise their business value. We
are a wholly-owned subsidiary of Boardroom
Limited which is listed on the Singapore
Exchange and serve over 5,500 clients in Singapore,
Malaysia, Hong Kong, China and Australia. In
Malaysia, we have offices in Selangor, Penang and
Johor.
We have been providing corporate services for
over 50 years to an illustrious and diversified
portfolio of clients which include world renowned
MNCs from the USA, Europe and the Asia Pacific,
local blue chip companies listed on Bursa Malaysia
Securities as well as small and medium-sized
businesses across a wide spectrum of industries.
Boardroom has built an established network of
offices and regional partners in Asia Pacific and
Europe and we are well-positioned to support your
growing business needs in the regions.
Boardroom Business Solution Sdn Bhd
(Company No.: 1050657-U)
1202, Level 12, Uptown 1, No. 1 Jalan SS21/58
Damansara Uptown, 47400 Petaling Jaya
Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia
Tel : +60-3-7661 8588 Fax : +60-3-7661 8577
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
Premier Alumni List
31.
Raja Tan Sri Arshad Raja Tun Uda
Asia Capital Reinsurance Malaysia Sdn Bhd
60.
Tan Sri Dato’ Sheriff Mohd Kassim
PLUS Expressway Berhad
Datuk Dr. Syed Muhamad bin Syed Abdul
Kadir
Bumiputra-Commerce Holdings Berhad
32.
Tan Poh Keat
Telekom Research & Development Sdn Bhd
61.
Dato’ Mohd Shukri Hussin
Bumiputra-Commerce Holdings Berhad
2.
Dato’ Dr. Mohamad Hashim Ahmad Tajudin
Chemical Company of Malaysia Berhad
62.
BHPD 2/2008
3.
Datuk Bazlan bin Osman
Telekom Malaysia Berhad
33.
Datuk Abdullah Hj Kuntom
Malaysia Building Society Berhad
Tan Sri Dato’ Dr. Muhammad Rais Abdul
Karim
Malaysian Directors Academy (MINDA)
63.
Oh Kim Sun
Pharmaniaga Bhd
4.
Lau Tiang Hua
Malaysia Building Society Berhad
34.
Tuan Haji Ir. Abdullah Yusof
Cement Industries of Malaysia
DF 1/2009
5.
Dato’ Abdul Rahman Abdul Ghani
Malaysian Airline System Berhad
35.
Abu Bakar Ibrahim
Khazanah Nasional Berhad
64.
Arlida Ariff
Iskandar Investment Berhad
6.
Tuan Haji Abdul Jabbar bin Abdul Majid
Proton Holdings Berhad
36.
Anuar bin Mohd Hassan
Malaysian Reinsurance Berhad
65.
Adlan Ahmad
Iskandar Waterfront Sdn Bhd
7.
Dato’ Lim Kheng Guan
Telekom Malaysia Berhad
37.
Dato’ Dr. Aziuddin Ahmad
ValueCap Sdn Bhd
66.
Shahnaz Al-Sadat binti Abdul Mohsein
UEM Group Berhad
8.
Dato’ Fuad bin Jaafar
Tenaga Nasional Berhad
38.
Tan Sri Bashir Ahmad bin Abdul Majid
Malaysia Airport Holdings Berhad
67.
Tuan Haji Hassan Jaa’far
PLUS Expressway Berhad
9.
Dato’ Anwarrudin Ahamad Osman
UEM Builders Berhad
39.
Jamilah Dato’ Hashim
Khazanah Nasional Berhad
68.
Dato’ Noorizah binti Hj. Abd Hamid
PLUS Expressway Berhad
10.
Tuan Haji Abdul Kadir Md Kassim
UEM World Berhad
40.
Dr. Kamarulzaman Mohamed Zin
Khazanah Nasional Berhad
69.
Tan Sri K. Ravindran
PLUS Expressway Berhad
11.
Andrew Lo Kian Nyan
Employees Provident Fund
41.
Tan Sri Datuk Mohamed Khatib bin Abdul
Hamid
Pantai Holdings Berhad
70.
Tan Sri Abdul Halim Ali
Malaysia Building Society Berhad
12.
Dr. Roslan A. Ghaffar
Malaysian Resources Corporation Berhad
71.
42.
Datuk Mohamed Zain bin Mohamed Yusof
Faber Group Berhad
Mohd Izani Ashari
Khazanah Nasional Berhad
Tuan Haji Mohd Yusof Hussian
Bumiputra-Commerce Holdings Berhad
72.
43.
Michael Jude Fernandez
Khazanah Nasional Berhad
14.
Tuan Haji Khairuddin Ahmad
RHB Bank Berhad
Mohd Nadziruddin Mohd Basri
Khazanah Nasional Berhad
73.
44.
Dr. Ir. Muhamad Fuad bin Abdullah
Island & Peninsular Bhd
Hiroyuki Kudo
CIMB Group Berhad
15.
Ismael Fariz Ali
Khazanah Nasional Berhad
45.
Dato’ Rosli Sharif
Faber Group Berhad
46.
Dato’ Syed Saleh Syed Abdul Rahman
Lembaga Tabung Haji
Tan Sri Samsudin Osman
BIMB Holdings Berhad
47.
Dato’ Zainal Azwar bin Zainal Aminuddin
TH Plantation Berhad
17.
Tan Sri Dato’ Seri Haidar Mohamed Noor
CIMB Bank Berhad
48.
18.
Tan Sri Dato’ Hj Mohd Zuki Hj Kamaluddin
Island & Peninsular Berhad
Datuk Zainal Abidin Alias
Faber Group Berhad
19.
Laksamana (B) Tan Sri Dato’ Sri Mohd
Anwar Hj Mohd Nor
Lembaga Tabung Angkatan Tentera
20.
BHPD 1/2007
1.
13.
CF 1/2007
16.
BHPD 3/2010
CF 2/2008
74.
Encik Johan bin Abdullah
BIMB Holdings Berhad
75.
Dato’ Kalsom binti Abdul Rahman
Chemical Company of Malaysia Bhd
76.
Dato’ Mohammed Azlan Hashim
Employee Provident Fund (EPF)
77.
Prof. Datuk Dr. Syed Othman Alhabshi
Etiqa Takaful Berhad
78.
Dato’ Ikmal Hijaz Hashim
Faber Group Berhad
79.
Mohd Izani Ashari
Khazanah Nasional Berhad
80.
Hisham Zainal Mokhtar
Khazanah Nasional Berhad
81.
Loh Wai Yee
Khazanah Nasional Berhad
82.
Stephanie Saw Ai Lin
Khazanah Nasional Berhad
83.
Dato’ Ir. Abdul Rahim Abu Bakar
Telekom Malaysia Berhad
84.
Dato’ Abdul Manaf bin Hashim
Tenaga Nasional Berhad
85.
Shahnaz Al-Sadat Abdul Mohsein
UEM Group Berhad
86.
Tuan Haji Abdul Kadir Bin Md. Kassim
UEM Land Holdings Berhad
49.
Dato’ Ir. Abdul Rahim Bakar
OPUS Group Berhad
Mohd Ali Dewal
Lippo Bank Tbk
50.
Abdullah Abdul Hamid
Malaysian Directors Academy (MINDA)
21.
Tan Sri Datuk Dr Aris Othman
Malaysia Airport Holdings Berhad
51.
Dato’ Ahmad Pardas Senin
Malaysian Directors Academy (MINDA)
22.
Tan Sri Abdul Halim Ali
Malaysia Building Society Berhad
52.
Dato’ Anwar bin Haji @ Aji
Faber Group Berhad
23.
Tan Sri Azlan Mohd Zainol
Malaysia Resources Corporation Berhad
53.
Tan Sri Dato’ Seri Haidar bin Mohamed Nor
CIMB Bank Berhad
24.
Tan Sri Datuk Khatib Abdul Hamid
Pantai Holdings Berhad
54.
Datuk Mohamed Arif Nun
Silterra Malaysia Sdn Bhd
25.
Tan Sri Ahmad Sarji Abdul Hamid
Permodalan Nasional Berhad
55.
Tan Sri Dato’ Lau Yin Pin
Tenaga Nasional Berhad
26.
Dato’Mohammed Azlan Hashim
Proton Holdings Berhad
56.
Tan Sri Dato’ Lodin Wok Kamaruddin
Boustead Holdings Berhad
27.
Tan Sri Dato’ Ir Muhammad Radzi Hj Mansor
Telekom Malaysia Berhad
57.
28.
Tan Sri Leo Moggie
Tenaga Nasional Berhad
Dato’ Dr. Mohamad Hashim bin Ahmad
Tajudin
Chemical Company of Malaysia Berhad
58.
87.
29.
Dato’ Ir Abdul Rahim Abu Bakar
UEM Builders Berhad
Tan Sri Mohamed Azman Yahya
Pharmaniaga Bhd
Tuan Haji Abdul Kadir Bin Md. Kassim
Cement Industry of Malaysia
59.
88.
30.
Tan Sri Dr Ahmad Tajuddin Ali
UEM Group Berhad
Tan Sri Datuk Mohamed Khatib bin Abdul
Hamid
Pantai Holdings Berhad
Datuk Dr. Syed Muhamad bin Syed Abdul
Kadir
CIMB Islamic Berhad
CF 3/2010
MALAYSIAN DIRECTORS ACADEMY
31
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
ALUMNI LIST
89.
Dato’ Ikmal Hijaz Hashim
Faber Group Berhad
119. Dato’ Kalsom Abd Rahman
MISC Berhad
90.
Tan Sri Dato’ Dr. Muhammad Rais Abdul
Karim
Malaysian Directors Academy (MINDA)
120. Mahadzir Bin Azizan
Syarikat Takaful Malaysia Berhad
91.
Laksamana Tan Sri Dato’ Seri Ilyas Hj Din
(Bersara)
Perbadanan Hal Ehwal Bekas Angkatan
Tentera
92.
Fazlur Rahman Ebrahim
Securities Commision
93.
Mahbob bin Abdullah
TH Plantations Berhad
94.
95.
Datuk Azizan Abdul Rahman
TH Properties Sdn Bhd
Dato’ Othman Jusoh
TH Technologies Sdn Bhd
BHPD 4/2011
96.
Tan Sri Abdul Halim Ali
Malaysian Building Society Berhad
97.
Abdul Rahim Bin Abdul Hamid
Proton Holdings Berhad
148. Tan Sri Abdul Halim Ali
Malaysia Building Society Berhad
121. Datuk Mohaiyani binti Shamsudin
Malayan Banking Berhad
149. Prof. Ir. Dr. Hj Abdul Rahman Bin Omar
UiTM Hospitality Management Services Sdn
Bhd
122. Dato’ Mohamed Hassan Md Kamil
Syarikat Takaful Malaysia Berhad
150. Ahmad Norhisham Hassan
Jambatan Kedua Sdn Bhd
123. Tan Sri Dato’ Dr Muhammad Rais Bin Abdul
Karim
Malaysian Directors Academy (MINDA)
151. Datuk Wira Ahmad Rusli Joharie
Pengurusan Aset Air Berhad
124. Osman bin Ismail
Permodalan Nasional Berhad
125. Richard George Azlan Abas
Theta Edge Berhad
126. Ronnie Kok Lai Huat
TIME dotCom Berhad
127. Tan Sri Datuk Dr. Raiah Salim
NAM Institute for the Empowerment of
Women (NIEW)
128. Dato’ Sulaiman Mohd Yusof
Syarikat Takaful Malaysia Berhad
152. Tan Sri Dr. Ahmad Tajuddin Ali
UEM Group Berhad
153. Dato’ Ahmad Zaini Othman
Malaysia Building Society Berhad
154. Azman Bin Hj. Tambi Chik
Rangkaian Hotel Seri Malaysia Sdn Bhd
155. Dato’ Hashmuddin Bin Mohd
Jambatan Kedua Sdn Bhd
156. Dato’ Seri Ismail Shahudin
Opus Group Berhad
157. Dato’ Md. Agil Bin Mohd Natt
EXIM Bank Malaysia Berhad
98.
Tan Sri Abi Musa Asa’ari
Lembaga Tabung Haji
129. Maj Gen Dato’ Zulkilee bin Mazlan
Perbadanan Hal Ehwal Bekas Angkatan
Tentera
99.
Dr Achmad Riawan Amin
CIMB Islamic Bank Berhad
BHPD 5/2012
159. Dato’ Mohamed Hassan Md Kamil
Syarikat Takaful Malaysia Berhad
100. Behara Venkata Rama Subbu
Proton Holdings Berhad
130. Tan Sri Dato’ Sri Azizan Arifin
BHIC Aero Services Sdn Bhd
160. Datuk Mohamed Zain Mohamed Yusuf
Faber Group Berhad
101. Datuk Francis Tan Leh Kiah
Securities Commission Malaysia
131. Amrish Hari Narayanan
EMRAIL Sdn Bhd
161. Tuan Haji Mohd Radzi Hussein
Pengurusan Aset Air Bhd
102. Tan Sri Ghazzali Sheikh Abdul Khalid
Axiata Group Berhad
132. Tan Sri Dato’ Hari Narayanan A/L
Govindasamy
Tenaga Nasional Berhad
162. Dato Norazman Abd Aziz
UEM Group Berhad
103. Datuk Johar Bin Che Mat
Proton Holdings Berhad
104. Michael Jude Fernandes
Pantai Holdings Berhad
105. Mohamed Nor Bin Abdul Hamid
Etiqa Takaful Berhad
106. Dato’ Sri Mohd Nadzmi Bin Mohd Salleh
Proton Holdings Berhad
107. Tan Sri Rainer Althoff
Proton Holdings Berhad
108. Tuan Haji Zakaria Bin Ismail
Syarikat Takaful Malaysia Berhad
109. Yew Wan Kup
CIMB Group Holdings Berhad
DF 2/2011
110. Datuk Abdul Malek Bin Abdul Aziz
NCB Holdings Berhad
111. Tuan Haji Abdul Kadir Bin Md Kassim
UEM Land Holdings Berhad
112. Abdul Rahim Bin Abdul Hamid
Proton Holdings Berhad
113. Ahmad Tajuddin Carrim
Proton Holdings Berhad
114. Cindy Tan Ler Chin
Malaysia Building Society Berhad
115. David Lau Nai Pek
Axiata Group Berhad
116. Dato’ Gumuri Hussain
Securities Commission Malaysia
117. Tuan Haji Hassan Jaafar
PLUS Expressway Berhad
118. Ibrahim bin Awang
Permodalan Nasional Berhad
32
DF 4/2013
SEPT 2014
133. Datuk Mohamed Zain Mohamed Yusuf
Faber Group Berhad
134. Tan Sri Samsudin Osman
Employee Provident Fund
135. Dato’ Sulaiman Mohd Yusof
Syarikat Takaful Malaysia Berhad
136. Datuk Zainal Abidin Alias
Faber Group Berhad
137. Zaiviji Ismail bin Abdullah
UEM Group Berhad
158. Mohamad Azmi Bin Ali
Jambatan Kedua Sdn Bhd
163. Tan Sri Dato’ Ir. Haji Omar Bin Ibrahim
UEM Builders Berhad
164. Dato’ Rosely Bin Samsuri
Perbadanan Nasional Berhad
165. Dato’ Rosman Bin Abdullah
Kumpulan FIMA Berhad
166. Shahnaz Al Sadat
Malaysian Directors Academy (MINDA)
167. Dato’ Sulaiman Mohd Yusof
Syarikat Takaful Malaysia Berhad
DF 3/2012
168. Tuan Syed Kamarulzaman Bin Dato’ Syed
Zainol Khodki Shahabudin
Perbadanan Nasional Berhad (PNS)
138. Tuan Haji Abdul Kadir bin Md Kassim
UEM Group Berhad
169. Wan Abdul Aziz Arifin
Khazanah Nasional Berhad
139. Dato’ Ir Abdul Rahim Abu Bakar
Telekom Malaysia Berhad
170. Dato’ Wan Mohd Fadzmi Wan Othman
AGRO Bank
140. Dato’ Ahmad Ibnihajar
Malaysian Resources Corporation Berhad
171. Zainal Abidin Jalil
Malakoff Corporation Berhad
141. Datuk Azzat bin Kamaludin
Axiata Group Berhad
172. Dato’ Zohari Bin Akob
Jambatan Kedua Sdn Bhd
142. Ibrahim Marsidi
Telekom Malaysia Berhad
173. Encik Zaiviji Bin Abdullah
UEM Group Berhad
143. Kenneth Shen
Axiata Group Berhad
BHPD 6/2013
144. Loh Lee Soon
Maybank Asset Management Sdn Bhd
174. Abdul Rahim Abdul Hamid
Malaysia Debt Ventures Berhad
145. Tan Sri Dato’ Mohd Sheriff Mohd Kassim
PLUS Malaysia Berhad
175. Prof. Ir. Dr. Hj Abdul Rahman Bin Omar
UiTM Hospitality Management Services Sdn
Bhd
146. Puasa Osman
Faber Group Berhad
147. Tuan Haji Zakaria bin Ismail
Syarikat Takaful Malaysia Berhad
176. Datuk Ir. Abdullah Sani bin Abd Karim
Faber Group Berhad
177. Dato’ Adzmy bin Abdullah
SME Bank
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
ALUMNI LIST
178. Elakumari Kantilal
Faber Group Berhad
179. Datuk Johar Che Mat
Agro Bank
180. Lim Tau Kien
UEM Group Berhad
181. Mahadzir Azizan
Syarikat Takaful Malaysia Berhad
182. Tan Sri Datu Dr. Mohamad Taha Arif
IJN Sdn Bhd
183. Dato’ Mohd Salleh Mahmud
IJN Sdn Bhd
184. Tan Sri Dato’ Dr Muhammad Rais bin Abdul
Karim
Malaysian Directors Academy (MINDA)
185. Datuk Mustafha Abd Razak
Bank Rakyat
186. Dato’ Nasarudin bin Hashim
Perak Corporation Berhad
187. Nik Rizal Kamil Bin Tan Sri Dato’ Nik Ibrahim
Kamil
Telekom Malaysia Berhad
188. Datin Paduka Norazlina binti Zakaria
Perbadanan Kemajuan Negeri Selangor
(PKNS)
189. Norazni Binti Mohd Isa
Tenaga Nasional Berhad
190. Tan Sri Dato’ Ir. Hj. Omar Bin Ibrahim
UEM Group Berhad
191. Rahim Yunus
Bank Rakyat
192. Datuk Razali bin Che Mat
Perbadanan Kemajuan Negeri Selangor
(PKNS)
208. Lt. Jen. (R) Datuk Abdul Aziz Bin
Hassan
NCB Holdings Bhd
210. Dato Zuraidah Binti Atan
NCB Holdings Bhd
237. Dato’ Sri Haji Azemi Kasim
Technology Park Malaysia Corporation Sdn
Bhd
211. Puan Azlina Juliani Binti Abd Jalil
Perbadanan Nasional Berhad (PNS)
238. Dato’ Sri Dr. Halim Shaie
Telekom Malaysia Berhad
212. YBhg Datuk Idris Bin Hashim
Perbadanan Nasional Berhad (PNS)
239. Dato’ Ir. Dr. Ismail Mohamed Taib
Jambatan Kedua Sdn Bhd
213. YBhg Dato’ Mohd Arif Bin Ab.
Rahman
Perbadanan Nasional Berhad (PNS)
240. Tn. Hj. Mohd Radzi Hussein
Pengurusan Aset Air Berhad
214. Tan Sri Datuk Amar (Dr.) Hamid Bin
Bugo
Sapurakencana Petroleum Berhad
215. Encik Ishak Bin Ismail
SME Bank
219. Encik Hazrul Anuar Bin Abdull Hamid
UiTM Hospitality Management Services Sdn
Bhd
DF 6/2014
220. Prof Datuk Dr. Abdul Rahman Idris
Institut Terjemahan Buku Malaysia (ITBM)
221. Mr. Ashvin Valiram
1Malaysia Development Berhad
DF 5/2013
224. Dato’ Gumuri Bin Hussain
KUB Agro Holdings Sdn Bhd
199. Dato’ Farizan Darus
Jambatan Kedua Sdn Bhd
200. Dato’ Hashmuddin Bin Mohd
Jambatan Kedua Sdn Bhd
201. Encik Mohamad Azmi B Ali
Jambatan Kedua Sdn Bhd
202. Major (R) Ir. Mohd Ashari Alias
Jambatan Kedua Sdn Bhd
244. Datin Soiah Mohd Salim
JBB Consultant Sdn Bhd
218. Dato’ Sri Azemi Bin Kasim
Technology Park Malaysia
223. Encik Ghazali Haji Darman
Bursa Malaysia Berhad
198. YM Tengku Dato’ Seri Hasmuddin Tengku
Othman
Institut Jantung Negara Sdn Bhd
242. Ms. Nguyen My Lan
GE in Vietnam & Cambodia
217. Mr. Abdulla Faiz
State Trading Organization PLC
194. Dato’ Zuraidah Atan
Bank Rakyat
197. Encik Azizi Meor Ngah
Halal Industry Development Corporation
241. Tan Sri Dato’ Mohd Sheriff Mohd Kassim
Plus Malaysia Berhad
243. Mr. Philip Tan Puay Koon
MIDF Amanah Investment Bank
216. Tuan Haji Ishak Bin Hashim
SME Bank (CEDAR)
222. Dato’ Sri Haji Azemi Bin Kasim
Pembinaan BLT Sdn Bhd (PBLT)
196. Dr. Saimy Bin Ismail
Faber Group Berhad
236. Prof. Ir. Dr. Haji Abdul Rahman Omar
UiTM Hospitality Management Services Sdn
Bhd(Intekma Resort & Convention Centre)
209. Dato Abdul Malek Bin Abdul Aziz
NCB Holdings Bhd
193. Zainal Abidin Jalil
Malakoff Corporation Berhad
195. Puan Rashidah Mohd Sies
Agro Bank
BHPD 7/2014
225. Dato’ Ikmal Hijaz Hashim
Faber Group Berhad
226. Encik Ismail Bin Mahbob
Export-Import Bank of Malaysia Bhd (Exim
Bank)
227. Dr. Khalid Abdul Hamid
Jambatan Kedua Sdn Bhd
228. Datuk Dr. Marzuki Mohamad
Institut Terjemahan Buku Malaysia (ITBM)
229. Dato’ Mazri Muhammad
Institut Terjemahan Buku Malaysia (ITBM)
230. Encik Nik Mohd Nasir Nik Rithauddeen
Bank Rakyat
231. Encik Nik Najib Bin Husain
Export-Import Bank of Malaysia Bhd (Exim
Bank)
203. Tan Sri Dr. Sulaiman Mahbob
Jambatan Kedua Sdn Bhd
232. Dato’ Rosli Bin Mohamed Nor
Export-Import Bank of Malaysia Bhd (Exim
Bank)
204. Dato’ Zohari Bin Akob
Jambatan Kedua Sdn Bhd
233. Tan Sri Dato’ Sri Sabbaruddin Chik
Bank Rakyat
205. Encik Hazim Jamaluddin
Ministry of Finance
234. Dr. Suraya Sulaiman
Alpha Catalyst Consulting
206. Ms. Ravinder Kaur a/p Mahan Singh
Malaysia Building Society Bhd
235. Dr. Zainal Abideen Bin Salleh
KUB Agro Holdings Sdn Bhd
207. Puan Hawariah Bt Idris
Multimedia Development Corporation Sdn
Bhd (MDEC)
MALAYSIAN DIRECTORS ACADEMY
33
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
Our Client List
1Malaysia Development Berhad
Agrobank
Ahmad Zaki Resources Berhad
Allianz Malaysia Berhad
Alpha Catalyst Consulting
Amanah Raya Berhad
Amanahraya Investment Management Sdn Bhd
Amir Kahar Holdings
Bank Rakyat
BHIC Aero Services Sdn Bhd
BIMB Holdings Berhad
Boustead Holdings Berhad
Boustead Penang Shipyard Sdn Bhd
Bursa Malaysia Berhad
Business and Management International College (BMIC)
CapitaMalls Malaysia REIT Management Sdn Bhd
Cement Industry Malaysia Berhad
Chemical Company of Malaysia Berhad
CIMB Bank Berhad
CIMB Holdings Berhad
CIMB Islamic Berhad
Cliq Energy Berhad
Composite Technology Resources Malaysia Sdn Bhd
Continental Tyre PJ Malaysia Sdn Bhd
Credience Malaysia Sdn Bhd
Destination Resorts & Hotels Sdn Bhd
Dijaya Corporation Berhad
Employees Provident Fund
EMRAIL Sdn Bhd
Encorp Berhad
Etiqa Takaful Berhad
EXIM Bank
Faber Group Berhad
GE in Vietnam&Cambodia
Genting Plantations Berhad
Global Facilities Management Sdn Bhd
Halal Industry Development Corporation
IJN Holdings Sdn Bhd
Inno Bio Ventures Sdn. Bhd.
Institut Terjemahan Buku Malaysia (ITBM)
Iskandar Investment Berhad
Iskandar Regional Development Authority
Iskandar Waterfront Development
Island & Peninsular Berhad
IWK Konsortium Sdn Bhd
Jambatan Kedua Sdn Bhd
JBB Consultant Sdn Bhd
JKP Sdn Bhd
K & N Kenanga Holdings Berhad
Khazanah Nasional Berhad
KKIP Sdn Bhd
Kolej Yayasan Sabah
KPJ Seremban Specialist Hospital
KTM Berhad
KUB Agro Holdings Sdn Bhd
Kumpulan FIMA Berhad
Kumpulan Modal Perdana Sdn Bhd
Lembaga Tabung Angkatan Tentera
Lembaga Tabung Haji
Linshanhao Plywood (Sarawak) Sdn Bhd
Malakoff Corporation Berhad
Malaysia Airlines
Malaysia Airports Holdings Berhad
Malaysia Building Society Berhad
Malaysia Debt Ventures Berhad
Malaysia Venture Capital Management Berhad
34
SEPT 2014
Malaysian Mosaics Berhad
Malaysian Resources Corporation Berhad
Malaysia-Thailand Joint Authority
Maybank Asset Management Sdn Bhd
Maybank Group Berhad
MIDF Amanah Investment Bank
Ministry of Finance
Ministry of Transport
Ministry of Women, Family and Community Development
MNRB Holdings Berhad
Multimedia Development Corporation Sdn Bhd
NCB Holdings Bhd
Opus Group Berhad
Pakatan Reka Arkitek Sdn Bhd
Pejabat Timbalan Setiausaha Kerajaan Negeri Sabah
Pembinaan BLT Sdn Bhd (PBLT)
Penang Port Sdn Bhd
Pengurusan Aset Air Berhad
Perak Corporation Berhad
Perbadanan Hal Ehwal Bekas Angkatan Tentera
Perbadanan Kemajuan Negeri Selangor (PKNS)
Perbadanan Nasional Berhad (PNS)
Permodalan Nasional Berhad
Pharmaniaga Berhad
PLUS Expressways Berhad
Primanora Medical Centre
Prokhas Sdn Bhd
Proton Holdings Berhad
PT Bank Lipro Tbk
Rangkaian Hotel Seri Malaysia Sdn Bhd
RHB Bank Berhad
Romstar Sdn Bhd
S.S Excel Communication Consulting Sdn Bhd
Sabah Electricity Sdn Bhd
Sapura Industrial Berhad
Sapura Resources Berhad
Sapurakencana Petroleum Berhad
Sarawak Hidro Sdn Bhd
Securities Commision Malaysia
Sepang International Circuit
Shin Yang Shipyard Sdn Bhd
Silterra Malaysia Sdn Bhd
Sime Darby Berhad
SIRIM Berhad
SME Bank
State Trading Organization PLC
Syarikat Perumahan Negara Berhad
Syarikat Prasarana Negara Berhad
Tan Chong Motors Sdn Bhd
Taylor’s University Sdn Bhd
Technology Park Malaysia Corporation Sdn Bhd
Telekom Malaysia Berhad
Tenaga Nasional Berhad
TH Plantations Berhad
TH Properties Sdn Bhd
TH Technologies Sdn Bhd
Theta Edge Berhad
TPM College Sdn Bhd
UDA Holdings Berhad
UEM Builders Berhad
UEM Group Berhad
UEM Sunrise Berhad
UiTM Hospitality Management Services Sdn Bhd
Unit Perancang Ekonomi Negeri Johor
Valuecap Sdn Bhd
Yayasan Sabah Group
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor
MALAYSIAN DIRECTORS ACADEMY
35
4-DAY
BHPD
2-DAY
2-DAY
2-DAY
2-DAY
2-DAY
2-DAY
3-DAY
CDAP – Finance
CDAP – Human Capital
CDAP – Innovation
CDAP – Mergers & Acquisitions
CDAP – Strategy & Risk
CDOP
WDOTP
1-DAY
Raya Open House
BHPD: Building High Performance Directors
DF: Directors Forum
LEGEND
1-DAY
Breakfast/Luncheon Talk
Cosecs & HR Learning Briefing
TIER 3 AWARENESS & NETWORKING
PROGRAMMES
2-DAY
CDAP – Ethics
TIER 2 CUSTOMISED PROGRAMMES
2-DAY
DURATION
DF
TIER 1 PREMIER PROGRAMMES
PROGRAMMES
27-28
JAN
27
11-12
23-24
MAR
TBC
21-23
8-9
22-23
APR
27-28
13-14
MAY
9-10
JUNE
CDAP: Corporate Directors Advanced Programme
CDOP: Corporate Directors Onboarding Programme
WDOTP: Women Directors Onboarding Training Programme
FEB
TBC
28-30
JUL
6
17-20
AUG
8-10
2-3
SEPT
22
7-8
OCT
26-27
1-3
NOV
1-3
DEC
www.minda.com.my
The BoardView newsletter is published bi-annually by Malaysian Directors Academy (MINDA)
PDF compression, OCR, web optimization using a watermarked evaluation copy of CVISION PDFCompressor