The News Review A special supplement to NOVEMBER 11, 2014

THE NEWS REVIEW - Thursday, November 6, 2014 - Page 9A
NOVEMBER 11, 2014
A special
supplement to
The News Review
Page 10A - THE NEWS REVIEW - Thursday, November 6, 2014
Lest
We Forget
Lest We
Forget
Remember
When
Auto Electric
Service Ltd.
CARPET ONE
FLOOR & HOME
HARVEST MEATS
Over 85 years in Yorkton
www.harvestmeats.ca
YORKTON
Linden Square
Shopping Centre
306-782-6556
1-888-782-6556
Lest
We Forget
50 Broadway St. W.
Yorkton, SK
306-782-2638
Remember
When
Lest
We Forget
BG
DENTURE
CLINIC
26-4th Ave. N.
Yorkton, SK
46 Broadway St. E.
Yorkton, SK
26 - 2nd Ave. N.
306-783-6515
306-783-6350
306-782-2927
Legion plays an important role
The
Great
War
Veterans
Association
(“GWVA”) was the largest and the most influential of the many Veterans
groups. Formed in 1917,
it comprised of more than
700 branches by 1925. In
1921
they started pressuring for the unification of
all the various Veterans
groups as being the best
way to represent the
many Veterans and their
dependants.
By 1918—more than
15 veterans’ groups and
regimental associations
with common goals but
fragmented and largely
unsuccessful
The British Empire
Service League (BESL)—
founded in 1921 as coalition of Britain, Canada,
South Africa, Australia
and New Zealand and is
now known as the Royal
Commonwealth
Ex-Services
League
(RCEL) with 57 member
organizations from 47
nations
1925—Appeal
for
Unity led to formation of
Dominion
Veterans
Alliance
A Unity Conference
was held in Winnipeg on
November 25, 1925. From
this conference emerged
“The Canadian Legion of
the BESL”, [commonly
referred to as “The
Canadian Legion”].
The Legion is organized in 10 provinces in
Canada, 5 US States,
and branches are now
being organized overseas.
Legion goals of providing a strong voice for veterans and to advise the
government shall be
maintained.
The Legion has become
a persuasive advocate for
pension legislation, and
other benefits such as
treatment and appeals
procedures, returned soldiers’ insurance and
assistance for those with
disabilities for veterans
and their dependants,
dealing directly with
Federal Government.
Legion is the largest
of the many veterans
Organizations in Canada
with 370,000 members.
Major responsibility
for the perpetuation of
“REMEMBRANCE” in
Canada through the
Annual Poppy Campaign
with a mission to ensure
that the sacrifices made
are never forgotten, and
reminding Canadians of
the 117,000 plus, men
and women who gave
Lest We
Forget
their lives in the wars
and military missions
around the world.
Poppy funds collected
are used for assistance to
veterans,
ex-service
members and their families who are in need.
1926 -- The Yorkton
Branch of the Canadian
Legion was granted a
charter to operate as
“The
Yorkton,
Saskatchewan Branch
#77, The Canadian
Legion, of the BESL,
[British Empire Service
League’.] Charter members included Messer’s
Balfour, DeBalinhard,
Schlitt, Eby, Williams,
Regan Graham, Walker,
Crosthwaite, Macleod,
Taylor, Morrow, Scott,
Kimber, and McMillan
with General Alexander
Ross as President.
The word “Royal” was
not added to the name
until 1960, signifying
recognition of the Queen.
1930 -- The Royal
Canadian Legion founded the Ladies Auxiliary
on April 23rd.
On
May
25th,
Yorkton’s War Memorial
was erected on Darlington
Street.
1949 -- Erection of the
War Memorial Monument
in the City of Yorkton
cemetery.
Over the years, and
into the present time, the
Yorkton Br. #77 of the
Royal Canadian Legion
has actively supported in
various ways, innumerable local community oriented groups, organizations and school projects.
These include, but are
not restricted to, health
and senior’s institutions,
and youth and young
people’s organizations.
Funding and help is
based on individual
applications supported
by documentation and
financial statements if
requested. Final disposition is made by a
Committee of the Board
of Directors and based on
The Legions ability to
fulfill the request.
As a final note The
Royal Canadian Legion
is dedicated to perpetuating the memory of
those who gave their all
to the cause of freedom
and the safeguarding of
our way of life in Canada
and the world over, and
those famous words,
LEST WE FORGETLEST WE FORGET!!
Researched and compiled by the late Wally
Austman, Veteran of the
Korean War
Lest We Forget
HEARN’S
WESTVIEW PHARMACY
265 Bradbrooke Drive, Yorkton, SK
306-783-4331
or 306-783-3988
Don’t Just Get “R” Done!
Get “R” Done Rite!
391 Ball Road
Yorkton, SK
Phone: 306-782-9600 Fax: 306-782-4449
THE NEWS REVIEW - Thursday, November 6, 2014 - Page 11A
Lest
We Forget
Remember
When
Lest
We Forget
STAN'S MOBILE
SERVICE
Lest
WeForget
BMO
Bank of
Montreal
Truck & Trailer
Repair Centre
361 York Road West
Yorkton
306-782-4200
23 Broadway St. E.
Yorkton
www.leadingedgeaviation.ca
306-783-5550
306-783-0321
Lest
We Forget
PARKLAND ENGINE
REBUILDERS
1994 LTD.
Hwy. #10 East, Box 22016
Yorkton, SK
Bruce Wonchulanko
Norm Dumka
306-782-2453
306-782-2454
Remember
When
• NURSERY
• GARDEN CENTRE
• GROCERY STORE
Hwy. #9 North
Yorkton, SK
Phone
306-783-8660
Facts about Remembrance Day
10 Quick Facts on...
Remembrance Day
1. Remembrance Day
was first observed in
1919 throughout the
British Commonwealth.
It was originally called
“Armistice Day” to commemorate
armistice
agreement that ended
the First World War on
Monday, November 11,
1918, at 11 a.m.—on
the eleventh hour of the
eleventh day of the
eleventh month.
2. From 1921 to 1930,
Armistice Day was held
on the Monday of the
week
in
which
November 11 fell. In
1931,
Alan
Neill,
Member of Parliament
for
Comox–Alberni,
introduced a bill to
observe Armistice Day
only on November 11.
Passed by the House of
Commons, the bill also
changed the name to
“Remembrance Day”.
The first Remembrance
Day was observed on
November 11, 1931.
3. Every year on
November
11,
Canadians pause in a
moment of silence to
honour and remember
the men and women
who have served, and
continue
to
serve
Canada during times of
war, conflict and peace.
We remember the more
than
1,500,000
Canadians who have
served throughout our
nation’s history and the
more than 118,000 who
made the ultimate sacrifice.
4. The poppy is the
symbol of Remembrance
Day. Replica poppies
are sold by the Royal
Canadian Legion to
provide assistance to
Veterans.
5. Remembrance Day
is a federal statutory
holiday in Canada. It is
also a statutory holiday
in three territories
(Yukon,
Northwest
Territories
and
Nunavut) and in six
provinces
(British
Columbia,
Alberta,
Saskatchewan,
New
Brunswick,
Prince
Edward Island and
Newfoundland
and
Labrador).
6. The national ceremony is held at the
National War Memorial
in
Ottawa.
The
Governor General of
Canada presides over
the ceremony. It is also
attended by the Prime
Minister, other government officials, representatives of Veterans’
organizations, diplomatic representatives,
other
dignitaries,
Veterans as well as the
general public.
7. In advance of the
ceremony, long columns
of Veterans, Canadian
Armed Forces members, RCMP officers,
and cadets march to the
memorial lead by a pipe
band and a colour
guard. At the end of the
ceremony, they march
away to officially close
the ceremony.
Take time to reflect
Remembrance Day
is an opportunity to
reflect on the sacrifices
that today’s soldiers
make and on the sacrifices of all those who
preceded them.
The deadliest war:
The Great War of 19141918 is the greatest
drama known to Europe
in terms of the number
of deaths. The totalitarian regimes of the twentieth century and the
Second World War are
the direct consequences
of this war. But it was
the Second World War
that was the deadliest,
with more than 55 million deaths, of which 30
million were civilian.
The most remem-
bered war: This is the
Second World War
because of the atom
bombs dropped on
Japan and because it
left its mark on three
generations.
Fortunately, those
who remember it also
remember the slogan
“No more war!”
The bloodiest battle
in Canadian history:
The Battle of the
Somme took place from
July 1 to the end of
November, 1916. On
the first day of this battle,
the
1st
Newfoundland
Regiment was virtually
annihilated in the village of Beaumont.
Machine guns, barbed
RESIDENTIAL
and
COMMERCIAL
wire, trenches, and
massive artillery shelling resulted in ferocious
fighting marked by
heavy losses. Some
24,713 Canadians and
Newfoundlanders died
in the battle.
The largest naval
battle: The greatest
naval concentration of
contemporary history
was deployed in the
Persian Gulf and Indian
Ocean
area
on
September 21, 2007.
This
unprecedented
demonstration of power
by the United States
against Iran included
three aircraft carriers
supported by about 40
escort vessels and nearly 100 aircraft.
8. Some of the 54
Commonwealth member states, such as
Canada, the United
Kingdom and Australia,
observe the tradition of
Remembrance Day on
the eleventh hour of the
eleventh day of the
eleventh month. Other
nations observe a sol-
emn day but at different dates. For example,
ANZAC Day is observed
in New Zealand on April
25. In South Africa,
Poppy Day is marked
on the Sunday that falls
closest to November
11.
9. Many nations that
are not members of the
Commonwealth
also
observe Remembrance
Day on November 11,
including
France,
Belgium and Poland.
10. The United States
used to commemorate
Armistice Day on November 11. However, in
1954 they changed the
name to Veterans Day.
We remember those who served
in times of war and peace.
Serving You In Yorkton & District Since 1959
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Celebrating Over 55 Years
HEATING COOLING CALL
306-783-3028
FAX: 786-6441
71 Broadway E., YORKTON
HANCOCK PLUMBING 2011 LTD.
Safely providing quality services.™
EMW started in the Agri-business 36+ years ago.
We continually endeavor to be leaders in
“safety and innovation”.
We would like to take this opportunity
to thank our customers for their continued
business and support. Please have a safe
and prosperous year.
Page 12A - THE NEWS REVIEW - Thursday, November 6, 2014
Remember
When
Lest
We Forget
Lest
We Forget
ALL SEASON
RENTALS
&
SALES
R E F R I G E R AT I O N LT D .
Yorkton
"Builders of
Quality Homes"
306-782-1577
Hwy. 10 East
Yorkton, SK
306-782-9700
Perry 621-7965
Canora
37 Palliser Way,
Yorkton, SK
306-563-5527
1 800 667-1273
306-783-0400
Remember
When
Lest
We Forget
YORK-SASK Alexander’s
DRY CLEANERS Men’s Wear
14 - 1st Avenue North
Yorkton, SK
41 Broadway St. E.,
Yorkton
306-782-2647
306-783-8107
We Honor
Those Who
Served
78 Broadway Street E.
Yorkton, Sask.
306-786-3200
www.rbc.com/online
Poppy: Long standing tradition
Wearing a red poppy
for Remembrance Day
on November 11 has
been a tradition in this
country for 90 years
now. The white poppy,
dating from 1933, has
recently
resurfaced,
however. It is a way to
remember the civilian
victims of war. The two
complement each other:
the red for those who
died for their country,
the white for the hope of
peace.
Did you know that
behind these poppy
campaigns, both past
and present, are some
very committed women?
The adoption of the
poppy as a symbol of
remembrance has international origins. The
first person to use it in
this way was Mrs. Moina
Michael, a staff member
of
the
American
Overseas YMCA, during
the last year of the First
World War. In April
1920 she led a stirring
campaign to have the
poppy recognized as the
official symbol of remembrance by the American
Legion. At the same
time, Mrs. Anna Guérin,
from France, became an
ardent defender of the
poppy as the symbol
that would help all citizens remember those
who died in the war.
The efforts of these
two ladies were not in
vain. The first “poppy
day” was held on
November 11, 1921, in
France as well as in
Commonwealth countries. Ninety years later,
the poppy is still a
reminder to us all. But
we mustn’t forget that
on November 11, 1933,
the
Women’s
Cooperative Guild in
the United Kingdom
launched the white
poppy campaign, symbolizing the will to work
towards creating a world
without violence, to
resolve conflicts peacefully, and to remember
civilian victims of war.
First Remembrance day was 1918
Remembrance Day on
November 11 commemorates the eleventh hour of
the eleventh day of the
eleventh month of the year
1918. This is when the
Armistice was signed and
is also the date marking
the official end of the First
World War. To commemorate this day, you are invited to participate in the
annual Poppy Campaign,
the
Royal
Canadian
Legion’s main source of
fundraising, which allows
this organization to continue its work with veterans
in need.
Nowadays,
Remembrance Day includes all
wars that have occurred
since the Great War.
Indeed, there has not been
a single day since 1918 that
has not been marked by a
war or armed conflict somewhere on this planet. So, to
put an end to all wars,
people across the country
wear poppies in their lapels
and decorate war memorials with wreaths and
bunches of poppies on
November 11.
Why poppies? Because
this red flower recalls the
famous poem “In Flanders
Fields,”
written
by
Lieutenant Colonel John
McCrae during the First
World War. This is the
most frequently read and
quoted poem about war. It
is the mention of poppies in
the first and last verses
that has turned this flower
into an emblem of remembrance and a symbol of new
growth in the devastation
left by war.
We must all remember
the terrible toll wrought by
the First World War: the
death of 16.5 million people, including 9.7 million
military personnel. The
Second World War, the
bloodiest conflict in our history, saw the deaths of 60
million souls, one third of
which were military personnel. Please visit www.
veterans.gc.ca for more
information about the
Remembrance
Lest
We
Forget
Lest We Forget
PQ
LLP
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS BUSINESS ADVISORS
“Serving Yorkton & Area”
with services in
•Individual, Farm & Corporate Tax Preparation and Planning
• Financial Statement Preparation • Auditing Services
• Data Processing • Accounting Services
In Our Community
Fax 786-6414
306-783-8531
41 Broadway Street West, Yorkton
Email: [email protected]
THE NEWS REVIEW - Thursday, November 6, 2014 - Page 13A
Remember
When
INDUSTRIAL TRUCK
&
TRAILER REPAIRING
"Safety Inspection"
306-786-6065
Hwy. 16 W., Yorkton, SK
Lest We Forget
Greater love has no one than
this, that someone lay down his
life for his friends. John 15:13
Greg Ottenbreit
MLA Yorkton Constituency
@gregottenbreit
Remember
When
We Honor
Those Who
Served
STEPHANIUK
LAW
OFFICE
CHRISTIE’S
FUNERAL HOME
5 - 5th Ave. N.,
Yorkton
121 Palliser Way, Yorkton
306-783-2424
Toll Free
www.yorktonlawoffice.com
& CREMATORIUM
306-782-2312
1-800-268-7052
Lest We Forget
APPERLEY
ELECTRIC
Lest
We Forget
LTD.
ELECTRICAL
CONTRACTORS
•Electrical Controls
•Electrical Construction
•Installation and Service
YORKTON, SASK.
Claude: 306-621-7062
Fax: 306-783-3583
Email [email protected]
www.parklandmall.net
306-782-2132
Lest We Forget
2014 REMEMBRANCE
DAY PARADE
Tuesday, November 11, 2014
at the Gallagher Centre (Flexi-Hall)
at 10:50 a.m.
Please be seated by 10:40 a.m.
REMEMBRANCE
DAY DINNER
will be held in the
Legion Jubilee Hall
Cocktails 5:30 p.m.
Dinner 6:30 p.m.
Tickets: $20.00/person
available at the Legion
306-783-9789
Deadline for tickets Nov. 6/14
Lest
We Forget
WAGNER’S
FLOORING
CANADA
464 Broadway St. E.
Yorkton, SK
306-783-8392
www.wagnersflooring.com
Lest
We Forget
306.786.1750
www.yorkton.ca
www.facebook.com/
YorktonParksandRecreation
Remember
When
Lest
We Forget
Lest
We Forget
The Chalet
ASPHALT SERVICES
516 Broadway St. E.,
Yorkton SK
Ph: 306-783-3037
Lest We
Forget
THORSNESS APPLIANCE
AND
Remember
When
BED STORE
14 Betts Ave., Yorkton, SK
306-786-7676
39 Smith St. W.
Yorkton
Phone
306-782-6050
Yorkton
Chamber of
Commerce
Jct. Hwy. #9 & 16
Yorkton, SK
306-783-4368
Linden Square Mall
Yorkton
306-786-7700
Page 14A - THE NEWS REVIEW - Thursday, November 6, 2014
Remember
When
Remember
When
Remember
When
SALES & LEASING
Christ the Teacher
Catholic School Division
Board & Staff
75 Broadway St. E.,
Yorkton, Sask.
306-783-8787
Phone
306-782-3456
www.christtheteacher.ca
ANDREW JUBA – Born March 25, 1925.
Of the five members of his family that
fought in World War II, was the only one
to join the navy rather than the army.
During the war, Juba served on the
HMCS St. Lambert, which escorted convoys across the North Atlantic, protecting
them from German submarines. Died
May 9, 2014.
Lest
We Forget
Dream
Weddings
Bridal & Formal
Wear
269 Hamilton Road
Yorkton
91 Broadway Street E.
Yorkton, Sask.
Phone
306-783-6666
306-782-6000
ART ALSTAD
BRUCE SMITH
Remember
When
Remember
When
115 Palliser Way,
Yorkton
Phone
306-783-8080
Toll Free
1-800-565-0002
HAAS
NISSAN
386 Broadway St. E.
Yorkton, SK
306-783-9461
www.haasnissan.com
MANSE POWELL – Born April 25, 1918
in the Waldron District. Joined the army
with the Lord Strathcona’s Horse Cavalry
Unit in 1926 in Winnipeg. Went overseas
in 1941 with the Armoured Unit. Served in
Canada, Italy and North West Europe.
Went on to become a prominent member
of the community, and served as secretary of the village of Ebenezer for over 30
years. Died December 9, 2004.
Remembrance
Day
You are invited to the
Army Navy & Air Force Club
CELEBRATIONS – The opening of the new Royal Canadian Legion branch in 1961,
with Gen. Alexander Ross (center) participating in the celebrations in the then-new
building.
November 11th
Starting at 12 p.m.
St. Mary’s Parish
to Honor Our Veterans
Join Us for
Fellowship and Lunch!
Ukrainian Catholic Cultural Centre
We can accommodate small or large groups
• Weddings
• Socials
• Meetings/Conventions
Box 1669 • 240 Wellington Avenue
Yorkton, Saskatchewan S3N 3L2
Phone: (306) 782-1010
Fax: (306) 782-0424
email: [email protected]
website: smcultural.com
Army, Navy &
Air Force Club
43 Broadway St. East
Yorkton, SK
306-783-4260
THE NEWS REVIEW - Thursday, November 6, 2014 - Page 15A
GORDON MACKENZIE – Born February
5, 1922 in Kessock, Sk. Joined the RCAF
at 20, working as an aero-mechanic, put in
Squadron 436 which left for India, being
based out of Bombay, Gujrat, Calcuta,
Imphal Valley down to Akyab and Ramree
Island in Burma, flying supplies to the
British Army. On returning home, worked
with the Department of Highways for 40
years. Died April 27, 2003.
JOHN MILLER – Born August 11, 1923 in
Orcadia, joined the Navy after the RCMP
suggested that the army needed him
more than the police. Served on the
English Battleship HMS Malaya for two
months before moving on to Landing Craft
#271, which carried troops to the beaches
during the Normandy Invasion. Went on to
farm near Rokeby, raise seven children
and become a prominent volunteer in the
Yorkton area, receiving numerous honors
for his work in the community. Died
February 26, 2014.
MIKE BIDNOCK
NORMAN MCKEEMAN – Born February
9, 1923 in Cairns, North Queensland,
Australia. Enlisted in the Royal Australian
Air Force in August 1941, was posted to
Canada to finish training and received
wings in Yorkton. Served as president of
the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 77 in
1981 and 1982 and later became Zone
Commander.
THEN AND NOW – These two photos show the first office of the Royal Canadian Legion Gen. Alexander Ross Branch 77, located on First Avenue, and what the Legion looks like
today in its current location on Broadway Street, opened in 1961.
Page 16A - THE NEWS REVIEW - Thursday, November 6, 2014
Lest
We Forget
270 Hamilton Road, Yorkton
(next to Walmart)
306-783-9022
www.yorktondodge.com
Lest We Forget
Linden Square
Yorkton
306-782-5300
Remember
When
Yorkton
Animal
Health Centre
P.C. Ltd.
Hwy. 52 W.
Yorkton
306-782-6620
Remember
When
Lest We
Forget
Remember
When
concrete 2012 ltd.
Highway #9
and York Road
Yorkton, SK
49 Broadway St. E.
Yorkton, SK
306-782-2264
Phone
Dr. Long
308 Broadway St. W.
Yorkton, SK
306-783-5183
306-783-3349
Programs in place to help homeless veterans
Leave the Streets
Behind – Homeless
Veterans
The Legion helps
Veterans and their family members leave the
streets behind and turn
their
lives
around
through national and
provincial
programs
offering financial assistance and supports for
homeless Veterans and
those at risk.
In 2012, the Legion
established a national
homeless Veterans program, “Leave the Streets
Behind”, based on the
ground breaking work of
Ontario Command. The
program’s mission is to
reach out to homeless
Veterans, or near homeless Veterans, by providing immediate financial
assistance and support
when and where needed.
It also connects them
with the appropriate
social and community
services to establish a
long term solution to
meet their needs.
Help is Available
If a Veteran or Veteran’s family member
you know is homeless or
near homeless please
contact the Legion at:
Tel: 306-525-8739 or
Toll free: 1-866-4718387
Email us at [email protected]
sasktel.net
How We Can Help
Trained
Legion
Service Officers can
assist with the following:
Finding
suitable
accommodation: Legion
Provincial Commands
work
closely
with
Veterans Affairs, shelters and community
organizations to get
Veterans off the street
and into temporary and/
or long term accommodations.
Financial assistance:
Through the Poppy
Fund, financial assistance can be provided for
items such as first and
last month’s rent, rental
arrears,
furnishings,
food and clothing, bus
tickets, and medical
needs such as dental,
eyeglass, transportation
to medical appointments.
Other
supports:
Legion
Provincial
Commands can help
Veterans access additional community, mental health and training
programs to support
their transition.
Eligibility
Canadian ex-service
personnel and their
dependents (spouse/children).
Commonwealth exservice personnel who
are residents in Canada
and their dependents.
Allied countries exservice personnel who
are residents of Canada
and their dependents.
Program Funding
This program is funded by Legion Branches
within the province
through their Poppy
Funds, As well, Legion
Provincial Commands
receive an initial grant
from Dominion Command
to help with the start-up
costs of the program.
How the Legion is
helping across Canada
Recognizing the need
for a coordinated, national strategy to address
the issues facing homeless Veterans, the Legion
coordinated and hosted a
Homeless
Veterans
Forum in April 2014.
This meeting brought
together national organizations working with
homeless individuals,
but with a key focus on
addressing Veterans.
The Legion has been
assisting
homeless
Veterans across Canada
for many years. In addition to helping homeless
Veterans find and access
emergency
supports,
Provincial Commands
have taken the initiative
to develop and fund
homeless programs and
supports in their communities.
Ontario was the first
Provincial Command to
develop and offer the
“Leave
the
Streets
Behind”
program.
Through their efforts,
the Legion established a
network of support
through Veterans Affairs
and various shelters
across the province to
provide transition assistance
to
homeless
Veterans.
BC/Yukon Command
provides financial support for Veterans Manor
in Vancouver’s East side
and more recently,
Cockrell
House
in
Victoria.
Alberta-NWT Command has operated a
food bank for over 20
years assisting many
Veterans in their community and is engaged
with first responders in
identifying and assisting
homeless or near homeless Veterans. This
Command has also supported Maddison House
for homeless Veterans in
the Calgary area and
Veterans
Villa
in
Edmonton.
Nova Scotia/Nunavut
Command launched the
Veterans Outreach program bringing together
community resources
and establishing partnerships to provide proactive assistance to
homeless Veterans.
Dominion Command
is working towards the
goal of ensuring that
every Provincial Command in Canada establishes a homeless Veterans program tailored
to meet their unique
community needs.
Discovering the Power
in Me
Discovering the Power
in Me (DPM) is a program developed and
offered by the Pacific
Institute and is well
known throughout North
America. The program
gives people with mobility disabilities, their
families and others sharing their journey the
tools to develop the inner
strength and capacity
required to take control
of their lives. DPM teaches people to manage
change, set and achieve
goals, be more effective
and think in ways to create success. DPM used
cognitive psychology to
help participants understand how the human
mind works and how
their current beliefs and
attitudes can shape the
future. The underlying
theme is that everyone
can control their own
thought process. Once
learned and understood,
individuals
will
be
empowered to shape the
future they want. It’s
intention is to teach and
promote healthy cognitive behaviours when
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DOREEN K. CLARK
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NOLAN R. KONDRATOFF
MARK T. PERSICK
www.lelandcampbell.com
YORKTON OFFICE
36 Fourth Avenue North, Drawer 188, Yorkton, Saskatchewan S3N 2V7
Ph: 306-783-8541, Fax: 306-786-7484, Email: [email protected]
KAMSACK OFFICE
Box 399, 445 Second Street, Kamsack, Saskatchewan S0A 1S0
Ph: 306-542-2646, Fax: 306-542-2510, Email: [email protected]
dealing with traumatic
incidents.
DPM assists Veterans
in making a successful
transition to civilian life
following a service related injury. It is intended
to compliment, rather
than replace the Veterans
Transition Program.
As it currently stands,
the Veterans Transition
Program is not offered in
Saskatchewan. Should a
Veteran require that
program, he or she would
need to commit to extended travel and time. DPM
however, will be offered
in the Veterans’ own
community here in
Saskatchewan, at considerably less cost and
logistical effort. Should
the Veteran require further treatment following
the DPM program, the
Royal Canadian Legion
would attempt to locate
a spot for that Veteran
on the Veterans Transition Program in another
Province.
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85 Broadway St. East, Yorkton
Toll Free 1-800-667-5545
(Local) 306-782-5545
THE NEWS REVIEW - Thursday, November 6, 2014 - Page 17A
Remember
When
Remember
When
from
Their role was to offer
their lives.
Ours is to remember.
Remember
When
Remember
When
Lest
We Forget
from
PARKLAND
carpet & upholstery
(1976) Ltd.
CLEANERS
Relax We Can Do It!
41 Broadway Street W.
Yorkton, SK
4 Palliser Way
Yorkton, SK
45 - 5th Ave. N.
Yorkton
306-783-4477
306-783-8567
306-783-7552
www.farrellagencies.com
www.fountaintire.com
www.baileysfuneralhome.com
306-782-2940
306-782-2645
Farewell to Yorkton
Volunteers August 22,
1914. From the Howard
Jackson Collection. A
contingent of volunteers
– They were the first
group of volunteers, with
their kit bags to leave
Yorkton for an eastern
Canadian camp, likely
Val Cartier, Québec for
further training before
heading for the front.
They are lined up near
the Town Hall building
which was then on the
west side of Third Avenue
North across the present
day City Hall. A crowd of
citizens were gathered
on the stairs and yard to
bid them adieu.
The soldiers kit in
World War One, ready
for the battlefields consisted of: - Mark ll Lee
Enfield rifle.
Wool cap, spare socks
and long coat; Digging
tool; Rations; paybook;
toothbrush; soap and
towel; spare bootlaces;
tin plate and cup; fork
and spoon; mending and
darning kit; Water bottle
and carrier Bayonet -- a
blade that could be
attached to the end of the
rifle; 150 rounds of
ammunition in belt and
pouches; Identity tag;
Two canvas bags for respirator and gasmask;
Service cap, and regiment cap badge; Packet
of cigarettes
Courtesy of
THERESE LEFEBVRE
PRINCE
HERITAGE
107 Myrtle Ave.
Yorkton, SK
191 York Road W.
Yorkton
41 Betts Ave. N.
Yorkton
Phone
306-786-0506
RESEARCHER
CITY OF YORKTON
ARCHIVES
BOX 400 37 THIRD
AVENUE NORTH
YORKTON, SASK. S3N
2W3
306-786-1722
[email protected]
Videos produced to record history
The Ministry of Parks,
Culture and Sport today
premiered Stories of
Courage: Saskatchewan
Second
World
War
Veterans Remember, a
series of eight videos
presenting the oral histories of 17 Saskatchewan
residents who served
during the Second World
War.
The project started
when community advocates
asked
the
Government
of
Saskatchewan to help
preserve our province’s
military heritage before
it was lost. Together,
three priorities were
established: organizing
a new provincial military heritage committee,
developing an oral history project using video
and integrating information about military heritage
into
the
Saskatchewan curriculum.
“These oral histories
will help future generations gain a sense of
what life was like in
Saskatchewan during
the war, the values that
led our country to join in
the fight, and why the
veterans who shared
their stories so readily
volunteered to serve,”
Parks, Culture and Sport
Minister Mark Docherty
said. “You can draw a
direct line from that generation’s valour to the
spirit of the Canadian
EVERLAST
Eaves & Exteriors Ltd.
Owners: Lynton Evans & Jeff Morley
military today as we
honour the lives of the
two soldiers killed last
week defending our freedoms.”
“There is value in preserving military heritage
for present and future
generations,” Saskatchewan
Military
Heritage
Committee
Chair and Lieutenant
Colonel (retired) Larry
Wong said. “Our history
as a nation includes
those difficult times
when we were forced to
take up arms and it’s an
incomplete picture of our
province if we don’t learn
about and value these
parts of our heritage.”
“City Saskatchewan
is proud to broadcast
this important series,”
City
Saskatchewan
General Manager Joanne
McDonald said. “As the
province’s educational
broadcaster, we are
pleased to do our part to
help explore a fuller
understanding of this
significant period of our
history to our viewers.”
The videos, along with
a new teaching guide
containing detailed lesson plans for each video,
will be placed in the provincial social studies
curriculum for teachers
to use in the classroom.
They can be viewed
online at www.saskatchewan.ca/storiesofcourage/.
Lest We Forget
*Lifetime
Seal Warranty*
• PVC Window Door Replacement
• Vinyl Siding • Windows/Door Capping
• Custom Flashings • Eavestroughing
• Soffit/Fascia
306-786-7055
FAX: 306-782-7371
email: [email protected]
VISIT OUR SHOWROOM AT
130 LIVINGSTONE, YORKTON, SK
Highway #16 West
Yorkton, Sask.
email: [email protected]
306-782-7423
Page 18A - THE NEWS REVIEW - Thursday, November 6, 2014
GETIT
ON THE
WEB
Our website has a complete
package of local, national and
international news plus many
other features such as:
• TV listings
• Horoscopes
• Events Calendar
• Markets
• Weather & Travel
• Classifieds
• Sports
• Opinions
• Entertainment
You can now read the
Thursday edition online
plus
link to websites of the
businesses listed below.
HAAS
NISSAN
YORKTON
CO-OP
18 First Avenue North
Yorkton, SK
S3N 1J4
Phone 306-783-7355
Check out our Website at:
www.yorktonnews.com
Like us on Facebook
/yorkton.newsreview
THE NEWS REVIEW - Thursday, November 6, 2014 - Page 19A
Lest
We Forget
Lest
We Forget
Honoring The
Veterans
Saluting Our
Veterans
PROUD to support
SASKATCHEWAN'S
VETERANS
Remember
When
107 Broadway St. W.
Yorkton, SK
306-783-4212
P.O. Box 20030,
Yorkton
or
Phone: 783-9243
Cell: 621-3227
115 - 41 Broadway W.
Yorkton, SK
Email: [email protected]
website: www.yorktonbid.com
306-786-6636
306-641-5224
Corner of
Laurier & Broadway
and WalMart
#4 - 76 7th Ave. S.
Yorkton, SK
email:
[email protected]
www.remco-memorials.ca
306-782-2999
The Canadian Forces in Afghanistan
The chain of events
that
would
bring
Canadian soldiers into
the desolate and dangerous
terrain
of
Afghanistan began on
September 11, 2001. On
that day, four airliners
were hijacked in the
skies over the eastern
United States; two were
deliberately
crashed
into the World Trade
Center towers and one
into the Pentagon,
resulting in the death of
nearly 3,000 people.
These horrific attacks
shocked and galvanized
the United States and
much of the world.
Canada would soon play
a role in the ensuing
international efforts to
battle terrorism and
help bring democracy to
Afghanistan.
Afghanistan is a rugged country in Southwest
Asia, located between
Pakistan and Iran. This
ancient, mountainous
land is about the size of
Saskatchewan and has
a population of approximately 30 million people. The various ethnic
groups and factions that
have made the country
home over the centuries
have given Afghanistan
a rich heritage and
diversity, but have also
helped make peace and
stability difficult to
achieve.
The civil war that
broke out after the former Soviet Union withdrew from its military
occupation
of
Afghanistan in the
1980s would see the
Taliban regime gain
control of the country.
This extreme fundamentalist
regime
severely limited civil
rights and supported
international terrorist
groups, including alQaeda (the group which
was behind the attacks
in the United States). In
the wake of September
11, the United States
and the world took
action through the
United Nations (UN)
and the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization
(NATO).
The first Canadian
Armed Forces contribution to the campaign
against terrorism in
Southwest Asia came at
sea.
Beginning
in
October 2001, Canadian
ships would see ongoing
duty in the waters off
the region, supporting
and defending the international fleet operating
there as well as locating
and searching unknown
boats looking for illegal
activity.
The Aurora patrol
aircraft and Hercules
and Polaris transport
planes of the Canadian
Armed
Forces
Air
Command would also be
active in Afghanistan
and the waters off
Southwest Asia, filling
important roles in
marine surveillance,
transporting supplies
and personnel, and
evacuating casualties.
Canadian helicopters
also provided important
service in identifying
merchant vessels and
offering valuable transport support over the
years.
Canadian soldiers
soon
travelled
to
Afghanistan as well.
The first were commandos from the elite Joint
Task Force 2 (JTF 2) in
December 2001, followed by other Canadian
soldiers in January
2002 who were initially
based in Kandahar.
With the eventual
fall from power of the
Taliban,
attention
turned to stabilizing the
country and helping
establish a new Afghan
government. The UN
authorized a NATO-led
International Security
Assistance Force (ISAF)
to take on this challenge.
The
initial
Canadian contribution
to the ISAF in the summer of 2003 consisted of
more than 700 Canadian
Armed Forces members
stationed in Kabul, the
country’s capital, with
200 more providing support from elsewhere in
Southwest Asia.
In 2005, the Canadian
Armed Forces’ role
evolved again when
they began to shift back
to the volatile Kandahar
region.
While
the
Taliban
government
had been toppled, the
group remained a strong
presence in some areas
of the country. Indeed,
Canada’s return to
Kandahar
coincided
with a resurgence in
Taliban activity and our
soldiers quickly found
themselves the targets
of attack.
The
numbers
of
Canadian soldiers soon
swelled to approximately 2,300 to help deal
with the enemy and
support the Provincial
Reconstruction Team
operating
there.
Canadian tanks, artillery and infantry soldiers all took part in
many ground operations
in Kandahar, including
large-scale offensives
against massed Taliban
forces. This chapter of
Canada’s efforts in
Afghanistan was the
most perilous. Anytime
Canadian soldiers left
the relative safety of
their main camps to go
“outside the wire,” the
danger was very real.
Canada’s combat role
in the country ended in
2011 when the focus
shifted to training
Afghanistan’s army and
police force and the last
of our service members
left the country in
SOLID
WASTE
DISPOSAL
Locally Owned & Operated
Since 1963
[email protected]
306-783-6995
March
2014.
But
Canada’s efforts in the
troubled country have
been
numerous.
Reaching out in an
attempt to build trust
and win the hearts and
minds of the people of
Afghanistan was an
important goal. In addition to their military
activities,
Canadian
Armed Forces members
engaged
in
many
humanitarian efforts
like digging wells,
rebuilding schools and
distributing
medical
and relief supplies, both
as part of their official
mission and on a volunteer basis.
Canada’s efforts in
Afghanistan have made
a difference, but this
has come at a great cost.
Sadly, 158 Canadian
Armed Forces members
died in the cause of
peace and freedom in
Afghanistan.
The
Canada
Remembers Program of
Veterans Affairs Canada
encourages
all
Canadians to learn
about the sacrifices and
achievements made by
those who have served–
and continue to serve–
during times of war and
peace. As well, it invites
Canadians to become
involved in remembrance activities that
will help preserve their
legacy for future generations.
In Remembrance
of those
who fought
for our freedom.
Thanks Grandpa
Colbie, Bryce,
Brendan, Riley,
✞ Jordan, Ember,
Maple, Meagan
Page 20A - THE NEWS REVIEW - Thursday, November 6, 2014
Canadians take part in Korean War
The year is 1950. The
Second World War is
over.
The
United
Nations (UN) has been
in place for just five
years, and is working to
promote global peace
and security. Canada is
brimming with optimism as Canadians look
forward to a prosperous
and peaceful second half
of the 20th century.
Suddenly, an international crisis is brewing
in the Korean peninsula
and people, the world
over, are holding their
collective breath. What
happens next is history.
At the end of the
Second World War,
Japan’s empire was dismantled and the Soviet
Union, seeking to gain
influence in the region,
occupied North Korea
while the Americans
moved into South Korea.
The Soviets and the
Americans eventually
left, but not until a communist government had
been established in the
North and a democratic
government in the
South. Tensions between
the two Koreas grew to
a climax and, on June
25, 1950, the military
forces of North Korea
crossed the 38th Parallel
into South Korea. This
marked the beginning of
hostilities which were to
rage on for more than
three years, throughout
the country known to its
people as the Land of
the Morning Calm.
The UN, created to
resolve conflict between
member nations primarily through dialogue and
negotiation, also had
the flexibility to use
force in the pursuit of
peace. The situation in
Korea would require
armed intervention, and
16 member nations,
including
Canada,
would contribute military forces under United
States command.
Initial advances of
North Korean troops
reached Seoul, the capital of South Korea, but a
September 1950 UN sea
landing at Seoul’s port
of Inchon forced the
North
Koreans
to
retreat. Seoul was recaptured by UN Forces,
which then crossed the
38th Parallel, moving
toward the Chinese border. Chinese forces
intervened with a massive offensive that drove
the UN and South
Korean Armies back
across the 38th Parallel
to southern positions
along the Imjin River.
In
mid-February
1951,
units
from
Canada, Great Britain,
Australia, New Zealand
and India joined to form
one
Commonwealth
Force, as part of a northeastern advance toward
the 38th Parallel. Korea,
a rugged country with
hills, swamps and rice
fields, also has periods
of
severe
seasonal
weather which hampered combat operations. By the end of
March, Canadian troops
were in the Kapyong
Valley and in mid-April
UN Forces were again
north of the 38thParallel.
Western politicians
debated invading China
at the risk of expanding
the war, but decided
against such action and
in late April 1951, with
new troops and equipment, Chinese and
North Korean forces
struck in the western
and west-central sectors. The aggressive
Chinese advance forced
US troops in the area to
move back or risk being
overrun by the enemy.
Canadian and other
Commonwealth troops
entered the battle in the
Kapyong Valley and
helped the Americans
retreat to safety. The
Canadians were awarded a US Presidential
Citation for this gallant
action.
Early in July 1951,
ceasefire negotiations
began. However, there
would be two more years
of fighting until the
signing of the Armistice
at Panmunjom on July
27, 1953. The uneasy
truce which followed left
Korea a divided country, yet the first UN
intervention in history
effectively stopped the
aggression, and the UN
emerged from the crisis
with enhanced prestige.
As with the two world
wars that preceded
Korea, Canadians volunteered for military
service far from home.
More
than
26,000
Canadians served in the
Korean War, including
sailors
from
eight
destroyers and airmen
who took part in many
combat and transport
missions. Canada’s military contribution was
larger, in proportion to
its population, than
most other UN participants.
Canada, as a nation,
owes an everlasting debt
of gratitude to those
young men and women
who, in the prime of
their youth, have served
and continue to serve
their country to preserve global peace and
protect
fundamental
human rights. Many
made the ultimate sacrifice, and lie buried in
countries far from their
homes and loved ones.
Many have returned
from service with injuries to body and mind
that they must carry
with them for the rest of
their lives. The names
of 516 Canadians who
died in service during
the conflict are inscribed
in
the
Books
of
Remembrance located
in the Peace Tower in
Ottawa.
The collective experiences and stories of
Canada’s Veterans provide Canadians with a
proud and lasting legacy
that will continue into
the country’s future.
Remembering
and
reflecting on the significance of the contribution they made, and
continue
to
make,
strengthens the commitment to preserve the
values for which they
fought.
The Korean War
marked a new stage in
Canada’s development
as a nation. Since the
end of the war, Canada
has contributed to many
military
operations
around
The Canada Remembers Program of Veterans Affairs Canada encourages all Canadians
to learn about the sacrifices and achievements
made by those who have
served—and continue to
serve—during times of
war and peace. As well,
it invites Canadians to
become involved in
remembrance activities
that will help preserve
their legacy for future
generations.
To learn more about
Canada’s role in the
Korean War, please visit
the Veterans Affairs
Canada Web site at veterans.gc.ca or call 1-866522-2122 toll free.
We Remember
Royal Canadian Legion, Yorkton
General Alexander Ross Branch #77
“2014 – Remembrance Day Service”
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 11
Remembrance Day Parade
will be held on
Tuesday,
November 11th, 2014.
This year’s ceremonies will be at the
Gallagher Centre Flexi Hall
at 10:50 a.m.
Please be seated in the Gallagher Centre Flexi Hall
by 10:40 a.m.
The parade will form up
at 10:40 hours in the
Gallagher Centre Flexi Hall
TH
Banquet
Legion Jubilee Hall
Social at 5:30 p.m.
Dinner at 6:30 p.m.
Honouring Our Local Veterans
Entertainment by the
Legion Pipe Band
Tickets $20.00 per person
Tickets may be purchased at the Legion.
Deadline for tickets, Nov. 6th at 12 noon.
Only 125 tickets available
`