Document 437676

the bugle
Remembrance Day 2014 Edition
Royal Canadian Legion Branch 238
P.O. Box 247, 23 Veterans Way, Fenelon Falls ON K0M 1N0
Phone: (705) 887-3041 [email protected] Fax: (705) 887-2982
www.fenelonfallslegion.ca
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BRANCH OFFICERS
President: Belinda Wilson
Past President: Jackie Walter
1st Vice President: Brenda Wade
Secretary: Linda Stuckless
nd
2 Vice President: Brenda Campbell Treasurer: Brenda Campbell
3rd Vice President: Gerry Edmondson
Sgt-at-Arms: Garry Rutherford
COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN
Belinda Wilson: Canteen
Jackie Walter:
Veterans Services; Ladies Auxiliary Liaison
Brenda Wade:
Membership; Honours & Awards
Brenda Campbell: Youth Education; Charitable Foundation & Bursary
Gerry Edmondson: Sports; Track & Field
Linda Stuckless: Bingo; Lottery Licensing
Wes Arscott:
Veterans Services (Ass’t); Navy League Liaison; Supply
Arlene Colman:
Poppy, Seniors, Training & Organizational Development
Paul Leduc:
Public Relations; Website
John Mangan:
Building & Property
_________________________________________________________
Elaine Mann:
Janet Clarry:
Tony Turner:
Volunteers
Facility Rental & Bookings
Catering
LADIES AUXILIARY PRESIDENT: Jo Northey
BRANCH Meetings:
Executive - Last Thursday of the month
General - 2nd Thursday of the month 7:30 PM (except Dec. and Jan.)
Ladies Auxiliary - 1st Wednesday of the month 1:30 PM The Bugle
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November 11, 2014
table of contents
Remembrance Day 2014 Edition
4 ‐ 5 National Memorial (Silver Cross) Mother 6 Greetings from the District Commander 7 Greetings from the Zone Commander/Branch President 8 ‐ 9 Greetings from the Zone/Poppy Chairman 10 O Canada ‐ We Stand On Guard For Thee 11 Greetings from the L.A. President 12 ‐ 14 WWI Canadian Soldier's Remains Identified 15 ‐ 17 Letter from father killed in WWI 18 ‐ 21 Fenelon Falls marks the beginning of WWI 22 ‐ 25 Last Post ‐ WWI 26 Tower of London Poppy Installation 27 ‐ 34 Remembrance Day Order of Service 35 ‐ 37 The Country Warrior 38 ‐ 39 The Royal Canadian Legion 40 ‐ 41 Membership in the Legion 42 ‐ 55 Afghanistan 2002‐2014 56 Community Christmas Dinner 57 Branch events 58 ‐ 59 Last Post (November 11, 2013 ‐ November 10, 2014) On the front cover: The Fenelon Falls Cenotaph ‐ Service to Commemorate the beginning of World War I, and the 57 men from our area who were killed in service to their coun‐
try, 1914‐1918. (pages 18‐25) Right: Fenelon Falls pays tribute to the first Canadian soldiers killed by an act of aggression on home soil in 129 years. (pages 7 and 10) On the back cover: Photos from the Tower of Lon‐
don, story on page 26. The Bugle
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November 11, 2014
national memorial
(silver cross) mother
Legion Announces 2014-15
Memorial (Silver) Cross Mother
OTTAWA, ON, October 31st 2014 – Tom Eagles, Dominion President of The Royal Canadian Legion, an‐
nounced Mrs. Gisèle Michaud as the National Memorial (Silver) Cross Mother for 2014‐2015 earlier today here at Dominion Command. Mrs. Michaud lost her young‐
est son, Master Corporal Charles‐
Philippe Michaud, after he was mor‐
tally wounded after stepping on an improvised explosive device while on patrol in the Panjwayi District, south‐
west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan on June 23rd, 2009. He was trans‐
ported to a Quebec City hospital on June 28th, 2009 and passed away on July 4th, of that same year. Mrs. Michaud lives in Ed‐
mundston, New Brunswick. She is the 5th mother from New Brunswick to be named as the National Memo‐
rial (Silver) Cross Mother since the Legion began this tradition more than sixty years ago. As the National Memorial (Silver) Cross Mother, Mrs. Michaud will lay a wreath at the National War Memorial on 11 November 2014 on behalf of all Canadian mothers who have lost a son or a daughter in the military either in action or in the course of his/her normal duty. Throughout the year she will also be called upon to perform other The Bugle
duties honouring the Fallen from all conflicts. The Memorial (Silver) Cross was instituted on December 1, 1919 and was issued as a memento of per‐
sonal loss and sacrifices on behalf of all widows and mothers who lost a child while on active duty in the ser‐
vice of their nation or whose death was consequently attributed to such duty. Biography – Mrs. Michaud
Mrs. Michaud was born and raised in Edmundston, NB. In 1971, she married Conrad Michaud. She worked in retail but is now retired. Her youngest son, Master Corporal Charles‐Philippe Michaud, was mor‐
tally wounded after stepping on an improvised explosive device while on patrol in the Panjwayi District, south‐
4
November 11, 2014
national memorial
(silver cross) mother
west of Kandahar City, Afghanistan on June 23rd, 2009. He was trans‐
ported to a Quebec City hospital on June 28th, 2009 and passed away on July 4th, of that same year. Master Corporal Charles‐Philippe has an older brother, Denis. For the past five years, Mrs. Michaud has undertaken a number of activities to honour her son’s memory. She has hosted large dele‐
gations of soldiers from Master Cor‐
poral Michaud’s battalion in Edmund‐
ston, NB, on each anniversary of her son’s passing and on Remembrance Day. Mrs. Michaud, accompanied by her husband and her eldest son, has also travelled to Kandahar in Novem‐
ber 2010. for Kosovo, and in Lithuania in 2003, receiving the Canadian Peacekeeping Service Medal. Master Corporal Michaud served two tours in Afghanistan. He first served in Kabul in 2004, receiv‐
ing the General Campaign Star‐
International Security Assistance Force. Master Corporal Michaud arrived in Kandahar for his second tour of duty in April 2009. He was 28 years old and the 122nd fallen soldier from Canada’s mission in Afghani‐
stan. Called Chuck by his friends, Master Corporal Michaud dreamed of being a soldier throughout his youth. He is remembered as a men‐
tor to his fellow troops and a model soldier. He was an avid hockey Biography – Master Corporal
player and loved playing guitar and Charles-Philippe Michaud
the saxophone. Master Corporal Michaud was mortally wounded after stepping on an improvised explosive device while on patrol in the Panjwayi District, southwest of Kandahar City, Afghani‐
stan on June 23rd, 2009. He was transported to a Quebec City hospital on June 28th, 2009 and passed away on July 4th, of that same year. He was a member of the 2nd Battalion Royal 22nd Regiment based out of Valcartier, Québec. Born in 1981, he joined the Canadian Armed Forces in 2000. He served in Bosnia in 2002, receiving the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Medal The Bugle
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November 11, 2014
cde. greg kobold
district ‘f’ commander
We take the time every No‐
vember 11 to pay our respects to our Veterans, and acknowledge the sacri‐
fice made by their comrades on the fields of battle, and during the course of their service to our country. Those who died did not get a tomorrow. Those who survive fight with their demons, whether physical or mental, and tomorrow is never promised. We who gather here can‐
not predict the future, neither can we say with any degree of certainty “we’ll be back here next November 11.” I think now of WO Patrice Vin‐
cent and Cpl Nathan Cirillo ‐ they have no more tomorrows, and their sacrifices were not made in a far away land, in someone else’s war ‐ they were murdered on Canadian soil, their only provocation being the uniforms they both wore so proudly. The reality of such hatred is shocking, and for all Canadians this Remembrance Day takes on a whole new perspective. We have received an abrupt reminder of the meaning of sacrifice, right here at home. Every day should be Remem‐
brance Day. Every day we should make a point of acknowledging the sacrifice, of shaking the hand of a Veteran, of pausing on our way past the Cenotaph to read the names in‐
scribed here, and to consider what their sacrifice represented to this The Bugle
small community. And if you have the opportu‐
nity to encounter any of our brave CF personnel, let them know that they are appreciated for what they are doing, and what they are prepared to do. Tell them their country is proud of them, stands behind them, and sends all our best hopes with them as they embark on their various duties. “At the going down of the sun, and in the morning, we WILL remem‐
ber them!” 6
November 11, 2014
cde. Belinda wilson
Commander, Zone F-4; president, br. 238
Warrant Officer Patrice Vincent on Oct. 20 and Corporal Nathan Cirillo on Oct. 22. Both have been attrib‐
uted to acts of terrorism specifically intended to harm Canadian soldiers. Based on information pro‐
vided by the Department of National Defence, their deaths marked the first time in almost 130 years that a Canadian soldier was killed in a hos‐
tile act on Canadian soil. According to the department’s historians, the last time an on‐duty Canadian soldier was killed in such a way was on May 12, 1885. On that day, during the North‐
west Rebellion of 1885, five soldiers were killed, likely during the Battle of Batoche in Saskatchewan. The dead were listed by the department as a Captain Brown, Captain French, Lieu‐
tenant Kippen, Lieutenant Fitch, and Private Frazer. Captain SueEllen MacGowan, public affairs officer with the Depart‐
ment of National Defence, confirmed the last soldier killed was likely Pri‐
vate James Ira Frazer of the 90th Bat‐
talion of Rifles. One hundred and twenty nine years since the last Canadian soldier was killed in a hostile act on Cana‐
dian soil ‐ there’s another milestone for us to get puffed up about. LEST WE FORGET 2014 has been like no other for most Canadians living today. There have been so many mile‐
stones: one hundred years since the beginning of what was called “The Great War” ‐ World War One; sev‐
enty years since the D‐Day invasion of Normandy; the official end to the Canadian mission in Afghanistan. While we Canadians puffed ourselves up, swelling with national pride at our glorious past, reality came along and knocked us violently and deliberately back into the here and now. As we all know, two separate incidents, in which Canadian soldiers in uniform on Canadian soil were targeted, resulted in the deaths of The Bugle
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November 11, 2014
cde. arlene colman
poppy chairman, zone f-4, BR. 238
At the 11th hour On the 11th day Of the 11th month We will remember Them At this time of year we wear a poppy over our hearts to commemo‐
rate some of humanity’s greatest triumphs of strength and spirit, and pay tribute to our veterans of WWI, WWII, Korea, the Gulf War, Canadian missions and Afghanistan. It is also a fitting time to reflect on the men and women who continue the proud tra‐
dition of serving Canada’s Armed Forces. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the beginning of the First World War. By the end of WWI there were very few people who re‐
mained unaffected. The war reached out and touched almost everyone’s life in some way. We were not im‐
mune here Fenelon Falls and neighbouring communities, 57 of our The Bugle
men were killed in action. Parents lost sons, wives lost husbands, chil‐
dren lost their father, brothers and sisters lost a brother and the fallen lost a life full of potential and prom‐
ise. In addition tens of thousands served and returned home. Our veterans answered the call when needed, and served with courage and valour. They fought in trenches, on hills, beaches, deserts and rice paddies, on land and sea and in the air. They sacri‐
ficed the comforts, love and safety of home in order to defend the rights and freedoms of 8
November 11, 2014
cde. arlene colman
poppy chairman, zone f-4, BR. 238
others. Some returned with permanent physical and emo‐
tional scars and thousands upon thousands never re‐
turned. Each of those who gave their life had a family and friends whose lives were enriched by their love and diminished by their loss. This Remembrance Day we are aware of the per‐
ils and danger our serving military face, given the re‐
cent murders of Warrant Of‐
ficer Patrice Vincent and Cor‐
poral Nathan Cirillo on Cana‐
dian soil by Canadians. Cpl. Cirillo was killed in one of the most sacred places in Canada, the National War Memorial, while on ceremonial guard duty. Many of us grieved for these soldiers and their families and felt the need to do something. Poppies blossomed on the chests of Canadi‐
ans in advance of the Poppy Cam‐
paign, vigils and spontaneous memo‐
rials appeared at cenotaphs across the land, thousands lined the High‐
way of Heroes and millions watched the funerals on TV. To quote Prime Minister Harper “we know in our hearts that we owe our freedom, our democracy and our prosperity to the millions of Canadians who by serving in our armed forces have kept the true north strong and free for over two The Bugle
centuries.” We have a debt we can only repay by ensuring our veterans ef‐
forts, sacrifices and accomplishments are ever remembered and live on forever in our hearts and minds. I thank all who participated in making this year’s Remembrance activities such a success; local mer‐
chants, community service groups, the Hastings and Prince Edward Regi‐
ment cadets, our volunteers who freely give their time, talent and en‐
ergy, the O.P.P., Federal, Provincial and Municipal representatives and all those who attended and or partici‐
pated in our remembrance activities. Together we are making a down pay‐
ment on our debt of remembrance worthy of sacrifices made. Lest We Forget 9
November 11, 2014
O canada
We stand on guard for thee
In response to the sudden and very tragic deaths of WO Patrice Vin‐
cent and Cpl Nathan Cirillo, both at‐
tributed to deliberate acts of terror‐
ism, Canadians did the only thing they could ‐ they paid their respects. At Cenotaphs across the coun‐
try, folks stood vigil ‐ cadets, military service personnel both active and retired, and ordinary citizens who felt the need to take a stand, and stand united. The Bugle
10
We at the Fenelon Falls Legion were so proud to have our own MCpl (ret’d) Wes Arscott CD step up and pay his respects to his fallen brothers in arms. The prevailing sentiment fol‐
lowing these senseless killings is this: Canadians will not allow ourselves or our Country to be victims of terror‐
ism. While it is true that we are best known as a peacekeeping nation, we have proven time and again through‐
out history that we are neither afraid nor unable to take an active and aggressive role when called upon, at home or abroad, to defend against tyr‐
anny and that which threatens human rights. The tragedies in Quebec and on Parliament Hill brought our nation together, and our national spirit has been re‐
newed ‐ sadly at the expense of two precious lives, but their sacrifice has served to strengthen Canada’s collective resolve. To Cde. Arscott, and to all who stood in vigil across our great nation, thank you. To the families and friends of WO Vincent and Cpl Cirillo, our country has wept with you, shares in your sor‐
row, and will carry their mem‐
ory forever in its heart.
November 11, 2014
cde. jo northey
President, Ladies Auxiliary to Branch 238
Another year, another report from the Ladies Auxiliary to Branch 238. This year has become an impor‐
tant time to belong to such a great organization. The recent tragic events in Quebec and in Ottawa gave me a better insight into how our Charter members must have felt back in 1941, when their husbands, sons and other relatives were away at war; some did not return. The loss of loved ones is hard at any time, but as defenders of our freedom it seems to be much harder. I and others felt it was very important to do our Poppy Cam‐
paign, and also to attend the services this week. The Candlelight Parade has become a large part of our Remem‐
brance Services. Earlier this year some of our Auxiliary Ladies were in attendance at the August General Meeting when, much to her surprise, Cde. Jackie Walter was presented with the high‐
est honour from the Legion. The Palm Leaf is a hard‐
earned award. Jackie has been a huge backer of our Auxiliary and we are very proud of our Jackie. This year we welcomed Cde. The Bugle
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Jeannine Miller as a new member, and we have helped our Branch when called upon. We attended Decoration Day as well as thee WWI Commemora‐
tion. These events are always inspira‐
tional and enjoyable. Comrades, this Branch needs support from ALL members. It does not function by itself. We pledge to support. That pledge does not end at the end of initiation. I urge all of you to help where and when you can. God Bless all of you. Lest We Forget... November 11, 2014
WWI CANADIAN SOLDIER’S
REMAins identified
Sidney Halliday died in the
Battle of Amiens, 1918
By Lynne Chichakian and Liam O'Rinn / Doc Zone, CBC News The remains of a previously unknown soldier are those of Cana‐
dian Pte. Sidney Halliday, who fought in the First World War. The Department of National Defence announced today that they had identified Halliday's remains, one of eight bodies discovered together in France in 2006. DND had revealed the identities of four other soldiers on Sept. 27. It was only when scientific avenues of investigation had been exhausted that a momentary gesture of love a century ago proved to be the key in identifying the remains. "I guess it makes you feel as if he just passed away, instead of all those many years ago," Jim Halliday, Sidney's nephew, told CBC News. "it's a strange feeling. It's one you can't really explain all that well, brought some sense of closure, as they say." The five identified soldiers fought and died in the Battle of Amiens in 1918, the start of the hun‐
dred day offensive that eventually led to the end of the war. They were members of Can‐
ada’s 78th Battalion, the Winnipeg Grenadiers. The Bugle
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Pte. Sidney Halliday served with the 78th Battalion and died in the Battle of Amiens in 1918. (Jim Halliday) Sidney Halliday was one of 10 chil‐
dren. In March 1913, he and his brother William left their home in Gloucestershire, England to come to Canada. Sidney soon found work on a farm in Minto, Man., according to William's son, Jim. That's where he met Lizzie Walmsley. She had come from Winni‐
peg to work as a mother's helper November 11, 2014
WWI CANADIAN SOLDIER’S
REMAins identified
during the summer. Sidney and Lizzie shott, where they underwent more became sweethearts. training. When they were sent to France they took part in some of the A long lost locket
In 1915 Sidney and his brother fiercest battles of the war, including William decided to enlist in the Cana‐ Vimy Ridge and Passchendaele. In August 1918 the 78th was dian army. William was rejected for embroiled in yet another brutal con‐
health reasons, but Sidney joined the 78th Battalion. After basic training, flict, the Battle of Amiens. It was a turning point that marked the Sidney was shipped overseas. That would turn out to be beginning of the end of the war – the Sidney and Lizzie’s final farewell. As a final push back against the German token of their undying love they ex‐ Army. It was a battle of epic propor‐
changed lockets, each containing tions. Initially, the Canadian Corps locks of hair. On arrival in England, the 78th (Continued on page 14)
Battalion was stationed at Bram‐
The locket that was key to identifying Halliday's remains had a strand of hair inside and his sweet‐
heart Lizzie Walmsley's name on the lid. The Bugle
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(Emmanuel Marchand/CBC) November 11, 2014
WWI CANADIAN SOLDIER’S
REMAins identified
(Continued from page 13)
moved forward faster than anyone expected, advancing 13 km. More than 5,000 German troops were cap‐
tured. While the 78th was trying to hold the tiny hamlet of Hallu on Aug. 11, the tables were turned. German reinforcements surrounded the Ca‐
nadians. Sidney Halliday, 22 years old, was killed in action, one of about 100 members of the 78th who were killed or went missing in the Battle of Amiens. He fell with his brothers in arms in a field and was buried under the mud in Hallu. His military records state the body was not recovered for burial. Identifying the remains
The items unearthed, includ‐
ing a little gold locket, were eventu‐
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14
ally handed over to DND, along with the remains. At first the locket didn't seem relevant to their investigation, but it would prove to be a vital piece in helping identify Sidney Halliday. When the locket was cleaned it revealed Lizzie Walmsley’s name on the lid. On its own this wasn't helpful, but a further look at the service re‐
cords showed that at some point one of the missing soldiers from the 78th had asked for a change to his will. Young men at war were pragmatic enough to realize that their chances of survival were limited, so it was standard procedure to write a will. Those wills became part of the meticulously written war records. Sidney's records indicate that he had left most of his meagre wealth to his mother but at some point had asked for a change to be made. He asked that $10 go to Lizzie Walmsley of Winnipeg. Walmsley went on to work at Eaton’s in Winnipeg. She lived in what is now the St. James suburb, Jim Halliday said. Thanks to that locket, and the need to make sure he left something behind for Lizzie, Halliday will now have his name placed on a tomb‐
stone next year, when he and his comrades receive a full military fu‐
neral at the military cemetery near Caix, 28 km southeast of Amiens. November 11, 2014
98-year-old B.C. woman shares letter
from father killed in WW I
Letter written day after messenger brought word
that wife had just given birth to baby girl
By Chris Brown, CBC News June Gillrie, 98, looks over a letter written by her father, William Kineer Leslie of the 102 Battalion Canadian Infantry during the First World War. Leslie died on June 5, 1917 in Villers‐Au‐Bois, France, without ever getting to meet his new baby girl. (CBC) Meeting June Gillrie is like rewinding 100 years. She's a spry, vigorous 98‐year‐old with a sharp mind and a vivid mem‐
ory. A question about her long life elicits a rapid‐fire, autobiographical ac‐
count of how she owned retail stores in Vancouver, developed commercial buildings and pursued golfing and skiing with a passion. And yet, for all the memories Gillrie can recall instantly, she says there's always been a very large part of her life that's been missing — she has no memory of her father, William Kineer Leslie. They never met. A 31‐year‐old sergeant with the 102 Battalion Canadian Infantry, Leslie died on the battlefield in France in June 1917 without ever getting to see his (Continued on page 16)
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November 11, 2014
98-year-old B.C. woman shares letter
from father killed in WW I
(Continued from page 15)
newborn daughter. 'I never had a father'
"He was killed when I was almost a year old, so I never had a father," says Gillrie. Now, with her own years winding down, Gillrie says she wants to share her most personal possession — a handwritten letter from her father which he wrote upon learning of her birth. "I feel it's in honour of my father that I'm doing this." Gillrie has donated the letter, as well as Leslie's war medals, to the HMCS Alberni Museum in Comox, B.C., where they are now part of a perma‐
nent exhibit. The letter, penned by Leslie from the front lines of France, was written the day after a messenger brought word that his wife in British Columbia had just given birth to a baby girl. "My darling wife," reads Gillrie, "I can't tell you how happy I am...You always wanted a girl, and now you got one." It goes on to express his joy and hopes for the day he gets to meet his new little girl. "I will sure worship the little thing." Not long afterwards, Leslie survived the near massacre of his regiment, but his luck would run out on June 7, 1917. Museum curator Lewis Bartholomew, who's researched Leslie's life, says Leslie was leading an attack on a German machine gun bunker near the French village of Villers‐Au‐Bois. "He was struck by a sniper's bullet in the hip and almost immediately he was struck with machine gun fire in the chest and died instantly." But Gillrie says she doesn't believe death came immediately for her father. "I often think when a person is dying and they're hurt like that .. you realize that you're dying and I think his mind would have gone to his mother and to his new wife with this new baby. Because I don't think you die in‐
stantly." After Leslie's death, Gillrie's mother, Maud, moved her and her two siblings to California and then back to Vancouver where the family settled and her mother eventually remarried. Her father's letter, along with letters from other soldiers about her dad, ended up in a chest and were rarely taken out. The Bugle
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November 11, 2014
98-year-old B.C. woman shares letter
from father killed in WW I
But over time she says, she realized she wanted others to hear about his story. 'So very proud of what he did'
"I feel proud, so very proud of what he did. It comes out more, not when you're young, but when you're older and you realize what's gone on." Every year, Gillrie has taken out an ad in the local Courtenay newspa‐
per to coincide with Remembrance Day. It shows Leslie on a horse in a Cana‐
dian military uniform, taken in Vancouver in 1915. The caption reads: "Sadly but proudly I hold the medals of the father I never knew." Bartholomew says the title for the exhibit about Gillrie and Leslie came from the last words of his last letter, "How I Long to See You". "I hope what (visitors) take away from this is a father's love and 100 years later, a daughter's love for that father. That even though the war was tragic, it wasn't enough to kill the love between these people." Every year, June Gillrie has taken out an ad in the local Courtenay newspaper to coincide with Remembrance Day. It shows her father, William Kineer Leslie, on a horse in a Canadian military uniform, taken in Vancouver in 1915. (Courtesy of June Gillrie) The Bugle
17
November 11, 2014
Fenelon falls commemorates
The Beginning of wwi
On August 17, 2014, Fenelon Falls and area residents were joined at the Cenotaph by descendants of some of the fifty‐seven men from our community who were killed during the First World War. Wreaths were placed on behalf of the Governments of Canada and Ontario. Cpl Brooklynn Byrne (left), of the Royal Canadian Army Cadet Corps, Hastings & Prince Edward Regiment, placed a wreath on behalf of the Youth of Canada. Fenelon Falls singer/songwriter Rick Hughes, composer of “Thank God for Poppies”, placed a carnation in memory of his great‐
uncle, Wesley Hughes (inset), who served in the 38th Battalion, and was killed in France in 1917 at age 32. He rests in La Chaudieres Cemetery, just below Vimy Ridge. The Bugle
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November 11, 2014
Fenelon falls commemorates
The Beginning of wwi
Phyllis Barrett, grand‐niece of George Wilbert Akister, placed a carnation on the steps of the Cenotaph, accompanied by two of her sons, Ian and Shane. George Akister was 28 years old when he died of a gun‐
shot wound to abdomen at No. 49 Casualty Clearing Station, Albert, Somme, Picardie, France on Sep‐
tember 15, 1916. He is buried at Contay British Cemetery, Somme, France. Robert Carew, left, was honoured by grand‐niece, Gail Atkin, and grand‐nephew, John Carew. While helping carry out wounded during an attack at Pass‐
chendaele Ridge, Robert was hit by a piece of shrapnel and instantly killed. That was November 6, 1917 ‐ he was 21. His remains were never recovered, and he is commemorated on the Menin Gate at Ypres, Bel‐
gium. His brother, Sam, returned from the war, and became the first President of Fenelon Falls Legion Branch 238. in 1932. The Bugle
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November 11, 2014
Fenelon falls commemorates
The Beginning of wwi
Charles Norman Metcalfe, left, was re‐
membered by niece Boots Jones. Serving with the Canadian Machine Gun Corps, 2nd Battalion, he was killed on September 15, 1918, and is buried at Sun Quarry Cemetery, Pas de Calais France. He was 32 years old. Following the placement of the wreaths and the 57 com‐
memorative carnations, Branch President Wilson sang “The Green Fields of France” (right) before giving the order to march off the colours (bottom right), and inviting the gather‐
ing to drop by the Branch for a complimentary barbecue (opposite page, bottom), and to peruse the various historical displays, hear the Pilgrimage Presentation (opposite page, top) and join in a WWI sing‐
along with the Reunion Choir. Little did we know that during the Cenotaph Service the entire village had suffered a power outage, which made for more than a few challenges back at the Branch. The Bugle
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November 11, 2014
Fenelon falls commemorates
The Beginning of wwi
Museum for their display, and to the Reunion Choir, as well as all the many volunteers who made the day a resounding suc‐
cess, including Paul Leduc and Lois Densmore for the wonder‐
ful photos of the In true pioneer spirit, every‐
one made the best of it, and easily 250 people enjoyed the hospitality of the Branch, whether in the Hall, the clubroom, the West Lounge or out on the patio. Thanks go to Cde. Arlene Col‐
man, whose vision brought the whole project to life, including the Garden of Remembrance which is pictured on page 8. Thanks also to historian Carl Black for bringing his WWI memorabilia along, and for donning the uniform and standing vigil at the Cenotaph; also to the Victoria County The Bugle
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day’s events. A very special thank‐you goes out to those descendants of our 57 WWI KIAs who were able to attend the service, some coming from as far away as British Columbia. The last phase of this unique commemoration, which was funded in part by a grant from the Legacy Chest Fund, is a Book of Remem‐
brance, which should be completed over the winter months. This lasting tribute to the sacrifice of Fenelon’s Fifty‐Seven promises to be a one‐of‐a
‐kind publication. November 11, 2014
Last post ~ wwi
Fifty-seven war dead
From the Fenelon falls area
AKISTER, George Wilbert
1888-1916 28 years old
ALDOUS, Thomas Grenville
1895-1917 21 years old
BARRATT, Fred
BEECROFT, Harvey
1892-1916 24 years old
BROOKER, Stephen Walter
1897-1917 20 years old
BUDD, James John
1877-1917 40 years old
CAMPBELL, Alexander “Shy”
1886-1918 31 years old
CAREW, Robert
1896-1917 21 years old
CHAMBERS, Allistar
1895-1918 23 years old
COSBY, Walter
1897-1917 19 years old
COULTER, Douglas Johnstone
1896-1918 22 years old
COTEY, Earle
1894-1917 23 years old
CRAGG, Russell Alexander
1889-1916 26 years old
CUNDAL, William Johnston
1884-1916 31 years old
DONALDSON, Robert John
1894-1917 23 years old
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November 11, 2014
Last post ~ wwi
Fifty-seven war dead
From the Fenelon falls area
FARROW, George
FINLEY, Norman
1878-1917 39 years old
FISKE, Frederick
1897-1918 21 years old
GORDON, John “Jack”
1879-1916 37 years old
GORDON, Joseph
1886-1915 29 years old
GROVES, Robert
1888-1917 29 years old
HADLEY, Herbert Hilton
1878-1917 40 years old
HALLIDAY, Adam Sydney
1895-1919 23 years old
HATHAWAY, Harold
1891-1917 26 years old
HALL, George Carlton
1898-1917 19 years old
HUGHES, Wesley
1885-1917 32 years old
HUTCHINS, Horace
1868-1917 49 years old
JOHNSTON, Martin
1890-1918 28 years old
JUNKIN,Irvine
1897-1918 21 years old
JUNKIN, Percy John Clayton
1890-1916 26 years old
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November 11, 2014
Last post ~ wwi
Fifty-seven war dead
From the Fenelon falls area
KIRTON, Albert Edward
1892-1918 26 years old
KIRTON, William
1890-1918 28 years old
LORD, Lawrence MacLean
1899-1918 18 years old
LYLE, Wilbert Merril
1897-1917 20 years old
MacDOUGALL, Russell Hugh
1897-1916 19 years old
MARK, Robert Henry
1883-1917 33 years old
MARTIN, Malcolm
1897-1917 20 years old
McNEIL, Sherman
1887-1917 30 years old
METCALFE, Charles Norman
1886-1918 32 years old
MORRIS, Richard Leece
1897-1918 21 years old
MORRISON, William James
1876-1917 40 years old
MOSS, Albert Edward
1886-1917 32 years old
NAYLOR, John Denby
1896-1917 21 years old
PATTON, Neil Smith
1895-1918 23 years old
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November 11, 2014
Last post ~ wwi
Fifty-seven war dead
From the Fenelon falls area
QUIGG, Leslie B.
1889-1916 26 years old
SANDILAND, James R. Thomas
1892-1916 24 years old
SHANKLAND, John Wilfred
1897-1917 19 years old
STILLWELL, Arthur James
1890-1919 29 years old
STINSON, Charles Howard
1897-1917 19 years old
TAGGART, Gordon
1897-1917 20 years old
TAMLIN, Edgar Melville
1897-1918 21 years old
WARWICK, William
1894-1918 24 years old
WHITNEY, Joseph William
1888-1918 30 years old
WILKINSON, Harry
1887-1917 30 years old
WILSON, Norman
1891-1918 27 years old
WRIGHT, William Albert
1898-1917 19 years old
YORK, Frank
1888-1918 30 years old
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November 11, 2014
Tower of London
Poppy installation
Poppies in the Moat
www.britishlegion.org.uk From 5 August 2014 to 11 November 2014, a major artistic in‐
stallation entitled 'Blood Swept Lands and Seas of Red' sees the Tower of London's famous dry moat filled with over 800,000 ceramic poppies to cre‐
ate a powerful visual commemora‐
tion for the First World War Centen‐
ary. We're delighted to announce that all the poppies have been sold. Information about the sale of pop‐
pies and whether more may become available can be found at pop‐
pies.hrp.org.uk The ceramic poppies were on sale for £25 each with net proceeds, hoped to be in excess of £15 million, to be shared equally amongst a group of carefully selected Service charities including the Legion. The Legion is proud to be one of the selected charities along with the Confederation of Service Chari‐
ties (COBSEO), Combat Stress, Com‐
“The significance of the
vital work that these charities
provide is one we must not forget
and is especially poignant as we
mark the anniversary of the First
World War and remember all
those who lived and fought during
this time.”
Ed. Note: See back cover for photos of this amazing tribute. General the Lord Dannatt, Constable of the Tower The Bugle
ing Home, Help for Heroes and SSAFA (formerly the Soldiers, Sailors, Air‐
men and Families Association). The installation, in collabora‐
tion with ceramic artist Paul Cum‐
mins and theatre stage designer Tom Piper, was unveiled on 5 August 2014, one hundred years since the first full day of Britain's involvement in the First World War. The poppies, a symbol of Re‐
membrance in the UK, will encircle the iconic landmark, creating not only a spectacular display visible from all around the Tower, but also an inspiring setting for performance and learning activities, as well as pro‐
viding a location for personal reflec‐
tion. The scale of the installation in‐
tends to reflect the magnitude of such an important centenary. 26
November 11, 2014
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27
November 11, 2014
REMEMBRANCE DAY 2014
Royal Canadian Legion Branch 238
OPENING CEREMONY
President Belinda Wilson
THE NATIONAL ANTHEM
LAST POST
SILENCE
ROUSE
ACT OF REMEMBRANCE
INVOCATION
Reverend Caleb Kim
HYMN
“O God Our Help In Ages Past” (page 29)
PLACING OF WREATHS
Cde. Arlene Colman, Poppy Chairman
SCRIPTURE READING
Bernie Schofield
HYMN
“Let There Be Peace On Earth” (page 33)
CLOSING PRAYER & BENEDICTION
Reverend Caleb Kim
CLOSING CEREMONY
1st Vice-President Brenda Wade
THE ROYAL ANTHEM
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November 11, 2014
REMEMBRANCE DAY 2014
Royal Canadian Legion Branch 238
O GOD OUR HELP IN AGES PAST
1. O God our help in ages past
our hope for years to come,
Our shelter from the stormy blast
and our eternal home.
2. Time, like an ever-rolling stream
bears all its sons away,
They fly, forgotten, as a dream
dies at the opening day.
3. A thousand ages in Thy sight
are like an evening gone;
Short as the watch that ends the night
before the rising sun.
4. O God our help in ages past
our hope for years to come,
Be Thou our guard while troubles last
and our eternal home!
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November 11, 2014
REMEMBRANCE DAY 2014
Royal Canadian Legion Branch 238
PLACING OF WREATHS
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II…….Cde. Mel Deacon
Silver Cross Mothers…….Cde. Jean Smith
Government of Canada
Mr. Bob Pennock for Barry Devolin, MP
Government of Ontario
Cde. Ernie Wiles for Laurie Scott, MPP
City of Kawartha Lakes Ward 5…….Coun. Steve Strangway
City of Kawartha Lakes Ward 6…….Coun. Doug Elmslie
In Honour of WO Patrice Vincent & Cpl. Nathan Cirillo
Sub/Lt (NL) Randy Ward
100th Anniversary of the beginning of World War One
Jean Campbell, granddaughter of Alexander “Shy” Campbell
Canadian Forces in Afghanistan……..Cde. Wes Arscott CD
Hong Kong Veterans…….Cde. Frank Simmons
Korean War Veterans…….Cde. Cory Van de Kletersteeg
NATO Forces…….Cde. Denny Burke MMM CD
Cypress Veterans…….Cde. Gil Grindrod
In Memory of Fathers, Sgt Jack Colman &
Pte John Corbett…….Cde. Ian Colman
Royal Canadian Legion Zone F-4
Zone Commander Cde Belinda Wilson
Royal Canadian Legion Br 238
1st Vice President Cde. Brenda Wade
Ladies Auxiliary to Branch 238
President Cde. Jo Northey
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November 11, 2014
REMEMBRANCE DAY 2014
Royal Canadian Legion Branch 238
PLACING OF WREATHS (cont’d)
NLCC Adanac
Able Seaman Christopher Quibell & Able Seaman Alissondra Quibell
Scouts Canada……..Brian Gill
Fenelon Twp. Public School
Nolan Carson & Marissa Allen
Langton Public School
Rachael Walton & Abigail Dalton
Fenelon Falls Secondary School
Jamie Nettinga & Ashley Breedon
Salvation Army…….Major Roy Randell
Ontario Provincial Police
City of Kawartha Lakes EMS
Fenelon Firefighters Association…….District Chief Dave Kish
Community Policing Committee……..Scott Woolfrey
Fenelon Court Long Term Care
Cde. Glenn Metcalfe
Jardine Funeral Home…….Mr. Rob Jardine
St. Aloysius Church Knights of Columbus
Grand Knight Jim Smith
Fenelon Falls Rotary Club…….Wayne Hutchinson, President
Fenelon Falls Lions Club…...Joan Cox
The Spry Lodge #406 G.R.C.
Right Worshipful Brother Barry Gyton
Fenelon Falls Seniors Club
Messrs. Jim Scott & Carl Thompson
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November 11, 2014
REMEMBRANCE DAY 2014
Royal Canadian Legion Branch 238
PRE-PLACED WREATHS KINDLY SPONSORED BY
BMO Bank of Montreal
Bodiworx by Stacie
The Big Event
Bob Burns Books
Butterfly Boutique
CIBC
Canada Post
Canadian Tire
Community Care
The Corral
Fenelon Falls Home Hardware
Fenelon Falls Marina
Fenelon Falls Wireless
George Wilson Motors
Godfathers Pizza
Grr8 Finds Markets
Handley Lumber
Kawartha Lakes Winery Inc.
Kawartha North Family Health Team
Nolan’s Restaurant
New Deal Kawartha Lakes Realty
Road 121 Motel
Royal LePage Kawartha Lakes Realty
Stokes on Trent
Tallulah Salon & Spa
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November 11, 2014
REMEMBRANCE DAY 2014
Royal Canadian Legion Branch 238
LET THERE BE PEACE ON EARTH
Let there be peace on earth
And let it begin with me.
Let there be peace on earth
The peace that was meant to be.
With God as our father
Brothers all are we.
Let me walk with my brother
In perfect harmony.
Let peace begin with me
Let this be the moment now.
With every step I take
Let this be my solemn vow.
To take each moment
And live each moment
In peace eternally.
Let there be peace on earth
And let it begin with me.
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November 11, 2014
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34
November 11, 2014
The country warrior
By cde. Mel goddard
may of his mother and siblings, but there was a quiet pride from his fa‐
ther. With his fathers blessings, off he went to serve for King and Coun‐
try; not really knowing what lay ahead, but certainly SOMETHING different and better than from where he came from. Fast forward a few months; after being fitted with uniform, the notorious Ross Rifle, (unknown at that time) and the training to use it to good effect. When the rifle did fire, it spat out little bullets, .303s that were tiny The young man came into but very fast and deadly. town one day, from the country, to He and hundreds like him, carried the do what young men do in town. rifle on the boat to "over there". He was a little bored with country life; work, work, same old, same old. He saw a notice up on the town bulletin board, that his country was looking for men to enlist for ser‐
vice in a land far away. He had heard that somewhere 'over there' a war had started, and he was thinking that this would be a good chance to get away from the hum‐drum of farm life, and get a lit‐
tle adventure in; perhaps see some of the World. A number of men were very excited at the chance to get away from the hum‐drum of their exis‐
tence, and here was the chance. (Continued on page 36)
He enlisted; much to the dis‐
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35
November 11, 2014
The country warrior
By cde. Mel goddard
(Continued from page 35)
At long last he was in France, in the muddy fields that at times were a meat grinder that took good men and shredded them to pieces. He was in the thick of it, scared, but bravely carrying on, shooting at the 'other side' who was shooting at him, also with tiny bullets that were very fast and deadly. The other side shot similar sized bullets, that were tiny, but very fast and deadly. The good Lord was riding on his shoulder though, and he was scared, and mad, and dirty muddy, but basically unhurt. This place was a Hell on Earth that he hadn't envisioned, and as he lay there one day looking up at the sky, he saw a speck that was new to him. It drew closer giving a loud sputtering noise as it passed over‐
head; it was an aeroplane. A real honest to God flying machine. He had heard about them, but never had seen one. He was too busy trying to stay alive in the wet cold quagmires of his existence. He resolved that flying for King and Country was a lot better than swimming for them in the stink‐
hole where he was. Through good luck and better management he managed to per‐
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suade his Officers that he was good candidate material for aerial combat. If he was going to die for his King and Country, at least it would be a clean death. Off to flying school he went, in England and then France, where he survived the rigors of training in rag‐
tag cloth and wooden "kites" that somehow managed to lift his body and soul up into the heavens above. These aeroplanes smelled of castor oil and gasoline, and fabric dope, and gun oil, and other people's sweat, but they flew. And they carried guns. Good Lewis air‐cooled guns that spat out little .303 bullets that were tiny but very fast and deadly. And in school, his country home training, shooting rabbits and squir‐
rels and such, paid off as he became November 11, 2014
The country warrior
By cde. Mel goddard
quite an aerial marksman, hitting his targets a lot. Back in France, he joined a squadron of like minded individuals, who went after "The Hun" with a vengeance. Of course, 'the Hun' went af‐
ter them also, so at times he became quite adept at scoring victories, and soon became an "Ace". One becomes an 'ace', buy shooting down five en‐
emy aircraft. He lived the life of men who had become 'supermen' in the eyes of ground bound troops; flying over the mud and gore, chasing the en‐
emy off, or strafing the foe on the ground, with those little bullets that were tiny but very fast and deadly. In time he became a double Ace, with ten victories, and medals on his chest. But one day, he was up in his element, on patrol when his Squad‐
ron Leader spotted a line on enemy troops below. He signalled his men to The Bugle
37
attack, and down they went. Strafing the line of lorries and troops and generally making their life miser‐
able. Strafing with those tiny bullets that were very fast and deadly SOMEBODY down below fired back, also shooting those little bullets that were tiny but very fast and deadly; and one connected. Our flyboy was hit in the back. He managed to fly his aero‐
plane back to his own lines, but blacking out, he lost control and his 'plane dived into the ground. That horrid muddy ground that he had left many months ago, had re‐
claimed him. The farm boy had returned to the earth, but not at home. In the parlance of the aerial warrior; he had "Bought the Farm". One hundred years later, a young man, a student from home who had won a trip to France to tour the "Fields of Honour" looks at the headstone of a fighter pilot, and wonders: What was it like up there so long ago? This stu‐
dent is about the same age as the young man under the headstone, and he is won‐
dering: What was it like to be flying against others like him; both of whom are firing tiny bullets that are very fast and very deadly? November 11, 2014
the royal Canadian legion
www.legion.ca
MISSION STATEMENT The mission of The Royal Canadian Legion is "to serve veterans and their dependants, to promote Remem‐
brance, and to act in the service of Canada and its communities." In es‐
sence, the purposes and objects of the Legion were born of the need to further the spirit of comradeship and mutual assistance among all who have served and never to forget the deeds of the fallen. It is paramount that the Le‐
gion strives to pass on these goals and traditions to the families and descendants of our ex‐service per‐
sonnel and to raise this awareness among all Canadians. The major source of funding for the Legion to accomplish this most important work is the an‐
nual Poppy Campaign, the founda‐
tion of our Remembrance Program. It is the generosity of Canadians that enables the Legion to ensure that our veterans and their dependants are cared for and treated with the re‐
spect that they deserve. This Novem‐
ber campaign, which sees Poppies distributed to Canadians of all ages, serves to perpetuate Remembrance by ensuring that the memory and sacrifices of our war veterans are never forgotten. The Legion also maintains a leading role in the creation and care of memorials to the contributions The Bugle
and valour of our veterans and ex‐
service members. We are deeply honoured and proud to accept the task of organizing Remembrance ceremonies throughout the country, including the National Remembrance Day Ceremony in Ottawa. In addi‐
tion, working in concert with other veterans’ organizations and the Ca‐
nadian government, the Legion has vowed to ensure that the preserva‐
tion of the records and memories of our fallen heroes and returning vet‐
erans continues in perpetuity. The Royal Canadian Legion was honoured to initiate and coordi‐
nate the Tomb of the Unknown Sol‐
dier for the Centennial in 2000 and to suggest the declaration of 2005 as 'Year of the Veteran'. These and other commemorative projects and activities led by The Royal Canadian Legion have been welcomed by Ca‐
nadians who have never hesitated to demonstrate their support in ac‐
knowledging the debt that is owed to those who sacrifice so much. We repay this debt in our “Remembrance.” YOU CAN JOIN THE LEGION Here are just some of the many benefits membership in The Royal Canadian Legion brings: SOCIAL ACTIVITIES : Most branches have recreational facilities and may have licensed lounges. Members can 38
November 11, 2014
the royal Canadian legion
www.legion.ca
enjoy a wide variety of social events such as dances, barbeques, enter‐
tainment and a host of other special events. MEMBER SPORTS: The Legion has sporting events such as darts, curling, cribbage and golf, with competitions ranging from local, provincial to na‐
tional levels. MEMBER BENEFITS PACKAGE: The Legion has developed a relationship with a number of corporate partners to provide products and services to its members. Some of the partners include a home and auto insurance company, health care services, a credit card company, and an auto club to name a few. Only Legion members are entitled to the benefits offered. bers who can take on the Leadership challenge. If this is where your inter‐
est lies you can become involved by serving on the branch executive. You may even wish to go to higher levels such as zone, district or provincial. You may even aspire to the national level. Every Dominion President who has served in this capacity started out as a branch member. You, too, could one day be President of the largest community service organiza‐
tion in Canada. SERVICE: As Canada's largest volun‐
teer organization, tremendous intan‐
gible benefits are gained through the commitment of members to fulfill the mandate of remembrance, ser‐
vice to the community and our coun‐
try. Our fallen comrades served in battle, you have "another way to COMMUNITY SERVICE: You can serve" by joining The Royal Canadian serve your community by assisting Legion. with the many Legion programs in LEGION MAGAZINE: Your member‐
support of youth, seniors, the dis‐
ship includes a subscription to the abled and others. The Legion also Legion Magazine which is published provides bursaries and scholarships six times a year. It contains articles to students from Secondary School on various topics including history, to the University level and is the larg‐
current events and general interest est single supporter of Scouts and stories, as well as keeping members Guides in Canada. It is also a major up‐to‐date on the many and varied supporter of sea, army and air ca‐
Legion activities. It also contains a dets. section dedicated to the recognition LEADERSHIP: You will have the op‐ of those who served their country. portunity to grow within this great organization. The Legion needs mem‐ The Bugle
39
November 11, 2014
membership in
the royal Canadian legion
You may be eligible for vot‐  Her Majesty's reserve forces ing membership in a Canadian including Cadet Instructors on the Cadet Cadre for not less than branch of The Royal Canadian one year; or Legion if you are a Canadian citi‐
zen or Commonwealth subject  The Royal Canadian Mounted Police or The Royal Newfound‐
and are of federal voting age. You land Constabulary for not less may be eligible for Voting mem‐
than one year; or bership if you are a non‐Canadian 
the Forces of a country while citizen or a non‐Commonwealth that country was a member of subject from an Allied nation. NATO or NORAD in alliance with Canada; or There are three membership categories, each with different quali‐  the Forces of the United States; or fications. The criteria for each cate‐
gory are as follows:  the Vietnam War with the Armed Forces of the United States, Australia, New Zealand, ORDINARY MEMBERSHIP the Republic of Korea or South You may be eligible for Ordi‐
Vietnam, and were a Canadian nary membership if you have served citizen or Commonwealth sub‐
or are serving in: ject at the time of service; or  The Canadian Forces or Her Maj‐  the Canadian Coast Guard as an esty's Forces (including regular officer or crew member who has force or reserve force under two or more years active service class "C" service); or on the high seas or inland water‐
ways; or  the Forces or underground forces of any of Her Majesty's  a city, municipal or provincial allies in any war, conflict or po‐
police force as a police officer lice action in which Canada was for not less than one year. involved; or  the Merchant Navy or non‐ ASSOCIATE MEMBERSHIP military services in an actual If you do not qualify for Ordi‐
theatre of war in which Canada nary membership you may be eligible was involved; or for Associate membership if you: The Bugle
40
November 11, 2014
membership in
the royal Canadian legion
 are the child, stepchild, adopted Royal Canadian Legion you may apply 






child, grandchild, sibling, niece/
nephew, widow/er, parent or spouse of someone who is or was eligible for Ordinary mem‐
bership; or are the child of an Associate member; or have served in The Royal Cana‐
dian Sea, Army or Air Cadets for not less than 3 years; or have served as a cadet civilian instructor for not less than 3 years; or have served as an officer in the Navy League of Canada for not less than 2 years; or have served in the Polish Armed Forces after WW II below the rank of officer; or have served in a City, Municipal, Volunteer, Un‐organized Territo‐
ries or Federal Fire Service for not less than one year are the spouse, parent or sibling of an associate member who qualified subject to the above criteria. for Affiliate Voting membership. For further information, con‐
tact the Fenelon Falls Legion’s Mem‐
bership Chairman, Brenda Wade, at the Branch (705‐887‐3041) or email [email protected] AFFILIATE VOTING MEMBERSHIP If you do not qualify for Ordi‐
nary or Associate membership but support the aims and objects of The The Bugle
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November 11, 2014
afghanistan 2002 - 2014
At the going down of the sun...
Master Corporal Byron Garth Greff; Age: 26; Hometown: Swift Current, Saskatchewan; Unit: 3rd Battalion PPCLI; Deceased: October 29, 2011. Master Corporal Francis Roy; Age: 32; Hometown: Rimouski, Québec; Unit: Canadian Special Operations Regiment; Deceased: June 25, 2011. Bombardier Karl Manning; Age: 31; Hometown: Chicoutimi, Québec; Unit: 5e Régiment d'artillerie légère du Canada; Deceased: May 27, 2011. Corporal Yannick Scherrer; Age: 24; Hometown: Victoriaville, Québec; Unit: 1er Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment; Deceased: March 27, 2011. Corporal Steve Martin; Age: 24; Hometown: St‐Cyrille‐de‐Wendover, Québec; Unit: 3e Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment; Deceased: December 18, 2010. Corporal Brian Pinksen; Age: 21; Hometown: Corner Brook , NL; Unit: 2nd Battalion , Royal Newfoundland Regiment; Deceased: August 30, 2010. Sapper Brian Collier; Age: 24; Hometown: Bradford, ON; Unit: 1 Combat Engi‐
neer Regiment; Deceased: July 20, 2010. Master Corporal Kristal Giesebrecht; Age: 34; Hometown: Wallaceburg, ON; Unit: 1 Canadian Field Hospital; Deceased: June 26, 2010. Private Andrew Miller; Age: 21; Hometown: Sudbury, ON; Unit: 2 Field Ambu‐
lance; Deceased: June 26, 2010. Sergeant James Patrick MacNeil; Age: 29; Hometown: Glace Bay, NS; Unit: 2 Combat Engineer Regiment; Deceased: June 21, 2010. Sergeant Martin Goudreault; Age: 35; Hometown: Sudbury, ON; Unit: 1 Com‐
bat Engineer Regiment; Deceased: June 6, 2010. The Bugle
42
November 11, 2014
Afghanistan 2002 - 2014
...and in the morning...
Trooper Larry Rudd; Age: 26; Hometown: Brantford, ON; Unit: Royal Cana‐
dian Dragoons; Deceased: May 24, 2010. Colonel Geoff Parker; Age: 42; Hometown: Oakville, ON; Unit: Land Forces Central Area Headquarters; Deceased: May 18, 2010. Private Kevin Thomas McKay; Age: 24; Hometown: Richmond Hill, ON; Unit: 1st Battalion PPCLI; Deceased: May 13, 2010. Petty Officer Second Class Craig Blake; Age: 37; Hometown: Simcoe, ON; Unit: Fleet Diving Unit (Atlantic); Deceased: May 3, 2010. Private Tyler William Todd; Age: 26; Hometown: Bright, ON; Unit: 1st Battal‐
ion PPCLI; Deceased: April 11, 2010. Cpl Darren James Fitzpatrick; Age: 21; Hometown: Prince George, BC; Unit: 3th Battalion PPCLI; Deceased: March 20, 2010. Corporal Joshua Caleb Baker; Age: 24; Hometown: Scarborough, ON; Unit: Loyal Edmonton Regiment 4th Battalion PPCLI; Deceased: February 12, 2010. Sergeant John Faught; Age: 44; Hometown: Sault Ste. Marie, ON; Unit: 1st Battalion PPCLI; Deceased: January 16, 2010. Private Garrett William Chidley; Age: 21; Hometown: Cambridge, ON; Unit: 2nd Battalion PPCLI; Deceased: December 30, 2009. Corporal Zachery McCormack; Age: 21; Hometown: Edmonton, AB; Unit: Loyal Edmonton Regiment, 4th Battalion PPCLI; Deceased: December 30, 2009. Sergeant Kirk Taylor; Age: 28; Hometown: Yarmouth, NS; Unit: 84 Independ‐
ent Field Battery, RCA; Deceased: December 30, 2009. Sergeant George Miok; Age: 28; Hometown: Edmonton, AB; Unit: 41 Combat Engineer Regiment; Deceased: December 30, 2009. Lieutenant Andrew Richard Nuttall; Age: 30; Hometown: Prince Rupert, BC; Unit: 1st Battalion PPCLI; Deceased: December 23, 2009. Sapper Steven Marshall; Age: 24; Hometown: Calgary, AB; Unit: 1 Combat Engineer Regiment; Deceased: October 30, 2009. Lieutenant Justin Boyes; Age: 26; Hometown: Saskatoon, SK; Unit: 3rd Battal‐
ion PPCLI; Deceased: October 28, 2009. The Bugle
43
November 11, 2014
Afghanistan 2002 - 2014
...we will remember them!
Corporal Jonathan Couturier; Age: 23; Hometown: Loretteville, QC; Unit: 2nd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment; Deceased: September 17, 2009. Private Patrick Lormand; Age: 21; Hometown: Chute‐à‐Blondeau, ON; Unit: 2nd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment; Deceased: September 13, 2009. Corporal Jean‐François Drouin; Age: 31; Hometown: Beauport, QC; Unit: 5 Combat Engineer Regiment, 2nd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment Battle Group; Deceased: September 6, 2009. Major Yannick Pépin; Age : 36; Hometown : Warwick, QC; Unit : 5 Combat Engineer Regiment, 2nd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment Battle Group; De‐
ceased : September 6, 2009. Sapper Matthieu Allard; Age: 21; Hometown: Val d'Or, QC; Unit: 5 Combat Engineer Regiment, 2nd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment Battle Group; De‐
ceased: August 1, 2009. Corporal Christian Bobbitt; Age: 23; Hometown: Sept‐Îles, Québec; Unit: 5 Combat Engineer Regiment, 2nd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment Battle Group; Deceased: August 1, 2009. Private Sébastien Courcy; Age: 26; Hometown: St‐Hyacinthe, QC; Unit: 2nd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment; Deceased: July 16, 2009. Master Corporal Patrice Audet; Age: 38; Hometown: Montreal, QC; Unit: 430e Escadron tactique d’hélicoptères; Deceased: July 6, 2009. Corporal Martin Joannette; Age: 25; Hometown: Saint‐Calixte, QC; Unit: 3e Bataillon, Royal 22e Régiment; Deceased: July 6, 2009. Master Corporal Charles‐Philippe Michaud; Age: 28; Hometown: Edmund‐
ston, NB; Unit: 2nd Batallion, Royal 22e Régiment; De‐
ceased: July 4, 2009. Corporal Nicholas Bulger; Age: 30; Hometown: Peterborough, ON; Unit: 3rd Battalion, PPCLI; De‐
ceased: July 3, 2009. The Bugle
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November 11, 2014
Afghanistan 2002 - 2014
LEST WE FORGET
Corporal Martin Dubé; Age: 35; Hometown: Québec City, QC; Unit: 5 Combat Engineer Regiment; Deceased: June 14, 2009. Private Alexandre Péloquin; Age: 20; Home Town: Brownsburg‐Chatham, QC; Unit: 3rd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment Battle Group; Deceased: June 8, 2009. Major Michelle Mendes; Age: 30; Home Town: Wicklow, ON; Unit: Chief of Defence Intelligence; Deceased: April 23, 2009. Corporal Karine Blais; Age: 21; Home Town: Les Méchins, QC; Unit: 12e Régi‐
ment Blindé du Canada, 2nd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment Battle Group; De‐
ceased: April 13, 2009. Master Corporal Scott Francis Vernelli; Age: 28; Home Town: Sault Ste. Marie, ON; Unit: 3rd Bat‐
talion, The RCR Battle Group; Deceased: March 20, 2009. Corporal Tyler Crooks; Age: 24; Home Town: Port Colborne, ON; Unit: 3rd Battalion, RCR Battle Group; Deceased: March 20, 2009. Trooper Jack Bouthillier; Age: 20; Home Town: Hearst, ON; Unit: Royal Cana‐
dian Dragoons, 3rd Battalion the Royal Canadian Regiment Battle Group; De‐
ceased: March 20, 2009. Trooper Corey Joseph Hayes; Age: 22; Home Town: Ripples, New Brunswick; Unit: Royal Canadian Dragoons, 3rd Battalion the Royal Canadian Regiment Battle Group; Deceased: March 20, 2009. Trooper Marc Diab; Age: 22; Home Town: Missis‐
sauga, ON; Unit: Royal Canadian Dragoons, 3rd Battalion the RCR Battle Group; Deceased: March 8, 2009. Warrant Officer Dennis Raymond Brown; Age: 38; Home Town: St. Cathari‐
nes, ON; Unit: The Lincoln and Welland Regiment; Deceased: March 3, 2009. The Bugle
45
November 11, 2014
Afghanistan 2002 - 2014
At the going down of the sun...
Corporal Dany Olivier Fortin; Age: 29; Home Town: Baie‐Comeau, QC; Unit: 425 Tactical Fighter Squadron at 3 Wing Bagotville; Deceased: March 3, 2009. Corporal Kenneth Chad O’Quinn; Age: 25; Home Town: Happy Valley‐Goose Bay, NL; Unit: 2 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group Headquarters and Sig‐
nals Squadron; Deceased: March 3, 2009. Sapper Sean David Greenfield; Age: 25; Home Town: Pinawa, MB; Unit: 24 Field Engineer Squadron, 2 Combat Engineer Regiment, 3rd Battalion of the RCR Battle Group; Deceased: January 31, 2009. Trooper Brian Richard Good; Age: 42; Home Town: Ottawa, ON; Unit: 3rd Battalion, RCR Battle Group; Deceased: January 7, 2009. Sergeant Gregory John Kruse; Age: 40; Home Town: Campbelltown, NB; Unit: 2 Combat Engineer Regiment, serving as a member of 3rd Battalion, The RCR Battle Group; Deceased: December 27, 2008. Warrant Officer Gaétan Roberge; Age: 45; Home Town: Hanmer, ON; Unit: 2nd Battalion, The Irish Regiment of Canada; Deceased: December 27, 2008. Private Michael Freeman; Age: 28; Home Town: Peterborough, ON; Unit: 3rd Battalion, RCR; De‐
ceased: December 26, 2008. Cpl. Thomas James Hamilton; Age: 26; Home Town: Truro, NS; Unit: 2nd Battalion, RCR; Deceased: December 13, 2008. Private Justin Peter Jones; Age: 21; Home Town: Baie Verte, NL; Unit: 2nd Battalion, RCR; Deceased: December 13, 2008. Private John Michael Roy Curwin; Age: 26; Home Town: Mount Uniacke, NS; Unit: 2nd Battalion, The RCR; Deceased: December 13, 2008. Warrant Officer Robert Wilson; Age: 38; Home Town: Keswick, ON; Unit: 1st Battalion, RCR; De‐
ceased: December 5, 2008. The Bugle
46
November 11, 2014
Afghanistan 2002 - 2014
...and in the morning...
Corporal Mark Robert McLaren; Age: 23; Home Town: Peterborough, ON; Unit: 1st Battalion, RCR; Deceased: December 5, 2008. Private Demetrios Diplaros; Age: 24; Home Town: Scarborough, ON; Unit: 1st Battalion, RCR; Deceased: December 5, 2008. Sergeant Prescott Shipway; Age: 36; Home Town: Saskatoon, SK; Unit: 2nd Battalion PPCLI Battle Group; Deceased: Sept. 7, 2008. Corporal Andrew Paul Grenon; Age: 23; Home Town: Windsor, ON; Unit: 2nd Battalion PPCLI Battle Group; Deceased: Sept. 3, 2008. Corporal Michael James Alexander Seggie; Age: 21; Home Town: Winnipeg, MB; Unit: 2nd Battalion PPCLI Battle Group; Deceased: September 3, 2008. Private Chadwick James Horn; Age: 21; Home Town: Calgary, AB; Unit: 2nd Battalion PPCLI Battle Group; Deceased: Sept. 3, 2008. Sapper Stephan John Stock; Age: 25; Home Town: Campbell River, BC; Unit: 1 Combat Engineer Regiment (1 CER); Deceased: August 20, 2008. Corporal Dustin Roy Robert Joseph Wasden; Age: 25; Home Town: Spirit‐
wood, SK; Unit: 1 Combat Engineer Regiment (1 CER); Deceased: August 20, 2008. Sergeant Shawn Allen Eades; Age: 33; Home Town: Hamilton, ON; Unit: 1 Combat Engineer Regiment (1 CER); Deceased: August 20, 2008. Master Cpl Erin Doyle; Age: 32; Home Town: Kamloops, BC; Unit: 3rd Battal‐
ion, PPCLI, Edmonton AB; Deceased: August 11, 2008. Master Corporal Joshua Brian Roberts; Age: 29; Home Town: Prince Albert, SK; Unit: 2nd Battalion, PPCLI, Shilo, MB; Deceased: August 9, 2008. The Bugle
47
November 11, 2014
Afghanistan 2002 - 2014
...we will remember them!
Corporal James (Jim) Hayward Arnal; Age: 25; Home Town: Winnipeg, MB; Unit: 2nd Battalion, PPCLI, Shilo MB; Deceased: July 18, 2008. Private Colin William Wilmot; Age: 24; Home Town: Fredericton, NB; Unit: 1 Field Ambulance, Edmonton AB; Deceased: July 5, 2008. Corporal Brendan Anthony Downey; Age: 37; Home Town: Dundurn, SK; Unit: Military Police Detachment in Dundurn, SK; Deceased: July 4, 2008. Captain Jonathan (Jon) Sutherland Snyder; Age: 26; Home Town: Penticton BC; Unit: 1st Battalion, PPCLI, Edmonton AB; Deceased: June 7, 2008. Captain Richard Steven Leary; Age: 32; Home Town: Brantford ON; Unit: 2nd Battalion, PPCLI, Shilo MB; Deceased: June 3, 2008. Corporal Michael Starker; Age: 36; Home Town: Calgary AB; Unit: 15 (Edmonton) Field Ambulance, Calgary AB; Deceased: May 6, 2008. Private Terry John Street; Age: 24; Home Town: Surrey BC; Unit: 2nd Battal‐
ion, PPCLI, Shilo MB; Deceased: April 4, 2008. Sergeant Jason Boyes; Age: 32; Home Town: Napa‐
nee ON; Unit: 2nd Battalion, PPCLI, Shilo MB; De‐
ceased: March 16, 2008. Bombardier Jérémie Ouellet; Age: 22; Home Town: Matane QC; Unit: 1st Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, Shilo MB; Deceased: March 11, 2008. Trooper Michael Y. Hayakaze; Age: 25; Home Town: Edmonton AB; Unit: Lord Strathcona’s Horse (Royal Canadians), Edmonton AB; Deceased: March 2, 2008. Corporal Étienne Gonthier; Age: 21; Home Town: St‐Georges‐de‐Beauce QC; Unit: 5 Combat Engineer Regiment, Valcartier QC; Deceased: January 23, 2008. The Bugle
48
November 11, 2014
Afghanistan 2002 - 2014
LEST WE FORGET
Trooper Richard Renaud; Age: 26; Home Town: Alma QC; Unit: 12e Régiment blindé du Canada, Valcartier QC; Deceased: January 15, 2008. Warrant Officer Hani Massouh; Age : 41; Unit: 2nd Battalion, Royal 22e Régi‐
ment, Valcartier QC; Deceased: January 6, 2008. Corporal Éric Labbé; Age : 31; Home Town: Rimouski QC; Unit: 2nd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment, Valcar‐
tier QC; Deceased: January 6, 2008. Gunner Jonathan Dion; Age: 27; Home Town: Gatineau QC; Unit: 5e Régiment d'ar‐
tillerie légère du Canada, Valcartier QC; Deceased: December 30, 2007. Private Michel Jr. Lévesque; Age: 25; Home Town: Rivière‐Rouge QC; Unit: 3 Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment, Valcartier QC; Deceased: November 17, 2007. Corporal Nicolas R. Beauchamp; Age: 28; Home Town: Montréal QC; Unit: 5 Field Ambulance, Valcartier QC; Deceased: November 17, 2007. Corporal Nathan Hornburg; Age: 24; Home Town: Calgary AB; Unit: The King’s Own Calgary Regiment AB; Deceased: September 24, 2007. Major Raymond Mark Ruckpaul; Age: 42; Home Town: Hamilton ON; Unit: Armoured Corps, The Royal Canadian Dragoons; Deceased: August 29, 2007. Master Corporal Christian Duchesne; Age: 34; Home Town: Montreal QC; Unit: 5th Field Ambulance, 5 Area Support Group, Valcartier QC; Deceased: August 22, 2007. Master Warrant Officer Mario Mercier; Age: 43; Home Town: Weedon QC; Unit: 2nd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment, Valcartier QC; Deceased: August 22, 2007. Private Simon Longtin; Age: 23; Home Town: Longueuil QC; Unit: 3rd Battal‐
ion, Royal 22e Régiment, Valcartier QC; Deceased: August 19, 2007. Captain Jefferson Clifford Francis; Age: 37; Home Town: NB; Unit: 1 Royal The Bugle
49
November 11, 2014
Afghanistan 2002 - 2014
At the going down of the sun...
Canadian Horse Artillery, Shilo MB; Deceased: July 4, 2007. Corporal Jordan Anderson; Age: 25; Home Town: Iqaluit, NU; Unit: 3rd Battal‐
ion, PPCLI, Edmonton AB; Deceased: July 4, 2007. Captain Matthew Johnathan Dawe; Age: 27; Home Town: Kingston ON; Unit: 3rd Battalion, PPCLI, Ed‐
monton AB; Deceased: July 4, 2007. Master Corporal Colin Stuart Francis Bason; Age: 28; Home Town: Burnaby, BC; Unit: The Royal Westminster Regiment, New Westminster, BC; Deceased: July 4, 2007. Corporal Cole D. Bartsch; Age: 23; Home Town: SK; Unit: 3rd Battalion, PPCLI, Edmonton AB; Deceased: July 4, 2007. Private Lane William Thomas Watkins; Age: 20; Home Town: Winnipeg MB; Unit: 3rd Battalion, PPCLI, Edmonton AB; Deceased: July 4, 2007. Sergeant Christos Karigiannis; Age: 31; Home Town: Montréal QC; Unit: 3rd Battalion, PPCLI, Edmonton AB; Deceased: June 20, 2007. Corporal Stephen Frederick Bouzane; Age: 26; Home Town: Springdale, NL; Unit: 3rd Battalion, PPCLI, Edmonton AB; Deceased: June 20, 2007. Private Joel Wiebe; Age: 22; Home Town: Edmonton AB; Unit: 3rd Battalion, PPCLI, Edmonton AB; Deceased: June 20, 2007. Trooper Darryl Caswell; Age: 25; Home Town: Bowmanville ON; Unit: The Royal Canadian Dra‐
goons, Petawawa ON; Deceased: June 11, 2007. Master Corporal Darrell Jason Priede; Age: 30; Home Town: Burlington ON; Unit: Army News Team, 3 Area Support Group, CFB Gagetown; Deceased: May 30, 2007. Corporal Matthew McCully; Age: 25; Home Town: Orangeville ON; Unit: 2 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group Headquarters and Signals Squadron, Petawawa ON; Deceased: May 25, 2007. The Bugle
50
November 11, 2014
Afghanistan 2002 - 2014
...and in the morning...
Master Corporal Anthony Klumpenhouwer; Age: 25; Home Town: Listowel, ON; Unit: Canadian Special Operations Forces Command; Deceased: April 18, 2007. Master Corporal Allan Stewart; Age: 31; Home Town: Newcastle NB; Unit: The Royal Canadian Dragoons, Petawawa ON; Deceased: April 11, 2007. Trooper Patrick James Pentland; Age: 23; Home Town: Geary NB; Unit: The Royal Canadian Dragoons, Petawawa ON; Deceased: April 11, 2007. Sergeant Donald Lucas; Age: 31; Home Town: St‐John's, NL; Unit: 2nd Battal‐
ion, The RCR, Gagetown NB; Deceased: April 8, 2007. Corporal Brent Donald Poland; Age: 37; Home Town: Sarnia ON; Unit: 2nd Battalion, RCR, Gagetown NB; Deceased: April 8, 2007. Corporal Christopher Paul Stannix; Age: 24; Home Town: Dartmouth NS; Unit: Princess Louise Fusiliers, Halifax NS; Deceased: April 8, 2007. Corporal Aaron Edward Williams; Age: 23; Home Town: Perth‐Andover NB; Unit: 2nd Battalion, RCR, Gagetown NB; Deceased: April 8, 2007. Private David Robert Greenslade; Age: 20; Home Town: Saint John NB; Unit: 2nd Battalion, RCR, Gage‐
town NB; Deceased: April 8, 2007. Private Kevin Vincent Kennedy; Age: 20; Home Town: St‐John's NL; Unit: 2nd Battalion, RCR, Gagetown NB; Deceased: April 8, 2007. Corporal Kevin Megeney; Age: 25; Home Town: New Glasgow NS; Unit: 1st Battalion, The Nova Scotia Highlanders (North), Truro NS; Deceased: March 6, 2007. Chief Warrant Officer Robert Girouard, CD; Age: 46; Home Town: Bouctouche NB; Unit: 1st Battalion, RCR, Petawawa ON; Deceased: November 27, 2006. Corporal Albert Storm, CD; Age: 36; Home Town: Niagara Falls ON; Unit: 1st Battalion, RCR, Petawawa ON; Deceased: November 27, 2006. The Bugle
51
November 11, 2014
Afghanistan 2002 - 2014
...we will remember them!
(Continued from page 51)
Sergeant Darcy Scott Tedford, CD; Age: 32; Home Town: Calgary AB; Unit: 1st Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment, Petawawa ON; Deceased: October 14, 2006 Private Blake Neil Williamson; Age: 23; Home Town: Ottawa ON; Unit: 1st Battalion, RCR, Petaw‐
awa ON; Deceased: October 14, 2006. Trooper Mark Andrew Wilson; Age: 39; Home town: London ON; Unit: Royal Canadian Dragoons, Petawawa ON; Deceased: October 7, 2006. Sergeant Craig Paul Gillam, CD; Age: 40; Home town: South Branch NL; Unit: Royal Canadian Dragoons, Petawawa ON; Deceased: October 3, . Corporal Robert Thomas James Mitchell; Age: 32; Home town;: Owen Sound ON; Unit: Royal Canadian Dragoons, Petawawa ON; Deceased: October 3, 2006. Private Josh Klukie; Age: 23; Home town: Shuniah ON; Unit: 1st Battalion, RCR, Petawawa ON; Deceased: September 29, 2006. Corporal Glen Arnold, CD; Age: 32; Home Town: McKerrow ON; Unit: 2 Field Ambulance, Petawawa ON; Deceased: September 18, 2006. Private David Byers; Age: 22; Home Town: Espanola ON; Unit: 2nd Battalion, PPCLI, Shilo MB; Deceased: September 18, 2006. Corporal Shane Keating; Age: 30; Home Town: Dalmeny SK; Unit: 2nd Battal‐
ion, PPCLI, Shilo MB; Deceased: September 18, 2006. Corporal Keith Morley, CD; Age: 30; Home Town: Winnipeg MB; Unit: 2nd Battalion, PPCLI, Shilo MB; Deceased: September 18, 2006. Private Mark Anthony Graham; Age: 33; Home Town: Hamilton ON; Unit: 1st Battalion, RCR, Petawawa ON; Deceased: September 4, 2006. The Bugle
52
November 11, 2014
Afghanistan 2002 - 2014
LEST WE FORGET
Private William Jonathan James Cushley; Age: 21; Home Town: Port Lambton ON; Unit: 1st Battalion, RCR, Petawawa ON; Deceased: September 3, 2006. Warrant Officer Frank Robert Mellish, CD; Age: 38; Home Town: Truro NS; Unit: 1st Battalion, RCR, Petawawa ON. Warrant Officer Richard Francis Nolan, CD; Age: 39; Home Town: Mount Pearl NL; Unit: 1st Battalion, RCR, Petawawa ON; Deceased: September 3rd, 2006. Sergeant Shane Stachnik; Age: 30; Home Town: Waskatenau AB; Unit: 2 Combat Engi‐
neer Regiment, Petawawa ON; Deceased: September 3rd, 2006. Corporal David Braun; Age: 27; Home Town: Raymore SK; Unit: 2nd Battalion PPCLI, Shilo MB; Deceased: August 22, 2006. Corporal Andrew James Eykelenboom; Age: 23; Home Town: Comox BC; Unit: 1st Field Ambulance, Edmonton AB; Deceased: Au‐
gust 11, 2006. Master Corporal Jeffrey Scott Walsh; Age: 33; Home Town: Regina SK; Unit: 2nd Battal‐
ion, PPCLI, Shilo MB; Deceased: August 9, 2006. Master Corporal Raymond Arndt; Age: 31; Home Town: Edson AB; Unit: The Loyal Ed‐
monton Regiment, Edmonton AB; Deceased: August 5, 2006. Private Kevin Dallaire; Age: 22; Home Town: Calgary AB; Unit: 1st Battalion, PPCLI, Edmonton AB; Deceased: August 3, 2006. Sergeant Vaughan Ingram; Age: 35; Home Town: Burgeo NL; Unit: 1st Battal‐
ion, PPCLI, Edmonton AB; Deceased: August 3, 2006. Corporal Bryce Jeffrey Keller; Age: 27; Home Town: Regina SK; Unit: 1st Bat‐
talion, PPCLI, Edmonton AB; Deceased: August 3, 2006 Corporal Christopher Jonathan Reid, CD; Age: 34; Home Town: Truro NS; Unit: 1st Battalion, PPCLI, Edmonton AB; Deceased: August 3, 2006 The Bugle
53
November 11, 2014
Afghanistan 2002 - 2014
LEST WE FORGET
(Continued from page 53)
Corporal Francisco Gomez, CD; Age: 44; Home town: Edmonton AB; Unit: 1st Battalion, PPCLI, Edmonton AB; Deceased: July 22, 2006 Corporal Jason Patrick Warren; Age: 29; Home town: Québec City QC; Unit: The Black Watch (Royal Highland Regiment) of Canada, Montréal QC; De‐
ceased: July 22, 2006 Corporal Anthony Joseph Boneca; Age: 21; Home Town: Thunder Bay ON; Unit: Lake Superior Scottish Regiment, Thunder Bay ON; Deceased: July 9, 2006 Captain Nichola Kathleen Sarah Goddard, MSM; Age: 26; Home Town: Cal‐
gary AB; Unit: 1st Royal Canadian Horse Artillery, Shilo MB; Deceased: May 17, 2006 Corporal Matthew David James Dinning; Age: 23; Home Town: Richmond Hill ON; Unit: 2 Military Police Platoon, Petawawa ON; Deceased: April 22, 2006 Bombardier Myles Stanley John Mansell; Age: 25; Home Town: Victoria BC; Unit: 5th (BC) Field Artillery Regiment, Victoria BC; Deceased: April 22, 2006 Corporal Randy Payne; Age: 32; Home town: Ga‐
nanoque ON; Unit: 1 Garrison Military Police Company, Detachment Wainwright AB; De‐
ceased: April 22, 2006. Lieutenant William Turner; Age: 45; Home Town: Toronto ON; Unit: Land Force Western Area Head‐
quarters, Edmonton, AB (20th Field Artillery Regi‐
ment); Deceased: April 22, 2006. The Bugle
54
November 11, 2014
Afghanistan 2002 - 2014
LEST WE FORGET
Private Robert Costall; Age: 22; Home Town: Thunder Bay ON; Unit: 1st Bat‐
talion, PPCLI, Edmonton AB; Deceased: March 29, 2006. Master Corporal Timothy Wilson; Age: 30; Home Town: Grande Prairie AB; Unit: 2nd Battalion, PPCLI, Shilo MB; Deceased: March 5, 2006. Corporal Paul Davis; Age: 28; Home Town: Bridgewater NS; Unit: 2nd Battal‐
ion, PPCLI, Shilo MB; Deceased: March 2, 2006. Mr. Glyn Berry; Age: 59; Home Town: United Kingdom; Unit: Director, Foreign Affairs Canada; Deceased: January 15, 2006. Private Braun Scott Woodfield; Age: 24; Home Town: Eastern Passage NS; Unit: 2nd Battalion, RCR, Oromocto NB; Deceased: November 24, 2005. Corporal Jamie Brendan Murphy; Age: 26; Home town: Conception Harbour NL; Unit: 1st Battalion, RCR, Petawawa ON; Deceased: January 27, 2004. Corporal Robbie Christopher Beerenfenger; Age: 29; Home town: Ottawa ON; Unit: 3rd Battalion, RCR, Petawawa ON; Deceased: October 2, 2003. Sergeant Robert Alan Short; Age: 42; Home town: Fredericton NB; Unit: 3rd Battalion, RCR, Petawawa ON; Deceased: October 2, 2003. Sergeant Marc D. Léger; Age: 29; Home town: Lancaster ON; Unit: 3rd Battalion, PPCLI, Edmon‐
ton AB; Deceased: April 18, 2002. Corporal Ainsworth Dyer; Age: 24; Home town: Montréal QC; Unit: 3rd Battalion, PPCLI, Edmonton AB; Deceased: April 18, 2002. Private Richard Green; Age: 21; Home town: Mill Cove NS; Unit: 3rd Battalion, PPCLI, Edmonton AB; Deceased: April 18, 2002. Private Nathan Smith; Age: 26; Home Town: Tatamagouche NS; Unit: 3rd Battalion, PPCLI, Edmonton AB; Deceased: April 18 2002. The Bugle
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November 11, 2014
If possible, please contact the Fenelon Legion
705-887-3041 or [email protected]
by December 14
to confirm that you will be our guest
for a complimentary full-course
Turkey Dinner with all the trimmings.
The Bugle
56
November 11, 2014
branch 238 upComing events
www.fenelonfallslegion.ca
subscribe to our email newsletter
REGULAR BRANCH EVENTS 
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Hot Lunches every Thursday and Friday from 11:30 AM to 1:00 PM. Only $8.00, includes coffee or tea ($9.00 on Turkey Day ‐ last Thursday each month, except July, August and December). Liver & Onions or Hamburg Steak & Onions, served with mashed potatoes and vegetables; Fish & Chips on Friday; PLUS Daily Specials! Take‐out available. Open to the public. Winter Shuffleboard League Mondays 6:30 ‐ 10:00 PM (Members Only) Ladies 8‐Ball League Mondays 6:30 ‐ 10:00 PM (Members Only) Mixed Darts League Tuesdays 7:30 ‐ 10:00 PM ‐ All Welcome. Bingo every Wednesday night beginning at 6:45 PM ‐ All Welcome. Men’s Snooker League Wednesdays 7:00 ‐ 10:00 PM (Members Only) Super Sundays ‐ Special beverage pricing in the clubroom Noon ‐ 6:00 PM Drop‐In Shuffleboard Sundays, beginning at 1:30 PM ‐ All Welcome. NOV 11 NOV 22 NOV 24 NOVEMBER REMEMBRANCE DAY SERVICE 11:00 AM at the Cenotaph DINNER and Honours & Awards, beginning at 5:00 PM Inter‐Branch DARTS Tournament ‐ beginning at 9:30 AM NEWLYWED GAME ‐ beginning at 3:00 PM GREY CUP PARTY 6:00 PM DEC 5 DEC 6 DEC 7 DEC 13 DEC 24 DEC 25 DEC 31 DECEMBER ENGLISH PUB NIGHT ‐ Food served 5:00 ‐ 7:00 PM Fish & Chips or Meat Pies with fries and mushy peas or coleslaw Live entertainment ’til 8:00 PM CHRISTMAS CRAFT SALE 10:00 AM ‐ 3:00 PM CHILDREN’S CHRISTMAS PARTY 10:00 AM ‐ 12:00 NOON For children and grandchildren of members in good standing CHRISTMAS PARTY & TURKEY ROLL 2:00 ‐ 6:00 PM Music by “The Macs”. For Branch 238 members and guests BRANCH CLOSED AT 5:00 PM MERRY CHRISTMAS!!! BRANCH CLOSED Join us for a Community Christmas Dinner (see opposite page). NEW YEAR’S EVE DANCE with DJ Steve Watson JAN 1 The Bugle
JANUARY President’s New Year’s Levee 1:00 ‐ 4:00 PM 57
November 11, 2014
last post
George Bunnell
RCAF ~ WWII
February 8, 2014
Richard Roy Short
RN ~ WWII
February 21, 2014
Elizabeth Butterill
WAC ~ WWII
April 22, 2014
Orville Kenneth Bell
RCA ~ WWII
July 19, 2014
Thomas Ellery
RCOC ~ WWII
July 22, 2014
The Bugle
58
November 11, 2014
last post
Richard Wildgoose
Cdn Army ~ WWII
September 17, 2014
William Spiers
RCAF ~ WWII
October 2, 2014
Donald Sleep
RCN ~ WWII
October 10, 2014
Harvey Beecroft
RCA ~ WWII
October 12, 2014
Erich Noske
NATO
October 29, 2014
The Bugle
59
November 11, 2014
NOVEMBER 11, 2014
PUBLISHED BY
60
Royal Canadian Legion Branch 238 - Fenelon Falls, Ontario
DISTRICT ‘F’, ONTARIO COMMAND