Document 430041

AGENDA
VERNON TOWN COUNCIL
REGULAR MEETING
TOWN HALL - 14 PARK PLACE - 3 rd Floor
VERNON, CONNECTICUT
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 2014
7:30 P.M.
A.)
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE
B.)
ROLL CALL
C.)
CITIZENS FORUM
D.)
EXECUTIVE SESSION
THE TOWN COUNCIL, PURSUANT TO THE AUTHORITY GIVEN IN
CONNECTICUT GENERAL STATUTES § 1-200(6) (B), HEREBY MOVES TO
GO INTO EXECUTIVE SESSION TO DISCUSS TAX APPEAL SETTLEMENT
CV-14-6008068-S ST. GERMAIN LAURELWOOD LANE VS. TOWN OF
VERNON ET AL; CV-14-6008017-S HENDEL'S SHELL STATIONS LLC VS
TOWN OF VERNON; AND CV-14-6026071-S JANAKI CORPORATION LLC
VS TOWN OF VERNON AND INVITES JOHN D. WARD, TOWN
ADMINISTRATOR; AND DAVID WHEELER, TOWN ASSESSOR TO ATTEND.
THE TOWN COUNCIL, PURSUANT TO THE AUTHORITY GIVEN IN
CONNECTICUT GENERAL STATUTES §1-200(6) (A), HEREBY MOVES TO
GO INTO EXECUTIVE SESSION TO DISCUSS CONTRACT NEGOTIATIONS
WITH JOHN D. WARD, TOWN ADMINISTRATOR.
E.)
PUBLIC HEARING
E)
PRESENTATIONS BY THE ADMINISTRATION
Mayor Daniel A. Champagne to make a presentation to the Town Council on
various topics.
Presentation by Bruce Dinnie, Director of Parks and Recreation relative to the
Winterfest and the upcoming addition of a town wide Snowman Contest.
2
G.)
C
L
ACTION ON CONSENT AGENDA
Request for the approval Tax Refunds for Prior and Current Years. (A copv
of a memorandum from Terry Hjarne. Collector of Revenue. to John D. Ward.
Town Administrator dated November 11. 2014 is included in the Council
packet.)
PROPOSED MOTION:
THE TOWN COUNCIL HEREBY APPROVES THREE (3)
OVERPAYMENTS FOR PRIOR YEARS TOTALING $839.41 AND
TWENTY-EIGHT (28) CURRENT YEAR TAXES IN THE AMOUNT
OF $5517.08, AS OUTLINED IN THE MEMORANDUM FROM
TERRY HJARNE, COLLECTOR OF REVENUE TO JOHN D. WARD,
TOWN ADMINISTRATOR DATED NOVEMBER 7,2014.
C
2.
Request the Town Council approve budget amendment #67-68 for fiscal year
2013-2014 as provided by Finance Officer James M. Luddecke on the budget
amendment forms attached to this agenda.
(See amendment forms in the
Council packet.)
PROPOSED MOTION
THE
TOWN
COUNCIL
HEREBY
APPROVES
BUDGET
AMENDMENT REQUEST #67 - #68 FOR FISCAL YEAR 2013-2014
AS OUTLINED IN THE BUDGET AMENDMENT FORMS
PROVIDED BY FINANCE OFFICER, JAMES M. LUDDECKE.
C
3.
Request the Town Council approve budget amendment #9, #10 and #11 for
fiscal year 2014-2015 as provided by Finance Officer James M. Luddecke on
the budget amendment forms attached to this agenda.
(See amendment
forms in the Council packet.)
PROPOSED MOTION
THE
TOWN
COUNCIL
HEREBY
APPROVES
BUDGET
AMENDMENT REQUEST #9, #10 and #11 FOR FISCAL YEAR
2014-2015 AS PROVIDED BY FINANCE OFFICER JAMES M.
LUDDECKE ON THE BUDGET AMENDMENT FORMS ATTACHED
TO THIS AGENDA.
C
4.
Request the Town Council approve reappointment of Gordon F. Gibson (R).
836 Hartford Turnpike. Vernon, Connecticut as a regular member of the
Board of Ethics for the Town of Vernon, said term commences on December
1, 2014 and expires on November 30, 2019. (Mr. Gibson's resume is included
for Council review.)
3
PROPOSED MOTION
PURSUANT TO ORDINANCE # 173, TOWN CODE SEC. 2-91 - 298; THE TOWN COUNCIL HEREBY APPROVES MAYOR DANIEL A.
CHAMPAGNE'S REAPPOINTMENT OF GORDON F. GIBSON (R),
836 HARTFORD TURNPIKE,
VERNON, CONNECTICUT AS A
REGULAR MEMBER OF THE BOARD OF ETHICS FOR THE TOWN
OF VERNON, SAID TERM TO COMMENCE ON DECEMBER 1,
2014 AND EXPIRES ON NOVEMBER 30,2019. )
C
5.
Request the Town Council approve reappointment of Pierre Lisee (R), 210
Skinner Road, Vernon, Connecticut as an alternate member of the Board of
Ethics for the Town of Vernon, said term commences on December 1, 2014
and expires November 30, 2019. (Mr. Lisee's resume is included for Council
review.)
PROPOSED MOTION
PURSUANT TO ORDINANCE # 173, TOWN CODE SEC. 2-91 - 298; THE TOWN COUNCIL HEREBY APPROVES MAYOR DANIEL
A. CHAMPAGNE'S REAPPOINTMENT OF PIERRE LISEE (R), 210
SKINNER ROAD, VERNON, CONNECTICUT AS AN ALTERNATE
MEMBER OF THE BOARD OF ETHICS FOR THE TOWN OF
VERNON, SAID TERM TO COMMENCE ON DECEMBER 1,2014
AND ENDS ON NOVEMBER 30,2019.
C
6.
Request the Town Council approve reappointment of Carl Bard (U), 25 Grady
Road, Vernon, Connecticut as an alternate member of the Board of Ethics for
the Town of Vernon, said term commences on December 1, 2014 and expires
November 30, 2019. (Mr. Bard's resume is included for Council review.)
PROPOSED MOTION
PURSUANT TO ORDINANCE # 173, TOWN CODE SEC. 2-91 - 298; THE TOWN COUNCIL HEREBY APPROVES MAYOR DANIEL A.
CHAMPAGNE'S REAPPOINTMENT OF CARL BARD, (U), 25 GRADY
ROAD, VERNON, CONNECTICUT AS AN ALTERNATE MEMBER
OF THE BOARD OF ETHICS FOR THE TOWN OF VERNON, SAID
TERM TO COMMENCE ON DECEMBER 1,2014 AND ENDS ON
NOVEMBER 30,2019.
C
7.
Request the Town Council approve appointment of William Dowty, (R), 80
Wilson
Lane,
Vernon,
Connecticut
as
a
regular
member
of
Building Code Board of Appeals, said term to commence on November 19,
2014 and expires June 30, 2017. (A copy of Mr. Dowty's resume is included for
Council review.)
4
PROPOSED MOTION
PURSUANT TO TOWN OF VERNON CHARTER CHAPTER VIII,
SECTIONS 4 AND 6; C.G.S. §29-266, THE TOWN COUNCIL
HEREBY APPROVES THE APPOINTMENT OF WILLIAM DOWTY,
(R) 80 WILSON LANE, VERNON, CONNECTICUT AS A REGULAR
MEMBER OF THE BUILDING CODE BOARD OF APPEALS, SAID
TERM TO BEGIN ON NOVEMBER 19, 2014 AND EXPIRES JUNE
30,2017.
H.)
DISCUSSION OF PULLED CONSENT ITEMS
I.)
PENDING BUSINESS
J.)
NEW BUSINESS
1. Update and discussion regarding Year to Date Revenue and Expenditures
report from Finance Officer James M. Luddecke for Fiscal Year 20142015. (Please see YTD provided in the Council packet.)
NO PROPOSED MOTION
2. Request the Town Council authorize the transfer of fiscal year 2013-2014
funds in the Education budget to the Education Capital Non-Recurring
Expenditure Account.
(See documents relative to same from James M.
Luddecke, Finance Officer included for Council review.)
PROPOSED MOTION
THE TOWN COUNCIL HEREBY AUTORIZES THE TRANSFER OF
AVAILABLE FUNDS, IN THE AMOUNT OF $83,000.00, FROM THE
BOARD OF EDUCATION FISCAL YEAR 2013-2014 GENERAL
FUND BUDGET TO THE EDUCATION RESERVE FOR CAPITAL
AND
NON-RECURRING
EXPENDITURES
ACCOUNT,
AS
REQUESTED BY THE BOARD OF EDUCATION AND PURSUANT
TO THE RESOLUTION SO ESTABLISHED FOR THE EDUCATION
RESERVE FOR CAPITAL AND NON-RECURRING EXPENDITURES
ACCOUNT.
5
3. Request the Town Council formally adopt the Capitol Region Hazards
Mitigation Plan Update as presented below and authorize Mayor Daniel A.
Champagne to execute same. (Emergency Management Director, Michael
Purcaro will be present to discuss the resolution as presented.)
PROPOSED RESOLUTION
The Town of Vernon Resolution Adopting
2014 - 2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update
WHEREAS, the Town of Vernon Council recognizes the threats that natural hazards pose to
people and property with the Town of Vernon; and
WHEREAS, the Town of Vernon in collaboration with the Capitol Region Council of
Governments (CRCOG) has prepared a multi-hazard mitigation plan known as the 2014-2019
Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update in accordance with the Disaster
Mitigation Act of 2000; and
WHEREAS, the 2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update has
identified mitigation goals and actions to reduce or eliminate long-term risk to people and
property from the impacts of future natural hazards and disasters that affect the Town of Vernon
and the region; and
WHEREAS, public and committee meetings were held between March 15, 2012 and October 2,
2013, regarding the development and review of the 2014 - 2019 Capitol Region Natural
Hazards Mitigation Plan Update; and
WHEREAS, the Federal Emergency Management Agency/ Department of Homeland Security
has approved the 2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update, on
condition of local adoption, enabling the Town of Vernon to apply for Hazard Mitigation grant
funding; and
WHEREAS, adoption by the Town of Vernon Council demonstrates their commitment to
achieving the hazard mitigation goals outlined in the Town of Vernon's section of the 2014-2019
Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update.
NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the Town of Vernon Council hereby adopts
the 2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update.
Date of Adoption: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Signed:
(Chief Elected Official)
Name of Chief Elected Official:
------------------
6
4. Request the Town Council approve the Job Description of Recreation
Supervisor and Wastewater Collection System Foreman as recommended
by Assistant Town Administrator Dawn Maselek.
(A copy of the job
description is included for Council review.)
PROPOSED MOTION
THE TOWN COUNCIL CONSISTENT WITH THE TOWN OF
VERNON PERSONNEL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECTION
4.1(B) ENTITLED "JOB DESCRIPTIONS", HEREBY ADOPTS THE
JOB DESCRIPTION OF
RECREATION SUPERVISOR AND
WASTEWATER COLLECTION SYSTEM FOREMAN.
K.)
INTRODUCTION OF ORDINANCES
L.)
ACTION ON ORDINANCE(S) PREVIOUSLY PRESENTED
M.)
IDENTIFICATION/ADOPTION OF ADDITIONAL AGENDA ITEMS
N.)
DISCUSSION OF ADDITIONAL ITEMS AND INFORMATIONAL ITEMS
0.)
ADOPTION OF MINUTES
THE TOWN COUNCIL WAIVES THE READING OF THE MINUTES OF THE
REGULAR TOWN COUNCIL MEETING OF OCTOBER 21, 2014 AND THAT
MINUTES OF SAID MEETING BE APPROVED.
P.)
INFORMATIONAL ITEMS, PETITIONS, COMMUNICATIONS,
CORRESPONDENCE, REPORTS, ETC. NOT REQUIRING ACTION.
1. Monthly Report - October, 2014 from the Town Clerk's Office as submitted
by Bernice K. Dixon Town Clerk.
2. Monthly Report - October, 2014 from the Vernon Police Department as
submitted by Captain of Police, Stephen M. Clark.
Q)
ADJOURNMENT
CONSE~,tt'
TOWN OF VERNON
DEPARTMENT SUBMISSION FOR
TOWN COUNCIL AGENDA
FROM
DEPARTMENT/NAME
ICOlLECTOR OF REVENUE
ITAX REFUNDS
PROPOSED ITEM
rAX REFUNDS
SUBJECT
REQUEST FOR TAX REFUNDS FOR CURRENT YEARS. (A COPY OF A MEMORANDUM FROM TERRY -HJARNE, COlLECTOR OF REVENUE, TO JOHN D WARD, TOWN ADMINISTRATOR DATED 1 lli7il~"~'
IS INCLUDED IN THE COUNCIL PACKET.)
ACTION REQUESTED
__
BACKGROUND
INFORMATION
APPROPRIATION
REQUIRED 7
LIST OF SUPPORTING
DOCUMENTATION
(t NO
(' YES
AMOUNT SOUGHT
II
II
L -_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
WORDING
PROPOSED MOTION
THE TOWN COUNCIL HEREBY APPROVES
TOTALING
AND
1839.41
TOTALING
15517.08
P
r::::--
TAX REFUND(S) FOR PRIOR YEAR STAXES
TAX REFUND(S) FOR CURRENTYEAR
128
AS OUTLINED IN THE MEMORANDUM FROM TERRY HJARNE,
COLLECTOR OF REVENUE TO JOHN D WARD, TOWN ADMINISTRATOR
DATED
1117/14
I
~
.1
VERNON-CT.GOV
ONTHEMOVE
TOWN OF VERNON
B Park Place, VERNON, CT 06066
Terry Hjarne eeMe
Collector of Revenue
TO:
John Ward, Town Administrator
FROM:
Terry Hjarne, Collector of Revenue
DATE:
November 18, 2014
SUBJECT:
Refunds for Town Council Approval
Tel: (860) 870-3660
Fax: (860) 870-3585
E-mail: [email protected]
PRIOR YEARS:
~~!!~~~~ng~~~gion'::\ieiifc'le's'Old""""""""""""" ................................................................................647.47
~!!~s~~~ng~~~gioii' ::'Vehfc'le' So·ld· ...... ······· ...... ·· .. ······· .. ··············· .... ···· .. ·.... ····· ........ ·...... ·· ..................... 116. 82
Watkins Joshua Alan .....................................................................................................................................75.12
Assessor's Correction - Vehicle Sold
CURRENT YEAR: 2013 GRAND LIST
Beirn Susann M...........................................................................................................................................164.66
Assessor's Correction - Vehicle Sold
Bell James D. or Kathy L...............................................................................................................................75.11
Board of Assessment Appeals - High Mileage
Bravo Carlton C .............................................................................................................................................35.10
Board of Assessment Appeals - High Mileage
Carvalho Bridget A ........................................................................................................................................49.47
Board of Assessment Appeals - High Mileage
Chase Auto Finance Corp ...........................................................................................................................349.98
Assessor's Correction - Vehicle Sold
Chase Auto Finance Corp ...........................................................................................................................171. 52
Assessor's Correction - Vehicle Sold
Chase Auto Finance Corp ........................................................................................................................... 131.15
Assessor's Correction - Vehicle Sold
Daimler Trust .............................................................................................................................................1396.70
Assessor's Correction - Vehicle Sold
~~s~~~~~3~~~~tion' ::"VehiCies' So'ld'::" A~;sessmeni' C'orrected"··· .. ····· .. ·.. ·.. ··· .. ···· .. ·· .. ······ .... ··· .. ····· .. ····· .238.87
Furness Robert l JR .....................................................................................................................................11.52
Assessor's Correction - Vehicle Junked
Haddock Tina M..............................................................................................................................................9.02
Board of Assessment Appeals - High Mileage
Haddock Christopher A. or Tina M ................................................................................................................13.37
Board of Assessment Appeals - High Mileage
Honda lease Trust (2) ................................................................................................................................584.87
Assessor's Correction - Vehicles Sold
Honda Lease Trust .......................................................................................................................................55.64
Assessor's Correction - Vehicles Sold
Honda Lease Trust .....................................................................................................................................352.26
Assessor's Correction - Vehicles Sold
JP Morgan Chase Bank NA ........................................................................................................................490.01
Assessor's Correction - Vehicle Sold
JP Morgan Chase Bank NA ........................................................................................................................183.40
Assessor's Correction - Vehicle Sold
Morales Dinorah ..............................................................................................................................................3. 72
Assessor's Correction - Vehicle Junked
Oldham Melody L ..........................................................................................................................................24.94
Taxpayer Paid Too Much
Pascoe Arthur E ............................................................................................................................................10.83
Assessor's Correction - Vehicle Sold
Petersen Hans JNT Frances J ....................................................................................................................348.1 0
Board of Assessment Appeals - Assessment Miscalculated
Sperling Bradley ............................................................................................................................................33.58
Taxpayer Paid Too Much
l~~~~~~~tcgo~::~i~~c:r~ehi'cie' Sold····· .... ·.. ·.. ·· .. ·· .....................................................................................208. 35
Underwood Glenn T......................................................................................................................................66.80
Board of Assessment Appeals - High Mileage
Wanish Daniel ...............................................................................................................................................28.99
Board of Assessment Appeals - High Mileage
Watkins Joshua Alan ...................................................................................................................................312.44
Assessor's Correction - Vehicle Sold
'.
Wheels l T .....................................................................................................................................................52.21
Assessor's Correction - Vehicle Sold
2
Wilson Michele Miers ..................................................................................................................................114.47
Board of Assessment Appeals - High Mileage
(3)Prlor Overpayments ................................................................................$839.41
(28)Current Overpayments ............................................................... $5,517.08
Cc: James Luddecke TXP15051 TXC15051
3
CONSENT
TOWN OF VERNON
DEPARTMENT SUBMISSION FOR
TOWN COUNCIL AGENDA
FROM
DEPARTMENT/NAME
IFinance
PROPOSED ITEM
Fiscal Year 2013 - 2014 Budget Amendments: # 67 - 68
SUBJECT
ACTION REQUESTED
Request the Town Council approve budget amendments # 67 - 68 for fiscal year 2013-2014 as provided
by Finance Officer James M. Luddecke.
BACKGROUND
INFORMATION
APPROPRIATION
REQUIRED ?
LIST OF SUPPORTING
DOCUMENTATION
(' NO
r. YES
AMOUNT SOUGHT
Amendments; and "Additional Appropriation from General Fund Balance" form (3 pages)
WORDING
PROPOSED MOTION
RESOLVED, THE TOWN COUNCIL HEREBY APPROVES BUDGET AMENDMENT REQUESTS # 67 - 68 FOR
FISCAL YEAR 2013-2014 AS OUTLINED IN THE BUDGET AMENDMENT FORMS PROVIDED BY THE
FINANCE OFFICER, JAMES M. LUDDECKE.
11/7/2014
TOWN OF VERNON
ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATIONS FROM GENERAL FUND BALANCE
FISCAL YEAR 2013 - 2014
Date
#
Description
Pass Through
$
Balance brought forward:
Additional
Appropriation
409,479.75 $
572,285.00
Total
$
981,764.75
Town Clerk - Community Investment (Farmland Preservation)
56
21,816.00
21,816.00
Town Clerk - MERS fee - Grantor
56
5,842.00
5,842.00
Town Clerk - MERS fee - Other
56
5,830.00
5,830.00
Capital Improvements - Establish disc golf course
60
20,000.00
20,000.00
Education - School use activity reimbursement
61
44,596.60
44,596.60
Education - EASTCONN reimbursement for substitute teachers
61
14,010.58
14,010.58
Town Clerk - Community Investment $1.00 fee to CNR
63
3,599.00
3,599.00
Capital Improvements - 2003 Ambulance retrofit
64
66,000.00
66,000.00
09/16/14
Police - (2) SUV cruisers and accessories [ total cost =
$66,034.00]
65
24,034.00
24,034.00
10/21/14
Building Inspection - Buildingpermit refunds
66
30.00
30.00
Building Inspection - State education trainingfee
66
119.00
119.00
Pension - OPEB Trust Fund contribution
67
50,000.00
50,000.00
Capital Improvements - Vernon Avenue brid~ge
68
61,000.00
61,000.00
07/15/14
08/19/14
11/18/14
$
Totals to Date:
525,322.93 $
773,319.00
$
82,799,460.00
Original Budget:
Revised Budget:
1,298,641.93
$
84,098,101.93
Page 3
111712014
TOWN OF VERNON
ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATIONS FROM GENERAL FUND BALANCE
FISCAL YEAR 2013·2014
Date
#
Description
Pass Throu9h
$
Balance brought forward:
Additional
Appropriation
250,513.85 $
421,276.00
Total
$
671,789.85
Parks· Zero-Turn lawn mower [total cost = $9,316.99]
18
7,800.00
7,800.00
Town Clerk - Historic document preservation grant
19
500.00
500.00
Fire Dept. - Hydrant rentals
23
DPW - External agencies fuel reimbursable
28
37,000,00
37,000.00
Police - Special Services pay
31
40,000,00
40,000.00
Finance - Compensated absences
32
12,897.00
12,897.00
DPW - Refuse - Compensated absences
32
45,750,00
45,750.00
Senior Center - Compensated absences
32
19,362.00
19,362,00
Town Clerk - Community Investment (Farmland Preservation)
35
36,324,00
36,324,00
Town Clerk - MERS fee - Grantor
35
12,573,00
12,573,00
Town Clerk - MERS fee - Other
35
7,480.00
7,480.00
Parks Maintenance - Funds collected forportable toilets
37
2,162,62
2,162,62
Fire Dept. - Reimbursement for hydrant markers
40
959,00
959.00
Building Inspection - Building permit refunds
41
1,330,00
1,330.00
Building Inspection - State education training fee
41
400.00
400,00
Youth Service - Grant receipt from Board of Education
44
11,500,00
11,500,00
06/17/14
DPW ~q~ipment Maint. - Receipt of vendor check
49
937,28
937.28
07/15/14
Pension - Annual required contribution - supplement to FY 2015
55
4/1/2014
05/06/14
05/20/14
06/03/14
17,000,00
56,000,00
$
Totals to Date:
17,000,00
409,479.75 $
572,285.00
56,000.00
$
82, 799,460,00
Original Budget:
Revised Budget:
981,764.75
$
83,781,224.75
Page 2
111712014
TOWN OF VERNON
ADDITIONAL APPROPRIA TlONS FROM GENERAL FUND BALANCE
FISCAL YEAR 2013 - 2014
Date
#
Description
Pass Throu~h
Additional
Appropriation
08/20/13
Capital Improvements - Amerbelle security measures
11/19/13
Town Clerk - Community Investment (Farmland Preservation)
2
39,708.00
39,708.00
Town Clerk - MERS fee - Grantor
2
9,652.00
9,652.00
Town Clerk - MERS fee - Other
2
10,120.00
10,120.00
Police - Special Servicespay
3
70,000.00
70,000.00
Police - Compensated absences
4
Parks Maintenance - Funds collected for portable toilets
5
1,090.00
1,090.00
Parks - Funds collected for Henry Parkplayground
5
333.85
333.85
Law - Labor relations
6
40,000.00
40,000.00
12/03/13
Assessment - Personal property audits
8
10,000.00
10,000.00
12/17/13
Capital "Tlprovements - School security grant share
9
75,914.00
75,914.00
01/07/14
Snow Removal - Overtime; salt; and chemical supplies
12
80,000.00
80,000.00
03/04/14
Town Clerk - Community Investment (Farmland Preservation)
13
31,716.00
31,716.00
Town Clerk - MERS fee - Grantor
13
10,414.00
10,414.00
Town Clerk - MERS fee - Other
13
7,480.00
7,480.00
Snow Removal - Overtime; salt; and chemical supplies
14
Police - Special Servicesp?y
15
Totals to Date:
$
$
75,000.00
Total
$
75~362.00
75,362.00
65,000.00
65,000.00
70,000.00
$
250,513.85
70,000.00
$
421,276.00
$
671,789.85
82,799,460.00
Original Budget:
Revised Budget:
75,000.00
$
83,471,249.85
Page 1
Budget Amendment Request
Total Amount Requested:
To: Finance Officer:
$50,000.00
Fiscal Year 2013
From (Department):
Type of Amendment (X):
- 2014
D
67
Amendment #:
Pension /OPEB
[]] Additional Appropriation
November 18, 2014
Date:
D
Pass-Through
Transfer
Request is hereby submitted for amendment(s) of budget as indicated.
Department
Account Description
!
Org Code : Object
Amount
FROM:
31200
100
-
50,000.00
,-"'---
"-~
"-""""-~~
I
"FROM" Subtotal: $
Department
1. Pension
Account Description
Org Code
Trust fund contribution
-'~~"-.---.--'----
I
Object
50,000.00
Amount
50,000.00
10670271
2.
3.
4.
"TO" Subtotal: $
50,000.00
I~
1 ITo request $50,000.00 as a supplement to the fiscal year 2013-2014 Other Post Employment Benefits (OPEB)contribution.
~l
COMMENTS CONCERNING BUDGET AMENDMENT REQUEST
~-~~---~--~-----,,---~.---.-,-----------~-~-~~~--.---~---------~---~-~~------~-~-~----~-----~----------
I
I
I Within the FY 2014 OPEB line item, $80,000.00 was proposed for the annual contribution, and reduced by $50,000.00 for a net
iappropriation of$30,000.00. The reduction was made with the intent of utilizing available funds from overall FY 2014 activities.
IIt has been determined that there available funds to support this request.
I
Excluding the Board of Education, the general government accrued liability is approximately $3,184,903.00; and to date, there are
assets (from contributions) of$237,000.00. In FY 2015 the general government budget is $80,000.00; and there is also $21,000.00
appropriated by the Waste Treatment Plant. The Board of Education accrued liability is $5,016,063; and they have included
as a contribution to the OPEB trust fund.
__in their
__ _ FY 2015
~_L~_~"~_~
~
1
2
3
4
Balance in account for which funds are
O~~inal appr~p!:ia!ion in account:
i='lus or minusjlrior amendments:
Amount of appropriation to date:
30,000.00
November 18,2014
Date
James M. Luddecke
Head
At a meeting of the Town Council held on
the above request(s) was/were approved in the amount of: _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Signature of Town Administrator:
TOWN OF VERNON
PENSION
EXPENDITURE REPORT· FY 2013 • 2014
.{'I'.C'lii~lii:f!'IIIIiiiI;ru~I~J
mI;f4.'.l4l.:aa~!.1<e1~!
,,,,.4:j&I:all!e)la':1:jMiiliilli#!
938,457
1,406,250
10,000
18,800
30,000
52,000.00
80,000.00
42,336.96
15,000.00
.00
990,457.00
1,486,250.00
52,336.96
33,800.00
30,000.00
921,545.00
1,348,338.00
20,846.04
33,624.88
80,000.00
68,912.00
87,912.00
31,512.50
.00
.00
.00
50,000.00
-21. 58
175.12
-50,000.00
100.0%
96.6%
100.0%
99.5%
266.7%
TOTAL EMPLOYEE BENEFITS
2,403,507
189,336.96
2,592,843.96
2,404,353.92
188,336.50
153.54
100.0%
TOTAL PENSION
2,403,507
189,336.96
2,592,843.96
2,404,353.92
188,336.50
153.54
100.0%
TOTAL GENERAL FUND
2,403,507
189,336.96
2,592,843.96
2,404,353.92
188,336.50
153.54
100.0%
2,403,507
189,336.96
2,592,843.96
2,404,353.92
188,336.50
153.54
100.0%
52910
52911
52912
52920
52930
PENSION - TOWN
PENSION - POLICE
PENSION - ADMINISTRATION
PENSION - DEFINED CONTRIBU
OPEB TRUST FUND CONTRIBUTI
GRAND TOTAL
,'* END OF REPORT - Generated by James Luddecke ,'*
Report generated: 11/10/2014 16:46
user:
jluddecke
Program 1D:
glytdbud
page
1
TOWN OF VERNON
OTHER POST-EMPLOYMENT BENEFITS PROGRAM
ANNUAL REQUIRED CONTRIBUTION
The Annual Required Contribution (ARC) for the OPEB program consists of two pieces: a
Normal Cost (the cost of benefits earned each year should be accrued in that year) plus a Past
Service Cost (a catch-up accrual to amortize the Unfunded Accrued Liability). The amortization
period is 30 years starting for FYE 2009. The amortization method produces annual payments
that will increase over time as payroll grows. On this basis, the ARC is determined as follows:
Police
Accrued Liability
Assets
Unfunded Accrued Liability
Amortization Period
Payroll Growth Rate
Past Service Cost
Normal Cost
Interest
ARC for FY 2014
Expected Benefit Payouts
Net Budget Impact
$1,821,136
70,008
1,751,128
25
4.00%
96,492
79,105
12,292
187,889
102,350
85,539
Town
$1,363,777
7,001
1,356,776
25
4.00%
74,762
84,472
11,146
170,380
92,430
77,950
BOE
Certified
$4,755,731
°
4,755,731
25
4.00%
262,053
165,061
29,898
457,012
341,309
115,703
BOE NonCertified
$260,332
°
260,332
25
4.00%
14,345
20,460
2,436
37,241
23,940
13,301
Total
$8,200,976
77,009
8,123,967
25
4.00%
447,652
349,098
55,772
852,522
560,029
292,493
The ARC is assumed to be paid at the beginning of the Fiscal Year.
Page 10
This work product was prepared solely for the Town of Vernon for the purposes described herein and may not be
appropriate to use for other purposes. Milfiman does not Intend to benefit and assumes no duty or liability to other parties who receive this work.
Milliman
TOWN OF VERNON 2013-2014
BUDGET REQUEST DETAIL
DEPARTMENT'S
REQUEST
10670271
MAYOR'S
TOWN COUNCIL
RECOMMEND
APPROVED
PENSION
52910
PENSION - TO\VN
PENSION· TOWN
938,457
Total Object
52911
938,457
938,457
938,457
938,457
938,457
1,406,250
1,406,250
1,406,250
1,406,250
6,000
4,000
10,000
6,000
4,000
10,000
18,800
18,800
18,800
PENSION· POLICE
PENSION· POLlCE
1,406,250
Total Object
52912
1,406,250
PENSION· ADMINISTRATION
PENSION· ADMINISTRATION
OPES· ACTUARY FEE
6,000
4,000
Total Object
52920
10,000
PENSION· DEFINED CONTRIBUTION
DEFINED CONTRIBUTION
18,800
Total Object
52930
18,800
18,800
OPEB TRUST FUND CONTRIBUTION
OPEB TRANSFER TO TRUST FUND
REDUCTION BY CURRENT YEAR CONTRIBUTION
Total Object
Grand Total
10670271
PENSION
80,000
·50,000
80,000
-50,000
30,000
80,000
-50,000
30,000
2,403,507
2,403,507
2.403,507
30,000
Budget Amendment Request
$61,000.00
Total Amount Requested:
To: Finance Officer
i
Date: November 18,2014
Fiscal Year 2013 - 2014
Type of Amendment (X):
o
[K] Additional Appropriation
68
Amendment #:
From (Department): Capital Improvements
o
Pass-Through
Transfer
Request is hereby submitted for amendment(s) of budget as indicated.
Department
Org Code
Account Description
Object
Amount
FROM:
Fund Balance
.
"FROM" Subtotal: i $
Department
Account Description
Org Code
Object
1
61,000.00
--------~-----,,-,,--------
61,000.00
Amount
61,000.00
2.
3.
4.
"TO" Subtotal:" $
iNa.
I~~~
!
61,000.00
COMMENTS CONCERNING BUDGET AMENDMENT
!'~-~T~~'"
1 IThis request is to authorize the final funding for the local share of the Vernon Avenue Bridge reconstruction over the Hockanum
IRiver. This project was completed in the summer of2009, but there have been several outstanding issues pertaining to the
Iconstruction administration and inspection services provided by the firm Milone & MacBroom, Inc.; along with construction change
Iorders; and an overall shortfall in local share funding since commencement. As this project was funded 80% by the State of
IConnecticut Department of Transportation, the Town awaited approval of contract amendments to utilize a portion of contingency
Iand a supplemental agreement. Changes in the construction schedule and a contract time extension of 47 days increased the
:service time provided by MMI. All parties involved are in agreement of the additional costs incurred, and have been approved by
the State. The total cost amounted to $1,321,704.44; and the State reimbursement is $1,057,363.55, which equates to 80%.
L~.~lIhe 'f()~n~s.'p()I!i()J1()L~O~io..:,_~?()4 ,~40~92...and!\1e am(),u~J)re\'~().tIsly a2.~ove<i~~t.\'.aii().tIs int~..\'[lls =~?()~.'..4.1?:gO.:
1
2
3
4
Balance in account for which funds are
Plus or minus
Amount of appropriation to date:
10,300.00 .
James M. Luddecke
Head
At a meeting of the Town Council held on
November 7,2014
Date
the above request(s) was/were approved in the amount of: _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Signature of Town Administrator:
TOWN OF VERNON
CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS
EXPENDITURE REPORT - FY 2013 - 2014
"FORi;:i#i2014ii!iy~i~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
mI••eti:l~li:I:"!'IIiiliiI'I~I.]
jr'11:Itl..§:!·IIjIM:;i!it1.'~lij3·W3ijI3~'ii§l
51l GARIlliAIil OtlmlilA
511160
511200
511290
511310
511340
511590
57610
57615
50,000
40,000
0
0
20,000
142,965
12,600
0
20,000.00
1l5,000.00
4,000.00
10,300.00
.00
30,000.00
50,240.95
105,000.00
1l0,000.00
H5,000.00
4,000.00
10,300.00
20,000.00
1n, 965 .00
62,840.95
105,000.00
69,932.50
H5,000.00
.00
10,300.00
20,000.00
H2,965.00
62,840.95
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
105,000.00
61l.50
.00
4,000.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
99.9%
100.0%
.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
TOTAL CAPITAL OUTLAY
265,565
294,540.95
560,105.95
451,038.45
105,000.00
4,067.50
99.3%
TOTAL CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS
265,565
294,540.95
560,105.95
451,038.45
105,000.00
4,067.50
99.3%
TOTAL GENERAL FUND
265,565
294,540.95
560,105.95
451,038.45
105,000.00
4,067.50
99.3%
265,565
294,540.95
560,105.95
451,038.45
105,000.00
4,067.50
99.3%
PARK IMPROVEMENTS
BUIIilDINGS/BUILDING IMPROVE
OTHER TOWN BLDGS & GROUNDS
IMPROVE/RECONSTRUCT - BRID
IMPROVE/RECONSTRUCT - STRE
OTHER EQUIPMENT AND MACHIN
CARS AND VANS
AMBULANCE
GRAND TOTAL
,,* END OF REPORT - Generated by James Luddecke *,'
ReporL generaLed: 11/07/2014 18:39
User:
jluddecke
Program 1D:
glytdbud
page
1
Town of Vernon, Connecticut
VERNON AVENUE BRIDGE RECONSTRUCTION
State
Grant
Receipts
$
Subtotal:
Local
Receipts
94,442.86
5,551.56
115,238.23
92,577.70
76,229.98
81,301.40
2,475.85
93,375.38
20,861.41
11,559.78
8,092.03
44,686.35
20,605.47
36,135.43
8,957.12
38,558.06
108,678.73
7,118.40
68,693.14
10,768.82
41,231.85
18,369.51
10,660.21
$
1,016,169.27
97,000.00 Capital Improvements Appropriation
715.00 Bid receipts
65,000.00 COBG Small Cities
30,400.00 Additional appropriation approved 1/8/2008
10,300.00 Transfer approved June 17, 2014
203,415.00
40,010.18
1,184.10
Subtotal:
Total State Grant:
80.00%
Actual Expendentures:
(1,321,704.44)
Local Share Required:
(264,340.89)
Local Receipts:
203,415.00
Shortfall:
(60,925.89)
11/18/2014 Request:
Net Funds:
61,000.00
$
74.11
15.39%
CONSENT
TOWN OF VERNON
DEPARTMENT SUBMISSION FOR
TOWN COUNCIL AGENDA
FROM
DEPARTMENT/NAME
IFinance
PROPOSED ITEM
Fiscal Year 2014 - 2015 Budget Amendments: # 9 -11
SUBJECT
ACTION REQUESTED
Request the Town Council approve budget amendments # 9 -11 for fiscal year 2014-2015 as provided
by Finance Officer James M. Luddecke.
BACKGROUND
INFORMATION
APPROPRIATION
REQUIRED?
LIST OF SUPPORTING
DOCUMENTATION
(' NO
r. YES
AMOUNT SOUGHT
Amendments; and "Additional Appropriation from General Fund Balance" form (1 page)
WORDING
PROPOSED MOTION
RESOLVED, THE TOWN COUNCIL HEREBY APPROVES BUDGET AMENDMENT REQUESTS # 9 - 11 FOR
FISCAL YEAR 2014-2015 AS OUTLINED IN THE BUDGET AMENDMENT FORMS PROVIDED BY THE
FINANCE OFFICER, JAMES M. LUDDECKE.
TOWN OF VERNON
ADDITIONAL APPROPRIA TlONS FROM GENERAL FUND BALANCE
FISCAL YEAR 2014·2015
Date
07/15/14
#
Description
Police - Compensated absences
Pass Through
$
Additional
Appropriation
$
Building Inspection - Compensated absences
65,178.50
Total
$
65,178.50
16,821.50
16,821.50
20,450.00
20,450.00
Primary - August 12, 2014
2
08/19/14
DPW - Equipment Maintenance - Garage equipment
3
09/16/14
Police - Compensated absences
4
56,030.00
56,030.00
Fire Marshal - Compensated absences
4
6,215.00
6,215.00
Public Celebration - Postage for Vernon Events publication
5
7,250.00
7,250.00
Municipal Insurance - Law enforcement deductible
7
10,951.00
10,951.00
Engineering- Compensated absences
8
12,020.00
12,020.00
10/21/14
11/18/14
Parks Maintenance - Funds collected for
toilets
AS~El~~Il1El~.t- F'El~~on.§.LErQEerty audits
10
.......... LI:,~QO.OO
11
$
Totals to Date:
24,884.00
24,884.00
-,-"-----,-------~----,
31,072.20 $
..... -~!~QQ~QQ
,
194,916.00
$
Original Budget:
Revised Budget:
225,988.20
84,953,976.00
$
85,179,964.20
Page 1
Budget Amendment Request
Total Amount Requested:
I
To: Finance Officer:
Date: November 18,2014
Fiscal Year 2014 - 2015
$111.00
From (Department): Department of Public Works
Type of Amendment (X):
D
D
Additional Appropriation
9
Amendment #:
[R]
Pass-Through
Transfer
Request is hereby submittedfor amendment(s) of budget as indicated.
~
Department
FROM:
I
Account Description
i
Object
10340205
54211
Amount
i
I
DPW - Refuse Collection & ni"nn",,1
Org Code
Ini"nn",,1 - Tipping fees
111.00
-~~~
J
~...~
..
~~~
I
.~.~
.. ....
~
:
Ii
.
~.~...~~~
i
i
111.00
"FROM" Subtotal:! $
Department
Account Description
1. DPW - Condominium Refuse ...~.~ ... _....
Amount
111.00
- Condo refuse
2.
3.
4.
5.
11 1.00
iNOl~--~~~-~~~~_~~_H~_~- COM}{ENTS CQl'!f§Rl'!!l'!!l13J!DGET A¥EN!2AfI£l'!! ~QUE§]'_~__ ~ .._..~~.~~ .....
11. IDue to an increase in tipping fee cost, the annual reimbursement to participating condo units requires an additional $111.00.
1
2
Balance in account for which funds are reqUF!!':tF!d'
i
447:\
Orig~nal~Epropriati0r1..i~~c:g()l.JIl~t:~
Plus or minus prior amendments:
Amount of appropriation to date:
nn :
i
4 4?"1
...
~~~
nn
......
4,423.00
...
i
'-~~I~'
-
Robert J. Kleinhans
Head
At a meeting of the Town Council held on
I
I
i
5
4
3
I
-
-
I
-
October 15,2014
Date
the above request(s) was/were approved in the amount of:
Signature of Town Administrator:
--------
11/06/2014 12: 01
dluddecke
ITOWN OF VERNON
IBUDGET & EXPENDITURE REPORT
IpG
1
19lytclbud
FOR THE PERIOD ENDED NOVEMBER 6, 2014
FOR 2015 05
ACCOUNTS FOR:
100
GENERAL FUND
ORIGINAL
APPROP
TRANFRS/
REVISED
ADJSTMTS
BUDGET
YTD EXPENDED
ENCUMBRANCES
AVAILABLE
BUDGET
PCT
USED
10340207 CONDOMINIUM REFUSE
54 PROPERTY SERVICES
10340207 54218
DISPOSAL - CONDO. R
4,423
.00
4,423.00
.00
.00
4,423.00
.0%
TOTAL PROPERTY SERVICES
4,423
.00
4,423.00
.00
.00
4,423.00
.0%
TOTAL CONDOMINIUM REFUSE
4,423
.00
4,423.00
.00
.00
4,423.00
.0%
TOTAL GENERAL FUND
4,423
.00
4,423.00
.00
.00
4,423.00
.0%
4,423
.00
4,423.00
.00
.00
4,423.00
TOTAL EXPENSES
Budget Amendment Request
$1,688.20
Total Amount Requested:
To: Finance Officer
I
From (Department):
Type of Amendment (X):
D
Fiscal Year 2014 - 2015
Date:
Amendment #:
Parks and Recreation
D
[KJ Pass-Through
Additional Appropriation
October 28, 2014
Transfer
Request is hereby submitted for amendment(s) of budget as indicated.
I
Department
FROM:
General Fund B~
I
II
Account Description
I
I
Org Code I Object I
Amount
I
3/e:RotJ
/t7t1
I
$1,688.20
I
I
I
"FROM" Subtotal: $
Department
I
I Org Code I Object I
Account Description
1,688.20
Amount
I
TO:
Other Rentals
1. Park Maintenance
10560254
2.
.~----
3.
i
4.
I
I
1,688.20
54492
.....
II
"TO" Subtotal: $
1,688.20
COMMENTS CONCERNING BUDGET AMENDMENT REQUEST
Monies collected from leagues to pay for portable toilet rentals.
2
3
4
1
Balance in account for which funds are requested:
Original appropriation in account:
2
3
4
457.72
6,070.00
Plus or minus prior amendments:
Amount of appropriation to date:
Bruce Dinnie
Head
At a meeting of the Town Council held on
Date
the above rcquest(s) was/were approved in the amount of: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
Signature of Town Administrator: _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __
11/06/2014 11:57
I TOWN OF VERNON
dluddecke
IBUDGET
IpG
« EXPENDITURE REPORT
1
Iglytdbud
FOR THE PERIOD ENDED NOVEMBER 6, 2014
FOR 2015 05
ORIGINAL
ACCOUNTS FOR:
100
GENERAL FUND
APPROP
TRANFRS/
REVISED
ADJSTMTS
BUDGET
AVAILABLE
YTD EXPENDED
ENCUMBRANCES
BUDGET
PCT
USED
10560254 PARKS MAINTENANCE
51 SALARIES
« WAGES
10560254 51010
REGULAR WAGES
293,645
.00
293,645.00
95,892.01
.00
197,752.99
10560254 51020
OVERTIME WAGES
30,000
.00
30,000.00
10,376.61
.00
19,623.39
34.6%
10560254 51030
PART-TIME WAGES
88,000
.00
88,000.00
47,390.93
.00
40,609.07
53.9%
32.7%
10560254 51060
LONGEVITY
1,075
.00
1,075.00
.00
.00
1,075.00
.0%
10560254 51073
CLOTHING/ UNIFORM A
1,500
.00
1,500.00
1,500.00
.00
.00
100.0%
10560254 51080
COMPENSATED ABSENCE
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
COMPENSATED ABSENCE
o
o
.00
10560254 51081
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
414,220
.00
414,220.00
155,159.55
.00
259,060.45
37.5%
TOTAL SALARIES « WAGES
53 PROF « TECH SERVICES
10560254 53090
CUSTODIAL FEES
o
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
10560254 53800
OTHER FEES
2,500
.00
2,500.00
.00
.00
2,500.00
.0%
« TECH SERVICES
2,500
.00
2,500.00
.00
.00
2,500.00
.0%
25,000
.00
25,000.00
.00
.00
25,000.00
.0%
2,500
.00
2,500.00
467.98
.00
2,032.02
18.7%
TOTAL PROF
54 PROPERTY SERVICES
10560254 54130
WATER
10560254 54320
REPAIR MACHINERY AN
10560254 54380
CERTIFICATES AND IN
o
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
10560254 54390
OTHER REPAIR AND MA
31,950
.00
31,950.00
3,953.14
.00
27,996.86
12.4%
10560254 54450
RENTAL OF EQUIPMENT
2,500
.00
2,500.00
300.00
.00
2,200.00
12.0%
10560254 54492
OTHER RENTALS
6,070
.00
6,070.00
2,407.60
.00
3,662.40
39.7%
10560254 54510
BUILDING REPAIRS
1,500
.00
1,500.00
600.00
-600.00
1,500.00
.0%
69,520
.00
69,520.00
7,728.72
-600.00
62,391.28
10.3%
480
.00
480.00
.00
.00
480.00
.0%
TOTAL PROPERTY SERVICES
55 OTHER PURCHASED SERV
10560254 55320
COMMUNICATION RENTA
11/06/2014 11:57
I TOWN OF VERNON
IpG
dluddecke
IBUDGET & EXPENDITURE REPORT
19lytdbud
2
FOR THE PERIOD ENDED NOVEMBER 6, 2014
FOR 2015 05
ACCOUNTS FOR:
100
ORIGINAL
GENERAL FUND
10560254 55674
TRAINING
TOTAL OTHER PURCHASED SERV
APPROP
TRANFRS/
REVISED
ADJSTMTS
BUDGET
YTD EXPENDED
ENCUMBRANCES
AVAILABLE
BUDGET
PCT
USED
2,400
.00
2,400.00
160.00
.00
2,240.00
6.7%
2,880
.00
2,880.00
160.00
.00
2,720.00
5.6%
56 SUPPLIES & MATERIALS
10560254 56130
CUSTODIAL SUPPLIES
10560254 56140
PAINTING SUPPLIES/T
10560254 56141
10560254 56142
500
.00
500.00
53.72
.00
446.28
10.7%
13,000
.00
13,000.00
8,976.46
.00
4,023.54
69.0%
PLUMBING SUPPLIES
1,900
.00
1,900.00
52.14
.00
1,847.86
2.7%
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES
1,000
.00
1,000.00
39.73
.00
960.27
4.0%
10560254 56144
LUMBER AND WOOD PRO
7,600
.00
7,600.00
4,093.50
.00
3,506.50
53.9%
10560254 56154
AIR CONDITIONING SU
o
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
10560254 56160
HAND TOOLS
2,900
.00
2,900.00
633.49
.00
2,266.51
21.8%
18.8%
10560254 56161
SMALL HARDWARE
3,100
.00
3,100.00
581. 59
.00
2,518.41
10560254 56162
SIGN PARTS AND SUPP
1,100
.00
1,100.00
468.05
.00
631.95
42.6%
10560254 56165
GUARDRAILS/FENCING
1,400
.00
1,400.00
148.76
.00
1,251.24
10.6%
18.3%
10560254 56170
COMMUNICATION SUPPL
500
.00
500.00
91. 60
.00
408.40
10560254 56173
PHOTOGRAPHIC SUPPLI
o
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
10560254 56180
LANDSCAPING SUPPLIE
25,200
.00
25,200.00
7,041.99
.00
18,158.01
27.9%
10560254 56181
GRAVEL/SAND/SALT
10560254 56183
CHEMICAL SUPPLIES
10560254 56184
MEDICAL SUPPLIES
10560254 56190
OTHER OPERATING SUP
10560254 56240
AUTOMOTIVE OIL AND
10560254 56260
10560254 56261
10560254 56262
PROPANE
10560254 56500
CLOTHING AND UNIFOR
7,000
.00
7,000.00
.00
.00
7,000.00
.0%
21,700
.00
21,700.00
2,752.60
.00
18,947.40
12.7%
.0%
o
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
200
.00
200.00
.00
.00
200.00
.0%
1,000
.00
1,000.00
60.84
.00
939.16
6.1%
AUTOMOTIVE FUEL - G
10,877
.00
10,877.00
3,676.72
.00
7,200.28
33.8%
AUTOMOTIVE FUEL - D
20,256
.00
20,256.00
5,645.05
.00
14,610.95
27.9%
o
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
3,450
.00
3,450.00
530.64
2,069.36
850.00
75.4%
10560254 56501
BOOTS
10560254 56510
MOTOR VEHICLE PARTS
10560254 56511
TIRES
10560254 56520
MACHINERY AND EQUIP
o
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
500
.00
500.00
39.26
.00
460.74
7.9%
800
.00
800.00
.00
.00
800.00
.0%
17,800
.00
17,800.00
8,628.70
.00
9,171.30
48.5%
10560254 56610
SPORTING GOODS
o
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
10560254 56711
CEMENT AND CONCRETE
1,400
.00
1,400.00
.00
.00
1,400.00
.0%
10560254 56723
OTHER METAL PRODUCT
400
.00
400.00
.00
.00
400.00
.0%
10560254 56740
ASPHALT PRODUCTS
1,500
.00
1,500.00
.00
.00
1,500.00
.0%
145,083
.00
145,083.00
43,514.84
2,069.36
99,498.80
31. 4%
o
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
TOTAL SUPPLIES & MATERIALS
57 CAPITAL OUTLAY
10560254 57150
LAND ACQUISITION
11/06/2014 11: 57
I TOWN OF VERNON
d1uddecke
IBUDGET & EXPENDITURE REPORT
3
191ytdbud
FOR THE PERIOD ENDED NOVEMBER 6, 2014
FOR 2015 05
ORIGINAL
ACCOUNTS FOR:
100
GENERAL FUND
APPROP
TRANFRS/
REVISED
ADJSTMTS
BUDGET
YTD EXPENDED
ENCUMBRANCES
AVAILABLE
BUDGET
PCT
USED
10560254 57200
BUILDINGS/BUILDING
0
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
10560254 57210
AIR CONDITIONING SY
0
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
10560254 57290
OTHER BUILDINGS & G
0
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
10560254 57510
GARAGE EQUIPMENT AN
0
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
10560254 57590
OTHER EQUIPMENT AND
6,000
-50.00
5,950.00
3,540.00
.00
2,410.00
59.5%
10560254 57610
CARS AND VANS
0
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
10560254 57620
TRUCKS
0
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
10560254 57640
MOWERS
0
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
10560254 57650
PLOWS AND TRAILERS
0
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
10560254 57730
RADIOS
700
50.00
750.00
750.00
.00
.00
100.0%
10560254 57812
OUTDOOR FURNITURE
0
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
10560254 57860
MAJOR SPORTING GOOD
0
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
10560254 57873
OTHER SAFETY EQUIPM
0
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
6,700
.00
6,700.00
4,290.00
.00
2,410.00
64.0%
TOTAL PARKS MAINTENANCE
640,903
.00
640,903.00
210,853.11
1,469.36
428,580.53
33.1%
TOTAL GENERAL FUND
640,903
.00
640,903.00
210,853.11
1,469.36
428,580.53
33.1%
640,903
.00
640,903.00
210,853.11
1,469.36
428,580.53
TOTAL CAPITAL OUTLAY
TOTAL EXPENSES
TOWN OF VERNON
120 SOUTH STREET, VERNON, CT 06066
Tel: (860) 870-3520
Fax: (860) 870-3525
E-Mail: D2.arnelis!Wvemon-ct.2.ov
PARKS & RECREATION
DEPARTMENT
DATE:
ACCOUNT: 44690
AMOUNT DEPOSITED:
:&
~d
ITEMIZED DEPOSITS:
Amount
D
ID
"
DEPOSITED BY:
s
Report run on:
07/17/201410:52 AM EDT
Report run by:
Diane Garnelis
Selected start date & tirne:
07/17/201412:00 AM EDT
Selected end date & time:
07/17/201411:59 PM EDT
Account Group:
All
Deposits Created by:
All
Account Nurnber:
All
Deposit Status:
All
Deposit Detail by Account Report - Town of Vernon, CT
Account Name/Number:
General Fund/000000050086
Number of Deposits:
1
Total of Deposits Submitted:
428.20
Total Number of Items:
2
Deposit
Item Count
Post Amount
Credit Amount
Adjustment
0004296
2
428.20
428.20
0.00
Item Number
RIT
0000001
211170101
100010212341
0000002
011900571
000000048259
Confidential
Account Number
Check Number
Depositor
Account Group
Deposit Date
DG3520
PARKS & REC
07/17/201410:51 AM
Post Amount
Credit Amount
Adjustment
001293
214.10
214.10
0.00
048622
214.10
214.10
0.00
Page 1 of 1
TOWN OF VERNON
120 SOUTH STREET, VERNON, CT 06066
Tel: (860) 870-3520
Fax: (860) 870-3525
E-Mail: [email protected]
PARKS & RECREATION
DEPARTMENT
DATE: 10-3-2014
ACCOUNT: 44690
AMOUNT DEPOSITED: $130.00
ITEMIZED DEPOSITS:
Amount
Description
$130.00
Valley Falls Bam Portable Toilets
DEPOSITED BY: Diane Garnelis
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VEmJO~I, CT 06066
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TOWN OF VERNON
120 SOUTH STREET, VERNON, CT 06066
Tel: (860) 870-3520
Fax: (860) 870-3525
E-Mail: DgarnelislC"vvernon-ct.gov
PARKS & RECREATION
DEPARTMENT
DATE: October 28,2014
ACCOUNT: 44690
AMOUNT DEPOSITED: $1,130.00
ITEMIZED DEPOSITS:
Amount
Description
$870.00
Portable Toilets Vernon Youth Soccer Club
$260.00
Portable Toilets Rockville Little League
Report run on:
10/28/201401:49 PM EDT
Report run by:
Diane Garnelis
Selected start date & time:
10/28/201412:00 AM EDT
Selected end date & time:
10/28/2014 11 :59 PM EDT
Account Group:
All
Deposits Created by:
All
Account Number:
All
Deposit Status:
All
Deposit Detail by Account Report - Town of Vernon, CT
Account Name/Number:
Number of Deposits:
General Fund/000000050086
Total of Deposits Submitted:
1,130.00
Total Number of Items:
2
Deposit
Item Count
Post Amount
Credit Amount
Adjustment
0004641
2
1,130.00
1,130.00
0.00
Item Number
RIT
0000001
211170318
03080011798
0000002
211170318
03080004157
Confidential
Account Number
Check Number
1
Depositor
Account Group
Deposit Date
DG3520
PARKS&REC
10/28/201401:49 PM
Post Amount
Credit Amount
Adjustment
1338
870.00
870.00
0.00
0804
260.00
260.00
0.00
Page 1 of 3
Budget Amendment Request
Total Amount Requested:
$4,500.00
Date: November 18, 2014
Fiscal Year 2014 - 2015
I
To: Finance Officer:
Type of Amendment (X):
11
Amendment #:
From (Department): Assessment
o
[]] Additional Appropriation
o
Pass-Through
Transfer
Request is hereby submitted/or amendment(s) a/budget as indicated.
I
I
Department
FROM:
II
Account Description
I
Org Code
I
i
Object i
I
I
Amount
I
i
I
!
!~dBalance
100
I
4,500.00
31200
~~
"""
"~""""-~"-
I
I
I
!
""~""~~"~
I
!
~-"
"
I
i
"FROM" Subtotal: I $
Department
Account Description
Org Code
I
TO:
I
I
4,500.00
I
Object
i
Amount
I
i
I
1_!~~J\ssessment
\Accounting I auditing fees
,
10114144
4,500.00
53030
~""~"
2.
""~~
"-"""
""-"""~
f-~"-"~~
3.
""-"
4.
,
I,
"TO" Subtotal: i $
4,500.00
~ __ C;(}lI!A1JH'!rfi CONCEIY!!}'!9 BUDGET~JyfENDMENT REQUEST "
___ _
1. This request is to appropriate funds for personal property audits. The amount of $4,500.00 will cover an estimated 6 accounts
at $750.00 each. Although the prospects of generating tax revenue in excess of the audit costs is highly probable, this
additional appropriation is not categorized as a "pass through", as the actual receipt offunds will occur in the ensuing fiscal year.
Completing the audits at this time of year, will ensure that the results will be included in the grand list when determining the mil
for the next fiscal year. The audit encompasses a three-year period.
No.
1
4
3
2
i
I
-
-
-
Pius or minus prior amendments:
-
-
-
Amount of appropriation to date:
-
-
Balance in account for which funds are
IOriginal
Ql"t,"VI""CH'VI
in account:
James M. Luddecke
Head
At a meeting of the Town Council held on
,-,-----
I
"""-
"-"-
-
I
-
November 7,2014
Date
the above request(s) was/were approved in the amount of:
Signature of Town Administrator:
----------------
TOWN OF VERNON
ASSESSMENT
EXPENDITURE REPORT - FY 2014 - 2015
.('I'IIIIIi1:aN:a:'~'_iill~I.J
[0[[4lli44 ASSESSMEN
Sill
SAlliAR~ES
& WAGES
51010 REGULAR WAGES
51060 LONGEVITY
TOTAL SALARIES
53 PROF
& WAGES
240,381
200
.00
.00
240,381.00
200.00
88,343.35
200.00
.00
.00
152,037.65
.00
36.8%
100.0%
240,581
.00
240,581.00
88,543.35
.00
[52,037.65
36.8%
650
.00
650.00
.00
.00
650.00
.0%
650
.00
650.00
.00
.00
650.00
.0%
7,500
700
.00
.00
7,500.00
700.00
.00
141. 75
.00
.00
7, 500.00
558.25
.0%
20.3%
8,200
.00
8,200.00
141. 75
.00
8,058.25
1.7%
450
2,400
1,800
1,200
1,500
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
450.00
2,400.00
1,800.00
1,200.00
1,500.00
.00
2,400.00
2,067.57
550.00
D8.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
450.00
.00
-267.57
650.00
1,362.00
.0%
100.0%
114.9%
45.8%
9.2%
7,350
.00
7,350.00
5,155.57
.00
2,194.43
70.1%
& TECH SERVICES
53800 OTHER FEES
TOTAL PROF
& TECH SERVICES
54 PROPERTY SERVICES
54324 SOFTWARE MAINTENANCE
54490 COPIER RENTAL/LEASE
TOTAL PROPERTY SERVICES
55 OTHER PURCHASED SER
55410
55500
55650
55660
55670
LEGAL NOTICES
PRINTING & BINDING
CONFERENCE FEES & MEMBERSH
SUBSCRIPTIONS & MANUALS
SCHOOLS/SEMINARS
TOTAL OTHER PURCHASED SERV
56 SUPPLIES
~ MATERIA~
Report generated: 11/07/2014 21:01
User:
jluddecke
program ID:
glytdbud
page
1
TOWN OF VERNON
ASSESSMENT
EXPENDITURE REPORT - FY 2014 - 2015
1,200
50
200
2,300
.00
.00
.00
.00
1,200.00
50.00
200.00
2,300.00
466.88
.00
.00
2,100.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
733.12
50.00
200.00
200.00
38.9%
.0%
.0%
91. 3%
3,750
.00
3,750.00
2,566.88
.00
1,183.12
68.5%
100
.00
100.00
.00
.00
100.00
.0%
100
.00
100.00
.00
.00
100.00
.0%
TOTAL ASSESSMENT
260,631
.00
260,631.00
96,407.55
.00
164,223.45
37.0%
TOTAL GENERAL FUND
260,631
.00
260,631.00
96,407.55
.00
164,223.45
37.0%
260,63l
.00
260,631.00
96,407.55
.00
164,223.45
37.0%
56010
56020
56030
56172
OFFICE SUPPLIES
ENVELOPES
STATIONERY AND PAPER
POSTAGE AND DELIVERY
TOTAL SUPPLIES & MATERIALS
S7 CAPITAL OUTI.lA
57829 OTHER OFFIC EQUIP & MACHIN
TOTAL CAPITAL OUTLAY
GRAND TOTAL
,'" END OF REPORT - Generated by James Luddecke 1,*
Report generated: 11/07/2014 21:01
user:
jluddecke
Program 1D:
glytdbud
page
2
~CONSENT ~.
*
RESUME FOR APPOINTMENT
TO A TOWN OF VERNON AGENCY,
BOARD, COMMITTEE, COMMISSION OR AUTHORITY /
Name: Gordon F. Gibson
Address: 836 Hartford Tpke., Vernon CT 06066
Home Telephone: 860-871-7757
EMAIL: [email protected]
Work Telephone: Retired
Cell phone 860-966-:-9727
Educational Background:
Rockville High School, graduated 1959
University of Connecticut, B.S. 1964
Various professional courses and seminars offered by the International
Right of Way Association
Employment Experience:
State of Connecticut, Dept. of Environmental Protection, 1977-1996
Acquired land for State parks and forests
Self employed right of way consultant, 1996 - present
Provided a full range of real property acquisition and management
services to clients
Connecticut Farmland Trust, Inc. 2002 - present
Served three years as first president of Connecticut Farmland
Trust, a private nonprofit land trust dedicated to the preservation of worldng
farmland throughout Connecticut. Currently serve as a director, member of the
Executive Committee and Chair of the Governance Committee. This is a
volunteer position.
Civic Activity:
Vernon Grange, member, 1957 - present. Currently serve as Vice
President. Have held most all offices and committees over the years.
North Central Pomona Grange, 1960 - present. Currently serve as
Assistant Steward. Have held most all offices and many committees over the
years.
Connecticut State Grange, member, 1960 - present. Currently serve as
Vice Chair of the Board of Directors, Vice Chair of the Executive Committee
and Legislative Director.
National Grange, member, 1961- present.
Rockville High School Agricultural Education Consultant Committee,
1995 - present. Represent Vernon Board of Education on consultant committee
statutorily charged to insure that curriculum offerings in agriculture meet local
area needs. Volunteer for several activities each year such as judging public
spealdng contests and assisting faculty at 8th grad~ open house program.
CONSENT~5
RESUME FOR APPOINTMENT
TO A TOWN OF VERNON AGENCY,
BOARD, COMMITTEE, COMMISSION OR AUTHORITY
Name:
Pierre Lisee
Address: 210 Skinner Road, Vernon, Connecticut 06066
Home Telephone: 860-896-1559
EMAIL: [email protected]
Work Telephone: 860-209-3052
Educational Background:
Manchester Community College
Buisness Management
Employment Experience:
Transportation Manager for Info Shred
2001- Present
Civic Activity:
Volunteer for travel soccer
Personal Data/Comments: Looking to contribute to the Community at large.
Political Affiliation:
DDemocrat
xx 0 Republican
oUnaffiliated
I hereby request that I be considered for appointment to:
___Ethic Commission; Planning and Zoning and Conservation
DOther
Date: ___December 11, 2009 Signature:_Pierre Lisee
This form should be returned to: Office of the Mayor, Memorial Building, 14 Park Place, Vernon, CT 06066.
Please list any other Commission, Committee, or Authority that you are a member of:
NONE
If you were not appointed to a Town of Vernon Commission, would you like your resume distributed to the local Non-Profit Agencies?
eYes
uNo
CONSEN
RESUME FOR APPOINTMENT
TO A TOWN AGENCY, BOARD OR COMMISSION
VERHON-cr.GOV
Address:
Home Phone:
thiJ' 60/
Email Address:
I
Ie'·1 >( \'J(")
1,)J_
,I @~l q () /,
C(I "",",
Educational Background:
High School
College '-- LJ CO,v;v
Additional Schooling
Employment Experience:
c", r D
-:s ~;7 r' Ij
('17'
Civic Activity:
1.-.0
Political
Affiliation:
0
Democrat
0
Republican
(29'unaffiliated
o
Other
I hereby request appointment to the following Agency, Board or Commission:
dvisory Board
of
Senior Citizens
Arts
Commission
Board of
Assessment
Appeals
Cemetery
Commission
Conservation
Commission
Design
Review
Commission
Human Services
Advisory
Commission
nland Wetland
Commission
Pension
Board
Permanent
Municipal
Building
Committee
Youth
Services
Bureau
Water Pollution
Control
Authority
Date:
J(9
0 cJ
~1. 0 I ;2,
'\
Board
of Ethics
Capital
Improvement
Committee
rug & Alcohol
Prevention
Council
Bolton Lakes
Regional
Water Pollution
Control Authority
Economic
Development
Commission
Local Historic
Properties
Commission
Municipal
lood & Erosion
Control Board
North Central
District Health
Department
Open Space
Task Force
Planning &
Zoning
Commission
Risk
Management
Committee
Vernon
Housing
Authority
Vernon
Traffic
Authority
oning Board of
Appeals
Energy
Improvement
District
~rhlG5
6, \'Y\tvl' ?tg1 ~
Signature
Please return this form to Office af the Mayor, Memorial Building 14 Park Place,Yernan CT 06066 ,.'
Or email to Diane Wheelock at [email protected]
APPOIN~QN SENT
...
RESUME FOR
TO A TOWN AGENC¥, BOARD OR COMMISSION
ONfflfMOVE
Name: William Dowty
Address: 80 Wilson Lane
Home Phone:
Work Phone: 869 872 7800
Cell Phone: 860 930 7656
Email Address:[email protected]
Educational Background:
High School
College
Additional Schooling
Employment Experience:
.
Self Employed for the last 25 years in the construction Industry
Civic Activity:
Political
Affiliation:
0
Democrat
(!)
Republican
0
Unaffiliated
o
Other
I hereby request appointment to the following Agency, Board or Commission:
Bolton Lakes
Regional
Water Pollution
Capital
Improvement
Committee
rug & Alcohol
Prevention
Council
Commission
Energy
Improvement
District
dvisory Board
of
Senior Citizens
Arts
Commission
Board of
Assessment
Appeals
Board
of Ethics
Cemetery
Commission
Conservation
Commission
Design
Review
Commission
Human Services
Advisory
Commission
nland Wetland
Commission
Local Historic
Properties
Commission
Municipal
lood & Erosion
Control Board
North Central
District Health
Department
Open Space
Task Force
Pension
Board
Permanent
Municipal
Building
Committee
Youth
Services
Bureau
Planning &
Zoning
Commission
Risk
Management
Committee
Vernon
Housing
Authority
Vernon
Traffic
Authority
Water Pollution
Control
Authority
Date:
D
oning Board of
Appeals
Signatur
Please return this form to Office of the Mayo~ Memorial Building 14 Park Place, Vernon IT 06066
Or emoil to Diane Wheelock at [email protected]
7
W 8USf.NESS*1
TOWN OF VERNON
DEPARTMENT SUBMISSION FOR
TOWN COUNCIL AGENDA
FROM
DEPARTMENT/NAME
IFinance
PROPOSED ITEM
Fiscal Year 2014 - 2015 Revenue and Expenditure Report as of October 31 2014
SUBJECT
ACTION REQUESTED
No action requested.
BACKGROUND
INFORMATION
Monthly report to Town Council.
APPROPRIATION
REQUIRED ?
LIST OF SUPPORTING
DOCUMENTATION
WORDING
PROPOSED MOTION
ce-' NO
(' YES
AMOUNT SOUGHT
Revenue and Expenditure Report by Object Code
TOWN OF VERNON
FISCAL YEAR 2014 - 2015 - FOR THE PERIOD ENDED OCTOBER 31, 2014
BUDGET and EXPENDITURE REPORT - BY OBJECT CODE
Object
Code
Description
Original
Budget
51000
Salaries & Wages
12,697,478.00
168,265.00
12,865,743.00
4,387,923.59
52000
Employee Benefits
6,646,363.00
777.00
6,647,140.00
1,526,090.40
53000
Professional and Tech. Services
502,198.00
700.00
502,898.00
96,518.72
54000
Property Services
2,719,944.00
2,450.00
2,722,394.00
55000
Other Purchased Services
925,478.00
56000
Supplies and Materials
1,521,700.00
57000
Capital Outlay
1,086,538.00
58000
Other / Town Wide
3,217,315.00
59000
Debt Service
Subtotal General Government:
58900
Budget
Amendments
Education
51,291,956.00
Total General Fund - Expenditures
84,953,976.00
Year-to-Date
Expended
Encumbrances
Available
Budget
Percent Used
J Reserved
8,477,819.41
34.1%
1,308,533.05
3,812,516.55
42.6%
11,154.15
395,225.13
21.4%
420,834.05
702,744.11
1,598,815.84
41.3%
21,824.00
947,302.00
382,005.96
26,838.97
538,457.07
43.2%
900.00
1,522,600.00
283,272.31
(1,341.77)
1,240,669.46
18.5%
24,884.00
1,111,422.00
420,166.31
(1,805.00)
693,060.69
37.6%
3,217,315.00
1,700,864.12
474,128.81
1,042,322.07
67.6%
4,345,006.00
33,662,020.00
Revised
Budget
219,800.00
219,800.00
4,345,006.00
2,297,390.64
2,047,615.36
52.9%
33,881,820.00
11,515,066.10
2,520,252.32
19,846,501.58
41.4%
51,291,956.00
13,385,307.50
30,856,974.84
7,049,673.66
86.3%
85,173,776.00
24,900,373.60
33,377 ,227 .16
26,896,175.24
68.4%
FISCAL YEAR 2014 - 2015 - FOR THE PERIOD ENDED OCTOBER 31, 2014
REVENUE REPORT - BY OBJECT CODE
Object
Code
Description
41000
Property Tax Levies
42000
Licenses and Permits
43000
Intergovernmental Grants
44000
Charges for Services
45000
Fines, Penalties Assessments
Original
Estimated Revenue
63,588,168.00
Estimate
Adjustments
Revised
Est. Revenue
63,588,168.00
Actual YTD
Revenue
Remaining
Revenue
Percent
Collected
34,118,369.00
29,469,799.00
53.7%
622,450.00
622,450.00
369,946.22
252,503.78
59.4%
19,101,773.00
19,101,773.00
5,047,188.09
14,054,584.91
26.4%
954,435.00
954,435.00
293,074.54
661,360.46
30.7%
17,000.00
17,000.00
3,467.58
13,532.42
20.4%
47000
Use of Money/Property
169,660.00
169,660.00
39,536.78
130,123.22
23.3%
48000
Other Revenue
316,663.00
316,663.00
77,892.15
238,770.85
24.6%
49000
Other Financing Sources
183,827.00
183,827.00
183,827.00
0.0%
84,953,976.00
84,953,976.00
45,004,501.64
47.0%
Total General Fund - Revenue
39,949,474.36
'.W
;:;-~
BUSINESS ~
. .
TOWN OF VERNON
DEPARTMENT SUBMISSION FOR
TOWN COUNCIL AGENDA
FROM
DEPARTMENT/NAME
IFinance / Education
PROPOSED ITEM
Approval of transfer to the Education Capital and Non-Recurring Expenditure Account (CNR)
SUBJECT
IFY 2013-2014 Education budget transfer to Education CNR
ACTION REQUESTED
To authorize the transfer of fiscal year 2013-2014 funds in the Education budget to the Education CNR
in the amount of $83,000.00.
BACKGROUND
INFORMATION
APPROPRIATION
REQUIRED ?
LIST OF SUPPORTING
DOCUMENTATION
As submitted to the Mayor, by the Superintendent of Schools, and approved by the Board of Education,
there has been a request for the transfer of available funds from the fiscal year 2013-2014 Education
budget to the Education Reserve for Capital and Non-Recurring Expenditures Account. The projected
available balance is $87,638.43, and the amount requested for approval has been modified to
$83,000.00, to allow for any adjusting entries that may occur.
(!!NO
OYES
AMOUNT SOUGHT
Letter of request to the Mayor; Letter from Superintendent; Expenditure report
WORDING
PROPOSED MOTION
THE TOWN COUNCIL HEREBY AUTHORIZES THE TRANSFER OF AVAILABLE FUNDS, IN THE AMOUNT OF
$83,000.00, FROM THE BOARD OF EDUCATION FISCAL YEAR 2013-2014 GENERAL FUND BUDGET TO
THE EDUCATION RESERVE FOR CAPITAL AND NON-RECURRING EXPENDITURES ACCOUNT, AS
REQUESTED BY THE BOARD OF EDUCATION AND IN PURSUANT WITH THE RESOLUTION SO
ESTABLISHED FOR THE EDUCATION RESERVE FOR CAPITAL AND NON-RECURRING EXPENDITURES
ACCOUNT.
Town of Vernon
Finance Department
Memo
To:
Daniel A. Champagne, Mayor
From:
James M. Luddecke, Finance Officer and Treasurer
Date:
Friday, November 07,2014
Re:
AGENDA ITEM: Transfer to Capital Non-Recurring from Education Budget
As requested by the Superintendent of Schools, and approved by the Board of Education, the suggested motion
below can be utilized for the transfer of available funds from fiscal year 20l3-2014 Education budget to the
Education Reserve for Capital and Non-Recurring Expenditures Account, for approval by the Town Council at
their November 18, 2014 meeting:
THE TOWN COUNCIL HEREBY AUTHORIZES THE TRANSFER OF AVAILABLE FUNDS, IN THE
AMOUNT OF $83,000.00, FROM THE BOARD OF EDUCATION FISCAL YEAR 2013-2014
GENERAL FUND BUDGET TO THE EDUCATION RESERVE FOR CAPITAL AND NONRECURRING EXPENDITURES ACCOUNT, AS REQUESTED BY THE BOARD OF EDUCATION
AND IN PURSUANT WITH THE RESOLUTION SO ESTABLISHED FOR THE EDUCATION
RESERVE FOR CAPITAL AND NON-RECURRING EXPENDITURES ACCOUNT.
To date, the available balance in the fiscal year 20l3-2014 Education budget is $87,638.43. Whereas the
completion of the annual financial report for the period ended June 30, 2014, is pending, this request is for
$83,000.00, rather than the entire balance, to leave a small reserve to cover any possible adjusting entries.
Attached please find a copy of the June 30, 2014 Education Expenditure Report.
If there are any questions, please do not hesitate to contact me.
VERNON PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Office of the Superintendent
30 Park Street • P.O. Box 600
Vernon, CT 06066-0600
Fa'<. (860) 870-6005
Website: www.vemonpublicschools.org
Mary P. Conway, Ed.D.
Superintendent of Schools
October 1, 2014
(860) 870-6000 ext. 124
Jeffrey E. Burt
The Honorable Daniel Champagne
Mayor of Vernon
14 Park Place
Vernon, CT 06066
Assistant Superintendent of Schools
(860) 870-6000 ext. 143
Dear Mayor Champagne,
The Vernon Board of Education requests a transfer of the fiscal year ending 2014 balance total amount
of $86,993.08 to the Capital and Non-Recurring Education Fund. This request was approved by the
Vernon Board of Education at the September 22,2014 Board of Education meeting.
Additionally, it is understood by the Board of Education that should the Board receive the state School
Security Grant the total amount of the local portion of the grant will be funded through funds from the
Capital and Non-Recurring Education Fund.
Respectfully submitted,
Mary P. Conway, Ed.D.
Superintendent of Schools
PC:
Mr. John Ward, Town Administrator
Mr. Michael J. Purcaro, Director of Business and Finance
Mr. James Luddecke, Finance Officer
The l'emon Public Schools, in partnership withfamily and community, is committed to provide a quality education, with high
expectations, in a safe environment where all students become independent learners and productive contributors to society.
11/07/2014 14:13
I TOWN OF VERNON
IpG
jluddecke
IEDUCATION - FISCAL YEAR 2013 - 2014
19lytdbud
EXPENDITURE
1
REPORT - NOVEMBER 7, 2014
FOR 2014 12
ORIGINAL
APPROP
TRANFRS/
REVISED
ADJSTMTS
BUDGET
AVAILABLE
YTD EXPENDED
ENCUMBRANCES
BUDGET
PCT
USED
900 EDUCATION
51 SALARIES & WAGES
51060 LONGEVITY
51111 GENERAL CONTROL
51112 PRINCIPALS & SUPERVISORS
39,703
165.94
39,868.94
39,246.35
.00
622.59
98.4%
410,365
18,501. 60
428,866.60
428,866.60
.00
.00
100.0%
1,786,795
23,713.84
1,810,508.84
1,810,508.84
.00
.00
100.0%
16,196,228
-15,808.00
16,180,420.00
16,180,420.00
.00
.00
100.0%
51114 SPECIAL EDUCATION PERSONNE
3,064,926
-45,008.35
3,019,917.65
3,019,917.65
.00
.00
100.0%
51115 COORDINATORS/FACILITY MANA
547,695
-63,754.60
483,940.40
483,940.40
.00
.00
100.0%
51116 DEPARTMENT HEAD/FACILITATO
64,466
20,436.73
84,902.73
84,902.73
.00
.00
100.0%
258,194
-19,244.78
238,949.22
235,506.78
.00
3,442.44
98.6%
450,689
107,230.96
557,919.96
557,919.96
.00
.00
100.0%
51113 CLASSROOM TEACHERS
51117 COACHING
51118 SOCIAL WORKERS
SALARY
51119 SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGISTS
SAL
504,824
12,867.74
517,691. 74
517,691.74
.00
.00
100.0%
51120 GUIDANCE COUNSELOR - SALAR
637,881
9,937.09
627,943.91
627,723.36
.00
220.55
100.0%
51121 STUDENT ACTIVITY-SALARY ST
43,155
8,290.95
51,445.95
48,295.09
.00
3,150.86
93.9%
8,650
2,713.70
11,363.70
11,363.70
.00
.00
100.0%
51123 SALARY NON-AFFILIATED
759,098
73,111. 99
832,209.99
832,209.99
.00
.00
100.0%
51124 HOURLY NON AFFILIATED
220,929
7,128.15
228,057.15
227,013.44
.00
1,043.71
99.5%
51125 LIBRARIAN & ASSISTANTS SAL
150,697
12,508.73
163,205.73
163,205.73
.00
.00
100.0%
51122 TRAVEL SUPPLEMENT
51126 SECRETARIES
973,179
-14,515.48
958,663.52
958,663.52
.00
.00
100.0%
335,553
10,907.75
346,460.75
346,460.75
.00
.00
100.0%
1,688,855
23,677.40
1,712,532.40
1,712,532.40
.00
.00
100.0%
51129 NON-CERTIFIED GEN CONTROL
62,500
6,575.01
69,075.01
69,075.01
.00
.00
100.0%
51131 CERTIFIED PERSONNEL - OT S
29,030
5,815.83
34,845.83
34,845.83
.00
.00
100.0%
51132 CUSTODIAL/MAINTENANCE OT S
80,173
38,780.77
118,953.77
118,196.67
.00
757.10
99.4%
51133 SECRETARIAL OT
22,235
6,290.23
28,525.23
28,525.23
.00
.00
100.0'1;
51136 ANNUITY BOARD OF EDUCATION
22,000
.00
22,000.00
22,000.00
.00
.00
100.0%
51137 IN LIEU OF MEDICAL INSURAN
90,000
12,491. 63
102,491. 63
102,491. 63
.00
.00
100.0%
3,200
-2,195.52
1,004.48
1,004.48
.00
.00
100.0%
1,752,341
51,711.19
1,804,052.19
1,804,052.19
.00
.00
100.0%
51152 SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS
333,432
55,163.26
388,595.26
388,595.26
.00
.00
100.0%
51153 TUTORS
154,700
-14,200.43
140,499.57
140,499.57
.00
.00
100.0%
51154 SUBSTITUTE NURSES
20,000
22,715.80
42,715.80
42,715.80
.00
.00
100.0%
51156 CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT SAL
59,995
-14,147.00
45,848.00
45,848.00
.00
.00
100.0%
51127 NURSES
SALARIES
SALARY
51128 CUSTODIAL/MAINTENANCE SALA
51139 PROCTORS
51151 PARAPROFESSIONALS
51157 CLERICAL SALARIES
51158 TEMPORARY/CUSTODIAL SALARY
51159 TEMPORARY SALARIES
9,000
.00
9,000.00
8,672.38
.00
327.62
96.4%
49,000
-7,530.61
41,469.39
41,469.39
.00
.00
100.0%
60,288
24,366.19
84,654.19
81,728.54
.00
2,925.65
96.5%
288,000
21,156.38
309,156.38
309,156.38
.00
.00
100.0%
51276 SEVERANCE PAY - SECRETARIA
50,000
13,280.11
63,280.11
63,280.11
.00
.00
100.0%
51278 SEVERANCE PAY- CUSTODIAL/M
30,000
-503.13
29,496.87
29,496.87
.00
.00
100.0%
51270 SEVERANCE PAY - TEACHERS
11/07/2014 14:13
! TOWN OF VERNON
!PG
jluddecke
!EDUCATION
!glytdbud
FISCAL YEAR 2013 - 2014
EXPENDITURE
2
REPORT - NOVEMBER 7, 2014
FOR 2014 12
ORIGINAL
APPROP
51281 EARLY RETIREMENT-INSTRUCTI
TOTAL SALARIES & WAGES
TRANFRS/
REVISED
ADJSTMTS
BUDGET
YTD EXPENDED
ENCUMBRANCES
AVAILABLE
BUDGET
PCT
USED
276,614
60,988.32
337,602.32
337,602.32
.00
.00
100.0%
31,534,390
433,745.21
31,968,135.21
31,955,644.69
.00
12,490.52
100.0%
52 EMPLOYEE BENEFITS
52132 LIFE INSURANCE
52172 PPO/HMO MEDICAL INSURANCE
52173 MEDICAL
52174 DENTAL
52175 PRESCRIPTION DRUGS
94,598
.00
94,598.00
94,356.48
.00
241. 52
99.7%
4,412,127
477,364.00
4,889,491.00
4,889,491. 00
.00
.00
100.0%
600
.00
600.00
491. 52
.00
108.48
81. 9%
257,848
8,472.59
266,320.59
266,320.59
.00
.00
100.0%
1,015,363
-484,954.40
530,408.60
530,408.60
.00
.00
100.0%
52179 MEDICARE
379,338
33,057.04
412,395.04
412,284.24
.00
110.80
100.0%
52220 SOCIAL SECURITY
388,691
35,756.66
424,447.66
424,003.01
.00
444.65
99.9%
5,382
.00
5,382.00
3,797.30
.00
1,584.70
70.6%
100.0%
52221 RETIRED CUST/MAINT. MEDICA
52500 UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION
52600 WORKERS' COMPENSATION
52860 LONG & SHORT TERM DISABILI
52919 TOWN PENSION
TOTAL EMPLOYEE BENEFITS
57,700
2,752.86
60,452.86
60,452.86
.00
.00
130,000
80.36
130,080.36
130,080.36
.00
.00
100.0%
7,550
-2,044.09
5,505.91
5,505.91
.00
.00
100.0%
611,432
.00
611,432.00
640,296.00
80,000.00
-108,864.00
117.8%
7,360,629
70,485.02
7,431,114.02
7,457,487.87
80,000.00
1,000
-1,000.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.0%
150,357
9,761.88
160,118.88
158,183.76
.00
1,935.12
98.8%
94.3%
101.4%
53 PROF & TECH SERVICES
53070 ENGINEERING FEES
53321 INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES - B
53322 INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM IMPR
74,049
66.35
74,115.35
69,893.91
.00
4,221.44
53323 PUPIL SERVICES
20,800
-2,734.84
18,065.16
92.00
.00
17,973.16
.5%
53332 BOARD OF ED LEGAL SERVICES
75,000
23,520.35
98,520.35
98,520.35
.00
.00
100.0%
53339 OTHER PROF & TECH SERVICES
987,885
97,556.96
1,085,441.96
1,082,827.74
1,653.81
960.41
99.9%
1,309,091
127,170.70
1,436,261.70
1,409,517.76
1,653.81
25,090.13
98.3%
100.0%
TOTAL PROF & TECH SERVICES
54 PROPERTY SERVICES
54110 UTILITY SERVICES: ELECTRIC
663,339
134,006.51
797,345.51
797,342.51
.00
3.00
54120 UTILITY SERVICES: NATURAL
69,343
18,822.09
88,165.09
87,322.17
.00
842.92
99.0%
54130 UTILITY SERVICES: WATER
55,910
7,107.20
63,017.20
63,017.20
.00
.00
100.0%
54140 UTILITY SERVICES: SEWER US
29,060
.00
29,060.00
28,213.56
846.44
.00
100.0%
11/07/2014 14: 13
ITOWN OF VERNON
I PG
jluddecke
IEDUCATION - FISCAL YEAR 2013 - 2014
Iglytdbud
EXPENDITURE
3
REPORT - NOVEMBER 7, 2014
FOR 2014 12
ORIGINAL
APPROP
54200 CLEANING SERVICES
TRANFRS/
REVISED
ADJSTMTS
BUDGET
YTD EXPENDED
AVAILABLE
ENCUMBRANCES
BUDGET
PCT
USED
2,200
.00
2,200.00
1,959.13
.00
240.87
89.1%
54217 DISPOSAL - HAZARDOUS WASTE
10,000
.00
10,000.00
4,396.79
470.00
5,133.21
48.7%
54320 MACHINERY & EQUIPMENT REPA
24,000
13,773.16
10,226.84
10,226.84
.00
.00
100.0%
54332 COPIER MAINTENANCE
43,998
1,475.53
45,473.53
35,547.01
.00
9,926.52
78.2%
54350 REPAIR NON-INSTRUCTIONAL E
16,865
-1,766.08
15,098.92
11,528.53
.00
3,570.39
76.4%
54351 REPAIR INSTRUCTIONAL EQUIP
29,376
730.07
30,106.07
14,017.91
1,306.00
14,782.16
50.9%
54390 OTHER REPAIR AND MAINTENAN
1,800
.00
1,800.00
.00
.00
1,800.00
.0%
54450 RENTAL OF EQUIPMENT/VEHICL
49,440
256.73
49,696.73
48,065.82
.00
1,630.91
96.7%
54460 RENTAL OF LAND/BUILDINGS
12,650
.00
12,650.00
12,650.00
.00
.00
100.0%
54490 COPIER RENTAL/LEASE
81,646
13,234.53
94,880.53
94,820.89
.00
59.64
99.9%
54802 ROOF REPAIRS
12,000
-5,137.81
6,862.19
6,587.64
.00
274.55
96.0%
54813 AIR CONDITIONING REPAIRS
19,000
-18,035.57
964.43
964.43
.00
.00
100.0%
54814 REPAIR ENERGY MANAGEMENT S
51,185
-1,199.28
49,985.72
49,985.72
.00
.00
100.0%
54816 FIRE SAFETY SYSTEM REPAIRS
18,000
.00
18,000.00
16,280.28
.00
1,719.72
90.4%
54818 SECURITY/ALARM SYSTEM REPA
6,000
.00
6,000.00
5,710.03
.00
289.97
95.2%
54830 INTERCOM SYSTEM REPAIRS
2,000
.00
2,000.00
2,000.00
.00
.00
100.0%
54890 MISC. BUILDING & GROUND RE
17,000
22,549.92
39,549.92
39,385.07
164.85
.00
100.0%
54999 OTHER PURCHASED PROPERTY S
500
15,000.00
15,500.00
15,000.00
.00
500.00
96.8%
1,215,312
173,270.68
1,388,582.68
1,345,021.53
2,787.29
40,773.86
97.1%
TOTAL PROPERTY SERVICES
55 OTHER PURCHASED SERV
55020 EMPLOYEE TRAVEL
36,233
9,163.03
27,069.97
9,553.26
.00
17,516.71
35.3%
55210 GENERAL LIABILITY INSURANC
215,000
24,545.80
239,545.80
239,545.80
.00
.00
100.0%
55219 INTERSCHOLASTIC ACTIVITY I
10,000
.00
10,000.00
9,900.00
.00
100.00
99.0%
55246 REIMBURSEMENT-PRIVATE AGEN
67,000
.00
67,000.00
34,759.76
.00
32,240.24
51.9%
55310 TELEPHONE/DATA LINES/CELLP
98.7%
105,545
.00
105,545.00
104,218.91
.00
1,326.09
55330 COMMUNICATIONS/POSTAGE
42,901
-2,200.00
40,701. 00
40,660.72
.00
40.28
99.9%
55340 INTERNET ACCOUNT
44,650
-29,179.09
15,470.91
15,470.91
.00
.00
100.0%
55400 ADVERTISING
20,000
-12,584.97
7,415.03
7,415.03
.00
.00
100.0%
55500 PRINTING & BINDING
41,150
-10,042.78
31,107.22
25,938.42
165.28
5,003.52
83.9%
55650 CONFERENCE FEES & MEMBERSH
71,451
-441. 43
71,009.57
57,380.65
139.00
13,489.92
81. 0%
100.0%
55651 NEASC ACCREDITATION
55710 MEDICAL SERVICES
55800 LEA TUITION IN LEA BOUNDAR
55810 TUITION TO OTHER LEA'S
55815 MAGNET SCHOOL TUITION
55820 TUITION NON-PUB SCHOOL NO
a
350.00
350.00
350.00
.00
.00
1,000
.00
1,000.00
.00
.00
1,000.00
.0%
221,911
.00
221,911. 00
221,911. 00
.00
.00
100.0%
1,116,713
.00
1,116,713.00
1,381,029.77
.00
-264,316.77
123.7%
650,000
-23,006.00
626,994.00
620,655.10
.00
6,338.90
99.0%
1,645,842
-435,293.00
1,210,549.00
1,269,508.59
1,032.85
-59,992.44
105.0%
55911 CONTRACTED SERVICE - BUSES
664,384
-133.89
664,250.11
622,773.22
732.97
40,743.92
93.9%
55912 CONTRACT SERVICE VANS/LIFT
1,355,359
18,391.39
1,336,967.61
1,270,872.78
.00
66,094.83
95.H
55913 CONTRACTED SERVICE VO-TECH
60,398
.00
60,398.00
59,995.84
402.16
.00
100.0%
11/07/2014 14:13
ITOWN OF VERNON
IpG
jluddecke
I EDUCATION
19lytclbud
FISCAL YEAR 2013 - 2014
EXPENDITURE
REPORT
4
NOVEMBER 7, 2014
FOR 2014 12
ORIGINAL
APPROP
TRANFRS/
REVISED
ADJSTMTS
BUDGET
YTD EXPENDED
ENCU~lBRANCES
AVAILABLE
BUDGET
PCT
USED
55920 FIELD & ATHLETIC TRIPS
76,111
-2,892.69
73,218.31
50,305.28
2,653.64
20,259.39
72.3%
55999 OTHER PURCHASED SERVICES
67,009
-3,693.24
63,315.76
51,031.15
381.00
11,903.61
81.2%
6,512,657
-522,125.71
5,990,531.29
6,093,276.19
5,506.90
-108,251.80
101.8%
TOTAL OTHER PURCHASED SERV
56 SUPPLIES & MATERIALS
56050 COMPUTER SUPPLIES
24,015
-3,123.47
20,891. 53
5,054.27
324.07
15,5l3.19
25.7%
56130 CUSTODIAL SUPPLIES
71,385
26,000.00
97,385.00
96,746.59
613.76
24.65
100.0%
100.0%
5,000
.00
5,000.00
4,489.00
511. 00
.00
56140 PAINTING SUPPLIES
14,500
-11,000.00
3,500.00
3,490.42
.00
9.58
99.7%
56141 PLUMBING SUPPLIES
24,000
-7,993.79
16,006.21
7,919.85
.00
8,086.36
49.5%
56142 ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES
25,000
.00
25,000.00
22,656.51
.00
2,343.49
90.6%
56148 BOILER & HEATING SUPPLIES
13,000
.00
13,000.00
8,196.68
737.10
4,066.22
68.7%
41. 8%
56136 CEILING SUPPLIES
56152 AIR FILTER SUPPLIES
5,000
.00
5,000.00
2,091.64
.00
2,908.36
56160 HAND TOOL SUPPLIES
5,000
.00
5,000.00
2,523.39
.00
2,476.61
50.5%
56161 SMALL HARDWARE SUPPLIES
10,000
.00
10,000.00
8,351.87
.00
1,648.13
83.5%
56180 LANDSCAPING SUPPLIES
18,500
-9,216.02
9,283.98
9,283.98
.00
.00
100.0%
56183 CHEMICAL TREATMENT SUPPLIE
7,000
.00
7,000.00
4,995.00
.00
2,005.00
71.4%
56199 MISC. BUILDING GROUND SUPP
10,000
.00
10,000.00
9,988.93
.00
11.07
99.9%
519,324
43,377.67
562,701.67
562,021.17
.00
680.50
99.9%
31,041
9,515.26
40,556.26
39,492.12
.00
1,064.14
97.4%
264,500
.00
264,500.00
264,500.00
.00
.00
100.0%
89.9%
56252 HEATING OIL #2
56260 AUTOMOTIVE FUEL
GASOLINE
56261 AUTOMOTIVE FUEL - DIESEL
6,800
3,123.47
9,923.47
8,923.47
.00
1,000.00
56410 TEXTBOOKS
40,156
-3,631.57
36,524.43
21,308.87
.00
15,215.56
58.3%
56420 LIBRARY BOOKS
61,233
-10,623.30
50,609.70
40,543.96
.00
10,065.74
80.1%
100.0%
56262 PROPANE
56430 NEW TEXTBOOK ADOPTIONS
143,500
-50,643.11
92,856.89
92,856.89
.00
.00
56440 INSTRUCTIONAL SUPPLIES
542,630
-118,244.22
424,385.78
368,781.76
3,780.05
51,823.97
87.8%
3,750
.00
3,750.00
2,363.02
.00
1,386.98
63.0%
56450 OTHER NEW CURRICULUM SUPPL
28,600
.00
28,600.00
28,558.37
.00
41. 63
99.9%
56900 OTHER SUPPLIES & MATERIALS
187,408
-75,148.01
112,259.99
103,669.23
843.75
7,747.01
93.1%
56910 FIRE SAFETY SYSTEM SUPPLIE
1,500
.00
1,500.00
1,038.00
.00
462.00
69.2%
2,062,842
-207,607.09
1,855,234.91
1,719,844.99
6,809.73
128,580.19
93.1%
57100 LAND IMPROVEMENT REPAIRS
31,000
-1,412.80
29,587.20
1,747.81
.00
27,839.39
5.9%
57220 HEATING SYSTEM REPAIRS
18,500
.00
18,500.00
17,718.39
781.61
.00
100.0%
6,000
.00
6,000.00
2,100.00
.00
3,900.00
35.0%
56500 CLOTHING AND UNIFORM
TOTAL SUPPLIES & MATERIALS
57 CAPITAL OUTLAY
57230 PLUMBING SYSTEM REPAIRS
11/07/2014 14: 13
ITOWN OF VERNON
IpG
jluddecke
IEDUCATION - FISCAL YEAR 2013 - 2014
19lytdbud
EXPENDITURE
5
NOVEMBER 7, 2014
REPORT
FOR 2014 12
ORIGINAL
APPROP
- - - - - -- ------------------
-------
-
TRANFRS/
REVISED
ADJSTMTS
BUDGET
AVAILABLE
YTD EXPENDED
ENCUMBRANCES
BUDGET
PCT
USED
------------- -
-------------
57590 OTHER EQUIPMENT AND MACHIN
15,000
.00
15,000.00
8,975.30
.00
6,024.70
59.8%
57710 COMPUTER HARDWARE
91,299
31,900.80
123,199.80
108,974.80
.00
14,225.00
88.5%
85.3%
57712 REPLACE COMPUTER EQUIPMENT
71,390
.00
71,390.00
60,860.22
.00
10,529.78
57720 COMPUTER SOFTWARE
84,409
.00
84,409.00
66,368.12
.00
18,040.88
78.6%
57850 NEW INSTRUCTIONAL EQUIPMEN
10,020
.00
10,020.00
1,205.39
.00
8,814.61
12.0%
57852 REPLACE INSTRUCTIONAL EQUI
8,205
-1,410.95
6,794.05
4,496.05
.00
2,298.00
66.2%
57854 NON-INSTRUCTIONAL EQUIPMEN
35,037
-8,271.30
26,765.70
25,699.61
.00
1,066.09
96.0%
57856 REPLACE NON-INSTRUCTION EQ
15,711
-11,690.45
4,020.55
929.62
500.00
2,590.93
35.6%
386,571
9,115.30
395,686.30
299,075.31
1,281.61
95,329.38
75.9%
113,295
28,229.86
141,524.86
141,524.86
.00
.00
100.0%
113,295
28,229.86
141,524.86
141,524.86
.00
.00
100.0%
50,494,787
112,283.97
50,607,070.97
50,421,393.20
98,039.34
87,638.43
99.8%
50,494,787
112,283.97
50,607,070.97
50,421,393.20
98,039.34
87,638.43
99.8%
TOTAL CAPITAL OUTLAY
58 OTHER/SUNDRY
- ------------------58400 CONTINGENCY
TOTAL OTHER/SUNDRY
TOTAL EDUCATION
GRAND TOTAL
** END OF REPORT
Generated by James Luddecke
**
Region
1\rlitigation
9
Introduction
Connecticut's Capitol Region encompasses the City of Hartford and twenty-nine surrounding suburban
and rural communities. The Capitol Region Council of Governments (CRCOG) received Federal Emergency
Management Agency (FEMA) funds through the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental
Protection (DEEP) to develop a Natural Hazard Mitigation Plan Update for the thirty municipalities
comprising the region:
City of Hartford
Town of Andover
Town of Avon
Town of Bloomfield
Town of Bolton
Town of Canton
Town of East Granby
Town of East Hartford
Town of East Windsor
Town of Ellington
Town
Town
Town
Town
Town
Town
Town
Town
Town
Town
Town
Town
Town
Town
Town
Town
Town
Town
Town
Town
of Enfield
of Farmington
of Glastonbury
of Granby
of Hebron
of Manchester
of Marlborough
of Newington
of Rocky Hill
of Simsbury
of Somers
of South Windsor
of Stafford
of Suffield
of Tolland
of Vernon
of West Hartford
of Wethersfield
of Windsor
of Windsor Locks
CRCOG staff and municipal officials from each community contributed to this planning project. The
Capitol Region Emergency Planning Committee (CREPe) ESF-S Emergency Management subcommittee
was expanded to provide guidance to the update process. This plan update builds on the existing PreDisaster Natural Hazard Mitigation Plan of 2008. (All ofthe communities listed above except Stafford,
which joined the Capitol Region in 2010, participated in the 2008 Plan.) The purpose ofthis plan is to
identify natural hazards likely to affect the Capitol Region and its nearly 770,000 residents, assess our
vulnerabilities to these hazards and set forth mitigation strategies that will reduce the loss of life and
property, economic disruptions and the cost of post-disaster recovery for the region's communities. The
benefits of preparing a Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan include:
•
•
•
•
Improving the region's ability to deal with natural disasters and reduce losses
Reducing the need for emergency response to natural disasters
Enabling municipalities to access FEMA Hazard Mitigation Assistance Grants upon formal adoption
of an approved plan
Improving post-disaster recovery implementation
The plan considers the following natural hazards that affect the region:
•
•
•
•
Dam failure
Drought
Earthquake
Flooding
•
•
•
•
Forest and Wild Land Fires
Hurricanes and Tropical Storms
Tornados and High Winds
Severe Winter Storms
2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 1
Executive Summary
The impacts ofthese natural hazards were evaluated as well as the locations and groups of people particularly
vulnerable to the effects ofthese hazards. Mitigation goals and strategies were developed at both the regional
and local levels to reduce or prevent the damages to life and property that can result from these natural
hazards. CRCOG and CREPC, in addition to local and other partners, are responsible for implementation ofthe
regional goals contained in this plan. Each participating municipality identified its own mitigation goals and
strategies and assumes responsibility for implementation ofthose measures.
The Capitol Region is vulnerable to the numerous natural hazards with flooding, winter storms and high wind
events being the natural hazards that most frequently occur with enough severity to cause loss of life or
property. To evaluate the impacts ofthese hazards on our region, we looked at historical accounts of major
storms and other events; examined flood insurance claims data and public assistance provided after federally
declared disasters; analyzed demographic data and physical features; and used a computer model to estimate
losses due to flooding, hurricanes and earthquakes. The following is a brief summary of the natural hazards
affecting the region and our communities.
th
The Atlantic hurricane season extends from June 1st through November 30 each year. While the Capitol
Region is spared the coastal storm surges associated with hurricanes, it is not immune from damaging winds
and rain. According to the State's Hazard Mitigation Plan, a moderate Category II hurricane can be expected to
hit Connecticut once every twenty-three to thirty years. A major Category III or IV hurricane may occur before
th
2040, based on 20 century trends.
In August 2011, Hurricane Irene, which was downgraded to a tropical storm before hitting Connecticut, caused
widespread damage to the region and state. Irene was responsible for three deaths associated with flooding
and downed wires from falling trees. According to The Hartford Courant. insurance companies paid out $235
million on more than 60,000 claims in Connecticut related to damage from Irene. However, this figure does not
include hundreds of millions more in uncovered expenses and clean up costs for Connecticut's largest electric
utility, Connecticut Light and Power. At the height of the storm some 754,000 residents were without power.
Capitol Region cities and towns were widely affected by downed trees, flooding and power outages as a result
of Irene. Many residents and businesses were without power over a week. According to the Connecticut
Division of Emergency Management and Homeland Security, municipalities, other local and private nonprofit
agencies incurred expenses of over $3.18 million due to Irene. The municipalities and agencies are eligible for
reimbursement of 75% of these costs under FEMA's Public Assistance program.
CRCOG used FEMA's Hazus-MH software to estimate the extent of physical damage and the economic losses to
the region and our communities if we were hit with another hurricane similar to the Category III hurricane of
1938. The Hazus-MH hurricane model primarily considers wind damage for inland areas such as the Capitol
Region which are not subject to storm surges. The model predicts the region could face economic losses of
over $3.6 billion and nearly 26,000 buildings with moderate or greater damage as a result of such a storm.
Flooding can occur as a result of other natural hazards such as heavy preCipitation, hurricanes, winter storms,
snow melt, ice jams or dam failures. The Capitol Region's numerous rivers and streams, as well as its urbanized
areas, make floods and flash floods a regular risk. Individuals and local governments face significant economic
2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 2 Executive Summary
loss, risks to public safety, and degraded waterways from flooding. There is not a "flood season" per se in
Connecticut; however, waterways are normally higher during spring, and are thus especially vulnerable to
flooding from intense precipitation. Significant flooding can also occur as a result of hurricanes and tropical
storms. According to the State's Plan, major flooding of small rivers and loss of life can be expected every 5-10
years throughout the State. Major flooding of larger rivers, such as the Connecticut and Farmington, with loss
of life and structural damage can be expected once every 30 years. Historic and widespread floods occurred in
1936, 1938, 1955, and 1982.
Total Flood Insurance Claims in the Capitol Region by Town
Through February 2012
N
A
Number of Claims Total Payments
*
Less Than 10
(!)
10 to 50
@
50 to 100
@
Less Than $10,000
: J 510,000 to $100,000
0
3
6
9
12
I Miles
$100,000 to $500,000
More Than 100
_
$500,000 to $1,000,000
_
Over $1,000,000
An analysis of claims filed under the National Flood Insurance Program in the Capitol Region demonstrates
the potential for losses due to flooding. Since the program's inception, over 1,200 claims resulting in
payments of nearly $7.8 million have been filed in the Capitol Region as of February 2012. Ofthese claims,
287 were repetitive loss claims (Le., more than one claim over $1,000 has been filed for flood damages to an
2014·2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update· Page 3 Executive Summary
insured building over a ten year period). Nearly 100 properties have experienced repetitive losses in the
Capitol Region. These losses have resulted in payments of over $3.5 million. West Hartford and Farmington
have had the highest overall and repetitive flood loss claims.
To help assess the risks we face from major flooding, CRCOG used FEMA's Hazus-MH loss estimation program
to model the effects of flooding at the local level. The following table shows the damages each town in the
region might face from a flood with a 1% probability of occurring in any given year (Le., the 100 year flood).
As can be seen, losses could be expected to be particularly high for Farmington River Valley communities .
>
Munipp$iliW ..•' :
...
.......
.:
...•. <:
ANDOVER
AVON
BLOOMFIELD
"Q~i~~irn~~tr.·• ·•
..
~lJ!ldlngs ..t
>~'a$t • '. •. :'. .• · .•·.·Mu~r~ip'I.#
~~~:~~i~'
. onn .... :........ ·MQ~e.~IY··
...... ·t>~Plag~·: . ·
yearj.FJ~mr;·>
$10,290,000
8
$179,770,000
114
$21,720,000
30
.
..
.
..
MANCHESTER
MARLBOROUGH
NEWINGTON
Least
frpmazi,,(l.()O . MqQe~tely
Ve~~)F{oQd· .
·parnaged
$64,350,000
11
$5,170,000
2
$15,730,000
23
1
135
SOMERS
$12,790,000
10
41
SOUTH WINDSOR
$33,240,000
48
26
STAFFORD
$50,620,000
27
0
SUFFIELD
$24,030,000
12
$91,120,000
135
TOLLAND
$13,400,000
11
VERNON
0
34
SIMSBURY
EAST GRANBY
$13,340,000
13
EAST HARTFORD
$33,550,000
EAST WINDSOR
$17,970,000
ELLINGTON
$11,120,000
ENFIELD
ROCKY HILL
$228,470,000
393
GLASTONBURY
$35,720,000
10
WEST HARTFORD
GRANBY
$42,450,000
66
WETHERSFIELD
$206,450,000
61
WINDSOR
$4,400,000
0
HEBRON
8uiklings a~
$4,740,000
$1,970,000
$52,170,000
HARTFORD
Ec;qllorri.cip~.
$102,150,000
BOLTON
CANTON
FARMINGTON
TotalEstlmated
WINDSOR LOCKS
$50,460,000
76
$130,710,000
140
$20,960,000
7
$132,710,000
292
$2,420,000
Significant areas of the Capitol Region are vulnerable to flooding. Over 9% or 48,883 acres of the Capitol
Region is located in flood plains. Over half of this land is zoned residential. Without restrictions on
development in flood plains, lives and property are at risk.
Dam Failure
Dams provide vital benefits to our region such as water supply, power generation, flood control, and
recreation, but in the event offailure, they can pose a threat to lives and property. Dam failure can happen
for a number of reasons including as a result of natural disasters such as structural failure due to earthquakes
or overtopping due to heavy precipitation. Dams in Connecticut are regulated by the Department of Energy
and Environmental Protection (DEEP). According to the DEEP, there are 533 dams in the Capitol Region. Of
these, 38 are Class C, or high hazard, dams. Failure of a Class C dam would result in probable loss of life, major
damage to habitable structures, damage to major highways and great economic loss. The region also has 59
Class B, or significant hazard, dams. Failure in these dams would result in similar, but less severe damage. The
State estimates there are nearly 12,000 people in Hartford County and 4,150 people in Tolland County within
2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 4 Executive Summary
the mapped dam inundation areas of high and significant hazard dams. The Capitol Region does not include
all municipalities in Hartford and Tolland Counties thus the regional population exposed to this risk is likely
lower, probably under two percent.
Connecticut is subject to blizzards, ice storms and nor'easters - storms characterized by strong, possibly
damaging northeasterly winds. The Capitol Region receives an average annual snowfall of about 40",
although snowfall amounts vary widely from year to year and can vary dramatically across the Region in any
given storm. Severe winter storms can result in damage to buildings and infrastructure, loss of life, and
disruptions to regional transportation and communication systems. Half of all federal disaster declarations for
Connecticut over the past 20 years have followed major winter or snow storms. Federal assistance is
frequently used to offset the snow/ice removal costs the State and municipalities incur. For example, a
federal emergency was declared for the February 11-12, 2006 snowstorm in several counties in Connecticut
(including Hartford and Tolland) to help share the costs of snow removal. In 2011, FEMA obligated over $74
million in Public Assistance funds to the State of Connecticut to reimburse state agencies, local governments
and eligible private nonprofit organizations for costs associated with the January 11-12, 2011 snowstorm and
Storm Alfred in October. The frequency, intensity and timing of winter storms dramatically impacts snow
removal budgets. Storm Alfred was particularly costly for municipalities because ofthe heavy debris loads
resulting from the high number offully leafed trees downed in this storm. Municipalities also incur higher
labor costs for snow removal on weekends and holidays.
Connecticut averages approximately three tornadoes every two years; however, in the first week and a half of
July 2013 four tornadoes hit the State including three which touched down in the Capitol Region. Hartford
and Litchfield Counties are at the highest risk for tornadoes within the state based on historical patterns and
locations oftheir occurrence. Between 1950 and 2003, Hartford County experienced 14 tornadoes and
Tolland County experienced 10. Between 2006 and 2012, Connecticut experienced twelve tornados. Two of
these were in Hartford County (Wethersfield and Bristol) and one in Tolland County (Somers). Typically,
tornadoes occur between April and October. High winds and microbursts (strong straight-line downburst
winds) can also inflict damage to property and result in injuries.
One ofthe country's most destructive tornadoes touched down in Windsor Locks and Windsor on October 3,
1979. The F4 tornado had winds in excess of 200 miles per hour, and tore an ll-mile path from Windsor to
Suffield. The tornado killed 3 people, injured 500 and caused an estimated $250 million ($776,385,000 in
2011 dollars) in damage, in part because it struck the New England Air Museum destroying several planes and
hangars.
Connecticut has a moderate risk of earthquakes based on the frequency of their occurrence, not the intensity
of individual earthquakes. Between 1568 and 1989, the state had 137 recorded earthquakes. The Capitol
Region experienced sixteen between 1837 and 2012. Of those where the magnitude was known, all were
under magnitude 4.0. A strong earthquake centered in central Connecticut and thought to be 3.8 magnitude
occurred on August 9, 1840.
2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 5 Executive Summary
Magnitude 3.0 to 3.9 earthquakes are often felt by people up to a hundred miles away from the epicenter but
rarely cause damage. Magnitude 4.0 to 4.9 earthquakes cause shaking of objects indoors but generally cause
none to slight damage. Magnitude 5.0 to 5.9 earthquakes can cause moderate to major damage to poorly
constructed buildings but none to slight damage to other buildings. Connecticut incorporated building codes
for seismic activity into the state building code in 1992. There were no requirements prior to that. So, while
the risk for a very damaging earthquake is relatively low in the region, some structures may be impacted by
less intense earthquakes depending on the soil and integrity ofthe structure.
Using FEMA's Hazus-MH software, CRCOG analyzed several earthquake scenarios to estimate the potential
loss to property and life. One scenario run was based on a 19985.2 magnitude earthquake centered in
Pennsylvania and the results were typical for the modeling of historic earthquakes: No buildings or
transportation and utility infrastructure were estimated to be damaged as a result of such an earthquake
here. No fires were expected to result and no debris was expected to be generated as a result ofthe
earthquake. Also, no injuries, deaths or displacements were expected to result from the quake. There were
no economic losses estimated from such an earthquake scenario here.
We also ran a simulation of a magnitude 5 earthquake with an epicenter in Hartford. Such an earthquake
would be stronger than we would expect based on historical evidence and has a low probability of occurring.
An earthquake ofthis magnitude, however, would inflict considerable damage on the Capitol Region. Hazus
estimates that over 12% ofthe buildings in the region or about 30,700 buildings would be at least moderately
damaged and nearly 1,000 buildings would be damaged beyond repair. Four hospitals, 89 schools, seven
police stations, five fire stations and two emergency operations centers would suffer at least moderate
damage although none would be completely damaged. Thirty bridges would be expected to be moderately
damaged and one completely damaged. Numerous leaks and breaks in water, wastewater and natural gas
lines would be expected. Power outages would be widespread. Four fires are estimated to be ignited due to
the earthquake resulting in about $3 million in building losses. Depending on the time of day that the
earthquake struck, 40 to 85 deaths could be expected. Thousands of people would sustain minor injuries and
hundreds would need hospitalization. Total economic losses estimated for such an earthquake would be
$6.57 billion. Total building related losses were estimated at $5.51 billion with 47% ofthese losses attributed
to residential properties.
If a 5.0 magnitude earthquake were centered in Moodus, an area of historic "rumblings," the effects on the
Capitol Region would be conSiderably less severe. We ran a Hazus simulation of such an earthquake and
found that only 1% ofthe buildings in the Capitol Region or about 2,200 buildings would be at least
moderately damaged. Nearly 15 buildings in the region would be damaged beyond repair. No hospitals,
schools, police stations, fire stations, emergency operations centers or bridges would suffer at least moderate
damage and none would be completely damaged. Some leaks and breaks in water, wastewater and natural
gas lines would be expected but no power outages would be expected. Only one fire is estimated to be
ignited due to the earthquake. One death would be expected. About 40 people would sustain minor injuries
and only a few would need hospitalization. Total economic losses estimated for the earthquake would be
about $300 million. Total building related losses were estimated at $272 million with over 55% ofthese losses
attributed to residential properties.
These simulations highlight the significance of the location of the epicenter to the damages that could be
expected. A moderately strong earthquake centered near a more populated, built up area would be expected
to result in conSiderably more damage than one located in a more remote area. Based on our history and
2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 6 Executive Summary
geology, the Capitol Region's vulnerability to damaging earthquakes is low. The damages we are likely to face
here from earthquakes are much lower than in other parts of the nation and world.
Droughts periodically occur in Connecticut and can have serious consequences. While a drought does not
pose immediate threats to life and property, it can have severe economic, environmental and social
consequences. A lack of precipitation can affect not only agricultural production, but also tourism, water
utilities, residential wells, businesses and more. Connecticut experienced notable droughts in 1957, 1964-67,
1980-81 and 2002. During the 2002 drought, several water utilities imposed mandatory water conservation
and restriction measures on their customers, while most other companies imposed voluntary restrictions.
Such restrictions can impact businesses as well as residences.
A meteorological drought was most recently declared for Hartford, Tolland and Windham Counties from April
12 through April 24, 2012 due to precipitation levels that were approximately half of normal levels. According
to the NOAA Storm Events Database, rivers and streams were most affected as most ran at record low levels
during the spring run-off season. The State did not issue a drought declaration, however, as reservoirs were
at normal levels, thanks largely to above normal precipitation falling between August 2011 and November
2011. The main impact ofthis meteorological drought was periods of very high fire danger. Rainfall in the first
half of 2013 has been higher than normal and drought seems unlikely for the near future. However, as the
State's draft Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update notes, predicting the future occurrences of drought
within any given time period is difficult.
Forest or wildland fires can cause not only long-term damage to vegetation and ecosystems, but also damage
to developments, especially as residential development has increased in woodland areas. In the last twenty
years, a few forest fires have occurred in the Capitol Region including a fire in May 1995 which burned nearly
40 acres in Tolland; a brush fire in April 1999 in Vernon which also burned about 40 acres and came within
100 feet of homes in a nearby neighborhood; and a fire in April 2005 which burned eight acres along the
Farmington River in Avon. The scale of these fires is much less than those experienced in the western and
midwestern United States; nonetheless forest fires here pose a risk to lives and property especially at the
urban/woodland interface.
To address the impacts ofthese natural hazards, the planning committee and local and regional staff
reexamined the goals, objectives and strategic mitigation activities proposed in the 2008 Plan as well as
assessed our experiences with natural disasters ofthe last five years and considered input from the public
and other stakeholders in order to develop a blueprint for better protecting our region over the next five
years. Each mitigation action was prioritized and responsible agencies, potential funding sources and time
frames for implementing the projects were identified. What follows is a brief outline of the regional and local
strategies proposed.
We categorized the individual projects and actions proposed by the region and municipalities into the
following types of measures:
2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 7 Executive Summary
Education & Awareness - Projects and actions in this category include measures to inform and educate
local residents and businesses, elected and appointed officials, and other stakeholders. Types of outreach
include general public informational outreach efforts such as use of local websites to post information,
mailings with tax statements, newspaper advertisements, press releases, e-mail blasts, etc. Other
measures in this category include targeted outreach efforts to specific groups which could include more
direct contact such as meetings. Also included are workshops, forums, fairs, seminars and the like.
Natural Resource Protection - Actions included in this category are those that not only minimize hazard
losses but also can preserve or restore functions of natural systems such as stream corridor restoration,
watershed management, wetlands preservation and restoration, and timber management.
Preparedness and Enhancement of Emergency Response - Actions in this category may not be thought of
as directly tied to mitigation of damage due to natural disasters but they are measures vital to public safety
and the restoration of normalcy in a community. In this regard, they play an important role in the reduction
of losses a community will experience. Measures in this category include improving working relationships
and coordination between agencies; securing new equipment, facilities, supplies and personnel to aid in
emergency response; improving procedures related to emergency response; conducting emergency
response training; and improving communications systems.
Prevention - Activities in this category generally include government actions or processes that influence
the way land and buildings are developed, such as zoning regulations, floodplain regulations, building
codes, open space preservation, and stormwater regulations. Also included are studies and assessments of
risks and vulnerabilities including identifying and improving a community's ability to contact vulnerable
populations; improving mapping and data analysis capabilities; and undertaking engineering studies to
address drainage, flooding, and power outage issues. Other government actions and programs such as
implementing procedures for improving operations, using tax incentives and capital improvement
programming are also included in this category.
Structural Projects/Property Protection & Modifications - Activities in this category include modifications
and retrofits of existing buildings, structures and infrastructure to protect or remove them from harm such
as acquisition, relocation, elevation, flood proofing, installation of shatter proof glass, relining culverts,
strengthening roofs, etc. Measures in this category could also include new construction or reconstruction
projects to reduce the impact of hazards such as installation of improved drainage facilities, culverts, and
other stormwater controls as well as undergrounding utilities. Expanding sheltering capacity and
installation of backup power to critical facilities are other measures included in this category.
Because ofthe regional nature of natural hazards and common concerns, some mitigation activities are
better addressed at the regional level; however, the means to carry out certain activities may not be available
to regional agencies, but are available to municipalities. For example, CRCOG cannot enact laws and
regulations, levy taxes, or enter into construction contracts. This section establishes our regional strategy for
addressing natural hazards and sets out the mitigation actions that may best be undertaken on a regional
level.
2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 8 Executive Summary
Goal: Minimize the foss of life and property, and economic disruptions that can
Objective 1: improve stormwater management ami ground water
increased flooding and lessen the effects of
natural hazards.
throughout the
to
nrj:l\Jpr\T
Actions:
1.1
Encourage all municipalities in the Region to adopt regulations that incorporate or refer to
recommended practices from the most current Connecticut Stormwater Quality Manual, Connecticut
Guidelines for Erosion and Sedimentation Control and in particular, those which promote low impact
development and green infrastructure techniques.
1.2
Encourage development that is in harmony with natural drainage systems in all municipalities
through reviews of development referrals.
1.3
Foster improved understanding ofthe importance stream management, maintenance of natural
drainage channels, and use of green infrastructure practices among municipal staff, inland wetlands
commissions and planning and zoning commissions through education.
1.4
Continue participation with other regional planning agencies in Connecticut and Massachusetts in
the Connecticut River Bi-State Partnership and, in particular, in the development of a Connecticut River BiState Corridor Management Plan.
2: Assist municipalities in implementing hazard mitigation
<:TI";n~'O'!;'<:
Mitigation Actions:
2.1
Work with member municipalities to maintain this regional natural hazard mitigation plan with
updates at least every five years.
2.2
Work with member municipalities, state and federal agencies to improve availability of relevant
data; including, but not limited to current land uses, vulnerable building stock inventories and values, and
hazardous materials inventories.
2.3
Train CRCGG staff in HAZUS-MH software.
2.4
Assist member municipalities in pursuing federal and state funds to implement mitigation
measures.
2.5
Incorporate natural hazard mitigation concerns into the regional plan of conservation and
development and encourage municipalities to address natural hazards mitigation in local plans of
conservation and development.
2.6
Encourage municipalities to participate in the National Flood Insurance Program's Community
Rating System.
2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 9 Executive Summary
2.7
Work with municipalities to facilitate a process for improved communications with upstream
communities to provide timely downstream notifications regarding water levels and releases from dams.
2.8
Encourage municipalities to increase their citizens' awareness and use ofthe Get Ready Capitol
Region website. (http://www.getreadycapitolregion.orgl)
2.9
Encourage FEMA to recognize the cumulative effect of winter storm events
2.10
Assist member communities in efforts to develop and maintain lists of functional needs
populations and in improving involvement of functional needs persons in planning and training for hazard
mitigation.
3: Assist municipalities in minimizing risks associated with power disruptions.
Mitigation Actions:
3.1
Monitor state efforts to assist municipalities in working with Connecticut Light & Power concerns
over appropriate utility right-of-way maintenance, emergency response and the burial oftransmission lines.
3.2
Encourage the installation of generators at critical facilities and in developments serving the elderly
or special need populations through outreach and associated work with local officials.
Objective 4: Assist municipalities in minimizing risks associated with
Mitigation Actions:
4.1
Assist municipalities that do not currently have drought ordinances in enacting such ordinances to
enable the enforcement of water conservation.
4.2
Assist in disseminating drought-related information by encouraging municipalities to post droughtrelated information released by the Connecticut Division of Emergency Management and Homeland Security
or Connecticut Department of Public Health through their websites and/or newsletters, and by posting
drought-related information on the Get Ready Capitol Region website.
Each of the thirty municipalities in the Capitol Region also reassessed its goals, objectives, and strategic
mitigation actions from the 2008 Plan, and developed a new strategic course of action for the upcoming five
years. In all, some 400 specific mitigation actions and projects are proposed. While many are unique to the
individual communities, there are commonalities among the actions proposed, and all communities have
proposed a range of activities including public education and awareness; natural resource protection; plans,
studies and regulatory actions; structural projects and modifications to buildings, facilities and infrastructure;
as well as measures to improve preparedness and emergency response. The table which follows summarizes
these actions and projects.
2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 10 Executive Summary
Summary of Types of Mitigation Projects Proposed by Community
Education &
Awareness
Municipal Strategic
Mitigation Actions,
Processes, Projects
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Manchester
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Marlborough
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South Windsor
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Stafford
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2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 11 Executive Summary
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Plano
Process
The Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update planning process began in early 2012 when the Federal
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) awarded the Capitol Region Council of Governments (CRCOG) a
Pre-Disaster Mitigation Planning Grant to update its 2008 regional natural hazard mitigation plan. This
Plan Update was developed in collaboration with the Capitol Region Emergency Planning Commission
(CREPC), the Region's 30 municipalities and the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (CT
DEEP). A planning sub-committee provided guidance to the project. In July 2012, the planning committee
met to reexamine the list of hazards impacting the Capitol Region. The committee agreed that the list of
eight natural hazards identified in the 2008 Plan should continue to be considered the natural hazards
addressed in the Plan Update. The committee rated the hazards for their significance and impact on the
Region. Flooding ranked as the number one hazard of concern, followed closely by hurricanes and then
by winter storms and tornados. The planning committee met again in February 2013 to reassess the
regional mitigation strategies and in September 2013 to review the draft plan document.
CRCOG staff researched natural hazards and major storm events impacting the Region and State in the
last several years. The data analyzed came from a variety of sources including FEMA, DEEP, the National
Weather Service, regional newspapers, the United States Geological Survey, United States Census
Bureau, municipalities and CRCOG's internal geographic information system as well as other resources.
The data were used to evaluate natural disasters in terms of frequency, magnitude, areas of impact and
economic loss. The collected data was analyzed using the CRCOG's geographic information system and
HAZUS-MH, software developed for FEMA to estimate losses from earthquake, hurricanes and floods.
CRCOG staff led efforts to involve officials from each town in updating individual municipal sections.
Meetings were held in each ofthe thirty municipalities and included local staff from a variety of
departments including administration, planning, emergency management, police, fire, public health,
sanitation, public works, engineering, information technologies, social services, human resources, boards
of education, ambulance services, among others. In some towns citizens and elected officials also
partiCipated. Following these municipal meetings, CRCOG staff worked with the municipally deSignated
staff contacts to incorporate the updates prepared by the municipalities. In all, over 400 local officials
were involved in updating the municipal sections.
A variety of means were used to inform the public of the planning process and to gain public input on
hazards, areas and issues of concern, and on mitigation measures. These specific outreach efforts
included reports and presentations to local officials; web page updates; an opinion survey developed to
solicit input from the public on local mitigation activities and strategies; a series of subregional public
meetings. Specific efforts were also made to involve neighboring communities and other regional bodies
including Connecticut Light and Power (CL&P) and the Metropolitan District (MDC) into the planning
process.
From the survey and subregional meetings, we found there is strong support: 1} for using an emergency
alert system to contact residents; 2} for measures which could help restore a sense of normalcy after a
significant event, such as providing back-up power to important community facilities and ensuring that
roads are quickly passable after storms; 3} for ensuring that the public is prepared for natural disasters
through various means of outreach; 4} for training of municipal staff and volunteers for emergency
response; for trimming or removing trees to reduce the potential for power outages; and 5} for ensuring
the needs of vulnerable populations are addressed.
2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 12 Executive Summary
The public review and comment on the draft Plan Update extended from mid September through
October 2013. Notifications of the availability ofthe plan are posted on CRCOG's website and all
municipalities were asked to post similar notices on their websites. Two public meetings were held, one
in Hartford and one in Enfield, to gather public comment. Comment was also solicited through the
CRCOG website and emails to an extensive list of stakeholders developed during the plan update
process. Following the public review, the draft Plan Update was revised to incorporate suggestions
received and submitted the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection (DEEP) for
formal review. State officials reviewed the Plan Update and forwarded it to FEMA for federal review and
approval. FEMA requested a number of revisions; these were addressed and the revised Plan Update
was resubmitted for State and federal review. FEMA issued its Approval Pending Adoption August 29,
2014.
Plan
and Maintenance
Upon approval of the Plan Update by FEMA, each municipality's governing body as well as CRCOG's
Policy Board will need to formally adopt the Plan Update. CREPC will also be asked to append this plan to
the Regional Emergency Support Plan (RESP) Plan.
Implementation ofthe strategies contained within this plan will depend largely on the availability of
resources. Each municipality and CRCOG will have to consider the costs, availability of funding, and
impacts of each strategy individually. The CRCOG Policy Development & Planning Department will be
responsible for regional strategies and coordination with CRCOG Public Safety staff. The planning subcommittee of CREPC (ESF-S), which provided guidance to this project, will monitor progress on its
implementation with assistance from CRCOG staff. The sub-committee will conduct annual outreach to
municipalities to ascertain progress on proposed mitigation actions.
For more information on natural hazard mitigation planning, please visit CRCOG's website http://www.crcog.org!communitydev!currentpfema.html
2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 13 Executive Summary
Vernon
The Town of Vernon is a great place to live and work with a high quality of life, desirable residential
neighborhoods and schools. The town is a fully suburban community on the eastern edge of the Capitol
Region and encompasses a land area of 18.4 square miles and has a population of approximately 29,622.
Vernon's elevation ranges from about 150 feet in the west to over 800 feet in the east. Vernon's land
area contributes primarily to the Hockanum River Watershed; however, the southeastern corner of
town drains to the Willimantic River Watershed. Major watercourses include the Hockanum and
Tankerhoosen Rivers, as well as Clarks and Railroad Brooks. Vernon is bisected by Interstate 84 which
travels east-west. Other major thoroughfares that run through Vernon include state routes 30, 31, 74
and 83. There are distinct historic, agricultural, urban, suburban, and rural areas that provide a choice of
lifestyles. A variety of cultural, recreational, and commercial activities are available throughout town
offering goods and services, employment and amusement. Strong business sectors include retail,
professional, medical, and commercial- industrial as well as farming and horticultural enterprises.
Localized flooding is one challenge Vernon faces. In 2013, the Town incorporated low impact
development (LID) requirements into its Zoning Regulations to aid in reducing its vulnerability to
flooding. The Town has not permitted any new development in the flood plain since the adoption of the
2008 Plan. The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) has paid 25 claims in Vernon totaling $149,474
to-date. Vernon has eleven Repetitive Loss Property claims to-date with payments totaling $92,732.
CRCOG used FEMA's Hazus-MH model to analyze the risks that the Town of Vernon might face from a
major flood. The model estimates that economic losses to the town including residential and
commercial damage and business interruptions due to a flood having a 1% chance of occurring any given
year (the 100-year flood) would be over $50 million. The impacts of such a flood are summarized below:
Estimated
Damages
from 100Year Flood
Households Displaced
People Needing Shelter
Buildings at Least Moderately Damaged
Expected Damage to Essential Facilities
Total Estimated Economic Losses
Total Residential Building & Content Losses
Total Commercial, Industrial & Other Building & Content Losses
Total Business Interruption Losses
336
805
76
0.00
$50,460,000
$21,920,000
$28,230,000
$310,000
Losses from strong hurricanes would also be significant. The model estimates that economic losses
to the town including residential and commercial damage and business interruptions due to a Category
3 hurricane such as the 1938 Hurricane would be nearly $140 million. The impacts of such a storm are
summarized below:
Estimated
I
Damages
from a 1938
Strength
Hurricane
Households Displaced
People Needing Shelter
Buildings at Least Moderately Damaged
Buildings Completely Damaged
Total Estimated Economic Losses
2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 410
190
42
1,182
56
$139,900,000
Total Residential Building Losses
Total Commercial, Industrial & Other Building Losses
Total Business Interruption Losses
Total Debris Generated
Truckloads (at 25 tons/truck) of building debris
$107,500,000
$16,700,000
$15,700,000
40,650 tons
608
According to information from the Connecticut Department of Emergency Management and
Homeland Security, the three federally declared natural disasters of 2011 resulted in total expenses to
the municipality of over $4 million. These expenses include debris and snow removal, emergency
protective measures and repairs to damaged infrastructure and buildings but do not include damages
experienced by private citizens and businesses.
2011 Disasters .DamageAmounts Eligiblefor 7S%~eimbursementOnder FEMA Public Ass.istance Program
Applicant
Municipal & Other
(Other'" Fire Districts,
Schools, Private NonProfit Agencies)
Town of Vernon
Vernon Other
Vernon Total
100% of Amount Eligible for 75% Reimbursement
DR-1958-CT
2011 Snow
$106,773.87
DR-4023-CT
Irene
August 2011
$142,079.05
DR-4046-CT
Severe Weather
Oct 2011 Alfred)
Total Damages Eligible
for Public Assistance
Due to 2011 Disasters
$3,805,918.87
$5,819.71
$112,593.58
$4,054,771. 79
$5,819.71
$142,079.05
$3,805,918.87
$4,060,591.50
Goals, Objectives and Strategies
GOAL: PRESERVATION OF LIFE AND PROPERTY
Objective 1:
Improve snow removal equipment at public works.
Strategic Action:
1.1
Incorporate needs in Capital Improvement Plan and pursue opportunities to upgrade
equipment.
Lead:
Public Works, Administration
Priority:
Medium
The Town of Vernon has adopted a vehicle and equipment replacement plan
Status:
and has begun a multi-year fleet replacement program. This effort will continue
throughout the 2014-2019 Plan.
Potential Funding Sources: Grants, capital improvement and general operating budget.
2014-2019: Annual purchase through capital improvements and budget process
Timeframe:
as well as application for grant funding as available.
2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 411
Objective 2:
Provide police/fire/EMS with dedicated 4-wheel drive vehicles.
Strategic Action:
2.1
Pursue opportunities to obtain vehicles - through grants, surplus military equipment, etc.
Police and Fire
Lead:
Priority:
Medium
Status:
Completed. The following vehicles have been purchased or have been approved
for purchase by department: VPD =4 SUV's; VFD = 1 SUV (Fire Marshal), 1 SUV
(Command Vehicle), 1 Utility F-150, 2 ATV's; DPW = 5 F-250's, 1 Ford Escape;
Public Schools = 1 F-250, 1 Ford Escape, 2 Kubotas (pre-positioned at schools to
support primary and secondary shelter operations).
Objective 3:
Provide public works with mobile generator to power shelters.
Strategic Action:
3.1
Work with CREPC to identify grant programs for purchasing portable generators and modifying
buildings for hook-up.
Lead:
Emergency Management, Police
High
Priority:
Status:
The Office of Emergency Management (OEM) purchased the following portable
generators: (2) 7kw, (1) 3kw, (2) 2kw. OEM secured a state homeland security
grant to purchase and install a fixed generator at Vernon Center Middle School
(primary shelter). Vernon Public Schools purchased and installed a fixed
generator at Rockville High School (secondary shelter). This effort will continue
for the 2014-2019 plan with a focus on securing grant funding for a fixed
generator for the Town of Vernon's Town Hall and Annex buildings (secondary
EOC and town-wide IT network) and a fixed generator for Fire Station #5.
Applications for grant funding will be made as opportunities become available
through state and federal programs
Potential Funding Sources: Grants and general operating budget.
Timeframe:
2014 - 2019
Objective 4:
Ensure emergency preparedness of residents and businesses.
Strategic Actions:
4.1
Conduct periodic educational outreach to residents on storm readiness and property
maintenance issues.
Lead:
Public Works, Emergency Management, Police
2014·2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update· Page 412
Priority:
Status:
High
This is an established practice utilizing Everbridge {R-911}, town website, and
mass media to educate residents. Host public forums (Le. CRCOG). DPW
provides specific information to residents on property maintenance and
keeping road gutters clear. This effort will continue for the 2014-2019 Plan.
Potential Funding Sources: Grants and general operating budget.
2014 - 2019: annual outreach
Timeframe:
4.2
4.3
Conduct periodic outreach to private medical-care facilities and apartment complexes to
encourage installation of generators.
Lead:
Emergency Management, Building
Priority:
Medium
Status:
This is an established practice. Vernon Housing Authority included in Town of
Vernon emergency operations at EOC. Worked with local medical facilities to
review and exercise plans as well as to authorize priority electrical utility
restoration with CL&P.
Potential Funding Sources: Grants and general operating budget.
Timeframe:
2014 - 2019: annual outreach
Complete the
premiums for
Lead:
Priority:
Status:
requirements to join FEMA's Community Rating System to reduce flood insurance
residents.
Planning, Emergency Management
Medium
Deferred. The Town of Vernon will join the rating system and a community
information program will be established as part of the 2014-2019 Plan.
Potential Funding Sources: Grants and general operating budget.
2015-2016.
Timeframe:
GOAL: IMPLEMENT PREVENTATIVE PROGRAMS TO MIT/GATE STORM DAMAGE
Objective 1:
Purchase and implement GIS mapping program.
Strategic Actions:
1.1
Continue planning to implement GIS for use by all town departments, including emergency
services.
Planning, Administration, Emergency Management
Lead:
Priority:
Medium
Established a GIS program that was utilized to support EOC operations
Status:
during storms, specifically with coordinating school roof snow removal
and road clearing operations.
Potential Funding Sources: Grants and general operating budget.
2014-2019.
Timeframe:
2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 413
Objective 2:
Maintain adequate manpower and equipment for preventative tree program and assessment.
Strategic Action:
2.1
Investigate CRCOG service sharing initiative for opportunities to share equipment used in tree
maintenance.
Lead:
Public Works, Administration
Priority:
Medium
Status:
The Town of Vernon purchased a 60 foot bucket truck, (12) new chain saws,
and has added grapple apparatus to a loader, Bobcat and steer loader.
Additional requested equipment includes a high capacity chipper, grapple truck
and chip dump truck.
Potential Funding Sources: Grants, capital improvement and general operating budget.
Timeframe:
2014-2019.
Objective 3:
Make improvements to town Emergency Operations Center and communications facility.
Strategic Action:
3.1
Acquire telephones, computer server and back-up, mobile hand-held radios and enable wireless
connections.
Lead:
Police, Fire, Emergency Management
Priority:
Medium
Status:
Efforts are underway. The Town of Vernon has implemented several
improvements to its Emergency Operations Center (EOC), specifically in the
areas of information technology and communications. In addition, the Town of
Vernon has established a specific IT plan for EOC operations and is in the
process of establishing a dedicated HAM radio operations room. The Town of
Vernon is also exploring the possibilities of a unified/co-located (VFD and VPD)
dispatch center during emergencies.
Potential Funding Sources: Grants and general operating budget.
Timeframe:
HAM radio room to be completed by the end of FY2015.
NEW OBJECTIVE:
Objective 4:
Obtain weather and water level monitoring and alerting systems.
Strategic Actions:
1.1
Acquire weather monitoring system that provides real-time data and alerts to inform critical
decision making for emergency preparedness and response operations.
Lead:
Emergency Management
2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 414
High
This is a new initiative for the Plan Update. The Office of Emergency
Management (OEM) is exploring internet based streaming weather monitoring
systems.
Potential Funding Sources: Grants and general operating budget.
Timeframe:
To be completed by the end of FY2013/14.
Priority:
Status:
1.2
Acquire water level monitoring system that provides real-time data and alerts to inform
critical decision making for emergency preparedness and response operations. Because this is
expected to be a long term, mUlti-year project, for the 2014-2019 Plan period, the action to be
taken is to review available systems and grant funding options.
Lead:
Emergency Management, Public Works
Priority:
Medium
Status:
This is a new initiative for the Plan Update.
Potential Funding Sources: Grants and general operating budget.
2014-2019
Timeframe:
GOAL: IMPROVE DRAINAGE IN FLOOD ZONES
Objective 1:
Conduct study of existing drainage problem areas for improvements.
Strategic Actions:
1.1
1.2
Study improvements to Franklin Road to alleviate road flooding issues. (The Town made claims
for FEMA assistance in repair costs following the October 2005 flood). Because this is expected
to be a long term, multi-year project, for the 2014-2019 Plan period, the action to be taken is to
develop a scope of work and Request for Proposal (RFP) for the study.
Lead:
Engineering, Public Works
Priority:
Medium
Status:
Deferred. Study has yet not been completed. No significant progress
made on this effort however, it remains important to the Town.
Potential Funding Sources: Grants and general operating budget.
2018-2019
Timeframe:
Study improvements to Manchester Flats area - Route 83, Welles and Main Streets. (During the
October 2005 flood, a motel on Rt. 83 became inaccessible, isolating guests.) Because this is
expected to be a long term, multi-year project, for the 2014-2019 Plan period, the action to be
taken is to develop a scope of work and Request for Proposal (RFP) for the study.
Lead:
Engineering, Public Works
Priority:
Medium
Status:
Deferred. Study has yet not been completed. No significant progress
made on this effort however, it remains important to the Town.
Potential Funding Sources: Grants and general operating budget.
2018-2019
Timeframe:
2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 415
1.3
Study improvements along Frederick Road. (Residents in area currently carry flood insurance
and have utilized town sandbags during high water events.) Because this is expected to be a long
term, multi-year project, for the 2014-2019 Plan period, the action to be taken is to develop a
scope of work and Request for Proposal (RFP) for the study.
Lead:
Engineering, Public Works
Priority:
Medium
Status:
Deferred. Study has yet not been completed. No significant progress
made on this effort however, it remains important to the Town.
Potential Funding Sources: Grants and general operating budget.
2018-2019
Timeframe:
Objective 2:
Upgrade or repair identified problem areas.
Strategic Action:
2.1
Upon completion of above studies, prioritize and implement recommended improvements.
Because this is expected to be a long term, multi-year project, for the 2014-2019 Plan period,
the action to be taken is to develop a prioritized list of projects.
Lead:
Engineering, Public Works, Administration
Priority:
Medium
Status:
Deferred until completion of studies.
Potential Funding Sources: Grants and general operating budget.
By fall of 2019
Timeframe:
Objective 3:
Obtain public notification system.
Strategic Action:
3.1
Improve public notification system.
Lead:
Emergency Management, Police
Medium
Priority:
Status:
The Town of Vernon subscribes to the state's Everbridge/
Reverse-911 public notification system. The Town of Vernon has also upgraded
its current public warning siren system to include portable/handheld radio
activation and voice announcement capabilities. System improvements will
continue for the 2014-2019 Plan with a focus on expanding the public warning
siren system to the northeast and southeast corners of the town.
Potential Funding Sources: Grants, capital improvements, and general operating budget.
2014 - 2019.
Timeframe:
2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 416
Map 60: Vernon Population Density, Dams and Flood Zones
Capitol Region
Natural Hazards Mitigation
Plan Update
Town of Vernon
Population Density,
Dams and Flood Zones
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S
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~i~
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~
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_
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2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 417
o
I
0,325
0,65
1.3
I
I
Map 61: Vernon Flood Plains, Repetitive Loss Areas, Dams and Important Facilities
Capitol Region
Natural Hazards Mitigation
Plan Update
Ellington
Pi
e
Town of Vernon
Flood Plains, Dams
& Important Facilities
W+E
Tolland
S
Dams by Hazard
CIt
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.,
!l . Significant
,.
Ba " Moo"..!.
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Pi
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2014-2019 Capitol Region Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan Update - Page 418
05
NfW BUSfNESS-:fFJ.j
TOWN OF VERNON
DEPARTMENT SUBMISSION FOR
TOWN COUNCIL AGENDA
FROM
DEPARTMENT/NAME
IAdministration/Dawn Maselek
PROPOSED ITEM
Job Description for Recreation Supervisor in the Parks & Recreation Department
SUBJECT
Job Description for Recreation Supervisor in the Parks & Recreation Department
ACTION REQUESTED
Approval from Vernon Town Council of job description for Recreation Supervisor.
BACKGROUND
INFORMATION
The attached is an updated job description for the position of Recreation Supervisor.
APPROPRIATION
REQUIRED ?
LIST OF SUPPORTING
DOCUMENTATION
le NO
rYES
AMOUNT SOUGHT
Copy of Section 4.1 B (Job Descriptions) of the Town of Vernon Personnel Rules.
Copy of proposed job description listed.
WORDING
PROPOSED MOTION
PROPOSED MOTION
THE TOWN COUNCIL, CONSISTENT WITH THE TOWN OF VERNON PERSONNEL RULES AND
REGULATIONS, SECTION 4.1 (B) ENTITLED "JOB DESCRIPTIONS", HEREBY ADOPT THE JOB DESCRIPTION
OF RECREATION SUPERVISOR.
Town of Vernon
Job Title: Recreation Supervisor
Department: Parks & Recreation
Bargaining Unit: Professional
Wage Classification: E-2
General Statement of Duties: Develops, coordinates, implements and supervises community recreational and park programs; advises
the Director of Parks and Recreation in the planning of department's programs and activities.
Supervision Received: Receives general supervision from the Director or Assistant Director. Reports work accomplished to Director.
Supervision Exercised: Provides general and task supervision to intermittent and seasonal staff. Recruits, trains and evaluates program
staff; recommends related personnel actions as necessary. Assumes responsibilities for department programs in absence of the Director.
and Assistant Director.
Essential Job Functions: Develops, coordinates, implements and supervises social, recreation, aquatics and leisure activities and
programs according to a planned schedule. Procures materials, supplies and equipment needed. Assists in development of policy, rules
and regulations; responsible for enforcement and management of assigned programs, events and Teen center. Assists in the near-term
and long-range planning of recreation programs to assure proper operation, safety and supervision. Collects statistical program data;
prepares and reviews data to evaluate programs; recommends continuance or ending of assigned programs as necessary. Develops
schedules, plans tournaments and special events and prepares related public relations materials. Reviews and evaluates facilities;
reserves athletic fields and facilities through coordination with school personnel and parks maintenance staff. Coordinates with
Assistant Director and Parks Foremen on park and capital improvement projects as appropriate. Assists Director in budget preparations
and recommends fee schedules and expenditures in accounts for assigned programs. Researches opportunities for external funding of
programs through inter-government, foundation resources and grants. May administer approved grants. Organizes and chaperones
trips. Regular and punctual attendance.
Other Job Functions: Prepares and distributes promotional information regarding programs and events to the public and school
system. Coordinates activities with interested private and community organizations. Performs other related duties as required.
Physical Demands: The physical demands described here are representative of those that must be met by an employee to successfully
perform the essential functions of this job. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the
essential functions.
Work is performed in office settings and outdoors. Hand-eye coordination is necessary to operate computers and various pieces of office
equipment.
While performing the duties of this job the employee is frequently required to sit; stand; talk; hear; walk/use hands to finger, handle, feel
or operate objects, tools or controls; and reach with hands and arms. The employee is occasionally required to climb or balance; stoop,
kneel, crouch, or crawl; and smell.
Employee must occasionally lift and/or move up to 50 pounds. Specific vision abilities required by this job include close vision, distance
vision, color vision, peripheral vision, depth perception and the ability to adjust focus.
Work Environment: The work characteristics described here are representative of those an employee encounters while performing the
essential functions of this job. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the essential
functions.
While performing the duties of this job, the employee frequently works in outside weather conditions. The employee occasionally works
near moving mechanical parts and is exposed to wet and/or humid conditions, fumes or airborne particles, toxic or caustic chemicals, risk
of electrical shock, and vibration.
Must be able to concentrate on fine detail with some interruption. Must be able to remember task/assignment given to self and others
over long periods of time. Must be able to perform highly complex and varied tasks requiring
indep~ndent
knowledge, its application to a
variety of situations as well as exercise independent judgment.
The noise level in the work environment is usually quiet to moderate.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS:
Knowledge, Skills and Abilities Required: Considerable knowledge and skill in executing and administration of the principles and
practices of recreation and aquatics programs; knowledge of design, layout, care and maintenance of recreational and aquatic areas;
knowledge of planning, organizing and budgeting recreational activities and program evaluation; knowledge of grant writing and
administration; ability to assess community recreational needs and initiate, plan, budget, implement, administer and evaluate
programs; ability to foster relationships and deal effectively with officials, outside agencies, employees, and the general public; ability
to maintain strict confidentiality; ability to work in a team environment and independently; ability to work in a fast-paced, stressful
environment; ability to adapt to change; ability to be a self-starter; and demonstrate sound work ethics; ability to supervise, train and
evaluate employees; ability to work evening and weekend hours as needed. Must be computer proficient. A criminal background
check is required.
Experience & Training: Bachelor's degree in Park & Recreation Administration, Leisure Service Management, Public Administration or
closely related field with at least three (3) years experience in the development and administration of a community recreation and
parks programs, accounting, finance or closely related field, with three (3) years of progressively responsible governmental accounting
experience; or equivalent combination of education, training and experience. Any equivalent combination of education and experience.
Licenses or Certificates: Must have and maintain a valid driver's license. CPR and First Aid Certification to be obtained and maintained
within six (6) months of hire date.
This job description is not intended to be a complete statement of all duties, functions ond responsibilities which comprise this position.
EOE/AA/M/F Revised: November 6, 2014; Adopted:
Town of Vernon
Title: Recreation Supervisor
Department: Parks and Recreation
Position Definition: Develops, coordinates, implements and supervises
community recreational and park programs; and advises the Director of Parks
and Recreation in the planning of department's programs and activities.
Supervision Received: Receives general supervision from the Director or the
Assistant Director. Plans, organizes and implements work accruing to a planned
schedule. Independently establishes priorities in regular assigned duties. Reports
work accomplished to Director.
Supervision Exercised:
Provides general superVISion to intermittent and
seasonal staff. Recruits, trains, and evaluates program staff; and recommends
related personnel actions as necessary.
Example of Essential Duties:
Develops, coordinates, implements and
supervises social, recreation and leisure activities and programs. Assists in
development of policy, rules and regulation with responsibility for enforcement
and management of assigned programs, events and Teen Center, requiring a
flexible schedule with significant evening and weekend hours. Assists in the
near-term and long range planning of recreation programs to assure proper
operation, safety and supervision. Develops schedules, plans tournaments and
special events and prepares related public relations materials. Works closely
with school personnel and parks maintenance staff to assure availability of
athletic fields and facilities for program use. Coordinates with Assistant Director
and Parks Foremen on park and capital improvement projects as appropriate.
Reviews and evaluates programs and facilities. Collects statistical program data
on an on-going basis and prepares evaluation reports of some complexity.
Recommends continuance or ending of assigned programs as necessary.
Assists Director in budget preparations and recommends fee schedules and
expenditures in accounts for assigned programs. Promotes activities within
school system. Organizes and chaperones trips.
Examples of Incidental Duties: Assumes responsibilities for department
programs in the absence of the Director and Assistant Director. Prepares and
distributes information regarding programs and events to the public.
Coordinates activities with interested private and community organizations.
Orders materials, supplies and equipment as needed. Researches opportunities
for external funding of recreational programs and events, including intergovernment and foundation resources. Makes grant application. May administer
approved grants.
fa{j-f'
r/"
Ri?C Y J?tif; cJ; VI os,'C{()f?tv r~o y
Knowledge, Skills and Abilities Required:
Knowledge and skill in executing
the principles and practices of municipal recreation and its administration;
including planning, organizing, budgeting and program evaluation. Ability to
assess needs of commu,lity recreation programs and to initiate, plan budget,
implement, administer and evaluate programs. Ability to develop effective
working relationships with employees, different age groups and the media.
Ability to present ideas and programs to individuals or groups, and to
communicate effectively in writing. Ability to supervise, train evaluate
employees. Ability to acquire skill to use data and word processing equipment
used in the administration and planning of recreational programs.
Minimum Qualifications Required:
The skill and knowledge r~quired would
be generally acquired with a Bachelor's Degree in Park and Recreation
Administration, Public Administration; or a closely related field.
Physical Exertion/Environmental Conditions: Performs duties in both office
environment and at recreation sites. Some travel required in visiting recreation
sites and activities. Intermittent exposure to computer screen. Some stress
involved in public contact.
license or Certificates: Valid Connecticut Motor Vehicle Operator's License
required. CPR and First Aid Certification to be obtained and maintained within
six months of hire date.
~
The above tasks and responsibilities are illustrative only. The description
does not include every task or responsibility.
TOWN OF VERNON
DEPARTMENT SUBMISSION FOR
TOWN COUNCIL AGENDA
FROM
DEPARTMENT/NAME
IAdministration/Dawn Maselek
PROPOSED ITEM
Job Description for Wastewater Collection System Foreman in the WPC Department
SUBJECT
Job Description for Wastewater Collection System Foreman in the WPC Department
ACTION REQUESTED
Approval from Vernon Town Council of job description of Wastewater Collection System Foreman
BACKGROUND
INFORMATION
The attached updated job description is for a current, vacant position in the WPC Department
APPROPRIATION
REQUIRED ?
LIST OF SUPPORTING
DOCUMENTATION
r. NO
I YES
AMOUNT SOUGHT
Copy of Section 4.1 B (Job Descriptions) of the Town of Vernon Personnel Rules.
Copy of proposed job descriptions listed.
WORDING
PROPOSED MOTION
PROPOSED MOTION
THE TOWN COUNCIL, CONSISTENT WITH THE TOWN OF VERNON PERSONNEL RULES AND
REGULATIONS, SECTION 4.1 (B) ENTITLED "JOB DESCRIPTIONS", HEREBY ADOPT THE JOB DESCRIPTION
OF WASTEWATER COLLECTION FOREMAN.
Town of Vernon
Department: WPCA
Job Title: Wastewater Collection System Foreman
Bargaining Unit: WPCA Supervisors
General Statement of Duties: Supervises and participates in the maintenance of the sanitary sewer system and related facilities.
Supervision Received: Receives general written and oral directions from the Director of the Water Pollution Control Department
and general supervision from the Assistant Director.
Supervision Exercised: Oversight of contractors performing sewer maintenance and repair work. May assign operators and plant
staff to operations and related maintenance tasks. Supervises Wastewater Collection Systems Technician.
Essential Job Functions: Regular and punctual attendance. Reviews plans and specifications of referrals from Planning & Zoning
Commission and advises Director of possible problems and concerns relative to the sanitary sewers system. Conducts field
inspections of industries on a regular basis; draws wastewater samples and reads and verifies discharge-metering devices. Receives
and investigates complaints or requests for sewer maintenance service and acts as liaison between Water Pollution Control
Department and Public Works Department to schedule work as required. Assists in selection of contractors to provide sewer
maintenance and repair work. Inspects work upon completion to assure all specifications are m'et. Plots maps of sewer backups and
problem areas for institution of sewer maintenance program; records and identifies locations of manholes, sewer lines easements,
pump stations and information related to the wastewater collection system. Makes field inspections of new sewer system
construction by contractors for the Water Pollution Control Department; checks manholes and service mains for inflow/infiltration
and conducts smoke and dye testing of problem areas.
Other Job Functions: Seeks out contractors to provide repair and maintenance services. Prepares estimates and writes specifications
for materials relative to planning annual operating budget and maintains records pertaining to operations under his/her control.
Maintains easements in accordance with Town policies on Town sewer contracts. Performs other related work as required.
Physical Demands: The physical demands described here are representative of those that must be met by an employee to
successfully perform the essential functions of this job. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with
disabilities to perform the essential functions.
While performing the duties of this job, the employee is regularly required to use hands to finger, handle, feel or operate objects,
tools or controls and reach with hands and arms, talk or hear. The employee frequently is required to stand and walk. The
employee is occasionally required to climb, balance, stoop, kneel and crouch.
The employee may frequently lift and/or move up to 50 pounds. Specific vision abilities required by this job include close vision,
distance vision, color vision, depth perception and the ability to adjust focus.
Work Environment: The work characteristics described here are representative of those an employee encounters while performing
the essential functions of this job. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabilities to perform the
essential functions.
While performing the duties of this job the employee occasionally works in outside weather conditions. The employee occasionally
works near moving mechanical parts and is occasionally exposed to wet and/or humid conditions. The employee occasionally works
in high, precarious places and is occasionally exposed to toxic or caustic chemicals, raw and treated sewage. The employee
occasionally works in confined spaces.
The noise level in the work environment is usually moderately loud.
MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS
Knowledge, Skills & Abilities: Working knowledge of the materials, methods and equipment used in the construction, operation and
maintenance of sanitary sewers, manholes and pump stations; a working knowledge of federal and state laws pertaining to
wastewater collection and treatment; knowledge of operation of standard office machines and use of computer; knowledge of the
principles of sanitary engineering applicable to the operation and repair of a sewerage system. Ability to read and interpret plans,
blueprints and profiles of sewerage systems. Ability to plan, assign and supervise the work of subordinates. Ability to establish and
maintain effective working relationships with subordinates, associates, contractors, supervisors, and the public; ability to train
personnel; ability to apply principals of logical thinking to define problems, collect data, establish facts and draw valid conclusions;
ability to understand and carry out instructions furnished in written, oral, blueprint or diagrammatic form; mathematical ability to
determine units of measure; ability to work under unpleasant working conditions; ability to respond to emergencies on an assigned
basis, including holidays and weekends. Thoroughness and dependability in performing assignments.
Experience & Training: Graduation from high school, high school equivalency diploma (GED) or trade school graduate, or equivalent
combination of education and training that involves completion of vocational training program in wastewater treatment technology
and four years of experience, at least two of which must be of lead operational or plant maintenance supervisory experience.
College level courses highly desirable.
License or Certificate: Collection System Operator's Certification, Class II, Valid Connecticut Commercial Driver's license, Class B.
This job description is not nor is it intended to be, a complete statement ofduties, jimctiol1s and responsibilities which comprise this position.
EOEIAA/MIF Revised: 1Jl12/2014; Adopted:
Draft #1
Unapproved Minutes
MINUTES
VERNON TOWN COUNCIL REGULAR MEETING
ra
TOWN HALL - 14 PARK PLACE - 3 Floor
VERNON, CONNECTICUT
RECEIVED
VERrWr,! TOWN CLERK
14 NOV -4 Pt112: 0 I
October 21,2014 7:30pm.
Mayor Daniel A. Champagne called the meeting to order at 7:30 PM
A)
PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE:
B)
ROLL CALL:
Present: Council Members Pauline Schaefer, Virginia Gingras, Julie Clay, Brian Motola, Kim
Appleyard, Steve Wakefield, Steven Peterson, Fred Lehmann, Bill Campbell, John Kopec,
Michael Winkler and Ann Letendre
Absent:
Entered During Meeting:
Also Present: Mayor Daniel A. Champagne, Town Administrator John Ward, Recording
Secretary Danlelle Forand
C)
CITIZEN'S FORUM
Jean Merz, 144 Phoenix Street, spoke about Community Gardens and the Vernon garden club.
Closed: 7:39PM
D.)
EXECUTIVE SESSION
Council Member Wakefield, seconded by Council Member Kopec made a motion to go into
Executive Session.
THE TOWN COUNCIL, PURSUANT TO THE AUTHORITY GIVEN IN
CONNECTICUT GENERAL STATUTES SECTION 1-200 (2) HEREBY MOVES TO
GO INTO EXECUTIVE SESSION TO DISCUSS STRATEGIES AND/OR
NEGOTIATIONS WITH RESPECT TO COLLECTIVE BARGAINING RELATIVE TO
THE VERNON SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS' ASSOCIATION. THE FOLLOWING
INDMDUALS ARE INVITED TO ATTEND:
JOHN D. WARD, TOWN
ADMINISTRATOR;
DAWN MASELEK, ASSISTANT TOWN ADMINISTRATOR;
AND JAMES M. LUDDECKE, FINANCE OFFICER.
Council Member Wakefield made a motion to add an addendum to add Town Attorney Bud
O'Donnell, Director of Personnel and People Services for the Board of Education, Patty Buell,
and Chairman of the Board of Education, Ann Fisher to Executive Session. Motion carried
unanimously.
The Town Council hereby moves pursuant to CT General State Statue §10-153b to reject the
agreement with the Vernon Board of Education and the Vernon School Administrators
Association for July 1, 2015 through June 3D, 2018. Motion carries to reject the contract with 11 in
favor and 1 abstention. Council Member Appleyard abstained from going into executive session
and voting on the motion.
Open: 7:45pm
Closed: 8:30pm
Page 1 of6
Unapproved Minutes
Draft #1
E.)
PUBLIC HEARING
None
F.)
PRESENTATIONS BY THE ADMINISTRATION
Mayor Daniel A. Champagne to make presentations to the Town Council on various topics.
Director of Vernon Housing Authority Jeffrey Am, Chairman Peter Olsen and Board Member Ray
Powers presented 2 checks in the amount of $72,044.00 to the Town of Vernon.
G.)
ACTION ON CONSENT AGENDA
Council Member Wakefield. seconded by Council Member Kopec made a motion to move
Consent Agenda items .Motion carries unanimously.
~:L.
Request for the approval Tax Refunds for Prior and Current Years. fA copy
of a memorandum from Terry Hjame, Collector of Revenue, to John D. Ward,
Town Administrator dated October 10, 2014 is included in the Council
packet.)
PROPOSED MOTION:
THE TOWN COUNCIL HEREBY APPROVES FIVE (5)
OVERPAYMENTS FOR PRIOR YEARS TOTALING $738.50 AND
FORTY-EIGHT (48) CURRENT YEAR TAXES IN THE AMOUNT OF
$23,124.70, AS OUTLINED IN THE MEMORANDUM FROM TERRY
HJARNE, COLLECTOR OF REVENUE TO JOHN D. WARD, TOWN
ADMINISTRATOR DATED OCTOBER 10, 2014.
~
Request the Town Council approve budget amendment #66 for fiscal vear
2013-2014 as provided by Finance Officer James M. Luddecke on the budget
amendment forms attached to this agenda.
(See amendment forms in the
Council packet.)
2.
PROPOSED MOTION
THE
TOWN
COUNCIL
HEREBY APPROVES
BUDGET
AMENDMENT REQUEST #66 FOR FISCAL YEAR 2013-2014 AS
OUTLINED IN THE BUDGET AMENDMENT FORMS PROVIDED
BY FINANCE OFFICER, JAMES M. LUDDECKE.
~
3.
Request the Town Council approve budget amendment #6, #7 and #8 for IlScal
year 2014-2015 as provided by Finance Officer James M. Luddecke on the
budget amendment forms attached to this agenda.
(See amendment forms in
the Council packet.)
PROPOSED MOTION
THE TOWN
COUNCIL
HEREBY
APPROVES
BUDGET
AMENDMENT REQUEST #6, #7 AND #8 FOR FISCAL YEAR 20142015 AS PROVIDED BY FINANCE OFFICER JAMES M.
LUDDECKE ON THE BUDGET AMENDMENT FORMS ATI'ACHED
TO THIS AGENDA.
Page 2 of6
Unapproved Minutes
Draft #1
I.)
PENDING BUSINESS
1. Request the Town Council per Charter Chapter 10, Section One.
consider the compensation for the Chief Executive Officer.
(See
memorandum from John D. Ward, Town Administrator to the Vernon Town
Council dated September 11, 2014 and various other fmandal documents
for the Council to review.) (This item is returning from the September 16,
2014 meeting for further discussion and action. See memorandum dated
October 9, 2014 from John D. Ward, Town Administrator to the Vernon
Town Council and attached spreadsheet.)
PROPOSED RESOLUTION:
THE MAYOR'S ANNUAL STIPEND WILL BE INCREASED EVERY
TWO YEARS BY A PERCENTAGE EQUAL TO THE AVERAGE OF
THE GENERAL WAGE INCREASE AWARDED TO THE TOWN OF
VERNON NON-UNION EMPLOYEES FOR THAT TWO-YEAR
PERIOD. SAID INCREASE TO TAKE EFFECT IN DECEMBER OF
2015 AND EVERY TWO YEARS THEREAFTER.
Council Member Motola, seconded by Council Member Peterson made a motion to increase the
Mayor's annual stipend every two years by percentage equal to the average of the general wage
increase awarded to the Town Of Vernon Non-Union employees for that two-year period. Said
increase to take effect in December of 2015 and every two-year thereafter. Mayor left the table.
Discussion took place. Motion carries with 7 in favor and 5 opposed.
H.)
DISCUSSION OF PULLED CONSENT ITEMS
J.)
NEW BUSINESS
1. Request the Town Council approve the commitment of funds in the
Education Capital and Non-Recurring Expenditure Account in the
amount of $20,000.00.
(See letter
from Dr. Mary P. Conway,
Superintendent of School dated September 24, 2014 to Mayor Daniel A.
Champagne and the memorandum from James M. Luddecke, Finance
Officer dated October 1, 2014 to John D. Ward, Town Administrator relative
to same.)
PROPOSED MOTION
THE TOWN COUNCIL AUTHORIZES THE COMMITMENT OF
AVAILABLE FUNDS IN THE EDUCATION RESERVE FOR CAPITAL
AND NON-RECURRING EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT IN THE
AMOUNT OF $20,000.00 FOR DUCTWORK MODIFICATIONS IN
THE LIBRARY MEDIA CENTER AT ROCKVILLE HIGH SCHOOL.
Council Member Wakefield, seconded by Council Member Kopec made a motion to
authorize the commitment of available funds in the education reserve for capital
and
nonrecurring expenditure account in the amount of $20,000.00 for ductwork modifications in the
library media center at Rockville High School. Discussion took place. Motion carries unanimously.
2. Request the Town Council authorize Mayor Daniel A. Champagne to
execute the necessary paperwork to make application for and receive
Page 3 of6
Draft #1
Unapproved Minutes
Local Prevention Council Grant funds in the amount of $4245.00. (See
memorandum from Alan Slobodien included in the Council packet.)
PROPOSED MOTION
BE IT RESOLVED THAT THE TOWN COUNCIL AUTHORIZES
MAYOR CHAMPAGNE TO EXECUTE THE NECESSARY
PAPERWORK TO MAKE APPLICATION FOR AND RECEIVE LOCAL
PREVENTION COUNCIL GRANT FUNDS IN THE AMOUNT OF
$4245.00.
Council Member Wakefield, seconded by Council Member Kopec made a motion to authorize
Mayor Champagne to execute the necessary paperwork to make application for and receive local
prevention council grant funds in the amount of $4,245.00. Youth Services Director Alan
Siobodien was present. Discussion took place, Motion carries unanimously.
3. Update and discussion regarding Year to Date Revenue and Expenditures
report from Finance Officer James M. Luddecke for Fiscal Year 20142015. (Please see YTD provided in the Council packet.)
NO PROPOSED MOTION
4. Request the Town Council approve the disposal or sale of public works
vehicles and the disposal of computers and equipment from various
departments. (See memorandum from James M. Luddecke, Finance Officer
relative to same.)
PROPOSED MOTION
THE TOWN COUNCIL HEREBY APPROVES THE DISPOSAL OR
SALE AT PUBLIC SURPLUS AUCTION OF PUBLIC WORKS
VEHICLES AS DISCLOSED ON THE FIXED ASSET DISPOSAL
AND FURTHERMORE APPROVES THE
REQUEST FORM;
DISPOSAL OF COMPUTERS AND OTHER EQUIPMENT FROM
THE DEPARTMENTS OF ASSESSMENT, ADMINISTRATION,
BUILDING INSPECTION AND FIRE MARSHAL, AS DISCLOSED ON
THE FIXED ASSET DISPOSAL REQUEST FORMS.
Council Member Wakefield, seconded by Council Member Kopec made a motion to approve the
disposal or sale at Public Surplus Auction of Public Works vehicles as disclosed on the fIXed
asset disposal request form; and furthermore approves the disposal of computers and other
equipment from the departments of assessment, Administration building inspection and Fire
Marshal, as disclosed on the fixed asset disposal request forms. Director of Public Works, Bob
Kleinhans was present. Discussion took place. Motion carries unanimously.
5. Request the Town Council approve the Job Description of Town
Engineer as recommended bv Assistant Town Administrator Dawn
Maselek. (A copy of the job description is included for Council review.)
PROPOSED MOTION
Page 4 of6
Unapproved Minutes
Draft #1
THE TOWN COUNCIL CONSISTENT WITH THE TOWN OF
VERNON PERSONNEL RULES AND REGULATIONS, SECTION
4.I(B) ENTITLED "JOB DESCRIPTIONS", HEREBY ADOPTS THE
JOB DESCRIPTION OF TOWN ENGINEER.
Council Member Wakefield, seconded by Council Member Kopec made a motion to adopt the job
description of Town Engineer. Assistant Town Administrator, Dawn Maselek was present.
Discussion took place. Motion carries unanimously.
K.)
INTRODUCTION TO ORDINANCES
L.)
ACTION ON ORDINANCE(S) PREVIOUSLY PRESENTED
M.)
IDENTIFICATION/ADOPTION OF ADDITIONAL AGENDA ITEMS
Council Member Motola seconded by Council Member Wakefield made a motion to add an
additional agenda item. Motion carries with 11 in favor and 1 opposed.
PROPOSED MOTION:
THE TOWN COUNCIL HEREBY AGREES TO REDUCE THE RECORDED
FINES AGAINST THE REAL PROPERTY KNOWN AS 181 EAST MAIN
STREET IN FROM TWENTY ONE THOUSAND DOLLARS TO SEVEN
THOUSAND DOLLARS IF ALL CITIATIONS ON THE PROPERTY ARE
DEEMED TO HAVE BEEN RESOLVED BY THE ZONING EFORCEMENT
OFFICER. THE TOWN COUNCIL AUTHORIZES THE TOWN
ADMINISTRATOR TO SIGN ANY AND ALL NECESSARY AGREEMENTS
AND TO RELEASE THE LIENS UPON PAYMENT.
Council Member Wakefield, seconded by Council Member Kopec made a motion to agree to
reduce the recorded fines against the real property known as 181 East Main Street in from
Twenty one thousand dollars to seven thousand dollars if all citations on the property are deemed
to have been resolved by the zoning enforcement officer. The Town Council authorizes the Town
Administrator to sign any and all necessary agreements and to release the liens upon payment.
Town Attorney Beth Foran was present. Discussion took place. Motion carries with 9 in favor and
3 opposed.
N.)
DISCUSSION OF ADDITIONAL ITEMS AND INFORMATIONAL ITEMS
0.)
ADOPTION OF MINUTES
Council Member Wakefield, seconded by Council Member Kopec made a motion to waive the
reading of and approve the minutes of the Regular Town Council Meeting of September 17, 2014.
Motion carried unanimously.
P.)
INFORMATIONAL ITEMS, PETITIONS, COMMUNICATIONS, CORRESPONDENCE,
REPORTS, ETC. NOT REQUIRING ACTION
1. Monthly Report - July, 2014 from the Building Department as submitted by
Glen LeConche, Building Official.
2. Monthly Report - August, 2014 from the Vernon Police Department as
submitted by Stephen M. Clark, Captain.
3. Monthly Report - September, 2014 from the Town Clerk's Office, as
submitted by Bernice K. Dixon, Town Clerk.
Page 5 of6
Unapproved Minutes
Draft #1
4. Monthly Report - September, 2014 from Emergency Medical Services, as
submitted by Jean Gauthier, EMS Coordinator.
5. Invitation dated October 8, 2014 to all Board's Commissions and
Committees from John D. Ward, Town Administrator to participate in a
presentation regarding "Standard Process and Policies for Board's
Commission and Committees.»
6. Monthly Report - September, 2014 from the Vernon Police Department as
submitted by Stephen M. Clark, Captain.
Council Member Wakefield, seconded by Council Member Kopec made a motion to adjourn. Motion
carried unanimously.
Adjourned: 9:40 PM
Received:
Approved:
Respectfully Submitted,
Danielle Forand
Recording Secretary
Page 6 of6
TO:
Mayor Daniel Champagne
John Ward, Town Administrator
Members of the Town Council
FROM:
Bernice K. Dixon, Town Clerk
RE:
Monthly Report for October 2014
DATE:
November 4, 2014
I
In addition to the normal activities of the office, the following are specific for the time
period from October lsi through 31st.
Total vital statistics processed for the month were 16 birth certificates, 20 marriage
licenses, 0 civil union license and 21 death certificates. Certified copies of the
certificates were issued to residency towns as well as to the State of Connecticut
Department of Health Services. A total of 239 vital statistics requests were processed
and sold for the month, which consists of 115 birth, 68 death, 0 civil license and 33
marriage license requests, 16 burial permits, 7 cremation permits, for a total amount of
$4754.00.
13 Sporting licenses were processed.
The monthly total of land record documents recorded and processed was 460. Included
in this total were 70 property transfers of title. $86,177.87 in State Conveyance Tax was
collected and forwarded to the State of Connecticut Department of Revenue Services,
while $24,243.55 was collected in Town Conveyance Tax and retained by the :rown.
A total ofl? dog licenses were sold.
In addition 23 maps, 4. veteran discharges, 48 notary transactions, 9 trade names, 0
liquor permits were filed, recorded and processed.
Monthly Highlights:
.'
•
Preparation for November 41h Municipal Election continued.
•
Numerous phone calls and personal visits were received for the Registrars of
Voters and for the Town Clerk's Office.
•
Regular Town Council Meeting was held on October,21 st •
Control Report
----
Vernon Connecticut, Bernice K. Dixon, Town Cierk
(Oct 01,2014 thru Oct 31, 2014)
Distributions
Collections/Payments
Conveyance Trans Fee
5,410.50
1-Cash
Copies
63.803.55
2-Check
Dog Licenses (S,tate of CT)
(1.004.25)
Less Change Given
68.209.80
3-Charge Account
669.00
5-State Cony Chk
86.177.87
Deposit Total
41
27
Dog Surcharge Fee
66.00
27
Dog Town
Farm Fund - State
1.00
2
11.664.00
324
361
Farm Fund - TCierk
694.00
Fish & Game - State
291.00
11
Fish & Game - Town
11.00
13
13
Marriage - Town
143.00
Marriage State - Surcharge
247.00
13
Notary Fees
277.00
48
13,075.00
460
420.00
23
State Conveyance Tax
86,177.87
47
State Hist Preservation
648.00
324
State Treasure - MERS
8.642.00
324.00
73
324
972.00
324
24.243.55
48
Town Capitallmprov ~LOCIP
Town Conveyance Tax
Town Miscellaneous
15.25
4
Trade Names
45.00
9
4.364.00
239
Vitals
155,056.67
155,056.67
From Workstation: Cash Station 1
48
276
27.00
TClerk Hist Preservation
® All RIghts Reserved
96.00
2,405.00
208.00
Recording Maps
GRM 20120 Perfect VISion
#
Adj
Dog Licenses - TC
Recording Land Records
Printed By: vernon vernon
#
Filed
On: Nov 03, 2014 08:03a
Page 1 of1
TOWN OF VERNON
DEPARTMENT OF POLICE
d~~~~~~~~lnDMATIO
188th
Phone (860) 872-9126
Fax:
(8~' 1~2-~}91
Stephen M. Clark
Captain of Police
Police Department Monthly Report
October 2014
PATROL DIVISION
Calls for Service
Arrests
Traffic Sto s
DUI Arrests
Domestic Violence
Traffic Accidents
1,553
101
313
12
50
93
15782
774
3420
129
384
853
On October 25 th at approximately 3:08 AM, officers were dispatched to a local apartment
complex after the Vernon Police Department received a 911 call reporting a domestic
disturbance. Investigation showed a physical altercation occurred between a male and female
who had assaulted each other. When officers attempted to arrest the male accused, he fought
with the officers and attempted to escape. The officers were able to subdue the male accused and
take him into custody. He was charged with Assault 3rd, Interfering and an Officer, Attempted
Assault on a Police Officer, and Escape from Custody. He has an extensive criminal history,
which included arrests for assault and robbery in New York, and held on a $100,000 bond. The
female accused was arrested for Breach of Peace and released on bond.
On October 8th at approximately 1:07 PM, officers were dispatched to a local residence after the
Vernon Police Department received a 911 call reporting a domestic disturbance. The caller stated
her ex-boyfriend assaulted her; stole her car and was now on his way to Willimantic armed with
a knife to assault a male acquaintance. A Vernon sergeant found the accused with the victim's
car in the parking lot of Burger King on Reservoir Road. The accused was taken into custody
without incident and charged with Breach of Peace 2nd , Threatening 2nd , Larceny 3fd , Weapons in
a Motor Vehicle, Possession of Narcotics, and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. He was held on
a $100,000 bond.
DETECTIVE DIVISION
The Detective Division completed 3 patrol division assists and made 12 arrest. The Division
currently has 46 active cases under investigation. The following is a breakdown of those cases:
October 2014
Page 1 of3
Cases
1
10
4
3
9
1
1
Crime
Homicide Investigation
Sexual Assault
Burglary
Fraud Cases
Robbery
Assault
Protective Order
Violation
Cases
1
2
1
2
6
2
3
Crime
Home Invasion/Sexual Assault
Larceny
"Cold Case" Homicide
"Cold Case" missing persons
Computer Exams
Recovered Skeletal Remains
Sex Offender Violations
Significant Cases:
On October 3,2014 Vernon Police arrested John Papin, age 32 of 9 Mountain St, Vernon and
Joseph Dennis, age 32, of 43 Thomas St Vernon, and charged them with the September 2014
armed convenience store robberies of "On the Way Convenience" on Hartford Tpke and Rubia
Mart on Windsor Ave. Papin and Dennis are also believed to be responsible for several other
similar armed robberies in the Capitol Region. Vernon Police Detectives worked together with
Manchester, South Windsor, Newington, Hartford, East Hartford and the CT State Police on this
investigation. Dennis and Papin were also charged with the September 2014 burglary into the
"Fore Your Convenience" store on School St.
On October 28, 2014, Vernon Police responded to an armed robbery of a pizza delivery driver on
Talcott Ave near Woodland St. Through their investigation, officers found Joshua Negralle of
New Britain and Jonathan Collins of New Haven hiding in a closet inside 21 Woodland St. Both
were charged with the robbery. Police also arrested the resident of the apartment, Amanda
Negron and charged her with allegedly planning and assisting in the cover-up following the
robbery. Negralle and Collins allegedly robbed the driver using a BB gun that resembled a
handgun. They stole cash and the pizza. The driver was not injured.
In October 2014, Tolland State's Attorney Matthew Gedansky announced the creation of the
Tolland County Cold Case Task Force to investigate four cold cases in Tolland County. Three
of these cases are Vernon investigations: the 1968 disappearance of Deborah Spickler, 1974
disappearance of Lisa White and the March 2013 discovery of female skeletal remains on West
St. With funding from the Chief State's Attorney Office, the task force hired an analyst to take a
fresh look at these cases. The task force is based at Rockville Superior Court and is meeting
monthly to review the cases. Vernon Detectives are participating and soliciting new leads from
the public in hopes of solving these cold cases.
TRAINING
Department Training:
•
New Officers Training, Trantalis, Dubret, 16 hrs.
•
Academy Class #347, Trantalis, DuBret. Oct.
NRA Firearms-Rifle Instructor Training, Foster, Tedford, 8 hrs.
•
•
Field Training Officer Certification, Patrizz, Condon, 40 hrs.
•
Training Day 1, Active Shooter, 65 Officers, 8 hrs.
•
POST Recert. Off. Rooney, 40 hrs.
•
Collect Recert. Off. Gunnoud, 5 hrs.
October 2014
Page 2 of 3
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Inside the Tape, Sgt. Conde, 24 hrs.
New K-9 Training, Sembersky, 24 hrs.
New PR-1, Training, Sgt. Conde, Gallant, 8 hrs.
Taser Instructor Training, Sgt. Foster, Thiel, Pryputniewicz, 16 hrs.
Critical Incident Scenario at Newington, Meier, Foster, 6 hrs.
Leadership Skill for Police Supervisors, Sgt. Reynolds, 24 hrs.
NECNA Conference, Det. Grady 8 hrs.
Prostitution and Trafficking, Det. Grady, Hicking, 8 hrs.
Legal Training in Housing Matters, Off. Patrizz, 8 hrs.
State's Attorney's Legal Update, OffPatrizz, 2 days, 4 hrs.
CIT refresher, Off Grechko, Grzegorek, 8 hrs.
Capitol Region Emergency Services Team: Training:
•
Oct 1, Clark, Pryputniewicz, Gunnoud
•
Oct 2, Clark, Pryputniewicz, Gunnoud
October 2014
Page 3 of3