Dirranbandi JUSTICE RESOURCE DOCUMENTS October 2014

JUSTICE RESOURCE DOCUMENTS
Dirranbandi
October 2014
Dirranbandi
Community Acknowledgement
The Judges and Magistrates of Queensland and the Department of
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs (DATSIMA)
would like to respectfully acknowledge the valuable contribution made by the
Dirranbandi community in the development of this document.
While every effort has been made to respect cultural traditions, readers are advised this publication
may contain names and images of people who are deceased.
All reasonable measures have been taken to ensure that information contained in this document is
accurate, including histories, traditional names and pronunciations.
This document was produced as the result of funding granted by the National Judicial College of
Australia.
NOTE:
DRAFT AWAITING COMMUNITY ENDORSEMENT
THIS DOCUMENT IS RELEASED SUBJECT TO FINAL
APPROVAL OF, AND ANY CHANGES REQUESTED BY,
REPRESENTATIVES OF THE DIRRANBANDI COMMUNITY
This document was approved for release on 11 November 2014……………………………………..
Update scheduled for March 2016……………………………………………………………….
Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs
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Table of Contents
1. Introduction.................................................................................................................... 1
2. History of Dirranbandi .................................................................................................... 2
2.1
European Contact ......................................................................................................... 2
3. Dirranbandi Today ......................................................................................................... 4
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
Native Title/Traditional Owners ..................................................................................... 4
Languages .................................................................................................................... 4
Governance .................................................................................................................. 4
Community Aspirations ................................................................................................. 5
4. Community Justice Group ............................................................................................. 6
5. Alcohol Management Plan ............................................................................................. 7
6. Population Snap Shot for Dirranbandi ........................................................................... 8
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
Education...................................................................................................................... 8
Employment.................................................................................................................. 8
Income.......................................................................................................................... 8
Housing ........................................................................................................................ 8
7. Community Events ...................................................................................................... 10
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.4
7.5
7.6
7.7
7.8
7.9
7.10
7.11
7.12
Australia Day/Invasion Day/Survival Day .................................................................... 10
National Apology Day ................................................................................................. 10
Harmony Day .............................................................................................................. 10
National Close the Gap Day........................................................................................ 10
National Sorry Day...................................................................................................... 10
National Reconciliation Week ..................................................................................... 10
Mabo Day ................................................................................................................... 11
NAIDOC (National Aborigines and Islander Day Observance Committee) .................. 11
National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day ..................................... 11
The United Nations International Day of the World’s Indigenous People’s .................. 11
Royal Queensland Show ............................................................................................ 11
A-Day ......................................................................................................................... 11
8. Sorry Business and Sad News .................................................................................... 12
9. Services ....................................................................................................................... 13
9.1
Emergency ................................................................................................................. 13
9.1.1.
9.1.2.
9.1.3.
9.2
Justice ........................................................................................................................ 13
9.2.1.
9.2.2.
9.2.3.
9.2.4.
9.3
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Services (ATSILS) .................................13
Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Women’s Legal and Advocacy Service ..............14
Women's Legal Service..............................................................................................14
South West Queensland Corporation for Legal Services ..........................................15
Youth Justice .............................................................................................................. 16
9.3.1.
9.3.2.
9.3.3.
9.3.4.
9.4
Queensland Police Service ........................................................................................13
Queensland Ambulance Service ................................................................................13
Queensland Fire and Rescue Service .......................................................................13
Youth Justice Service .................................................................................................16
New Bail Support Program .........................................................................................17
Youth Offending Service ............................................................................................17
Youth Advocacy Centre .............................................................................................17
Queensland Corrective Services ................................................................................. 17
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9.4.1.
9.4.2.
9.5
9.6
9.7
Probation and Parole .................................................................................................. 18
Child Safety ................................................................................................................ 18
Recognised Entity ....................................................................................................... 18
9.7.1.
9.8
9.9
9.10
9.11
Social and Economic Development Service ..............................................................22
Goondiwindi Training and Technology - Gateway to Training ...................................22
Australian Government Initiatives ..............................................................................22
Women ....................................................................................................................... 22
9.15.1.
9.16
9.17
The Arts in Dirranbandi ..............................................................................................21
Dirranbandi Library .....................................................................................................22
Children and Youth ..................................................................................................... 22
9.14.1.
9.14.2.
9.14.3.
9.15
St George Aboriginal Housing Co Ltd ........................................................................21
South West Indigenous Network ................................................................................21
Kamilaroi Frogs Inc ....................................................................................................21
Arts, Library and Community Information .................................................................... 21
9.13.1.
9.13.2.
9.14
Early Childhood ..........................................................................................................20
Primary and Secondary ..............................................................................................20
Parent and Community Engagement .........................................................................20
TAFE and Vocational Studies ....................................................................................20
Sport and Recreation .................................................................................................. 21
9.12.1.
9.12.2.
9.12.3.
9.13
Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement Co. Ltd ....................................................18
Health ......................................................................................................................... 18
Disability ..................................................................................................................... 19
Aged Care .................................................................................................................. 19
Education, Employment and Training ......................................................................... 20
9.11.1.
9.11.2.
9.11.3.
9.11.4.
9.12
Adult Offenders ..........................................................................................................17
Youth Offenders .........................................................................................................17
Regional Aboriginal Elder Women’s Steering Committee .........................................22
Men ............................................................................................................................ 22
Support ....................................................................................................................... 23
Care Balonne Association Inc. .....................................................................................................23
10. Getting to Dirranbandi ................................................................................................. 24
11. Once at Dirranbandi .................................................................................................... 25
11.1
Who to contact if you have questions about your visit ................................................. 25
11.1.1.
11.1.2.
Ipswich Service Centre ..............................................................................................25
Balonne Shire Council ................................................................................................25
12. Bibliography ................................................................................................................. 26
12.1
12.2
12.3
12.4
12.5
12.6
12.7
Legislation .................................................................................................................. 26
Cases ......................................................................................................................... 26
Books, Journals and Theses ....................................................................................... 26
John Oxley Library ...................................................................................................... 26
Queensland State Archives ........................................................................................ 26
Internet Resources ..................................................................................................... 27
Websites ..................................................................................................................... 28
EndNotes ........................................................................................................................... 29
Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs
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1.
Introduction
Dirranbandi is located in southwest Queensland, about 600 kilometres southwest of Brisbane. With a
population of only 444 people (as of 2011) it is a relatively small township, although approximately a
quarter of Dirranbandi’s population identify as Indigenous.1
Dirranbandi’s major service centre is St George, which is situated about 95km north of Dirranbandi
along the Castlereagh Highway. Dirranbandi is well-known for its close proximity to Cubbie Station, the
largest privately-owned irrigation property in the southern hemisphere and largest producer of
Australia’s cotton. Cubbie Station provides significant employment opportunities for the Dirranbandi
community.
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2.
History of Dirranbandi
2.1
European Contact
The first known Europeans to explore the Dirranbandi district were the surveyor Sir Thomas Mitchell
and his party who, in 1845, were on an expedition into northern inland Queensland in search of a route
from Sydney to the Gulf of Carpentaria.2 Mitchell arrived back in Sydney in 1847 with reports of
desirable pastoral land in the district.3
Mitchell’s account of his travels up the river between Dirranbandi and Wynebah Station described the
Aboriginal people living in the area. Mitchell had noted two women carrying mummified bodies under
their possum skin cloaks and men and women fishing with hoop nets in a pond.4
Mitchell also observed that ‘their food consisted of fish of the river, ducks, and the small indigenous
melon which grew in such abundance.’5
After Mitchell’s reports of desirable pastoral land circulated, squatters soon flocked to the district to take
up land, triggering the start of frontier conflict in the Maranoa district. Conflict was so fierce that
between December 1847 and the end of 1848 Aboriginal groups had attacked every station in the
district.6
As a result, Crown Lands Commissioner Christopher Rolleston complained in 1848 that the police force
at his disposal was ‘not only insufficient but useless as a protection force where the blacks are
concerned.’7
In June 1848, Governor Fitzroy approved the setting aside of £1000 to be used for the establishment of
a small Corps of ‘Native Police’.8 A detachment, under the command of Frederick Walker, was sent to
the Maranoa district, arriving on 10 May 1849.9
In September 1852, a Native Police detachment commanded by Sergeant Dempster patrolled the
Dirranbandi district. Dempster sent the following report to Frederick Walker:
‘I proceeded down the Balonne River visiting the stations of Mr Danger at Boombah, Mr
Ezzy at Wynebah and Mr Baldwin at Cubbie. At the last two mentioned stations the
blacks had been doing great mischief lately especially at Mr Ezzy’s amongst the cattle.
They have slaughtered some, several have been seen with spears in them on the
adjoining run, and at the time I was down there he assured me he could not find a beast
on his run with the exception of a few crawlers which he turned out lately.’10
In December 1852, there was another Aboriginal attack on a station on the Culgoa River. Frederick
Walker’s second in command, George Fulford suggested the use of severe force to prevent future
attacks, saying:
I am inclined to think ... that if these blacks can be caught at the time they are
committing depredations and severe measures used with them once or twice they will
give very little trouble afterwards.11
Over the next two years, the Native Police relentlessly pursued any Aboriginal groups who attacked the
stations. A missionary, William Ridley, commented in 1855 that on the Balonne River:
After some fatal conflicts, in which some colonists and many [A]borigines have been
slain, the blacks have been awed into submission.12
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Following the violence of the frontier, Aboriginal people who were not accommodated on pastoral
stations and engaged in employment, moved into camps on the edge of towns throughout the district.
Many of these camps lacked basic amenities, which significantly impacted on the health and welfare of
the people living in them.13
In 1897, the Queensland Parliament passed the Aboriginal Protection and Restriction of the Sale of
Opium Act 1897 (Qld)14 which granted power to the ‘Protector of Aboriginals’15 to:
‘cause every [A]boriginal within any District … to be removed to, and kept within the
limits of, any reserve situated within such District, in such a manner, and subject to such
conditions, as may be prescribed. The Minister may, cause any [A]boriginal to be
removed from one reserve to another…’16
In 1902, Harold Meston (son of Archibald Meston, the Protector for southern Queensland), visited
Dirranbandi and found that there were 14 Aboriginal people living in the Dirranbandi camp, three
Aboriginal people living near Whynebah Station and 13 Aboriginal people living at Doondi Station.17
Documented removals from Dirranbandi include 10 people to Barambah/Cherbourg and one person to
Palm Island.18 Some people were able to evade the removal program by avoiding officials or moving to
New South Wales for a period of time.19
By 1934, there were around 100 people living in the Dirranbandi region and about 40 people living at
Hebel.20 During this time, many local Aboriginal people were employed on farms and stations. The
availability of employment and the movement of Aboriginal people into the district were associated with
the expansion of the region’s agriculture, which included cotton in the 1960s.21
For the 1970-71 financial year, two houses were approved for Aboriginal families in Dirranbandi. At the
time, there were four families (consisting of nine adults and 19 children), camped beside the river at
Dirranbandi on Bollon road.22
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3.
Dirranbandi Today
Today, the economy of Dirranbandi relies heavily upon agricultural enterprises. The town is a major
production area for cotton23 and experiences regular influxes of a seasonal labour work force.
3.1
Native Title/Traditional Owners
The legal doctrine of Native Title was first recognised in Australian law in the 1992 High Court decision,
known as the Mabo decision.24
On 18 November 2011, the Kooma people filed a Native Title claim with the National Native Title
Tribunal.25 It is currently active and covers about 31,865.8km2 to the west of St George, east of
Cunnamulla and down to the New South Wales border. The claim encompasses the township of
Dirranbandi.26 A determination is yet to be made.
Further information about Native Title determinations and Indigenous Land Use Agreements can be
obtained at http://www.nntt.gov.au/ or by calling 1800 640 501.
3.2
Languages
English is the predominant language spoken in Dirranbandi. In the 2011 Australian Bureau of Statistics
Census, six Indigenous people in Dirranbandi identified that they spoke an Australian Indigenous
language at home.27
The people of Queensland will often refer to themselves as ‘Murri’; however, Aboriginal people of
southwest Queensland prefer the term ‘Murdi’.28 The everyday language spoken by Murdis in this
region is therefore the Murdi language29.
Murdi language is a combination of many Aboriginal words and derivatives of the English language.30 It
was historically used by Aboriginal stockwomen and men as a common language when communicating
with colonial pastoralists working in the cattle industry in the region.31
The Murdi language is not recorded in written format32 and there are no recognised interpreters
available to translate for this language.33 As such, assistance may be required for complainants,
witnesses, victims and offenders who come before the courts.34
3.3
Governance
Dirranbandi is located within the Balonne Shire Council, which also incorporates the townships of St
George, Hebel and Bollon. The current elected mayor of the Balonne Shire Council (as of February
2013) is Councillor Donna Stewart. The Chief Executive Officer is Mr Scott Norman.
The Council’s Economic Development Strategic Plan 2011-201635 outlines several Indigenous
engagement strategies, including supporting the St George and District Aboriginal Employment
Strategy and partnering with Elders and other local Indigenous organisations in developing and
implementing strategies of social inclusion and Indigenous pathways to training, education, and
business establishment.
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3.4
Community Aspirations
The ‘Balonne 2025 Community Plan’36 outlines the aspirations for the desired future of the Balonne
Shire, including Dirranbandi.
The five key themes outlines in the document include ‘Wise Planning and Design’, ‘Strong and Resilient
Communities’, ‘Prosperity for All’, ‘River Country Stewardship’ and ‘Inclusive and Ethical Governance’.
Some specific goals include working towards a Keeping Place for the region’s Indigenous material
culture, implementing and supporting the Aboriginal Employment Strategy and supporting Traditional
Owners and Elders in building strong community governance and leadership.
Balonne River, Dirranbandi 1939
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4.
Community Justice Group
The closest Community Justice Group (CJG) to Dirranbandi is located in St George. Its role is to
ensure that clients of the service are given appropriate cultural support for court matters. Members of
the CJG work closely with a number of justice agencies including the Queensland Magistrates Court,
Department of Corrective Services, Queensland Police Service, and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander Legal Service. The CJG assists in supporting the community’s understanding of and access to
the justice system by working in conjunction with the JP Magistrates Program, Shire Council by-laws
and victim support agencies.
Contact details for the St George CJG are:
Contact:
Address:
Phone:
Postal Address:
Rob Lacey
90 St George Terrace
St George QLD 4487
07 4625 3774
St George Aboriginal Housing Company
PO Box 222
St George QLD 4498
For general information on CJG’s, please visit the Department of Justice and Attorney-General’s
website at:
http://www.justice.qld.gov.au/corporate/justice-initiatives/indigenous-justice-initiatives/new-queenslandaboriginal-and-torres-strait-islander-justice-strategy.
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5.
Alcohol Management Plan
There are currently no alcohol management plans in the southwest Queensland area. Further
information about community alcohol limits can be obtained from www.olgr.qld.gov.au or by calling 13
QGOV (13 74 68).
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6.
Population Snap Shot for Dirranbandi37
As of 30 July 2011:38
 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people make up 25% (111 of 444 people) of Dirranbandi’s
entire population.
 Of Dirranbandi’s Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population, 32.7% are children aged zero-14
years and 10.9% are people aged 65 years and over.
 The median age for Indigenous people in Dirranbandi is 25, compared to 43 for non-Indigenous
people.
6.1
Education
The proportion of Dirranbandi’s population that is currently attending a pre-school, primary or secondary
school, is comparable to the rates for Queensland overall. The proportion of Indigenous young people in
Dirranbandi aged 15 years and over who have completed Year 12 is 9.9%.
In 2011, Dirranbandi Prep-Year 10 (P-10) State School was identified by the Queensland and
Australian governments as a low socio-economic status school, and selected to receive funding through
the Smarter Schools National Partnership for Low Socio-economic Status School Communities.
Since participating in this partnership, the school has noted improved attendance rates and a decrease
in the Year 10 retention gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous students.39
In 2011 there were no Indigenous people in the community attending a TAFE or University full-time.
6.2
Employment
In 2011, the Indigenous labour force participation rate40 in Dirranbandi was 65%. Of the 71 Indigenous
people aged 15 years and over in Dirranbandi, 38 people recorded as being in the labour force; 29
employed and nine unemployed. Twenty-seven people were recorded as being not in the labour force.
6.3
Income
In 2011, the median Indigenous personal income41 in Dirranbandi was $390 per week. This is
considerably lower than that for a non-Indigenous person, which was $539.
However, the median weekly income42 for an Indigenous household43 in Dirranbandi is comparable to
that of other households.
6.4
Housing
There is a notable difference between Indigenous and other households in terms of the proportion of
dwellings that require one or more extra bedrooms44 (7.9% compared to only 2.4%).
The median mortgage repayment45 for an Indigenous household in Dirranbandi is $1,158 per month.
This is $508 higher than the median repayment for other households, which is $650 per month. Twenty
out of a total of 52 Indigenous households in the community owned their homes outright or had a
mortgage.
The median rent for an Indigenous household is recorded as $125 per week, whilst that for other
households is recorded as $35 per week.
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Bullock team with wool, Dirranbandi c1925
copyright expired
Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs
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7.
Community Events
The Dirranbandi community celebrate a number of annual public holidays and community events*.
26 January
Australia Day/Invasion Day/Survival Day
13 February
National Apology Day
21 March
Harmony Day
24 March
National Close the Gap Day
26 May
National Sorry Day
27 May – 3 June
National Reconciliation Week
3 June
Mabo Day
6 – 14 July
National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC)
Celebrations
4 August
National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day
9 August
International Day of the World’s Indigenous People’s
12 August
Royal Queensland Show
14 October
A-Day
*The above events are annual events and the dates may vary each year.
7.1
Australia Day/Invasion Day/Survival Day
This is celebrated annually across the country as Australia Day in recognition of the landing of the First
Fleet in 1788. However, for many Indigenous Australians it is a day of protest and mourning.
7.2
National Apology Day
This day marks the anniversary of the historic Federal Parliament Apology to the Stolen Generations.
7.3
Harmony Day
This is a national event in celebration of cultural diversity and coincides with the United Nations
International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.
Harmony Day is organised by the Department of Immigration and Citizenship.
7.4
National Close the Gap Day
National Close the Gap Day is held annually in an effort to raise awareness about Indigenous health
and closing the gap on life expectancy between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.
7.5
National Sorry Day
National Sorry day was first held on 26 May 1998 in recognition and commemoration of those impacted
by the Stolen Generations. The event was born out of the recommendations of the 1997 Bringing
Them Home Report.46
7.6
National Reconciliation Week
This week commemorates two important milestones in Australian reconciliatory history – the dates of
the 1967 Referendum (27 May) and the High Court decision in Mabo (3 June).
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7.7
Mabo Day
This day is a celebration of the anniversary of the Mabo decision, which overturned the doctrine of terra
nullius and recognised the legal doctrine of Native Title in Australian law. Mabo Day occurs annually on
3 June and though it is not a public holiday, it is nevertheless a significant day for all Indigenous
Australians.
7.8
NAIDOC (National Aborigines and Islander Day Observance
Committee)
NAIDOC begins in the first week of July each year. Staff of a number of services in the region will
generally participate in the festivities during this period and these services may be difficult to access at
this time. Essential services such as policing, child safety, health, education and justice will continue
throughout this period.
7.9
National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day
Held annually, National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children’s Day is held in order to raise
awareness of the issues impacting Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children. The event is
organised by the Secretariat of National Aboriginal and Islander Child Care.
7.10 The United Nations International Day of the World’s Indigenous
People’s
An annual event, this day aims to promote the interests and rights of global Indigenous communities.
7.11 Royal Queensland Show
The 12 August is the Show Holiday for the Balonne Shire.
7.12 A-Day
The Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs support the
Dirranbandi ‘A-Day’ Rugby League Knockout. Previously funded by Mission Australia, the competition
attracts a number of football teams representing southern Queensland and northern New South Wales.
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8.
Sorry Business and Sad News
‘Sorry Business’ is a term used during the time of mourning following the death of an Aboriginal or
Torres Strait Islander person. Torres Strait Islanders may use the terminology ‘Bad or Sad News’. The
term can also refer to the past practice of forcibly removing children from their families. The intensity of
mourning is reflective of the importance of the family or person who has died.47 The mourning process
enables healing for the family and community involved.
The death of an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person impacts on the whole community; however,
the experience of Sorry Business can vary within each community. Commonly, the name of the
deceased is not used for some time or the deceased person is called by another name. In some
communities, photographs or stories of the deceased are not to be used without the express permission
of relevant family members.
During periods of Sorry Business many Indigenous services will often close down as a sign of respect
for the person who has passed and to allow the community to mourn together. As a result, no business
is conducted during the closure period. However, essential services such as policing, justice, child
safety, health and education continue.
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9.
Services
The people of Dirranbandi often make the one hour trip north by road in order to access services such
as hospitals and schools. Visiting services from Toowoomba often attend the community to provide
other services, including mental health and justice services.
Local organisations such as the Aboriginal organisation, the Kamilaroi Frogs Inc, provide various other
services to the Dirranbandi community.
9.1
Emergency
9.1.1.
Queensland Police Service
There are two police officers permanently stationed at the Dirranbandi Police Station.
Contact details:
Phone:
Address:
Dirranbandi
4625 8200.
Kirby Street
Qld 4486
Opening Hours:
Monday, 9am to 3pm
Tuesday to Thursday, 9am to 1pm.
9.1.2.
Queensland Ambulance Service
The Dirranbandi Ambulance Service is located on the hospital grounds.
Contact details:
Phone:
Address:
4625 8632
36 Jane Street
Dirranbandi Qld 4486
Open hours:
Monday to Friday, 8am to 4pm.
9.1.3.
Queensland Fire and Rescue Service
Phone:
Address:
9.2
9.2.1.
4671 8112
4 Cowildi Street
Dirranbandi Qld 4486
Justice
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Services (ATSILS)
This organisation has a satellite office located in St George, which provides criminal law services, not
only to St George, but also to neighbouring communities such as Dirranbandi.
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Contact details:
Phone:
Address:
Postal Address:
4625 3052
88 The Terrace
St George QLD 4487
PO Box 222
St George QLD 4487
To access non-criminal law services, clients must contact the ATSILS Toowoomba office. Non-criminal
law services include family law services (child protection, domestic violence and family law matters) and
civil law services (ranging from ‘simple’ legal advice through to minor assistance such as helping draft
wills or legal representation at contested hearings).
9.2.2.
Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Women’s Legal and Advocacy Service
The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Women’s Legal and Advocacy Service (ATSIWLAS) provides
a referral service, information and legal advice in the areas of family law, child protection and
employment.
ATSIWLAS specialises in issues related to women and the law, domestic violence and child protection.
Contact details:
Phone:
Email:
Address:
Website:
1800 442 450 (toll free) or 3720 9089
[email protected]
Unit 26 Milton Village
43 Lang Parade
Milton, Qld, 4101
http://www.atsiwlas.com.au
Opening Hours: Monday to Friday 9:00am to 5:00pm
Telephone advice times:
Monday to Thursday 9:00am to 5:00pm
Walk in times (no appointment needed):
Monday to Thursday 9:00am to 5:00pm
Pre-booked appointment times:
Monday to Thursday 9:00am to 5:00pm
9.2.3.
Women's Legal Service
The Women’s Legal Service provides legal advice and assistance to women on a range of legal issues
however specialises in family law and domestic violence related issues.
The Women’s Legal Service takes a particular interest in issues related to Women, Children, Lesbian,
Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex individuals and groups in the following areas of law:
 Family law (including contact and residency, child and spousal maintenance, divorce and
separation);
 Child protection;
 Credit and debt;
 Domestic and family violence;
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






Employment;
Paternity;
Centrelink;
Property;
Victims of Crime;
Crimes against the person; and
Wills and estates.
Contact details:
Phone: 3392 0670
Email:
[email protected]
Address:
387 Ipswich Road
(Entrance In Ponsonby Street)
Annerley QLD 4103
Website:
http://www.wlsq.org.au
Advice times:
Outside of Brisbane:
Phone: 1800 677 278
Monday to Thursday 9:30am to 1:30pm, for clients outside Brisbane only
Rural Regional & Remote:
Phone: 1800 457 117
Tuesday 9:30am to 1:30pm
9.2.4.
South West Queensland Corporation for Legal Services
Areas of law covered by this organisation include criminal law and domestic violence. Services include
information, advice, referrals and casework (for criminal law issues).
Contact details:
Address:
Email:
Mailing Address:
Fax:
51 Wills Street
Charleville QLD 4470
4654 1721
PO Box 145
Charleville QLD 4470
4654 3182
The office is open 8.30 to 5pm Monday to Friday.
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9.3
9.3.1.
Youth Justice
Youth Justice Service
Youth Justice Services are responsible for supervising young people involved in the Youth Justice
system. Youth Justice staff work with young people and their family to address the factors that
contribute to their offending behaviour and encourage young people to build positive connections with
their community.
Once a young person is placed on an order, the Youth Justice Service will make an assessment of the
young person. This assessment will identify a young person's level of risk and the appropriate
intervention plan to address their offending and support needs. In addition to assisting young people to
meet the statutory requirements of their court order, Youth Justice Services engage young people in a
range of programs to address the diverse risks and needs present in their lives. The interventions
provided to young people involved in the Youth Justice system are across four categories including:




Supervision and monitoring of compliance with court orders;
support services;
developmental interventions; and
offence focussed interventions such as Changing Habits and reaching Targets (CHART) and
Aggression Replacement Training (ART).
 CHART is a 12 module program for YP assessed as moderate to high risk of reoffending.
6 core modules of CHART include:






mapping offences;
motivation to change;
thinking and offending;
problem solving;
lifestyle balance; and
relapse prevention.
The last 6 elective modules of CHART are to be matched to the young person’s assessed needs.
These are offence specific modules responding to issues such as drug and alcohol, motor vehicle
offending and violence. The modules take between 10 minutes and one hour to deliver.
ART is used in Queensland Youth Justice Services and Detention Centres to respond to young people
who exhibit violence behaviours or have been found guilty of a violent offence. ART comprises of three
components delivered in three weekly group-training sessions (one meeting each week for each of the
three components) over a 10-week period. Each session is co-facilitated by two ART trainers. The three
components are:
 Skill streaming (behavioural component): Designed to teach the young person effective social skills
aimed at replacing aggressive behaviour;
 Anger Control Training (emotional component): Designed to reduce the frequency of anger arousal
and teach techniques of self-control when anger is aroused; and
 Moral Reasoning Training (cognitive/values component): The ability to take the perspective of
another person and use moral decision making is delayed in antisocial and chronically aggressive
youth. The goal of this component is to teach participants these skills and remediate existing moral
developmental delays.
Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs
16
Dirranbandi
Dirranbandi is serviced by the Charleville Youth Justice Service (an outpost to Toowoomba Youth
Justice Service Centre). Staff currently drive into the community on an as needs basis only. YJS does
not currently engage with any services in this community as there have not been young people in the
area requiring YJS support for some time.
Contact details:
Charleville Youth Justice Service
Phone:
46544260
Address:
Lot 88 Hood Street,
Charleville Qld 4470
People from Dirranbandi can access the following programs through the St George family and youth
coach:
9.3.2.
New Bail Support Program
This program is designed to provide young people and their families with a court support person during
court attendance. A family and youth coach also provides support to young people on Community
Service Orders by assisting them to fulfil their obligations under the orders.
9.3.3.
Youth Offending Service
Through this program, the family and youth coach provides support to families with a young person in
contact with the justice system to access services such as counselling, assistance at school and social
support.
9.3.4.
Youth Advocacy Centre
The Youth Advocacy Centre provides a number of free legal resources and support services to young
people aged 17 years and under. The service is located in Brisbane and does not visit regional
centres; however, over the telephone legal and other advice can be provided by calling 07 3356 1002.
9.4
Queensland Corrective Services
Queensland Corrective Services (Probation and Parole) delivers specific programs to address
individual offending behaviours.
Ending Offending Program - This program can be delivered in either a community or custodial setting. It
utilises Cognitive Behaviour Therapy to modify drinking and offending behaviour for Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander people.
Ending Family Violence Program - This is an intervention aimed at Indigenous offenders who have
been convicted of violence related offences within their families or community.
9.4.1.
Adult Offenders
Throughout Queensland there are a number of correctional facilities used to house female and male
offenders. The locations and details for each facility can be obtained from:
http://www.correctiveservices.qld.gov.au/About_Us/The_Department/Custodial_Corrections/index.shtml
9.4.2.
Youth Offenders
The details of Youth Detention Facilities in Queensland can be obtained from:
http://www.qld.gov.au/youth/being-safe-knowing-your-rights/about-youth-detention/.
Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs
17
Dirranbandi
9.5
Probation and Parole
A permanent reporting office is not available in Dirranbandi. Offenders must report to the St George
office located at the St George Courthouse:
Contact details:
Phone:
Fax:
Address:
4625 3266
4625 3180
The Terrace
PO Box 266
St George QLD 4487
Office Hours:
9am to 4.30pm - Monday to Friday
This region is managed by the Roma Office.
Contact details:
Phone:
Fax:
Address:
9.6
4624 3020
4624 3028
44-46 Bungil St (Corner Arthur Street)
Roma QLD 4455
Child Safety
Child Safety officers visit Dirranbandi from the Toowoomba office.
Phone:
Address:
Mailing address:
Fax:
9.7
4699 4255
1 Kitchener Street
Toowoomba Qld 4350
PO Box 2807
Toowoomba Qld 4350
4699 4277
Recognised Entity
9.7.1.
Goolburri Aboriginal Health Advancement Co. Ltd
As one of 13 Recognised Entities (RE) throughout Queensland, Goolburri is responsible for
communities located in the South West corner. REs are community controlled organisations and work
closely with the Department of Communities (Child Safety Services). The role of the RE is to provide
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives on decisions made by Child Safety Services in
relation to Indigenous families who have come in contact with the child protection system.
Contact details:
Phone:
Address:
Mailing address:
9.8
4632 3576
20 Scott Street
Toowoomba Qld 4350
PO Box 1198
Toowoomba Qld 4350
Health
The Dirranbandi community is supported by the Dirranbandi Hospital, Dirranbandi Health Service and
Dirranbandi Medical Practice. Facilities available at the hospital include:
Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs
18
Dirranbandi







Accident and emergency;
Outpatients;
Pharmaceutical (nurse);
Dental clinic;
Aboriginal and community health;
Allied health services (occupational therapy, speech pathology, physiotherapy, social worker);
Outreach services (alcohol and other drugs, child health, health promotion, mental health, women's
health, young people at risk);
 HACC services (home care, home maintenance, meals on wheels); and
 Aged services (nursing home type care).
The Dirranbandi hospital also acts as a Legal Aid Queensland Community Access Point, with video
conferencing facilities available.
 The main referral hospital for the community is St George Hospital, located 94km northeast of
Dirranbandi.
 The Dirranbandi community is also serviced by Goondir Health Services (a member of the
Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council), which is based in St George.
 Goondir offers a range of Indigenous-specific medical services, including men’s and women’s
business and stolen generation service.48 Dirranbandi clients can be seen either by visiting regional
staff, or they can visit the St George clinic. Goondir also has a long distance transport service for
clients who do not have access to their own transport.
9.9
Disability
The Queensland government disability service regional office in Toowoomba manages this region:
Contact details:
Phone:
Fax:
Address:
07 4615 3900
07 4615 3991
Level 1, 162 Hume Street
Toowoomba QLD 4350
A range of disability, mental health and community services can be accessed in St George. For
example, there are Mission Australia and Lifeline offices in St George offering a range of community
services. The Care Balonne Association Inc. also operates out of St George, providing a Rural Family
Support Program and a Community Development Program.
9.10 Aged Care
Churches of Christ run a Healthy Ageing Program in the region for people aged 50 years and over,
aimed at proactively improving the health of older people. Mission Australia also has an Employment
Solutions office located in St George.
‘Elders’ is a Lifeline program which supports Aboriginal Elders in St George and neighbouring
communities to connect with school students and other young people, and to record and preserve
language and culture. A space is provided for Elders to meet and become involved in regular craft
activities.
Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs
19
Dirranbandi
9.11 Education, Employment and Training
9.11.1. Early Childhood
Dirranbandi Crèche and Kindergarten (C&K) Community Kindergarten currently offers an approved
kindergarten program which caters for three and a half to four and half year olds. This kindergarten is
listed by C&K as an ‘Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Community Kindergarten’, and provides
families with a culturally appropriate early childhood education development environment.
South West Indigenous Network has recently introduced an early childhood education program called
‘Billy Lids’ to Dirranbandi. Billy Lids engages Indigenous mothers and children in an active playgroup
and had its first session in Dirranbandi in October 2012. The program is scheduled to run every Friday
at Dirranbandi P-10 State School from 9am-11am.49
9.11.2. Primary and Secondary
The educational needs of children and young people in Dirranbandi are supported by the Dirranbandi
P-10 State School. Since 2011, Dirranbandi State School has participated in the Low Socio-economic
Status School Communities National Partnership in order to support the continued improvement of
students attending the school.
Some specific initiatives include:50
 Establishment of Individual Education Plans and Individual Behaviour Plans for all Indigenous
students;
 Appointment of Parent Community Liaison Officer;
 Appointment of Indigenous community language speaker to support the schools Indigenous
languages program - embedding of Gamilaraay and Yeeralaraay languages in Prep to Year five; and
 Indigenous languages offered as Languages Other Than English subjects in Years six to 10.
To complete Years 11 and 12, young people of Dirranbandi must travel to nearby towns, such as St
George.
9.11.3. Parent and Community Engagement
Known throughout the community as PaCE, this federally funded program aims to increase
engagement between Indigenous parents, service providers and educational institutions. A Project
Worker operates from St George in order to provide this service.
9.11.4. TAFE and Vocational Studies
South Queensland Institute of TAFE has a number of campuses in the southwest Queensland region,
including Roma and Charleville.
It offers over 300 courses to students through flexible learning options. Several courses are specifically
designed for Indigenous students and include:
 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care - Certificate III; and
 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Primary Health Care (Community Care) - Certificate IV.
The TAFE also provides support for Indigenous students through the Indigenous Support Program
which is accessible across several campuses.
Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs
20
Dirranbandi
Contact details:
Toowoomba and Dalby
Phone:
4694 1325 and 4694 1326
Roma and Charleville
Phone:
4624 4315
9.12 Sport and Recreation
9.12.1. St George Aboriginal Housing Co Ltd
This organisation is based in St George but also services the Dirranbandi community, offering various
sport and recreation programs throughout the Balonne Shire. Mr Clint Bishop is the current St George
Indigenous Community Sport and Recreation Officer and can be contacted by telephone on 4625 4160.
9.12.2. South West Indigenous Network
This is a multi-sport organisation operating in southwest Queensland.51 They operate several sporting
programs in the region, including:
‘Education Tours’, which provide rural areas with access to coaching, officials and sports administration
education, and
‘Deadly Sports’, which are coaching clinics held in the community and attended by local children, young
people, and sports heroes who give their time to the program.52
Contact details:
Website:
http://www.swin.org.au/contact.html
9.12.3. Kamilaroi Frogs Inc
This group provides and facilitates sport and recreation activities in Dirranbandi.
It plays a key role in the organisation of ‘A-Day’, an annual football competition held in Dirranbandi, and
worked closely with the Balonne Shire Council towards the development of Dirranbandi Skate Park.
9.13 Arts, Library and Community Information
9.13.1. The Arts in Dirranbandi
There are number of artistic and creative agencies currently operating throughout the Balonne Shire.
The Dirranbandi, St George and Mundigi Arts Councils Inc. undertake a number of projects throughout
the year, including furniture restoration workshops, historical restoration projects, annual art shows and
festivals.
The Mungindi Arts Council Inc. also holds regular arts events throughout the year including the
Mungindi Art Show.
Contact details for the Dirranbandi Arts Council Inc (Balonne Shire Council):
Address:
PO BOX 8
Dirranbandi QLD 4486
Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs
21
Dirranbandi
9.13.2. Dirranbandi Library
The library is situated on Railway Street and can be contacted by telephone on 07 4625 8411.
Their opening hours are Monday to Friday, 10am to 12.30pm and 1.30pm to 4pm.
9.14 Children and Youth
9.14.1. Social and Economic Development Service
This program is run from the Lifeline building in St George and aims to deliver responses to young
people aged 12-25 years old in St George and Dirranbandi who are experiencing limited opportunities
for participation in the economic and cultural life within the community. It also aims to address the
barriers to young people’s safety and engagement in family living arrangements. The program has a
partnership with Roma Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs Service (ATODS).
9.14.2. Goondiwindi Training and Technology - Gateway to Training
This organisation run a program in St George called ‘Youth Connections’,53 providing tailored
assistance for young people aged 14 to 18 who have disengaged or are at risk of disengaging from
education. They also provide access to both accredited and non-accredited training. Courses include
(but are not limited to) Community Literacy Program; Apply First Aid; Certificate IV in Training and
Assessment; Firearms Safety; MYOB Intermediate; Certificate IV in Occupational Health and Safety
and QuickBooks.
9.14.3. Australian Government Initiatives
‘Learn Earn Legend!’ employs community leaders and sports stars to advocate to young Indigenous
people, the importance of education, training and employment. A specific program under this initiative is
the Former Origin Greats (FOGS) Employment and Careers Expos. These expos offer young job
seekers opportunities to network and meet a broad range of education and training providers, and to
meet Former Origin Greats. The nearest FOGS Expo to St George is held annually in Toowoomba at
the University of Southern Queensland.
9.15 Women
9.15.1. Regional Aboriginal Elder Women’s Steering Committee
The Women’s Elder group are a committee that was originally established during the International Rural
Women’s Day held in 2006. Elder Aboriginal women in the region are all invited to participate in the
group.
9.16 Men
Men’s services in Dirranbandi are limited. St George however, has its own ‘Men’s Shed’, a not-for-profit
initiative that aims to advance the well-being and health of men in the community.
Contact details:
Contact person:
Phone:
Keith Codrington
4625 3842.
Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs
22
Dirranbandi
9.17 Support
Care Balonne Association Inc.
This organisation runs a Rural Family Support Program, which aims to equip families with the
knowledge needed to care safely for children and young people, and a Community Development
Program, which provides a support and referral service to individuals and community groups seeking
assistance and support. The Community Development Program also coordinates the Community
Housing Project and other various community projects.54 Video conferencing facilities linking people to
Legal Aid Queensland are also available at Care Balonne through the Rural Family Support Program.
Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs
23
Dirranbandi
10. Getting to Dirranbandi
Dirranbandi is easily accessible via the Castlereagh Highway. It is located approximately 600km
southwest of Brisbane. There are no specific seasonal considerations for this area, although there can
be heavy rain during the summer which can adversely impact on local road conditions.
For current conditions visit http://131940.qld.gov.au/.
Dirranbandi is accessible by road and air; however seasonal conditions such as flooding and fire can
impact access to Dirranbandi throughout the year.
Dirranbandi 1938
Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs
24
Dirranbandi
11. Once at Dirranbandi
Accommodation is available at the Dirranbandi Motor Inn, Dirranbandi Hotel and Motel and the
Dirranbandi Hostel and Caravan Park.
11.1 Who to contact if you have questions about your visit
You may wish to contact the Ipswich Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and
Multicultural Affairs Service Centre and the Balonne Shire Council, who will be able to provide you with
up to date information regarding government and community activities that may be relevant to your visit.
11.1.1. Ipswich Service Centre
Contact details:
Regional Director: Mr Bradley Saunders
Phone:
3432 7206
Mobile:
0400 001 092
Fax:
4616 1778
Address:
Level 1, 38 Limestone Street
Ipswich QLD 4305
Postal Address:
PO Box 99
Ipswich QLD 4305
Email:
[email protected]
11.1.2. Balonne Shire Council
Contact details:
Mayor:
CEO:
Phone:
Fax:
Address:
Postal Address:
Email:
Councillor Donna Stewart
Mr Scott Norman
4620 8888
4620 8889
118 Victoria Street
St George QLD 4487
PO Box 302
St George QLD 4487
[email protected]
Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs
25
Dirranbandi
12. Bibliography
12.1 Legislation
Aboriginal Protection and Restriction of the Sale of Opium Act 1897 (Qld)
12.2 Cases
Mabo v. Queensland (No. 2) [1992] HCA 23; (1992) 175 CLR 1
Bligh & ors v State of Queensland [1996] HREOCA 28; (1996) EOC 92-848 at 79,290.
12.3 Books, Journals and Theses
P Collins, Goodbye Bussamarai (University of Queensland Press, St Lucia; 2002) 17
M Copland, J Richards and A Walker, One Hour More Daylight (Catholic Social Justice Commission,
Toowoomba: 2006) 127
M Enders and B Dupont (eds), Policing The Lucky Country (Hawkins Press, Sydney; 2001) 84
Ray Evans, Kay Saunders & Kathryn Cronin, Race Relations in Colonial Queensland: A History of
exclusion, exploitation and extermination, (University of Queensland Press, St Lucia; 1975)
L Godwin, Preliminary Report of Aboriginal Associations with the St George Area, (Unpublished, 1996)
JD Lang, Queensland, Australia (Stanford, London: 1861)
Noel Loos, Invasion and Resistance: Aboriginal-European Race Relations on the North Queensland
frontier 1861-1897 (National University Press, Australia; 1982)
T Mitchell, Journal of an Expedition into the Interior of Tropical Australia (Longman Brown, Green &
Longmans, Australia; 1848) 6
Queensland, Department Justice and Attorney General and Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander Policy and Development, Aboriginal English In the Courts: A Handbook, 2000
Jonathon Richards, The Secret War, (University of Queensland Press, St Lucia; 2008)
12.4 John Oxley Library
New South Wales Colonial Secretary’s Office, Inwards Correspondence, Microfilm no. A2/17, Annual
Report on the Aborigines for 1847 from Christopher Rolleston to Colonial Secretary.
12.5 Queensland State Archives
Queensland State Archives, Native Police, Series NMP/4, Papers re work of Native Police in Darling
Downs, Lower Condamine and Maranoa Districts, report from Native Police Sergeant Richard
Dempster to Native Police Lieutenant George Fulford, 10 September 1852.
Queensland State Archives, Native Police, Series NMP/4, Papers re work of Native Police in Darling
Downs, Lower Condamine and Maranoa Districts, letter from George Fulford to Frederick Walker, 12
January 1853.
Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs
26
Dirranbandi
Queensland State Archives, Home Secretary’s Department, Series SRS 5263/1, General
Correspondence, Item HOM/J72, 02/12375, report from Harold Meston to the Under Secretary re St
George district Aboriginals, 7 August 1902.
Queensland State Archives, Chief Protector of Aboriginals Office, Series SRS 18090, Correspondence
Files, Item A/58635, report on a Patrol of Protectorates in the South Eastern District, 11 May 1935.
Queensland State Archives, Director of Native Affairs Office, Series SRS 505/1, Correspondence Files,
Item ID/137, Administration, Protectorates, Complaints and Investigation, Dirranbandi.
12.6 Internet Resources
Australia, National Native Title Tribunal, Claimant application summary - Kooma People #4 (2012)
<http://www.nntt.gov.au/Applications-And-Determinations/SearchApplications/Pages/Application.aspx?tribunal_file_no=QC11/7> at 2 May 2013
Australia, Australian Bureau of Statistics, Dirranbandi Census 2011 (2012)
<http://www.censusdata.abs.gov.au/census_services/getproduct/census/2011/communityprofile/SSC30
499?opendocument&navpos=230> at 10 October 2012
Australia, Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2011 Census Quick Stats - Dirranbandi (2012)
<http://www.censusdata.abs.gov.au/census_services/getproduct/census/2011/quickstat/ILOC3060
0102> at 10 October 2012
Balonne Shire Council, Economic Development Strategic Plan 2011-2016, (2011)
<http://www.balonne.qld.gov.au/c/document_library/get_file?uuid=545ed3d4-7b21-4fb1-92dde175b4e545f1&groupId=722471>at 16 November 2012
Care Balonne Association Inc, Services We Offer (2011) <http://carebalonne.com/services.html> at 22
October 2012
Dirranbandi P-10 State School, Queensland State School Reporting – 2011 Dirranbandi P-10 State
School (1001) (The State of Queensland 2011)
<http://dirranbass.eq.edu.au/wcms/images/stories/annual_report/1001_dirranbandi_p10_ss_sar2011.pdf>at 10 October 2012
Gateway To Training, Programs (2012) <http://www.gttc.com.au/programs.html> at 23 October 2012
Goondir Health Service, Services, Goondir Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islanders Corporation for Health
Services 2004, <http://www.goondir.org.au/html/services.html> at 12 October 2012.
Queensland, Commission for Children and Young People and Child Guardian, Commission for Children
and Young People and Child Guardian: Domain One: Youth offending and prevention
<http://www.ccypcg.qld.gov.au/pdf/publications/reports/Child-Guardian-Report_Youth-JusticeSystem_2012/Domain-One.pdf> at 26 October 2012.
Queensland, Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Cotton industry overview (2012)
<http://www.daff.qld.gov.au/26_3431.htm > at 12 October 2012
Queensland, Department of Education, Training and Employment, Language Perspectives: Vernacular
Language Posters - Cunnamulla-MurdisOnDaWarrego (2011) <
http://www.learningplace.com.au/deliver/content.asp?pid=50983> at 24 October 2012
Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs
27
Dirranbandi
Queensland, Department of Education, Training and Employment, Dirranbandi P-10 State School Support for Indigenous students (2011) <http://education.qld.gov.au/nationalpartnerships/lowses/case-studies/dirranbandi-ss.html> at 10 October 2012.
South West Indigenous Network, Dirranbandi Billy Lids Playgroup (SWIN 2012)
<http://www.swin.org.au/BookingRetrieve.aspx?ID=216957> at 22 October 2012
South West Indigenous Network, Programs (SWIN 2012)< http://www.swin.org.au/Programs.html> at
22 October 2012
12.7 Websites
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Services at http://www.atsils.com.au/
Australian Bureau of Statistics at http://www.abs.gov.au/
Balonne Shire Council at http://www.balonne.qld.gov.au/
C&K at http://www.candk.asn.au/
Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs at
http://www.datsima.qld.gov.au/
Department of Justice and Attorney-General at http://www.justice.qld.gov.au/
Gateway to Training at http://www.gttc.com.au/
Goondir Health Service at http://www.goondir.org.au/
Learn, Earn, Legend! at http://www.deewr.gov.au/indigenous/pages/learnearnlegend.aspx#5
Lifeline Darling Downs at http://www.lifelinedarlingdowns.org.au/
National Native Title Tribunal at http://www.nntt.gov.au/
Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations at http://www.oric.gov.au/
Queensland Corrective Services at http://www.correctiveservices.qld.gov.au/
Queensland Emergency Services at http://www.emergency.qld.gov.au/services
Queensland Health at http://www.health.qld.gov.au/
Queensland Police at http://www.police.qld.gov.au/
RACQ at http://www.racq.com.au/
Southern Queensland Institute of TAFE at http://www.sqit.tafe.qld.gov.au/
South West Indigenous Network at http://www.swin.org.au/
The Advocacy and Support Centre at http://www.tascinc.org.au/
Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs
28
St Stephens Island (Ugar)
EndNotes
1 ‘Indigenous’ refers to persons who identified on the Census as Australian Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander or Both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander. See:
Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2011 Census Quick Stats (Commonwealth of Australia 2012)
<http://www.censusdata.abs.gov.au/census_services/getproduct/census/2011/quickstat/ILOC30600102 >at 10 October 2012.
2 T Mitchell, Journal of an Expedition into the Interior of Tropical Australia (Longman Brown, Green & Longmans, Australia; 1848) 6.
3 Ibid, 405-430.
4 Ibid, 109-113.
5 Ibid,110.
6 P Collins, Goodbye Bussamarai (University of Queensland Press, St Lucia; 2002) 17.
7 Annual report on the Aborigines for 1847 from Christopher Rolleston to Colonial Secretary (1 January 1848), John Oxley Library, A2/17, frames 639-643, letter
number 48/1611.
8 M Copland, The Native Police at Callandoon: A blueprint for forced assimilation? In M Enders and B Dupont (eds), Policing The Lucky Country (Hawkins Press,
Sydney; 2001) 84.
9 The Native Mounted Police Force were established in 1848 by the New South Wales Government, and were disbanded around 1900 after becoming notorious for
their violence and lack of discipline. Musketry and horse power made compact squads of Native Mounted Police highly effective. They operated without proper
scrutiny for many years, resulting in the death of many Aboriginal people as a result of their ‘dispersals’. For detailed information see: Jonathon Richards, The Secret
War, (University of Queensland Press, St Lucia; 2008); Noel Loos, Invasion and Resistance: Aboriginal-European Race Relations on the North Queensland frontier
1861-1897 (National University Press, Australia;1982); Ray Evans, Kay Saunders & Kathryn Cronin, Race Relations in Colonial Queensland: A History of exclusion,
exploitation and extermination, (University of Queensland Press, St Lucia;1975).
10 Richard Dempster to George Fulford, 10 September 1852, QSA: NMP/4 (Z2433).
11 George Fulford to Frederick Walker, 12 January 1953, QSA: NMP/4 (Z2433).
12 W Ridley, Journal of a Missionary Tour Among the Aborigines of the Western Interior of Queensland in the Year 1855’, pp.439 in JD Lang, Queensland, Australia
(Stanford, London: 1861).
13 M Copland, J Richards and A Walker, One Hour More Daylight (Catholic Social Justice Commission, Toowoomba: 2006) 127.
14 Herein entitled the Act.
15 Section 6 of the Act.
16 Section 9 of the Act.
17 Report from Harold Meston to the Under Secretary, 7 August 1902, QSA: HOM/J72, 02/12375.
18 According to Queensland Government’s Community and Personal Histories database.
19 Ibid.
20 A/58635, Report on a Patrol of Protectorates in the South Eastern District dated 11.5.1935.
21 L Godwin, Preliminary Report of Aboriginal Associations with the St George Area, (Unpublished, 1996).
22 Queensland State Archives, Director of Native Affairs Office, Series SRS 505/1, Correspondence Files, Item ID/137, Administration, Protectorates, Complaints
and Investigation, Dirranbandi.
23 Queensland, Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Cotton industry overview (2012) <http://www.daff.qld.gov.au/26_3431.htm > at 12 October 2012.
24 Mabo and others v. Queensland (No. 2) [1992] HCA 23; (1992) 175 CLR 1.
25 Federal Court file no: QUD504/2011.
26 Australia, National Native Title Tribunal, Claimant application summary - Kooma People #4 (2012) <http://www.nntt.gov.au/Applications-And-Determinations/SearchApplications/Pages/Application.aspx?tribunal_file_no=QC11/7 > at 2 May 2013.
27 Australia, Australian Bureau of Statistics, Dirranbandi Census 2011 (2012)
<http://www.censusdata.abs.gov.au/census_services/getproduct/census/2011/communityprofile/SSC30499?opendocument&navpos=230> at 10 October 2012.
28 Queensland, Department of Education, Training and Employment, Language Perspectives: Vernacular Language Posters - Cunnamulla-MurdisOnDaWarrego
(2011) < http://www.learningplace.com.au/deliver/content.asp?pid=50983> at 24 October 2012.
29 Ibid.
30 Ibid.
31 Ibid.
32 Ibid.
33 The only recognised qualification in Australia for translating and interpreting is accreditation from the Australian National Accreditation Authority for Translators
and Interpreters (NAATI).
Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs
29
St Stephens Island (Ugar)
34 Queensland, Queensland Courts, Aboriginal English In the Courts: A Handbook (2000) <http://www.courts.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/90715/m-aboriginalenglish-handbook.pdf >at 16 October 2012.
35 Balonne Shire Council, Economic Development Strategic Plan 2011-2016, (2011) <http://www.balonne.qld.gov.au/c/document_library/get_file?uuid=545ed3d4-7b214fb1-92dd-e175b4e545f1&groupId=722471>at 16 November 2012.
36 Ibid.
37 Statistical data in this section has been sourced from the Australian Bureau of Statistics 2011 Census and is based on the Community Profile for Dirranbandi
ILOC (Indigenous Location). Indigenous Locations (ILOCs), which ideally have a population of at least 100 Indigenous persons, are comprised of one or more
Statistical Areas Level 1 (SA1s). ILOCs aggregate to Indigenous Areas (IAREs), and cover the whole of Australia without gaps or overlaps. Summary of Indigenous
Census data are available at the Indigenous Location level. Under the former ASGC boundary definitions, the area of Dirranbandi ILOC is only a State Suburb
Boundary. Suburb boundaries are less stable than other ASGC and ASGS defined boundaries.
38 Australia, Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2011 Census Quick Stats - Dirranbandi (2012)
<http://www.censusdata.abs.gov.au/census_services/getproduct/census/2011/quickstat/ILOC30600102> at 10 October 2012.
39 Dirranbandi P-10 State School, Queensland State School Reporting – 2011 Dirranbandi P-10 State School (1001) (The State of Queensland 2011)
<http://dirranbass.eq.edu.au/wcms/images/stories/annual_report/1001_dirranbandi_p-10_ss_sar2011.pdf>at 10 October 2012.
40 The number of persons in the labour force expressed as a percentage of persons aged 15 years and over.
41 Median total personal income is applicable to persons aged 15 years and over.
42 Median total household income is applied to occupied private dwellings. It excludes households where at least one member aged 15 years and over did not state
an income. It also applies to households where at least one member aged 15 years and over was temporarily absent on Census Night. It excludes 'Visitors only' and
'Other non-classifiable' households.
43 Households have been divided into those with Indigenous persons and other households depending on whether households have Indigenous residents or not.
Both family and non-family households (such as group households) can be grouped in this way. Households with Indigenous persons include households that had at
least one person of any age as a usual resident at the time of the Census who identified as being of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander origin and who was
present on Census Night.
44 Proportion of dwellings that need one or more extra bedrooms is applied to occupied private dwellings, excluding 'Visitors only' and 'Other non-classifiable'
households. It is a comparison of the number of bedrooms in a dwelling with a series of household demographics, such as the number of usual residents, their
relationship to each other, age and sex. It is based on the Canadian National Occupancy Standard.
45 Median mortgage repayment is applied to occupied private dwellings being purchased and includes dwellings being purchased under a rent/buy scheme. It
excludes 'Visitors only' and 'Other non-classifiable' households. In addition, Proportion of dwellings that need 1 or more extra bedrooms is applied to occupied
private dwellings, excluding 'Visitors only' and 'Other non-classifiable' households. It is a comparison of the number of bedrooms in a dwelling with a series of
household demographics, such as the number of usual residents, their relationship to each other, age and sex. It is based on the Canadian National Occupancy
Standard.
46 Recommendation 7a of the Report states: ‘[t]hat the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission, in consultation with the Council for Aboriginal
Reconciliation, arrange for a national `Sorry Day' to be celebrated each year to commemorate the history of forcible removals and its effects.’
47 In many Indigenous communities, the term ‘passed’ or ‘passing’ is used in preference to the term ‘died’.
48 Goondir Health Service, Services, Goondir Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islanders Corporation for Health Services 2004, <http://www.goondir.org.au/html/services.html >
at 12 October 2012.
49 South West Indigenous Network, Dirranbandi Billy Lids Playgroup (SWIN 2012) <http://www.swin.org.au/BookingRetrieve.aspx?ID=216957> at 22 October 2012.
50 Queensland, Department of Education, Training and Employment, Dirranbandi P-10 State School - Support for Indigenous students (2011)
<http://education.qld.gov.au/nationalpartnerships/low-ses/case-studies/dirranbandi-ss.html> at 10 October 2012.
51 For further details, visit www.swin.org.au/Programs.html.
52 South West Indigenous Network, Programs (SWIN 2012)< http://www.swin.org.au/Programs.html > at 22 October 2012.
53 Gateway To Training, Programs (2012) <http://www.gttc.com.au/programs.html > at 23 October 2012.
54 Care Balonne Association Inc, Services We Offer (2011) <http://carebalonne.com/services.html > at 22 October 2012.
Department of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Multicultural Affairs
30
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