Document 434854

Ad Populos, Non Aditus, Pervenimus
OUR 124th YEAR – ISSUE NO. 46-2014
USPS 680020
Periodical – Postage Paid at Rahway, N.J.
Thursday, November 13, 2014
(908) 232-4407
press@goleader.com
Published Every Thursday Since September 3, 1890
www.goleader.com
SEVENTY FIVE CENTS
WF Council Amends Land Use
Ordinance For Afford. Housing
By DOMINIC A. LAGANO
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
WESTFIELD — The town council
last Wednesday passed on first reading four ordinances amending the
town’s land use ordinance.
First Ward Councilman James
Foerst explained the reason for the
amendments. “As part of our COAH
(New Jersey’s Council On Affordable Housing) obligation, we are required to set forth a plan. The plan is
not yet due. The plan was to be due on
November 17. The (New Jersey State
Supreme) court still has not determined what the rules are for COAH
even though we are now four years
into the program.
“So it’s a bit of an interesting game.
It’s very difficult to comply with a
law when the law does not exist. But
nevertheless, we are trying to comply
with the law as we anticipate it may
come forth and as part of that, we are
voting on the housing plan element
setting forth the direction of the Town
of Westfield’s COAH plan for the
next decade.”
COAH is an arm of the New Jersey
state government tasked with enforcing the Fair Housing Act of 1985,
which states that New Jersey municipalities must include a percentage of
low-income affordable housing in
their housing plans.
During the public discussion portion of the meeting, resident Greg
Kasko spoke regarding the purchase
Paul Lachenauer for The Westfield Leader
WE WILL NEVER FORGET…A veteran salutes during Westfield’s Veterans
Day program Tuesday morning at the town’s Monument to Veterans of World
War I.
Freeholders Set to Okay
Contract For Golf Courses
of the Westfield Police Department’s
mobile command center.
As covered in previous editions of
The Westfield Leader, Mr. Kasko has
addressed and questioned the town
council on this issue on multiple occasions.
At the last town council meeting,
Town Attorney Russell Finestein released a statement regarding the bidding process and the acquisition of
the police department’s mobile command center. He also stated the council considered the matter “concluded”
and requested a public apology from
Mr. Kasko for his “allegations.”
“I am accused of wasting the town’s
time and money,” Mr. Kasko stated.
“You are the cause of the waste. If you
would answer questions and not tell
people to go to the prosecutor, this
would not have happened.”
The council approved the demolition of single-family dwellings located at 667 Westfield Avenue and
751 Lawrence Avenue as well as a
single-family dwelling and detached
garage located at 883 Summit Avenue.
At the start of the meeting the town
council issued a proclamation observing November 2014 as National
Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month.
Jeanne Gladis, a volunteer from the
Pancreatic Cancer Action Network
(PCAN), was present to receive the
proclamation.
Ms. Gladis also provided The
Westfield Leader with a brief statement outlining the purpose of her
organization and thanking the council for its proclamation. “By declaring November 2014 to be Pancreatic
Cancer Awareness Month in
Westfield, you are helping us to do
the critical work of making the public
aware of this disease and its lethal
nature. We hope by working together
with you we will be able to continue
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
By PAUL J. PEYTON
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
COUNTY — After completing
negotiations with the company that
manages its two public golf courses,
the Union County Freeholder Board
is expected to vote tonight to give
another five-year contract to Illinoisbased KemperSports.
At last week’s agenda meeting,
Armando Sanchez, director of golf
operations for the county, explained
that the county paid $605,000 to
Kemper to manage the Ash Brook
and Galloping Hill golf courses in the
previous contract. He said the management of the courses by Kemper in
the new contract is $100,000 less
than the previous agreement.
As part of the new agreement,
Kemper will pay the county 7 percent
of the revenues for the food and beverage operations and the pro shop.
Mr. Sanchez said the county is expected to receive $300,000 annually
from the food and beverage and pro
shop revenues.
The board also is expected to vote
on a resolution for an operational
budget of $4.5 million for the period
of November 17, 2014 through December 31, 2015 to Kemper to manage the golf operations. Mr. Sanchez
said it is expected that the cost of golf
operations will be offset by $5.2 million in revenue.
On another matter, it was announced that the county is about to
enter into a contract with Vermont
Systems, of Vermont, to update the
county’s RecTrac application to include Pass Management, Webtrac and
Paytrac applications.
Ron Zuber, director of parks and
recreation, said the upgrades will enable county parks users to reserve a
field or picnic area from their home.
He said users of the system, both incounty and out-of-county residents,
will have to come to the county the
first time in order to present proof of
residency, at which time they will be
given an identification number in order to log into the county parks reserve system.
“It is bringing us into the 21st century, if you will, with our reservation
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
Paul Lachenauer for The Westfield Leader
POWERFUL WEAPON…A father and son admire a machine gun mounted on
a 1945 Willys Jeep that was included as part of the Veterans Day display at the
Hanson House in Cranford on Sunday morning.
Paul Lachenauer for The Westfield Leader
REMEMBERING OUR VETS…World War II veteran Bob Miller, left, and Westfield Bell Master John Panosh stand
in front of the Westfield Town Bell during the Town Bell ringing ceremony and Veterans Day presentation held at the
Reeve House on Sunday afternoon. The event was sponsored by the Westfield Historical Society.
Westfield BOE Appoints New
Girls Coach Amidst Controversy
By DELL SIMEONE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
WESTFIELD – The board of education, on Tuesday evening, held a
brief public meeting to approve the
appointment of Elizabeth McKeon
to be the new head girls’ varsity
basketball coach at Westfield High
School for the 2014-2015 season.
The salary will be $8,578.
According to a district news release, Ms. McKeon had served as
the volunteer assistant varsity coach
for the team in the 2013-2014 school
year.
CF Acts on Wilf Liquor
License; PD Awards Officers
By CHRISTINA M. HINKE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
CRANFORD — A liquor license
transfer from Primavera Liquors to
Riverfront Liquor was granted by resolution Tuesday at the township committee official meeting.
Riverfront Liquor is wholly owned
by Zygmunt Wilf of 500 Ashwood
Road, Springfield, according to the
public notice. Mr. Wilf is the owner and
chairman of the Minnesota Vikings
and a real estate mogul, who last year
lost a New Jersey real estate civil court
case. New Jersey Superior Court Judge
Deanne Wilson ordered Mr. Wilf, his
brother, MarkWilf, and cousin, Leonard
Wilf, to pay $100 million in damages
and legal fees to former partners they
defrauded in a large apartment complex project, according to The Associated Press. The court found the Wilfs
committed fraud, violated civil racketeering laws and deprived a former
business partner of contractual payments, according to The AP. Earlier
this year, the Wilfs filed an appeal.
Mr. Wilf is an owner of Garden
Communities, which owns Riverfront
at Cranford Station, the newly built,
three-story apartment building with
retail. The corner retail space has a
liquor license and recently a sign showing the restaurant space as available
has come down.
The housing development under construction at 555 South Avenue is expected to open in early spring, Township Engineer Carl O’Brien said Monday at the workshop session. Mr.
O’Brien said the site work is nearing
completion and the paving of two driveways will be completed this month,
and so he recommended the township
decrease the performance bond. This
partial release of the bond was approved, 4 to 1, by resolution Tuesday at
the official meeting. The bond is now at
$359,000, where it was originally at
$1.37 million, Mayor Andis Kalnins
said on Monday. Commissioner Tom
Hannen, Jr. voted against the resolution.
Prior to the official meeting on Veterans Day, the police department held its
awards ceremony for 2014. Chief James
Wozniak presented the awards.
Retired Sergeant Anthony Dobbins and Retired Detective Robert
Montague were given plaques honoring their time served with the police department. Sgt. Dobbins served
26 years and Det. Montague served
25 years. Department Citations were
given to Retired Sgt. Dobbins, Ret.
Det. Montague, Lieutenants Christopher Polito and Edward Davenport, Detectives Spencer Durkin,
William Pietrucha and Derek
Farbanec, Sergeants John Swandrak
and Ryan Greco, and Officers
Michael Andrews, Nelson Hearns,
Nadia Jones, Steven D’Ambola, John
Rattigan, Timothy O’Brien, Daniel
Donnerstag and Patrick Fay.
Lieutenant Edward Davenport and
Detective Russell Luedecker were given
the Medal of Honor, the highest award
bestowed to a police officer, for their
evacuating the Cranford Towers Condominiums when it was on fire earlier
Ms. McKeon is a graduate of
Westfield High School, where, as a
member of the girls’ basketball
team, was the second person to ever
score 1,000 points. She also is a
graduate of Lafayette College,
where she played Division 1
Women’s Basketball and achieved
the Patriot League Athletic Honor
Roll.
The press release states that her
10-year business career includes
marketing positions at ESPN and
the NFL, where she was selected to
serve on the Woman’s Interactive
Network. She holds a master’s degree in broadcast journalism from
Boston University and a Bachelor
of Arts from Lafayette College.
The appointment is necessary
since the season starts in a few
weeks. The board, last month, voted
not to renew the contract of Joe
Marino, who has been the coach for
the past 15 years. The team had a
winning season in 2013-2014. That
decision proved to be controversial
and sent shock waves throughout
the district. Mr. Marino had been
recommended for re-hire by Superintendent of Schools Margaret
Dolan and Athletic Director Sandy
Mamary.
More than 200 people attended
the board’s October 21 meeting,
which had to be moved from the
board meeting room at the Admin-
istration Building to the auditorium
at Roosevelt Intermediate School
to accommodate the crowd. Students, administrators and other
teachers asked the board to re-instate Mr. Marino. They demanded
to know the reason Mr. Marino’s
contract was not renewed. Mr.
Marino, himself, implored the board
to tell him, the team and the public
the reason he was fired. The board
would not discuss its reason.
At that meeting, Board President
Richard Mattessich said, “The
coach has to coach all of the members of the team.” Board Vice-President Rosanne Kurstedt defended the
action by saying, “Each member of
the board had cast their vote.” Board
member Mark Friedman said, “For
those who don’t know, all board
decisions are based on evaluations.
Our main objective is to protect the
students and to provide the best
possible coaching staff.”
In other business, Derek Lewis
was appointed to the technology
department as a non-aligned computer technician, at the annual rate
of $45,000. He is replacing Vin
Manalo, who resigned.
The regular meeting lasted five
minutes. The board, then, moved to
the conference room where Lorre
Korecky, the district community relations officer, gave a PowerPoint
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
Paul Lachenauer for The Westfield Leader
Editor’s Note:
Thanksgiving, Christmas and
New Year's Day are all Thursday
this year.
The Westfield Leader will operate as normal these weeks. However, the newspapers will be delivered by the post offices on Friday.
Submittals to the newspaper will
be per our normal schedule.
PEDALS...On Saturday morning, enthusiastic riders of vintage bicycles met at
Jay’s Cycle Center in Westfield for an early morning ride. The bikes had to be
from the early 1990s or older.
PAGE INDEX
Regional ........
Editorial ........
Police ............
Community ...
Obituary ........
2-3
4-5
6
6-8
8
Education ......
Sports ............
Real Estate ....
Classifieds .....
A&E ..............
EXTRAORDINARY PROFESSIONALS
The Right Combination Of Cutting Edge Technology And The Highest Quality Of Services And Programs
Is The Reason We Are The Preferred Real Estate Company.... If It Is Real Estate Anywhere, We Can Help!
Westfield
W
We
stfi
st
field
ld - West
Wes
W
estt | 600
60
00 North
Noort
No
rrtth Avenue
Avven
A
enue
ue West,
Wes
est,
t, Westfield
Wes
estfi
tfiel
field
eld | 908-233-0065
el
908
90
088-23
233
3--00
0065
65 | www.coldwellbankermoves.com/westfieldwest
www
ww.ccoollldw
dwel
dw
ellb
ellb
lban
anke
kerm
rmoovvves
es.c
es.c
es
.com
om/w
/weeestfi
fieelldw
dwes
est
©2013 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC
9
11-17
11-17
18
19-20
Westfield Leader only
Page 10
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, November 13, 2014
A Watchung Communications, Inc. Publication
CF Zoning Bd. Denies
Mini Mart for Exxon Station
By DELL SIMEONE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
Dominic A. Lagano for The Westfield Leader
PANCREATIC CANCER MONTH…Jeanne Gladis, a volunteer from the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN), receives a proclamation from Westfield
Mayor Andy Skibitsky at Wednesday’s Town Council meeting proclaiming
November 2014 as National Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month in the town.
Cranford Council
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
this year. Lt. Davenport carried a disabled man down five flights of stairs.
A Life Saving Award was given to
Officer Sean Halcomb.
Civilian Achievement Awards were
given to Jennifer Klein and John Weber, who both were paramount in supplying information to the police department on burglary suspects in two
separate incidents.
“We have the best cops in the state of
New Jersey,” Chief Wozniak said.
“They do extraordinary things every day,” Commissioner Robert
D’Ambola said of the police force
during his commissioner report.
November is designated Pancreatic
Cancer Awareness Month in Cranford.
Mayor Kalnins presented a proclamation to Todd Cohen from the Pancreatic
Cancer Action Network, along with his
brother, Lee, and nephew, Brian. Mr.
Cohen’s father died of pancreatic cancer, a disease that is the second leading
type of cancer and has a 6-percent fiveyear survival rate, Mr. Cohen said.
Winans Avenue paving is almost
complete, and Herning, Brookdale and
Tuxedo Avenues are to be paved soon
as part of the paving project, Commissioner D’Ambola said.
A meeting was held on the One Seat
Ride on October 27, at the community
center, where it was announced that NJ
Transit will fund the second phase that
will extend one-seat service on the
Raritan Valley line on weeknights after
8 p.m., Mayor Kalnins said.
The committee recognized the ser-
vice of veterans in observance of Veterans Day.
Rita Mason, a resident of Alan Okell
Place, complained about a tree on her
property she has attempted over a number of years to have the township remove and has said the tree is healthy
and so would not remove it.
A number of charity drives and events
are taking place in the township. A
Blanket Drive is being held by a Girl
Scout troop that is accepting blankets
at 113 Spring Garden Street.
Dr. Kurt Krause is holding an oral
cancer screening at his dental practice.
The library will hold a free practice
SAT test and analysis that will offer
strategies to improve scores on Saturday, November 15, from 9 a.m to 1 p.m.
The Jeans for Troops program asks
employees to donate $5 and in return allows employees to wear jeans
to work for the day. “Any way we
can support our veterans, it is worth
it,” Mayor Kalnins said.
Chamber of Commerce Pride in Cranford award winners this year for business improvement are Dreyer Farms,
Martin Jewelers, 100 Steps Supper Club
and Raw Bar, Jeff’s Landscaping, and
Needlepoint Homes. Union County
Neighbors United and the Rotary Club
of Cranford won the organizational
award. Individual award winners were
John Guempel, Barbara Ragone (posthumously), Barry O’Donovan and
Martha Garcia. “These people help out
our town every day and make Cranford
what it is,” Mayor Kalnins said.
CRANFORD – The zoning board,
on Monday evening, denied an application to allow the owner of the
Exxon gas station at 464 South Avenue East to install a “Tiger Mart,”
or mini mart, in one of the three
service bays at the station. The property is at the intersection of Centennial Avenue.
The applicant, Jaranjeet Singh,
owns 25 gas stations in New Jersey
that contain mini marts. The applicant was seeking the following variances: conditional use (convenience
store) approval; less than the minimum required on-site parking
spaces; granite block curbing not
provided; no loading or unloading
zone provided and no bicycle rack
provided.
The existing station, which was
built in 1958, has two pumps and
three service bays. The applicant’s
attorney, Frank Capece, said there
is no longer a need for the third
service bay so the owner wants to
use it as a space for the convenience
store, which he said would not sell
prepared foods. He described the
average customer as someone who
pulls in for gas and then runs into
the store for a quart of milk. He said
the average visit to the station for
gas and a food item would be less
than four minutes. He said the station would operate each day between 6 a.m. and 10 p.m.
The applicant’s engineer, Edward
Bogan, said there would be seven
parking spaces for customers. However, after questioning by the board
he said there would be seven parking spaces provided including three
spaces for employees and one
handicapped spot. Parking would
be located on either side of the
building. He also said there would
be a small dumpster on one side.
Board members were concerned
about how the cars could maneuver
in and out of the parking spaces if
other cars were lined up at the
pumps. Board member John Mallon
said, “If all employees park you
only have four spaces for customers.”
Board member William Montani
said, “You are only 100 feet away
from Krauszer’s.” Board member
Mary Ann Hay questioned how a
driver in the space nearest to the
pumps could get out. “He would be
stuck,” Mr. Mallon said. Mr. Bogan
admitted the driver would have to
make a K-turn.
LOCK INTO A GREAT
CD RATE
3 Year CD
1.50
%
2.25
%
APY*
5 Year CD
APY*
Westfield Office
828 South Avenue West
eNorthfield.com
(908) 789-9600
* Annual Percentage Yield (APY) in effect as of November 10, 2014 and subject to change without
notice. Minimum balance of $2,500 to open account. There is a substantial penalty for early CD
withdrawals. Fees could reduce earnings. Member FDIC.
Mr. Capece noted that there is
parking on both sides of the street
on Centennial Avenue. “No one has
come forward to object to the plan,”
he said.
“What concerns me the most is
that there would be an overflow of
cars on Centennial Avenue,” Mr.
Montani said.
Mr. Montani also stated, “I don’t
see any landscaping plans.” Mr.
Bogan responded, “There are none.”
The applicant’s architect said the
store would be 700 square feet and
take up half of the existing building.
Mr. Montani said he did not see
how the mini mart would be a benefit to the community. Board member Robert Bovasso said the store
is, “an adjustment to the gas station. A three-bay gas station isn’t in
demand. They’re making use of
space,” he added.
The board’s discussion lasted 90
minutes before the board voted 4to-3 to deny the application. Most
board members said they were concerned about the small space and
the room to maneuver cars in and
out of the parking spaces.
In other business, the board approved an application by John and
Maura O’Connor of 49 John Street
to construct a third-story addition,
which exceeds the maximum number of allowable stories on the street.
Architect Maria Cosmo argued that
the home is older and the addition
is consistent with others in the
neighborhood. She said the home is
long and narrow and that there is no
place to go but up. Ms. Cosmo said
a dormer will be in the middle of
the structure and will not change
the façade of the home.
Zoning Officer Robert Hudak said
it is only one-and-a-half feet beyond the code requirement. Ms.
Cosmo said the dormer will not
face the front of the home.
Freeholders
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
system,” Mr. Zuber said.
The freeholders also are likely to
vote on a new lease agreement and
location for the county’s intoxicated
driver resource center. Classes have
been held at the Union County Performing Arts Center in Rahway. Frank
Guzzo, director of human services,
said the Gateway Family YMCA in
Elizabeth, located at 135 Madison
Avenue, has more classroom space
and parking, which will allow the
county to hold more classes, resulting
in increased revenue to the county.
Mr. Guzzo said the county will pay
$520 per day, or $27,000, in 2015,
where the county currently pays $250
per day, or $12,000. He said the cost
is paid by client fees.
The board also is to vote on several
agreements with municipalities relative to maintaining red light cameras.
The county, in return, receives a percentage of revenue from summonses
generated by the traffic control signal
monitoring devices.
The costs through Tuesday, December 16, are: $104,227, Rahway;
$40,123, Roselle Park; $93,881,
Union, and $209,612, Linden. County
Counsel Robert Barry said the agreements are going through December
16, as this is the date when the state’s
red light pilot program ends unless
the Legislature and the governor take
action.
The board also will likely vote tonight on an agreement with the New
Jersey Department of Transportation
(DOT) to accept funding of
$4,155,600 for the county’s 2015
capital budget, an amount that is
$700,000 over the county’s 2014
funding.
At the start of the meeting the board
honored Scotch Plains resident
Courtney Dreyfus, who won a silver
medal in the triathlon at the Nationals
at the Special Olympics. She also will
represent Team USA in the 2015 Special Olympics World Games in Los
Angeles, where she will compete in
the triathlon and in a half-mile swim.
She said the triathlon includes a quarter-mile swim, a 12- to 15-mile bike
event, and a 5k run.
WF Council
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
to raise awareness, support patients
and their families, and raise funds to
find the cure – through both individual contributions and federal funding and legislation.”
Mayor Andy Skibitsky praised the
Pancreatic Cancer Action Network
for its work in raising awareness of
this disease. “The Pancreatic Cancer
Action Network is the first and only
patient advocacy organization that
serves the pancreatic cancer community in Westfield and nationwide by
focusing its efforts on public policy,
research funding, patient services and
public awareness and education related to developing effective treatments and a cure,” he said.
The next town council conference
session open to the public is scheduled for Tuesday, November 25, at 7
p.m. It will be held at the municipal
building, located at 425 East Broad
Street. The conference session will
be immediately followed by the
council’s regular public meeting at
7:45 p.m.
Paul Lachenauer for The Westfield Leader
THANKS FOR YOUR SERVICE…Captain Ryan Harty of the 102 Cavalry
greets soldiers during Westfield’s Veterans Day program held Tuesday at the
town’s Monument to Veterans of World War I.
CF Train Plaza on Track;
New Tree Ord. Discussed
By CHRISTINA M. HINKE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
CRANFORD — The stalled pedestrian improvements plan for the
North Avenue Plaza, located in front
of the Cranford train station, to be
funded partially by a Municipal Aid
2011 Transit Village Program grant
in the amount of $500,000, is back
on track, Township Engineer Carl
O’Brien said Monday at the township committee’s workshop session.
The project is to go out to bid and
construction is scheduled to begin
in April, with a completion date in
August 2015, Mr. O’Brien said.
The plan is to make the area safer
for pedestrians and provide better
traffic flow of NJ Transit buses.
There will be a turnaround area for
the buses, added fencing by the
crosswalk areas and new curbing,
pavement and lighting.
Earlier this year the bids for the
project exceeded the budgeted
amount and were thrown out.
In other business, West Holly
Street will have a delay in paving
until after the winter due to gas
main replacements taking place, Mr.
O’Brien said. Since the road is in
poor condition, the Department of
Public Works had recommended the
road be milled before the winter.
The areas in the southwest portion of the township set for paving
will be paved in the spring, Mr.
O’Brien said.
The New Jersey Department of
Environmental Protection told Mr.
O’Brien the plans to modify Orchard Brook, a tributary of the
Rahway River, no longer meet with
regulations and need to be more
environmentally sensitive. The permits for easements along the Orchard Brook were secured about 10
years ago, and not all homeowners
along the brook gave their consent.
Mayor Andis Kalnins has said it
could help alleviate flooding impacts for about 160 homes.
A potential new tree ordinance
that would include the hiring of a
forester, and a new law requiring
permission from the forester for
residents to remove a tree considered a landmark tree, was laid out
by
Commissioner
Robert
D’Ambola. The definition of a landmark tree was not specified. Salary
costs for a forester are still to be
determined, Mr. D’Ambola said.
“This ordinance is needed desperately because we are losing large
trees,” said Barbara Krause, a member of the tree advisory board, during public comments. She cited a
long list of nearby communities that
have adopted an ordinance like the
one presented or contains stricter
laws. She noted that not only did
Cranford lose 900 township trees
as well as private trees in Hurricanes Sandy and Irene, but property owners have been taking down
Portion of Raritan Rd.
Closed for Road Work
SCOTCH PLAINS — The New
Jersey American Water Company will
be replacing a large water main on
Raritan Road in Scotch Plains beginning today, November 13, which will
necessitate the closure of Raritan
Road between Terrill Road and
Ashbrook Drive.
This work will continue for several
weeks. Raritan Road will shut down
each morning at 7:30 a.m. and reopen each evening. During the closure there will be no through traffic.
Drivers should use Cooper Road as
their detour or plan an alternate route.
Scotch Plains police officers will be
on site each day to enforce the closure. Residents will be allowed in
and out of their homes as construction allows.
See it all on the web!
www.goleader.com
large trees that were healthy.
Commissioner Mary O’Connor
said after having some businesses
interested in a winter farmers’ market the idea of holding it inside by
the kitchen of the community center on Saturday mornings is being
discussed.
The safety concerns of the ingress and egress and front setbacks
of new bank establishments on
North Avenue was again brought
up by resident Frank Krause. He
said the committee and the zoning
board need to have better coordination between them, and said the
zoning board that approved those
plans had disregarded police reports.
The board of health meeting was
held prior to the workshop meeting
Monday. Megan Avallone, health
officer, said there have been two
complaints regarding a rat problem, which is down from six properties on Sailer Street and Scherer
Street that had exterminators come
out in September. The township is
continuing to pursue gaining approval for access to the vacant, foreclosed home that residents on those
streets had blamed for the problem.
Ms. Avallone said there has been no
evidence externally of a rat infestation on the property.
A public complaint was made regarding the home at 133 Mohawk
Drive. Robert Fico, the new parttime code enforcement property
maintenance officer, said he went
to the property, which has been vacant for about seven years, and
learned a pipe burst that has caused
mold in the interior. Additionally,
there are holes in the roof where
animals have probably entered
through to the house.
Also, a large limb from a dead
tree on the property came down on
a walkway, and it is a safety concern. The house is in such disrepair
that Mr. Fico said it would probably
need to be demolished or undergo a
major rehabilitation. The maintenance company of the home has not
shown up to arranged meetings for
the township to gain access to the
home. The township said it will
begin the process to fine the owner.
WF BOE
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
presentation and update on community relations, which lasted one
hour.
The presentation was called Tradition of Excellence. Superintendent Dolan introduced the presentation and said she enjoyed working with Ms. Korecky on it and
appreciated Ms. Korecky’s knowledge of public relations from her
experience working in corporate
communications.
Ms. Korecky outlined the
district’s methods of communication to parents, students and the
community. She said this year, the
district had 345 placements in print
or online media. She said the district had 1,028 Twitter followers,
252 tweets and 508 friends on
Facebook. She said the district has
reached out with video links to
award presentations, sends a weekly
synopsis of board meetings by email and posts on the website.
She also said that feature articles
are sent to The Westfield Leader,
N.J. School Boards magazine and
to the district’s Administration
magazine. She also said the website
is new and has a new home page.
Ms. Korecky said the district,
through Edline, is working with the
Voice of America, which chose
Westfield to illustrate by video why
New Jersey is number one in education. The Voice of America broadcasts to 85 countries, she said. “We
are working with them on national
outreach,” she added.
She said there is room for growth
in alumni relations as the district
moves forward. The goal, Ms.
Korecky said, is to reinforce internal and external communications.
Some tools for that, she said, are
websites, synopsis PTO newsletters and surveys.
The meeting was adjourned to go
into private session.
The next meeting of the board
will be Tuesday, November 18, at
7:30 p.m., at the Administration
Building, located at 302 Elm Street.
Serving the community since 1959
OUR 55th YEAR – ISSUE NO. 46-2014
USPS 485200
Periodical – Postage Paid at Rahway, N.J.
Thursday, November 13, 2014
(908) 232-4407
press@goleader.com
Published Every Thursday Since 1959
www.timesnj.com
SEVENTY FIVE CENTS
FW Council Discusses Pilgrim
Pipeline and Roadwork
By CHRISTINA M. HINKE
Specially Written for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
FANWOOD — Borough Council
President Russell Huegel, who stood
in for an absent Mayor Colleen Mahr,
introduced at last Wednesday’s
agenda meeting for discussion the
topic of the Pilgrim Pipeline, a possible oil pipeline route that would
bring crude oil from Albany, N.Y. to
Linden, N.J. The council suggested
reviewing the resolution Watchung
passed to oppose the pipeline.
“If enough municipalities pass
enough resolutions against, maybe
then the DEP (Department of Environmental Protection) will take notice. Maybe they will look at it differ-
ently,” Mr. Huegel said. Councilwoman Kathleen Mitchell said the
Fanwood Environmental Commission opposes the pipeline.
The Fanwood Public Works Department is pouring sidewalk cement
on South Avenue and installing brick
pavers to be completed this fall, Councilman Huegel said.
Burns Way is slated for a complete
reconstruction of the road beginning
in late spring/early summer of 2015,
a project paid for by a $250,000 state
Department of Transportation grant.
The work will take about 60 days to
complete, Mr. Huegel told The Scotch
Plains-Fanwood Times.
La Grande Avenue is expected to
Courtesy of Brian Horton
THANKING OUR VETS...Veterans listen during Fanwood’s Veterans Day
ceremony at the Fanwood Memorial Library on Tuesday. Vets were given
American flags to carry during the ceremonies.
Freeholders Set to Okay
Contract For Golf Courses
By PAUL J. PEYTON
Specially Written for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
COUNTY — After completing
negotiations with the company that
manages its two public golf courses,
the Union County Freeholder Board
is expected to vote tonight to give
another five-year contract to Illinoisbased KemperSports.
At last week’s agenda meeting,
Armando Sanchez, director of golf
operations for the county, explained
that the county paid $605,000 to
Kemper to manage the Ash Brook
and Galloping Hill golf courses in the
previous contract. He said the management of the courses by Kemper in
the new contract is $100,000 less
than the previous agreement.
As part of the new agreement,
Kemper will pay the county 7 percent
of the revenues for the food and beverage operations and the pro shop.
Mr. Sanchez said the county is expected to receive $300,000 annually
from the food and beverage and pro
shop revenues.
The board also is expected to vote
on a resolution for an operational
budget of $4.5 million for the period
of November 17, 2014 through December 31, 2015 to Kemper to manage the golf operations. Mr. Sanchez
said it is expected that the cost of golf
operations will be offset by $5.2 million in revenue.
On another matter, it was announced that the county is about to
enter into a contract with Vermont
Systems, of Vermont, to update the
county’s RecTrac application to include Pass Management, Webtrac and
Paytrac applications.
Ron Zuber, director of parks and
recreation, said the upgrades will enable county parks users to reserve a
field or picnic area from their home.
He said users of the system, both incounty and out-of-county residents,
will have to come to the county the
first time in order to present proof of
residency, at which time they will be
given an identification number in order to log into the county parks reserve system.
“It is bringing us into the 21st century, if you will, with our reservation
CONTINUED ON PAGE 10
Susan M. Dougherty for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
SALUTING OUR VETERANS...Veterans from American Legion Post No. 209
present the colors during Scotch Plains’ Veterans Day ceremony Tuesday at the
township’s War Memorial, located at the corner of Park Avenue and Front
Street.
be on the paving list for summer 2015,
after the water company has completed its work on the pipes that lie
underneath the road.
Mr. Huegel said a grant was submitted for the paving of Madison
Avenue. In addition, a resolution was
passed by the council to increase the
contract to Millenium, the grant-writing company hired by the borough.
The borough was awarded a $724
Greening Union County Grant for
trees and a $40,000 Kids Recreation
Trust Fund grant for recreation programs and equipment for the recreation commission.
The borough council also renewed
by resolution its three-year contract
with the Garden State Joint Insurance
Fund, which provides workers compensation and general liability insurance.
A budget transfer was passed by
resolution to buy two new police cars
and pay attorney fees.
Fanwood Police Sergeant Marc
Gottlick, a certified emergency
medical technician, will be honored
for delivering a baby, Borough Administrator Eleanor McGovern said.
Jamie Elizabeth Cole was delivered
by Sgt. Gottlick after a 9-1-1 call
was placed by Fanwood resident
Sherry Cole, who was going into
labor, according to a report on the
Fanwood Police website.
The borough council granted permission to the Fanwood Lions Club
to sell Christmas trees at LaGrande
Park and to put up nativity figures
on North Avenue/Community
House.
Also on the agenda was correspondence from the City of Summit
pertaining to the support of bill S444 and A-1779, which would
amend the New Jersey Spill Compensation and Control Act. Last
year, a state judge approved a settlement in the Passaic River pollution
case. This bill, S-444, seeks to prohibit contribution action against
local public entities for cleanup and
removal costs or any other damages
associated with discharge of hazardous substances.
Susan M. Dougherty for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
TIME TO REFLECT...Veterans and other onlookers attend Scotch Plains’ Veterans Day observance at the township’s War
Memorial on Tuesday.
Fanwood-Scotch Plains Recycling
Center Dedicates New Banner
By DELL SIMEONE
Specially Written for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
FANWOOD – The FanwoodScotch Plains Recycling Association,
on Tuesday morning, held a ceremony to dedicate a new banner at
the center at 536 North Avenue in
Fanwood, in honor of America Recycles Day, which is this Saturday,
November 15. Jim and Barbara
Murphy of Sir Speedy of Westfield
donated the banner, which says,
“America Recycles and you can too!”
Harold Clark, association president, served as the master of ceremonies for the event. “The first
Earth Day was in 1970 and 17 years
later New Jersey mandated recycling.
We want to thank all of our volunteers from the 20 community groups
that work here at the center. Through
SP Zoning Board Okays
New Blue Star Sign
By FRED T. ROSSI
Specially Written for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
SCOTCH PLAINS — The zoning board of adjustment last week
gave its approval to a signage upgrade at one Route 22-based business while requesting additional
information from another business
seeking to upgrade its own sign.
The sign that identifies Blue Star
shopping center on Route 22 West
will be upgraded so that the businesses located there are more easily
identifiable to passing cars. Two
months ago, the board had requested
more information from the sign company about how much additional
lighting would be produced from
the revamped sign and whether it
would be excessive. At its November 6 meeting, the board was provided a series of statistics from
Robert Newell, a Westfield-based
lighting expert, about the level of
lighting the new sign will emit.
The refurbished sign will remain
the same size as the present one, but
will include four additional panels
to advertise businesses located at
Blue Star. Robert Carson, an officer
with Levin Management, Blue Star’s
management firm, told the board in
September that a more visible sign
is needed because the segment of
the highway where the sign is located, just east of the driveway into
the shopping center, is a fast-moving area and offers “very limited
visibility” for the sign.
The other sign application was from
Par Fuel LLC, which operates the
Exxon gas station on Route 22 East
and seeks to put up a new digital LED
price sign. The owners of the gas
station were not present at last week’s
hearing but Leo Viana, the owner of
the company that makes the sign,
testified and told the board that the
new sign will be the same size as the
existing one but with better and more
visible lighting. He said the lighting
will be self-adjusting depending on
weather conditions and the time of
day, with the sign being brighter at
night and during cloudy daytime
weather.
Several board members asked about
the actual brightness of the proposed
sign but were not satisfied with the
responses given by Mr. Viana. Instead, it was agreed that Par Fuels
will return at the board’s Thursday,
December 4 meeting with additional
information.
The board also gave its approval
to two variances, the first being for
David Gabbai, who sought permission to install an in-ground swimming pool at his 19 Marion Lane
residence. The board allowed the
pool despite it not meeting the 30foot side-yard setback set forth in
township zoning ordinances. The
pool’s setback will be about 15 feet.
The board also gave approval to
John and Clara Strong of 4 Heritage
Lane, who sought permission to construct a replacement barn on their
property that will be situated about
16.5 feet from the side-yard property line versus the 30-foot requirement.
them it is possible to make a profit
and donate back to their organization,” Mr. Clark said.
Among the invited guests present
were Union County Freeholder Bette
Jean Kowalski and Fanwood Mayor
Colleen Mahr. Since Tuesday also
was Veterans Day, many of those
invited had to attend Veterans Day
ceremonies. Other guests represented
area firms who do business with or
donate to the center.
Ms. Kowalski praised the recycling association for its service to
the community. She then thanked the
veterans who were present for their
contribution to the country.
Mayor Mahr honored the veterans
who were present. She thanked volunteers of the recycling association
for their contribution to the communities. Fanwood Councilwoman
Katherine Mitchell, one of the
founders of the association, also
spoke.
Following the ceremonies, those
assembled enjoyed coffee and sandwiches. Two cakes from Costco in
North Plainfield were served. One
cake celebrated America Recycles
and the other cake, a chocolate cake,
celebrated Veterans Day. Alan
Ebersole, the recycling site manager,
took the attendees on a tour to show
just what is done by the volunteers.
The recycling center is 28 years
old and is manned by volunteers
from local organizations. On both
Wednesday and Saturday, from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m., members of the public
from all towns can bring their
recyclables to the center. It is a taxexempt organization.
Materials accepted at the center
include glass containers, tin cans,
aluminum pans and foil, plastics,
newspapers, mixed papers, cardboard, used motor oil, printer cartridges, batteries, Styrofoam, florescent bulbs and other recyclables.
Clayton Pierce, an association
board member, told The Scotch
Plains-Fanwood Times, “It is a place
you can bring your recyclables to be
processed responsibly and an alternative to curb-side pickup.”
Some of the local businesses providing refreshments were Nick’s
Pizza and Deli, Mara’s Café and
Bakery, 25 South Pizza and Deli, the
Scotch Plains CVS, the Fanwood
A&P, the Garwood ShopRite, the
Westfield Stop & Shop, Walgreen’s
and McIntyre Locksmith of
Westfield.
Editor’s Note:
Thanksgiving, Christmas and
New Year's Day are all Thursday
this year.
The Scotch Plains-Fanwood
Times will operate as normal these
weeks. However, the newspapers
will be delivered by the post offices on Friday.
Submittals to the newspaper will
be per our normal schedule.
Courtesy of Brian Horton
FANWOOD RECYCLES... At the dedication of the "America Recycles" banner
at the Fanwood Recycling Center on Tuesday, Fanwood Mayor Colleen Mahr,
second from left, was joined by, from left to right, center manager Alan Ebersole,
association member Clayton Pierce, Union County Freeholder Bette Jane Kowalski
and Association President Harold Clark.
PAGE INDEX
Regional ........
Editorial ........
Police ............
Community ...
Obituary ........
2-3
4-5
6
6-8
8
Education ......
Sports ............
Real Estate ....
Classifieds .....
A&E ..............
EXTRAORDINARY PROFESSIONALS
The Right Combination Of Cutting Edge Technology And The Highest Quality Of Services And Programs
Is The Reason We Are The Preferred Real Estate Company.... If It Is Real Estate Anywhere, We Can Help!
Westfield
W
We
stfi
st
field
ld - West
Wes
W
estt | 600
60
00 North
Noort
No
rrtth Avenue
Avven
A
enue
ue West,
Wes
est,
t, Westfield
Wes
estfi
tfiel
field
eld | 908-233-0065
el
908
90
088-23
233
3--00
0065
65 | www.coldwellbankermoves.com/westfieldwest
www
ww.ccoollldw
dwel
dw
ellb
ellb
lban
anke
kerm
rmoovvves
es.c
es.c
es
.com
om/w
/weeestfi
fieelldw
dwes
est
©2013 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC
9
11-17
11-17
18
19-20
Scotch Plains - Fanwood Times only
Page 10
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, November 13, 2014
A Watchung Communications, Inc. Publication
SP Police Receives Grant
From Roethlisberger
Paul Lachenauer for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
POWERFUL WEAPON…A father and son admire a machine gun mounted on
a 1945 Willys Jeep that was included as part of the Veterans Day display at the
Hanson House in Cranford on Sunday morning.
WF BOE Appoints New Girls
Coach Amidst Controversy
By DELL SIMEONE
Specially Written for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
WESTFIELD – The board of education, on Tuesday evening, held a brief
public meeting to approve the appointment of Elizabeth McKeon to be the
new head girls’varsity basketball coach
at Westfield High School for the 20142015 season. The salary will be $8,578.
According to a district news release,
Ms. McKeon had served as the volunteer assistant varsity coach for the team
in the 2013-2014 school year.
Ms. McKeon is a graduate of
Westfield High School, where, as a
member of the girls’ basketball team,
was the second person to ever score
1,000 points. She also is a graduate of
Lafayette College, where she played
Division 1 Women’s Basketball and
achieved the Patriot League Athletic
Honor Roll.
The press release states that her 10year business career includes marketing positions at ESPN and the NFL,
where she was selected to serve on the
Woman’s Interactive Network. She
holds a master’s degree in broadcast
journalism from Boston University and
a Bachelor of Arts from Lafayette College.
The appointment is necessary since
the season starts in a few weeks. The
board, last month, voted not to renew
the contract of Joe Marino, who has
been the coach for the past 15 years.
The team had a winning season in
2013-2014. That decision proved to be
controversial and sent shock waves
throughout the district. Mr. Marino had
been recommended for re-hire by Superintendent of Schools Margaret
Dolan and Athletic Director Sandy
Mamary.
More than 200 people attended the
board’s October 21 meeting, which
had to be moved from the board meeting room at the Administration Building to the auditorium at Roosevelt Intermediate School to accommodate the
crowd. Students, administrators and
other teachers asked the board to reinstate Mr. Marino. They demanded to
know the reason Mr. Marino’s contract
was not renewed. Mr. Marino, himself,
implored the board to tell him, the team
and the public the reason he was fired.
The board would not discuss its reason.
At that meeting, Board President
Richard Mattessich said, “The coach
has to coach all of the members of the
team.” Board Vice-President Rosanne
Kurstedt defended the action by saying, “Each member of the board had
cast their vote.” Board member Mark
Friedman said, “For those who don’t
know, all board decisions are based on
evaluations. Our main objective is to
protect the students and to provide the
best possible coaching staff.”
In other business, Derek Lewis was
appointed to the technology department as a non-aligned computer technician, at the annual rate of $45,000.
He is replacing Vin Manalo, who resigned.
The board, then, moved to the conference room where Lorre Korecky,
the district community relations officer, gave a presentation and update on
community relations.
Following the presentation the
meeting was adjourned to go into private session.
SCOTCH PLAINS — The Scotch
Plains Police Department has been a
recipient of a grant from Pittsburgh
Steelers’
quarterback
Ben
Roethlisberger and his Ben
Roethlisberger Foundation at The
Giving Back Fund. The police department will use the funds to expand
its K-9 unit.
The Washington Township Police
Department also will receive a grant,
which it will use to help the department
meet unexpected medical expenses for
its four-year-old German shepherd,
Arek.
The Ben Roethlisberger Foundation
invited police and fire departments
across the country to submit proposals
detailing their needs. This marks the
eighth season that the Foundation has
distributed grants to K-9 units. The
mission of the Ben Roethlisberger
Foundation is to support K-9 units of
police and fire departments throughout
the United States. The Foundation dis-
tributed $157,600 in grants to K-9 units
around the country during the 2013
NFL season and has distributed in excess of $1.2 million since 2007.
Scotch Plains Chief of Police Brian
T. Mahoney said, “We are excited for
the opportunity to work with the Ben
Roethlisberger Foundation at The Giving Back Fund in support of our local
K-9 program. Our program has been a
tremendous success since its inception
and the chance to enhance our efforts at
providing safety and security to the
people of Scotch Plains. Many thanks
go out to Ben and this great organization.”
In commenting on why the mission
of the Foundation is so important to
him, Mr. Roethlisberger said, “We’re
very fortunate to be in the position that
we are able to help these K-9 units. The
work that is performed by the dogs and
their handlers, as well as the bond that
is formed, is incredible. We’re just
thrilled to do our small part.”
CF Train Plaza on Track;
New Tree Ord. Discussed
By CHRISTINA M. HINKE
Specially Written for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
CRANFORD — The stalled pedestrian improvements plan for the North
Avenue Plaza, located in front of the
Cranford train station, to be funded
partially by a MunicipalAid 2011 Transit Village Program grant in the amount
of $500,000, is back on track, Township Engineer Carl O’Brien said Monday at the township committee’s workshop session. The project is to go out to
bid and construction is scheduled to
begin in April, with a completion date
in August 2015, Mr. O’Brien said.
The plan is to make the area safer for
pedestrians and provide better traffic
flow of NJ Transit buses. There will be
a turnaround area for the buses, added
fencing by the crosswalk areas and
new curbing, pavement and lighting.
Earlier this year the bids for the
project exceeded the budgeted amount
and were thrown out.
In other business, West Holly Street
will have a delay in paving until after
the winter due to gas main replacements taking place, Mr. O’Brien said.
Since the road is in poor condition, the
Department of Public Works had recommended the road be milled before
the winter.
The areas in the southwest portion of
the township set for paving will be
paved in the spring, Mr. O’Brien said.
LOCK INTO A GREAT
CD RATE
3 Year CD
1.50
%
2.25
%
APY*
5 Year CD
APY*
The New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection told Mr.
O’Brien the plans to modify Orchard
Brook, a tributary of the Rahway River,
no longer meet with regulations and
need to be more environmentally sensitive. The permits for easements along
the Orchard Brook were secured about
10 years ago, and not all homeowners
along the brook gave their consent.
Mayor Andis Kalnins has said it could
help alleviate flooding impacts for about
160 homes.
A potential new tree ordinance that
would include the hiring of a forester,
and a new law requiring permission
from the forester for residents to remove a tree considered a landmark
tree, was laid out by Commissioner
Robert D’Ambola. The definition of a
landmark tree was not specified. Salary
costs for a forester are still to be determined, Mr. D’Ambola said.
“This ordinance is needed desperately because we are losing large
trees,” said Barbara Krause, a member of the tree advisory board, during
public comments. She cited a long
list of nearby communities that have
adopted an ordinance like the one
presented or contains stricter laws.
She noted that not only did Cranford
lose 900 township trees as well as
private trees in Hurricanes Sandy and
Irene, but property owners have been
taking down large trees that were
healthy.
Commissioner Mary O’Connor said
after having some businesses interested
in a winter farmers’ market the idea of
holding it inside by the kitchen of the
community center on Saturday mornings is being discussed.
The safety concerns of the ingress
and egress and front setbacks of new
bank establishments on North Avenue
was again brought up by resident Frank
Krause. He said the committee and the
zoning board need to have better coordination between them, and said the
zoning board that approved those plans
had disregarded police reports.
The board of health meeting was
held prior to the workshop meeting
Monday. Megan Avallone, health officer, said there have been two complaints regarding a rat problem, which
is down from six properties on Sailer
Street and Scherer Street that had exterminators come out in September. The
township is continuing to pursue gaining approval for access to the vacant,
foreclosed home that residents on those
streets had blamed for the problem.
Ms. Avallone said there has been no
evidence externally of a rat infestation
on the property.
A public complaint was made regarding the home at 133 Mohawk Drive.
Robert Fico, the new part-time code
enforcement property maintenance
officer, said he went to the property,
which has been vacant for about seven
years, and learned a pipe burst that has
caused mold in the interior. Additionally, there are holes in the roof where
animals have probably entered through
to the house.
Also, a large limb from a dead tree on
the property came down on a walkway,
and it is a safety concern. The house is
in such disrepair that Mr. Fico said it
would probably need to be demolished
or undergo a major rehabilitation. The
maintenance company of the home has
not shown up to arranged meetings for
the township to gain access to the home.
The township said it will begin the
process to fine the owner.
Susan Dougherty for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
REMEMBERING OUR VETS...Scotch Plains Mayor Kevin Glover makes
remarks during the Veterans Day ceremony held at the Scotch Plains War
Memorial on Tuesday. The Veterans Day program was jointly sponsored by
American Legion Post No. 209 and VFW Post No. 10122.
WF Council Amends Land
Use For Afford. Housing
By DOMINIC A. LAGANO
Specially Written for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
WESTFIELD — The town council last Wednesday passed on first
reading four ordinances amending
the town’s land use ordinance.
First Ward Councilman James
Foerst explained the reason for the
amendments. “As part of our COAH
(New Jersey’s Council On Affordable Housing) obligation, we are
required to set forth a plan. The
plan is not yet due. The plan was to
be due on November 17. The (New
Jersey State Supreme) court still
has not determined what the rules
are for COAH even though we are
now four years into the program.
“So it’s a bit of an interesting
game. It’s very difficult to comply
with a law when the law does not
exist. But nevertheless, we are trying to comply with the law as we
anticipate it may come forth and as
part of that, we are voting on the
housing plan element setting forth
the direction of the Town of
Westfield’s COAH plan for the next
decade.”
Freeholders
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
system,” Mr. Zuber said.
The freeholders also are likely to
vote on a new lease agreement and
location for the county’s intoxicated
driver resource center. Classes have
been held at the Union County Performing Arts Center in Rahway. Frank
Guzzo, director of human services,
said the Gateway Family YMCA in
Elizabeth, located at 135 Madison
Avenue, has more classroom space
and parking, which will allow the
county to hold more classes, resulting
in increased revenue to the county.
Mr. Guzzo said the county will pay
$520 per day, or $27,000, in 2015,
where the county currently pays $250
per day, or $12,000. He said the cost
is paid by client fees.
The board also is to vote on several
agreements with municipalities relative to maintaining red light cameras.
The county, in return, receives a percentage of revenue from summonses
generated by the traffic control signal
monitoring devices.
The costs through Tuesday, December 16, are: $104,227, Rahway;
$40,123, Roselle Park; $93,881,
Union, and $209,612, Linden. County
Counsel Robert Barry said the agreements are going through December
16, as this is the date when the state’s
red light pilot program ends unless
the Legislature and the governor take
action.
The board also will likely vote tonight on an agreement with the New
Jersey Department of Transportation
(DOT) to accept funding of
$4,155,600 for the county’s 2015
capital budget, an amount that is
$700,000 over the county’s 2014
funding.
At the start of the meeting the board
honored Scotch Plains resident
Courtney Dreyfus, who won a silver
medal in the triathlon at the Nationals
at the Special Olympics. She also will
represent Team USA in the 2015 Special Olympics World Games in Los
Angeles, where she will compete in
the triathlon and in a half-mile swim.
She said the triathlon includes a quarter-mile swim, a 12- to 15-mile bike
event, and a 5k run.
COAH is an arm of the New Jersey state government tasked with
enforcing the Fair Housing Act of
1985, which states that New Jersey
municipalities must include a percentage of low-income affordable
housing in their housing plans.
During the public discussion portion of the meeting, resident Greg
Kasko spoke regarding the purchase
of
the
Westfield
Police
Department’s mobile command
center.
As covered in previous editions
of The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times,
Mr. Kasko has addressed and questioned the town council on this issue on multiple occasions.
At the last town council meeting,
Town Attorney Russell Finestein
released a statement regarding the
bidding process and the acquisition
of the police department’s mobile
command center. He also stated the
council considered the matter “concluded” and requested a public apology from Mr. Kasko for his “allegations.”
“I am accused of wasting the
town’s time and money,” Mr. Kasko
stated. “You are the cause of the
waste. If you would answer questions and not tell people to go to the
prosecutor, this would not have happened.”
The council approved the demolition of single-family dwellings located at 667 Westfield Avenue and
751 Lawrence Avenue as well as a
single-family dwelling and detached garage located at 883 Summit Avenue.
At the start of the meeting the
town council issued a proclamation
observing November 2014 as National Pancreatic Cancer Awareness
Month. Jeanne Gladis, a volunteer
from the Pancreatic Cancer Action
Network (PCAN), was present to
receive the proclamation.
Ms. Gladis also provided The
Times with a brief statement outlining the purpose of her organization
and thanking the council for its
proclamation. “By declaring November 2014 to be Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month in Westfield,
you are helping us to do the critical
work of making the public aware of
this disease and its lethal nature.
We hope by working together with
you we will be able to continue to
raise awareness, support patients
and their families, and raise funds
to find the cure – through both individual contributions and federal
funding and legislation.”
Mayor Andy Skibitsky praised
the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network for its work in raising awareness of this disease. “The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network is the
first and only patient advocacy organization that serves the pancreatic cancer community in Westfield
and nationwide by focusing its efforts on public policy, research
funding, patient services and public awareness and education related
to developing effective treatments
and a cure,” he said.
The next town council conference session open to the public is
scheduled for Tuesday, November
25, at 7 p.m. It will be held at the
municipal building, located at 425
East Broad Street. The conference
session will be immediately followed by the council’s regular public meeting at 7:45 p.m.
Portion of Raritan Rd.
Closed for Road Work
Westfield Office
828 South Avenue West
eNorthfield.com
(908) 789-9600
* Annual Percentage Yield (APY) in effect as of November 10, 2014 and subject to change without
notice. Minimum balance of $2,500 to open account. There is a substantial penalty for early CD
withdrawals. Fees could reduce earnings. Member FDIC.
SCOTCH PLAINS — The New Jersey American Water Company will be
replacing a large water main on Raritan
Road in Scotch Plains, beginning today, November 13, which will necessitate the closure of Raritan Road between Terrill Road andAshbrook Drive.
This work will continue for several
weeks. Raritan Road will shut down
each morning at 7:30 a.m. and reopen
each evening. During the closure there
will be no through traffic. Drivers
should use Cooper Road as their detour
or plan an alternate route. Scotch Plains
police officers will be on site each day
to enforce the closure. Residents will
be allowed in and out of their homes as
construction allows.
Susan M. Dougherty for The Scotch Plains-Fanwood Times
REMEMBERING THEIR SACRIFICE... A wreath is placed at the Scotch Plains
War Memorial during the township’s Veterans Day ceremony on Tuesday.
Do It Now!
Subscribe
Click Here
www.goleader.com/
subscribe
To Serve You.
Our newspaper will be mailed to your home and/or place of business each week (within the USA)
Be Our Guest
To a Free, 3-month Trial of the newspaper
(For new subscribers, mailing in Union County, NJ to)
Click Here
www.goleader.com/form/sub_trial.htm
WESTFIELD, GARWOOD, SCOTCH PLAINS, MOUNTAINSIDE, CRANFORD, FANWOOD, CLARK,
SPRINGFIELD, KENILWORTH, SUMMIT, BERKELEY HEIGHTS and NEW PROVIDENCE
Thank You!
For Reading Our Publications
The Westfield Leader & The Scotch Plains-Fanwood TIMES
PO Box 250, 251 North Ave. West, Westfield, NJ 07091
Tel 908 232-4407; Fax 908 232-0473 Email press@goleader.com
Page
2
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
General Election 2014 Westfield Unofficial Results
Thursday, November 13, 2014
1st
688
272
40%
2nd
868
331
38%
3rd
806
240
30%
WARD 1
4th
1227
405
33%
5th
936
297
32%
6th
700
275
39%
7th
438
179
41%
1st
830
254
31%
2nd
1048
378
36%
Public Questions
Question #1 - Yes
Question #1 - No
141
78
184
96
142
60
253
100
171
77
139
91
117
40
118
84
199
115
127
57
Question #2 - Yes
Question #2 - No
162
63
188
93
124
81
228
127
160
87
175
64
103
53
134
60
233
92
U. S. Senator
Cory Booker ( D )
Jeff Bell ( R )
Joseph Baratelli
Eugene Martin Lavergne
Jeff Boss
Antonio N. Sabas
Hank Schroeder
158
104
3
1
0
0
1
165
150
3
0
1
0
1
121
110
2
1
0
0
2
171
215
6
0
1
1
1
135
151
2
0
0
2
0
154
111
3
1
0
0
2
86
85
2
0
0
1
0
141
105
1
1
0
1
1
Member of House
of Representatives
Janice Kovach ( D )
Leonard Lance ( R )
James Gawron
131
123
4
145
167
6
106
125
3
146
237
9
120
169
3
132
127
6
74
95
5
Sheriff
Joseph Cryan ( D )
Michael C. Ince ( R )
94
165
101
211
79
149
126
252
96
190
105
149
Surrogate
James S. La Corte ( D )
142
146
96
170
130
Freeholders
Angel Estrada ( D )
Christopher Hudak ( D )
Vernell V. Wright ( D )
P. Mark Martini ( R )
117
136
135
140
123
140
116
177
82
101
99
154
117
166
158
255
1st
688
272
40%
2nd
868
331
38%
3rd
806
240
30%
107
44
122
55
64
96
34
148
42
146
34
118
79
47
108
30
89
31
62
59
22
Districts
Registered Voters
Votes Cast
Voter Turnout
Districts
Registered Voters
Votes Cast
Voter Turnout
Members of Board
of Education
3 Year Term
Christopher B. Langhart
Anastasia Harrison
Margaret Oster
David J. Sexton
Michael Bielen
Mark Friedman
Noreen Coleman
WARD 2
3rd
4th
699
956
224
331
32%
35%
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
5th
1135
384
34%
6th
688
271
39%
1st
430
157
37%
2nd
610
240
39%
3rd
691
250
36%
WARD 3
4th
883
321
36%
5th
886
280
32%
6th
867
235
27%
7th
839
258
31%
1st
1342
447
33%
2nd
1058
360
34%
WARD 4
3rd
1118
408
36%
4th
874
289
33%
5th
1050
369
35%
192
101
214
109
141
86
75
49
130
72
118
85
175
100
170
80
115
71
138
87
242
142
179
123
231
117
168
86
219
105
4,098
2,211
121
70
193
95
180
145
142
86
80
37
150
54
143
62
184
91
159
87
133
54
142
85
276
114
197
110
232
117
161
91
198
122
4,198
2,140
188
178
1
0
0
0
1
71
143
4
1
1
0
0
168
152
3
0
1
0
0
155
216
4
0
0
1
0
133
122
4
0
0
1
1
97
54
2
0
0
0
0
141
94
1
0
0
0
0
171
75
1
0
0
0
0
163
151
5
0
0
0
0
130
141
2
0
0
0
0
124
104
5
0
0
0
0
124
125
2
0
1
0
0
246
180
9
0
0
0
0
213
139
2
1
0
2
1
236
164
1
0
0
0
0
156
122
7
0
0
0
0
168
189
3
0
0
0
0
3,815
3,380
78
6
5
9
11
117
121
3
170
192
2
65
143
5
127
179
5
114
241
9
113
145
3
76
65
4
118
111
5
149
81
4
133
175
5
100
156
4
100
124
4
114
136
3
211
209
7
180
155
6
175
203
5
134
141
5
143
209
3
3,193
3,829
118
68
99
93
146
144
211
65
142
105
206
88
253
107
143
72
70
99
133
152
86
117
191
76
161
92
113
99
146
190
126
167
180
148
225
122
159
127
224
2,732
4,130
136
81
122
179
82
139
116
134
85
119
165
155
117
131
128
209
203
189
158
164
3,496
0
101
130
121
182
112
139
132
133
66
81
78
100
103
120
118
123
159
180
174
197
66
79
75
145
104
146
136
210
99
129
124
259
96
122
107
149
76
81
83
65
107
118
117
124
155
152
148
82
125
150
126
187
102
121
114
125
101
119
113
125
102
129
118
144
191
191
204
230
178
182
188
164
163
184
175
221
113
154
143
156
137
169
163
211
2,895
3,419
3,265
4,058
WARD 1
4th
1227
405
33%
5th
936
297
32%
6th
700
275
39%
7th
438
179
41%
1st
830
254
31%
2nd
1048
378
36%
WARD 2
3rd
4th
699
956
224
331
32%
35%
5th
1135
384
34%
6th
688
271
39%
1st
430
157
37%
2nd
610
240
39%
3rd
691
250
36%
WARD 3
4th
883
321
36%
5th
886
280
32%
6th
867
235
27%
7th
839
258
31%
1st
1342
447
33%
2nd
1058
360
34%
WARD 4
3rd
1118
408
36%
4th
874
289
33%
5th
1050
369
35%
107
67
192
64
91
132
62
73
54
126
32
64
96
37
74
41
113
33
56
78
38
49
31
86
29
34
43
23
68
40
87
27
47
64
30
122
52
139
60
93
137
47
85
38
191
73
76
104
43
89
36
92
29
51
81
35
40
22
29
12
26
25
22
53
40
68
46
63
82
29
67
41
72
35
54
55
26
90
61
122
56
89
74
51
76
32
81
54
86
86
32
58
34
68
31
65
53
32
58
42
72
66
78
75
38
130
72
124
68
142
73
55
106
69
96
66
106
72
52
104
67
142
69
112
174
56
76
40
84
49
71
94
39
116
56
115
91
91
112
40
50
27
53
39
51
51
26
83
52
158
50
78
103
43
TOTAL
21,667
7,455
34%
TOTAL
21,667
7,455
34%
2,137
1,130
2,667
1,199
1,868
2,098
959
General Election 2014 Scotch Plains Unofficial Results
TRIAL LAWYERS
Est. 1984
The Law Office of
Francis M. Smith, ESQ.
INJURED?
LEARN YOUR RIGHTS IN PLAIN ENGLISH
Negligence Cases
Call Jon Bramnick
Certified Civil Trial Attorney
908-322-7000
BRAMNICK, RODRIGUEZ, GRABAS & WOODRUFF LLC
1827 East Second Street, Scotch Plains • www.jonbramnick.com
Do you really want to deal with
the insurance companies yourself?
I can help.
Over 30 Years of
Personal Injury Experience
In New Jersey
Motor Vehicle Accidents
Slips & Falls
Dog Bite Injuries
Construction Accidents
Wrongful Death
928 Mountain Avenue, Mountainside NJ 07092
908-233-5800 • www.FrankSmithLaw.com
No Fee If No Recovery
Call Me For A Free Consultation
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Peyton's
Peek at the Week
In Politics
By Paul Peyton of The Leader/Times
A FANWOOD LANDMARK...Seafare Chippery owner Brian Walter and his
son, Damian, cut the ribbon on November 1, marking the first anniversary of the
re-opening of the eatery that has been a landmark in the borough since 1970. Also
pictured are Fanwood Mayor Colleen Mahr, fourth from right; owners Deanna
Boll, Rita Walter (in lobster costume), Norm Walter, Rossalina Walter and
Damian Walter.
Program On Dealing With Foreclosure
ROSELLE PARK — The Union
County Commission on Human Relations and the Union County Foreclosure Task Force will host a public
information session on dealing with
foreclosure as a property owner or
tenant on Tuesday, December 2, from
6 to 7:30 p.m. at the Church of the
Assumption, 113 Chiego Place,
Roselle Park.
The forum, “Foreclosure: Moving From Fear To Positive Action!,” is a free educational program that will identify positive
actions that can be taken, options
that are available, and free resources that are offered on a state
and county level.
Key players will answer questions
and give hands-on program information including funding, legal assistance, housing assistance and mediation.
The New Jersey Public
Defender’s Office of Dispute Settlement and the Union County State
Superior Court are also cooperating in the program.
General Election 2014 Scotch Plains
Voters Decide Mayor Races
In Five Union County Towns
Voters last week decided mayoral
races in Garwood, Kenilworth, Linden, Rahway, and Roselle Park.
In Garwood, former Democratic
Councilman Charles Lombardo defeated Republican Sal Piarulli. Mr.
Piarulli had defeated first term GOP
Mayor Pat Quattrocchi in the June
primary.
Kenilworth Councilman Fred
Pugliese, a Republican, defeated
former Democratic Councilman Peter Corvelli for the year remaining on
the unexpired term of former Mayor
Kathi Fiamingo, who resigned after
becoming a tax court judge on April
1. Mr. Corvelli, a Hillside police detective, was defeated two previous
times by Ms. Fiamingo. Despite losing the mayor’s race, Democrats captured two seats on the borough council for a 3-3 split as of January.
In Rahway, Samson Steinman, a
Democrat, defeated Republican
Patrick Cassio, 63 to 33 percent, and
Independent Democrat Renee
Bridges Thrash, who captured only
4.35 percent of the vote. Mr. Steinman
became mayor following the resignation of Rick Proctor in September
of 2013 after a turbulent 32 months
as mayor.
Linden Councilman Derek
Armstead, a Democrat, defeated
two-term
Mayor
Richard
Gerbounka, an Independent Democrat, by some 400 votes. Mr.
Armstead came within 159 votes of
defeating the mayor in 2010. The
mayor-elect also won a close primary in June by only 140 votes
over Rhashonna Cosby-Hurling, the
Linden
Democratic
Party
organization’s picked candidate.
And in Roselle Park, Democratic
Councilman Carl Hokanson defeated
Republican Councilman Michael
Yakubov by 259 tallies to become the
first Democrat in over 20 years to be
elected mayor. He will replace Republican Mayor Joe Accordi who
failed to secure the local GOP party
line for the primary and opted not to
challenge Mr. Yakubov. According to
roselleparknews.org, Mr. Yakubov
was arrested on October 25 and
charged with theft and criminal mischief for removing a political sign
from the lawn of a residence.
Several other towns will have new
mayors come January. Republican
Allen Morgan, who previously served
as mayor of New Providence for two
terms from 1999 to 2006, was unopposed on Election Day to be the
borough’s new mayor come January.
He will replace Brooke Hern who
failed to get the GOP Party’s nod for
another term and opted not to challenge Mr. Morgan in the primary. Mr.
Hern, a former Democrat, defeated
Mr. Morgan in the 2010 GOP mayoral primary.
In Berkeley Heights, Republican
Councilman Robert Woodruff was
elected the township’s new mayor.
He will replace incumbent Joseph
Bruno, who he defeated in the June
primary.
New Jersey Elects Three
New Congress Members
A quarter of New Jersey’s Congressional delegation will be new following last Tuesday’s General Election. In South Jersey, Democrat
Donald Norcross, a state senator from
Camden, was elected over former
Philadelphia Eagle Garry Cobb of
Cherry Hill, the Republican candidate, in the 1st District to fill a vacancy left when long-time Rep. Rob
Andrews, a Democrat, resigned.
In the 3rd District, former Randolph
Mayor Tom MacArthur of Toms
River, a Republican, defeated Democrat Aimee Belgard, 54 to 44 percent,
to capture the House seat held the last
four years by Rep. Jon Runyan, a
Republican, who opted not to seek a
third term.
And in the 12th District, Bonnie
Watson Coleman, a Democratic state
assemblywoman from Mercer
County, defeated Alieta Eck to become the state’s first African-American Congressman and first female
House member since Marge
Roukema, a Republican, left office in
2003. Ms. Watson Coleman replaces
Rep. Rush Holt who, after 16 years in
the House, has opted not to seek
another term.
GOP Wins Senate Majority;
Increases House Advantage
Republicans picked up seven seats
in the U.S. Senate to take the majority
for the first time in eight years. House
Republicans, according to press reports, picked a dozen seats to increase their number to 246, the most
seats they held since World War 11.
Senate Republicans will hold at least
52 of the 100 seats with seats still to
be decided in Alaska and Louisiana,
which will hold a runoff election in
December.
Thursday, November 13, 2014
Page 3
Runnells Employee Pleads
Guilty to Paying Bribes
COUNTY — A NJ Transit vendor,
who is also works for Runnells Specialized Hospital, admitted last week
to paying bribes to a NJ Transit employee to obtain landscaping contracts.
Raymond Rapuano, 47, of New
Providence, pleaded guilty before
U.S. District Judge William H. Walls
in Newark federal court to an information charging him with one count
of bribery.
According to court documents
filed by federal prosecutors, prior
to March 2012, Rapuano had provided an individual who worked
for NJ Transit $3,500 in bribe payments for the purpose of obtaining
work for the landscape company
RA Landscape and Design (RA),
for which Rapuano worked.
Around April 2012, Rapuano
agreed to give NJ Transit employ-
ees 13 percent of the value of any
work awarded by the agency to
RA. Rapuano. Prosecutors said in
court documents that he paid an NJ
Transit employee $2,000 for
$22,000 worth of work awarded to
RA by NJ Transit.
As a Runnells employee his salary
was just under $85,000. He has
worked for the county since 1987,
according to documents published
on the Union County Watchdog Association website.
The bribery charge to which
Rapuano pleaded guilty carries a
maximum potential penalty of 10
years in prison and a $250,000 fine.
Sentencing is scheduled for March
18, 2015. In addition to the FBI, the
State Police, New Jersey Attorney
General’s Office, and the Division of
Criminal Justice assisted in the investigation.
Dog Walker Charged
With Multiple Thefts
CRANFORD — On November
4, Cranford police arrested a local
dog walker in connection with a
series of thefts involving Cranford
residents.
The investigation began in early
October when police began receiving complaints of missing
jewelry from clients of Juliet
Novak, a dog walker employed by
a p e t g r o o m i n g fa c i l i t y i n
Garwood.
The investigation, led by Detective
Spencer Durkin, revealed that Novak,
22, was hired by the victims to come
to their homes for the purpose of
providing dog walking services. On
multiple occasions, however, Novak
entered the residences of her clients
to steal high end jewelry items. Det.
Durkin was able to trace some of the
stolen items to pawn shops in nearby
communities.
Novak was charged with four
counts of theft. She was processed at
Cranford Police Headquarters and
released pending an appearance in
state Superior Court.
Police believe there may be additional theft victims that have not yet
been identified. Anyone who may
have victimized by Novak is encouraged to contact Det. Durkin at (908)
709-7345.
Police Looking for Help In Finding
Intruder At St. Michael’s Parish
CRANFORD — Police are looking for the public’s help in finding the
individual who entered St. Michael’s
Roman Catholic Church on Alden
Street on Saturday through the front
door at 12:15 p.m. where he was
captured on video.
After several minutes of wandering in the foyer, police said he exited
to the street and approached the
priests’ residence, which is attached
to the church. He entered the private
area through an unlocked window.
Police said one of the priests heard a
commotion and went to investigate at
which point the suspect exited out of
the door of the residence.
This is the third incident in Cranford
involving possible church burglaries
in the past week. The other two,
Cranford Alliance Church and
Cranford Methodist Church, involved
forced entry with a prying tool to
interior offices, police said.
Police said anyone with information relevant to the investigation is
asked to contact Detective Spencer
Durkin at (908) 709-7346 or Detective Derek Farbanec at (908) 7097347.
HAPPY
THANKSGIVING
from the
Shovlin Family
Your Local Mattress Maker since 1972
Page
4
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, November 13, 2014
The Westfield Leader
The Scot
ch Plains–F
anwood
Scotch
Plains–Fanwood
Times
Since 1959
— Established 1890 —
Legal Newspaper for the Town of Westfield,
Legal Newspaper for the Borough of Fanwood
Boroughs of Mountainside and Garwood
And the Township of Scotch Plains
And the County of Union, NJ.
Members of:
New Jersey Press Association • National Newspaper Association • Greater Westfield Area Chamber of Commerce
Scotch Plains Business & Professional Association • Fanwood Business & Professional Association
Periodicals – Postage Paid at Rahway, New Jersey
Periodicals – Postage Paid at Rahway, New Jersey
P.O. Box 250 • 251 North Avenue, West
Westfield, N.J. 07091
P. O. Box 368
Scotch Plains, N.J. 07076
Tele: (908) 232-4407 • E-mail: editor@goleader.com • Web: www.goleader.com • Fax: (908) 232-0473
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the offices of the newspapers at
P. O. Box 250, Westfield, New Jersey 07091
Published every Thursday by Watchung Communications, Inc.
Paul Peyton
Horace R. Corbin
Jeff Gruman
ASSIGNMENT EDITOR
PUBLISHER
SALES MANAGER
Suzette F. Stalker
David B. Corbin
Michael L. Bartiromo
COMMUNITY
ASSISTANT PUBLISHER & SPORTS
MARKETING PRODUCTION
Lauren S. Barr
Ben Corbin
Robert P. Connelly
EDUCATION & ARTS
SERVICES
BUSINESS OPERATIONS
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE
www.goleader.com/subscribe
One-year – $33 • Two-year – $62 • Three-year – $90
Trees
By Joyce Kilmer (1886 –1918),
an American poet.
*****
I THINK that I shall never see
A poem lovely as a tree.
A tree whose hungry mouth is prest
Against the sweet earth's flowing breast;
A tree that looks at God all day,
And lifts her leafy arms to pray;
A tree that may in summer wear
A nest of robins in her hair;
Upon whose bosom snow has lain;
Who intimately lives with rain.
Poems are made by fools like me,
But only God can make a tree.
He was killed by a sniper's bullet at the
Second Battle of the Marne in 1918.
In Flanders Fields
By: Lieutenant Colonel John McCrae, MD
(1872-1918), Canadian Army
*****
In Flanders fields the poppies blow
Between the crosses row on row,
That mark our place; and in the sky
The larks, still bravely singing, fly
Scarce heard amid the guns below.
We are the Dead. Short days ago
We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,
Loved and were loved, and now we lie
In Flanders fields.
Take up our quarrel with the foe:
To you from failing hands we throw
The torch; be yours to hold it high.
If ye break faith with us who die
We shall not sleep, though poppies grow
In Flanders fields.
Non-Competitive Races Has
Resulted In Low N.J. Turnout
Last week’s General Election produced what
may have been the lowest turnout for a federal
election in the state with just 31 percent of voters
statewide turning out at the polls or submitting
mail-in ballots. With non-competitive U.S. Senate
and Congressional races topping this year’s ballot,
there was not much incentive for voters to head to
the polls in the Garden State. But that was unfortunate as there were a number important mayoral and
town council races here in Union County as well as
competitive school board elections.
Looking at this newspaper’s coverage area, turnout was 34 percent in Westfield, 38 percent in
Fanwood and Mountainside, 42 percent in Cranford,
and around 39 percent in Scotch Plains and 43
percent in Garwood. County Clerk Joanne Rajoppi
has said turnout countywide was 36 percent.
Low turnouts are never good as it is important
that a good percentage of the electorate participate
in the election process. While this was not a Presidential or Gubernatorial election year where turnouts are the highest, locally there was a mayoral
election in Garwood and council races in Cranford,
Garwood and Scotch Plains. County voters also
elected a new sheriff for the first time in nearly 40
years.
In terms of Congressional races, only two of
New Jersey’s 12 Congressional Districts were
expected to be close — the 3rd District in south
Jersey and the 5th District in north Jersey, but
neither was close in the end. In fact no House race
came closer than 10 percentage points in the state.
Meanwhile, Sen. Cory Booker easily defeated littleknown and poorly funded Republican Jeff Bell by
14 percentage points with major networks calling
the race minutes after the polls closed at 8 p.m.
There has not been a close U.S. Senate race in the
Garden State since Bob Franks nearly defeated Jon
Corzine in the 2000 Senate race. We are hopeful
that the GOP will mount a better fight in 2018 when
the next Senate seat will be on the ballot when Sen.
Robert Menendez seat is up again.
We anticipate that turnout in next year’s statewide election may be lower than this year as state
General Assembly races will be at the top of the
ballot. Like the Congressional Districts, New
Jersey’s legislative districts have gone through
gerrymandering thus making most of these races
non-competitive.
Locally, council seats in Westfield, Cranford,
Garwood, Fanwood and Mountainside will be on
the ballot in 2015 although Democrats rarely run
candidates in Mountainside and Fanwood Republicans failed to field a candidate this year.
If New Jersey is to see higher voter turnout in
future years the state needs to generate more
competitive Congressional and Legislative districts as well having political parties pick better
funded and better known candidates to run in
statewide races.
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
ABCDICTIONOPQRSTDECEPTIONUVWXYZ
Letters to the Editor
Regional Bd. of Health: No One Is
Currently At Risk of Ebola Exposure
Some Westfield residents have expressed concerns about Ebola. However, as discussed at our meeting,
there are no cases of Ebola in town or
anywhere in New Jersey. No one in
the schools or in the community is
currently at risk of exposure.
The airport is monitored and our
hospitals are on alert. Health care
workers and emergency responders
need to be vigilant since virus transmission requires direct contact with
the body fluids of an ill infected person.
The Westfield Regional Health
Department is working with local
groups and hospitals and other government agencies to best plan for the
needs of our community.
The seasonal influenza vaccination program is ongoing and over
250 residents have already been vaccinated. It is best to get vaccinated
before the flu starts spreading.
Flu kills tens of thousands of people
each year in the U.S., compared to
one death due to Ebola to date. But a
simple vaccination can prevent the
flu. Residents can find a current list
of flu vaccination sites and schedules
at www.westfieldnj.gov/health.
The Health Department offers
many types of flu vaccine. For all
types, there is a $15 cash fee for each
person who does not have Medicare
B or one of the following insurances:
Aetna, CIGNA, Humana, Medicaid
and United Healthcare.
The Health Department is also
sponsoring a cholesterol screening
on Monday, November 17, and a
bone density screening on Monday,
November 24, with Overlook Medical Center. Both programs are from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Overlook
Downtown Center in Summit, and
there is a $10 charge for each. For
more information and to register,
please call the Overlook Community
Health Department at 1-800-2479580.
Information about all of the
Department’s activities is available
on its website www.westfieldnj.gov/
health. The complete minutes of the
November 3 meeting will be posted
after review and approval at our December 1 meeting, which starts at
5:30 p.m. in the municipal building.
The public is invited to attend.
Lawrence Budnick, MD
President, Westfield Board of Health
Fraudulent IRS Calls, Stopping Scams;
Is Moral Compass Disappearing?
I have received at least six calls
from a caller identifying himself as
an IRS agent and claiming that there
was some legal action against me. I
wanted to post this letter in The
Westfield Leader for three reasons.
First, to warn fellow Westfield residents of this scam; Secondly, to talk
about the wheels of bureaucracy and
why we can’t stop scams like this.
And lastly, to talk about the moral
compass that is quickly disappearing
within our society.
I started getting these calls earlier
this year and have received at least
six calls at both my home number
and my office number at home. Originally, the caller ID showed the incoming number being based in the
D.C. area, but the recent scam calls
are pointing to an area in California.
It doesn’t matter, as the criminals are
using software to disguise the real
location of the caller.
Basically, the caller identifies himself as an agent of the IRS and claims
that there is a case against you. Anyone with even a little common sense
knows that the IRS would never call
you about this, let alone leave a message. Once you challenge them, they
end the call.
However, today’s call (November
4, 2014) was interesting, as they used
a computer-generated call with a female voice. When I returned the call
(knowing it was a fraud call), the
same guy that has called before (he
has a distinctive voice) picked up and
started using every expletive you can
imagine when I asked him for his
credentials. Simply put, don’t take
these calls and don’t offer any personal information. More info at
www.treasury.gov/tigta.
Here is where I really started getting frustrated. The first time I received this type of call, I reported it to
the FBI. They said, “not our thing,
call the FTC.” I did and that went
nowhere.
After today’s calls, I again called
the FBI (Newark Office), I was again
referred to the FTC, but this time I
mentioned that this was useless information. My call was kicked around
and eventually picked up by someone with more information, who then
referred me to the treasury department. That call went nowhere and I
was referred to the website that I
mentioned above.
I know that we as a nation have a lot
on our plate, to name a few, a struggling economy, potential terrorism in
our backyard and more, but these
fraudulent calls are victimizing
Americans in their own way. The
treasury site mentioned they have
received over 20,000 reports of these
calls and that Americans have been
defrauded for over a million dollars
with this scam. How can this happen?
How can these people defraud Americans and continue these scams with
impunity?
So, that leads me to my last point.
Why does this happen? Because we
let it happen.
Where is the moral compass that
we once had? I remember my parents
telling me that they bought a car in
1969 and that the dealer told them to
take the car home and just mail him a
check that week for the balance. Can
you imagine that happening now? It
wouldn’t. Why?
Because there are some many
cheaters and liars out there. And guess
what? We let them cheat and lie. At
home, at school, at work, everywhere.
We turn a blind eye to so many things
at work and at home.
I am not perfect, but I try to live an
honest life and I try to instill that in
my kids and everyone I know. Take
what you work for and don’t cheat
the other guy. Someone does something wrong, tell him/her that’s wrong.
You see something that’s not right,
report it. It’s not being a snitch, it’s
being honest. It’s having morality.
Have we lost that? I can assure you
that the scam artist making these bogus IRS calls has friends and family
that know what he’s doing and they
just look the other way. Where is their
sense of right and wrong?
Sorry to pontificate, but this really
bothers me. Let’s think about this and
tell people how we feel about cheating and lying and taking advantage
of people. Maybe our child, our friend
or our co-worker will think twice
about cheating someone. We don’t
need more laws or more government
regulation, we just need more honest
people.
So, finally, when I asked the scam
artist today, “How can you sleep at
night knowing you’re cheating
people.” His reply was very disconcerting; “I sleep just fine,” he said and
then ended the call.
Joshua Suri
Westfield
Checchio Thanks Scotch Plains Voters;
Promises Her Best for Residents
I want to express my heartfelt
thanks to the voters of Scotch Plains
for electing me to the Township Council. The support I felt on Election Day
was incredible, and I am humbled
and honored by your trust in me.
During my campaign travels, I had
the opportunity to meet directly with
so many of you, listening to your
concerns, while discussing important community matters. Your confidence in me is one that I do not take
lightly and I promise to work tirelessly on your behalf to help address
challenges, and to secure lasting and
meaningful improvements throughout our community.
As I’ve stated throughout the campaign I am extremely optimistic about
our township’s future. I am looking
State LD-21
Sen. Thomas Kean, Jr. (R)
425 North Ave. E.
Westfield, N.J. 07090
(908) 232-3673
Asm. Jon Bramnick (R)
251 North Ave. West
Westfield, N.J. 07090
(908) 232-2073
Asm. Nancy Munoz (R)
57 Union Place, Suite 310
Summit, N.J. 07901
(908) 918-0414
LD-21 includes Westfield,
Mountainside, Garwood,
Summit and Cranford.
State LD-22
Sen. Nicholas Scutari (D)
1514 E. Saint Georges Ave.
Linden, N.J. 07036
(908) 587-0404
Asw. Linda Stender (D)
1801 East Second St.
Scotch Plains, N.J. 07076
(908) 668-1900
Asm. Jerry Green (D)
17 Watchung Ave.
Plainfield, N.J. 07060
(908) 561-5757
LD-22 includes Scotch Plains,
Fanwood, Plainfield, Clark and
Linden.
7th Congressional District
Representative Leonard Lance (R)
425 North Avenue E., Westfield, NJ 07090
(908) 518-7733
[Westfield, Mountainside, Garwood, Summit and Cranford
are in the 7th Congressional District]
12th Congressional District
Rep. Rush Holt (D)
50 Washington Rd., West Windsor, N.J. 08550
(609) 750-9365
[Fanwood, Plainfield and most of Scotch Plains
are in the 12th Congressional District]
senkean@njleg.org, senscutari@njleg.org
asmbramnick@njleg.org, aswmunoz@njleg.org
aswstender@njleg.org, asmgreen@njleg.org
forward to working and governing
with my running mate John Del Sordi,
alongside Mayor Kevin Glover and
Councilwoman Colleen Gialanella
while reaching across the aisle to
Councilman Jones to move our township forward as a representative of all
the people.
My only disappointment is that I
will not have the opportunity to serve
with my good friend and talented
running mate Luisa Bianco.
In closing, let me once again say
thank you, and as the holidays approach, let me wish you and your
family, a Happy, Peaceful, and
Healthy Holiday Season.
DD
TM
Diction Deception
Below are four arcane words, each
with four definitions – only one is correct. The others are made up. Are you
sharp enough to discern this deception
of diction?
If you can guess one correctly – good
guess. If you get two – well-read individual. If you get three – word expert. If
you get all four – You must have a lot of
free time!
All words and correct definitions
come from the board game Diction
Deception.
Answers to last week’s arcane words.
1. Vibex – Discolored spot or blotch of
the skin due to a subcutaneous effusion of
blood
2. Giallolino – Naples yellow pigment
3. Trigo – Wheat
4. Geniculate – To form joints or bend
like a joint
CYSTALGIA
1. Painful swelling of the mammary
glands
2. Pain in the bladder
3. Bunyons
4. Pain and swelling of the lymph
nodes
RONDACHE
1. A small circular shield carried by
medieval foot soldiers
2. Any large stage prop in the theater
which depicts the background
3. Moving in a hopping or skipping
manner
4. Envy; resentment
CYNEGETICS
1. Hunting with dogs
2. The study of the Brythonic Celtic
languages that includes Welsh, Breton
and Cornish
3. Pertaining to swans or the study of
swans
4. Study of diseases or inflammations
of the throat or windpipe
ANGEKOK
1. A fencing master
2. A chiropractor
3. An Eskimo medicine man
4. An interpreter; translater
See more letters on page 5
Letters to
the Editor
Veterans Day
“Today [Tuesday] we take time to
honor and pay respect to the men and
women who have served in our
nation’s Armed Forces. Our veterans
have made tremendous contributions
and sacrifices while wearing our
nation’s uniform. Their desire to serve
our country has kept us safe at home
and abroad and has helped to protect
the values of our nation. Today serves
as a reminder to thank our veterans,
those currently serving in the military, and their families for their service, bravery and commitment to
America.”
New Jersey Governor
Chris Christie
Oster Gives Thanks;
Ensure That Education
Continues To Flourish
I am truly honored that the voters
of Westfield have elected me to be a
member of the Westfield Board of
Education. The Board has the responsibility for ensuring that the longstanding tradition of providing an
outstanding educational experience
for all our children is continued by
their work.
The partnership among educators,
parents, taxpayers and the Board of
Education has produced consistently
outstanding results for our students
and I will work tirelessly to ensure
that the partnership continues to grow
and flourish.
I would like to congratulate Mark
Friedman and Chris Langhart for also
winning election to the Board of Education. I look forward to working
with them and the other Board members.
Michael Bielen and David Sexton
were outstanding candidates and I
hope they continue to volunteer and
support our community.
Many thanks go out to my family,
friends and supporters. Without your
help this success would not have been
possible.
Peggy Oster
Westfield
HANGING CHADS
WERE EXCITING
Rose Checchio
Councilwoman-Elect
Scotch Plains
Councilman-Elect Del Sordi Thanks
Scotch Plains Voters, Residents
I would like to express my deep
appreciation to all that have helped
and supported me in my recent campaign. I am humbled by the outpour
of residents and friends who devoted
countless hours in supporting me and
my running mates. Along my journey, I have had the pleasure of meetFor more information, see
www.goleader.com
www.goleader.com/presskit
www.goleader.com/help
ing so many extraordinary people.
I also would like to thank the Scotch
Plains residents for putting their trust
in me. It will be my privilege to serve
as your councilman. I look forward
to working with Mayor Glover, Councilwoman Gialanella, Councilman
Jones, and Councilwoman-elect
Checchio in ensuring that Scotch
Plains is the best town that it can be.
John Del Sordi, Jr.
Councilman-Elect
Scotch Plains
Union County Freeholders
Elizabeth, New Jersey
(908) 527-4200
Al Faella, Mgr. afaella@ucnj.org
Chris Hudak, chair
chudak@ucnj.org
Sebastian D’Elia, Public Info.
(908) 527-4419
sdelia@ucnj.org
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Westfield High School Coaching Staff
Petitions the Board of Education
Editor’s note: This letter of October
29, 2014 was submitted to the Westfield
Board of Education.
*****
Dear Board of Education,
The tenured members of the athletic
coaching staff of Westfield High School
are sending this letter after a two-and-ahalf-hour meeting with the Westfield Education Association on Wednesday, October 29, in response to the Board of Education meeting that took place on October 21 at Roosevelt School. Many of us
attended this meeting to support our colleague, Joe Marino, who was not re-hired
to coach the girls’ varsity basketball team,
as he had for the last 15 years.
We hoped to find answers to questions
that were shared by many others. We
were told that since it was a personnel
matter, the reasons behind the decision
could not be discussed, despite the fact
that Joe Marino gave his consent to bring
them to light. We were also told that we
did not have all the facts. If that is the
case, we can only comment on the facts as
we know them, and we believe the following facts to be true.
Joe Marino has been a loyal employee
in the Westfield Public School for 28
years.
In that time, he has coached various
levels of football, baseball, and girls basketball.
In his role of the girls basketball coach,
he had inherited a struggling team, and
developed it into a championship program.
Each summer, Joe has volunteered to
spend time training and teaching his girls,
and has attended summer leagues with
them.
Based on his evaluations, he was recommended for reappointment by the supervisor of athletics and the superintendent.
At this meeting, approximately 15
speakers, including administrators, both
current and former coaches, former athletes, residents, parents, and teachers defended Joe Marino’s character and coaching abilities.
Sixteen members of the current basketball team felt strongly enough about
their coach to stand up and publicly request that you re-think your decision.
One member of the public spoke against
Joe Marino, and read a letter by someone
who was not in attendance, and is no
longer a resident of Westfield, stating
that his daughter felt belittled by Marino
and did not have a positive experience
under his leadership.
The Board assured us that this was not
a personal decision. Based on the reactions of those in attendance, it seemed to
us that there is far more support for Joe
Marino than there is against. Certainly,
the team members who spoke on their
coach’s behalf, those who interact with
him every day, did not seem to feel belittled by him and seem to enjoy playing
for him. As such, we have not been convinced that this decision was anything
but personal.
As coaches, our positions are listed as
extra-curricular. We see our jobs as an
extension of the education the students
receive throughout the school day.
Clearly, this is not the way the board sees
it. Any teacher whose performance does
not meet expectations is made aware of
the specific area(s) of deficiency, given
support by the direct supervisor, and provided with an opportunity to rectify the
situation.
In this case, the results of Joe Marino’s
evaluations, which included two rubrics,
one completed by the Supervisor of Athletics, Sandra Mamary, and the other by
members of the team, were strong enough
to gain the support, and ultimately, the
recommendation of both Ms. Mamary
and the superintendent, Dr. Dolan. If the
board had concerns about his coaching,
did they take the time to let him know
where he was not meeting expectations?
Did they provide him with an opportunity to rectify the situation?
Item 9 of the Board’s Code of Ethics
states, “I will support and protect school
personnel in proper performance of their
duties.” Where is the support and protection in this case?
Much of what was discussed during
our coaches’ meeting focused on the timing of your decision, which was reached
just over one month prior to the start of
the winter sports season. We are concerned for the girls who head into what
could be the finest season in the program’s
history with an unfamiliar coach. Had
this decision been reached earlier, the
girls could have spent their off-season
training with their new leader, and more
time could have been taken to find a
suitable replacement. With the system
that is currently in place, coaches evaluations include the time they commit to
their programs in the off-season.
While most of us choose to work with
our athletes over the summer, we question how we could be held accountable
for this time that extends beyond our
contracts. More importantly, in light of
this situation, we fear that we will give up
our summers to prepare a team that we
will never have an opportunity to coach,
as Mr. Marino just did.
In an ideal world, we would hope you
would reverse your decision, inform
Coach Marino of the areas in which improvement is needed, and give him the
opportunity to do so. As professionals
who go above and beyond our contractual obligations, we truly aim to do the
best we can for our student-athletes. We
know we will not be able to satisfy
everybody’s wants and we will make
mistakes. We simply request that before
dismissing us from our jobs, you clearly
communicate where we are falling below
the board’s standards, and provide us
with an opportunity to improve.
Thomas Hornish
on behalf of the
Westfield High School Athletic
Coaching Staff
Garwood Officials Thank Voters and
Pledge Their Best Effort for All
cause better communication betters
the community. Please contact us
anytime. We are committed to being
accessible and keeping the lines of
communication open. You can reach
Charles at (908) 789-0508 or
CLombardo@garwood.org, Lou at
(908)
233-1657
or
LPetruzzelli@garwood.org, and Sara
at
(908)
377-7890
or
STodisco@garwood.org. We will listen and do our best to provide solid
answers to your concerns.
We sincerely thank you for the
opportunity to continue the work
we’ve started, and look forward to
facing the borough’s challenges together. We are experienced, committed, active and dedicated, and we will
work toward a brighter future for
Garwood. Thank you!
Mayor-Elect Charles Lombardo
Councilman Louis Petruzzelli
Councilwoman Sara Todisco
Poll Says 50 Percent of Residents
Want to Move Out of New Jersey
TRENTON – Following the release of Monmouth University/
Asbury Park Press poll this week that
indicates 50 percent of New Jersey
residents want to move out of the
state and for those most likely to
move, 54 percent of respondents list
taxes and costs as their top reason for
wanting to leave, Assembly Republican Leader Jon Bramnick issued the
following statement:
“For seven consecutive years, polling has shown that half of our residents want to leave the state while
Democrats have controlled the Legislature. While Democrats continue
to call for higher taxes, Republicans
in the Legislature have been the only
consistent voice fighting to make our
state more affordable.
Far too many New Jersey residents
have been forced to leave our state
because of high taxes and a high cost
of living. Republicans are ready on
day one to give our residents the tax
relief they deserve.”
Asm. Jon Bramnick
Westfield
Post election is a good time to consider why eminent people say negative things about politics.
Henry A. Kissinger: “Ninety percent of the politicians give the other 10
percent a bad reputation.”
Charles de Gaulle: “Politics is too
serious a matter to be left to politicians.”
Harry S. Truman: “If you want a
friend in Washington get a dog.”
Gilbert and Sullivan: “I always voted
at my party’s call, and I never thought
of thinking for myself at all.”
(“Iolanthe”)
Napoleon: “In politics stupidity is
not a handicap.”
Theodore Roosevelt: “A typical vice
of American politics is the avoidance
of saying anything real on real issues.”
Benjamin Disraeli: “There is no act
of treachery or meanness of which a
political party is not capable; for in
politics there is no honor.”
Will Rogers: “If you ever injected
truth into politics you have no politics.”
Thomas Jefferson: “Politics is such
a torment that I advise anyone I love
not to mix with it.”
William Howard Taft: “Politics
makes me sick.”
Hubert H. Humphrey, “To err is
human. To blame someone else is politics.”
Machiavelli: “Politics have no relation to morals.”
George W. Bush: “I crawled out of
the swamp (politics), and I’m not
crawling back into it.”
Bernard Baruch: “Vote for the man
who promises least; he’ll be the least
disappointing.”
Charles Dudley Warner: “Politics
makes strange bedfellows.”
Jerry Lewis: “I have some very personal feelings about politics, but I
don’t get into it because I do comedy
already.”
Ronald R. Reagan: “It has been said
that politics is the second oldest profession. I have learned it bears a striking resemblance to the first.”
Theodore H. White: “The flood of
money that gushes into politics today
is a corruption of democracy.”
Marshall McLuhan: “Politics will
eventually be replaced by imagery.
The politician will be all too happy to
abdicate in favor of his image because
the image will be much more powerful
than he could ever be.”
Were these people right or were
they wrong? Or was there any truth in
what they had to say about politics?
At our peril we dismiss these questions for there is very considerable troubling evidence that politics and the
public’s interest do not comport whether
on the local, state, or national level.
That what the public wants, the public does not get.
That political promises mean nothing other than getting elected.
That people who do not have the
skill to manage or run anything of
substance choose instead to run for
office.
That the best qualified people fear
running for political office.
That the object of politics is personal aggrandizement of some sort.
That the politician would rather be
wrong and get elected than right and
not get elected.
Democracy and politics do not mix
when politics is all about political
advantage and not all about the wishes
of the people as a whole.
Democracy comes from the ancient
Greek “demokratia” which means
“rule of the people.” It does not mean
rule of the politicians! It means the
instructions of the people and not the
wishes of the politicians!
Stephen Schoeman
Westfield
Michael Bielen Thanks Westfield
Community for BOE Support
Dear Friends and Neighbors, I
would like to thank everyone for their
support during my campaign for a
seat on the Westfield Board of Education. While we received more than
2,000 votes, we came up a few votes
short from being elected. I truly appreciate all the positive feedback both
during and after the campaign.
Even though we came up short this
year, the Westfield Board of Education is in good hands. Mark Friedman
with his technology and financial
background, Chris Langhart with his
Home Financing By
OWEN BRAND
public policy background and Peggy
Oster with her finance and PTSO
experience will all serve the BOE,
our students, parents teachers and
administrators well over the next three
years.
I’d also like to thank David Sexton
for running this year. As I highlighted
in my last letter, I went “all in.” We
need to make a total commitment to
a course of action we believe in. I
strongly believe in public service and
giving back to our community and
will continue to work on behalf of all
residents and taxpayers who all call
Westfield home.
Thank you again for your support.
Holiday Schedules
owen.brand@pncmortgage.com
Carmen Cascao
N&C Jewelers
908-233-3380
102 Quimby Street Westfield, NJ
nandcjewelers@gmail.com
Reading
Store hours - M T W F & Saturday: 10 to 5:30pm
Thursday: 10 to 7:30pm • Sunday: Closed
Is Good
For You
SM
Local: 908-789-2730
Cell: 908-337-7282
Nabig Sakr
Michael Bielen
Westfield
NMLS# 222999
Thanksgiving, Christmas and
New Year's Day are all Thursday
this year. The Leader/Times will
operate close to normal these weeks,
closing Wednesdays at noon. The
newspapers will be delivered by the
post offices on Friday. Please assist
us by being timely with your submittals during these periods.
Page 5
Politics, ‘Second Oldest Profession Is
Striking Resemblance To The First’
Letters to the Editor
It is our absolute honor and privilege to have just been elected to serve
as mayor and on the council for the
great Borough of Garwood. We were
pleased to see so many people come
out to vote Tuesday and cast their
votes of confidence for us.
As we promised during our campaign, we pledge to work hard to
represent all the residents of Garwood
— those that voted for us, those that
did not, and those that didn’t make it
out to the polls. We will represent the
homeowners and the renters, those
that have just moved in, and those
that have lived here their whole lives.
We promised to listen to your concerns and seek viable solutions. We
will not go back on our word. With
your help, we will do our very best to
make Garwood better, stronger and
more vibrant.
We look forward to continuing our
conversations with the residents be-
Thursday, November 13, 2014
Interiors So Lovely, You’ll Want to Stay Home
Think “Superior” For:
Member
FDIC
PNC is a registered service mark of The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. (“PNC”). PNC Mortgage is a division of PNC Bank,
National Association, a subsidiary of PNC. All loans are provided by PNC Bank, National Association and are subject to credit
approval and property appraisal. 2014 The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
•
•
•
•
Expert Consultation Services
Space Planning / Room Layouts
Remodeling Services
All Interior Related Products:
Furniture Floor Coverings
Lighting
Window Treatments
Accessorizing & Finishing Touches
Joanne Womelsdorf, IFDA, ASID allied
Phone: 908.232.3875
www.superiorinteriorsofnj.com
SEPTEMBER 16 – DECEMBER 16, 2014
Pirouette® Window Shadings
It’s time to decorate
your windows for the holidays.
SAVE $100*
Save with mail-in rebates on a selection of stylish Hunter Douglas
window fashions, September 16–December 16, 2014.
Ask for details.
on qualifying purchases of
Hunter Douglas window fashions
Innovative Window
Treatments
Kenilworth NJ
FREE SHOP AT HOME SERVICE
609-865-2800
innovative-windowtreatments.com
OR MORE WITH REBATES
Child Safety
at the Window
brochure
Ask about
with this ad
Measuring and
Installation
Follow Us At Facebook or Twitter
* Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 9/16/14 –12/16/14 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Rebate will be issued in the form of
a prepaid reward card and mailed within 6 weeks of rebate claim receipt. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card
balance 7 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. Additional limitations apply. Ask participating dealer for details and rebate form. ©2014 Hunter Douglas.
All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas. HOL14MB2
47029
Page
6
Thursday, November 13, 2014
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Israel Support Comm. Slates
Body & Soul N.J. Premiere
SCOTCH PLAINS — The Israel
Support Committee of Central New
Jersey invites the community to the
New Jersey premiere of Gloria
Greenfield’s newest film, Body &
Soul — The State of the Jewish Nation, on Sunday, November 23, at 11
a.m. It will take place at the Jewish
Community Center (JCC) of Central New Jersey, located at 1391
Martine Avenue, Scotch Plains.
This film presents the historical,
religious and archeological connections of the Jewish people to
Israel and answers the propaganda,
misinformation and revisionist history that has permeated the media’s
coverage of the Israeli-Palestinian
conflict.
Gloria Greenfield and Doc Emet
Productions previously produced
The Case for Israel with Alan
Dershowitz and Unmasked
Judeophobia – The Threat to Civilization. Ms. Greenfield will lead a
discussion after the screening.
Admission is $8 in advance and
$10 at the door. Student admission
is $5. Sponsorships are available
for $25, which includes one ticket
and lunch with Ms. Greenfield after the screening of the movie.
The Israel Support Committee of
Central New Jersey represents Congregation Beth Israel of Scotch
Plains, Temple Emanu-El of
Westfield, Temple Sholom of
Scotch Plains, Temple Beth O’r/
Beth Torah of Clark, Temple Beth
El/Mekor Chayim of Cranford,
Temple Beth Ahm Yisrael of Springfield and Congregation Anshe
Chesed of Linden. The committee’s
mission is to disseminate information about issues affecting Israel
and to offer support for the people
and the State of Israel.
To register and obtain additional
information, contact Conrad
Nadell at conradwho@gmail.com
or (908) 531-8228. Checks payable to “Israel Support Committee” should be sent to 18 Shalom
Way, Scotch Plains, N.J. 07076.
ACGNJ to Hear Talk
On ‘Espanol’ Software
SCOTCH PLAINS — The Amateur Computer Group of New Jersey
(ACGNJ) will meet on Friday, November 21, from 8 to 9:30 p.m., on
the second floor of the Scotch Plains
Rescue Squad building. Participation
is free.
ACGNJ member Paul Syers will
present a demonstration of the Rosetta
Stone “Espanol” software for the
Spanish (Latin America) Level 1, 2,
3, 4 and 5 version. The demonstration will run through different lessons and cover how to interact with
the software.
The rescue squad building is located at 1916 Bartle Avenue, Scotch
Plains. Directions are available on
the club website, acgnj.org, or by
calling (908) 246-0410.
ACGNJ is a computer user group
(club) based in Scotch Plains.
Founded in May of 1975, the club is
open to anyone interested in computers. All events are open to the public
and are free.
HELPING HANDS...Joe Masterson, a spokesperson for Roots & Wings Union
County (RWUC), and Alison Jaruzelski, a Westfield Girl Scout and RWUC
volunteer, celebrate the organization’s successful October 15 fundraiser in
Westfield that raised more than $6,000. RWUC assists youth who have aged out
of the foster care system with housing and transitional support.
Roots & Wings Union County
Holds Successful Fundraiser
WESTFIELD — Roots & Wings
Union County (RWUC) raised more
than $6,000 at a successful fundraiser
on October 15 at the Mulberry House
in Westfield. The full amount will go
directly to help the first two youths
from Union County accepted into
the program, which helps young
adults who have aged out of the
foster care system.
RWUC Leadership Council member Joe Masterson announced during
the evening that an apartment had
been secured and the first client would
move in before the month’s end. “This
milestone is the culmination of the
efforts of many individuals and organizations during the past year,” Mr.
Masterson said. He thanked everyone for donating their time, talent
and financial support.
Special acknowledgements went to
the Westfield Tennis Club for hosting
Probitas Verus Honos
the first fundraiser; Alison Jaruzelski,
a Westfield Girl Scout working toward her Gold Award by being responsible for furnishing the apartment;
CR Bard employee Lauren Doyle,
who raised donations through her
employer’s quarterly “Denim Day;”
the Robert and Marion Schamann
Brozowski Foundation for their generous grant, and the Westfield Foundation for being the first seed investor
in RWUC with a $40,000 grant.
Children raised in foster care face
significant challenges when they age
out of the system at age 18. Many
have no place to live, insufficient
education, few employable skills, no
financial resources and no dependable adult relationships.
The Roots & Wings model has
been extremely successful in helping
these youths since its inception in
1999 in Morris County. RWUC was
formed early in 2014 as an expansion
of the original program. To learn
more, visit rootsandwingsnj.org or
call Joe Masterson at (908) 403-8621.
BRITTON-SELG-STANFORD
HOLIDAY JOURNEY...Crescent Concerts will continue its 33rd season with
“The Journey to Christmas,” to be presented by the Crescent Choral Society this
Saturday, November 15, at 8 p.m., at the historic Crescent Avenue Presbyterian
Church, located at 716 Watchung Avenue, Plainfield. Artistic Director F. Allen
Artz III will conduct the choir in a performance of Vivaldi’s Magnificant, SaintSaens’ Oratorio de Noel and Pinkham’s Christmas Cantata. The cost is $20 for
general admission, $15 for senior citizens and $5 for students. For more information, call (908) 756-2468 or visit crescentconcerts.org.
INSURANCE
FOR ALL YOUR INSURANCE NEEDS
AXWRHRPHRZQHUV)ORRGBXVLQHVVLLIHHHDOWK
(VWDEOLVHG
Richard J. Kaplow, Esq.
“25 Years Experience”
Civil & Criminal Trial Lawyer
FAMILY LAW
· Divorce · Domestic Violence
· Custody · Child Support
CRQWDFW8VToday
1-908-241-1180
JOGP!TUBOGPSEBHFODZDPN
XXX4UBOGPSE"HFODZDPN
Comparing Retirement Communities?
(908) 232-8787
· DWI · Criminal Defense
· Business Representation · Civil Litigation
Former Assistant Union County Prosecutor
24 Hours · 53 Elm Street, Westfield, NJ 07090
kaplowlaw@aol.com
richardjkaplow.com
Westfield Pediatric
Dental Group
• Dentistry for infants, children,
adolescents & special needs
• Specializing in comforting
fearful children
• Laser Dentistry
E
G
CE
50
N
I
L
• Oral Conscious Sedation
BRAT
YEARS
ting Healthy Smiles
Crea
• We offer IV Sedation and
General Anesthesia services
by Board Certified Pediatric
Anesthesiologists in the dental
office or hospital setting
Timothy P. McCabe, D.M.D.
Board Certified in Pediatric Dentistry
Julie Jong, D.M.D.
Fellowship
Village
Stands Out from the Rest
The setting of our one-of-a-kind
community is second to none in
North Jersey
Our traditional American
community with gabled roofs
and inviting porches is situated
on 72 scenic acres.
A vibrant, active lifestyle
Outstanding dining options, stimulating cultural,
educational and social opportunities as well as health,
fitness and wellness programs.
Tried and true
A trusted and much sought after, not-for-profit
continuing care retirement community with a solid
financial position.
Outstanding on-site healthcare
Peace of mind knowing that the area’s
most complete continuum of healthcare
services is on-site.
Where staff and neighbors share
your core values
Board Certified in Pediatric Dentistry
Kelly Walk, D.D.S.
Board Certified in Pediatric Dentistry
John Chang, D.D.S.
Board Certified in Pediatric Dentistry
555 Westfield Avenue • Westfield, NJ 07090
www.kidsandsmiles.com • 908-232-1231
New Jersey Family’s Favorite Kids’ DocsTM, 2009-2013
Named 2009-2012 Top Dentist by NJ Monthly Magazine
A Part of Fellowship
Senior Living
Call 877-395-1715 for the
date of our next public
event, more information
or a personal tour.
8000 Fellowship Road, Basking Ridge, NJ 07920
www.FellowshipSeniorLiving.org
Like us on
Westfield
Monday, November 3, an incident
of identity theft was reported on the
900 block of Carleton Road. The victim stated that on July 29, someone
unknown withdrew $2,800 from her
bank account. The account was closed
and the bank made good on the proceeds from the theft. Bank security
also was investigating the incident.
Monday, November 3, police took
a report concerning an incident of
identity theft. The victim stated that
someone unknown attempted to open
two Chase credit cards in her name
but were denied.
Tuesday, November 4, a resident
of the 200 block of Sunset Avenue
reported an act of fraud in which
someone unknown opened two accounts in his name, accruing charges
in the amount of $40. There were no
suspects at the time of the report.
Thursday, November 6, a 16-yearold male Westfield resident was arrested on the 400 block of Clark
Street and charged with possession
of a controlled dangerous substance
(CDS)/less than 50 grams of suspected marijuana. Police had responded to the area on a report of
suspicious activity. The juvenile subsequently was released to the custody of his parents.
Thursday, November 6, a resident
of the 100 block of Stoneleigh Park
reported an act of criminal mischief in
which someone unknown defaced his
home with spray paint. There were no
suspects at the time of the report.
Thursday, November 6, Regina
Bauer-Wright, 26, of Union was arrested at Washington Street and Central Avenue on an outstanding Newark warrant for $5,000. She was released on her own recognizance per
Newark authorities.
Friday, November 7, Casey Nicholls,
28, of Morristown was arrested on an
outstanding Westfield warrant after
turning herself in at police headquarters. Nicholls was processed and released after posting $106 bail.
Friday, November 7, Hatim
Bayoumi, 27, of Elizabeth was arrested during a motor vehicle stop at
North Avenue and Clark Street and
charged with possession of less than
50 grams of suspected marijuana
and possession of drug paraphernalia. Bayoumi was transported to police headquarters, processed and released with summonses.
Saturday, November 8, Timothy
Dimondi, 44, of Union was arrested
on two outstanding traffic warrants
and one criminal warrant pursuant
to a prisoner pickup at the Oakland
Police Department. The traffic warrants were from Westfield, for
$1,813, and Hightstown, for $1,000;
the criminal warrant was from Newark, for $5,000. Dimondi was transported to Westfield police headquarters and processed. He was released
Program to Highlight
Chinese Culture
WESTFIELD — The Presbyterian Women invite members of the
community to their November
Gathering, which will be held on
Thursday, November 20, at 1 p.m.
It will take place in the Christian
Lounge of The Presbyterian
Church in Westfield, located at 140
Mountain Avenue.
The program, “Secrets of Traditional Chinese Culture — Profound
Insight for Modern Life,” will consist of a video/slideshow and lecture presentation, including questions and answers, from Shen Yun
Promotions International. Nadia
Ghattas will be the featured speaker.
China encompasses 5,000 years
of civilization. With its spiritual
foundation centering upon the values of honor, etiquette, wisdom,
sincerity and compassion, traditional Chinese culture was heralded
as a divine gift.
Shen Yun Promotions International is an independent, 501(c)3
non-profit organization, established in New York, to promote
and present Shen Yun performing
arts shows around the world.
This program is designed to help
attendees uncover the mystery behind ancient China’s legendary
longevity, creativity and enlightenment. All are welcome.
Seats Available For
NYC Holiday Lights
WESTFIELD — The Westfield
Recreation Department is again offering its popular New York City
Holiday Night Light Tour on Tuesday, December 9. This escorted,
narrated tour of New York City will
include some of the beautiful holiday window displays, a stop at
Rockefeller Center to see the tree,
and visiting the holiday shops at
Bryant Park. Spots are limited.
The cost of $65 per person includes bus transportation, narrated
tour, boxed sandwich meal for the
bus ride, and coffee/dessert at a
New York City eatery at the conclusion of the tour.
The bus will depart at 3:30 p.m.
from the Memorial Park Pool, located at 713 Cumberland Street,
Westfield, and return at approximately 10 p.m. For registration information, contact the Westfield Recreation Department at (908) 7894080 or recreation@westfieldnj.gov.
on his own recognizance as per the
Newark Municipal Court and released after posting bail on the
Westfield and Hightstown Municipal Court warrants.
Saturday, November 8, an Apple
Macbook Air laptop computer was
reported stolen from a backpack while
the owner was at a location on the 300
block of Watterson Street. The laptop,
valued at $1,009.13, was stolen between 12:15 and 1 p.m. that day.
Saturday, November 8, Shereka
Fagan, 25, of Plainfield was arrested
on an outstanding warrant from
Haworth, in the amount of $165,
following a motor vehicle stop at
East Broad Street and Wychwood
Road. She was processed and released on her own recognizance.
Mountainside
Monday, October 27, an employee
of a Route 22 business filed a report
of harassment against another employee. The man alleged that the
employee accused him of stealing
his wallet and breathed heavily in a
panting manner to frighten him.
Monday, October 27, Davonn
Norton, 22, of Newark was arrested
at police headquarters on a child
support warrant out of Essex County.
Wednesday, October 29, Edgar
Eliosa, 33, of Plainfield was arrested
and charged with driving with a suspended license following a motor
vehicle accident on Route 22.
Fanwood
Sunday, October 19, Darnell
Caldwell, 34, of Piscataway was arrested on a warrant out of South
Plainfield following a motor vehicle
stop. He was processed and turned
over to the South Plainfield Police
Department.
Wednesday, October 22, Robert
Neusch, 51, of Cranford was arrested on a warrant out of Dunellen
following a motor vehicle stop. He
was processed and released after
posting bail.
Friday, October 24, Lawrence Diamond, 29, of Green Brook was arrested and charged with driving
while intoxicated (DWI) following
a motor vehicle stop. Diamond was
processed and released to a responsible person.
Friday, October 24, a resident of
Cray Terrace reported that an unknown person removed Halloween
decorations from her front lawn. The
decorations were valued at $100.
Friday, October 24, Carla Walker,
44, of Roselle was arrested on an
active warrant out of Roselle following a motor vehicle stop. Walker
was processed and released after
posting bail.
Saturday, October 25, a resident
of South Martine Avenue reported
that two of his motor vehicle tires
were slashed while the vehicle was
parked in his driveway.
Monday, October 27, a resident of
La Grande Avenue reported that his
garbage can was stolen from in front
of his house.
Saturday, November 1, Lionel
Cruz, 39, of Elizabeth was charged
with DWI after being found asleep
in his motor vehicle, according to
police. Cruz was processed and released to a responsible person.
Sunday, November 9, Alfred
Voelker, 20, of Scotch Plains was
arrested on an outstanding warrant
out of Fanwood following a traffic
stop.
General Election 2014
Cranford Unofficial
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
FCC Plans ‘Souper Sunday,’
Food Stamp Challenge
WESTFIELD — In the spirit of
Thanksgiving, the First Congregational Church (FCC) of Westfield will
host multiple opportunities throughout November to offer the gift of
charity to the less fortunate. All activities will be open to the public.
This Sunday, November 16, the
church’s Board of Outreach will host
its annual “Souper Sunday” luncheon at 11:30 a.m. This year’s event
will feature representatives from
Roots & Wings Union County, an
organization that provides housing
and transitional support for youth
who have aged out of the foster care
system. A free soup luncheon will
be provided.
Throughout November, FCC also
will participate in the “SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program)
Challenge,” also known as the food
stamp challenge. This national program raises awareness of poverty in
America by challenging participants
to eat on the monetary equivalent of
their state’s food stamp budget, approximately $4.50 per day or $30 per
week in New Jersey.
Participants can choose any sevenday period before Sunday, November 23, to take the challenge, followed by a discussion on either Monday, November 24, or Tuesday, November 25, from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m., in
the church’s chapel lounge. Participants may choose either night. To
register for the challenge and receive
introductory materials, contact (908)
233-2494 or uccfcc@verizon.net.
The annual Thanksgiving Service
will be celebrated on Sunday, November 23, at 10 a.m. Worshippers are
asked to bring a non-perishable food
donation for the church’s food pantry.
FCC will host its annual Alternative Gift Market on consecutive Sundays, November 30 and December
7, at 11:30 a.m. The market offers
the opportunity to make a donation
to worthy causes in someone’s name
instead of a material gift. For each
donation, a gift card will be provided with details about the charitable organization which can be personalized with the recipient’s name.
This year’s market will benefit seven
different charities: Bridges Outreach,
CONTACT We Care, Doctors Without Borders, Elizabeth Coalition to
House the Homeless, FCC’s Food
Closet, Heifer International and
Roots & Wings.
First Congregational Church, a
member of the United Church of
Christ, is located at 125 Elmer Street,
Westfield. For more information or
to register for any of the events, contact the church office at (908) 2332494 or uccfcc@verizon.net. Further
information about the church also is
available at fccofwestfield.org.
Holy Name Society
Slates Turkey Drive
SCOTCH PLAINS — The Holy
Name Society of St. Bartholomew
the Apostle Roman Catholic Church,
located at 2032 Westfield Avenue,
Scotch Plains, will sponsor a frozen
turkey and food drive with Community FoodBank of New Jersey.
It will take place on Saturday and
Sunday, November 22 and 23. Donations may be dropped off between 9
a.m. and 2 p.m. on Saturday and
between 8 a.m. and noon on Sunday.
The following items are requested:
Frozen turkeys (never fresh or
thawed); canned soups and stews;
canned vegetables and fruits; instant
potatoes, rice, grains and stuffing mix,
and other non-perishable foods. Donations should not be contained in
glass jars or bottles.
All donations should be brought to
the Community FoodBank truck on
the church grounds. For more information about the Community
FoodBank of New Jersey, visit
cfbnj.org.
Cranford Hist. Soc. to Present
Carder and Steuben Glass
CRANFORD — The Cranford
Historical Society will present
“Frederic Carder and Steuben
Glass” with Vic Bary this Sunday,
November 16, from 2 to 4 p.m. It
will take place at the Crane-Phillips
House Museum, located at 124
North Union Avenue, Cranford. The
program will begin at 2:15 p.m.
While many recognize the name
Louis Comfort Tiffany and associate it with turn-of-the-20th-century art glass creations, far fewer
may recognize the name Frederic
Carder. Carder, the founder of
Steuben Glass, was a contemporary of Tiffany, who considered
him his most important competitor. Tiffany even brought an unsuccessful lawsuit against Carder
for theft of intellectual property.
While similar to Tiffany in being a
“Renaissance man” in his breadth
of skills, Carder distinguished himself from the former by actually
blowing some of the creations he
designed — something Tiffany
never did.
Mr. Bary, a Cranford Historical
Society trustee and art glass collector, will speak about Frederic
Carder and Steuben Glass. The presentation will include many visuals as well as some examples of
Carder’s Art Nouveau glass. Mr.
Bary has previously presented on
the art glass of Louis Tiffany, as
well as competitors Quezal and
Durand, on behalf of the Cranford
Historical Society this year.
Admission will be free but donations are always welcome. Space is
limited, so reservations are required.
This program is not recommended
for children. To reserve a seat, call
the Cranford Historical Society’s
office at (908) 276-0082 or e-mail
cranfordhistoricalsociety@verizon.net.
Established in 1927, the Cranford
Historical Society, a non-profit organization, is dedicated to the preservation and perpetuation of Cranford’s
history. For more information, visit
cranfordhistoricalsociety.com.
Do you wish you had an extra
set of hands to get it all done?
Then we are the answer...
Mom 2 Go
Fully Insured Errand & Concierge Service
General Errands • Holiday Preparation
Shopping & Returns • Moving Assistance
Senior Assistance • Grocery Shopping/Drop Off
Christmas Tree Set-Up/Breakdown
Gift Wrapping & Shipping • Waiting Service
Senior Peace of Mind Check Ins
FAMILIES SHARE FAITH...Rabbi Ethan Prosnit, who will be installed as
Temple Emanu-El’s new assistant rabbi on Friday, November 21, and Assistant
Cantor Michelle Rubel, at his right, are pictured during a new family Shabbat
program that was begun at the temple in October. The program, called Shabbat
B’Yachad, is for families with children in kindergarten to second grade. Rabbi
Prosnit and Cantor Rubel lead that program. Temple Emanu-El is located at 756
East Broad Street, Westfield.
Temple Emanu-El to Install
Asst. Rabbi Ethan Prosnit
WESTFIELD — A special Erev
Shabbat service will be held at Temple
Emanu-El on Friday, November 21,
at 7:45 p.m., to celebrate the installation of Rabbi Ethan Prosnit as the
temple’s new assistant rabbi. The
temple is located at 756 East Broad
Street, Westfield.
Rabbi Prosnit moved to Westfield
with his wife, Arielle Traub, and
joined Temple Emanu-El in July. He
graduated from Clark University in
Worcester, Mass. with a Bachelor of
Arts degree in African History and a
Masters in Teaching. Prior to applying to rabbinical school, Rabbi Prosnit
worked at Tufts University Hillel,
organizing Shabbat and holiday programming as well as the Alternative
Break programs with American Jewish World Service and the Joint Distribution Committee.
“We are thrilled that Rabbi Ethan
Prosnit has joined the Temple EmanuEl family. He is a compassionate,
kind and gifted rabbi who has already made an impact on our community,” said Temple Emanu-El Senior Rabbi Douglas Sagal. “We are
delighted to welcome Rabbi Prosnit
and Arielle to our temple family.”
Rabbi Prosnit is passionate about
pursuing social justice and making
connections with global Jewry. During his time at Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion
(HUC-JIR), he volunteered at an absorption center, working with an Ethiopian family, and was the summer rabbinic intern at the Religious Action
Center in Washington, D.C. As a student, Rabbi Prosnit served many different communities. He also taught in
the HUC-JIR’s Miller High School
Program, staffed NFTY-in-Israel and
Birthright-Israel experiences and is a
member of the Entwine steering committee for the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee.
Besides social justice initiatives,
Rabbi Prosnit’s responsibilities include adult education, family education, Adult B’nai Mitzvah class and
the Confirmation class. He additionally is the liaison rabbi to the temple’s
Early Childhood Education program.
“I heard wonderful things about
Rabbi Sagal and Cantor [Martha]
Novick, the creative worship experiences they developed, the high level
of learning that takes place throughout the entire congregation, and the
rich history of being a social justice
congregation,” Rabbi Prosnit said. “I
was also lucky to learn with [Temple
Emanu-El’s] Rabbi Emeritus Charles
Kroloff at HUC-JIR, and through my
studies with him he shared how wonderful it was to serve this community
and the true partnership that takes
place between clergy and congregant
at Temple Emanu-El.”
The Family Law Department of Dughi, Hewit & Domalewski
Presents
Back row: Richard A. Outhwaite, Esq., Jennifer L. Young, Esq. & Mario C. Gurrieri, Esq. (Chair)
Front row: Eva Uhrik, Esq. and Kristin M. Capalbo, Esq.
5 Lawyers, 5 Levels of Experience, 4 Hourly Rates
All designed to serve your interests in all aspects of divorce including
custody, parenting time, relocation, distribution of assets, alimony, child
support, college costs, prenuptial agreements, mediation, domestic violence,
palimony, post-divorce changes in financial circumstances, and civil unions
Mention this ad to receive a complimentary conference
Dughi, Hewit & Domalewski, P.C.
340 North Avenue
Cranford, New Jersey 07016
(908) 272-0200
www.dughihewit.com
C E L E B R A T I N G 15 Y E A R S O F S E R V I C E
Invisalign Day
Scott Seib
November 22, 2014
Plumbing & Heating Inc.
908-654-1818
scottseibplumbing.com
Master Plumber License No. 6548
and 18th-Century Table Customs”
on November 23; “Gingerbread Sunday” on December 7, and “Italian
Christmas Customs” on December
14. Reservations are required for
“Gingerbread Sunday.”
The museum is available for tours
by school and other community
groups during the week as well as
for Scout troops after school on
weekdays. Special programs also
may be arranged on site for schools
and other groups. For more information, visit the museum’s Facebook
page, call the office weekday mornings at (908) 232-1776 or e-mail
millercorymuseum@gmail.com.
The
museum
website
is
millercoryhouse.org.
Knights Blood Drive
To Be Held Sunday
GARWOOD — The Garwood
Knights of Columbus will hold a
blood drive this Sunday, November
16, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. It will take
place at their council hall, located at
37 South Avenue, Garwood, opposite PathMark.
Parking is available behind the
building off Willow Avenue (turn at
Marty Shoes). For further information, call Chairman Dennis Clark at
(908) 247-5389 or the Blood Center
of New Jersey at (973) 676-4700,
extension no. 144, visit bloodnj.org
or e-mail bcnj@bloodnj.org.
Drug or Criminal Charges?
Call Jon Bramnick
And Speak With Our Criminal Defense Team
We Have Three Former Prosecutors
908-322-7000
BRAMNICK, RODRIGUEZ,
GRABAS & WOODRUFF LLC
1827 East Second Street, Scotch Plains
www.jonbramnick.com
NICHOLAS A. GIUDITTA, III
“Where there’s a Will, there’s a way”
Mom2Go@icloud.com
Oil To Gas Conversions
Steam and Hot Water Boilers
WESTFIELD — The Miller-Cory
House Museum, located at 614 Mountain Avenue, Westfield, will present a
program entitled “Native American
Medicine Pouches” this Sunday,
November 16, between 2 and 4 p.m.
This program will focus on the
beliefs of the Lenape Indians who
inhabited New Jersey at the time the
first European settlers arrived. The
presenters will explain the significance of medicine pouches and the
special items that the wearer of the
pouch might put inside. Additionally, the volunteers will relate the
creation stories of each of the Lenape
clans. Children will make their own
pouches out of leather, decorate them
with beads and a symbol from one of
the Lenape Indian clans, and choose
an item to put inside.
Sunday’s program also will include tours of the restored 1740 farmhouse. Members of the cooking committee will demonstrate the skills
used in 18th-century open-hearth
cooking, using authentic recipes and
seasonal foods. The gift shop, which
carries a variety of colonial toys,
crafts, books and educational materials, will be open. Admission to the
museum and its grounds is $3 for
adults and children age 13 and older,
$2 for children ages 3 to 12, and free
for those under age 3.
Upcoming Sunday programs at
the museum include “Annual
Thanksgiving Dinner Demonstration
ATTORNEY AT LAW
908-913-0121
For All Your
Plumbing & Heating Needs
Page 7
Miller-Cory to Spotlight
Lenape Medicine Pouches
We can do so much more...just ask!
Celebrating Our 31st Year
Thursday, November 13, 2014
Payments as low as $199/mo*
*Pending Credit Approval
No Down Payment!!
Save an Extra $750
LIMITED AVAILABILITY
Call Today for details and a free
Invisalign Consultation
908-389-0222
229 Charles Street • Westfield, NJ 07090
Like us on
Currently accepting new patients
Estate Administration and Planning
Wills and Trusts
Estate Litigation
Elder Law
600 South Avenue West, Suite 230
Westfield NJ, 07090
908-232-0099
nick@giudittalaw.com
www.giudittalaw.com
Page
8
Thursday, November 13, 2014
Ysobel Marcelia Hall, 95, Was Active
In DAR, Westfield Community Players
Ysobel Marcelia Hall passed away
early Tuesday, November 4, 2014, in
her home. She was 95 years old. Born
in Charlottesville, Va., she was the
daughter of Frank Lloyd Foster, M.D.,
whose family was from Lynchburg,
Va., and Ysobel Marguerite
McKennie Foster, of Charlottesville.
She is survived by two sons, Richard
Foster Hall and Stacy Wilmot Hall; a
daughter, Virginia McKennie Hall
Ashworth Davis; eight grandchildren
and 15 great-grandchildren.
Marcelia Hall obtained her Bachelor of Music and Secondary Education degree at Syracuse University,
N.Y., teaching in that state.
She took roles in opera, musicals
from Broadway, and sang yearly concerts for the benefit of scholarships
for the youth of America. She was a
church soloist for many years.
Marcelia was Regent of the
Westfield Chapter, National Society
of the Daughters of the American
Revolution in Westfield, N.J. She was
president of the Union County Medical Society Auxiliary and the Trailside
Museum Association, both in New
Jersey. She was a member of the
National Association of Professional
Sacred Singers, Inc. in New York and
New Jersey and treasurer and vicepresident of the Westfield Community Players.
For nine years Marcelia had a radio
program called the National Society
Daughters of the American Revolution, produced out of her home and
aired as a public service on WERA in
Plainfield, N.J.
On retiring to Barboursville, Va.,
she became president of the United
Daughters of the Confederacy —
Albemarle Chapter No. 1, #154. She
transferred her membership from the
Westfield Chapter, NSDAR to Jack
Jouett Chapter NSDAR in
Charlottesville. She sang in the Christ
Episcopal Church in Gordonsville, Va.
Marcelia and her husband, Dr.
Ralph Arthur Hall, who predeceased
her, built their own home, board by
board; attended postgraduate courses
at the University of Virginia in Anthropology and Sociobiology, and
they were on the board of directors of
the Four County Players, Inc. in
Barboursville for many years. She
belonged to the Albemarle County
Historical Society and continued her
interest in genealogy.
She is loved and missed by a multitude of family and friends.
In lieu of flowers, please give to the
Christ
Episcopal
Church,
Gordonsville, Va. 22942 and/or Four
County Players, Inc., Barboursville,
Va. 22923.
A memorial service will be held at
11 a.m. on Saturday, November 22,
2014, in the Christ Episcopal Church,
Gordonsville.
November 13, 2014
Naomi M. Chewey, 95, Westfield Resident;
Was Member of Music Club and Choir
Naomi M. Chewey, 95, of Westfield
passed away peacefully at home on
Sunday, November 9, 2014, surrounded by her loving family.
Mrs. Chewey was born in Newark
and resided in Westfield since 1946.
She was a homemaker and amateur
musician. Naomi was a longtime
member of the Westfield Music Club
and also sang in the choir at the Holy
Trinity Roman Catholic Church in
Westfield.
Naomi was predeceased by her
husband, John, and her son, Clyde,
and is survived by her two sons, ThoSHERIFF’S SALE
SHERIFF’S FILE NO.: CH-14004748
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-047197-13
Plaintiff: NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC
VS.
Defendant: MARY CLARK A/K/A MARY C.
CLARK; KENNY WARDEN; JOSEPH A.
RACANELLI
Sale Date: 12/03/2014
Writ of Execution: 08/07/2014
By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution
to me directed I shall expose for sale by public
vendue, at the UNION COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, 1ST FLOOR, 10 ELIZABETHTOWN PLAZA, Elizabeth, New Jersey on
WEDNESDAY, at two o’clock in the afternoon of
said day. All successful bidders must have 20%
of their bid available in cash or certified check at
the conclusion of the sales.
The judgment amount is: ***One Hundred
Eighty-One Thousand Seventy-Nine and 64/
100*** $181,079.64.
Property to be sold is located in: Township of
Scotch Plains, County of Union, State of New
Jersey.
Premises Commonly known as: 441 Farley
Avenue, Scotch Plains, New Jersey 07076.
Tax Lot # 22, Block # 501
Nearest Cross Street: East Second Street.
Approximate Dimensions: 50 X 106
Total Upset: ***One Hundred Eighty-Eight
Thousand Seven Hundred Eleven and 65/100***
$188,711.65 together with lawful interest and
costs.
The sale is subject to any unpaid taxes and
assessments, tax, water, and sewer liens and
other municipal assessments. The amount due
can be obtained from the local taxing authority.
All interested parties are to conduct and rely
upon their own independent investigation to ascertain whether or not any outstanding interests
remain of record and/or have priority over the lien
being foreclosed and, if so, the current amount
due thereon. **If the sale is set aside for any
reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall only be
entitled to a return of the deposit paid. The
Purchaser shall have no further recourse against
the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney.**
Subject to tax sale certificate #: 12-1238.
Surplus Money: If after the sale and satisfaction of the mortgage debt, including costs and
expenses, there remains any surplus money, the
money will be deposited into the Superior Court
Trust Fund and any person claiming the surplus,
or any part thereof, may file a motion pursuant to
Court Rules 4:64-3 and 4:57-2 stating the nature
and extent of that person’s claim and asking for
an order directing payment of the surplus money.
The Sheriff or other person conducting the sale
will have information regarding the surplus, if
any.
There is a full legal description on file in the
Union County Sheriff’s Office.
The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this
sale for any length of time without further advertisement.
Joseph Cryan
Acting Sheriff
Attorney:
MILSTEAD & ASSOCIATES, LLC
1 EAST STOW ROAD
MARLTON, NEW JERSEY 08053
(856) 482-1400
4 T - 11/06, 11/13, 11/20
& 11/27/14
Fee: $191.76
mas and his wife, Debbie, and
Jonathan, and her daughter, Diane
Bielawski, and her husband, Donald.
She also will be deeply missed by her
three grandchildren, Renee, Michael
and Benjamin, and two great-grandchildren, Kai and Joon.
Relatives and friends are kindly
invited to visit the Dooley Colonial
Home, 556 Westfield Avenue,
Westfield, today, Thursday, November 13, from 4 to 8 p.m. Services will
take place tomorrow, Friday, November 14, at 10 a.m., at the funeral
home. Interment will follow at
Fairview Cemetery in Westfield.
In lieu of flowers, donations may
be made to Autism Speaks.
– Obituaries –
Lee W. Rich, 89, Okinawa Veteran;
Enjoyed Family, Art, Greek History
Lee Weiland Rich, 89 years paintings showcased Vermont and
young, passed away on Friday, Oc- gained him entrance into the New
tober 31, 2014. Husband and best England Watercolor Society. Fascinated by the Mycenaean
friend of Mari-Lou
period of Greek history,
Griggs Rich, Lee
Lee was in the process
moved his family to
of writing a book on the
Wilmington, Vt. in
topic.
1965. Active in the
Adored by his chilWilmington commudren, Kathy (Steve)
nity, Lee served as SeWalmsley, Jeff (Joyce)
lectman, Auditor, a
Rich, Meg Rich Ryan,
member of the PlanKim (Bob) Milliken and
ning Commission and
Chris (Lydia) Rich, Lee
president of the BDCC
will be best remembered
in Brattleboro, Vt.
for being a devoted famRaised in Westfield,
ily man. As PopPops to
N.J., Lee attended
10 grandchildren and
Princeton University
nine great-grandchilbefore enlisting in the
dren, he loved getting
United States Marine
Lee Weiland Rich
his gang together.
Corps. A recipient of
Always the great debater, yet with
the Purple Heart, he was wounded
in Okinawa before his honorable affable demeanor, Lee encouraged
discharge in 1945. Lee was proud everyone around him to think outto don his uniform on Memorial side the box, imagine the glass as
Day to participate in the annual always half full, and most imporparade and once posed for a group tantly, analyze, analyze, analyze evphoto of World War II vets for a ery situation. He is and will be profoundly missed.
fund-raising calendar.
A private memorial service will
Spanning 40 years, Lee enjoyed a
successful insurance career. He was be held at a later date. Notes of
the General Agent for National Life condolence can be sent to Mari-Lou
of Vermont in Manhattan and estab- Rich, 300 Village Lane, Apt. 215,
lished Vermont Insurance Associ- Bennington, Vt. 05201. No flowers,
ates shortly after moving to please; in lieu please support the
Wilmington. Upon retiring, Lee con- Deerfield Valley Food Pantry, P.O.
centrated on his artwork and his avid Box 1743, Wilmington, Vt. 05363.
November 13, 2014
interest in Greek history. His realist
Elaine P. Tishman, 80, Active In Church;
Worked at Bell Labs, Burgdorff Realtors
Elaine Patricia Tishman
(Barbalinardo), 80, of Westfield
passed away peacefully on Wednesday, November 5, at Peggy
Coloney’s House in Scotch Plains,
surrounded by her loving family.
Mrs. Tishman was born and raised
in Jersey City and moved to
Westfield in 1969. She was active
with the Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Church and was a member of its
RCIA team.
Elaine was a manager at Bell Labs
November 13, 2014
Library Program to Address
College Decision-Making
WESTFIELD — The Westfield
Memorial Library, located at 550 East
Broad Street, will present “Making
the Right Decisions for College” on
Wednesday, November 19, at 7 p.m.
Presenter David Twersky will discuss topics relative to the college
admissions process, including the
SAT and ACT, and answer questions. The goal of this program will
be helping students and parents avoid
mistakes along the way.
Mr. Twersky is an Independent
Education Consultant who founded
CollegeLink Consulting in 2013. He
holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in
Microbiology from UCLA, a Master
of Science degree in Biology from
Fairleigh Dickinson University and a
Master of Business Administration
degree from Rutgers University.
Additionally, he received a certificate in Independent Educational Consulting from the University of California, Irvine. He is an Associate member
of the IECA (Independent Educational
Consultants Association) and a member of HECA (Higher Education Consultants Association) and of NACAC
(National Association for College
Admission Counseling).
This program will be free and open
to Westfield Memorial Library and
MURAL cardholders. MURAL
cardholders belong to libraries that
are part of the Middlesex Union Reciprocal Agreement Libraries. To
Gray Funeral Homes
Since 1897
Begun in 1876 by William Gray, in Cranford and later Incorporated in
1897 as the Gray Burial & Cremation Company.
Today, known by many simply as Gray’s. We continue to provide the
personal service that began with Mr. Gray, whether it be for burial or
cremation.
Gray Funeral Home
318 East Broad St.
Westfield, NJ 07090
William A. Doyle Mgr.
NJ Lic. Number 2325
(908)-233-0143
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Gray Memorial Funeral Home
12 Springfield Ave.
Cranford, NJ 07016
Dale R. Schoustra Mgr.
NJ Lic. Number 3707
(908)-276-0092
John-Michael “J.M.” Jones
N.J. Lic. #4869
Director
www.grayfuneralhomes.com
check if a library participates, call
the Westfield Memorial Library at
(908) 789-4090. To register for the
program, visit the library’s website
at wmlnj.org and click on the Online
Calendar or call (908) 789-4090,
extension 0.
Library hours are 9:30 a.m. to 9
p.m., Monday through Thursday;
9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday, and 1 to 5 p.m. on Sunday.
For more information about library
programs and services, call (908) 7894090, visit wmlnj.org and sign up for
the monthly e-newsletter, “Library
Loop,” or stop by the library for a
copy of its award-winning, quarterly
newsletter, “Take Note.”
SHERIFF’S SALE
SHERIFF’S FILE NO.: CH-14004691
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-027430-12
Plaintiff: PROVIDENT FUNDING ASSOCIATES, L.P.
VS.
Defendant: MARK J. TONDI; DAWN M. TONDI
Sale Date: 11/19/2014
Writ of Execution: 06/05/2014
By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution
to me directed I shall expose for sale by public
vendue, at the UNION COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, 1ST FLOOR, 10 ELIZABETHTOWN PLAZA, Elizabeth, New Jersey on
WEDNESDAY, at two o’clock in the afternoon of
said day. All successful bidders must have 20%
of their bid available in cash or certified check at
the conclusion of the sales.
The judgment amount is: ***Three Hundred
Fifteen Thousand Thirty-Two and 92/100***
$315,032.92.
Concise statement of description of real property to be sold
MUNICIPALITY: Borough of Garwood
COUNTY AND STATE: County of Union, State
of New Jersey.
STREET AND STREET NUMBER: 245 Willow Avenue.
TAX LOT AND BLOCK NUMBERS: Lot: 4.02;
Block: 505
DIMENSIONS: 40 X 100
NEAREST CROSS STREET: East Street
Beginning at a point on the southeasterly line
of Willow Avenue distant 240.00 feet northeasterly from the corner formed by the intersection of
the southeasterly line of Willow Avenue with the
northeasterly line of East Street.
Pursuant to a tax search of 09/08/2014: 2013
Taxes: $7,086.35 Paid in Full; 2014 QTR 1
Taxes: $1,771.59 Paid; 2014 QTR 2 Taxes:
$1,771.59 Paid; 2014 QTR 3 Taxes: $1,839.70
Paid, estimated tax bill; 2014 QTR 4 Taxes:
$1,840.49 Open due on 11/01/2014; Sewer Account: Included with taxes.
(This concise description does not constitute a
legal description.)
Total Upset: ***Three Hundred Thirty-One
Thousand Four Hundred One and 86/100***
$331,401.86 together with lawful interest and
costs.
*Subject to any unpaid taxes, municipal liens
or other charges, and any such taxes, charges,
liens, insurance premiums or other advances
made by plaintiff prior to this sale. All interested
parties are to conduct and rely upon their own
independent investigation to ascertain whether
or not any outstanding interest remain of record
and/or have priority over the lien being foreclosed and, if so the current amount due thereon.
*If the sale is set aside for any reason, the
Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only a
return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall
have no further recourse against the Mortgagor,
the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney.
Surplus Money: If after the sale and satisfaction of the mortgage debt, including costs and
expenses, there remains any surplus money, the
money will be deposited into the Superior Court
Trust Fund and any person claiming the surplus,
or any part thereof, may file a motion pursuant to
Court Rules 4:64-3 and 4:57-2 stating the nature
and extent of that person’s claim and asking for
an order directing payment of the surplus money.
The Sheriff or other person conducting the sale
will have information regarding the surplus, if
any.
There is a full legal description on file in the
Union County Sheriff’s Office.
The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this
sale for any length of time without further advertisement.
Joseph Cryan
Acting Sheriff
Attorney:
FRENKEL LAMBERT WEISS WEISMAN &
GORDON, LLP
80 MAIN STREET
SUITE 460
WEST ORANGE, NEW JERSEY 07052
(973) 325-8800
03-010683-F00
4 T - 10/23, 10/30, 11/06
& 11/13/14
Fee: $234.60
in Murray Hill for 35 years and then
worked for Burgdorff Realtors for
10 years.
Mrs. Tishman was the loving
daughter of the late Peter and Rose
Barbalinardo and the loving sister
of the late Estelle Silver. She was
the beloved wife for 50 years of
Harry A. Tishman. She will be
deeply missed by her niece, Gail,
and her nephew, Jack, and many
cousins and friends.
A Memorial Mass was celebrated
at the Holy Trinity Church in
Westfield on Tuesday, November 11.
Please make donations in her
memory to the Susan G. Komen
Foundation, 785 Springfield Avenue, Summit, N.J. 07901.
Arrangements were by the
Dooley Colonial Home of
Westfield.
November 13, 2014
Hist. Soc. Boutique
Set This Weekend
CRANFORD — The Cranford
Historical Society will present its
Holiday Boutique and Garage Sale
this Saturday, November 15, from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday, November 16, from 10:30 a.m. to 4
p.m. It will take place at the Hanson
House, located at 38 Springfield
Avenue, Cranford.
New and gently used holiday merchandise for shoppers of all ages
will be available. This fund-raising
event will help maintain the gardens and grounds at the CranePhillips House Museum on North
Union Avenue in Cranford, in addition to the History Scholarship
Fund. For more information, call
the Cranford Historical Society’s
office at (908) 276-0082.
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Robert Parkinson, Hospice Volunteer;
Had Career In Sales Management
Robert Charles Parkinson was born
He was preceded in death by both
in Elizabeth, N.J. on June 18, 1931 to his parents; a brother, Joseph; his
Dorothy and Granville Parkinson. He loving wife and his daughter, Sarah
was a proud graduate of
Hope. He is survived by a
Thomas Jefferson High
brother, John David; his
School in Elizabeth,
son, Robert Christopher,
Temple University and
and four grandchildren,
New York University.
Hannah, William, Benjamin
He married Rose Mary
and Charlotte Van Why.
Wnukowski in 1960 and
He was interred at Fairview
raised two children, SaCemetery in Westfield, N.J.
rah Hope and Robert
In lieu of flowers, his family
Christopher, in Westfield,
requests donations be made
N.J. Rose Mary passed
to: Hospice of the Carolina
away in 1990. Robert reFoothills, 130 Forest Glen
married Sue Akins and
Drive, Columbus, N.C.
eventually relocated to
28722 or Integrity House,
Landrum, S.C. Follow- Robert C. Parkinson 103 Lincoln Park, Newark,
ing his retirement from a
N.J. 07102.
career in sales management, he spent
Arrangements were by the Dooley
much of his time volunteering for Colonial Home, Westfield, N.J.
November 13, 2014
Hospice of the Carolina Foothills in
Columbus, N.C.
Anne M. Wells, 100, Active Parishioner;
Had Been Secretary at Edison School
Anne M. Wells, 100, passed away
peacefully on Sunday, November 9,
2014.
Mrs. Wells was born in Centralia,
Pa. and was a longtime resident of
Westfield. Anne had been employed
for many years as a secretary at Edison
Junior High School and also was
affiliated with the Westfield Teachers
Union. She was very active at the
Holy Trinity Roman Catholic Church
in Westfield, serving as a lector,
former trustee, member of the Rosary Society and the Senior Group.
Anne enjoyed crossword puzzles
and reading but most of all she thoroughly loved helping her family.
Anne was predeceased by her husband, James R. Wells, and is survived
by their children, Mary Ann Cassidy,
Jean Leopold, James, William and
Frank. She also will be deeply missed
by her brother, James McNelis, along
with her 16 grandchildren and 11
great-grandchildren.
A Mass of Christian Burial will be
celebrated tomorrow, Friday, November 14, at 11 a.m., at the Holy Trinity
Church in Westfield. Family and
friends are invited to visit one hour
prior to the Mass at the church. Interment will follow at Fairview Cemetery in Westfield.
In lieu of flowers donations may be
made to the Holy Trinity Food Pantry.
Arrangements are by Dooley Colonial Home of Westfield.
November 13, 2014
Scotch Plains Junior Women
Begin Coat Drive Saturday
SCOTCH PLAINS — The
Scotch Plains Junior Woman’s Club
(SPJWC) will hold its 2014 Annual Charity Coat Drive this Sunday, November 16, through the
following Saturday, November 22.
Donations of new or gently used
children’s and adult coats may be
dropped off at the Scotch Plains
Public Library, 1927 Bartle Avenue, or the Jewish Community
Center (JCC) of Central New Jersey, 1391 Martine Avenue, Scotch
Plains.
Both facilities will accept donations during their normal business
hours. The donations will be distributed to citizens within the local
community and surrounding organizations in need.
Last year, the SPJWC collected
and distributed more than 400
coats. If individuals know of anyone needing a coat or for further
information regarding the coat
drive, call (201) 207-3598 or visit
spjwc.com.
The SPJWC was organized on
July 11, 1947 and incorporated on
July 9, 1964. It is dedicated to
General Federation of Women’s
Club’s Mission of Community Improvement by enhancing the lives
of others through volunteer service. SPJWC and its members donate thousands of dollars and volunteer hours each year to help those
in need, support the arts, preserve
natural resources, promote education, encourage healthy lifestyles,
SHERIFF’S SALE
SHERIFF’S SALE
SHERIFF’S FILE NO.: CH-14004675
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-041463-10
Plaintiff: CITIMORTGAGE, INC
VS.
Defendant: GUSTAVO MORALES; ALIZ
AROSTEGUI
Sale Date: 11/19/2014
Writ of Execution: 08/19/2014
By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution
to me directed I shall expose for sale by public
vendue, at the UNION COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, 1ST FLOOR, 10 ELIZABETHTOWN PLAZA, Elizabeth, New Jersey on
WEDNESDAY, at two o’clock in the afternoon of
said day. All successful bidders must have 20%
of their bid available in cash or certified check at
the conclusion of the sales.
The judgment amount is: ***Four Hundred
Forty-Eight Thousand Four Hundred SeventyFive and 36/100*** $448,475.36.
Property to be sold is located in the TOWNSHIP of SCOTCH PLAINS, County of UNION,
State of New Jersey.
Premises commonly known as: 203
MOUNTAINVIEW AVENUE, SCOTCH PLAINS,
NEW JERSEY 07076-1417.
BEING KNOWN as LOT 9, BLOCK 3907 on
the official Tax Map of the TOWNSHIP of
SCOTCH PLAINS.
Dimensions: 50.00 X 100.00 X 50.00 X 100.00
Nearest Cross Street: Mountain Avenue
Total Upset: ***Four Hundred Seventy-Six
Thousand Four Hundred Thirty-Five and 09/
100*** $476,435.09 together with lawful interest
and costs.
*Subject to any unpaid taxes, municipal liens
or other charges, and any such taxes, charges,
liens, insurance premiums or other advances
made by plaintiff prior to this sale. All interested
parties are to conduct and rely upon their own
independent investigation to ascertain whether
or not any outstanding interest remain of record
and/or have priority over the lien being foreclosed and, if so the current amount due thereon.
*If the sale is set aside for any reason, the
Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only a
return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall
have no further recourse against the Mortgagor,
the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney.
Surplus Money: If after the sale and satisfaction of the mortgage debt, including costs and
expenses, there remains any surplus money, the
money will be deposited into the Superior Court
Trust Fund and any person claiming the surplus,
or any part thereof, may file a motion pursuant to
Court Rules 4:64-3 and 4:57-2 stating the nature
and extent of that person’s claim and asking for
an order directing payment of the surplus money.
The Sheriff or other person conducting the sale
will have information regarding the surplus, if
any.
There is a full legal description on file in the
Union County Sheriff’s Office.
The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this
sale for any length of time without further advertisement.
Joseph Cryan
Acting Sheriff
Attorney:
PHELAN HALLINAN & DIAMOND, PC
400 FELLOWSHIP ROAD
SUITE 100
MOUNT LAUREL, NEW JERSEY 08054
(856) 813-5500
4 T - 10/23, 10/30, 11/06
& 11/13/14
Fee: $195.84
SHERIFF’S FILE NO.: CH-14004647
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-057230-10
Plaintiff: CITIMORTGAGE, INC
VS.
Defendant: KIMBERLY GIAIMO
Sale Date: 11/19/2014
Writ of Execution: 08/25/2014
By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution
to me directed I shall expose for sale by public
vendue, at the UNION COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, 1ST FLOOR, 10 ELIZABETHTOWN PLAZA, Elizabeth, New Jersey on
WEDNESDAY, at two o’clock in the afternoon of
said day. All successful bidders must have 20%
of their bid available in cash or certified check at
the conclusion of the sales.
The judgment amount is: ***One Hundred
Fifty-Six Thousand Eight Hundred Ninety-Four
and 94/100*** $156,894.94.
Property to be sold is located in the TOWNSHIP of SCOTCH PLAINS, County of UNION,
State of New Jersey.
Premises commonly known as: 12 KING
JAMES COURT, SCOTCH PLAINS, NEW JERSEY 07076-1110.
BEING KNOWN as LOT 26 CKJ12, BLOCK
903.03 on the official Tax Map of the TOWNSHIP
of SCOTCH PLAINS.
Dimensions: 105.92 X 225.54 X 55.00 X 22.00
X 55.00 X 22.00
Nearest Cross Street: N/A
Total Upset: ***One Hundred Sixty-Six Thousand Eight Hundred Sixty-Two and 87/100***
$166,862.87 together with lawful interest and
costs.
*Subject to any unpaid taxes, municipal liens
or other charges, and any such taxes, charges,
liens, insurance premiums or other advances
made by plaintiff prior to this sale. All interested
parties are to conduct and rely upon their own
independent investigation to ascertain whether
or not any outstanding interest remain of record
and/or have priority over the lien being foreclosed and, if so the current amount due thereon.
*If the sale is set aside for any reason, the
Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only a
return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall
have no further recourse against the Mortgagor,
the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney.
Surplus Money: If after the sale and satisfaction of the mortgage debt, including costs and
expenses, there remains any surplus money, the
money will be deposited into the Superior Court
Trust Fund and any person claiming the surplus,
or any part thereof, may file a motion pursuant to
Court Rules 4:64-3 and 4:57-2 stating the nature
and extent of that person’s claim and asking for
an order directing payment of the surplus money.
The Sheriff or other person conducting the sale
will have information regarding the surplus, if
any.
There is a full legal description on file in the
Union County Sheriff’s Office.
The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this
sale for any length of time without further advertisement.
Joseph Cryan
Acting Sheriff
Attorney:
PHELAN HALLINAN & DIAMOND, PC
400 FELLOWSHIP ROAD
SUITE 100
MOUNT LAUREL, NEW JERSEY 08054
(856) 813-5500
4 T - 10/23, 10/30, 11/06
& 11/13/14
Fee: $195.84
stress civic involvement and work
toward world peace and understanding.
The SPJWC invites anyone interested in joining the organization to attend a meeting of the club
at 7:30 p.m. on the second Wednesday of each month, September
through June. Meetings are held at
the Scotch Hills Country Club, located at Plainfield Avenue and
Jerusalem Road in Scotch Plains.
ECF Seeks to Bring
Kids Holiday Cheer
SCOTCH PLAINS — The
Emmanuel Cancer Foundation
(ECF) is seeking people to be wish
grantors by adopting one of the
organization’s children or young
adults with cancer for the holiday
season.
The Foundation’s goal is to make
the holidays a joyful and memorable time for its children with cancer. ECF serves New Jersey children who have been diagnosed with
cancer and their families. If interested in becoming a wish grantor,
contact Barbara Kopel at (908)
322-4323, extension no. 17, or
barbara@emmanuelcancer.org for
further information.
See it all on the Web!
www.goleader.com
SHERIFF’S SALE
SHERIFF’S FILE NO.: CH-14004664
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-042351-10
Plaintiff: CITIMORTGAGE, INC
VS.
Defendant: JOSE M. RIOS; DONNA M.
VALLARIO; JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A.
Sale Date: 11/19/2014
Writ of Execution: 08/20/2014
By virtue of the above-stated writ of execution
to me directed I shall expose for sale by public
vendue, at the UNION COUNTY ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, 1ST FLOOR, 10 ELIZABETHTOWN PLAZA, Elizabeth, New Jersey on
WEDNESDAY, at two o’clock in the afternoon of
said day. All successful bidders must have 20%
of their bid available in cash or certified check at
the conclusion of the sales.
The judgment amount is: ***Three Hundred
Eighty-Four Thousand Six Hundred Three and
77/100*** $384,603.77.
Property to be sold is located in the TOWN of
WESTFIELD, County of UNION, State of New
Jersey.
Premises commonly known as: 712 EMBREE
CRESCENT, WESTFIELD, NEW JERSEY
07090-4342.
BEING KNOWN as LOT 2, BLOCK 707 on the
official Tax Map of the TOWN of WESTFIELD.
Dimensions: 113.07 X 70.00 X 113.07 X 70.00
Nearest Cross Street: Eaglecroft Road
Total Upset: ***Four Hundred Ten Thousand
Three Hundred Twenty-Six and 99/100***
$410,326.99 together with lawful interest and
costs.
*Subject to any unpaid taxes, municipal liens
or other charges, and any such taxes, charges,
liens, insurance premiums or other advances
made by plaintiff prior to this sale. All interested
parties are to conduct and rely upon their own
independent investigation to ascertain whether
or not any outstanding interest remain of record
and/or have priority over the lien being foreclosed and, if so the current amount due thereon.
*If the sale is set aside for any reason, the
Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only a
return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall
have no further recourse against the Mortgagor,
the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney.
Surplus Money: If after the sale and satisfaction of the mortgage debt, including costs and
expenses, there remains any surplus money, the
money will be deposited into the Superior Court
Trust Fund and any person claiming the surplus,
or any part thereof, may file a motion pursuant to
Court Rules 4:64-3 and 4:57-2 stating the nature
and extent of that person’s claim and asking for
an order directing payment of the surplus money.
The Sheriff or other person conducting the sale
will have information regarding the surplus, if
any.
There is a full legal description on file in the
Union County Sheriff’s Office.
The Sheriff reserves the right to adjourn this
sale for any length of time without further advertisement.
Joseph Cryan
Acting Sheriff
Attorney:
PHELAN HALLINAN & DIAMOND, PC
400 FELLOWSHIP ROAD
SUITE 100
MOUNT LAUREL, NEW JERSEY 08054
(856) 813-5500
4 T - 10/23, 10/30, 11/06
& 11/13/14
Fee: $193.80
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Thursday, November 13, 2014
Page 9
College Planning Discussion
Set for Special Ed. Students
WESTFIELD – The Westfield special-education community will host
a roundtable discussion on Wednesday, November 19, from 7 to 9 p.m.,
at the Westfield High School Cafeteria B, located at 550 Dorian Road in
Westfield.
Preparation for college is a daunting experience for many students and
families. For students who face learning, emotional, and physical challenges, the task of selecting an institution that can effectively accommo-
HTIS Announces
Cross Country Results
SPIKE THE PINK...The Westfield High School (WHS) Girls Volleyball raised
$40,000 for Breast Cancer Awareness during their PINKOUT fundraiser.
Pictured are a few of the WHS Blue Devils Girls Volleyball Varsity and JV Players
wearing their "PINKOUT " shirts as they took turns on the runway modeling
some new fall/winter shoes at Lord & Taylor. On October 31, the WHS Girls
Varsity Volleyball team captured the Union County Championship at a game
held at Kean University.
Christopher Academy Hosts
Math Materials Workshop
WESTFIELD – Christopher Academy, The Montessori School, will
hold a free Math Workshop for parents today, Thursday, November 13,
at 6:30 p.m., at the Westfield campus, 510 Hillcrest Avenue.
Established in 1963, Christopher
Academy maintains premier status
as the first Montessori school in New
Jersey and is accredited by the
American Montessori Society.
With campuses in Westfield and
Scotch Plains, Christopher Academy
presents an exceptional learning en-
vironment tailored to the individual
child aged two-and-a-half through
first grade. Christopher Academy
holds true to the holistic approach to
education as set forth by Dr. Maria
Montessori in 1906 at the first Casa
dei Bambini in Rome, Italy.
For additional information on
Christopher Academy or Montessori
education, contact Christopher
Academy at (908) 233-7447 or (908)
322-4652,
or
visit
christopheracademy.com and on
Facebook.
SPFHS Marching Band Places First
In Yamaha Cup Competition
EAST RUTHERFORD – The
Scotch Plains-Fanwood High School
Raiders Marching Band took first
place in Group 6-A at the annual
Yamaha Cup competition, held Saturday at MetLife stadium.
The musicians and color guard
performed their Roman Empirethemed 2014 show, "Il Cuore di
Romano," on the home field of the
football Giants and Jets. The event
came one week after SPFHS won
the US Bands Group 6-A New Jersey State Championship at the
Rutgers University stadium in
Piscataway.
TheYamaha Cup competition was a
daylong event, featuring scores of
bands from around New Jersey plus
New York, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, and as far away as North Carolina.
The students are led by drum majors Emily Fidlow, Liz Casserly and
Michael Lange, under the direction
of Durand Thomas, director; assistant directors John Gillick and
Charlie Jackson, and color guard
head Jackie Tumolo.
Wardlaw-Hartridge Students
Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF
EDISON – For more than 60
years, Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF
has served as a “Kids Helping Kids”
campaign. The students in Ellen
Colandrea’s third-grade class at The
Wardlaw-Hartridge School in
Edison recently learned about the
realities that countless children in
the developing world must endure
every day as they struggle to survive in the face of disease, disasters
and other hardships such as poor
nutrition. The students also discussed the difference between human “wants” and human “needs.”
The class was amazed to hear that
only 25 cents provides 10 children
with clean water to drink for a day,
and only $50 can vaccinate 85 children against polio for life. The presentation motivated all of the students in 3C to volunteer to ask for
UNICEF donations instead of candy
as they were trick-or-treating for
Halloween. By making a small sacrifice of their own, the third graders
wanted to give their peers thousands of miles away the best hope
for survival.
The donations collected from this
year’s class broke all the records
from Miss Colandrea’s previous
classes, with a total of $500 raised
for UNICEF.
MOUNTAINSIDE – Holy Trinity Interparochial School (HTIS)
held its 12th Annual Cross Country
Invitational on October 19, at the
Mountainside campus. Seventeen
Catholic schools participated with
273 athletes. The HTIS team placed
fourth overall. HTIS students
Parker Smith placed first in the
Novice boys catagory; Jonathan
Scalia placed fifth in Novice boys;
Meagan Bourke placed sixth for
JuniorVarsity girls; Grace Cull
placed sixth for Varsity girls and
Sean Wieszczek placed fifth for
Varsity boys.
date their needs requires additional
planning in order to ensure their college experiences will be rewarding.
The goal of this program is to bring
together educational professionals
who will discuss how to plan for
college during the high-school years,
how to search for a college that fits
the students’ needs, strategies for students and parents in the selection of a
college and how to work with a college office of disabilities program.
Attendees also will hear from a parent and her perspective in selecting a
college for her child. Parents and
students will be encouraged to ask
questions of the panel.
Guest speakers will include
Maureen Mazzarese, director of
guidance; Jan Fine, guidance counselor; Silvia Sasso, case manager;
Jodi Klimko, case manager; Sylvia
Banga, case manager; Lisa Bleich,
Independent Education Consultant;
College Bound Mentor, LLC; College Representative from Disability Program.
This program is free. Pre-registration is not required. For further
information,
visit
westfieldnjk12.org/pages/
Westfield_Town_School_District/
Parents/specialedparents.
HS Seniors Invited to Apply
For Scholarship Award
MORRISTOWN – Monk’s Home
Improvements currently is accepting applications for the second annual Monk’s Home Improvements
Service Scholarship Award.
College-bound students who have
demonstrated a leadership role in
community service are encouraged
to apply. Five scholarships, each in
the amount of $2,000, will be
awarded. Applicants must be from
Morristown and surrounding areas
Geena Gao Earns
Univ. of Maryland
Honors Citation
COLLEGE PARK, Md. – Geena
Gao, a graduate of Westfield High
School Class of 2012, received the
University of Maryland Honors Citation in a ceremony held at the
Memorial Chapel on campus at
College Park on November 5. The
Citation signifies the successful
completion of Honors course work
which includes Honors seminars,
special Honors versions of introductory courses, and a first year
colloquium.
The University of Maryland's
Honors College is a highly selective, by invitation only, nationally
recognized academic program for
talented undergraduate students. A
National Merit Scholarship Finalist during her senior year at
Westfield High School in 2012,
Geena currently is a junior doublemajoring in economics and business at the University of Maryland.
with plans to attend, or continue attending, an accredited college or university for the 2015-2016 school year.
“Last year was the first year of the
scholarship,” explained Ty Monk,
founder of Monk’s Home Improvements. “We were able to award five
very deserving local high-school seniors with scholarships. Their accomplishments, even at such a young
age, were inspiring. With the Monk’s
Service Scholarship, I hope to give
something back to people who have
offered their time and made the commitment to their community.” Mr.
Monk added, “I’m looking forward
to this year’s scholarship ceremony
and meeting another group of outstanding individuals.”
The 2014 Monk’s Service Scholarship awarded high-school seniors
from Madison High School, Ridge
High School, Watchung Regional
High School and West Morris
Mendham High. Recipients included
a volunteer firefighter, a leader of
the local Habitat for Humanity chapter, a participant of S.C.E.E.P, a volunteer tutor and a leader for
TOPSoccer and Relay for Life.
For more information or to apply
online,
visit
MonksHomeImprovements.com/
scholarship.
Mountainside
REG. VOTERS
SENATE
SHERIFF
District 1 District 2 District 3 District 4 By Mail
Provisional
SURROGATE
FREEHOLDER
TOTAL
BOOKER, CORY
BELL, JEFF
BARATELLI, JOSEPH
LAVERGNE, EUGENE M
BOSS, JEFF
SABAS, ANTONIO N
SCHROEDER, HANK
KOVACH, JANICE
LANCE, LEONARD
GAWRON, JAMES
CRYAN, JOSEPH
INCE, MICHAEL
LACORTE, JAMES S
ESTRADA, ANGEL
HUDAK, CHRISTOPHER
WRIGHT, VERNELL V
MARTINI, MARK P
LOMBARDO, CHARLES
PIARULLI, SALVATORE
PETRUZZELLI, LOUIS
TODISCO, SARA
KEARNEY, CAROL
SIMITZ, TINA M
PROVISIONAL VOTES
COUNCIL WRITE-IN
BOARD OF EDUCATION
WATKINS, AARON
GUERRIERO, CHRISTINE
KOENIG, LINDA
FICARRA, KIMBERLY
State Question #1 YES
State Question #1 NO
State Question #2 YES
State Question #2 NO
133
147
6
0
0
3
0
117
164
5
119
170
154
129
151
143
154
152
147
145
163
151
141
0
1
187
223
2
0
1
0
1
157
237
2
133
275
183
165
182
162
233
200
221
195
223
221
201
1
6
150
129
4
1
0
2
0
128
133
7
119
151
139
119
151
144
134
158
134
143
175
114
123
2
1
85
76
2
1
0
0
0
76
82
4
75
86
83
81
88
80
79
92
83
83
98
78
81
5
96
114
97
100
160
68
158
68
177
198
177
181
235
117
212
136
115
123
108
120
160
77
143
91
77
85
71
69
79
55
77
59
555
575
14
2
1
5
1
478
616
18
446
682
559
494
572
529
600
631
605
594
689
583
563
8
8
0
465
520
453
470
634
317
590
354
Votes Cast
311
441
300
180
1232
29
20
28
30
19
17
UC Freshman Awarded
Hammeke Scholarship
SCOTCH PLAINS – Union
Catholic (UC) has announced that
Kevin Degnan of Scotch Plains has
been selected as the 2014 recipient
of the Eldon M. Hammeke Scholarship. The scholarship was established
in memory of Mr. Hammeke by his
wife, Grace, and is supported by the
Knights of Columbus Summit Council No. 783, of which Mr. Hammeke
was an active member. The award is
presented every year to one current
freshman student at a Catholic high
school and is renewable for the
recipient’s remaining three years at
the school.
Kevin was chosen based on his
successful integration into Union
Catholic, good grades, and his response to the call to “become all God
calls you to be” at UC. He demonstrates enthusiasm about the beginning of his freshman year. Kevin is a
member of the Varsity Soccer team
and intends to try out for basketball
and baseball. Past recipients still attending UC include sophomore
Katrina Springer of Roselle Park, junior Nick Birritteri of Linden and senior Danielle Cusick of Edison.
WHS SGA Announces
Homecoming Events
WESTFIELD – Beginning at 1
p.m. on Wednesday, November 26,
the annual Homecoming parade
will march through town, beginning at the south side of the
Westfield Train Station, and enter
Kehler Stadium at 1:30 p.m. to
kick off the pep rally, which also
will be at Kehler this year. Following this, the Junior and Senior girls
will compete in their annual
Powderpuff football game.
After the Powderpuff game an
exhibition bowl game of the
Westfield High School (WHS) Flag
Football League will be held at
Edison Intermediate School, followed by the annual bonfire starting at 5 p.m. To register a club,
organization or sports team to have
the opportunity to march in the
Westfield Homecoming Parade,
access the form on the Student Gov-
ernment Organization’s (SGA)
website, whs.westfieldnjk12.org/
pages/Westfield_High_School/
C l u b s _ a n d _ A c /
Student_Government.
This year, the SGA will host its
first annual Homecoming Dance for
current WHS students on Friday,
December 5, in the WHS cafeterias.
It will begin at 8 p.m. and will feature dinner, dancing, entertainment
and a professional photo booth. Admission at the door will be $10;
tickets presently can be pre-ordered
for $7 in the school store, on Tuesdays and Thursdays until December
4. The attire will be semi-formal.
See it all on the Web!
www.goleader.com
General Election 2014 Mountainside Unofficial Results
HOUSE
General Election 2014 Garwood Unofficial Results
SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENT...Union Catholic High School freshman Kevin
Degnan has been named the 2014 recipient of the Eldon M. Hammeke Scholarship, supported by Knights of Columbus Summit Council No. 783. Pictured, from
left to right, are: Knights of Columbus Summit Council No. 783 member David
Janazzo, Grace Hammeke, who established the scholarship in memory of her
husband; Kevin, and Sister Percylee Hart, RSM, principal of Union Catholic
High School, located in Scotch Plains.
D
R
D
R
D
R
D
D
D
D
R
4895
C. Booker
J. Bell
J. Kovach
L. Lance
J. Cryan
M. Ince
J. La Corte
A. Estrada
C. Hudak
V. Wright
P. Martini
Dist. 1 Dist. 2 Dist. 3 Dist. 4 Dist. 5 Dist. 6 Dist. 7 Dist. 8 Dist. 9 Totals
191
189
222
195
288
171
232
191
180 38.0%
75
70
80
60
114
64
86
77
60
686
111
116
134
130
167
103
132
111
113
1117
63
49
66
51
92
57
72
62
56
568
123
131
145
137
185
106
146
117
113
1203
54
57
68
54
103
62
83
64
53
598
125
123
139
138
169
104
139
116
122
1175
71
59
85
47
118
72
83
76
67
678
58
55
71
51
96
59
72
63
58
583
64
67
86
70
117
68
83
75
69
699
63
61
85
71
100
58
82
69
73
662
123
124
139
135
177
106
149
121
120
1194
COUNCIL
R
R
BD. OF ED
QUESTION
#1
QUESTION
#2
K. Turner
D. Andre
D. Gioia
Yes
No
Yes
No
125
124
58
110
49
93
65
127
124
67
98
60
80
77
151
155
95
142
50
128
66
132
139
65
126
47
101
69
182
186
97
155
87
145
97
112
110
49
102
47
90
60
150
150
90
131
64
120
79
125
125
62
107
57
93
68
126
133
67
107
53
90
66
1230
1246
650
1078
514
940
647
General Election 2014 Fanwood Unofficial Results
REG VOTERS
VOTES CAST
DIST #1 DIST #2 DIST #3 DIST #4 DIST #5 DIST #6 DIST #7
TOTAL
719
510
916
738
724
783
795
5185
266
200
368
280
277
300
314
2005
Senator
Booker
Bell
150
104
101
88
213
146
170
104
157
111
158
131
137
160
1086
844
138
111
98
90
200
146
159
110
136
127
137
142
126
172
994
898
133
116
89
99
195
156
150
123
130
130
125
153
128
170
950
947
142
105
215
177
149
150
152
1090
133
153
142
125
86
114
104
98
210
218
214
151
153
175
166
121
130
151
145
136
125
149
140
156
126
146
125
176
0
963
1106
1036
963
168
169
115
116
212
227
178
179
157
159
164
159
144
145
1138
1154
89
100
151
151
140
141
140
912
139
73
112
61
192
105
158
92
148
87
164
86
175
100
1088
604
129
74
125
46
204
94
187
60
165
69
171
80
163
107
1144
530
House
Coleman
Eck
Sheriff
Cryan
Ince
Surrogate
LaCorte
FREEHOLDERS
Estrada
Hudak
Wright
Martini
COUNCIL
Huegel
Boris
Education
Cleary
Question 1
Yes
No
Question 2
Yes
No
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Lady Raiders Top Westfield in OT
See story in Next Week’s Issue
THE WEEK
IN
Thursday, November 13, 2014
SPORTS
Page 11
Sports Section
Pages 11-17
RESENZWEIG NETS 2; HALMA, GIBBONS, BIANCO NET 1
Raider Soccer Boys Pummel
North Hunterdon Lions, 5-0
By ALEX LOWE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
The third-seeded Scotch PlainsFanwood High School boys soccer
team had little trouble with North
Hunterdon on its way to a 5-0 victory
in the quarterfinal round of the North
Jersey, Section 2, Group 4 tournament held in Scotch Plains on November 7. Junior Ari Rowenzweig
scored two goals, while Chris Gibbons, Zach Halma and Joey Bianco
added one each in a dominating overall performance.
The easy victory set the 19-3 Raiders up for a semifinal showdown
against the 10th seeded Phillipsburg
Stateliners, who upset Westfield, 2-1,
in other quarterfinal action.
Rowenzweig got the Raiders off to
fine if somewhat fortunate start with
his first goal of the game, which came
with 34:03 remaining in the first half.
Senior Brian Howard was credited
with an assist on the play.
“I got played in somewhat on that
goal,” said Rowenzweig. “I had a
tough angle on the shot. When I took
it, the ball deflected off of a defender’s
leg and bounced into the goal. You
take them any way they come to you.”
Gibbons gave the Raiders a 2-0
lead when he scored with 26:15 to
play in the half.
The Raiders effectively ended the
competitive phase of the game when
Halma scored to make it 3-0 with
12:26 left in the first half. Halma
slammed home his goal off of an
assist by Johnny Delsordi.
“This was a good win for us,” said
Scotch Plains-Fanwood veteran Head
Coach Tom Breznitsky. “We had been
a little off of our game coming out of
the county tournament, I thought. But
we’ve tightened things up lately. We
had a good week of practices and I
think it showed today.”
In the second half, the Raiders
did not let up. Rowenzweig added
his second goal of the game just
nine minutes into the second half.
Justin Rodriquez assisted on the
CONTINUED ON PAGE 14
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
CRUNCHING A RED DEVIL...Blue Devil Cotter Spurlock, center, and company crunch Red Devil running back Henry
Hawkins, No. 25, in Westfield on November 8. See more photos at goleader.com Ballyhoo Sports.
MORIARTY KICKS 21-YARD FIELD GOAL, 29-YARD FG
Red Devils’ 4th ‘Q’ TD Burns
Blue Devil Footballers, 7-6
By DAVID B. CORBIN
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
One big play and a penalty in the
end zone with less than a minute
remaining set the Hunterdon Central
Red Devils on the path to a 7-6 victory over the Westfield High School
football team at Gary Kehler Stadium
in Westfield on November 8. The Red
Devils’ winning drive consisted of 10
plays and five penalties that covered
86 yards, including a 65-yard strike
from quarterback James Mania to
wide receiver Walt Wynkoop and a
one-yard touchdown plunge by Mania.
Penalties and strong defense dictated the rhythm of each team’s of-
fense. In all, 21 penalties were assessed and neither team gained 100
yards on the ground with Hunterdon
Central totaling 87 rushing yards but
getting 114 yards in the air, all in the
second half and 83 of them on the
final drive.
The Red Devils’ defense keyed on
CONTINUED ON PAGE 14
More photos – goleader.com Ballyhoo Sports
Jim O’Connor (NJSportPics) for The Westfield Leader and The Times
LEAP OF FAITH...Raider Chris Gibbons with Jake Longo, No. 16, behind him takes a big leap to stop the ball in the state
sectional game against North Hunterdon in Scotch Plains on November 7. The Raiders won easily, 5-0.
LIDDY NAILS WINNER IN 1ST OT, MORGAN NETS GOAL
Blue Devils Deny Union, 2-1,
In Girls Sectional Soccer OT
By DAVID B. CORBIN
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
Sophomore Hannah Liddy found
herself in the right position of a
scramble and ripped the ball into the
net with less than two minutes remaining in the first overtime to give
the fourth-seeded Westfield High
School girls soccer team a 2-1 victory
over the Union Lady Farmers in the
quarterfinal round of the North Jersey, Section 2, Group 4 tournament at
Gary Kehler Stadium in Westfield on
November 7.
The magic moment began with a
kick from senior Lil Scott that sailed
into sophomore Haley Farella as
Union goalkeeper Stephanie Rivero
attempted to smother it.
“Lil had the breakaway. It hit Haley
Farella and then I think the goalie
tried to jump on it and she missed it,
so the middle was kind of a scramble
then it went to Hannah Liddy’s feet,”
Blue Devil Head Coach Alex Schmidt
recalled. “Right place, right time!”
“Lil Scott crossed it in on a free
kick. Haley Farella poked it back to
me then I shot it,” Liddy described.
Major concern for both teams was
the velocity of the wind blowing toward the east goal and other major
concerns for the Blue Devils were
athletic prowess and range of sisters
Adora Moneme (sweeper) and forward Nneka Moneme.
The Blue Devils’ concern quickly
became a reality when Nneka
Moneme slipped past a defender and
scored the first goal with less than
three minutes off the clock.
“The two sisters obviously are good
players. We played them twice and
each time they played a different position. With this wind, we knew the
one in the back would send long balls
to the other one up top. The ground
they cover, they are so fast,” Coach
Schmidt said. “Their three steps is 10
or 12 of ours. Unfortunately, we had
a slow start, she was able to turn and
put it away. Not the way we want to
start.”
The Blue Devils took five shots on
goal in the first half, while the Farmers took four. Blue Devil goalkeeper
Kiera Loftus made three saves, as did
Rivero in the half. Blue Devil sophomore Taylor Morgan managed to
CONTINUED ON PAGE 14
More photos – goleader.com
Ballyhoo Sports
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
GETTING POSITION...Blue Devil Hannah Liddy, No. 25, gets position on a Union Farmer in the sectional quarterfinal
round in Westfield on November 7. Liddy scored the winning goal in the first overtime to advance to the semifinals.
HIRING THE TOP AGENT ISN’T EXPENSIVE…IT’S PRICELESS!
Scan to
View All
Listings
and Open
Houses
Frank D. Isoldi, Broker / Sales Associate
#1 Agent Westfield Office: 2006-2013
email: isre@aol.com • Office: 908-233-5555 x 202 • Direct: 908-301-2038 • www.frankdisoldi.com
© 2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.
Page 12
Thursday, November 13, 2014
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Devil’s Den
Red Devils’ TD Burn Blue Devil Footballers, 7-6
Relight My Fire, No Time
To Wallow In the Mire
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11
running back Jack Curry and limited
him to 75 yards on 24 carries. Their
defense also read quarterback Zack
Kelly’s eyes, intercepting him twice
and batting down several of his passes.
Kelly finished with eight completions for 66 yards. Receiver Chris
Boutsikaris had two receptions for 24
yards, Sean Elliott had one for 27
yards, JD Marner had three for 12
yards, Curry had one for two yards
and fullback Nick Buontempo had a
one-yard reception.
“They took away Jack [Curry].
They keyed on Jack. We were not
able to get anyone else to get the
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
the Westfield eight yard line and returned it to the 19 in the first half.
Linebacker Jackson Simcox made
several crushing tackles and added a
blocked field goal attempt that he
advanced from the 26 yard line to
midfield. Linebacker Luke Prybylski
also added several tackles, including
a pair of sacks and lineman Cotter
Spurlock plugged up the middle for
low or no gains.
“For 47 minutes, we dominated
them then they hit a big play. That’s
what happens when you only have
six points,” Coach DeSarno said.
“Our defense was spectacular to-
more Mike Moriarity finished the
drive with a 21-yard field goal. Early
in the fourth quarter, Westfield got
great field position at the Central 23
but could only advance the ball to the
12 where Moriarty added a 29-yard
field goal to make the score 6-0.
At the beginning of the season,
Moriarty was struggling with points
after and field goals but seemed to
find his mark as the season progressed.
“Basically, Mike just got his confidence, because in practice he could
always make the field goals. But
through the season, he got more confident with himself and we are
going to need field goals down
the road in the playoffs,” Costa
said.
“He’s a sophomore. He was a
little baby in the beginning of the
year, now being out on the stage
doesn’t bother him anymore,”
Coach DeSarno said.
Bad snaps also hindered the
Blue Devils’ offensives on several occasions, one that ruined a
drive at the beginning of the third
quarter and another that forced
the Blue Devils to settle on their
second field goal.
Pryblyski’s 10-yard sack with
4:40 left in the game gave the
Blue Devils control, but an immediate bad snap resulting in a
three-yard loss was an omen that
the worst was yet to come. Elliott’s
tumbling punt seemed like a good
thing when it rolled to the 14 then
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times it looked even better for Westfield
NOWHERE TO GO...Blue Devil receiver Chris Boutsikaris, No. 87, discovers there is when the Red Devils faced a
fourth-and-six from their own 31.
nowhere to go after being hemmed in by two Red Devils.
But Mania fired deep downfield
passing game going. It wasn’t our day. I think we came on their back where Wynkoop sprinted down the
defense’s fault. We just couldn’t put and the loss was on the offense. One left side before being knocked out of
points on the board. We were just bad play shouldn’t sum up the entire bounds at the four by Sid Douglas.
playing field position after a while, game for them,” Costa said.
A penalty moved the ball back to
because we were not moving the footElliott’s effectiveness with his the nine, but another returned the ball
ball,” Blue Devil Head Coach Jim rugby-style punts played a major role to the four then a pass into the end
DeSarno said.
in field position. On five occasions, zone was batted down by a host of
“What they did was fill the holes his tumbling punts put the Red Devils Blue Devils, but a yellow flag soared
really well. They played a really well back behind their own 20, one that in the air and the Red Devils got a first
executed game. They really got to the rolled to the four and the final one down at the two. After a one-yard
ball fast and they just outplayed us on that rolled to the 14.
gain, Mania bashed in for the touchthe line and beat us in the trenches,”
“Sean, when he gets the ball up in down.
said Blue Devil co-captain/offensive the air, it will go 40-50 yards,” Costa
“Anytime you look at a program
tackle Nick Costa. “The linebackers said.
like Hunterdon Central we knew they
blitzed on every play, but we should
“Field position was important. They were going to be good, but we just
be used to that, because we practice had to go 86, 87 yards. They hit a big didn’t come out and execute today.
on that everyday, every week.”
play,” Coach DeSarno said.
That 6-7 is what you get when you
Westfield’s defense sent a message
The only time in the game when don’t come out and execute the way
on the Red Devils’ first offensive play the Blue Devils’ offense seemed to be you should,” Costa said.
of the game when defensive end Owen in rhythm was on their first series
The fourth-seeded Blue Devils will
Kessler sacked Mania for an eight- when they marched to the Red Devil host Bridgewater-Raritan this Saturyard loss that led to a three-and-out. four where they sputtered and sopho- day at 1 p.m. in the first round of the
Cornerback Matt Catanzaro got his
playoffs.
seventh interception of the season
Probitas Verus Honos
Hunterdon Central 0 0 0 7
7
when he picked off Mania’s pass at
Westfield
3 0 0 3
6
Weichert
By BRUCE JOHNSON
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
Thankfully there’s not a lot of time to
stew over Saturday’s 7-6 last-minute loss
to Hunterdon Central at Kehler Stadium. It
was one of the toughest losses in school
football history, and “ranks” with the 2005
overtime loss at Scotch Plains – thanks to
that blind 500-pound (600?) back judge.
Both involved, let’s say, questionable
(phantom?) pass interference calls.
This Saturday the Blue Devils host
Bridgewater (1 p.m.) in the North 2,
Group 5 quarterfinals, and that is now the
biggest game of the year. The winner will
likely take on Linden in the semifinals (or
North Hunterdon), and you know the
Devils would like a chance to avenge
their Game 3 overtime loss to the Tigers.
This Saturday’s game figures to be as
close as last week’s. Both WHS and
Bridgewater were 5-3 at the cutoff date, and
both went into last week with 99 power
points. Despite its harrowing loss, Westfield
got enough residual points to get another
home game, by a slim 105-103 margin.
Bridgewater has been a tough opponent, but Westfield has posted four wins
in their six meetings, including the last
three seasons (22-7, 35-21, 40-10). The
Panthers come into the game on a fourgame win streak. (WHS, of course, was
52 seconds from a similar streak.)
While Bridgewater has a season-opening 17-7 win over Hunterdon Central on
its resume, WHS should have a 6-0 win
over the Red Devils, according to my
sources at the game. A botched fourthdown pass coverage and a phantom pass
interference call or two helped HC pull
off a modern-day Harry Houdini act.
But that’s last Saturday’s news. My
sources tell me that game coulda/shoulda
been over long before the final minutes.
Westfield’s potent offense was pretty
much stymied after Jack Curry’s first two
runs netted nearly 40 yards and a pair of
first downs. But the Devils did have two
first-and-goals and had to settle for Mike
Moriarty field goals both times.
For the game, Central limited Curry to 60
yards on 22 carries. And quarterback Zach
Kelly was off, completing just 9 of 21
passes for 68 yards with two interceptions.
Still, the game was there to be won,
until it wasn’t. Westfield is now 0-4
against Central, and this one really stung.
The best way to get over it is to get on the
field again and take care of Bridgewater –
for the full 48 minutes.
TOURNAMENT RECAP
Cross-country: Senior Matt Russo
won the individual title, and superior
depth carried the Blue Devils to the team
title at the North 2, Group 4 sectional
meet. It was their record 20th N2-4 title,
and 24th overall, counting four Central
Jersey Group 4 crowns in the 1960s.
Last year coach Chris Tafelski’s club
was second by just two points to Millburn,
after winning the three previous sectionals.
This Saturday it’s the Group 4 championships at Holmdel Park, where Ridgewood,
South Brunswick, Old Bridge, Cherry
Hill East and defending Group 4 winner
West Windsor-Plainsboro South await.
WHS has had nine individual state
champions, the first being Ed Hoos in
1946. The other winners were Dave
Coleman (1961), Dave Calvert (1966),
Cliff Sheehan (1979 and ’80), Matt
Elmuccio (1994, ’95 and ’96) and Jeff
Perrella (2005).
The girls weren’t as lucky, finishing
fourth as Ridge showed a very deep team.
Coach Thom Hornish, the only head coach
WHS girls cross-country has ever had,
will get one more trip to Holmdel before
settling into retirement after 35 seasons.
Gymnastics: Senior Jenna Rizkalla
scored a hat trick, winning all-around,
vault and floor exercise as the Blue Devils
captured their second straight (and No. 8
overall) North 2 sectional title. Classmates
Hannah Goldring and Mae Devin, and
sophomore Hannah Prieto helped coach
Amanda Diaz’s girls qualify fourth for
tonight’s state team finals at Montgomery.
Soccer: The girls team will get another
shot at Scotch Plains. They earned a Tuesday
sectional semifinal rematch with the Raiders
by stopping Union, 2-1, in overtime.
The boys, though out-shooting
Phillipsburg by a huge margin, suffered a
2-1 loss last Thursday. If they had won, it
would’ve got them another shot SP-F.
Volleyball: I’m not sure about the
finer points of this fast-growing sport,
but senior Megan Mondon’s stats from
the wild three-set win over Washington
Township in their Group 4 opener sure
sounds impressive: 40 assists and 25 digs
– both career bests for the three-year
starter – along with 9 kills and 7 service
points. The sixth-seeded girls then beat
Bayonne 2-0 and faced third-seeded
Hunterdon Central on Tuesday.
Tennis: While the team had a tough
year, it did win twice in states, and it earned
coach Matt Vahrley is 100th victory. In six
seasons, his teams are 104-40, with four
county, two sectional and two state titles.
GIRLS JAYVEE CHAMPS
Coach Ralph Corey’s jayvee girls soccer team capped its second straight undefeated season with a 3-2 victory over Scotch
Plains in the county jayvee tournament
title game. The win ended a 15-0-2 season
that included three wins over SP-F. The
girls outscored opponents 74-8.
The 2013 jayvee team was 14-0-2,
tying Cranford, 0-0, in the county final.
They outscored opponents 75-8.
Since Corey became the coach in 2012,
the jayvees have gone 42-2-6, and won
three county titles.
INTERVIEWING THE INTERVIEWER
If you have a spare 40 minutes, you
might go to www.wbgo.org/sportsjam
and listen to WBGO’s Doug Doyle’s
interview of yours truly. It’s part of his
wonderful collection of podcasts, that
includes Jimmy Brown, Kareem AbdulJabbar, Mike Tyson, Shaquille O’Neal,
Earl (The Pearl) Monroe, assorted writers
from Sports Illustrated, hockey’s Jim
Dowd, baseball researcher Larry Hogan
of Fanwood, and many others. Stick with
it until the end – “my favorite day in the
newspaper business” – the story of the
first of my six firings in the business.
Spoiler alert: It involves WHS football
and Bridgewater.
BIG BOY FOOTBALL
The late Charlie (the Scorekeeper)
Hanson had to be smiling. Saturday night
was Alabama vs. LSU at Death Valley, and
the two teams put on big-time slugfest,
pounding each other for 60 minutes, and
then continuing into overtime. Bama won
but nothing was decided, since it still has to
play No. 1 Mississippi State and Auburn.
It was like watching a game between a
Gary Kehler-era WHS team vs. a Lou
Rettino-era Union team.
In this era of wide-open, spread-’emout, pass-first, defense-last, 63-56 scores,
it was invigorating to see two teams that
like to put it all on the line, so to speak.
When LSU had the ball and was running
behind its massive line vs. Bama’s defense, it was man-on-man, quite literally.
COLLEGE UPDATE
Freshman Caroline Baldwin (’14), a
four-time individual state champion at
WHS, earned her initial college victory
recently. Baldwin won the 200-yard backstroke (2 .52) during North Carolina’s
186-108 win over Virginia Tech. She
also swam on the winning 200 free relay
(1:31.75). The Tar Heels women’s team
is ranked a best-ever No. 5 in the country.
IN PASSING
Nick Johnson, one of the coolest cats to
ever roam 130 North Bellevue Ave. in
Langhorne, Pa., had to be put down on
Nov. 3 at age 19. He joins siblings
Alexander, Victoria, Ivan and Louis XIV.
Rick Rosas, the longtime bass player for
Neil Young, passed away Nov. 7 at age 65.
Nick Johnson
1995-2014
Real Estate
Mortgages
Closing Services
Insurance
®
Sales Associate
of the Month
COLONIAL
W
ESTFIELD. 4 bedroom, 3½ bath Contemporary Colonial. The lush professional
Susan
landscaping - including mature evergreens, trees and shrubs, along with the fenced yard,
Devaney
provide privacy for the large in-ground kidney shaped pool, spa, sitting area, patio and
deck. The 1st flr includes an updated gourmet EIK with custom cabinetry, granite countertops, professional
grade SS appliances and views and access to the rear yard; spacious DR, FLR and oversized Great rm with
fireplace & skylights, powder room, laundry room and garage access. The 2nd flr offers 4 BR and 2 Bths. The
MBR has 2 walk-in closets and a 2 room master bath with jetted soaking tub and large stall shower. $879,900.
COLONIAL
W
ESTFIELD. Stunning updated 5 Bedroom 2.1 Bath Colonial
Phyllis
in mint condition near elementary school. Hardwood floors,
Brown
moldings, custom built-ins, and French doors. LR w/WBFP flanked
by custom BI’s, FDR, EIK opens to FR and screened porch. 2nd Fl has 4 BRs; main
Bath. 3rd Fl has 5th BR/office. Finished Basement w/full Bath and storage. 1 Car
Garage. Newer Multi-zone CAC, roof, FP flue, Belgian Block driveway. Surround
sound, Sec System. Nice yard. Prof. Landscaped. Must see! $799,000.
Renata Dias
Top Lister for the
Month of October
NEW CONSTRUCTION
WESTFIELD. NEW CONSTRUCTION from Villane Building &
Team
Development 5 Bedroom 4.1 Bath Colonial. Large Family Room with
Villane
Fireplace opens to state of the art EIK continuous on to Formal Dining
Room and Living Room, convenient powder room, mudroom and 2 car gar. 2nd floor
includes 3 Bedrooms, full Bath, laundry and luxurious Master Suite. Master features double
sided gas fireplace, sitting room, 2 WIC and spa like bath. Finished attic w/guest suite 14x12
and another 10x10 bonus space w/full bath. Finished walkout basement. $1,275,000.
SPLIT LEVEL
NEW CONSTRUCTION
WESTFIELD. Welcome to this 10 Room, 4-5 Bedroom, 3.5 Bath
WESTFIELD. Built by Michael Mahoney, this new construction
Holly
Residence located in the premier Stonehenge enclave. This distinctive
Cohen
Bob Newman built residence reflects an unsurpassed level of quality
craftsmanship with an outstanding focus on detail. The specious floor plan offers a
flexible layout to suit your individual lifestyle. Set on a wonderful 100` X 148`
property among some of the very best Westfield has to offer. $819,000.
Westfield Office
581 Elm St U 908-654-7777
www.weichert.com
Kerry
CHC feature 5 Bedrooms, 4.5 Baths and ~3,200 sq ft of living space.
McDevitt
Situated on a large lot (67x120) this home features an open floor plan
on the 1st floor with LR, FDR, Jennaire kitchen and large FR with HWF and gas
fireplace. The 2nd floor consists of 4 Bedrooms including a large MBR featuring WI
closet and Master Bath. Walk up stairs lead to a fin attic perfect for a guest suite with
full bath. A large finished basement, also with full bath. $1,099,900.
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Thursday, November 13, 2014
Page 13
BALIATICO NOTCHES HAT TRICK, RODGERS 2 ASSISTS
Lady Raiders Rock Tigers, 3-1
In NJSIAA Soccer Quarters
By ALEX LOWE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
Senior Tori Baliatico scored three
goals for the Scotch Plains-Fanwood
High School girls soccer team to lead
them past 7-12-1 Linden, 3-1, in the
quarterfinal round of the NJSIAA North
Jersey, Section 2, Group IV tournament held on November 6 in Scotch
Plains. The victory advanced the 19-02 Raiders to the semifinal round where
they would host Westfield, which defeated Union, 2-1, in overtime.
Against the Lady Tigers, Baliatico
broke a scoreless deadlock on a penalty kick with 6:08 remaining in the
first half.
“They fouled Annie Pierce in the
box,” said Baliatico. “I usually get the
call on penalty kicks. I just lined up my
shot and tried to anticipate which way
the goaltender might lean and then I
fired it into the opposite corner.”
The Raiders were in charge
throughout the first half but could not
improve on their 1-0 lead going into
the break. Linden, on the defensive
throughout the opening half of play,
hung tough behind goaltender Ashley
Paulino, who recorded 10 saves.
“I think the girls played well today,” said Raider Head Coach Kevin
Ewing. “In the first half, we had some
opportunities to score that we did not
convert, but in general, they controlled
possession and really were not threatened often. It was a good win for us.”
In the second half, the Raiders assumed command when Baliatico scored
her second goal with 32:38 to play.
“Chrissie Rodgers played a ball to
me,” said Baliatico. “It was a nice feed
and I just tried to put it in the corner of
the net. Christina Rodgers is a great
passer and she sets me up to score, so
I better finish those opportunities.”
At this point, the game clearly
turned to the Raiders favor. In fact, it
was somewhat surprising that the
Raiders did not score more. It was not
CONTINUED ON PAGE 14
Courtesy of Eban Fox for The Westfield Leader and The Times
McCUTCHEON SCORES TWICE; BOND, LUZZI ASSIST
Blue Devil Sydney Keenan performs a back handspring on the balance beam
RIZKALLA WINS ALL-AROUND, VAULT, FLOOR TITLES
Blue Devils Tame Lions, 2-0, Blue Devil Gymnasts Capture
In NJ Section 2 Girls Soccer North Jersey Section 2 Crown
By ALEX LOWE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
Senior Sara McCutcheon scored a
couple of quick strike, first half goals
to lead the fourth-seeded Westfield
High School girls soccer team past
the North Hunterdon Lady Lions, 20, on November 4 in the first round of
the North Jersey, Section 2, Group 4
playoffs at Kehler Stadium in
Westfield. McCutcheon scored her
first goal 12:32 into the contest on a
short arcing kick into the back of the
net. Natalie Bond was credited with
the assist on the scoring play.
“The first goal came off of a great
cross from my left side from Natalie
Bond,” said McCutcheon. “It was an
easy shot thanks to the pass. We were
doing a good job possessing the ball
to that point, so it felt like the shots
would eventually be there.”
Less than three minutes later,
McCutcheon struck again. With
Westfield in scoring position, junior
Olivia Luzzi got off a shot on goal
that rebounded back to McCutcheon,
who promptly slammed home the
kick for a 2-0 lead with 25 minutes
remaining in the half.
From there, the Blue Devils simply
controlled possession and dominated
the rest of the way. The Blue Devils
had several great scoring opportunities, including a pair of shots by sophomore Taylor Morgan that missed just
wide early in the second half. Morgan
had been a force all game. Her speed
and ability to move the ball up the
sidelines quickly had North Hunterdon
in a defensive posture throughout.
“Taylor is very fast,” said Blue Devil
Head Coach Alexander Schmidt. “She
moved up here from Florida and she
has played a lot of club ball. She is
very creative when she has the ball and
she really pressures the defense. I know
she is probably upset with herself for
not being able to convert a couple of
chances during the game. She brings a
lot of energy to the game with her.”
The 12-4-2 Blue Devils managed
16 shots on goal, including five corner kicks compared to just four shots
on goal attempted by the 4-11-2 Lady
Lions. As a result of the win, the Blue
Devils will host the fifth-seeded Union
Farmers, who defeated the 12thseeded Piscataway Chiefs in their
playoff match. Westfield and Union
have already met twice this season
splitting their meetings.
Coach Schmidt appeared confident
about his team as they begin their run
into the state playoffs.
“This really is the first time in a
long time that we are close to being
healthy,” said Schmidt. “We had
Hannah Liddy back on the field for us
today. She was a really important
player for us last year. She has missed
most of this season with ankle trouble.
I’m not saying that she is 100 percent
right now, but she helps us when she
is on the field. We’ve also gotten
Carly Bechtloff back after she missed
some time with a cornea injury.”
The Westfield performance was so
dominant that goaltender Lizzie
Brucia was required to make only
one save for the entire game. For the
Blue Devils, nothing less than their
peak performance will be good
enough to get them through a bracket
that includes top-seeded Scotch
Plains-Fanwood and second-seeded
Ridge as potential obstacles on their
path to a championship.
“We’ve been working on trying to
maintain possession of the ball,” said
Schmidt. “We did a good job of that
today. The competition in this bracket
is very tough. This was a good start.”
North Hunterdon
Westfield
0
2
0
0
0
2
The Westfield High School Blue
Devils gymnastics team captured its
second straight NJSIAA North Jersey, Section 2 championship over a
strong field of contenders at Bishop
Ahr (BA) High School in Edison on
November 8. Westfield scored a 109.8
to beat Watchung Hills by over two
points.
The Watchung Hills (WH) Warriors secured second place with strong
vaults and bar routines for a total of
107.725. Arthur L. Johnson (J) placed
third with 105.15, while Scotch
Plains-Fanwood (SPF) came in fourth
with a 104.65.
The Blue Devils were led by senior
tri-captain Jenna Rizkalla, who won
the All-Around title with a season
high 37.925, which was also the fourth
highest all-around score across New
Jersey sectional competitions.
Rizkalla also won first place on the
vault with a 9.6, first on the floor
exercise with a 9.65, and second place
on the uneven bars and balance beam
to lead the charge for the Blue Devils.
Senior tri-captain Hannah Goldring
added a solid 9.20 on the balance
beam to place third, and scored 9.30
on floor to place fifth and help
Westfield complete its victory. The
Blue Devils also got strong contributions from sophomore Hannah Prieto
(seventh all-around), freshmen Alexis
Fasano (10th on uneven bars) and
Sarah Fox, and juniors Jessica Keenan
and Megan Mellilo. Juniors Lexi
CONTINUED ON PAGE 14
Hye-Young Choi, Sales Associate
908-301-2015, Direct
Member of Coldwell Banker International President's
Premier-Top 1% of Sales Associates Nationwide
# 1 REALTOR - Total Production - 11 Years
NJAR® Circle of Excellence Platinum - 2002-2009
NJAR® Circle of Excellence Gold - 1987-2001. 2009-2011.
RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE
OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 11/16 1-4PM • 245 Charles Street
Blue Devil Boys Win XC Section Title
Senior Matt Russo crossed the finish line first with a school record time
of 15:52 to lead the Westfield High
School boys cross-country team to
the North 2, Group 4 championship
at Greystone Park in Morris County
on November 8. The top-5 Blue Devils had an average time of 16:39.
Andrew Harting-Smith finished
ninth with a personal record (PR)
time of 16:41. Alex Campbell
knocked 31 seconds off his PR to
finish 13th with a time of 16:46. Will
Chandler crossed 17th at 16:54. Ryan
Siegel finished 21st at 17:02 (PR).
Bryan Jackler finished 24th at 17:06
(PR) and Gabe Givelber crossed 47th
at 17:36.
The Blue Devil girls placed fourth,
led by Charlie O’Brien, who placed
17th with a PR 20:20.8. The next five
Blue Devils had PRs beginning with
Carline Stocking, who finished 18th
at 20:22. Julia Myers finished 21st at
20:34.3. Gabrielle Brennan placed
24th at 20:37, Noelle Blackford finished 25th at 20:38.9, Natalie
Marcotullio finished 29th at 20:51
and Meghan O’Dwyer finished 39th
at 21:16.7.
See Devils Den on page 12
Westfield. Sunny and spacious 10 room, 5 bedroom, 3 ½ bath home facing south with easy
access to K thru 12 schools and park. First floor has a private suite with sitting room with
built-in writing area, full bath and walk-in closet. Beautiful granite eat-in kitchen with center
island has a full panoramic view of great level back yard and adjacent family room with
cathedral ceiling. A warm breakfast area, with French sliders, opens to tree enclosed yard.
House also has skylights, large living room with fireplace and formal dining. The master
suite with whirlpool bath and separate shower, walk-in closet with deep crawl space. 3
additional good-size bedrooms, hallway bath and laundry room on the second floor.
Hardwood floors throughout, multi-zone central air and heat, 2 car attached garage and
newly landscaped front gardens, 75x150 level lot…$1,070,000. A must see.
Westfield. Fabulous newly constructed 4 bedroom 3 full bath colonial w/easy, desirable
access to transportation, town and schools. Quality craftsmanship , high ceilings, hardwood
floors throughout, embellished moldings, designer kitchen with granite counters, custom
maple cabinets, stainless steel Viking appliances, center isle with breakfast bar and adjacent
den. Gracious foyer opens to living room, formal dining room, kitchen den and guest suite
with full bath. Spacious master bedroom, a 15x12 luxurious bath w/Jacuzzi tub, separate
stall shower, double marble vanity and “California” outfitting walk-in closet 13x11. Three
additional bedrooms and 2nd floor laundry. Two zone heat and cac, full basement w/9’
ceiling, 2 car attached garage, fenced yard, Truly a beautiful newly constructed home to call
your own! Ready to move right in!
$850,000.
COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE
Westfield Office • 209 Central Avenue • 908-233-5555 x 169
© 2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.
Jayne Bernstein
Search for homes
Sales Associate
from your cell phone!
NJAR Circle of Excellence Sales Award: 1997-2013
Text “jbcb”
Direct Line: (908) 301-2006 Cell Phone: (908) 403-9330
to “87778”
E-mail: jaynebernstein@gmail.com
OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, November 16th • 1-4PM
705 St. Marks Avenue, Westfield, NJ
$789,900
Beautifully updated 4 BR, 4 bath Colonial offers great living space & is in movein ready! Formal LR w/fireplace flanked by built-in’s, Formal DR, renovated kitchen
w/bkfast bar open to FR; 1st floor full bath. Remodeled MBR suite w/ WIC and
French doors to a gorgeous, newly added spa-like private bath. Two add’l BR’s
and a hall bath complete the 2nd level . The 3rd floor BR Retreat offers a freshly
added full bath with stall shower. LL w/Rec Room + Laundry. Manicured grounds
w/paver patio & fenced back yard. Convenient to town, and NYC transportation.
RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE
OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, November 16th • 1-4PM
111 North Cottage Place, Westfield, NJ
$969,000
Totally renovated 4 bedroom, 3 full and 2 half bath Colonial with beautiful
appointments, including crown moldings, decorative ceilings, and gleaming
hardwood floors! The open floor plan offers a formal LR, a banquet-size DR, a
gourmet EIK open to the FR & powder room. MBR Retreat with private bath
& closets galore; BR w/en suite bath + 2 add’l BR’s & full bath. Finished Rec
Room & powder room on LL. New landscaping and a convenient location
makes this home an absolute Gem!
OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, November 16th • 1-4PM
259 Prospect Street, Westfield, NJ
$999,000
Fabulous 5 BR, 3-1/2 bath Colonial Victorian w/numerous renovations by Master
Builder, Anthony James Construction. Open & spacious floor plan w/front & back
staircases. Grand entry foyer w/cantilevered staircase, Formal LR open to Formal DR
with gas fplc.; newly remodeled gourmet kitchen; 1st floor FR & powder room. 2nd
floor MBR w/private bath; 3 additional BR’s + hall bath. 3rd floor 5th BR and private
bath. Professionally landscaped grounds w/irrigation system, brick patio, fenced rear
yard, 2 car det. garage & wrap around front porch to enjoy the vibe of in-town living.
COLDWELL BANKER RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE
WESTFIELD EAST OFFICE • 209 CENTRAL AVENUE • (908) 233-5555
© 2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.
Page 14
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, November 13, 2014
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Blue Devils Win Section Crown
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13
Jim O’Connor (njsportpics.com) for The Westfield Leader and The Times
MAKING THE SAVE...Raider goalkeeper Tyler O’Brien makes the save in the
game against North Hunterdon.
Raiders Pummel N. Hunterdon
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11
scoring play.
“Justin Rodriquez played a great
ball for me,” said Rowenzweig. “He
gave it to me in great position. I saw
my defender was heading right, so I
faked in that direction, then went
hard to my left and kicked it into the
opposite corner.”
For Rowenzweig, a junior, it was
another clutch performance in a big
spot. Rowenzweig had a two-goal
performance against Plainfield in the
semifinal round of the Union County
Tournament as well. He has emerged
as the latest scoring threat in a Raider
lineup that has many of them.
Junior Joey Bianco finished out the
scoring by slamming home a free
kick at the six minute mark to make it
5-0. Once again, sophomore goalkeeper Sean Murray had a clean game,
keeping the visiting Lions off the
board on the way to the Raiders’ 15th
shutout win of the season. As dominant as the performance was, the
Raiders did suffer a loss.
“We’re going to be without Alex
Guevara,” said Breznitsky. “He got a
card during the game and that hurts
because it is an automatic two-game
thing. We do have very good depth
though. You just hate to see that happen, especially at this time of the year.”
The Raiders then went on to pummel Phillipsburg, 7-0, to advance to
the sectional championship.
North Hunterdon
Sc. Pl.-Fanwood
0
3
0
2
0
5
Blue Devils Sting Bayonne Bees
In NJSIAA V-Ball, 25-20, 25-23
The Westfield High School girls
volleyball team stung the Bayonne
Bees, 25-20, 25-23, in the quarterfinal
round of the Public Group 4 tournament at Westfield on November 7.
Senior setter Megan Mondon had
18 assists, while adding seven digs,
four kills and three service aces for the
21-3 Blue Devils. Co-captain Olivia
Manning notched seven kills, a block
and five digs. Co-captain Kaelyn Heard
added a kill and three digs. Libero
Leigh Scarano had 11 digs, an assist
and four service points with an ace.
Stephanie Borr banged five kills.
Lizzie Sottung racked up 12 service points with six aces and added
six digs. Rachel Mattessich had four
kills, a block and a dig. Olivia Meyer
had five digs, while Dana Boretz had
four. Rachel Holt had two kills, a
block and three digs. Gab Cofone had
a dig and a service point. Morgan
Biglin added a dig.
Katie Kalinowski had seven assists
and six digs for the 19-4 Bees. Khiara
Yap had seven service points with two
aces and four digs. Emelin Flores had
four kills and four digs. Alexis Carchidi
had two blocks, four digs and a kill.
On November 4, the Blue Devils
went three sets with Washington Township in the first round but prevailed 2519, 20-25, 25-23. Mondon amassed 40
assists, 25 digs, nine kills and seven
service points with a pair of aces. Manning notched 18 kills and added six
digs and a service ace. Scarano scooped
33 digs and added eight service points
with an ace and four assists.
Holzer and Megan Troutman and
freshmen Nicole Dispenza and
Sydney Keenan also competed for
Westfield in the Sectional competition at Bishop Ahr.
After the first two events, the
Westfield competitors trailed
Watchung Hills, but rallied and
turned in strong performances on
balance beam and floor exercise to
secure the sectional title. This is the
Blue Devil gymnasts’ first back to
back championships since winning
four straight sectional titles between
1998-2001 and represents the first
sectional title with Amanda Diaz as
head coach, after the retirement last
year of long-time coach Melissa
Greenwald.
As a result of the sectional win,
Head Coaches Amanda Diaz and
Laurie McCormack and the Blue
Devil squad head to the State tournament and try to improve on last year’s
third place finish. The NJSIAA Team
competition will be held on Thursday, November 13, at Montgomery
High School.
Currently, Westfield is ranked fourth
in the state. Individual competition is
set for Saturday, November 15, at
Montgomery; based on their performances at Sectionals, Jenna Rizkalla
qualified for the all-around competition, and Hannah Goldring qualified
on balance beam and floor exercise.”
ALL-AROUND:
1. Rizkalla (W) 37.925, 2. Shannon
Gregory (JP Stevens) 37.15, 3. Morgan
Durant (WH) 36.65, 4. Kelsey Dwyer
(OB) 36.275, 5. Gina Ferdinandi (J)
36.025
VAULT:
1. Rizkalla 9.6, 2. Anne Meringolo
(WH), Ferdinandi (J) 9.45, 4. Sydne
Powers (BA) 9.375, 5. Durant (WH) 9.35,
10. Amelai Paladino (SPF) 9.15
UNEVEN BARS:
1. Dwyer (OB) 9.3, 2. Rizkalla 9.225,
3. Durant (WH) 9.2, 4. Alexis Tekin
(WH) 9.125, 5. Abby Claus (Summit)
9.025, 8. Paladino (SPF) 8.825
BALANCE BEAM:
1. Gregory (JPS) 9.55, 2. Rizkalla
9.475, 3. Goldring 9.2, 4. Payton Wiesse
(J) 9.0, 5. Durant (WH), Jamie Bush
(SPF) 8.925, 9. Kelly McAuliffe
(Cranford) 8.825
FLOOR EXERCISE:
1. Rizkalla 9.625, 2. Ferdinandi (J)
9.575, 3. Gregory (JPS) 9.4, 4. Dwyer
(OB) 9.325, 5. Goldring 9.3, 8T Abby
Spector (SPF) 9.15
Lady Raiders Rock Tigers, 3-1
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13
for lack of trying. The shot attempts
were there for the Raiders over the
next five minutes after Baliatico’s
second goal. Kayla Diggs had a pair
of scoring opportunities, around the
30 minute mark. Diggs missed just
high of the crossbar on a kick in front
of the net, then less than a minute
later, she was wide of the post on a
hard cross kick.
Finally, Baliatico put home her third
goal at 26:30 giving the Raiders an
insurmountable 3-0 lead.
“They are a great team,” said Linden Head Coach Brian Mehalick. “We
competed with them throughout the
game. I’m proud of our girls. What
really killed us was taking that player
down inside the box. You saw what
happened on the penalty kick. It
changed the whole complexion of the
game. Baliatico is a great player for
them, and the last thing you want to
do is give her penalty kicks.”
Baliatico’s hat trick gave her 19
goals for the season and 45 for her
career as a Raider. Rodgers was credited with two assists for the game.
Goalkeeper Andrea Leitner had a quiet
day in the net turning away two shots.
Linden avoided the shutout when
Rachel Rocha scored with 4:27 remaining.
“I’m looking forward to playing
Westfield,” said Baliatico. “They are
a good team, but I think some of the
areas where we are strong are in areas
where they are a little weaker, so I
hope that works to our advantage.”
Looking forward to the fourth
showdown with 13-4-2 Westfield,
Coach Ewing said, “It will be a real
battle. “Westfield is a good team.
Then there is the fact that it is such a
local rivalry that only adds to the
intensity.”
Linden
Sc. Pl.-Fanwood
0
1
1
2
1
3
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
SETTLING THE BALL...Blue Devil senior Lil Scott, No. 10, settles the ball as
Farmer Alyssa Caggiano, No. 11, closes in. Blue Devil Carly Bechtloft, No. 2, also
closes in on the action.
Blue Devils Deny Union, 2-1
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11
break away after stealing possession
from Adora Moneme and banged a
wicked shot off the crossbar midway
through the half. Farella also ripped a
shot that Rivero stopped.
With 2:08 on the clock, Morgan
launched a shot from 30 yards out
that skid off Rivero’s fingertips and
imbedded itself into the net to knot
the score.
Westfield had to defend the east goal
in the second half and the Farmers took
advantage of the wind with seven shots
on goal, but Blue Devil keeper Lizzie
Brucia stopped all seven. The Lady
Farmers also took five corner kicks,
which added to the jeopardy.
“I told the girls I was glad we got
through the second half. Whoever
wins that coin toss is, either way,
going to score. The wind was too
strong for our girls to hit the ball out
of the back. We kept fighting, a couple
of real dangerous corners,” Coach
Schmidt said.
After the coin toss, the Farmers had
to defend the east goal in the overtime
period and within two minutes, Scott
drilled a shot that ricocheted off the
near post. As time was running down,
Liddy, who had been on the sidelines
most of the season due to injury, did
her magic to send her team into a
fourth showdown with the top-seeded
Scotch Plains-Fanwood Raiders on
November 10.
“It feels so good to be back. Sitting
on the sidelines was not fun. I think
it’s our time, fourth time! The other
time have been battles. I think it’s our
time,” Liddy said.
“Fourth time will be a charm
maybe,” Coach Schmidt said. “It will
be a battle.”
Union
Westfield
1
1
0
0
0
1
1
2
SPF Lady Raiders Complete
Rebuilding Volleyball Season
By ALEX LOWE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
Success breeds expectations and
sometimes those expectations can be
hard to satisfy. The Scotch PlainsFanwood girls volleyball team recently completed what could best be
described as a rebuilding season. The
Raiders went 6-13 for the year. This
was a far cry from the result they
posted in 2013.
In 2013, the Lady Raiders charged
to an 18-5 overall record and advanced to the second round of the
state tournament before falling to
Mendham. Graduation losses hit the
Raiders hard heading into the 2014
campaign and despite some promising results during summer league play,
Scotch Plains-Fanwood was unable
to match the accomplishments of the
2013 squad.
“There was no question that this
was a rebuilding season for us,” said
Raider Head Coach Adrienne Stack.
“We lost several seniors from that
team who were First or Second Team
All-County performers. Once you let
go of that and understand that you
have a lot of new faces coming in to
fill roles and gain experience for the
future, it becomes much easier to
help the team focus on maintaining a
positive attitude. We had some great
individual sets during matches this
year in which we crushed teams, but
maintaining our consistency throughout a match was a problem for us.”
The Lady Raiders had only three
seniors on this year’s roster. Middle
hitters Briana Johnson and Jackie
Fletcher, along with setter Alexandra
Gale, helped lead the young Raider
squad through a difficult schedule.
Johnson was a standout performer
throughout the season, leading the
team in blocks (39) and aces (15).
“Briana has come on tremendously
for us this year,” said Stack. “She
really erupted as a player on the court.
Really both of our middle hitters had
very strong years for us.”
Fletcher nudged out Johnson for
the team lead in kills (83 to 82). Gale
led the team in assists with 133.
“It was frustrating at different times
this season,” said Gale. “Especially
after the success we had the previous
year. But we knew we were short on
experience and that this was going to
be a growing process. I’ve enjoyed
playing on this team and hopefully
they will continue to improve and be
successful next year.”
Fletcher echoed those sentiments.
“For a lot of players on the team
this year, it was their first extended
time on the floor,” said Fletcher. “I
think the success we had during the
summer league prior to the season
may have made us think we were
going to be better once the season
started. It didn’t work out that way.”
Inexperience was not the only factor
in the outcome for the Raiders this year.
“I think the fact that we moved up
in divisions this year was also important,” said Johnson, who plans to play
at Kean next year. “We were playing
a tougher schedule now. Jackie is
right. During the summer league we
were really strong and I think that
raised expectations for how good we
might be as a team.”
Hope for a return to success in the
near future is not unreasonable. The
Raiders have several players, who
gained valuable experience this season, who figure to play key roles next
year. Junior Kristen Koederitz led the
team with 136 service points and
finished second in assists with 131.
Junior Fallon Goldberg led the team
with 74 digs. Another junior, Caroline
Yessman, finished with 64 kills and
99 service points. As if that is not
enough to signal a quick turnaround
in fortunes for the Raiders, Stack has
additional reasons to be optimistic.
“We had a lot of freshmen and
sophomores play this year,” she said.
“They will be better for that experience next season. We also have a
phenomenal freshman class that will
be incoming next year.”
Alex Lowe for The Westfield Leader and The Times
RAIDER VOLLEYBALL TEAM CAPTAINS...Pictured, left to right, are
Alexandra Gale, Briana Johnson and Jackie Fletcher.
The Proven Professional
Long-term success in the real estate profession is
reserved for the select few who consistently deliver
value to their clients. With unparalleled dignity and
grace, Hye-Young Choi continues to provide an
inspired level of service and outstanding results.
Hye-Young Choi
Sales Associate
Top 1% of all Coldwell Banker Agents Internationally
Member of Coldwell Banker President’s Elite
#1 REALTOR, Westfield East Office, Total Production 11 Consecutive Years!
Email: hyeyoungchoi1@gmail.com
Direct: (908) 301-2015
Cell: (908) 938-9248
Westfield East Office: 209 Central Avenue, Westfield, NJ 07090 • (908) 233-5555
ColdwellBankerMoves.com
© 2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, November 13, 2014
SR. PROSUK SCORES LONE GOAL ON BIRLIE’S ASSIST
More photos – goleader.com
Ballyhoo Sports
P-Burg Stuns Blue Devils, 2-1,
In Soccer Section Quarterfinal
By DAVID B. CORBIN
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
Multiple opportunities failed to
materialize into goals as the secondseeded Westfield High School boys
soccer team bowed to the 10th-seeded
Stateliners of Phillipsburg, 2-1, in the
quarterfinal round of the North Jersey, Section 2, Group 4 tournament at
Gary Kehler Stadium in Westfield on
November 6. Previously, the
Stateliners knocked off seventhseeded Union, while the Blue Devils
eliminated JP Stevens.
The 13-6 Blue Devils out-shot the
Stateliners, 6-4, in the first half then
shelled them 10-2 in the second half,
but only one hit the mark when freshman Mike Birlie crossed the ball into
the box where senior/co-captain center midfielder Mike Prosuk slipped it
in to tie the score, 1-1, with 19:00
remaining in the game.
Blue Devil co-captain/goalkeeper
Koryn Kraemer made three saves and
P-burg goalkeeper/captain Alex Meny
made 14 saves. The Blue Devils also
had four corners kicks to the
Stateliners’ none.
Senior forward Adekunle Akande
scored P-burg’s first goal less than
eight minutes into the second half on
a left-to-right shot that lodged into
the right corner. P-burg’s deciding
goal came off the foot of senior
midfielder TJ Molvhill with 7:22 remaining.
Westfield senior/co-captain striker
Matt Williams took several shots in
the first half, two flew over the crossbar and another was smothered by
Meny. Senior midfielder Kevin Irving hooked a corner kick into the box
that Meny also smothered. Meny also
managed to get his fingers on another
wicked shot and tipped it out of
bounds, setting up Irving’s corner
kick.
Also during the first half, the Blue
Devils attempted several long leads
up field that were just out of reach of
the charging Prosuk and Williams.
With nine minutes left in the half,
Birlie lined a shot toward the goal that
Meny tipped away.
The first seven minutes of the sec-
ond half consisted of a furious Blue
Devil attack, beginning with Williams taking a shot that Meny saved.
In a span of just one minute, Prosuk
broke free twice past the last P-burg
defender. but Meny managed to make
the right decisions and stopped both
close-range shots.
“Great vision of him [Prosuk].
Great first touch with the first goal,
but it’s always that last step that is the
hardest. A lot of it is mental, 95 percent is mental like calming yourself
down under pressure. The game just
got to us. It’s our last game, a lot of
frustration building up. I think our
minds weren’t as clear today,” Williams said.
“It’s about finishing. You don’t hit
the back of the net, you can’t win. We
are better than that in terms of finishing and Mike would probably tell you
that he could do better as well.. We
left them in the game in the second
half. If we put two of those away then
it’s a different outcome,” Blue Devil
Head Coach Eric Shaw said. “When
CONTINUED ON PAGE 16
More photos – goleader.com Ballyhoo Sports
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
CRUNCHING A CANUCK...Cougars Jake Mathews, No. 81, Ethan Tom, No. 25, and company put the crunch on Canuck
running back Kyeronn Cole, No. 5, in the final regular-season game at Memorial Field in Cranford on November 7.
SCHETELICH PASSES FOR 260 YARDS AND THREE TDs
Cougar Footballers Go 9-0,
Rout North Plainfield, 52-20
By DAVID B. CORBIN
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
Cranford High School football history was made for the second week in
a row when the Cougar gridders
routed the North Plainfield Canucks,
52-20, at Memorial Field in Cranford
on November 7 to finish the regular
season with a 9-0 record. Last week,
the Cougars attained an 8-0 record
for the first time ever with a 30-12
victory over Governor Livingston.
The possibility of another record
may be on the horizon since the Cougars have totaled 360 points in those
nine game, while yielding just 123,
but in the triumph over the Canucks,
junior quarterback Jack Schetelich
made all six of his pass completions
worth while with 260 total yards,
including respective touchdown (TD)
passes of 67 yards, 33 yards and 39
yards. Schetelich also ran for TDs of
15 yards and nine yards.
“We put in a couple of new plays.
They ran out of coverage. It was easy.
Once the line gave me protection, we
David B. Corbin for The Westfield Leader and The Times
PUTTING THE PINCH ON A STATELINER...Blue Devils Austin Kronick, No. 15, and Kevin Irving, right, put the pinch
on P-burg’s AJ Meyer, No. 23, in the section quarterfinals in Westfield on November 6.
Page 15
Probitas Verus Honos
Scotch Plains
could do whatever we wanted. It was
fun. It was a lot of fun tonight,”
Schetelich said.
Senior Luke Christiano also had
a lot of fun on “Senior Night” with
three receptions for 151 yards, including TD grabs of 67 yards and
39 yards. Senior Donavin Walker
rushed four times for 42 yards and
had a TD run of three yards. Senior
Donte Anderson had two reception
for 59 yards, including a 33-yard
TD grab. Sophomore Ryan Bakie
returned an interception 53 yards
for a TD, and junior Joe Norton,
who kicked all six of his points
after, also booted a 29-yard field
goal. Sophomore Brian Oblachinski
kicked the final point after.
The Canucks got possession at their
own 29 on the opening kickoff and
proceeded to march 71 yards on 12
straight running plays, ending in a
one-yard TD plunge by running back
Kyeronn Cole, which may have
caused some concern for the Cougars’ defense. After Norton kicked a
29-yard field goal with 3:18 left in the
first quarter, the Canucks got great
field position at the Cougar 34 and
$400,000
took only four running plays when
Jorge Zavaleta hooked right 16 yards
to make the score, 14-3.
“I wouldn’t say we got nervous.
We never really get nervous. It happened before against Roselle and Del.
Val. where we were down,” said Cougar defensive lineman Nick Ballas,
who made several key tackles, including a six-yard sack.
Defensive back Kevin Trotter finished with three tackles and two assists,
Colin Scanlon also had three tackles (2
throws for loss) and two assists. Ahmad
Davis had two tackles (1 throw for loss)
and two assists. Linebacker Niko
Cappello had two tackles and an assist
and Matt Muller had two tackles and
two assists. Ethan Tom added a throw
for a loss and two assists.
Three minutes into the second
quarter, after Schetelich connected
with Christiano for 45 yards to the
Canuck 15, he kept the ball and
slicked up the middle for a TD. On
their next series, the Cougars got the
ball at their own 33 then Schetelich
found Christiano wide open in the
center. From there, Christiano finCONTINUED ON PAGE 16
Westfield
$399,900
Well maintained end unit w/private patio. 1st
flr MBR w/full bath & WIC, updt kit w/granite
open to FR. Great location!
Elegant Condo close to town/NY trans. High
ceilings, beautiful HW flrs, W/D in unit, 2
full baths, 2 skylights, & more!
Agent: Joyce Taylor
MLS: 3179572
Agent: Patricia Plante
MLS: 3178615
Westfield
$499,000
Scotch Plains
$500,000
Well maintained young Colonial on lovely
street. Spacious LR, EIK w/granite & access
to yard & deck, HW flrs, CAC, more!
Beautiful 4BR Col on quiet cul-desac.
Spacious bdrms, 2 full updt baths, fenced
yard, expansive deck, move-in ready!
Agent: Cathy Splinter
Agent: Deborah Citarella
MLS: 3168620
MLS: 3178536
OPEN HOUSE: Sunday, 11/16 • 1-4PM
2150 Seward Drive
Scotch Plains
$629,000
Westfield
$1,449,000
Spacious Split in Parkwood Section! MBR w/
lrg WIC & full bath, HW flrs under carpet,
LR w/fpl, comfy FR, fenced yard.
New Construction boasting 5 bedrooms (1
on main flr), 4 full baths, short distance to
town, all schools & NYC trans.
Agent: Anne Weber
Agent: Gerald Robinson
MLS: 3182307
Westfield West Office:
600 North Avenue West, Westfield, NJ 07090
(908) 233-0065
ColdwellBankerMoves.com
© 2014 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act.
Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker® and the Coldwell Banker logo are registered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.
MLS: 3170575
Page 16
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, November 13, 2014
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
P-burg Stuns Blue Devils, 2-1
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15
RUNNING THROUGH THE DEFENSE...Griffin Rooney runs though the defense for a big gain in Westfield PAL B’s 42-20 victory over Cranford.
Westfield PAL ‘B’ Defeats
Cranford in Playoffs, 42-20
The Westfield PAL “B” football
team notched a 42-20 victory over
Cranford in the first round of the
NJSYFL playoffs on November 9.
The Blue Devils scored five touchdowns and kicked three extra points
in the first-half to pace the team to the
win.
In all, the Blue Devils amassed
over 300 yards of total offense with
Timmy Alliegro and Griffin Rooney
running for scores and Henry
Meiselman, Colin Freer and Ryan
Smith catching touchdown passes
from Hank Shapiro. John Czarnecki
and Nick Martini also had some nice
gains on the ground and Colin Elliott
hauled in a pass.
As well as the offense performed,
the defense was also up to the task.
The Blue Devils held Cranford scoreless in the first half and recorded a
number of strong tackles, sacks, and
plays for losses of yardage.
Noteworthy plays were by Sean
Link, Doug Moore, Max Gigantino,
Declan McCauley, Brian Felter, Chris
Larkin, Jake Zrebiec, Brendan
Harrington, Reid Colwell, Kevin
Yucetepe and Eric Daaleman. Next
up for the Blue Devils will be a game
in the second round of the playoffs.
you leave teams like this in and they
start believing, these things happen.”
Three minutes later, Akande gave
the Stateliners a 1-0 lead.
Williams came back with two more
shots that Meny saved, sophomore
Loukas Carryannopoulos banged a
header that Meny saved then senior
attacker Dave LeVelle took a shot
that a defender warded off. After
Prosuk’s goal knotted the score,
LeVelle sent a cross into Prosuk and
Birlie, but Meny was on the spot to
stop the shot.
“He’s on ‘heck’ of a player. He’s a
good goalie. He’s probably the best
one I have seen in my opinion,” Williams said.
Molvhill scored the go-ahead goal,
but the Blue Devils continued to attack until the end with a shot from
Sam Karnofsky with one minute remaining then another with seconds
remaining from Irving, set up by a
free kick from Williams.
“Like I said at the counties, some
games you come and you bring it and
sometimes it just doesn’t work out
for you no matter how many times
you try to put it on target. It’s one of
the most frustrating things in the world
not seeing that ball go in, but at the
end of the day, it is what it is. But I am
happy as a captain with our team, we
really did try, but sometimes it doesn’t
happen,” Williams said.
Phillipsburg
Westfield
0
0
2
1
2
1
Cougars Rout North Plainfield
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 15
ished up with his 67-yard TD reception, making the score, 17-14.
After forcing the Canucks to punt,
Trotter received the punt and returned
it 17 yards to the 47. Four plays later,
Schetelich zipped nine yards for the
TD putting Cranford up 24-14 at the
half.
It took only 1:02 off the clock in the
third quarter for the Cougars to score
when Anderson grabbed Schetelich’s
pass and sprinted to complete his 33yard TD. Defensive back Sean
Leonard’s interception gave the Cougars possession at the Canuck 45. After Walker’s six-yard run, Schetelich
EXCELLENT PAL SEASON...The Scotch Plains-Fanwood PAL A football players and cheerleaders pose after Raiders
ended regular season at 7-0-1 with 16-0 victory over Perth Amboy on November 2 at SP-F High. The Raiders also ended
their five-year PAL careers without losing any home games.
Congratulations
Agents of the Month!
hooked up with Christiano for the 39yard TD with 8:34 left in the third.
The Cougars’ defense was all over
the Canucks then Kevin McNeil
blocked a punt and Cranford took
over at the Canuck 14. On the fourth
running play, Walker walked in from
the three boosting the score to 45-14.
After Head Coach Erik Rosenmeier
put in his second team, defensive back
Ryan Bakie intercepted a Canuck pass
and returned it 53 yards for the TD just
as the third quarter ended.
“Coach [Joe] Huber told us we just
got to stick to what we do best. We
listened. We did that and started to
execute on defense,” Ballas said.
The Canucks added a TD late in the
fourth quarter, but the Cougars’ undefeated 9-0 regular season record was
firmly in tact and so was their top seed
for the state tournament playoffs.
“It’s a great feeling. It really is. I
hope we can carry this momentum
into the playoffs and win a state title,”
Ballas said.
“It’s great, but we are still not done.
Now it’s the second part of the season. One game at a time. Right now
we are 0-0. We are just hoping to go
3-0 and win out,” Schetelich said.
North Plainfield
Cranford
7 7 0
3 21 28
6
0
The Westfield Area “Y” Aquaducks
WF ‘Y’ Aquaducks to Perform
At 22nd Annual Water Show
Tickets are available for the 22nd
Annual Synchronized Swimming
Show featuring the Westfield Area
“Y” Aquaducks. This popular show
will be held on Saturday, November
22, 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. and Sunday,
November 23, at 1 p.m. at the
Westfield Area “Y” in Westfield.
Talented girls from elementary
through high school comprise the
Aquaducks, combining athletic swimming and dance skills synchronized
to music. The show includes multiswimmer team routines, as well as
smaller solos, duets and trios.
Tickets are $8 for adults and $5 for
children under 12 and all proceeds go
to support the team. Seating is limited
and the show often sells out early.
Tickets are available online at
www.westfieldynj.org or individuals
can register at the Main “Y” Welcome Center. Snacks, baskets and
raffles will also be available at the
performances.
Synchronized swimming requires
a unique combination of strength,
20
52
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAILNS
ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE, that at the
November 6, 2014 meeting of the Zoning
Board of Adjustment, the Board adopted
the Resolution approving the application
of Apollo 22, LLC, commonly known as the
Grillestone Restaurant, 2377 Route 22
West, Block 3904, Lot 1 for an extension of
the Board’s original Resolution adopted
on May 2, 2013 granting preliminary and
final site plan approval.
Barbara Horev
Secretary to the Board
1 T - 11/13/14, The Times Fee: $14.28
A SUCCESSFUL SEASON...Team Holland of the Westfield Soccer Association
U8 Boys Division finished a successful Fall season at Westfield Memorial Fields
on November 9. Westfield Soccer Association awarded a medal to each player.
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
Experience,
Trust, Reliability & Service
Elizabeth Bataille
Sales Associate
Frank D. Isoldi
Broker Sales Associate
Jayne Bernstein
Sales Associate
SCOTCH PLAINS-FANWOOD
BOARD OF EDUCATION
NOTICE OF MEETINGS
(In Compliance with OPEN PUBLIC
MEETINGS ACT - Chapter 231)
*ADDENDUM TO REGULARLY
SCHEDULED MEETINGS*
The Public Board Meeting scheduled on
Thursday, November 20, 2014 will begin
at 7:00 p.m. in the Evergreen School Multipurpose Room located at Evergreen Avenue and Cedar Street, Scotch Plains for
the recognition of the Scotch PlainsFanwood High School Marching Band.
1 T - 11/13/14, The Times
Fee: $14.79
PUBLIC NOTICE
SCOTCH PLAINS
$1,199,000
One yr young! 5BR, 4BA Col, Golf Course Views,
Vltd Ceil, Mstr Balc,WIC, Radiant Heat, Fin Bsmt,
MLS 3182408
1st fl ste, 2nd fl lndry.
WESTFIELD
$969,000
Completely reno'd 4BR Col w/HWF, crown
moldings, gour Kit w/SS appls, LR/boxbeam ceil,
MLS 3180933
MBR/cath ceil, WIC, fin bsmt.
WESTFIELD
$1,199,000
Spacious 5BR, 2.5BA Col w/many beautiful upgrds.
HWF w/radiant heat, stunning Kit/cust cabs, FR/fp,
MLS 3178597
FDR, covered patio.
WESTFIELD
$819,000
Meticulously maint'd 4BR, 2.2BA Col, LR/fpl, FDR,
newly reno'd gourmet EIK, lrg FR, fin bsmnt
MLS 3181918
w/powder rm & lndry rm.
SCOTCH PLAINS
$1,195,000
Exceptional 5BR, 5 1/2 BA CHC set on a cul-desac, 9' ceil on 1st flr, Impeccably kept, fabulous
MLS 3181680
floor plan.
WESTFIELD
$699,000
Charming 5BR, 2.2BA Col features entrance
vestibule, wbfp in LR, sun lit den, FDR, granite EIK
MLS 3173287
w/separate brkfst rm.
WESTFIELD
$699,000
Classic 5BR side-hall Col, Sunny foyer, LR/fpl,
FDR, FR, Kit/granite, HWF on 1st flr, high ceilings,
MLS 3181981
beautiful moldings.
SCOTCH PLAINS
$649,000
Cust remodeled 5BR, 3BA Col, spacious open
flrpln, HWF thru-out, tiled bths, Gour EIK/cenMLS 3181261
ter isl open to great rm w/fp.
WESTFIELD
$559,000
Beautifully maintained 3BR, 2BA Ranch w/open floor
plan, updated EIK, FDR/bay wndw, LR w/WBFP, MBR
MLS 3180278
w/WIC, fin bsmt, 2c gar.
WESTFIELD
$419,900
Chrmng 3BR Col w/light-filled generous sized
rms, EIK w/HWF, FDR, LR/fpl, oak & pine flrs.
Walk-up storage attic, updtd BA. MLS 3181573
SCOTCH PLAINS
$365,000
Wonderful charm & detail thruout this 3BR,
1.5BA Col, inviting flr pln, LR/fp, FDR full of natuMLS 3180823
ral light, HWF thruout.
SCOTCH PLAINS
$339,000
Lovely 3BR, 1.1BA English Col, charming entry,
nwr Kit w/adj FR, lrg LR/fpl,spacious DR, HWF
MLS 3182354
& chestnut trim/drs thru-out.
Since 1986, the Westfield Office has been recognized as one of the best in the Coldwell Banker Corporation.
Westfield Office • 209 Central Avenue • 908-233-5555
Ask about our Coldwell Banker
Home Protection Plan
Coldwell Banker Home Loans
Call now for pre-approval • 888-317-5416
ColdwellBankerMoves.com
RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE
www.facebook.com/ColdwellBankerWestfield
©2014 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company.
Equal Housing Opportunity. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT, LLC.
agility, endurance, flexibility and
speed. These performances include
dramatic leaps and throws throughout their routines. One girl rises into
the air, while the rest of the team
forms an elevating structure with their
bodies and kicks furiously to push
her up through the water…all with a
smile! The Aquaducks typically practice 6 to 12 hours per week in order to
build their endurance and harmonize
their movements.
As the only competitive team in
N.J., the Aquaducks must travel for
meets. Many of the Aquaducks’ routines regularly qualify to participate
in the Age Group Nationals meet,
which invites only the top age group
athletes to the largest synchronized
swim meet in the world. The annual
show raises funds to help defray the
cost of the team’s travel all over the
U.S.
Please contact Coach Kate Johnson
with any questions or for additional
information
at
aquaducks@westfieldynj.org
SCOTCH PLAINS-FANWOOD
BOARD OF EDUCATION
REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
WINDOW REPLACEMENTS
Notice is hereby given that pursuant to
the requirements of N.J.A.C. 6A:23A-5.2
(a)(5), the Scotch Plains-Fanwood Board
of Education (hereinafter referred to as the
“Board’) is requesting from interested and
qualified firms proposals for architectural
services as outlined in the RFP. The understanding of the parties with respect to
the services to be rendered and the various fee arrangements are required to be
set forth in a formal agreement. The Board
Offices are located at Evergreen Avenue &
Cedar Street, Scotch Plains, New Jersey
07076.
A copy of the RFP may be inspected or
picked up at the Board offices between the
hours of 8:00 AM and 4:00 PM, Monday
through Friday, except Saturday, Sundays
and holidays. Further information may be
obtained by calling Deborah S. Saridaki,
School Business Administrator/Board Secretary at (908) 232-6161 ext. 4013 or email
dsaridaki@spfk12.org.
All vendors submitting proposals must
use and complete all forms and include all
information required in the RFP. An original and two (2) copies of the proposal must
be submitted, in a sealed envelope with
“RFP: Professional Services – Window
Replacement” marked on the front of the
envelope.
Pursuant to P.L 2004, c.57, all proposals
must be accompanied by a New Jersey
Business Registration Certificate issued
by the New Jersey Department of Treasury, Division of Revenue. All vendors are
required to comply with the requirements
of P.L. 1975, c. 127, “Law Against Discrimination” and the Affirmative Action statutes and regulations, N.J.S.A. 10:5-31 et
seq. and N.J.A.C. 17:27-1.1 et seq.
Proposals must be submitted to the
Scotch Plains-Fanwood Board of Education no later than Wednesday, December 3, 2014 at 2:00 PM. If sent by
mail, it should be clearly marked as “Proposal for Architectural Services.” The proposals should be addressed to Scotch
Plains-Fanwood Board of Education, Evergreen Avenue & Cedar Street, Scotch
Plains, New Jersey 07076.
The Board reserves the right to reject
any or all proposals and waive any informality in the process if it is in the best
interests of the Board. No proposal may be
deemed accepted until the adoption of a
formal resolution by the Board.
By order of the Scotch Plains-Fanwood
Board of Education in the County of Union,
New Jersey.
Deborah S. Saridaki
Business Administrator
Board Secretary
1 T - 11/13/14, The Times Fee: $57.63
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWN OF WESTFIELD
NOTICE OF SALE OF REAL ESTATE FOR NON-PAYMENT OF TAXES AND
ASSESSMENTS AND/OR OTHER MUNICIPAL LIENS
Public notice is hereby given that I, The Collector of Taxes of the Town of Westfield,
Union County, New Jersey, will sell at public auction on the 12th day of December, 2014
in the Tax Collector’s office in the Municipal Building, 425 East Broad Street, Westfield,
New Jersey, at nine o’clock in the morning, the following described lands:
The said lands will be sold to make the amount of Municipal liens chargeable against
that same on the 12th day of December, 2014, together with interest and cost of sale,
exclusive however, of the lien for taxes for the year 2014.
The said lands will be sold in fee to such persons as will purchase the same, subject
to redemption at the lowest rate of interest, but in no case in excess of eighteen percent
(18%) per annum. Payments for the sale shall be made by cash or certified check before
conclusion of the sale or the property will be resold.
Any parcel of real property for which there shall be no other purchaser will be struck off
and sold to the Municipality in fee for redemption at eighteen percent (18%) per annum
and the Municipality shall have the right to bar or foreclose the right of redemption.
The sale will be made and conducted in accordance with the provisions of Article 4 of
Chapter 5 of Title 54, Revised Statutes of New Jersey , 1937, and amendments thereto.
At any time before the sale the undersigned will receive payment of the amount due on
the property, with interest and costs incurred up to the time of payments, by certified check
or cash.
Industrial properties may be subject to the Spill Compensation and Control Act
(N.J.S.A. 58:10-23.11 et seq.), the Water Pollution Control Act (N.J.S.A 58:10A-1 et seq.)
and the Industrial Site Recovery Act (N.J.S.A. 13:1K-6 et seq.) In addition, the municipality
is precluded from issuing a tax sale certificate to any prospective purchaser who is or may
be in any way connected to the prior owner or operator of the site.
The said lands so subject to sale, described in accordance with the tax duplicate,
including the name of the owner as shown on the last duplicate and the total amount due
thereon respectively on the 12th day of December, 2014, exclusive of the lien for the year
2014 are as listed below:
Susan Noon
Collector of Taxes
Westfield, New Jersey
BK/LT/QUAL
OWNER
PROPERTY LOCATION
AMOUNT
2512 27
2606 1
4805 4
TAX & SEWER
Centennial Lodge #400 IBOP Elks 440 West Broad Street
$5,053.29
Mormile Brothers
1144 South Avenue West $6,438.78
Billing, Glen A.
923 Columbus Avenue
$13,918.77
2510
2802
3006
3405
3906
4004
4104
4301
4803
4901
5504
Buontempo, Richard A.
Aguirre, Donna Contreras M.
C F G R, LLC
Matos, Nelson
Cacici, Charles J.
Winsor, Barbara Franklin
Vavrica, Anthony J.
Buontempo, Richard
C F G R, LLC
Willoughby, Harry
Kania, Joseph & Suzanne
TAX
10
1
5
7
6
43
11
35
2
45
17
716-718 South Avenue W $5,955.25
601 First Street
$10,628.48
430 Central Avenue
$4,598.83
727 Fourth Avenue
$455.00
299 Springfield Avenue $3,815.24
229 Windsor Avenue
$1,492.22
218 Grove Street West
$5,998.37
670 Vermont Street
$960.23
214 Grove Street East
$54,364.59
1103 Boynton Avenue
$2,495.36
154 Summit Court
$6,311.67
SEWER
703/5 - 831-10
Donofrio, Michael J.
705/10 - 868-0
Maset, Jennifer & Timothy
707/20.01- 919-0 Barham, Patrick A. & Charleen
907/18 - 1378-0 Nuber, Paul T & Mary E
1002/4 - 1420-0 Giere, John P. & Kimberly K. Koivisto
1005/18- 1564-0 Kudlick, Catherine O.
1005/24 - 1570-0 Greene, Desmond & Janice
1111/3- 1792-0 Carey, William & Dallenback, Alison
1203/33- 1877-0 Finter, Steven W.
1304/48- 2130-0 Fitzpatrick, Brian & Jennifer
2003/56-2492-0 Stern- Su-Ellyn
2701/7-3706-0
Robustelli, Christopher & Lorraine
2804/2-4005-0
Schappel, Mark & Kathy
2904/5-4443-0
Fisher, Bruce, Estate of
3002/16-4678-0 Calavano, Joseph & Nina
3506/36-5792-0 Schiff, Jeffery & Joyce M.
4001/5-6138-0
Weiner, Lawrence
4001/22-6155-0 Bolaji, Karen A.
4001/65-6197-0 Cooper, Frederick & Paulette
4002/2-6260-0
Clairborne, Vanita
4002/5-6263-0
Wilkerson, Aman& Friend, Martha
4005/5-6347-0
Todisco, Frank III & Diana
4504/20-7194-0 Konstantinidis,John-Stojcic,Snezana
4801/1- 7608-0 Schuman, Regina
4905/5-8005-0
Lombardo, Jennifer &Francisco,Pinho
5204/24-8827-0 Desapio, Antonio & Martin
5502/13.01-9036-0 Lopes,James & Wisehart, Dana
5504/2-9081-0
Whitman,Andrew E & Victoria L
5505/6-9115-0
Ondi, Peter & Dawn
5714/6-9582-0
113 Connecticut Street Trust
928 Everts Avenue
$208.08
937 Fanwood Avenue
$208.08
215 Brightwood Avenue $199.47
420 Dudley Avenue West $199.62
641 Elm Street
$208.08
150 Dudley Avenue West $208.08
534 Clark Street
$207.84
408 Dudley Avenue East $197.80
601 Chestnut Street North$208.08
711 Girard Avenue
$199.88
128 Woodland Avenue
$208.08
786 West Broad Street
$208.08
702 Shadowlawn Drive
$208.08
614 Dorian Road
$208.08
356 First Street
$151.02
733 Marcellus Drive
$197.39
122 Cacciola Place
$182.55
204 Livingston Street
$208.08
242 Windsor Avenue
$201.17
612 Ripley Place
$158.07
620 Ripley Place
$207.21
313 Myrtle Avenue
$208.08
7 Willow Grove Parkway $208.08
120 Greene Place
$362.48
233 Avon Road
$200.53
25 North Wickom Drive
$208.08
42 Moss Avenue
$208.08
74 Summit Court
$197.40
113 Summit Court
$208.08
113 Connecticut Street
$208.08
In the event that the owner of the property is on Active Duty in the Military Service, the
Tax Collector should be notified immediately.
4 T - 11/13, 11/20, 11/27 & 12/04/14, The Leader
Fee: $579.36
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, November 13, 2014
Page 17
SPF PAL A Raiders Squeak
By Perth Amboy Grid Kids
BONE JARRING HIT...Russell Kobrin, No. 27, delivers a bone-jarring hit to the
Bloomfield quarterback causing a fumble that Russell recovered. Also pictured,
are: Luke Engelke, No. 10 and Jonathan Heard, No. 60. The Westfield PAL
Football C-Team defeated Bloomfield, 19-0, to win their first playoff game. They
are 20-0 in two seasons of play.
Westfield Flyers Advance 22
To Region State Jr. Olympics
Twenty-two athletes from the Flyers Track Club were among the more
than 400 athletes that competed at the
Sate Junior Olympics on November 2
at Rowan College in Sewell. Six athletes finished in the top 10 for their
Division and the 11-12 Boys Team
The Scotch Plains-Fanwood PAL
A football team held off Perth Amboy,
22-20, in the opening round of the
New Jersey Suburban Youth Football
League playoffs held in Bloomfield
on November 9. On November 2, the
Raiders shut out Perth Amboy, 16-0,
to close the regular season.
The 8-0-1 Raiders will clash with
long-time rival Richmond Boro of
Staten Island in the semifinals this
Sunday at a site yet to be determined.
The Raiders shutout Richmond, 7-0,
on September 28. Richmond (7-2)
blanked Sparta, 21-0, in its opening
round. Summit will meet Sayre Woods
South in the other semifinal.
slipped out of the backfield and was
open for a 34-yard TD. That touchdown came on fourth down and 23
yards to go. Fugett’s kick put the
Raiders up at half, 16-13.
Porter scored the eventual winning
touchdown with a one-yard plunge to
give the Raiders a 22-13 lead. Porter’s
crucial 25-yard strike to a diving
Jonathan Ramos at the one set up the
TD. Perth Amboy scored in the fourth
period and had one more drive in the
final minutes, but SPF linebacker
Ryan Johnson picked off a desperate
pass on his 35 to ice the victory.
Strong running by Johnson and
Oslislo keyed the eventual winning
Westfield PAL D Shuts Out
Cranford, 20-0, in Playoffs
Declan LeWarn, Jason Paden, Will
McGlynn, Paul Koizumi, Thomas
Chen, Kyle Tierney and Brian Viscido.
The Flyers Track Club is a USATF
certified club that serves over 700 athletes throughout the year. The club has
spring and summer track programs in
BATTING DOWN THE PASS...Alex Oslislo of the Scotch Plains-Fanwood A
team leaps to bat down a pass, while Mateo Velez provides coverage in the
Raiders’ 22-20 playoff victory over Perth Amboy last Sunday in Bloomfield.
Westfield “Y” Flyers 11-12 Boys State Jr. Olympics qualifiers
took second place in the team competition. Athletes who advanced to the
Regional Junior Olympics will compete in Hershey, Pa. on November 23.
TOP-10 FLYERS:
Age 15-16 Boys’ Division: Thomas
Whitehead – 3rd place.
Age 11-12 Boys’ Division: Ronit Rao –
7th place.
Age 9-10 Boys’ Division: Griffin Murphy
– 10th place.
Ages 9-10 Girls’ Division: Abigail
Granrath – 6th place.
Age 7-8 Boys’ Division: Eamon Mason
– 1st place.
Athletes who finished second as a
team in the 11-12 Boys Division competition included (listed as pictured
from left to right): Dustin Paden,
Westfield, Cranford and Mountainside.
For more information, contact the
club at: www.yflyerstrackclub.com, or
contact Greg Hatzisavvas at (908) 2332700 x251.
Reading is Good For You
goleader.com/subscribe
Courtesy of Laura Ortiz for The Westfield Leader and The Times
FINDING PAYDIRT...Westfield Freshman football team fullback Drew Ortiz,
No. 39, rumbles into the end zone for a touchdown in the 20-7 victory over
Hunterdon Central on November 8.
The A team Raiders, who won the
Super Bowl title on the D level in
2011, had to rally from a 6-0 deficit
and then were forced to thwart a late
drive by Perth Amboy. In the second
quarter, quarterback Anthony Porter
found Nick Merkel open in the end
zone for a six-yard TD. Charlie
Fugett’s kick sent SPF ahead, 8-6.
Perth Amboy retook the lead, but
again Porter came through in the
clutch, hitting Alex Oslislo, who
PUBLIC NOTICE
STATE OF NEW JERSEY
MOTOR VEHICLE COMMISSION
Note complying with N.J.S.A. 39:16-16*,
application has been made to the Chief
Administrator of the NJ MVC, Trenton,
New Jersey, get title papers and issue a
New Jersey Certificate of Ownership for a
1969 Chevrolet Malibu 2dr vin#
136679B346467. Any objections, should
be made in writing within 10 days of the to
the Chief Administrator of the NJ MVC,
Special Title Section, P.O. Box 017, Trenton, New Jersey 08666-0017.
1 T - 11/13/14, The Leader Fee: $13.26
drive. They plowed behind linemen
Nicky Smith, Gianni Caro Esposito,
Bill Root, Matt Fazzino and Jay Jay
Sistrunk. Coming through with key
defensive efforts were ends Teddy
Giandana, who pounced on a fumble,
and Tom Nakonechny, linebackers
Noah Costanzo and Oslislo, who had
an interception, and backs Mateo
Velez and Danny Wright.
The SPF PAL D White team, was
eliminated in the first round with a
14-7 loss to Richmond in Staten Island. The SPF D White team closed
its season with a 6-3 record. Anthony
Robinson scored the lone Raider TD.
The effort by the fifth graders was
a reflection of the season, according
to Shawn Johnson, who served as the
co-head coach with Rob Harmer.
“The whole team played hard and
physical on both sides of the ball,”
Johnson said.
Probitas Verus Honos
The top-seeded, 8-0 Westfield PAL
Football D Team defeated fourthseeded 6-2 Cranford, 20-0, in the first
round of the NJSYFL playoffs on
November 9 at Bloomfield. Westfield
had edged Cranford, 25-6, during the
regular season.
Westfield took the opening drive
62 yards, but a touchdown pass from
Sean Czarnecki to Jack Barker on
fourth-and-goal was called back due
to an illegal procedure penalty. The
Blue Devils then failed to convert.
Cranford then moved the ball for 30
yards, but the Westfield defense
stopped the drive.
Westfield then kept pounding the
ball with their running game. Running backs Jaylen Simpson, Justin
Colby, Jack Barker and Stephen
Angeli each gaining yards on the
drive. Westfield finally got on the
board when tailback Angeli scampered 25 yards for the touchdown and
a 7-0 lead at the half.
“Cranford was very physical up
front, and did not give up any big
plays,” noted coach John Czarnecki.
“We had to work hard for every yard
we got.”
“It was clear we were in a dog
fight,” noted coach Peter Gialluisi.
“Cranford is a very good football
team and they were giving us all they
had.”
Westfield added another drive in
the third quarter and capped it with a
touchdown run by Barker, making
the score 14-0. Simpson added the
final touchdown.
Defensively, Westfield’s shutout
performance was paced by defensive
ends Mark Gialluisi and Barker, tackles Jack Price and Nick Schoen, and
linebackers Aiden Scheper and
Malachi Mercher.
Westfield will face Richmond Boro
this Sunday, November 16, at a neutral site. Richmond Boro edged Scotch
Plains, 14-7.
DIVING FOR THE SCORE...Fullback Jack Barker dives for the score against
Cranford. Blue Devils also pictured are Sean Czarnecki, No. 7, Steven Angeli, No.
1, Justin Colby, No. 39, Mark Gialluisi, No. 6, Dylan Murphy, No. 51, and Jaylen
Simpson, No. 37.
Page 18
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, November 13, 2014
COUNSELING IN WESTFIELD
CLASSIFIEDS
Evening and weekend
appointments available. Horizon
BCBS, Cigna, Qualcare, and
MultiPlan accepted. Convenient
scheduling online with
reminders. Teen-friendly.
Visit amyarmstronglpc.com
or call Amy at (908) 913-0581.
HOUSE CLEANING
Portuguese Cleaning Ladies
Sandra and Christina
Honesty, Excellent References,
Lots of Experience.
Home or Office.
(908) 966-2423
HELP WANTED
FOR SALE
Looking for responsible, reliable,
pet loving adult for part-time pet
sitter/ dog walker position in
Westfield. Must be available days
11am-3pm and the occasional,
night, weekend, or holiday. Must
have dependable transportation.
Call (908) 928-1748
or (908) 416-7434
for more information
and to set up interview.
Solid Wood Crib, Black Finish,
Converts to Full-Sized Headboard.
Sealy Premium Crib Mattress with
Protective Cover. Crib & Mattress
Set, $150. Evenflo High Chair,
$30. All Great Condition. Gently
Used
at
Grandma’s.
Call (908) 654-6091
DAYSI’S CLEANING SERVICES
Are you tired? Let me help you!
Experience & Excellent Work
Residential, Apartments,
Commercial, Offices
Free Estimates 100% Guaranteed
References Available
(908) 510-2542
CHILDCARE NEEDED
Nannies - Housekeepers
BabyNurses Needed
Live-in / -out, Full/Part-time
Solid References Required.
CALL (732) 972-4090
www.absolutebestcare.com
Poll: Camden Remains
Place People Feel Least Safe
STATE — If safety is a consideration when people decide which city
to visit, not all metropolitan centers
in the tri-state area are created equal.
In the most recent statewide survey
of registered voters from Fairleigh
Dickinson University’s PublicMind,
people were asked about how safe
they feel in big cities including Manhattan, Atlantic City, Philadelphia,
Camden, Trenton, and Newark.
As they did in 2011, voters place
Manhattan atop the list of safe cities
to visit. Camden remains the place
where voters feel the least safe. A
third of all respondents say they feel
very safe in the Big Apple (32 percent), with numbers in the single digits for Camden (2 percent). In between are Philadelphia (13 percent),
Atlantic City (11 percent), Newark
(5 percent), and Trenton (7 percent).
PublicMind first asked these questions in 2011, and the numbers have
changed little in the interim.At that time,
NewYork City topped the list for safety,
followed by Atlantic City, Philadelphia,
Trenton, Newark and Camden.
“The traditional ‘tourist’ destinations
like Atlantic City, Philly, and NewYork
City are clearly communicating an ethos
of public safety. Unfortunately, cities
that would like to attract the attention
and dollars of outsiders continue to
struggle with perceptions of danger
lurking around the corner,” said Krista
Jenkins, professor of political science
and director of the poll.
Those who reside in the “urban
core” of the state, or those in Hudson,
Essex, and Union Counties are more
likely to look at Newark and think of
it as a reasonably safe place to visit,
as compared with those who live in
other regions in the state. And, those
who reside in the southern part of the
state, and who are arguably the least
well positioned to visit New York
City, are the least likely to say they
feel very or somewhat safe when they
visit Manhattan (67 percent).
The Fairleigh Dickinson University poll of 1,107 registered voters
in New Jersey was conducted by
telephone with both landline and
cell phones from October 13
through October 19, 2014, and has
a margin of error of +/-2.9 percentage points.
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWN OF WESTFIELD
PLANNING BOARD
NOTICE OF DECISION
On November 3, 2014, the Planning
Board of the Town of Westfield adopted a
Resolution granting Minor Subdivision
approval to the Applicant, Michael
Mahoney, LLC, for the properties located
at 227 & 231 Elizabeth Avenue, Block
4803, Lots 12 & 11.03 on the Tax Map of
the Town of Westfield. The approval will
permit the Applicant to adjust the lot line
between the properties for future singlefamily home construction. A copy of the
Resolution is on file and available for public inspection in the office of the Town
Engineer, 959 North Avenue West,
Westfield, New Jersey, during that Office’s
normal business hours.
HEHL & HEHL, P.C,
Attorneys for the Applicant
1 T - 11/13/14, The Leader Fee: $20.40
HOME HEALTH AIDE
Certified Aide seeks position to
care for sick or elderly.
Live-in/out or hourly, nights or
weekends. Good References.
(973) 763-1438 or (201) 407-1903
FIREWOOD
Split hardwood. Our stock is
90% oak, seasoned for min. of
7 months. Full Cord $180/Half
Cord $100. Free local delivery.
Heron's Tree Service
(908) 757-3318
EMPLOYMENT WANTED
APARTMENT FOR RENT
Certified Home Health Aide
seeking job caring for the sick
and mature. References
available. Own transportation.
(973) 445-6896
Westfield, northside. Attractive
2BR duplex in quiet residential
area. Walk to town & NYC trans.
Updated granite kitchen. DW, W/
D, CAC, Hardwd floors. Off-street
parking. $2000 per month plus
security. (908) 568-1217. No Fee.
PUBLIC NOTICE
SUPERIOR COURT OF NEW JERSEY
CHANCERY DIVISION
UNION COUNTY
DOCKET NO. F-029579-14
FILE NO. 18868-14
NOTICE TO ABSENT DEFENDANT
(L.S.) STATE OF NEW JERSEY TO:
MAHENDRA
MOHAN;
MELINDA MOHAN, HIS WIFE;
ANJANEE MOHAN; MRS.
ANJANEE MOHAN, WIFE OF
ANJANEE MOHAN;
YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED AND
REQUIRED to serve upon PELLEGRINO
AND FELDSTEIN, LLC, plaintiff’s attorneys, whose address is 290 Route 46
West, Denville, New Jersey, an Answer to
the Complaint filed in a Civil Action, in
which FWDSL & ASSOCIATES LP is the
plaintiff and MAHENDRA MOHAN, ET ALS;
are defendants, pending in the Superior
Court of New Jersey, Chancery Division,
UNION County and bearing Docket No. F029579-14 within thirty-five (35) days after
November 13, 2014 exclusive of such
date. If you fail to answer or appear in
accordance with Rule 4:4-6, Judgment by
Default may be rendered against you for
relief demanded in the Complaint. You
shall file your Answer and Proof of Service
in duplicate with the Clerk of the Superior
Court of New Jersey, Hughes Justice Complex - CN 971, Trenton, New Jersey 08625,
in accordance with the Rules of Civil Practice and Procedure.
You are further advised that if you are
unable to obtain an attorney you may communicate with the Lawyer Referral Service
of the County of Venue and that if you
cannot afford an attorney, you may communicate with the Legal Services Office of
the County of Venue. The telephone number of such agencies are as follows: Lawyer Referral Service 908-353-4715 - Legal
Services Office 908-354-4340.
THE ACTION has been instituted for the
purpose of foreclosing the following tax
sale certificate:
1. A certain tax certificate 12-0866, sold
on 6/14/2012, dated 6/20/2012, and was
recorded on 2/19/2014 in Book 13730 at
Page 887, made by MARIA GLAVAN,
Collector of Taxes of PLAINFIELD, and
State of New Jersey to CITY OF
PLAINFIELD and subsequently assigned
to plaintiff, FWDSL & ASSOCIATES LP on
5/14/2014 and was recorded on 6/3/2014
in Assignment Book 1416 at Page 875.
This covers real estate located in
PLAINFIELD, County of UNION, and State
of New Jersey, known as LOT 6 BLOCK
236 as shown on the Tax Assessment Map
and Tax Map duplicate of PLAINFIELD
and concerns premises commonly known
as 116 LIBERTY STREET, PLAINFIELD,
New Jersey.
YOU, MAHENDRA MOHAN; MELINDA
MOHAN, HIS WIFE; and ANJANEE
MOHAN, are made party defendants to the
above foreclosure action because you are
the owners of a property which is the
subject of the above entitled action.
YOU, MRS. ANJANEE MOHAN, WIFE
OF ANJANEE MOHAN, are made party
defendant to the above foreclosure action
because plaintiff has been unable to determine whether defendant ANJANEE
MOHAN is married, and if married, the
name of ANJANEE MOHAN’s spouse. If
ANJANEE MOHAN is married, the plaintiff
joins MRS. ANJANEE MOHAN, WIFE OF
ANJANEE MOHAN as a defendant for any
possessory or marital rights you may have.
DATED: November 7, 2014
Michelle M. Smith, Clerk
Superior Court of New Jersey
PELLEGRINO & FELDSTEIN, L.L.C.
Denville Law Center
290 Route 46 West
Denville, New Jersey 07834
(973) 586-2300
1 T - 11/13/14, The Leader Fee: $76.50
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWN OF WESTFIELD
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
Notice is hereby given that sealed bids
will be received by the Town Clerk of the
Town of Westfield, County of Union, State
of New Jersey, in the Town of Westfield
Municipal Building Court Room, 425 East
Broad Street on Tuesday, December 9,
2014, at 10:00 a.m. for:
TENNIS COURT RECONSTRUCTION AT TAMAQUES
PARK
in accordance with Drawings and Specifications prepared by Greene Engineering, Inc., Flemington, New Jersey. No bids
shall be received after the time designated
above.
Plans and specifications will be available for pick up on Monday, November 17,
2014.
One set of complete documents may be
obtained upon the payment of Fifty dollars
($50.00) per project for each set, refundable to Bidders only. Drawings and Specifications are on file at the Recreation office
and may be examined and obtained there
between the hours of 9:00 A.M. and 4:00
P.M. daily except Saturday, Sunday and
holidays. Checks must be made payable
to the order of the “Town of Westfield”.
Bidders must use, and fully complete the
proposal pages included with the specifications furnished by the Owner and comply with all requirements attached thereto,
including the following:
1. An experience record of the bidder;
2. Certified Check or a Bid Bond in an
amount not less than 10% of the amount
for which the bid is submitted, but not in
excess of $20,000.00, furnished by a Surety
Company licensed to do business in the
State of New Jersey;
3. A Non-Collusion Affidavit;
4. A Consent of Surety;
5. Qualification Statement; and,
6. Ownership disclosure statement;
7. Affirmative Action Information.
Each bid must be submitted and enclosed in a sealed envelope with the name
and address of the bidder and the project
title and contract number clearly shown on
the face of the envelope.
The bid shall be directed to the attention
of:
Town Clerk
Town of Westfield
Municipal Building
425 East Broad Street
Westfield, New Jersey 07090-2196
The Owner expressly reserves the right
to reject any or all bids, accept and enter
into contract with the lowest responsible
bidder for the project, or combined projects,
or to waive any informalities in the bids and
accompanying documents received,
should it be deemed to be in the best
interest of the Owner.
The Owner also reserves the right to
correct any erroneous mathematical computations in any proposals submitted, and
to consider the bid on the basis of the
corrected total or totals. The written figures
shall prevail over the numerical figures.
Bidders are required to comply with the
requirements of P.L. 1975, c. 127 (N.J.A.C.
17:27 et seq.) entitled “Law Against Discrimination”.
Bidders are required to comply with the
requirements of P.L. 1999, c. 39 (N.J.S.A.
40A:11-23.1 and 40A:11-23.2).
Bidders are required to comply with the
requirements of PL. 1999, C.238 The Public Works Contractor Registration Act.
Bidders are required to comply with the
requirements of P.L. 2004, c. 57 New Jersey Business Registration Act.
M. Bruce Kaufmann,
Recreation Director
1 T - 11/13/14, The Leader Fee: $73.95
TREATS FOR OUR TROOPS...Dr. Timothy McCabe, owner of Westfield
Pediatric Dental Group, is pictured with boxes of candy collected from local
children that will be sent to United States troops serving in Iraq and Afghanistan
as a “sweet” thank you for their efforts.
Dr. McCabe and Kids Give
Troops Happy Halloween
WESTFIELD — Dr. Timothy
McCabe and the staff of Westfield
Pediatric Dental Group were joined
by many local children in making
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS
NOTICE TO BIDDERS
NOTICE is hereby given that sealed bids
will be received by the Township of Scotch
Plains, in the County of Union, State of
New Jersey, at the office of the Township
Clerk, Scotch Plains Municipal Building,
430 Park Avenue, Scotch Plains, New
Jersey, 07076 (ATTN: Bozena Lacina,
Township Clerk) on or before Tuesday,
December 9, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. prevailing
time or as soon thereafter as the matter
may be reached, for “Scotch Hills Country Club Roof Replacement” in accordance with the Specifications and Information to Bidders provided by the Township. At that time and place, such bids will
be publicly opened and read aloud. No
bids shall be received other than at the
time and place herein designated for their
receipt, unless mailed to the Township
Clerk for receipt at the designated time
and place.
Copies of the Bid Documents may be
obtained during regular business hours
from the Township Clerk A non-refundable
fee of $25.00 in the form of a check or
money order payable to ‘Barton Ross &
Partners, LLC,” is required for each complete set of Bid Documents. Partial sets will
not be provided.
The recommended pre-bid conference
and walk-through will be conducted on:
Tuesday, November 18, 2014 at lOam.
Please meet at the front door of the Project
Site: 820 Jerusalem Road, Scotch Plains,
New Jersey.
A certified check, cashier’s check or bid
bond in the amount often percent (10%) of
the bid, but in no case in excess of twenty
thousand dollars ($20,000), must be submitted with the bid guaranteeing that if a
contract is awarded, the bidder shall execute the contract.
Bidders are required to comply with the
requirements of N.J.S.A. 10:5-31 et seq.
and N.J.A.C. 17:27 and all other applicable statutes, laws or regulations.
Bidders are required to submit a valid
Business Registration Certificate from the
State of New Jersey Department of Treasury, Division of Revenue.
Each bid shall be enclosed in a sealed
envelope addressed to the Township Clerk,
bearing the name and address of the bidder, upon which shall be designated:
“Scotch Hills Country Club Roof Replacement”
The Township reserves the right to reject any and all bids under the provisions of
N.J.S.A. 40A: 11-13.2.
BY ORDER OF THE TOWNSHIP OF
SCOTCH PLAINS, IN THE COUNTY OF
UNION AND STATE OF NEW JERSEY.
Jerry Giaimis
Township Manager
Bozena Lacina
Township Clerk
1 T - 11/13/14, The Times Fee: $57.63
sure United States soldiers serving in
Iraq and Afghanistan have a very
happy Halloween. For the past 10
years, Westfield Pediatric Dental
Group has been buying back Halloween candy from children after Halloween and sending it to the troops.
Each box sent to the troops contains
candy, letters and drawings from the
children, snapshots of the children,
toothbrushes, toothpaste, and floss.
Each year more candy is collected
than the year before. Dr. McCabe,
owner of the practice, said, “I can’t
believe how much candy we collected this year — 18 boxes — weighing close to 400 pounds.” Westfield
Pediatric Dental Group pays the children for the amount of candy they
bring in. The child who brings in the
most candy will win four tickets to go
see a movie of their choice. The parents receive some peace of mind that
their children are not overloading on
too much candy; the soldiers are given
a treat to show everyone’s appreciation for their hard work and dedication.
PUBLIC NOTICE
TOWNSHIP OF SCOTCH PLAINS
ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the Zoning Board of Adjustment of the Township of
Scotch Plains, at its November 6, 2014
public meeting, adopted a resolution granting the undersigned the relief described
below in connection with the addition of a
second outdoor swimming pool, adjacent
to the existing swimming pool, at the Jewish Community Center of Central New Jersey site, on premises located at 1391
Martine Avenue, and shown on the Tax
Maps of the Township of Scotch Plains as
Block 10401, Lot 1.0101. The relief granted
is as follows:
1. A variance, pursuant to N.J.S.A.
40:55D-70d(3) regarding deviation from a
conditional use standard, as to the requirement in §23-5.2f1(e) of the Scotch
Plains Zoning Ordinance, which requires
that all activities on-site be carried on within
an enclosed building.
2. A variance from §23-3.4A and the
schedule thereto, with regard to maximum
percentage of lot coverage.
3. A waiver of site plan approval.
Copies of the resolution, application,
plans and other supporting documents are
on file in the Office of the Zoning Board of
Adjustment, 430 Park Avenue, 2nd Floor,
Scotch Plains, New Jersey 07076, and are
available there for public inspection during
regular business hours, Monday through
Friday, except holidays.
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER OF
CENTRAL NEW JERSEY
1391 Martine Avenue
Scotch Plains, New Jersey 07076
1 T - 11/13/14, The Times Fee: $34.17
Goods & Services You Need
JONES
CONSTRUCTION
BLACK TOP
COMMITTED TO SUPERIOR
QUALITY & CRAFTMANSHIP
PAVING
DRIVEWAYS
PARKING LOTS
908-380-9984
CONCRETE
BRICK PAVERS
Additons • Alterations • Excavating
Waterproofing • Hardscapes • Decks
908-889-4422
NJ LIC # 13VH08056400
FREE ESTIMATES
30 Years
Experience
Grandfather clock repair
Howard Miller Certified service technician
We make house calls • All types of watch and clock repair
Handyman
Lawn Sprinklers
(908) 276-1062
www.Hydro-TekLtd.com
JK’s Painting &
Wall Covering
OLIVER A
PAVING
Interior Painting
Wallpaper Removal
Wallpaper Installation
Plaster & Sheet Rock Repair
Call Joe Klingebiel
908-322-1956
Howarth Paving
908-753-7281
FULLY INSURED
FREE ESTIMATES
Mr. Reliable
(908) 462.4755
PAINTING
MARINO’S PAINTING
“The Neatest Painter Around”
• Interior & Exterior Painting
• Expert preparation & clean-up
• Paper Hanging & Wall Paper Removal
• Sheetrock & Trimwork - Powerwashing
• Deck Repairs & Staining - Driveway Seal Coating
• We Clean Windows & Gutters • Hepa Vacuum Sanding
Lic. # 13VH01137900
908-688-0481
RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL
Recessed Lighting
Service Upgrades
Phones & Cable Lines
Additions and Renovations
Builders & Contractors Welcome
NJ Lic # 10421
Member of BBB
20 Years in Business
908.654.0287 • SERVICE CALLS
Single Size: 10 Weeks $275 • Double Size: 10 Weeks $425 • Call 908-232-4407 • email PDF Ad to sales@goleader.com
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Thursday, November 13, 2014
Page 19
Holiday Journey With
Celebration Singers Planned
MONTCLAIR — The Montclair
Film Festival announced that its 4th
annual Behind the Screen: Media
Careers 101 program, presented in
partnership with The Montclair
State University, is scheduled for
Saturday, November 22. The daylong event features free panels with
leading professionals across the film
and television industry that offer
insights into the variety of careers
available in today’s media landscape
and the process of creating a career
in film production. Behind the
Screen is a partnership between the
Montclair Film Festival and
Montclair State University.
This year’s panels include “Moving Into The Director’s Chair,” featuring Michael Slovis (Breaking
Bad, Game Of Thrones) and Laura
Belsey (Criminal Minds); “Illuminating The Gaffer” with Andy Day
(The Departed); “Producing For
Film & Television” with Eileen
Bernstein (Live From Lincoln Center) and Alexandra Jewitt (Operation Homecoming); “Storytelling In
Reality Television” with Banks
Tarver (Mob Wives Chicago) and
Rob Sharenow (Storage Wars),
“Documentary Filmmaking” with
Paul Lovelace (Iris, Radio Unnameable) and Jessica Wolfson (A Girl
and A Gun, Radio Unnameable) ;
“Publicity and Social Media” with
Charlie Olsky (Cinetic Media) and
Kristin Wald (Social Media); and
“The Art of The Promo” with John
Kelleher (HBO). Additional guest
speakers will be added in the coming weeks.
“We are proud to host the 4th
annual Behind The Screen program,” said Daniel Gurskis, Dean
of the College of the Arts at
Montclair State University. “This
year’s program offers a unique opportunity to find out what it’s really
like behind the scenes of dynamic
media careers in everything from
documentary filmmaking to reality
TV.”
“We are so pleased to continue
our partnership with Montclair State
University on this important program,” said Montclair Film Festival Executive Director Tom Hall.
“Behind The Screen represents the
cornerstone of our commitment to
educating our community about the
professional vitality of film and tele-
Town Book Store to
Host Ken Ludmer
WESTFIELD – The Town Book
Store will be hosting a meet and greet
for Westfield resident Ken Ludmer
on Saturday, November 15 from 2 to
4 p.m.
In his poignant memoir, “Insanity
Begins at Home, Surviving Ma, and
the Road: A Therapist’s Memoir”,
Mr. Ludmer details his often raucous,
always conflicted, and yet loving relationship with his mother. After sixty
plus years of their epic battle, Mr.
Ludmer and his Ma attempt to heal
their wounds as he cares for her, following her broken hip at age 91. In
the last 18 months of her once brave
and independent, world-traveling life,
they tell their stories to one another.
He had hitchhiked America and Europe, as a young man, and she always
knew what was best for everyone.
Except him.
Mr. Ludmer received his Master’s
from Columbia University. He has
been a family therapist in Westfield
for 37 years and former presidentelect of the American Association of
Family Therapy, N.J. He has acted in
the Westfield Community Players and
plays guitar in Greenwich Village. He
is the father of Joshua and Alyson,
and he resides in Westfield.
The Town Book Store is located at
270 East Broad Street in Westfield
(corner of East Broad and Elmer
Streets). If you are unable to attend
this event, you can call The Town
Book Store at (908) 233-3535 to reserve an autographed copy of “Insanity Begins at Home, Surviving Ma,
and the Road.”
vision.”
The Behind the Screen program
takes place on Saturday, November
22 Montclair State University’s University Hall 1070 & 1060 from
10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. The program is
free and open to the public.
To ensure a space, please preregister
by
visiting
www.montclairfilmfest.org.
Choral Soc. to Present
Journey to Christmas
PLAINFIELD – Crescent Concerts
continues its 33rd Season with The
Journey to Christmas, which will be
presented by the Crescent Choral
Society on Saturday, November 15 at
8 p.m. at the historic Crescent Avenue
Presbyterian Church, 716 Watchung
Avenue, Plainfield. Artistic Director,
F. Allen Artz III, will conduct the
choir in a performance of Vivaldi’s
Magnificant, Saint-Saens’ Oratorio
de Noel and Pinkham’s Christmas
Cantata. These three choral masterpieces from three different centuries
will be the perfect beginning for your
own journey into the season of Christmas.
From the 18th century we begin
our journey with the stirring Vivaldi
Magnificat, the classic choral setting
of the song of Mary. Then from the
19th century, the concerty will continue with the thrilling Saint-Saëns
Oratorio de Noël, a work with lovely
duets, trios, quartets and even a quintet of soloists. The journey ends with
the 20th century classic Daniel
Pinkham’s Christmas Cantata that
really prepares listeners for the joyous season of Christmas to come.
The Crescent Choral Society will be
accompanied on the mighty Gilbert
Adams organ with Brenda Day at the
keys.
General admission for the concert
is $20, seniors are $15, and students
are $5. Call (908) 756-2468 or visit
www.crescentconcerts.org for more
information about this and upcoming
concerts.
Art on the Hill Event to
Feature Westfield Artist
STIRLING – Artists Marie
Ozmon of North Plainfield, and Jody
Pfeiffer of Westfield, will exhibit
their latest works at Art on the Hill,
at The Shrine of St. Joseph, located
at 1050 Long Hill Road in Stirling.
This unique evening of fine art and
music, as well as food and drink,
will take place on Saturday, November 15. The third biennial Art
on the Hill event begins at 8 p.m. in
the Shrine Auditorium.
Ms. Ozmon makes garden-inspired two and three dimensional
multi-media artworks, whimsical interpretations of textures, structures
and colors observed in various
neighborhood gardens in NJ and
California. Ms. Pfeiffer is an accomplished photographer who enjoys doing nature studies.
The group art show will feature
the works of 15 accomplished area
artists, some of whom are quite well
known in their media. In addition,
each of the artists has donated an
original piece of art for an art drawing which will take place that
evening. (Attendees will drop tick-
ARB Announces Dates for
Annual Nutcracker Season
PRINCETON - American Repertory Ballet’s (ARB) 2014 Nutcracker Season will run Saturday,
November 22 through Sunday, December 21 at venues across New
Jersey: Union County Performing
Arts Center in Rahway, McCarter
Theatre in Princeton, Patriots Theater at the War Memorial in Trenton, Algonquin Arts Theatre in
Manasquan, and State Theatre in
New Brunswick. ARB’s Nutcracker
is a holiday classic featuring
Tchaikovsky’s score and a cast of
over 100 performers, featuring the
professional, international dancers
of American Repertory Ballet and
select students from Princeton Ballet School, the official school of
ARB. A holiday tradition since
Union Photographer to
Exhibit at Pearl St. Gallery
ELIZABETH – The Union County
Board of Chosen Freeholders will
present an exhibit of photographs by
Sheilia R. Lenga of Union in the gallery space at the Union County Office
of Cultural and Heritage Affairs, located in the historic St. John’s Parsonage at 633 Pearl Street in Elizabeth. A
selection of her work entitled “Photos
from SouthAfrica by Sheilia R. Lenga”
is on display at the Pearl Street Gallery
through Wednesday, December 31.
The public is invited to enjoy the exhibit during gallery hours, 8:30 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. weekdays.
“The talent and diversity of our
county artists assure an inspiring variety of exhibitions at the Pearl Street
Gallery,” said Freeholder Bette Jane
Kowalski, liaison to the Union County
Cultural and Heritage Advisory Board.
“We are pleased to display Ms. Lenga’s
intriguing photographs.”
Ms. Lenga became involved with
the Cranford Camera Club in New
Jersey, and served as its president,
eventually merging it with the Millburn
Camera Club. She joined the Board of
the Westfield Art Association and also
was the founding President of the Contemporary
Art
Group
(www.contemporaryartgroup.org). For
10 years she curated art exhibits at the
Spanish Tavern Restaurant in
Mountainside.
She has exhibited her work in many
solo and multi-artist shows and galleries, including the Watchung Art Center, the Les Malamut Gallery in Union,
the Arts Guild of Rahway, Overlook
Hospital, NJ Workshop for the Arts,
Salem Roadhouse Café, the Plainfield
Arts Festival and many others. Her
photographs are in private collections
in Arizona, Mexico, Canada, Boston,
St. Maarten, New York and New Jersey.
Union County artists (whose works
can be hung on a wall) interested in
exhibiting in the gallery space are welcome to apply. For more information
about the Pearl Street Gallery or other
programs, please contact the Union
County Office of Cultural and Heritage Affairs, 633 Pearl Street, Elizabeth. Free on-site parking is available.
For more information call (908) 5582550 or email culturalinfo@ucnj.org.
) *
& )
!% ) +"&#
"& '++
ets in vessels placed in front of each
piece; a lucky winner will be drawn
for each donated work of art.)
Other participating visual artists,
who represent the mediums of watercolor, acrylic, oil, photography,
fiber art, pottery, and sculpture, include: Hank Buntin, Marie Burns,
Tom Butler, Joanne Collins, Diane
Gallo, Liz Heine, Betty Ann Kelly,
Don Kuhn, Betty McGeehan,
Masako Murphy, Mim Pastino, and
Frank Shyers. Artists will exhibit
several pieces of their work, most
of which will be for sale.
Musicians who will entertain throughout the event include Cathy Bush, Dan
Gates, and “friends.” In addition to the
arts, the evening includes wine and hors
d’oeuvres, desserts and coffee.
Tickets to this fundraising event
are $25 a person; five art drawing
tickets are included in the ticket
price. Additional art drawing tickets will be available for purchase
during the evening. Tickets will be
available at the door the night of Art
on the Hill. There is ample free
parking in the Shrine parking lot.
'# ! )(
+"+
"& #"#
1964, ARB’s is the longest-running
Nutcracker production in New Jersey and one of the longest consecutively-running in the United States.
The company will begin its 2014
Nutcracker season at Union County
Performing Arts Center’s main stage
in Rahway on Saturday, November 22
at 2 p.m. ARB’s Nutcracker will be at
McCarter Theatre in Princeton for
Thanksgiving weekend: Wednesday,
November 26 at 7 p.m. and Friday,
November 28 and Saturday, November 29 at 1 p.m. and 4:30 p.m. On
Saturday, December 6 at 1 p.m. and
4:30 p.m. ARB’s Nutcracker will be at
Patriots Theater at the War Memorial
in Trenton. Performances at Algonquin
Arts Theatre in Manasquan are the
following weekend on Saturday, December 13 at 1:p.m. and 4:30 p.m. and
on Sunday, December 14 at 3 p.m. The
closing weekend of ARB’s Nutcracker
will be at State Theatre in New
Brunswick, with performances on Friday, December 19 at 7:30 p.m. and
Saturday, December 20 and Sunday,
December 21 at 1 p.m. and 4:30 p.m.
These performances at State Theatre
will feature a live orchestra, conducted
by Maestro Michael Pratt, and the
Princeton GirlChoir.
ARB will be holding its annual
“Nutcracker Sweets” party on November 28 at 3:15 p.m. between the 1
p.m. and 4:30 p.m. performances at
McCarter Theatre. At “Nutcracker
Sweets,” families can enjoy homemade treats; tea, coffee, and hot cocoa served in china teacups; story
time; and free photos with costumed
characters. Tickets for “Nutcracker
Sweets” are sold separately from performance tickets, but they are also
available by calling the McCarter box
office at (609) 258-ARTS (2787).
Please contact Development Coordinator Vanessa Ramalho with any questions: vramalho@arballet.org, (732)
249-1254 ext. 20. Tickets are still
available.
GREEN HOUSE TOUR...This environmentally “green “ home on Minisink Way
in Westfield is one of the four classic homes on the Deck the Halls Holiday House
Tour sponsored by the Rake and Hoe Garden Club of Westfield scheduled for
Saturday, December 6 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Rake and Hoe Deck the
Hall House Tour Planned
WESTFIELD – The Deck the Halls
Holiday House Tour of four elegant
homes in Westfield, which is scheduled for Saturday, December 6 will
have interior and exterior holiday
designs by the talented gardeners and
floral designers of the Rake and Hoe
Garden Club of Westfield. Only presented every four years because of
the intense planning and execution of
detail, the 2014 Holiday House Tour
will be an outstanding effort on the
part of every club member. Each
home will be decorated with a different theme depending on the character
of the home
The homes, which include a shingle
clad home built in 1905, a colonial
revival shingle style home built in
1906, a certified “green home” built
in 2011, and a Dutch Colonial in
Indian Forest remodeled in 2011, will
also be decorated for the holidays by
the creative members of the Rake and
Hoe Garden Club of Westfield. Tour
tickets can be purchased from members, at Baron’s Drug Store, Williams
Nursery, Christoffer’s Flowers and
Gifts, and Coldwell Banker on Central Avenue, Westfield for $35 in advance, and on the day of the tour for
$40 each. They will also be available
at the tour homes and the boutique at
the First United Methodist Church, 1
East Broad Street, Westfield, which
also will have unique gifts and creative decorations for the holidays.
The Holiday House Tour is the
Rake and Hoe Garden Club’s pri-
Enlow Hall to Present
Vienna Boys Choir
UNION – Gene & Shelley Enlow
Recital Hall at Kean University will
present the Vienna Boys Choir in
Christmas in Vienna on Saturday,
December 6 at 7:30 p.m. Christmas in
Vienna encompasses Austrian folk
songs and waltzes, classical masterpieces, and, of course, beloved holiday favorites. Over the past six centuries, the famed Vienna Boys Choir
has delighted music-lovers across the
globe with their purity of tone, distinctive charm and diverse, crowd
pleasing repertoire.
Tickets to Vienna boys Choir in
Enlow Hall range from $35 to $55
and can be purchased by calling Kean
Stage Box Office at (908) 737-SHOW
(7469),
online
at
http://
EnlowHall.kean.edu or in person at
Kean University’s Wilkins Theater
Box Office, 1000 Morris Avenue,
Union.
Situated on Kean University’s East
Campus, 215 North Avenue, Hillside,
Enlow Hall is renowned for its superb
acoustics and elegant design. With
just 300 seats, Enlow Hall has been
praised by noted performers and patrons for its intimate ambiance and
close proximity between musicians
and audience members. Free onsite
parking is available at every concert.
For complete Enlow Hall Season
information,
please
visit
enlowhall.kean.edu.
mary source of revenue in support of
their many service projects to the
town, county, and state. As a volunteer organization, the garden club
provides service to the community by
maintaining the gardens found at the
northside of the Westfield Train Station, the Miller Cory House Museum,
the Shadowlawn Pocket Park (a Blue
Star Memorial), and the Claire
Brownell Wildflower Garden at the
Reeve House, the home of the
Westfield Historic Society, as well as
projects for Mobile Meals, Lyons
Veterans Hospital, and the Jardine
Academy for special needs children.
For information on how to join,
please contact Karen Jolley-Gates,
club president, at (908) 233-5125.
For more information, see the club
website at www.rakeandhoe.org
The Harrison home, located at 1011
Minisink Way, was built in 2011 by
Anastasia Harrison, an environmentally-conscious architect. Her goal
was to build a home for her family
that achieved high-silver or low gold
LEED certification from the New
Jersey Green Council. This home’s
features show the owner’s dedication
to leaving a minimal environmental
footprint.
The Womelsdorf home, one of the
four stately homes, is located at 288
Watchung Fork in Westfield. A handsome, sprawling stone Dutch Colonial built in 1934, it was renovated in
2011. The interior of the home is
enhanced by many fine design elements. The large living room, decorated in the French Country style, is
painted a brilliant bamboo shoot
green, which gives the illusion of
bringing the lovely grounds into the
interior of the house.
The Jaruzelski home, located at
210 South Euclid Ave., is one of the
four elegant homes on the tour. This
home, a colonial in the revival shingle
style, was built in 1906 by Walter J.
Lee, a real estate developer and publisher of The Westfield Leader. The
current owners purchased the property from Mr. Lee’s daughter-in-law
in nearly its original condition. The
interior combines classical as well as
arts and crafts elements.
The Toricollo home, located at 625
Westfield Avenue is a single clad neoclassical home features a wrap-around
porch with ionic columns and a unique
entryway with a full beveled glass
door, elegant leaded glass sidelights,
and an outstanding leaded glass elliptical transom. All of the wood detailing on the first floor including door
and window casings, baseboard moldings, doors, and the staircase are of
American chestnut, which is now extinct due to a blight in the early part of
the 20th century.
“The tour showcases the incredible
creativity of our many talented members for the public’s enjoyment. After having seen the tour once, many
viewers are excited to see the tour
again, and sorry to have to wait the
four years until the next one,” said
Ms. Jolley-Gates.
ORCHESTRAL PERFORMANCE...Westfield’s Roosevelt Intermediate School
choral students performed with the New Jersey Festival Orchestra in the final
movement to Gustav Holst’s “The Planets” in weekend concerts held in Westfield
and Basking Ridge on September 20 and 21.
creative framing
simply...
Annual Behind The Screen
Program to be Held at MSU
dards to the performance of the variety of songs. Celebration Singers’
mission is to bring before as wide
an audience as possible the beauty,
richness, and excitement of not only
a valuable segment of American culture, “the Classic American Popular Song,” but of songs of many
styles and from other cultures. At
the same time, they look to provide
a more diverse musical education to
our children and adult chorus members and audience alike. It continues to grow in scope, appeal, and
audience and member enthusiasm.
Funding for the Celebration Singers is made possible in part by the
New Jersey State Council for the
Arts, Department of State, through
a grant administered by the Union
County Office of Cultural and Heritage Affairs. For more information,
please visit celebration-singers.org,
e
m
a
i
l
celebrationsingersnewjersey@gmail.com,
or leave a voice mail at (908) 5524656.
creative framing
BRIDGING THE GAP...12-year-old Florian Schantz of Westfield played with his
jazz combo to a full house at the NJ Veterans Home in Menlo Park, NJ. After the
performance, Florian spent time with the veterans honoring their service to our
country.
CRANFORD – Under the direction of Brian Clissold and Jennifer
Jenkins, The Celebration Singers
are preparing for their winter performance “A Holiday Journey with
The Celebration Singers” at St.
Michael’s Church, 40 Alden Street,
Cranford, on Friday, December 5
and Saturday, December 6 at 8 p.m.
Tickets can be purchased online at
celebration-singers.org or through
the phone at (908) 552-4656.
The Celebration Singers is a nonprofit musical entertainment organization whose goal is to reach out
to as many people as possible in as
many different environments so as
to expose people to the art of music.
Diverse programs give audiences
the opportunity to experience a
wealth of musical styles and disciplines, and see this music performed
by children and adults.
Although many outstanding choral groups exist in New Jersey, there
are few groups that bring the same
rigorous and exacting musical stan-
Art • Framing • Gifts • Home Accents • Unique Jewelry
Conservation Framing • Sports Memorabilia & Jerseys
Shadow Boxes • Graduation Diplomas • Mirrors
Corporate & Home Consultations
Holiday Jazz Night
Friday, Dec. 5th, 7pm - 9pm
6th Annual Boutique Show
Saturday, Dec. 6 & Sunday, Dec. 7th
10am - 5pm
908-272-3030
Visit our website to view merchandise &
upcoming events: www.simplyartandframes.com
Mon 12-4; Tues, Wed & Fri 10-6; Thurs 10-7; Sat 10-5
Page 20
The Westfield Leader and The Scotch Plains – Fanwood TIMES
Thursday, November 13, 2014
A WATCHUNG COMMUNICATIONS, INC. PUBLICATION
Westfield High School Theatre to Present
Award Winning “The Laramie Project”
WESTFIELD – The Westfield
High School Theatre Department will
present its fall drama, “The Laramie
Project,” the award-winning play
about the 1998 murder of Matthew
Shepard, a gay college student, in
Laramie, Wyoming.
Performances of “The Laramie
Project” will be held at 4 p.m. on
Thursday, November 20; and at 7:30
p.m. Friday, November 21 and Saturday, November 22.
The show will feature a cast of 21
students playing more than 80 different characters, including
Shepard’s friends and family, area
residents, local clergy, police, medical professionals and fellow students
at the University of Wyoming.
Cast members are: Colin Barry,
Alex Cestero, Daniel Coelho, Jackie
Daaleman, Lauren Echausse, Alex
Frisch, Isabella Gelfand, Frank
Guerriero, Madeline Hudelson,
Alexandra Jackman, Katherine Ko,
Olivia Kuzman, Madelyn Metzger,
Julian Mone, Emmanuelle Nadeau,
Tony Peer, Michael Poyntz,
Madeleine Rosenthal, Lisa Simon,
Connor Wynne, and Jesse
Zimmermann.
The emotional, documentary-style
play examines Shepard’s death
through the eyes of the citizens of
Laramie. It was created by Moisés
Kaufman and the members of Tectonic Theater Project through interviews with hundreds of people. Much
of the dialogue is transcribed directly from those interviews.
“Actually, the show is not really
about Mr. Shepard’s murder, but
rather its aftermath,” said director
Daniel Devlin, who is also the
school’s drama teacher. “Through
the hundreds of interviews conducted
by the Tectonic Theater Project, we
see that each person in Laramie
viewed the event through their own
lens, and responded in ways that
reflected their own values and experience.”
“We hope the show challenges our
audience to consider their own personal responses to the issues of injustice and cruelty raised in this production,” Mr. Devlin said.
Shepard’s brutal murder drew national attention at the time, and mo-
tivated efforts to combat anti-gay
violence and other hate crimes.
Senior Michael Poyntz, who plays
five characters in the show, including Shepard’s father, said that while
today’s young people may be more
open-minded than previous generations, it’s still common to hear the
word “gay” or “homo” used as a slur,
and for people to be considered inferior because of their perceived sexuality. He hopes the show will help
change that behavior.
“The entire cast and crew feel
proud to be communicating the
show’s important and relevant messages about acceptance, compassion,
and understanding,” said Mr. Poyntz.
In keeping with the show’s documentary style, the set is minimal, but
evocative. Set designer Roy Chambers, a teacher at the high school, has
incorporated imagery of the split-rail
fence that Shepard was found tied to,
as well as large video screens whose
images change during the show.
The stage manager for “The
Laramie Project” is Stephen
Bubniak, a senior, and assistant stage
manager is sophomore Matthew
Hopen. Other students leaders on
the technical crew include Katie
Brown and Ted Dannevig (lighting
and sound); Jack Frankola and Sarah Morton (set construction); OC
Szwarc and Maddie Kevelson (costumes); Ellie Smith (props);
Alexandra Safonov (hair and
makeup); and Rita Murphy (graphic
design).
Tickets for “The Laramie Project,”
which are general admission seating, are $12 each. They are available
by
visiting
the
website
teacherdjd.wix.com/whstheatredept.
They also will be on sale at the door
on the evenings of the shows.
All performances are at Westfield
High School, 550 Dorian Road,
Westfield. Due to the mature nature
of the play’s mature subject matter
and language, parental discretion is
advised.
Westfield High School’s Theatre
Department has won multiple awards
for its innovative choices and highcaliber performances. Its 2013 fall
drama, “Metamorphoses” won the
top prize at the Montclair State University Theater Awards earlier this
year.
Information about the Matthew
Shepard Foundation, the advocacy
group founded by Mr. Shepard’s parents,
can
be
found
at
www.matthewshepard.org.
REHEARSING FOR LARAMIE...Westfield High School students rehearsed a
scene from The Laramie Project, the school's fall drama, which will run Thursday,
November 20, Friday, November 21, and Saturday, November 22. Pictured from
left are: Frank Guerriero, Julian Mone (standing), Isabella Gelfand, Michael
Poyntz, Colin Barry, and Alex Cestero.
"The Art of Photography" by Jim O'Connor of Scotch Plains
Scotch Plains-Fanwood HS Marching Band
Clinches Group 6A National Championship
ALLENTOWN, PA – The Scotch
Plains-Fanwood High School
(SPFHS) Marching Band capped an
undefeated competition season on
November 8 by sweeping the awards
in Group 6A at the US Bands A Class
National Championships show at J.
Birney Crum Stadium in Allentown,
Pa. With an overall score of 92.875,
the SPFHS Raiders band took first
place in Group 6A, plus the awards for
Best Color Guard, Best Percussion,
Best Music, Best Visuals and Best
Overall Effect.
SPFHS also received the U.S. Army
Award of Excellence, presented by the
Army to the band “that best displays the
values and beliefs of the Army and
Youth Education in theArts' programs.”
The 181-member SPFHS band competed against Tottenfield High School
from Staten Island, New Providence
High School, Fort Lee High School and
Jackson Memorial High School.A total
of 81 bands from seven states participated in the all-day event. The bands
are grouped by number of performing
members, with Group 6A including
bands of more than 135 students.
The National Championship followed SPFHS victories in previous
weeks at the annual Yamaha Cup competition at MetLife Stadium and the US
Bands Group 6A New Jersey State
Championship at the Rutgers University stadium. The SPFHS 2014 show,
"Il Cuore di Romano," has a Roman
Empire theme and includes props simulating Roman ruins.
The 2014 SPFHS student drum ma-
jors are Emily Fidlow, Liz Casserly and
Michael Lange. Band director Durand
Thomas is supported by assistant directors John Gillick and Charlie Jackson
and color guard head Jackie Tumolo.
The marching band will next perform
in Scotch Plains-Fanwood’s Memorial
Day Parade in May 2015, but other
SPFHS music department activities
continue during the winter, including
four jazz bands led by the award-winning Moonglowers and a spring musical play presented by the school’s Rep
Theater group.
USBands, a program of Youth
Education in the Arts, is a competitive circuit for scholastic band programs nationwide and has a membership of more than 700 high school
marching bands.
THEY ARE THE CHAMPIONS...The Scotch Plains-Fanwood High School
Marching Band won the Group 6A National Championship in Allentown, P.A. on
November 8.
NO HEAT?
We can help!
CALL NOW FOR A FREE ESTIMATE
877-893-0084
WeltmanHomeServices.com
$500 OFF
ON THE INSTALLATION OF A NEW HEATING SYSTEM
Offer expires 12/31/14
0% APR FINANCING
60 MONTHS TO PAY
0% APR financing with 60 months to pay. Financing through a
3rd party provider on qualifying systems only.
D. Weltman Plumbing Lic. #6440 G. Nowicki Electric Lic. #6808 HIC #13VH04948800
Page S-1
Thursday, November 13, 2014
goleader.com/ballyhoo
Ballyhoo
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
Story on page 15
of The Westfield Leader
SCHETELICH PASSES FOR 260 YARDS AND THREE TDs, CHRISTIANO TWO TD RECEPTIONS
Cougar Footballers Go 9-0, Rout North Plainfield, 52-20
By DAVID B. CORBIN
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader and The Times
Cranford High School football
history was made for the second
week in a row when the Cougar
gridders routed the North
Plainfield Canucks, 52-20, at
Memorial Field in Cranford on
November 7 to finish the regular
season with a 9-0 record. Last
week, the Cougars attained an 80 record for the first time ever
with a 30-12 victory over Governor Livingston.
The possibility of another record
may be on the horizon since the
Ballyhoo
Cougars have totaled 360 points
in those nine game, while yielding just 123, but in the triumph
over the Canucks, junior quarterback Jack Schetelich made all
six of his pass completions worth
while with 260 total yards, including respective touchdown
(TD) passes of 67 yards, 33 yards
and 39 yards. Schetelich also ran
for TDs of 15 yards and nine
yards.
“We put in a couple of new
plays. They ran out of coverage.
It was easy. Once the line gave
me protection, we could do whatSee & Subscribe at
goleader.com/ballyhoo
Submit commentary and items for publishing.
Email to ballyhoo@goleader.com
ever we wanted. It was fun. It
was a lot of fun tonight,”
Schetelich said.
Senior Luke Christiano also
had a lot of fun on “Senior Night”
with three receptions for 151
yards, including TD grabs of 67
yards and 39 yards. Senior
Donavin Walker rushed four
times for 42 yards and had a TD
run of three yards. Senior Donte
Anderson had two reception for
59 yards, including a 33-yard
TD grab. Sophomore Ryan Bakie
returned an interception 53
yards for a TD, and junior Joe
Norton, who kicked all six of his
points after, also booted a 29yard field goal. Sophomore Brian
Oblachinski kicked the final point
after.
l'ennemi du journaliste
The Canucks got possession at
their own 29 on the opening kickoff and proceeded to march 71
yards on 12 straight running
plays, ending in a one-yard TD
plunge by running back Kyeronn
Cole, which may have caused
some concern for the Cougars’
defense. After Norton kicked a
29-yard field goal with 3:18 left
in the first quarter, the Canucks
got great field position at the
Cougar 34 and took only four
running plays when Jorge
Zavaleta hooked right 16 yards
to make the score, 14-3.
“I wouldn’t say we got nervous.
We never really get nervous. It
happened before against Roselle
and Del. Val. where we were
Probitas Verus Honos
down,” said Cougar defensive
lineman Nick Ballas, who made
several key tackles, including a
six-yard sack.
Defensive back Kevin Trotter finished with three tackles and two
assists, Colin Scanlon also had
three tackles (2 throws for loss)
and two assists. Ahmad Davis had
two tackles (1 throw for loss) and
two assists. Linebacker Niko
Cappello had two tackles and an
assist and Matt Muller had two
tackles and two assists. Ethan Tom
added a throw for a loss and two
assists.
Three minutes into the second
quarter, after Schetelich connected with Christiano for 45
yards to the Canuck 15, he kept
the ball and slicked up the middle
for a TD. On their next series,
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
Page S-2
Thursday, November 13, 2014
goleader.com/ballyhoo
Ballyhoo
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
the Cougars got the ball at their
own 33 then Schetelich found
Christiano wide open in the center. From there, Christiano finished up with his 67-yard TD
reception, making the score, 1714.
After forcing the Canucks to
punt, Trotter received the punt
and returned it 17 yards to the
47. Four plays later, Schetelich
zipped nine yards for the TD
putting Cranford up 24-14 at the
half.
It took only 1:02 off the clock in
the third quarter for the Cougars
to score when Anderson grabbed
Schetelich’s pass and sprinted to
complete his 33-yard TD. Defensive back Sean Leonard’s interception gave the Cougars possession at the Canuck 45. After
Walker’s six-yard run, Schetelich
hooked up with Christiano for the
39-yard TD with 8:34 left in the
third.
The Cougars’ defense was all
over the Canucks then Kevin
McNeil blocked a punt and
Cranford took over at the Canuck
14. On the fourth running play,
Walker walked in from the three
boosting the score to 45-14. After
Head Coach Erik Rosenmeier put
in his second team, defensive
back Ryan Bakie intercepted a
Canuck pass and returned it 53
yards for the TD just as the third
quarter ended.
“Coach [Joe] Huber told us we
just got to stick to what we do
best. We listened. We did that
and started to execute on defense,” Ballas said.
The Canucks added a TD late in
the fourth quarter, but the Cougars’ undefeated 9-0 regular season record was firmly in tact and
so was their top seed for the state
tournament playoffs.
“It’s a great feeling. It really is.
I hope we can carry this momentum into the playoffs and win a
state title,” Ballas said.
“It’s great, but we are still not
done. Now it’s the second part of
the season. One game at a time.
Right now we are 0-0. We are
just hoping to go 3-0 and win
out,” Schetelich said.
North Plainfield
Cranford
7 7 0
3 21 28
6
0
20
52
Page S-3
Thursday, November 13, 2014
goleader.com/ballyhoo
Ballyhoo
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
Raider Soccer Boys Pummel North Hunterdon, 5-0 – photos by Jim O’Connor njsportpics.com
Page S-4
Thursday, November 13, 2014
goleader.com/ballyhoo
Ballyhoo
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
See Charles Mulrooney
Photos on next page
Hunt. Cent. Red Devils’ Fourth Quarter Touchdown Burns Blue Devil Gridders, 7-6
Page S-5
Thursday, November 13, 2014
goleader.com/ballyhoo
Ballyhoo
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
Hunterdon Central Red Devils Stun Blue Devil Footballers, 7-6 – photos by Charles Mulrooney
Page S-6
Thursday, November 13, 2014
goleader.com/ballyhoo
Ballyhoo
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
Phillipsburg Stateliners Edge Blue Devils, 2-1, in NJSIAA Boys Soccer Section Quarters
Page S-7
Thursday, November 13, 2014
goleader.com/ballyhoo
Ballyhoo
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
Liddy Scores in 1st OT to Lift Blue Devils Past Farmers, 2-1, in Soccer Quarterfinals
Page S-8
Thursday, November 13, 2014
goleader.com/ballyhoo
Ballyhoo
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
Cranford Acts on Wilf Liquor License;
Police Department Awards Officers
By CHRISTINA M. HINKE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
Paul Lachenauer for The Westfield Leader
POWERFUL WEAPON…A father and son admire a machine gun mounted on
a 1945 Willys Jeep that was included as part of the Veterans Day display at the
Hanson House in Cranford on Sunday morning.
CF Train Plaza on Track;
New Tree Ord. Discussed
By CHRISTINA M. HINKE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
CRANFORD — The stalled pedestrian improvements plan for
the North Avenue Plaza, located
in front of the Cranford train
station, to be funded partially by
a Municipal Aid 2011 Transit Village Program grant in the amount
of $500,000, is back on track,
Township Engineer Carl O’Brien
said Monday at the township
committee’s workshop session.
The project is to go out to bid and
construction is scheduled to begin in April, with a completion
date in August 2015, Mr. O’Brien
said.
The plan is to make the area
safer for pedestrians and provide better traffic flow of NJ Transit buses. There will be a turnaround area for the buses, added
fencing by the crosswalk areas
and new curbing, pavement and
lighting.
Earlier this year the bids for the
project exceeded the budgeted
amount and were thrown out.
In other business, West Holly
Street will have a delay in paving
until after the winter due to gas
main replacements taking place,
Mr. O’Brien said. Since the road
is in poor condition, the Department of Public Works had recommended the road be milled before the winter.
The areas in the southwest portion of the township set for paving will be paved in the spring,
Mr. O’Brien said.
The New Jersey Department of
Environmental Protection told Mr.
O’Brien the plans to modify Orchard Brook, a tributary of the
Rahway River, no longer meet
with regulations and need to be
more environmentally sensitive.
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
CRANFORD — A liquor license
transfer from Primavera Liquors
to Riverfront Liquor was granted
by resolution Tuesday at the
township committee official
meeting.
Riverfront Liquor is wholly
owned by Zygmunt Wilf of 500
Ashwood Road, Springfield, according to the public notice. Mr.
Wilf is the owner and chairman of
the Minnesota Vikings and a real
estate mogul, who last year lost
a New Jersey real estate civil
court case. New Jersey Superior
Court Judge Deanne Wilson ordered Mr. Wilf, his brother, Mark
Wilf, and cousin, Leonard Wilf, to
pay $100 million in damages and
legal fees to former partners they
defrauded in a large apartment
complex project, according to
The Associated Press. The court
found the Wilfs committed fraud,
violated civil racketeering laws
and deprived a former business
partner of contractual payments,
according to The AP. Earlier this
year, the Wilfs filed an appeal.
Mr. Wilf is an owner of Garden
Communities, which owns
Riverfront at Cranford Station,
the newly built, three-story apartment building with retail. The
corner retail space has a liquor
license and recently a sign showing the restaurant space as available has come down.
The housing development under construction at 555 South
Avenue is expected to open in
early spring, Township Engineer
Carl O’Brien said Monday at the
workshop session. Mr. O’Brien
said the site work is nearing
completion and the paving of two
driveways will be completed this
month, and so he recommended
the township decrease the performance bond. This partial release of the bond was approved,
4 to 1, by resolution Tuesday at
the official meeting. The bond is
now at $359,000, where it was
originally at $1.37 million, Mayor
Andis Kalnins said on Monday.
Commissioner Tom Hannen, Jr.
voted against the resolution.
Prior to the official meeting on
Veterans Day, the police department held its awards ceremony
for 2014. Chief James Wozniak
presented the awards.
Retired Sergeant Anthony Dobbins and Retired Detective Robert Montague were given plaques
honoring their time served with
the police department. Sgt. Dobbins served 26 years and Det.
Montague served 25 years. Department Citations were given to
Retired Sgt. Dobbins, Ret. Det.
Montague, Lieutenants Christopher Polito and Edward Davenport, Detectives Spencer Durkin,
William Pietrucha and Derek
Farbanec, Sergeants John
Swandrak and Ryan Greco, and
Officers Michael Andrews, Nelson
Hearns, Nadia Jones, Steven
D’Ambola, John Rattigan, Timothy O’Brien, Daniel Donnerstag
and Patrick Fay.
Lieutenant Edward Davenport
and Detective Russell Luedecker
were given the Medal of Honor,
the highest award bestowed to a
police officer, for their evacuating the Cranford Towers Condominiums when it was on fire earlier this year. Lt. Davenport carried a disabled man down five
flights of stairs.
A Life Saving Award was given
to Officer Sean Halcomb.
Civilian Achievement Awards
were given to Jennifer Klein and
John Weber, who both were paramount in supplying information
to the police department on burglary suspects in two separate
incidents.
“We have the best cops in the
state of New Jersey,” Chief
Wozniak said.
“They do extraordinary things
every day,” Commissioner Robert D’Ambola said of the police
force during his commissioner
report.
November is designated Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month
in Cranford. Mayor Kalnins presented a proclamation to Todd
Cohen from the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, along with
his brother, Lee, and nephew,
Brian. Mr. Cohen’s father died of
pancreatic cancer, a disease that
is the second leading type of
cancer and has a 6-percent fiveyear survival rate, Mr. Cohen
said.
Winans Avenue paving is almost complete, and Herning,
Brookdale and Tuxedo Avenues
are to be paved soon as part of
the paving project, Commissioner
D’Ambola said.
A meeting was held on the One
Seat Ride on October 27, at the
community center, where it was
announced that NJ Transit will
fund the second phase that will
extend one-seat service on the
Raritan Valley line on weeknights
after 8 p.m., Mayor Kalnins said.
The committee recognized the
service of veterans in observance
of Veterans Day.
Rita Mason, a resident of Alan
Okell Place, complained about a
tree on her property she has
attempted over a number of years
to have the township remove
and has said the tree is healthy
and so would not remove it.
A number of charity drives and
events are taking place in the
township. A Blanket Drive is being held by a Girl Scout troop that
is accepting blankets at 113
Spring Garden Street.
Dr. Kurt Krause is holding an
oral cancer screening at his dental practice.
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
Page S-9
Thursday, November 13, 2014
goleader.com/ballyhoo
CF Train Plaza on Track; Tree Ord
The permits for easements along
the Orchard Brook were secured
about 10 years ago, and not all
homeowners along the brook
gave their consent. Mayor Andis
Kalnins has said it could help
alleviate flooding impacts for
about 160 homes.
A potential new tree ordinance
that would include the hiring of a
forester, and a new law requiring
permission from the forester for
residents to remove a tree considered a landmark tree, was
laid out by Commissioner Robert
D’Ambola. The definition of a
landmark tree was not specified.
Salary costs for a forester are
still to be determined, Mr.
D’Ambola said.
“This ordinance is needed desperately because we are losing
large trees,” said Barbara Krause,
a member of the tree advisory
board, during public comments.
She cited a long list of nearby
communities that have adopted
an ordinance like the one presented or contains stricter laws.
She noted that not only did
Cranford lose 900 township trees
as well as private trees in Hurricanes Sandy and Irene, but property owners have been taking
down large trees that were
healthy.
Commissioner Mary O’Connor
said after having some businesses interested in a winter
CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE
Holiday Journey With
Celebration Singers Planned
CRANFORD – Under the direction of Brian Clissold and Jennifer
Jenkins, The Celebration Singers
are preparing for their winter
performance “A Holiday Journey
with The Celebration Singers” at
St. Michael’s Church, 40 Alden
Street, Cranford, on Friday, December 5 and Saturday, December 6 at 8 p.m. Tickets can be
purchased online at celebrationsingers.org or through the phone
at (908) 552-4656.
The Celebration Singers is a
non-profit musical entertainment
organization whose goal is to
reach out to as many people as
possible in as many different environments so as to expose
people to the art of music. Diverse programs give audiences
the opportunity to experience a
wealth of musical styles and disciplines, and see this music performed by children and adults.
Although many outstanding choral groups exist in New Jersey,
there are few groups that bring
the same rigorous and exacting
musical standards to the performance of the variety of songs.
Celebration Singers’ mission is to
bring before as wide an audience
as possible the beauty, richness,
and excitement of not only a valuable segment of American culture, “the Classic American Popular Song,” but of songs of many
styles and from other cultures. At
the same time, they look to provide a more diverse musical education to our children and adult
chorus members and audience
alike. It continues to grow in
scope, appeal, and audience and
member enthusiasm.
Funding for the Celebration
Singers is made possible in part
by the New Jersey State Council
for the Arts, Department of State,
through a grant administered by
the Union County Office of Cultural and Heritage Affairs. For
more information, please visit
celebration-singers.org, email
celebrationsingersnewjersey@gmail.com,
or leave a voice mail at (908)
552-4656.
Ballyhoo
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
Cranford Zoning Board Denies
Mini Mart for Exxon Station
By DELL SIMEONE
Specially Written for The Westfield Leader
CRANFORD – The zoning board,
on Monday evening, denied an
application to allow the owner of
the Exxon gas station at 464
South Avenue East to install a
“Tiger Mart,” or mini mart, in one
of the three service bays at the
station. The property is at the
intersection of Centennial Avenue.
The applicant, Jaranjeet Singh,
owns 25 gas stations in New
Jersey that contain mini marts.
The applicant was seeking the
following variances: conditional
use (convenience store) approval; less than the minimum
required on-site parking spaces;
granite block curbing not provided; no loading or unloading
zone provided and no bicycle
rack provided.
The existing station, which was
built in 1958, has two pumps and
three service bays. The
applicant’s attorney, Frank
Capece, said there is no longer a
need for the third service bay so
the owner wants to use it as a
space for the convenience store,
which he said would not sell prepared foods. He described the
average customer as someone
who pulls in for gas and then runs
into the store for a quart of milk.
He said the average visit to the
station for gas and a food item
would be less than four minutes.
He said the station would operate each day between 6 a.m. and
10 p.m.
The applicant’s engineer, Edward Bogan, said there would be
seven parking spaces for customers. However, after questioning by the board he said there
would be seven parking spaces
provided including three spaces
for employees and one handicapped spot. Parking would be
located on either side of the build-
ing. He also said there would be
a small dumpster on one side.
Board members were concerned about how the cars could
maneuver in and out of the parking spaces if other cars were
lined up at the pumps. Board
member John Mallon said, “If all
employees park you only have
four spaces for customers.”
Board member William Montani
said, “You are only 100 feet away
from Krauszer’s.” Board member Mary Ann Hay questioned
how a driver in the space nearest
to the pumps could get out. “He
would be stuck,” Mr. Mallon said.
Mr. Bogan admitted the driver
would have to make a K-turn.
Mr. Capece noted that there is
parking on both sides of the street
on Centennial Avenue. “No one
has come forward to object to
the plan,” he said.
“What concerns me the most is
that there would be an overflow
of cars on Centennial Avenue,”
Mr. Montani said.
Mr. Montani also stated, “I don’t
see any landscaping plans.” Mr.
Bogan responded, “There are
none.”
The applicant’s architect said
the store would be 700 square
feet and take up half of the existing building.
Mr. Montani said he did not see
how the mini mart would be a
benefit to the community. Board
member Robert Bovasso said the
store is, “an adjustment to the
gas station. A three-bay gas station isn’t in demand. They’re
making use of space,” he added.
The board’s discussion lasted
90 minutes before the board
voted 4-to-3 to deny the application. Most board members said
they were concerned about the
small space and the room to
maneuver cars in and out of the
parking spaces.
In other business, the board
approved an application by John
and Maura O’Connor of 49 John
Street to construct a third-story
addition, which exceeds the maximum number of allowable stories on the street. Architect Maria
Cosmo argued that the home is
older and the addition is consistent with others in the neighborhood. She said the home is long
and narrow and that there is no
place to go but up. Ms. Cosmo
said a dormer will be in the middle
of the structure and will not
change the façade of the home.
Zoning Officer Robert Hudak
said it is only one-and-a-half feet
beyond the code requirement.
Ms. Cosmo said the dormer will
not face the front of the home.
Wilf Liquors, Police
The library will hold a free practice SAT test and analysis that
will offer strategies to improve
scores on Saturday, November
15, from 9 a.m to 1 p.m.
The Jeans for Troops program
asks employees to donate $5
and in return allows employees
to wear jeans to work for the
day. “Any way we can support
our veterans, it is worth it,”
Mayor Kalnins said.
Chamber of Commerce Pride in
Cranford award winners this year
for business improvement are
Dreyer Farms, Martin Jewelers, 100
Steps Supper Club and Raw Bar,
Jeff’s Landscaping, and Needlepoint Homes. Union County Neighbors United and the Rotary Club of
Cranford won the organizational
award. Individual award winners
were John Guempel, Barbara
Ragone (posthumously), Barry
O’Donovan and Martha Garcia.
“These people help out our town
every day and make Cranford what
it is,” Mayor Kalnins said.
Page S-10
Thursday, November 13, 2014
goleader.com/ballyhoo
CF Train Plaza on Track; Tree Ord
farmers’ market the idea of holding it inside by the kitchen of the
community center on Saturday
mornings is being discussed.
The safety concerns of the ingress and egress and front setbacks of new bank establishments on North Avenue was again
brought up by resident Frank
Krause. He said the committee
and the zoning board need to
have better coordination between
them, and said the zoning board
that approved those plans had
disregarded police reports.
The board of health meeting
was held prior to the workshop
meeting Monday. Megan
Avallone, health officer, said there
have been two complaints regarding a rat problem, which is
down from six properties on Sailer
Street and Scherer Street that
had exterminators come out in
September. The township is continuing to pursue gaining approval for access to the vacant,
foreclosed home that residents
on those streets had blamed for
the problem. Ms. Avallone said
there has been no evidence externally of a rat infestation on the
property.
A public complaint was made
regarding the home at 133
Mohawk Drive. Robert Fico, the
new part-time code enforcement
property maintenance officer,
said he went to the property,
which has been vacant for about
seven years, and learned a pipe
burst that has caused mold in the
interior. Additionally, there are
holes in the roof where animals
have probably entered through
to the house.
Also, a large limb from a dead
tree on the property came down
on a walkway, and it is a safety
concern. The house is in such
disrepair that Mr. Fico said it
would probably need to be demolished or undergo a major
rehabilitation. The maintenance
company of the home has not
shown up to arranged meetings
for the township to gain access to
the home. The township said it
will begin the process to fine the
owner.
Dog Walker Charged
With Multiple Thefts
CRANFORD — On November 4,
Cranford police arrested a local
dog walker in connection with a
series of thefts involving Cranford
residents.
The investigation began in early
October when police began receiving complaints of missing
jewelry from clients of Juliet
Novak, a dog walker employed
by a pet grooming facility in
Garwood.
The investigation, led by Detective Spencer Durkin, revealed that
Novak, 22, was hired by the victims to come to their homes for
the purpose of providing dog
walking services. On multiple occasions, however, Novak entered
the residences of her clients to
steal high end jewelry items. Det.
Durkin was able to trace some of
the stolen items to pawn shops in
nearby communities.
Novak was charged with four
counts of theft. She was processed
at Cranford Police Headquarters
and released pending an appearance in state Superior Court.
Police believe there may be
additional theft victims that have
not yet been identified. Anyone
who may have victimized by
Novak is encouraged to contact
Det. Durkin at (908) 709-7345.
Probitas Verus Honos
Ballyhoo
New Jersey
Sports, Humor and Commentary
Garwood Officials Thank Voters and
Pledge Their Best Effort for All
It is our absolute honor and
privilege to have just been elected
to serve as mayor and on the
council for the great Borough of
Garwood. We were pleased to
see so many people come out to
vote Tuesday and cast their votes
of confidence for us.
We pledge to work hard to represent all the residents of Garwood
— those that voted for us, those
that did not, and those that didn’t
make it out to the polls. We will
represent the homeowners and
the renters, those that have just
moved in, and those that have
lived here their whole lives. We
promised to listen to your concerns and seek viable solutions.
We will not go back on our word.
With your help, we will do our
very best to make Garwood better, stronger and more vibrant.
We look forward to continuing
our conversations with the resi-
dents because better communication betters the community.
We are committed to being accessible and keeping the lines of
communication open. You can
reach Charles at (908) 789-0508
or CLombardo@garwood.org,
Lou at (908) 233-1657 or
LPetruzzelli@garwood.org, and
Sara at (908) 377-7890 or
STodisco@garwood.org. We will
listen and do our best to provide
solid answers to your concerns.
We sincerely thank you for the
opportunity to continue the work
we’ve started, and look forward
to facing the borough’s challenges
together. We are experienced,
committed, active and dedicated,
and we will work toward a brighter
future for Garwood. Thank you!
Mayor-Elect Charles Lombardo
Councilman Louis Petruzzelli
Councilwoman Sara Todisco
Police Looking for Help In Finding
Intruder At St. Michael’s Parish
CRANFORD — Police are looking
for the public’s help in finding the
individual who entered St. Michael’s
Roman Catholic Church on Alden
Street on Saturday through the
front door at 12:15 p.m. where he
was captured on video.
Knights Blood Drive
To Be Held Sunday
GARWOOD — The Garwood
Knights of Columbus will hold a
blood drive this Sunday, November 16, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. It
will take place at their council
hall, located at 37 South Avenue.
Parking is available behind the
building off Willow Avenue. For
further information, call Chairman Dennis Clark at (908) 2475389 or the Blood Center of New
Jersey at (973) 676-4700, extension no. 144, visit bloodnj.org
or e-mail bcnj@bloodnj.org.
After several minutes of wandering in the foyer, police said he
exited to the street and approached
the priests’ residence, which is
attached to the church. He entered the private area through an
unlocked window. Police said one
of the priests heard a commotion
and went to investigate at which
point the suspect exited out of the
door of the residence.
This is the third incident in
Cranford involving possible
church burglaries in the past
week. The other two, Cranford
Alliance Church and Cranford
Methodist Church, involved
forced entry with a prying tool to
interior offices, police said.
Police said anyone with information relevant to the investigation is asked to contact Detective
Spencer Durkin at (908) 7097346 or Detective Derek
Farbanec at (908) 709-7347.
General Election 2014
Cranford Unofficial
LEADER/TIMES SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT
Are you enjoying the quality content you’re reading
in the pages of this fine newspaper? If this is true...
Our newspaper will be mailed to your home and/or place of business each week within the USA
WE’RE ASKING YOU
TO BECOME A SUBSCRIBER!
By CC Online
Click Here
By Phone, Call 908 232-4407
By Check, please print and mail this.
Please enter my subscription starting with the next issue.
for The Westfield Leader
for The SP-F Times
One year ($33) - Two years ($62) Three years ($90)
New Subscriber
Renewal
First Name:
Last Name:
Street Addr:
HERE’S WHY
You are important. Our advertisers CARE about doing business
with you and want to know that YOU are reading their message
in the LEADER/TIMES each week.
Support the weekly newspaper by mailing in this coupon
TODAY! Each Thursday you’ll be glad you did!
City:
State:
Tel:
Email:
Zip Code:
Make check payable to The Westfield Leader
The Westfield Leader & The Scotch Plains-Fanwood TIMES
PO Box 250, 251 North Ave. West, Westfield, NJ 07091
Tel 908 232-4407; Fax 908 232-0473 Email press@goleader.com
WESTFIELD, GARWOOD, SCOTCH PLAINS, MOUNTAINSIDE, CRANFORD, FANWOOD, CLARK, SPRINGFIELD, KENILWORTH, SUMMIT, BERKELEY HEIGHTS, NEW PROVIDENCE
`