INVAVE The Journal of VE for the INSIDE

T
IN
S
VE
The Journal of VE for the
Indian Value Engineering Society
INVAVE
Vol. - 25, No. 3
Please visit us at -www.invest-in.org
Jul-Sept 2014
INSIDE
Editorial
1
A VE Case Study on Battery Mounting...
2
Growth of Value Engineering in India
19
Function Analysis to Identify Customer...
22
Module I Workshop at WZC
25
Mr. P. S. Mashelkar conducts Prog....
25
Building Value Attitude through VE
26
Module I Workshop
27
Module I Workshop for Educational...
28
Editorial Board
29
Editorial
Editorial
The economic vitality of recent years has presented a special set of challenges to companies. A Company’s
market value depends less on tangible assets, and more on intangible ones, such as brand technology, and
how it manages its work force. It is becoming more and more imperative that the companies focus on long
term agenda for sustenance and valuation enhancement, rather than quick fixes.
INVEST’s mission is to enable companies achieve a higher degree of excellence through building of
visionary and strategic perspectives of top management teams, and providing of effective operational
solutions to client systems through orienting work force on Value Management. There are a set of simple
fundamental statements which underlie all the work INVEST does. INVEST believes that:
•
A holistic approach is better than a partial one.
•
Alignment of people to visionary, strategic and operational excellence holds the key to success and
sustainability.
•
Evolution is better than revolution.
•
Strategic excellence is built on operational excellence
•
Simple solutions , implemented well are better than complex ones
•
Success is also measured by obstacles overcome and problems solved.
•
The success of a process lies in its practice.
Value Management has become the complete set of wherewithal from administration, finance and HR
to service, operation and production. With its simplicity and quick adaptability it transforms the work
force into a reservoir of thinking resources, where development through evolution becomes a
continuous process.
Embrace Value Management.
Happy reading!
Alok Ghosal (CVS-Life)
Editor - in - Chief
1
A VE Case Study on Battery Mounting Arrangement
Surya Prakash Prabhaker, Vikash Yadav, Shailendra Pratap Singh, Shyam Ji Gupta.
T Madhu and Mukta Srivastava
Tata Motors Limited, Jamshedpur
VALUE ENGINEERING
Value Engineering is the success mantra in today’s
world of highly competitive market, increasing cost
pressures & at the same time increased expectations
of the customer for more value added, cost effective,
reliable & sustainable products.
Value Engineering is an organized creative approach
that has the purpose of efficient identification of
unnecessary cost without compromising on the
performance of the product, system or process &
without sacrificing the functions. It can be simply
perceived as a systematic application of recognized
techniques to identify the function of a product at the
lowest total cost.
Various groups at Tata Motors have been applying this
Idea Generation
• Idea generation
• Develop ideal cost
workshops
• Benchmarking
Key
Activities
– Functions/
features
– Specification
differences
– Engineering
differences
•
•
•
•
•
• Choice of
projects to pursue
Key
•
Ideas for
Deliverables
Commonization
of components
Idea Evaluation
for each cost
element
Clean-sheet ideal
cost build-up if
appropriate
Evaluate feasibility/
timing of ideas
Verify potential cost
savings
Prepare discussion/
negotiation strategy
for suppliers
Identify investment
required
technique in a structured manner to sustain the
changing demands of customers and remain
competitive in the market & at the same time It has
helped to stir the creative instincts of its people to
come up with ingenuous solutions to problems. The
efforts of VE group has provided the platform for
preparation and opportunity to synthesize into
success & initiate continuous improvement in all
areas of activity
VE process at Tata Motors Ltd.
The VE teams at Tata Motors systematically use the
various phases of job plan as under to identify the
unnecessary functions and the cost allocated to them.
This unnecessary cost is used to strengthen the basic/
necessary function to increase the value of the product
or to reduce the cost of the product keeping the value
same
Idea Syndication
• Technical
feasibility clarified
• Go-ahead given
by all
stakeholders
– QA
– ADD
– Marketing
– Service
– ERC
• Exhaustive list of rigorously evaluated
ideas with syndicated estimate of the
total savings potential
• Go-no go decision on ideas taken by the
Steering Committee
Design &
Market
Testing
• Design drawings
Idea
Implementation
& audit
• Identify
approved
• Supplier contracts
signed
• Marketing &
Service approval
obtained
•
•
•
Customer
focus
•
•
• Test reports
• DML release
implementation
requirements
Get change
approvals
Initiate
engineering
changes
Discuss savings
ideas with
suppliers and
agree on price
Idea “installed” in
vehicle
Bottom line
impact validated
• EPA
• Try out
• Material
Clearance
• MBPA
• BOM updation
• Cost audit by
Finance
2
ABSTRACTS
With rapid increase in active global entry of
Automotive players and continuous increase in
commodity price is creating tremendous pressure on
all the companies to explore the alternate and effective
way to reduce the cost and improve the product
performance in order to deliver improved valued
products in the right market segment. In this context
it is important for all of us to proactively understand
the customer expectations and at the same time
understand the product or services being offered by
competition. This proactive approach will not only
help in managing the customer expectation but also in
improving the market share as well. Or this would
helps us in leading the target market segment.
Value engineering is one of the highly effective tool
which targets at customer expectations and alignment
of the respective function to deliver improved valued
products or services through function analysis and
FAST diagramming
Input Process- Output Matrix :
Input
Process
-Global
Competition
Orientation
Management
Phase
acceptance on
VE
Output
Team formation
aquaintance with
VE objective
INFORMATION PHASE
Inline with the output of first phase the complete
information were aggregated from the authentic
source. Battery Carrier is made of Sheet metal and
is used for mounting or holding the two nos. of
batteries with the vehicle. Two nos. of Plastic Trays
are also used to collect the acid seepage if any and
at the same time it holds the battery in intact
condition. Two nos. of Battery covers are also used
for proper clamping and covering the end terminals
of the battery
OBJECTIVE OF THE PROJECT
In this paper we are going to present how
systematically Value engineering approach helped us
in understanding the set of functions being performed
by the existing product and which of the functions are
necessary to meet the customer expectations and
where is the scope of optimization. This helped us in
exploring different options to deliver desired functions
through various alternatives identified in F-C-W
analysis and FAST diagramming. Thereby
improvement in product value w.r.t. cost optimization.
JOB PLAN
All the eight steps of VE approach was deployed
systematically to identify various functions of Silicon
hose assembly which are non value adding at any
stage right from manufacturing to delivery to the
customers. This will help us improving the product
value through elimination of unnecessary functions
and optimization of other set of functions like All time
functions, one time functions.
ORIENTATION PHASE
With the management acceptance, Cross Functional
Team Approach was deployed in this Value
Engineering Study. The team comprising of six
members was briefed about the objective ((eg; Cost
reduction, Performance improvement & weight
reduction) by Senior Management
Assy Battery mounting arrangement consists of the
following components.
1. Battery Support Bracket (Part No.:28495410010
Validity-2 Nos.)
2. Battery Tray (Part No.: 208254106301, Validity-2
Nos.)
3. Stud (Part No.: 257354108803, Validity– 4 Nos.,
Thread :M8, Thread length:70mm, Material
Spec:Fe410WAS6, IS2062
4. Battery Cover (Part No.: 216154100110, Validity
2 Nos.)
5. Clamping Channel (Part No.: 284954108203,
Validity-2 Nos.):Sheet Thickness: 2mm,
Material:DD1079 SS4013A
Applicable Models: LPT 2518/3118/1613/1616
3
PART INFORMATION DETAILS
Battery
Support
Bracket
Part No.
284954100103
Validity
per veh
2
Battery Tray 208254106301
2
Stud
257354108803
4
Battery
Cover
216154100110
2
Battery
Channel
Total
284954108203
2
12
Material Thickness
specs
(mm)
D 513,
SS:4010
Preprocess
ed
polyprople
ne (Plastic)
4 mm
3mm
Dimension Weight(K
(mm)
g)
Length
560mm,
Height
320mm
Length
415mm,
Width
300mm
Fe410WA
Thread :M8,
Dia meter 8
S6, IS2062
Thread
mm
length:70mm
IS7078,
Length
PPCP(BLA
400mm,
3 mm
CK)
Width
175mm
DD1079,
SS:4013A
2mm
Length
494mm,
Width 35mm
Design
17.36
0.4
1.1
0.4
2.4
B/o or
Inhouse
B/O
Tata Motors design
Part
Description
Suppliers
M/s M B
Enterprises &
Gloria
Engineering
Jamshedpur.
B/O
M/s Auro
Plastics &
Pacoline Pvt.
Limited
B/O
M/s Aztec
Engineers
B/O
M/s Auro
Plastics
B/O
M/s M B
Enterprises, ASL
Industry &
Khurana
Industry
Other info
Used for
providing
support to
battery
Used for
collection of
Acid
Seepage
Used for
Clamping
Battery
Used for
covering the
battery & Its
terminal
21.7
4
critical functions and identifying the functions having
higher value gap.
FUNCTION PHASE
Functional Analysis
Considering the various child parts and their
characteristics as a input from Information phase,
Assy Battery Carrier was studied in order to identify
the various set of functions being performed by its
profile, metrological & metallurgical characteristics &
were categorized into Basic & Secondary. This
analysis was utilized in FAST diagram to establish the
Function
Sl.
Componet
Verb
1
1.1
2
Assly Battery
Carrier
Support
Bracket
Paint on
Support
Bracket
Battery Tray
3
Cover plate
4
Battery
Channel
Paint on
Battery
Channel
Stud
5
Noun
List of Functions
In order to place the various function into FAST and
convert the component cost to function cost all the
functions were listed combining the overlapping
functions being performed by more than one no. of
components
List of Function
Basic/
Secondary
Sl.
Verb
1
Withstand
Weight
Assly Battery Carrier
Secondary
2
Hold
Weight
Support Bracket
rust
Secondary
3
Prevent
rust
Paint on Support Bracket
& Galvanising on Stud
Hold
Collect
Cover
Increase
Withstand
Position
Liquid (Acid)
terminals
Contact area
load
Secondary
Secondary
Secondary
Secondary
Secondary
4
Hold
Position
5
Collect
Liquid Acid)
6
Cover
Terminals
Facilitate
Mounting
Secondary
7
Increase
Contact area
8
Withstand
Load
Prevent
rust
Secondary
9
Facilitate
Mounting
Join
arrest
parts
vibration
Secondary
Secondary
10 Join
Parts
rust
Secondary
11 Arrest
vibration
Withstand
Weight
Basic
Hold
Weight
Prevent
Galvanising on
Prevent
Stud
Noun
Componet
Battery Tray
Cover plate
Battery Channel
Stud
FAST Diagram
The Function Analysis system Technique diagram was drawn to understand the critical path which consists of
series of functions required to achieve the function desired or perceived by the customer i.e.; the higher order
function. This also helps in enhancing the focus critical functions during creativity phase.
FAST Diagram
How?
Weight on Battery Carrier:40 Kg
When?
Hold Battery
When?
Prevent
rust
(Rs.125)
Withstand
weight
(Rs.200)
Withstand
load
(Rs.40)
Hold
Weight
(Rs.300)
Arrest
Vibration
(Rs.5)
Increase
contact area
(Rs.20)
Cover
Terminals
(Rs.20)
Collect
Liquid(acid)
(Rs.60)
Facilitate
Mounting
(Rs.140)
Join
Parts
(Rs.40)
Why?
Clamp
Battery
Support
Hold
Position
(Rs.100)
Scope
5
well as method for eliminating or reducing the same.
This acts as a guide for the team to set cost targets.
The two parameters used are Cost & Worth. The worth
is the least cost of achieving a function. Cost is
allocated to each function & then the minimum cost
method to achieve that cost is explored which is taken
as its worth. The difference of the two is called Value
gap. Value Index is the cost per unit of worth. The
higher value gap & value index indicate the functions
to be concentrated upon in the creativity phase. The
ideal “to be achieved cost” is the Worth.
Now the following Critical functions were taken as output
and were used in the creativity phase to generate ideas
1. Withstand Weight
2. Hold Weight
3. Facilitate Mounting
Output of FAST
Diagramming
4. Join Parts
FUNCTION COST WORTH ANALYSIS
This is a unique tool in Value methodology which helps
VE team to pin point the unnecessary cost areas as
Function - Cost - Worth Analysis
Allocated
Cost
'C'
Function
Cost
'W'
Value
Gap
(C-W)
Value
Index
(C/W)
1 Withstand Weight
200
150.00
Use of Less weight bracket
50
1.33
2 Hold Weight
300
150.00
Use of Plastic bracket
150
2.00
3 Prevent rust
125
1.00
No painting required in case of
Plastic material
124
125.00
4 Hold Position
100
50.00
Use of Stoper in bracket
50
2.00
5 Collect Liquid (Acid)
60
40.00
Use of Single Tray
20
1.50
6 Cover Terminals
20
10.00
Use of Pocket Cover
10
2.00
7 Increase Contact area
20
10.00
Reduce length of Cover
10
2.00
8 Withstand Load
40
20.00
Use of less weight & thick bracket
20
2.00
9 Facilitate Mounting
140
46.00
94
3.04
10 Join Parts
40
1.00
39
40.00
11 Arrest Vibration
5
4.00
1
1.25
Sl.
Function
Total
1050
Basis for Worth
Use of Rubber strap instead of
clamping with Studs & Clamping
Channel
Use of Rubber strap instead of
clamping with Studs & Clamping
Channel will lead to deletion of
Studs
Use of Rubber strap instead of
clamping with Studs & Clamping
Channel
482
568
6
Value Management Curve:
1200
Value is sum total of Function (s)/Cost or Worth
(s)/Cost. Using this concept the VMC curve was
drawn to understand how much cost has been
allocated against each of the function and where is
potential of cost optimization. This helped us in
enhancing the focus on the functions which have
lesser slope. The ideas slope is 45 degree ie; to be
condition.
1000
Desired Value
800
Existing Value
thr
o600
W
400
200
0
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
700
800
900
1000
1100
1200
Cost
The Functions were sorted out in the descending order to select the functions having high value gap to improve
focus of VA/VE study.
Function - Cost - Worth Analysis
Sl.
Function
Allocated
Cost
'C'
Function
Cost
'W'
Basis for Worth
Use of Plastic bracket
Value
Gap
(C-W)
Value
Index
(C/W)
150
2.00
124
125.00
94
3.04
2
Hold Weight
300
150.00
3
Prevent rust
125
1.00
9
Facilitate Mounting
140
46.00
1
Withstand Weight
200
150.00
Use of Less weight bracket
50
1.33
4
Hold Position
100
50.00
Use of Stoper in bracket
50
2.00
39
40.00
No painting required in case of
Plastic material
Use of Rubber strap instead of
clamping with Studs & Clamping
10 Join Parts
40
1.00
Use of Rubber strap instead of
clamping with Studs & Clamping
Channel will lead to deletion of
Studs
5
Collect Liquid (Acid)
60
40.00
Use of Single Tray
20
1.50
8
Withstand Load
40
20.00
Use of less weight & thick bracket
20
2.00
6
Cover Terminals
20
10.00
Use of Pocket Cover
10
2.00
7
Increase Contact area
20
10.00
Reduce length of Cover
10
2.00
5
4.00
Use of Rubber strap instead of
clamping with Studs & Clamping
Channel
1
1.25
11 Arrest Vibration
Total
1050
482
568
Considering the rule of 80:20 as a cut off on value gap the functions of high value gaps were
identified and were used as a input to Creativity phase for idea generations. With reference to the
above F-C-W (sorted) the following functions were identified.
1. Hold Weight
2. Prevent Rust
4. Withstand Weight
5.Hold Position
3. Facilitate Mounting
Output of
F-C-W Analysis
7
The output functions obtained from FAST diagraming
and Function –Cost –Worth analysis were used for the
purpose of idea generation. Some of the function
which were common between the FAST output and
FCW output were considered as one functions and the
following ideas were generated against each of the
functions. The Benchmarking with the competition
vehicle was also taken as input in this phase.
Output Function of FAST
Output Function of F-C-W
Sl. Source
Sl.
Source
Functions
Functions
1
Withstand Weight
2
Hold Weight
FAST Diagramming
3
Facilitate Mounting
4
Join Parts
Sl. Source
1
Hold Weight
2
Prevent Rust
Function-Cost3
Worth Analysis
Facilitate Mounting
4
Withstand Weight
5
Hold Position
Functions
1
Withstand Weight
2
Hold Weight
3 FAST & FunctionCost-Worth
4 Analysis
Facilitate Mounting
5
Prevent Rust
6
Hold Position
Output from FAST &
F-C-W Analysis
Join Parts
Input Process Output Matrix
Input
Process
Output
All technical & commercial
information
Function Phase(Function
Analysis, FAST, F-C-W
Analysis & Value
Management Curve
Critical path functions and
functions identified in F-C-W
analysis as per Team cut off
criteria on value gap
8
CREATIVE PHASE
The output functions obtained from FAST diagraming and Function –Cost –Worth analysis were used for the
purpose of idea generation. Some of the function which were common between the FAST output and F-C-W
output were considered as one functions and the following ideas were generated against each of the functions.
The Benchmarking with the competition vehicle was also taken as input in this phase.
Sl. Source
Functions
Ideas Generated
Components
Remarks
Assly Battery Carrier
Common between FAST &
FCW Output
Support Bracket
Common between FAST &
FCW Output
Battery Channel
Common between FAST &
FCW Output
Idea is same as Sl. 1
Use of high grade material for support
bracket with lesser weight & thickness
1
2
Withstand Weight
3
Reduce length of plastic cover
Use of pocket cover to cover terminals
FAST Diagramming
Use of plastic material for support
bracket.
4
Hold Weight
5
Use of high grade material for support
Facilitate Mounting
bracket with lesser weight & thickness
6
Join Parts
Use of rubber strap thus eliminating
channel & stud
Stud
7
Prevent Rust
Delete paint by using rubber strap and
plastic support bracket.
Paint on Support Bracket &
Galvanising on Stud
Function- Cost8 Worth Analysis
Hold Position
Use of single tray with stopper at the
middle
Battery Tray
Use of two stud mtg. instead of four stud
mtg.
9
Input Process Output Matrix
Input
Process
Critical path functions and
functions identified in F-C-W Creativity Phase(Idea
analysis as per Team cut off
Generation)
criteria on value gap
Output
List of Ideas
9
BENCHMARKING
Tata Motors own
other vehicles
LPS 1018
Vehicle Aggregate
under VA/VE Study
Comparison with
TML other vehicle
These proposals are then analyzed on certain parameters in view of their feasibility of implementation, cost, time
of implementation
The short listed ideas are evaluated for their feasibility.& based on them, three alternative proposals are
finalized.
In view of enhancing focus on formalizing feasible alternatives, Team decided to discard the ideas which have
scored less than 60% ie; 30 points
FEASIBILITY RANKING MATRIX
Parameters
State of Art
Probability
of
Implementation
Cost to
Develop
Time to
Implement
Potential
Cost benefit
Ideas
10: Off the
shelf
1: New
technology
10: High Chance
1: No Chance
10: Low Cost
1: High Cost
10: No Time
1: Max Time
10: High
1: Low
Total
Use of rubber strap thus
eliminating channel & stud
7
6
7
2
8
30
Use of two stud mtg. instead of
four stud mtg.
8
8
7
8
7
38
Use of high grade material for
support bracket with lesser
weight & thickness
7
6
5
5
6
29
Use of plastic material for
support bracket.
7
6
4
Ideas Discarded
5
5
27
Use of single tray with stopper
at the middle
6
6
7
7
6
32
Use of pocket cover to cover
terminals
7
7
8
7
6
35
Reduce length of plastic cover
4
6
7
7
6
30
Delete paint by using rubber
strap and plastic support
bracket.
7
6
7
2
8
30
10
Alternative I—Use of Single Battery Tray with Stopper at the middle, reduction in no. of studs by 2 nos.
alongwith reduction in size of the Battery cover( for mounting only) with Pocket cover for covering the Battery
Terminal
Alternative II— Use of Rubber Strap for mounting of Batteries with deletion of Studs & Clamping channels
Input Process Output Matrix
Input
Process
Creativity Phase(Evaluation
based on feasibility matrix)
List of Ideas
Output
List of Alternatives
EVALUATION PHASE
These three alternatives were then evaluated
using the following methods
Comparision
l
Paired Comparison Matrix
Major Difference
l
Cost Benefit analysis
to select the best alternative in terms of improved
value for money to the customer.
Criteria
Pts.
Key
Letters
Safety
A
Ease of assembly
B
Weight
C
Reliability
D
Maintainability
E
No. of Parts
F
3
Medium Difference
2
Minor Difference
1
Paired Comparison Matrix
To evaluate the alternatives, certain criteria are
selected. These criteria are prioritized using
Paired Comparison Matrix and a score is allotted
to each criterion. In this case, Safety of the
subject component has come out most important
with aesthetics & weight next in row.
No Difference
0
Decision Matrix:
Based on the scores obtained from the paired comparison, the three alternatives are further judged on a 5 point
scale using Decision Matrix. Below is the matrix of the 5 point scale based on the actual values of the evaluating
criteria. In this case, the Alternative I emerges as the one with highest points.
A
B
C
D
E
F
Score
Score+1
A3
A3
A2
A3
A3
14
15
B
B2
D2
E2
B2
4
5
C
D2
E2
F2
0
1
D
D1
D2
7
8
E
E2
6
7
F
2
3
11
POINT SCALE
Safety(A)
Ease of
assembly(B)
Weight
(Kg)
(Battery)
Assembly
time
Component
wt.
Failure
possibility
Cost
No. of
Child
parts
1
24
17-21
27-32
1.5-2.0%
45-50
12-14
2
28
13-17
22-27
1.0-1.5%
40-45
10-12
3
32
9-13
17-22
0.5-1.0%
35-40
08-10
4
36
5-9
12-17
0-0.5%
30-35
06-08
5
40
1-5
7-12
0
25-30
04-06
Criteria
Measuring
Parameter
Point Scale
Weight('C) Reliability(D)
Maintainability(E)
No. of
Parts(F)
DECISION MARIX
Proposal
A
B
C
D
E
F
Weightage for Criteria->
15
5
1
8
7
3
5
3
3
5
3
Total
Score
3
Existing
163
75
5
15
5
3
4
40
4
21
4
9
3
Alternative I
173
75
4
25
4
4
3
32
3
28
4
9
2
Alternative II
141
60
20
3
24
28
6
12
COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS
Sl. Parameters
Existing
1 Price(Rs.)
Alternative I
Alternative II
1,050.00
714.00
500.00
1
1
1
3 Weight(Kg)
21.7
20
18
4 Cost Per Vehicle(Rs.)
1050
714
500
5 Weight per vehicle(Kg)
21.7
20
18
10
12
8
336
550
2
4
2 Validity(Nos.)
6 No. of Parts
7 Cost Saving per Vehicle(Rs.)
8 Weight Saving per vehicle(Kg)
Input
Process
Output
List of Alternatives
Evaluation Phase
Best Alternative
RECOMMENDATION PHASE
From the above Cost benefit analysis, the Alternative II appears to be OK but because of faster ageing effect
on Rubber items, the rubber strap well get damaged in short span of time and hence the cost of ownership to
the customer will increase.
In view of the above point and Decision matrix, the Alternative I was recommended and the approval of
the management was sought for further progress on it.
Input
Process
Output
Best Alternative
Recomendation Phase
Management approval for
implementation
13
IMPLEMENTATION PHASE
From the above Cost benefit analysis, the Alternative II appears to be OK but because of faster ageing effect
on Rubber items, the rubber strap well get damaged in short span of time and hence the cost of ownership to
the customer will increase.
In view of the above point and Decision matrix, the Alternative I was recommended and the approval of
the management was sought for further progress on it.
Design
Modification
by ERC &
FEA
clearance
Syndication by
Quality, ADD,
Marketing,
Service , ERC etc
EPA
(Effective Point
of adviice)
By
Technical Serv.l
Prototype samples
given to ERC
for mechanical &
material testing
DML
(Design mod. List)
Release by ERC
Modified design
& drawing
released for
implementation
Technical
Evaluation
for
Load test
requirement
Field
Trials
Reports not
satisfactory
Approval from
Marketing &
Service
Reports
satisfactory
OK
Fitment Trial
involving Prod,.
Q.A.
Not
OK
Development of
vendor for
regular supply
of material
Intimation to
Service , FLG,
Technical
Coordination of
other plants &
Central Quality
Implemented on
vehicle in
coordination
with all relevant
agencies after
exhausting the
old stock
FITMENT TRYOUT
One vehicle in line with proposed Alternative
I (ie; Single Battery Tray with two no. of
Studs for clamping of Battery and reduced
size of top cover necessarily required for
clamping.) has been prepared and shown to
all the stake holders (QA, ADD & ERC) for
syndication
14
In order to further expedite the implementation the action plan has been finalized and being reviewed by Senior
Leadership Team.
Implementation Plan
Sl.
Recommendations
Actions to be taken
Person/Agency
Completion date
Remarks
1
Approval from the Top
Management
Mukta Srivastava
10.05.2012
GM(PP,SP & ICR) &
DGM(Mfg.)
2
Discussion with Supplier on the
proposal
Surya P Prabhaker
12.05.2012
ADD and His Team
3
Syndication from All stake holders
Surya P Prabhaker
including ERC
25.05.2012
VE Team
4
Proto sample development
Abhishek Singh
05.06.2012
ADD
5
Proto sample Inspection(QA
Clearance)
Hitesh Lullani
15.06.2012
QA
Modifications if fitment issue
Abhishek Singh
20.06.2012
ADD
7
Release of Final drawing by ERC
P Soumondal
25.06.2010
ERC Design-Jsr
8
Volume Rampup
Amajit Kumar
10.07.2012
ADD
9
Stock exhaustion of Old material
Anupam Mohan
14.07.2012
FLG(Plant 1)
10
Implementation
Hitesh Lullani
22.12.2012
Truck Factory
11
Savings audit
Mukta Srivastava
25.12.2012
Finance
6
Alternative I
Input Process Output Matrix
Input
Process
Output
Management approval for
implementation
Implementation Phase
Technical validation of
recommended Alternative
15
IMPLEMENTATION PHASE
Before
After
1-One No. Battery Tray with
stopper at middle
2-Single & Small Battery Cover
3-2 Nos. Studs
4- 2 Nos. Clamp
5– 4 nos. Pocket cover for
Terminal
1-Two Nos. Battery Tray
2-Big two Battery Cover
3-4 Nos. Studs
4- 2 Nos. Clamp
4
4
2
2
3
3
1
1
CHALLENGES & BENEFITS
AUDIT PHASE
Challenges :
Operational Audit
l
Release
of MBPA
implementation
for
ensuring
effective
l
Syndication from all concerned agencies
l
Volume ramp up of new part at supplier end
l
BOM updation of the new parts
Benefits :
Physical Verification for the regular consumption of
the new parts
Customer Satisfaction
Input Process Output Matrix
Input
Technical validation of
recommended
Alternative
l
Cost of Spare parts will reduce
Benefit to Manufacturers
l
Ease in handling
Process
Output
Audit Phase
Operational and
Financial Audit
l
Productivity improvement (Assembly time also
reduced from 10 to 9 min)
Green Benefits :
Financial Audit
l
Reduction in consumption of natural resources
l
Reduction in carbon footprint
Cost Element
Cost per vehicle (Rs.)
Saving per vehicle (Rs.)
Existing
Proposed
1,050.00
714.00
336.00
Annualized cost saving (Rs.)
80 Lakhs
Nature of saving
Recurring
l
Reduced Diesel consumption
l
Expected Cost Saving
Rs.336/- per vehicle
Rs.80.00 Lakhs saving of recurring nature
16
Modified FAST Diagram
How?
Weight reduced by:1.7 Kg
When?
Hold Battery
Prevent
rust
(Rs.125)
Withstand
weight
(Rs.170)
Hold
Weight
(Rs.169)
Withstand
load
(Rs.40)
Hold
Position
(Rs.60)
Arrest
Vibration
(Rs.5)
Increase
contact area
(Rs.20)
Cover
Terminals
(Rs.15)
Collect
Liquid(acid)
(Rs.45)
Facilitate
Mounting
(Rs.50)
Join
Parts
(Rs.15)
Why?
Clamp
Battery
Support
When?
Scope
Value Management Curve after VE :
This Curve shows that, the value of the product has increased and is still further Value gap of Rs 628 which is
opportunity of further improvement.
Desired Value
Worth
Value after VE
Existing Value
Cost
17
Function-Cost Worth Analysis after VE
Function - Cost - Worth Analysis
Sl.
Function
Allocated
Cost
'C'
Function
Cost
'W'
Basis for Worth
Value
Gap
(C-W)
Value
Index
(C/W)
1
Withstand Weight
170
150.00
Use of Less weight bracket
20
1.13
2
Hold Weight
169
150.00
Use of Plastic bracket
19
1.13
3
Prevent rust
125
1.00
No painting required in case of
Plastic material
124
125.00
4
Hold Position
60
50.00
Use of Stoper in bracket
10
1.20
5
Collect Liquid (Acid)
45
40.00
Use of Single Tray
5
1.13
6
Cover Terminals
15
10.00
Use of Pocket Cover
5
1.50
7
Increase Contact area
20
10.00
Reduce length of Cover
10
2.00
8
Withstand Load
40
20.00
Use of less weight & thick bracket
20
2.00
4
1.09
14
15.00
1
1.25
9
Facilitate Mounting
10 Join Parts
11 Arrest Vibration
Total
50
46.00
15
1.00
5
4.00
714
Use of Rubber strap instead of
clamping with Studs &
Clamping Channel
Use of Rubber strap instead of
clamping with Studs &
Clamping Channel will lead to
deletion of Studs
Use of Rubber strap instead of
clamping with Studs & Clamping
Channel
482
232
The ideas generated during the Creativity phase after implementation has resulted in decrease in the cost (green
coloured) of the functions mentioned in the above modified FAST diagram and F-C-W.
18
Growth of Value Engineering in India
V Rabi
VE for competitive edge –the context
The Indian business environment today has become
more challenging than it was three decades ago when
the first INVEST conference was held possibly on a
similar theme. Indian organisations have been looking
for newer ways to cut costs, improve quality and take
on the competition without hiking prices. Some have
moved on from traditional measures such as reduced
energy consumption and retrenching workforce to
redefining products and services.
In my view, to thrive in this dynamic competitive
environment in the country, the principles of Value
Engineering (VE) are being deployed many a time
without the VE methodology being institutionalised as
an organised activity. I have attempted to bring out my
perception on strategies for VE and actions that
Indian organisations have to take to maintain a
competitive edge and succeed. Deploying VE on
purpose in this chaotic environment can certainly
help both the manufacturer/service provider as well
as the customer/consumer a price that suits both.
VE in India – thriving on chaos
True winners today and tomorrow will be those who
have learnt to deal proactively with chaos and
uncertainty, even taking it head on as a source of
market advantage, not as a problem to be got around.
VE has stood out of the crowd wisely without
competing with other techniques and management
tools including TQM, Kaizen, and Six Sigma etc.,
grounded by its philosophy in the belief that people
will improve things. That it has been the longest
serving methodology and also complements others
too, I believe whether it is India or rest of the world, VE
is the mother of all continuous improvement
techniques. The fact that there are only training
programmes on the others, we have in India, annual
VE National conferences regularly over the last 30
years which has turned international too lately
attended by delegates from representing several
organisations is ample evidence that VE has
succeeded the test of the turbulent times.
VE practitioners in India have been advocating the
principle that unnecessary functions should be done
away with and newer ways of organising necessary
functions at a lesser cost will have to be a
commonplace necessity. We are now witnessing value
improvements including reduced life cycle costs in
several products and services. What are more
important now are accelerated efforts to drive through
VE by building on its strengths.
VE drivers - the real difference
That VE should be seen and felt as a revolution or
movement has been uppermost in the minds of VE
professionals. There have been doubts and
deliberations over the years on the state of VE and
how it should be applied relentlessly across
industries despite barriers and forces resisting its
growth. Passionate leaders and followers of VE have
successfully overcome them to some extent. In India,
companies small and big like Tata steel, Tata Motors,
TCS, Maruti Suzuki , L&T, SAIL, BHEL, Hero Honda,
Crompton Greaves, to name a few have realised
savings in millions of rupees and numerous
intangible benefits and maintained their cost and
market leadership by the implementation of VE
proactively following the systematic Job Plan. Though
much more needs to be done by some of these
organisations through publicity of the successes they
have achieved through VE, the following are the
prescriptions to VEs growth within their
organisations and its spread across the country.
Other organisations too have to follow suit for VE to
take off and cruise.
1. Management Support: A firm conviction,
provisioning a VE budget, regular reviews, visits to
sites, recognizing VE teams, ensuring sustainability.
2. Dedicated VE cell: A group of few full-time VE
practitioners headed by a Senior Management person
responsible for continuous improvements reporting
to Top management for credibility.
3. Committed VE team: Individuals with In-depth
knowledge to facilitate learning, good human
relations, prepared to be change agents who network
and keep regularly updated on VE.
4. Functions of the VE cell team: Designing training
modules and imparting training, helping departments
identify problems appropriate for value study and
form teams, rewarding and recognizing them after
technical and cost audits and report success to
management and others within and outside.
19
I have and several other VE crusaders must have
made attempts even borrowing some of the ideas from
the above , accepting the challenge, coming up with
very practical – bold and mundane- first steps,
mounted several pilots which produced promising
results. However, up and down the line, VE becomes
overwhelmed by restraining forces beyond the control
of the VE professional.
VE journey – overcoming roadblocks
One of the main pressures is the VE study time. A 5day workshop is considered a luxury whereas the
shorter version leaves the facilitation and application
of techniques spread out over a longer period with its
associated difficulties of getting the team together and
breaking the creative flow. To counter this, it would be
ideal to get the right team members first for the shorter
version rather than the wrong ones for all the five
days. The time for development and implementation
are bothersome and this is mainly dependent on the
selection of the problem areas and the stage of
application of VE in its project life cycle. Whatever the
duration, maintaining the integrity of the VE Job Plan
and making the necessary adjustments in time
allotted for all elements of the process is critical.
Though the team members are intrigued by the
techniques taught, there is some element of cynicism
on their application on the problems. Some even
perceive the function analysis tools as a manipulation
by the facilitators affecting VE’s credibility. It has been
my experience therefore at times to develop the FAST
diagram outside the workshop and present it to the
team to determine if it is a good representation of the
project as easing first time participants into function
thinking is difficult .
Sceptical participants unfamiliar and untrusting the
VE methodology can be better addressed by
streamlining the workshop with some pre-read
information or pre-workshop preparation and
spending more time focussing on creativity to bring
out more good ideas to add value to the project.
Resistance through difficult “owners” and team
members/participants is a major barrier to a VE
study. By revealing and sharing commitment to the
VE process and engaging in deeper dialogue through
emotional intelligence, the VE facilitator can be
capable of creating the realization of intangible results
that lead to long term investment by the team and
stakeholders.
We need the Leadership in Indian organisations to
believe in VE to the point of obsession to drive it. The
ability of the VE cell Head and his team members to
convince the Management with VE’s potential and
benefits and eliminate objections stated and
perceived and get the recommendations implemented
contribute immensely to towards lasting success of
VE.
I must admit that in the organisations I have initiated
and facilitated VE, the journey was not smooth. There
were disappointments and frustrations. I am satisfied
that I have done my best under the circumstances. It
gives me a sense of fulfilment that the seeds of VE had
planted 15 years ago in SAIL, Bhilai Steel Plant have
borne fruits and grown thanks to the nurturing by
leaders, VE cell members and teams.
VE – growth through design
Barring exceptions, organisations mentioned earlier
have been some of the most competitive even post the
recent down turn in their respective product lines.
There is no secret to this; they have just managed to
cross over the above hurdles.
Not surprisingly, VE is present in manufacturing and
procurement in the country to a larger extent than in
other sectors or disciplines. The reason is apparently
either historical or due to mandate to reduce costs
during the sustaining period of the product life cycle
amidst stiff competition. The goal of ensuring product
function could be maintained well while the specific
construction of the product could change slightly with
reduction in costs and providing value added
services. In the process, Design in Product and design
in Infrastructure projects have been ignored and still
promises a great potential for VE application in India.
VE should be a natural part of any design in a project
of a product/ service. However, the strong focus on
cost reduction has disqualified Value Engineering as
a general method for evaluating quality or value. One
of the possible reasons for this is the VE team tends to
ignore the fact that customer choice is usually based
upon far more than minimum essential product
functions. The team explores why the customer will
buy or use the product, as opposed to identifying the
technical functions of the parts or system
components. The fact that Task /Customer– oriented
FAST diagrams are more popular these days leading
to managerial decisions on systems, processes and
products but not necessarily in design.
20
In infrastructure projects too, the VE mind-set is not
deployed in project design by the contractors or
providers also due to their poor capabilities. Like in
the USA , Europe even in the Middle-East countries,
Indian infrastructure organisations in the public and
private sector should build strong in-house value
engineering teams, put in place the right performance
tracking and incentive mechanisms in contracts too
and partner with clients and suppliers to enforce value
engineering in all steps of the design process. They
should aggressively eliminate the redundancies and
over-engineering in project design if any, and explore
the use of standardised design modules through VE
studies across projects.
Indian organisations have lost out on several
opportunities for not having the practice of sharing the
cost savings through VE with the contractors/vendors
in the project/product areas. Indifference to VE and
the obsession to award item-rate contracts and L1
(lowest rate of procurement and commissioning) has
resulted in products and projects with over or under
specification of designs resulting in high life cycle
costs. It is an accepted fact that redesign using VE can
reduce the project or product costs by 5 to 10% and
this could be the real edge for VE to win.
VE- a game changer to win
Companies and customers both will have to be
constantly on the lookout for winning products and
services that could help them escape the ‘gravity’ of
costs. Organisations must reinforce their value
engineering teams to review and modify designs for
products and projects during bidding and
construction. Where such teams exist, their
performance management systems (e.g., value
engineering KPIs and incentives) need to be in place.
In the current environment of uncertainty and rupee
depreciation, capex and opex in infrastructure and
engineering industry is largely shifting to emerging
markets. This is a blessing in disguise for us in VE to
work in the areas of localization and in process
equipment and machinery too.
The environment of the future will be even more
challenging and companies have to act like gladiators
to emerge victorious. If Indian organisations have to
shift to higher growth rates of 8% plus, VE
professionals have to urge the industry to adopt a
strategy and always carry high the attitude that is
more akin to a game changer than just an also ran . A
firm belief that VE can only leverage Indian industry to
thrive in this chaotic competitive environment should
be the start and end point.
Can you answer these? Please write to the Editor, if yes.
qq
If all the nations in the world are in debt (I am not joking. Even US has got debts), where did all the
money go?
qq
When dog food is new with improved tasting, who tests it?
qq
What is the speed of darkness?
qq
If the "black box" flight recorder is never damaged during a plane crash, why isn't the whole airplane
made out of that stuff?
qq
Who copyrighted the copyright symbol?
qq
Can you cry under water?
qq
Why do people say, "You've been working like a dog" when dogs just sit around all day?
qq
Why are the numbers on a calculator and a phone reversed? (God knows.)
qq
Do fish ever get thirsty?
qq
Can you get cornered in a round room?
qq
What does OK actually mean?
qq
Why do birds not fall out of trees when they sleep?
qq
What came first, the fruit or the color orange?
21
Function Analysis to Identify Customer Requirement
Anita Lukose, Shobha Developers, Bangalore
Abstract:
Function Analysis and FAST diagram helps in
addressing the customer requirement as effective as it
aids a design project or a project analysis. The paper
explains the guidelines in finding the function and
preparing the FAST. Defining the function using right
word and right approach is very essential. Aptly
defined function enhances the creativity of a designer,
a purchase personal or a sales personal leading them
to effective solutions. The customer oriented FAST is
discussed in detail.
Introduction
There is a story connected with King Nebuchadnezzar.
He always wanted his dreams to be interpreted. All the
wise men in his kingdom were happy about it as they
used to get many gifts and riches in return. But this
time king had a different requirement. He asked the
wise men first tell his dream and then interpret it. If
the dream was not correct, he would kill that person.
Often customers are like this. They really do not know
what they want. According to Steve jobs “people don't
know what they want until you show it to them.” This
is very much in line with Henry Ford “If I had asked
people what they wanted, they would have said faster
horses.” When customers ask for a faster horse
function listing helps us to identify the requirement. ”
What does it do?” what does a faster horse do?” Enhance Speed. What else will do the job? – A
machine! So create a machine to enhance the speed –
and the modern car was made!
Function
Function is very powerful to generate alternatives
for materials, designs, process and procedures.
Consider the example of a pen. The function of the pen
is to make mark. When you directly ask for a pen what
you get will be a pen. But if you search for something
else that will make mark, what you get will be wide
variety of materials like pencil, paint and brush,
charcoal, some types of vegetables and leaves and
even water to be applied on a dry surface to make
mark along with different types of pen (marking pen,
sketch pen etc).
Function enhances the design of a product. The
function helps the designer to think in the right
direction and design. Function of the chair is support
weight. The different questions will be what the weight
is and how has it to be supported. The weight gives
clarity on the structural stability that need to be
incorporated in the design. Support helps to think on
the support systems to be adopted.
Drawing from nature
This is a visual tool to encourage creativity is to draw
ideas from nature to think differently. The big idea of
this tool is to help you have big ideas. It is designed to
expand ones visioning and to encourage not focusing
in on an idea too soon.
Using this tool, look at the nature and observe how
nature supports weight. Hanging mango, a flower on
its stalk, a prey carried by eagle with its claws, a twig
carried by the bird are different ways of supporting
system seen in nature. Now the feasible support
system can be adopted for the chair makes it a unique
one!
A customer request of a client of a solar energy
company is an ideal example of the importance of
function understanding. There was no electric power
in his village and he wanted his children to study for
which they required light. He wanted three solar lights
to lit up three room. When he got the quote, he
understood that he cannot afford it. Then the
company personal visited the place and studied his
requirement. What the customer wanted was to light
up three rooms and not three lights necessarily. The
technician suggested opting for a single light at the
centre of the three rooms as the partition walls were
not touching the ceiling. So with one third the price he
could achieve what he wanted. At times when we are
stuck, go back to the why which generated the
function and ask “what else will do the job?” The “how
function” for the function “illuminate space” was
different for the technician and the customer!
Function Analysis differentiates VE from other costreduction techniques. VE creates or enhances value
of an item when it may also does cost reduction.
22
There can be different functions that are performed by
an item. For example, the function of a chair is
“support weight”. The support system varies with the
other secondary functions it has to perform align user;
Facilitate rotation; enhance comfort; enhance
aesthetics etc. All are possible functions of a chair. For
VE, the function closely related to the business at
hand is identified.
What is function?
•
•
Function of any item is defined as a phrase of two
words – an active verb and a measurable noun. It
is defined without describing the specific method
of performing that action. For example,
excavation is a process in building construction
the function of which is “reach level”. The function
does not specify how the level is achieved.
Functions help us to focus on what the process or
the item does rather than on the sub activities or
the components.
technique. He presented his new technique at the
SAVE Conference in 1965.
Any new concept always goes through evolution. The
FAST diagram, started by Charles Bytheway, also
encounters various changes in order to make it more
user-friendly and understandable to all. Wayne
Ruggles made a format in the year 1967, applying
various aspects of FAST diagramming. This was
subsequently known as the Technical FAST Diagram.
R.J. Park in 1968, incorporated the ‘when’ logic to the
Technical FAST Diagram. Thomas J. Snodgrass and
Theodore Fowler drew the FAST diagram using the
customers’ point of view in the year 1969. This
diagram is now known as the Customer Oriented
FAST.
Use of the FAST diagram: 1.
Organize random listing of functions
2.
Helps as a check for identifying missing function
3.
Simplifies the list of functions first generated
4.
Helps in identification of basic function
5.
Helps in setting scope of the study
6.
Deepens understanding of the problem within
the team
7.
Better communication during the project
8.
Demonstrates a thorough team analysis
Guidelines for defining Functions:
9.
Increases the decision making capability
•
10. Highlights the implicit knowledge
•
•
Functions also help us to address the
requirements of the different customers of the
product at its different stages of operation.
Function analysis when properly performed
enables the team to understand the scope and
objectives of the project.
Active describe what is to be done and measurable
noun describe what the action is being done to.
While defining functions use right word such that
it opens up various options expanding the
possibilities of the product/ project.
Guidelines:
•
If the unit of measure for the noun in the function
cannot be determined, new noun must be created.
If one wants to use the FAST in the design stage, he
should:
•
Avoid defining the use of the product as its
function. Example, the use of pen “write matter” is
defined as the function of pen which is “make
mark”.
1.
Restrict the diagram to a specific concept.
2.
The ‘method selected’ to perform a function
brings many other functions into existence.
3.
Use the future oriented questions.
4.
Prepare the FAST diagram addressing the right
area where issue is identified. For example, FAST
diagrams are prepared for the product analysis
when the issue is with the process of handling it.
•
Avoid using the process or sub activity as
function.
Function Analysis System Technique (FAST)
Charles Bytheway, was very creative in VE sessions
and he could think differently. His thought process
when presented as a method FAST was formed. He
used the power of asking how and why to the process
and products and found that it had a logical
connection and thus he created this powerful
Customer Oriented FAST
This type of FAST has only the left scope line and
customers’ requirement is mentioned as task. Asking
“why” to the task, the basic function is determined
23
which is essential to the performance of the task.
Supporting functions are pre defined. Supporting
functions contribute to selling and acceptance of the
product / process. There are four supporting
functions at the primary level. Each supporting
function will branch out to secondary level function.
Secondary level functions will branch out to third level
functions.
Customer oriented FAST is very effective in the
planning and the conceptual stage. The two important
characteristics of Customer Oriented FAST diagram
are:
1.
The functions are looked from a customer
viewpoint
2.
Support functions are also given weightage like
the basic function
Supporting functions:
The lack of clarity on defining and putting the support
functions under the right primary support function
makes this type of FAST diagram less effective. The
criteria for defining them are explained below. There
are four predefined support functions for the
customer oriented FAST. These functions cover all the
aspects of customer satisfaction. The different aspects
of the customer orientation defined by those
supporting function are as follows :
•
Enhances the durability of parts
•
Minimises the maintenance
•
Lengthens the life of the product
•
Protects environment
Assure Convenience :
•
Modify basic function to make it convenient to
use
•
Enhances the spatial arrangements
•
Facilitates maintenance and repairs
•
Provides instructions
stakeholders
and
directions
to
Satisfy user
•
Modify basic function to satisfy customer desires
•
Makes stakeholders life more pleasant (minimise
noise)
•
Offer physical comfort
•
Enhance the appearance in the perception of the
customer
•
Is desired by the user
Attract user
•
Pleases senses
Assure Dependability :
•
Favourable brands (projects favourable image)
•
•
Product sturdiness
•
Product appears stronger to the customer and
may not be to the designer
•
Makes the elements of the project more stronger,
effective or reliable
Makes it safer to use – protect user
24
Module – I Workshop at WZC
A Module - I workshop was conducted by
INVEST- WZC (Pune Chapter) from 21st to
25th July ’14 at Residency Club, Pune. The
workshop was conducted by Mr. Dilip
Gowaikar CVS-Life. 23 participants from
Eaton Corporation, Mahindra (Truck
Division) and other SMEs. Five projects
were studied in the workshop, followed by
the AVS examination by 9 candidates. The
workshop was preceded by an awareness
programme for the management of Eaton
Ltd., Pune on 13th Nov. ‘14.
Mr. P.S. Mashelkar conducts programme in Gujarat
P.S. Mashelkar, CVS-Life, FINVEST, conducted One-day awareness program at Halol, Baroda, Gujarat
on 8th Aug. 2014. The programme was conducted by him on behalf of “Concept Business Group”. The
program was attended by 20 Senior Managers from process industry. With the help of case studies,
participants learned about VE Job Plan & its effectiveness. Participants showed keen interest to learn
about INVEST activities. Participants also felt that VE can be one of the important methodologies to be
integrated with any business models.
“INVAVE” wishes P.S. Mashelkar & his WZC team to succeed in propagation of VE in Gujarat.
Alok Ghosal
SM Agrwal
DS Gowaikar
KSRM Sastry,
Chairman
RN Nagre
AK Mukhopadhyay
Administrator
Amit Ghosh
PS Mahelkar
Members of INVEST Certification Board (ICB)
25
Building Value Attitude through VE for Business Growth
In today’s highly competitive environment, organisations have to follow the ‘Value Cycle’ – Create
Value, Capitalize Value & Sustain Value. Value Engineering (VE) principles help in creating value for
all stake holders. In order to follow the Value Cycle, developing Value attitude among all stake holders
of the business is very important, then only organisations can Capitalize & Sustain Value.
Hence through successful implementation of VE projects continuously, the organisations can develop
‘Value Attitude’ among employees. People with Value Attitude see endless possibilities, such people in
business, look not only at the obstacles but also at opportunities. They have the spirit of can do—what
can we do today, what will we do tomorrow and how we will succeed becomes the essence of success.
Successful business people know where their businesses are going. They have a plan that they are
willing to follow it.They are mentally prepared for success. They are the motivators, the dreamers and
the real world implementers. They are committed to the balancing act of the world of possibilities and
the business realities. They follow the Value Engineered Leadership (VEL) approach to gauge value
and strength of theirbusiness. Their positive attitude and energy brings different perspectives. They
gain energy from other’s ideas, as well as of their own.
Hence looking at the this need, Indian Value Engineering Society (INVEST) has come out with the apt
theme ‘Building Value Attitude through VE for Business Growth’ for 30th INVEST International
Conference scheduled on Dec 12-13,2014 at Mumbai, India.
We are sure more organisations & educational institutes will take advantage of this golden
opportunity by sharing their thoughts through presentations of papers on this theme & related VE
projects.
INVEST wishes you all a great learning experience!!!
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Module-I Workshop
INVEST (EZC) organized a Module - I Workshop, from 21st July to 25th July'14 in the Centre for Excellence,
Jamshedpur. The programme was conducted by Anil Kumar Mukhopadhyaya CVS-Life. Mr. Alok Ghosal,
CVS-Life also took one session on Creativity. There were 24 participants from different industries like
Hitachi Tata Ltd, Uranium Corporation of India LTD, Tata Consulting Engineers Ltd.,T ata Steel Ltd, and
M.N.Dastur Ltd.
The programme was inaugurated by Mr Alok Kanagath, Vice President (Projects), Tata Steel and Mr
P.S.Reddy, Vice Chairman INVEST (EZC). Mr.Alok Kanagat had showed his interest to join in the valedictory
session also. Mr. P.K.Ghosh, Chief of Projects, Tata Steel was also present in the valedictory session. Mr.
Amit Ghosh, CVS-Life coordinated the workshop. The AVS Exam was conducted after the completion of
Module I Workshop. 14 participants appeared for the AVS Exam.
Mr Kanagat (seated middle) inaugurating the
session, with Mr. Reddy (seated left) and
Mr. Mukhopadhyay (seated right)
Mr Alok Ghosal taking a session
Mr. Mukhopadhyay explain FAST
diagram
27
Module-I Workshop for Educational Institute
A Module - I workshop was conducted by INVEST- WZC (Pune Chapter) from 21st to 25th July ’14 at
Residency Club, Pune. The workshop was conducted by Mr. Dilip Gowaikar CVS-Life. 23 participants
from Eaton Corporation, Mahindra (Truck Division) and other SMEs. Five projects were studied in the
workshop, followed by the AVS examination by 9 candidates. The workshop was preceded by an
awareness programme for the management of Eaton Ltd., Pune on 13th Nov. ‘14.
Photograph of Participants; seated L-R, Prof P Kalra,
Mr Ghosal & Dr R Belokar
Mr Alok Ghosal is awarded a plaque
During inauguration with Prof Kalra seated left
Workshop in progress
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INVAVE Editorial Board
P. S. Reddy (Tata Steel), Chairman
Members
A. K. Mukhopadhyaya, CVS (Ex-Tata Motors)
A. K. Ghosh, (Tata Steel) CVS, Jamshedpur
R Chandrashekar, TCS (IES) Bangalore
S. M. Agrawal (L&T) CVS, Mumbai
Ajay Sharma (Maruti Susuki India Ltd.)
INDIAN VALUE ENGINEERING SOCIETY
National Council for 2012-13
National President
Immediate Past President
Mr. S. Maitra
Executive Director
Supply Chain
Maruti Suzuki India Ltd.
Polam Gurgaon Rd. Gurgaon
E-mail : [email protected]
Mr. S. C. Sarkar
Ex-Vice President
Larsen & Toubro Ltd.
Coimbatore
E-mail : [email protected]
Mobile : 09007168510
R. K. Gupta (L&T), Mysore
P.S. Mashalkar, CVS, Mumbai
Rajen Nagre, CVS, Mumbai
Editor-in-Chief
Alok Ghosal, CVS
Publisher
(Vice-President - Administration)
Mr. R. K. Gupta
Sr. DGM, L&T Limited
Mysore Works, Mysore - 570018
Ph. : 0821-402561
E-mail : [email protected]
Indian Value Engineering Society, INVAVE
(Vice-Presidents)
is published quarterly by the Indian Value
Engineering Society and is distributed nationally.
INVAVE Deadlines
Contributions to INVAVE are welcome. Material
for INVAVE must be received atleast six weeks
Mr. Rohit Mehta, GM
Chairman, INVEST-SZC
L&T Limited, KIADB
Industrial Area
Mysore Works
Mr. Sriram G. V.
Chairman, INVEST-EZC
GM (PP, SP & ICR)
Tata Motors Ltd., Jamshedpur
E-mail :[email protected]
Mobile : 09234500497
in advance of the issue date. Deadlines do not
apply to technical papers. Material selected
will be at the Editorial Board’s direction.
Subscriptions :
Yearly rate is Rs. 200 including mailing
charges. Members of INVEST will receive
free copies of the journal.
Address
Editor-in-Chief, INVAVE
Centre for Excellence
Room No. 17, C. H. Area (East)
Jamshedpur - 831001, India
e-mail : [email protected]
Mr. Ajay Sharma
Chairman, INVEST-NZC
Maruti Suzuki India Ltd.
Palam Gurgaon Rd.
Gurgaon
Mr. Shrikant M Agrawal, CVS-Life
Jt. GM, Corporate HR Learning
L&T Ltd., Mumbai
e-mail : [email protected]
E-mail :[email protected] Mobile : 09820560613
Mobile : 09810418019
INVEST ZONAL
Mr. Paramjit S. Chadha
Secretary, INVEST-NZC
Bosch Chassis Systems India Ltd.
Gurgaon - 122 050
E-mail : [email protected]
Mobile : 09810152023
Mr. S. S. Ahluwalia
Larsen & Toubro, Mumbai
e-mail : [email protected],
Mobile: 09820082954
Mrs. Anita Lukose
Secretary, INVEST-SZC
Sobha Developers Ltd. - Bangalore
Mobile : 09980930053
E-mail : [email protected]
Mr Amit Ghosh
Secretary, INVEST-EZC
C/o Room No. 17, Centre for Excellence
Jubilee Rd, C. H. Area, Jamshedpur-831001
Mobile : 08092087100
E-mail : [email protected]
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